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Sample records for hcv ns5b rna

  1. HCV RNA traffic and association with NS5A in living cells

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    Fiches, Guillaume N.; Eyre, Nicholas S.; Aloia, Amanda L.; Van Der Hoek, Kylie [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide and Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Betz-Stablein, Brigit; Luciani, Fabio [Systems Immunology, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Chopra, Abha [Institute for Immunology and infectious diseases (IIID), Murdoch University, Perth, WA (Australia); Beard, Michael R., E-mail: michael.beard@adelaide.edu.au [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide and Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA localisation are poorly understood. To address this we engineered HCV genomes harbouring MS2 bacteriophage RNA stem-loops within the 3′-untranslated region to allow tracking of HCV RNA via specific interaction with a MS2-Coat-mCherry fusion protein. Despite the impact of these insertions on viral fitness, live imaging revealed that replication of tagged-HCV genomes induced specific redistribution of the mCherry-tagged-MS2-Coat protein to motile and static foci. Further analysis showed that HCV RNA was associated with NS5A in both static and motile structures while a subset of motile NS5A structures was devoid of HCV RNA. Further investigation of viral RNA traffic with respect to lipid droplets (LDs) revealed HCV RNA-positive structures in close association with LDs. These studies provide new insights into the dynamics of HCV RNA traffic with NS5A and LDs and provide a platform for future investigations of HCV replication and assembly. - Highlights: • HCV can tolerate can bacteriophage MS2 stem-loop insertions within the 3′ UTR. • MS2 stem-loop containing HCV genomes allow for real-time imaging of HCV RNA. • HCV RNA is both static and motile and associates with NS5A and lipid droplets.

  2. HCV RNA traffic and association with NS5A in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiches, Guillaume N.; Eyre, Nicholas S.; Aloia, Amanda L.; Van Der Hoek, Kylie; Betz-Stablein, Brigit; Luciani, Fabio; Chopra, Abha; Beard, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA localisation are poorly understood. To address this we engineered HCV genomes harbouring MS2 bacteriophage RNA stem-loops within the 3′-untranslated region to allow tracking of HCV RNA via specific interaction with a MS2-Coat-mCherry fusion protein. Despite the impact of these insertions on viral fitness, live imaging revealed that replication of tagged-HCV genomes induced specific redistribution of the mCherry-tagged-MS2-Coat protein to motile and static foci. Further analysis showed that HCV RNA was associated with NS5A in both static and motile structures while a subset of motile NS5A structures was devoid of HCV RNA. Further investigation of viral RNA traffic with respect to lipid droplets (LDs) revealed HCV RNA-positive structures in close association with LDs. These studies provide new insights into the dynamics of HCV RNA traffic with NS5A and LDs and provide a platform for future investigations of HCV replication and assembly. - Highlights: • HCV can tolerate can bacteriophage MS2 stem-loop insertions within the 3′ UTR. • MS2 stem-loop containing HCV genomes allow for real-time imaging of HCV RNA. • HCV RNA is both static and motile and associates with NS5A and lipid droplets.

  3. Cyclophilin B stimulates RNA synthesis by the HCV RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

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    Heck, Julie A; Meng, Xiao; Frick, David N

    2009-04-01

    Cyclophilins are cellular peptidyl isomerases that have been implicated in regulating hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a target of cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressive drug recently shown to suppress HCV replication in cell culture. Watashi et al. recently demonstrated that CypB is important for efficient HCV replication, and proposed that it mediates the anti-HCV effects of CsA through an interaction with NS5B [Watashi K, Ishii N, Hijikata M, Inoue D, Murata T, Miyanari Y, et al. Cyclophilin B is a functional regulator of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase. Mol Cell 2005;19:111-22]. We examined the effects of purified CypB proteins on the enzymatic activity of NS5B. Recombinant CypB purified from insect cells directly stimulated NS5B-catalyzed RNA synthesis. CypB increased RNA synthesis by NS5B derived from genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a HCV strains. Stimulation appears to arise from an increase in productive RNA binding. NS5B residue Pro540, a previously proposed target of CypB peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity, is not required for stimulation of RNA synthesis.

  4. Inhibitor candidates's identification of HCV's RNA polymerase NS5B using virtual screening against iPPI-library

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    Sulistyawati, Indah; Sulistyo Dwi K., P.; Ichsan, Mochammad

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis C is one of the major causes of chronic liver failure that caused by Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Preventing the progression of HCV's replication through the inhibition of The RNA polymerase NS5B of Hepatitis C virus (NS5B) can be achieved via 4 binding regions: Site I (Thumb I), Site II (Thumb II), Site III (Palm I), and Site IV (Palm II). The aim of this research is to identify a candidate of NS5B inhibitor as an alternative for Hepatitis C treatment. An NS5B's 3D structure (PDB ID = 3D5M) used in this study has met some criteria of a good model to be used in virtual screening againts iPPI-lib using MTiOpenScreen webserver. The top two natural compounds resulted here then docked using Pyrix 0.8 and discovered trans-6-Benzamido-2-methyldecahydroisoquinoline (-9,1kcal/mol) and 2,4-dichloro-5-[4-(2 methoxyphenyl) piperazine-1-carbonyl]-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] benzenesulfonamide (9,4 kcal/mol) can bind to Tyr448 similar with all three established inhibitors, such as setrobuvir (-11,4 kcal/mol; site 3 inhibitor), CHEMBL379677 (-9,1 kcal/mol; site 1 inhibitor), and nesbuvir (-7,7 kcal/mol; site 4 inhibitor). The results of this study are relatively still needs to be tested, both in vitro and in vivo, in order to obtain more comprehensive knowledges as a follow-up of this predictive study.

  5. NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors: the promising approach to treat hepatitis C virus infections.

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    Deore, R R; Chern, J-W

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a causative agent for non-A and non-B hepatitis, has infected approximately 3% of world's population. The current treatment option of ribavirin in combination with pegylated interferon possesses lower sustained virological response rates, and has serious disadvantages. Unfortunately, no prophylactic vaccine has been approved yet. Therefore, there is an unmet clinical need for more effective and safe anti-HCV drugs. HCV NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase is currently pursued as the most popular target to develop safe anti-HCV agents, as it is not expressed in uninfected cells. More than 25 pharmaceutical companies and some research groups have developed ≈50 structurally diverse scaffolds to inhibit NS5B. Here we provide comprehensive account of the drug development process of these scaffolds. NS5B polymerase inhibitors have been broadly classified in nucleoside and non nucleoside inhibitors and are sub classified according to their mechanism of action and structural diversities. With some additional considerations about the inhibitor bound NS5B enzyme X-ray crystal structure information and pharmacological aspects of the inhibitors, this review summarizes the lead identification, structure activity relationship (SAR) studies leading to the most potent NS5B inhibitors with subgenomic replicon activity.

  6. Inhibition of HCV replication by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4 through interaction with HCV NS5B and alteration of lipid droplet formation.

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    In-Woo Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3'x RNA element within the HCV 3' untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3' X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4, a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  7. Resistance Analyses of HCV NS3/4A Protease and NS5B Polymerase from Clinical Studies of Deleobuvir and Faldaprevir.

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    Kristi L Berger

    Full Text Available The resistance profile of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV agents used in combination is important to guide optimal treatment regimens. We evaluated baseline and treatment-emergent NS3/4A and NS5B amino-acid variants among HCV genotype (GT-1a and -1b-infected patients treated with faldaprevir (HCV protease inhibitor, deleobuvir (HCV polymerase non-nucleoside inhibitor, and ribavirin in multiple clinical studies.HCV NS3/4A and NS5B population sequencing (Sanger method was performed on all baseline plasma samples (n = 1425 NS3; n = 1556 NS5B and on post-baseline plasma samples from patients with virologic failure (n = 113 GT-1a; n = 221 GT-1b. Persistence and time to loss of resistance-associated variants (RAVs was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis.Faldaprevir RAVs (NS3 R155 and D168 and deleobuvir RAVs (NS5B 495 and 496 were rare (90%. Virologic relapse was associated with RAVs in both NS3 and NS5B (53% GT-1b; 52% GT-1b; some virologic relapses had NS3 RAVs only (47% GT-1a; 17% GT-1b. Median time to loss of GT-1b NS5B P495 RAVs post-treatment (5 months was less than that of GT-1b NS3 D168 (8.5 months and GT-1a R155 RAVs (11.5 months.Faldaprevir and deleobuvir RAVs are more prevalent among virologic failures than at baseline. Treatment response was not compromised by common NS3 polymorphisms; however, alanine at NS5B amino acid 499 at baseline (wild-type in GT-1a, polymorphism in GT-1b may reduce response to this deleobuvir-based regimen.

  8. The Future of HCV Therapy: NS4B as an Antiviral Target

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    Hadas Dvory-Sobol

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major worldwide cause of liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is estimated that more than 170 million individuals are infected with HCV, with three to four million new cases each year. The current standard of care, combination treatment with interferon and ribavirin, eradicates the virus in only about 50% of chronically infected patients. Notably, neither of these drugs directly target HCV. Many new antiviral therapies that specifically target hepatitis C (e.g. NS3 protease or NS5B polymerase inhibitors are therefore in development, with a significant number having advanced into clinical trials. The nonstructural 4B (NS4B protein, is among the least characterized of the HCV structural and nonstructural proteins and has been subjected to few pharmacological studies. NS4B is an integral membrane protein with at least four predicted transmembrane (TM domains. A variety of functions have been postulated for NS4B, such as the ability to induce the membranous web replication platform, RNA binding and NTPase activity. This review summarizes potential targets within the nonstructural protein NS4B, with a focus on novel classes of NS4B inhibitors.

  9. Naturally occurring mutations associated with resistance to HCV NS5B polymerase and NS3 protease inhibitors in treatment-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C.

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    Costantino, Angela; Spada, Enea; Equestre, Michele; Bruni, Roberto; Tritarelli, Elena; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita

    2015-11-14

    The detection of baseline resistance mutations to new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in HCV chronically infected treatment-naïve patients could be important for their management and outcome prevision. In this study, we investigated the presence of mutations, which have been previously reported to be associated with resistance to DAAs in HCV polymerase (NS5B) and HCV protease (NS3) regions, in sera of treatment-naïve patients. HCV RNA from 152 naïve patients (84 % Italian and 16 % immigrants from various countries) infected with different HCV genotypes (21,1a; 21, 1b; 2, 2a; 60, 2c; 22, 3a; 25, 4d and 1, 4k) was evaluated for sequence analysis. Amplification and sequencing of fragments in the NS5B (nt 8256-8640) and NS3 (nt 3420-3960) regions of HCV genome were carried out for 152 and 28 patients, respectively. The polymorphism C316N/H in NS5B region, associated with resistance to sofosbuvir, was detected in 9 of the 21 (43 %) analysed sequences from genotype 1b-infected patients. Naturally occurring mutations V36L, and M175L in the NS3 protease region were observed in 100 % of patients infected with subtype 2c and 4. A relevant proportion of treatment naïve genotype 1b infected patients evaluated in this study harboured N316 polymorphism and might poorly respond to sofosbuvir treatment. As sofosbuvir has been approved for treatment of HCV chronic infection in USA and Europe including Italy, pre-treatment testing for N316 polymorphism on genotype 1b naïve patients should be considered for this drug.

  10. Identification of drug resistance and immune-driven variations in hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B regions reveals a new approach toward personalized medicine.

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    Ikram, Aqsa; Obaid, Ayesha; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Hanif, Rumeza; Naz, Anam; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Ali, Amjad; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immune responses (T cell responses) during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are significant factors for determining the outcome of infection. HCV adapts to host immune responses by inducing mutations in its genome at specific sites that are important for HLA processing/presentation. Moreover, HCV also adapts to resist potential drugs that are used to restrict its replication, such as direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Although DAAs have significantly reduced disease burden, resistance to these drugs is still a challenge for the treatment of HCV infection. Recently, drug resistance mutations (DRMs) observed in HCV proteins (NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B) have heightened concern that the emergence of drug resistance may compromise the effectiveness of DAAs. Therefore, the NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B drug resistance variations were investigated in this study, and their prevalence was examined in a large number of protein sequences from all HCV genotypes. Furthermore, potential CD4 + and CD8 + T cell epitopes were predicted and their overlap with genetic variations was explored. The findings revealed that many reported DRMs within NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B are not drug-induced; rather, they are already present in HCV strains, as they were also detected in HCV-naïve patients. This study highlights several hot spots in which HLA and drug selective pressure overlap. Interestingly, these overlapping mutations were frequently observed among many HCV genotypes. This study implicates that knowledge of the host HLA type and HCV subtype/genotype can provide important information in defining personalized therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of halosalicylamide derivatives as a novel class of allosteric inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase.

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    Liu, Yaya; Donner, Pamela L; Pratt, John K; Jiang, Wen W; Ng, Teresa; Gracias, Vijaya; Baumeister, Steve; Wiedeman, Paul E; Traphagen, Linda; Warrior, Usha; Maring, Clarence; Kati, Warren M; Djuric, Stevan W; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2008-06-01

    Halosalicylamide derivatives were identified from high-throughput screening as potent inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase. The subsequent structure and activity relationship revealed the absolute requirement of the salicylamide moiety for optimum activity. Methylation of either the hydroxyl group or the amide group of the salicylamide moiety abolished the activity while the substitutions on both phenyl rings are acceptable. The halosalicylamide derivatives were shown to be non-competitive with respect to elongation nucleotide and demonstrated broad genotype activity against genotype 1-3 HCV NS5B polymerases. Inhibitor competition studies indicated an additive binding mode to the initiation pocket that is occupied by the thiadiazine class of compounds and an additive binding mode to the elongation pocket that is occupied by diketoacids, but a mutually exclusive binding mode with respect to the allosteric thumb pocket that is occupied by the benzimidazole class of inhibitors. Therefore, halosalicylamides represent a novel class of allosteric inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase.

  12. Lipid droplet-binding protein TIP47 regulates hepatitis C Virus RNA replication through interaction with the viral NS5A protein.

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    Dorothee A Vogt

    Full Text Available The nonstructural protein NS5A has emerged as a new drug target in antiviral therapies for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection. NS5A is critically involved in viral RNA replication that takes place at newly formed membranes within the endoplasmic reticulum (membranous web and assists viral assembly in the close vicinity of lipid droplets (LDs. To identify host proteins that interact with NS5A, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with the N-terminus of NS5A (amino acids 1-31, a well-studied α-helical domain important for the membrane tethering of NS5A. Our studies identified the LD-associated host protein, Tail-Interacting Protein 47 (TIP47 as a novel NS5A interaction partner. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments in Huh7 hepatoma cells confirmed the interaction of TIP47 with full-length NS5A. shRNA-mediated knockdown of TIP47 caused a more than 10-fold decrease in the propagation of full-length infectious HCV in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells. A similar reduction was observed when TIP47 was knocked down in cells harboring an autonomously replicating HCV RNA (subgenomic replicon, indicating that TIP47 is required for efficient HCV RNA replication. A single point mutation (W9A in NS5A that disrupts the interaction with TIP47 but preserves proper subcellular localization severely decreased HCV RNA replication. In biochemical membrane flotation assays, TIP47 cofractionated with HCV NS3, NS5A, NS5B proteins, and viral RNA, and together with nonstructural viral proteins was uniquely distributed to lower-density LD-rich membrane fractions in cells actively replicating HCV RNA. Collectively, our data support a model where TIP47--via its interaction with NS5A--serves as a novel cofactor for HCV infection possibly by integrating LD membranes into the membranous web.

  13. Cyclophilin B stimulates RNA synthesis by the HCV RNA dependent RNA polymerase

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    Heck, Julie A.; Meng, Xiao; Frick, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclophilins are cellular peptidyl isomerases that have been implicated in regulating hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a target of cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressive drug recently shown to suppress HCV replication in cell culture. Watashi et al. recently demonstrated that CypB is important for efficient HCV replication, and proposed that it mediates the anti-HCV effects of CsA through an interaction with NS5B (Mol. Cell 19:111). We examined the effects of pu...

  14. Enzymatic activities of the GB virus-B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

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    Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Santos, Jan Lee; Gutshall, Lester L.; Johnston, Victor K.; Juili, L.-G.; Kim, M.-J.; Porter, David J.; Maley, Derrick; Greenwood, Cathy; Earnshaw, David L.; Baker, Audrey; Gu Baohua; Silverman, Carol; Sarisky, Robert T.; Kao Cheng

    2003-01-01

    The GB virus-B (GBV-B) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) with greater than 50% sequence similarity to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B. Recombinant GBV-B NS5B was reported to possess RdRp activity (W. Zhong et al., 2000, J. Viral Hepat. 7, 335-342). In this study, the GBV-B RdRp was examined more thoroughly for different RNA synthesis activities, including primer-extension, de novo initiation, template switch, terminal nucleotide addition, and template specificity. The results can be compared with previous characterizations of the HCV RdRp. The two RdRps share similarities in terms of metal ion and template preference, the abilities to add nontemplated nucleotides, perform both de novo initiation and extension from a primer, and switch templates. However, several differences in RNA synthesis between the GBV-B and HCV RdRps were observed, including (i) optimal temperatures for activity, (ii) ranges of Mn 2+ concentration tolerated for activity, and (iii) cation requirements for de novo RNA synthesis and terminal transferase activity. To assess whether the recombinant GBV-B RdRp may represent a relevant surrogate system for testing HCV antiviral agents, two compounds demonstrated to be active at nanomolar concentrations against HCV NS5B were tested on the GBV RdRp. A chain terminating nucleotide analog could prevent RNA synthesis, while a nonnucleoside HCV inhibitor was unable to affect RNA synthesis by the GBV RdRp

  15. A cooperative interaction between nontranslated RNA sequences and NS5A protein promotes in vivo fitness of a chimeric hepatitis C/GB virus B.

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    Lucile Warter

    Full Text Available GB virus B (GBV-B is closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV, infects small non-human primates, and is thus a valuable surrogate for studying HCV. Despite significant differences, the 5' nontranslated RNAs (NTRs of these viruses fold into four similar structured domains (I-IV, with domains II-III-IV comprising the viral internal ribosomal entry site (IRES. We previously reported the in vivo rescue of a chimeric GBV-B (vGB/III(HC containing HCV sequence in domain III, an essential segment of the IRES. We show here that three mutations identified within the vGB/III(HC genome (within the 3'NTR, upstream of the poly(U tract, and NS5A coding sequence are necessary and sufficient for production of this chimeric virus following intrahepatic inoculation of synthetic RNA in tamarins, and thus apparently compensate for the presence of HCV sequence in domain III. To assess the mechanism(s underlying these compensatory mutations, and to determine whether 5'NTR subdomains participating in genome replication do so in a virus-specific fashion, we constructed and evaluated a series of chimeric subgenomic GBV-B replicons in which various 5'NTR subdomains were substituted with their HCV homologs. Domains I and II of the GBV-B 5'NTR could not be replaced with HCV sequence, indicating that they contain essential, virus-specific RNA replication elements. In contrast, domain III could be swapped with minimal loss of genome replication capacity in cell culture. The 3'NTR and NS5A mutations required for rescue of the related chimeric virus in vivo had no effect on replication of the subgenomic GBneoD/III(HC RNA in vitro. The data suggest that in vivo fitness of the domain III chimeric virus is dependent on a cooperative interaction between the 5'NTR, 3'NTR and NS5A at a step in the viral life cycle subsequent to genome replication, most likely during particle assembly. Such a mechanism may be common to all hepaciviruses.

  16. Evaluation of the Abbott realtime HCV genotype II RUO (GT II) assay with reference to 5'UTR, core and NS5B sequencing.

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    Mallory, Melanie A; Lucic, Danijela X; Sears, Mitchell T; Cloherty, Gavin A; Hillyard, David R

    2014-05-01

    HCV genotyping is a critical tool for guiding initiation of therapy and selecting the most appropriate treatment regimen. To evaluate the concordance between the Abbott GT II assay and genotyping by sequencing subregions of the HCV 5'UTR, core and NS5B. The Abbott assay was used to genotype 127 routine patient specimens and 35 patient specimens with unusual subtypes and mixed infection. Abbott results were compared to genotyping by 5'UTR, core and NS5B sequencing. Sequences were genotyped using the NCBI non-redundant database and the online genotyping tool COMET. Among routine specimens, core/NS5B sequencing identified 93 genotype 1s, 13 genotype 2s, 15 genotype 3s, three genotype 4s, two genotype 6s and one recombinant specimen. Genotype calls by 5'UTR, core, NS5B sequencing and the Abbott assay were 97.6% concordant. Core/NS5B sequencing identified two discrepant samples as genotype 6 (subtypes 6l and 6u) while Abbott and 5'UTR sequencing identified these samples as genotype 1 with no subtype. The Abbott assay subtyped 91.4% of genotype 1 specimens. Among the 35 rare specimens, the Abbott assay inaccurately genotyped 3k, 6e, 6o, 6q and one genotype 4 variant; gave indeterminate results for 3g, 3h, 4r, 6m, 6n, and 6q specimens; and agreed with core/NS5B sequencing for mixed specimens. The Abbott assay is an automated HCV genotyping method with improved accuracy over 5'UTR sequencing. Samples identified by the Abbott assay as genotype 1 with no subtype may be rare subtypes of other genotypes and thus require confirmation by another method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phosphorylation of NS5A Serine-235 is essential to hepatitis C virus RNA replication and normal replication compartment formation

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    Eyre, Nicholas S., E-mail: nicholas.eyre@adelaide.edu.au [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Hampton-Smith, Rachel J.; Aloia, Amanda L. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Eddes, James S. [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Simpson, Kaylene J. [Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hoffmann, Peter [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Beard, Michael R. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein is essential for HCV RNA replication and virus assembly. Here we report the identification of NS5A phosphorylation sites Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 during an infectious HCV replication cycle and demonstrate that Ser-235 phosphorylation is essential for HCV RNA replication. Confocal microscopy revealed that both phosphoablatant (S235A) and phosphomimetic (S235D) mutants redistribute NS5A to large juxta-nuclear foci that display altered colocalization with known replication complex components. Using electron microscopy (EM) we found that S235D alters virus-induced membrane rearrangements while EM using ‘APEX2’-tagged viruses demonstrated S235D-mediated enrichment of NS5A in irregular membranous foci. Finally, using a customized siRNA screen of candidate NS5A kinases and subsequent analysis using a phospho-specific antibody, we show that phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα) is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation. We conclude that Ser-235 phosphorylation of NS5A is essential for HCV RNA replication and normal replication complex formation and is regulated by PI4KIIIα. - Highlights: • NS5A residues Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 are phosphorylated during HCV infection. • Phosphorylation of Ser-235 is essential to HCV RNA replication. • Mutation of Ser-235 alters replication compartment localization and morphology. • Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation.

  18. Downregulation of viral RNA translation by hepatitis C virus non-structural protein NS5A requires the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR.

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    Hoffman, Brett; Li, Zhubing; Liu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is essential for viral replication; however, its effect on HCV RNA translation remains controversial partially due to the use of reporters lacking the 3' UTR, where NS5A binds to the poly(U/UC) sequence. We investigated the role of NS5A in HCV translation using a monocistronic RNA containing a Renilla luciferase gene flanked by the HCV UTRs. We found that NS5A downregulated viral RNA translation in a dose-dependent manner. This downregulation required both the 5' and 3' UTRs of HCV because substitution of either sequence with the 5' and 3' UTRs of enterovirus 71 or a cap structure at the 5' end eliminated the effects of NS5A on translation. Translation of the HCV genomic RNA was also downregulated by NS5A. The inhibition of HCV translation by NS5A required the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR as NS5A did not affect translation when it was deleted. In addition, we showed that, whilst the amphipathic α-helix of NS5A has no effect on viral translation, the three domains of NS5A can inhibit translation independently, also dependent on the presence of the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR. These results suggested that NS5A downregulated HCV RNA translation through a mechanism involving the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR.

  19. Novel nucleotide and amino acid covariation between the 5'UTR and the NS2/NS3 proteins of hepatitis C virus: bioinformatic and functional analyses.

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    Hung-Yu Sun

    Full Text Available Molecular covariation of highly polymorphic viruses is thought to have crucial effects on viral replication and fitness. This study employs association rule data mining of hepatitis C virus (HCV sequences to search for specific evolutionary covariation and then tests functional relevance on HCV replication. Data mining is performed between nucleotides in the untranslated regions 5' and 3'UTR, and the amino acid residues in the non-structural proteins NS2, NS3 and NS5B. Results indicate covariance of the 243(rd nucleotide of the 5'UTR with the 14(th, 41(st, 76(th, 110(th, 211(th and 212(th residues of NS2 and with the 71(st, 175(th and 621(st residues of NS3. Real-time experiments using an HCV subgenomic system to quantify viral replication confirm replication regulation for each covariant pair between 5'UTR₂₄₃ and NS2-41, -76, -110, -211, and NS3-71, -175. The HCV subgenomic system with/without the NS2 region shows that regulatory effects vanish without NS2, so replicative modulation mediated by HCV 5'UTR₂₄₃ depends on NS2. Strong binding of the NS2 variants to HCV RNA correlates with reduced HCV replication whereas weak binding correlates with restoration of HCV replication efficiency, as determined by RNA-protein immunoprecipitation assay band intensity. The dominant haplotype 5'UTR₂₄₃-NS2-41-76-110-211-NS3-71-175 differs according to the HCV genotype: G-Ile-Ile-Ile-Gly-Ile-Met for genotype 1b and A-Leu-Val-Leu-Ser-Val-Leu for genotypes 1a, 2a and 2b. In conclusion, 5'UTR₂₄₃ co-varies with specific NS2/3 protein amino acid residues, which may have significant structural and functional consequences for HCV replication. This unreported mechanism involving HCV replication possibly can be exploited in the development of advanced anti-HCV medication.

  20. HCV NS5A protein containing potential ligands for both Src homology 2 and 3 domains enhances autophosphorylation of Src family kinase Fyn in B cells.

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    Nakashima, Kenji; Takeuchi, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Horiguchi, Tomoko; Sun, Xuedong; Deng, Lin; Shoji, Ikuo; Hotta, Hak; Sada, Kiyonao

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects B lymphocytes and induces mixed cryoglobulinemia and B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of HCV infection-mediated B cell disorders remains obscure. To identify the possible role for HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein in B cells, we generated the stable B cell lines expressing Myc-His tagged NS5A. Immunoprecipitation study in the presence or absence of pervanadate (PV) implied that NS5A was tyrosine phosphorylated by pervanadate (PV) treatment of the cells. Therefore we examined pull-down assay by using glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins of various Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, which associates with phosphotyrosine within a specific amino acid sequence. The results showed that NS5A specifically bound to SH2 domain of Fyn from PV-treated B cells in addition to Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Substitution of Arg(176) to Lys in the SH2 domain of Fyn abrogated this interaction. Deletion mutational analysis demonstrated that N-terminal region of NS5A was not required for the interaction with the SH2 domain of Fyn. Tyr(334) was identified as a tyrosine phosphorylation site in NS5A. Far-western analysis revealed that SH2 domain of Fyn directly bound to NS5A. Fyn and NS5A were colocalized in the lipid raft. These results suggest that NS5A directly binds to the SH2 domain of Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed that the expression of NS5A in B cells increased phosphorylation of activation loop tyrosine in the kinase domain of Fyn. NS5A containing ligand for both SH2 and SH3 domains enhances an aberrant autophosphorylation and kinase activity of Fyn in B cells.

  1. HCV NS5A protein containing potential ligands for both Src homology 2 and 3 domains enhances autophosphorylation of Src family kinase Fyn in B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakashima

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects B lymphocytes and induces mixed cryoglobulinemia and B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of HCV infection-mediated B cell disorders remains obscure. To identify the possible role for HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A protein in B cells, we generated the stable B cell lines expressing Myc-His tagged NS5A. Immunoprecipitation study in the presence or absence of pervanadate (PV implied that NS5A was tyrosine phosphorylated by pervanadate (PV treatment of the cells. Therefore we examined pull-down assay by using glutathione S-transferase (GST-fusion proteins of various Src homology 2 (SH2 domains, which associates with phosphotyrosine within a specific amino acid sequence. The results showed that NS5A specifically bound to SH2 domain of Fyn from PV-treated B cells in addition to Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Substitution of Arg(176 to Lys in the SH2 domain of Fyn abrogated this interaction. Deletion mutational analysis demonstrated that N-terminal region of NS5A was not required for the interaction with the SH2 domain of Fyn. Tyr(334 was identified as a tyrosine phosphorylation site in NS5A. Far-western analysis revealed that SH2 domain of Fyn directly bound to NS5A. Fyn and NS5A were colocalized in the lipid raft. These results suggest that NS5A directly binds to the SH2 domain of Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed that the expression of NS5A in B cells increased phosphorylation of activation loop tyrosine in the kinase domain of Fyn. NS5A containing ligand for both SH2 and SH3 domains enhances an aberrant autophosphorylation and kinase activity of Fyn in B cells.

  2. 5′ UTR and NS5B-based genotyping of hepatitis C virus in patients from Damietta governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwa R. El-Tahan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a main health problem in Egypt causing high rates of mortalities. Egypt has the highest HCV prevalence in the world, with specific HCV subtypes epidemic and circulating extensively in the country. Different antiviral therapy protocols have been implemented for treating Egyptian HCV patients. Due to the limited data about HCV in Egypt, this study aimed to genotype HCV strains circulating in the Nile Delta Damietta governorate and to investigate the variation in the nonstructural 5B (NS5B region targeted by the newly approved antiviral drugs. Thirty HCV samples from treatment-naïve patients were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Some samples were genotyped by direct sequencing of their 5′ untranslated region (UTR and NS5B regions. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on the sequences of their NS5B regions. Fourteen new sequences have been deposited in the GenBank database. Results showed that subtype 4a was prevalent in addition to subtype 1g. None of the previously reported NS5B substitutions were detected in the sequenced isolates from treatment-naïve patients, which may be a good predictor for efficient treatment of HCV Egyptian patients with Sofosbuvir. Further studies on Sofosbuvir treated-HCV Egyptian patients are required to investigate whether any NS5B substitutions can confer resistance to treatment.

  3. HCV Core Residues Critical for Infectivity Are Also Involved in Core-NS5A Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Katarzyna; Baugh, James; Chatterji, Udayan; Lim, Precious J.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. The molecular machinery of HCV assembly and particle release remains obscure. A better understanding of the assembly events might reveal new potential antiviral strategies. It was suggested that the nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), an attractive recent drug target, participates in the production of infectious particles as a result of its interaction with the HCV core protein. However, prior to the present study, the NS5A-binding site in the viral core remained unknown. We found that the D1 domain of core contains the NS5A-binding site with the strongest interacting capacity in the basic P38-K74 cluster. We also demonstrated that the N-terminal basic residues of core at positions 50, 51, 59 and 62 were required for NS5A binding. Analysis of all substitution combinations of R50A, K51A, R59A, and R62A, in the context of the HCVcc system, showed that single, double, triple, and quadruple mutants were fully competent for viral RNA replication, but deficient in secretion of viral particles. Furthermore, we found that the extracellular and intracellular infectivity of all the mutants was abolished, suggesting a defect in the formation of infectious particles. Importantly, we showed that the interaction between the single and quadruple core mutants and NS5A was impaired in cells expressing full-length HCV genome. Interestingly, mutations of the four basic residues of core did not alter the association of core or NS5A with lipid droplets. This study showed for the first time that basic residues in the D1 domain of core that are critical for the formation of infectious extracellular and intracellular particles also play a role in core-NS5A interactions. PMID:24533158

  4. Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A

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    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Na; Liu, Xiaojing; Lin, Shumei [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Luo, Wenjuan, E-mail: wenjuanluoxa@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Liu, Min, E-mail: minliusx@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China)

    2016-07-01

    With the increased burden induced by HCV, there is an urgent need to develop better-tolerated agents with good safety. In this study, we evaluated the anti-HCV capability of kushenin, as well as the possible mechanism to Huh7.5-HCV cells. The results demonstrated that kushenin significantly inhibited the HCV-RNA level. Similarly, the expression of HCV-specific protein NS5A was also decreased. Molecular docking results displayed that kushenin bonded well to the active pockets of HCV NS5A, further confirming the effects of kushenin on HCV replication. Coimmunoprecipitation assay determined that kushenin suppressed the interaction between PI3K and NS5A in HCV-replicon cells. Furthermore, kushenin exerted an obviously induced function on HCV-replicon cells apoptosis by inhibiting PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, which could be ameliorated by the specific activator IGF-1 addition. Taken together, kushenin possesses the ability to inhibit HCV replication, and contributes to the increased apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A. Our results provide important evidence for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection, and suggest that kushenin has the potential to treat HCV disease. - Highlights: • Kushenin inhibits HCV replication. • Kushenin bonds directly to NS5A protein. • Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells. • kushenin suppresses the interaction between PI3K and NS5A. • Kushenin inhibits PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway.

  5. Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Na; Liu, Xiaojing; Lin, Shumei; Luo, Wenjuan; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    With the increased burden induced by HCV, there is an urgent need to develop better-tolerated agents with good safety. In this study, we evaluated the anti-HCV capability of kushenin, as well as the possible mechanism to Huh7.5-HCV cells. The results demonstrated that kushenin significantly inhibited the HCV-RNA level. Similarly, the expression of HCV-specific protein NS5A was also decreased. Molecular docking results displayed that kushenin bonded well to the active pockets of HCV NS5A, further confirming the effects of kushenin on HCV replication. Coimmunoprecipitation assay determined that kushenin suppressed the interaction between PI3K and NS5A in HCV-replicon cells. Furthermore, kushenin exerted an obviously induced function on HCV-replicon cells apoptosis by inhibiting PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, which could be ameliorated by the specific activator IGF-1 addition. Taken together, kushenin possesses the ability to inhibit HCV replication, and contributes to the increased apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A. Our results provide important evidence for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection, and suggest that kushenin has the potential to treat HCV disease. - Highlights: • Kushenin inhibits HCV replication. • Kushenin bonds directly to NS5A protein. • Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells. • kushenin suppresses the interaction between PI3K and NS5A. • Kushenin inhibits PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway.

  6. Cyclophilin B is a functional regulator of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watashi, Koichi; Ishii, Naoto; Hijikata, Makoto; Inoue, Daisuke; Murata, Takayuki; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2005-07-01

    Viruses depend on host-derived factors for their efficient genome replication. Here, we demonstrate that a cellular peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase), cyclophilin B (CyPB), is critical for the efficient replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. CyPB interacted with the HCV RNA polymerase NS5B to directly stimulate its RNA binding activity. Both the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated reduction of endogenous CyPB expression and the induced loss of NS5B binding to CyPB decreased the levels of HCV replication. Thus, CyPB functions as a stimulatory regulator of NS5B in HCV replication machinery. This regulation mechanism for viral replication identifies CyPB as a target for antiviral therapeutic strategies.

  7. Recombinant HCV variants with NS5A from genotypes 1-7 have different sensitivities to an NS5A inhibitor but not interferon-a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Gottwein, Judith M; Mikkelsen, Lotte S

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS5A influences its sensitivity to interferon-based therapy. Furthermore, NS5A is an important target for development of HCV-specific inhibitors. We aimed to develop recombinant infectious cell culture systems that express NS5A from isolates...

  8. Infection of Common Marmosets with GB Virus B Chimeric Virus Encoding the Major Nonstructural Proteins NS2 to NS4A of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaomei; Li, Tingting; Liu, Bochao; Xu, Yuxia; Sun, Yachun; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Yuanzhan; Shuai, Lifang; Chen, Zixuan; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2016-09-15

    A lack of immunocompetent-small-primate models has been an obstacle for developing hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccines and affordable antiviral drugs. In this study, HCV/GB virus B (GBV-B) chimeric virus carrying the major nonstructural proteins NS2 to NS4A (HCV NS2 to -4A chimera) was produced and used to infect common marmosets, since HCV NS2 to NS4A proteins are critical proteases and major antigens. Seven marmosets were inoculated intrahepatically with HCV NS2 to -4A chimera RNA for primary infection or intravenously injected with chimera-containing serum for passage infection. Three animals used as controls were injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or GBV-B, respectively. Six of seven HCV NS2 to -4A chimera-infected marmosets exhibited consistent viremia and one showed transient viremia during the course of follow-up detection. All six infected animals with persistent circulating viremia presented characteristics typical of viral hepatitis, including viral RNA and proteins in hepatocytes and histopathological changes in liver tissue. Viremia was consistently detected for 5 to 54 weeks of follow-up. FK506 immunosuppression facilitated the establishment of persistent chimera infection in marmosets. An animal with chimera infection spontaneously cleared the virus in blood 7 weeks following the first inoculation, but viral-RNA persistence, low-level viral protein, and mild necroinflammation remained in liver tissue. The specific antibody and T-cell response to HCV NS3 in this viremia-resolved marmoset was boosted by rechallenging, but no viremia was detected during 57 weeks of follow-up. The chimera-infected marmosets described can be used as a suitable small-primate animal model for studying novel antiviral drugs and T-cell-based vaccines against HCV infection. HCV infection causes approximately 70% of chronic hepatitis and is frequently associated with primary liver cancer globally. Chimpanzees have been used as a reliable primate model for HCV infection

  9. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Subgenotypes 1a and 1b in Japanese Patients: Ultra-Deep Sequencing Analysis of HCV NS5B Genotype-Specific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Nakatani, Sueli M.; Ono, Suzane Kioko; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Gonoi, Tohru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenotypes 1a and 1b have different impacts on the treatment response to peginterferon plus ribavirin with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against patients infected with HCV genotype 1, as the emergence rates of resistance mutations are different between these two subgenotypes. In Japan, almost all of HCV genotype 1 belongs to subgenotype 1b. Methods and Findings To determine HCV subgenotype 1a or 1b in Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1, real-time PCR-based method and Sanger method were used for the HCV NS5B region. HCV subgenotypes were determined in 90% by real-time PCR-based method. We also analyzed the specific probe regions for HCV subgenotypes 1a and 1b using ultra-deep sequencing, and uncovered mutations that could not be revealed using direct-sequencing by Sanger method. We estimated the prevalence of HCV subgenotype 1a as 1.2-2.5% of HCV genotype 1 patients in Japan. Conclusions Although real-time PCR-based HCV subgenotyping method seems fair for differentiating HCV subgenotypes 1a and 1b, it may not be sufficient for clinical practice. Ultra-deep sequencing is useful for revealing the resistant strain(s) of HCV before DAA treatment as well as mixed infection with different genotypes or subgenotypes of HCV. PMID:24069214

  10. Efficient hepatitis c virus genotype 1b core-NS5A recombinants permit efficacy testing of protease and NS5A inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Long V.; Ramirez Almeida, Santseharay; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) strains belong to seven genotypes with numerous subtypes that respond differently to antiviral therapies. Genotype 1, and primarily subtype 1b, is the most prevalent genotype worldwide. The development of recombinant HCV infectious cell culture systems for different variants......, permitted by the high replication capacity of strain JFH1 (genotype 2a), has advanced efficacy and resistance testing of antivirals. However, efficient infectious JFH1-based cell cultures of subtype 1b are limited and comprise only the 5= untranslated region (5=UTR)-NS2, NS4A, or NS5A regions. Importantly...

  11. Analysis of hepatitis C virus core/NS5A protein co-localization using novel cell culture systems expressing core-NS2 and NS5A of genotypes 1-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Scheel, Troels K H; Prentoe, Jannick C

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen infecting hepatocytes. With the advent of infectious cell culture systems, the HCV particle assembly and release processes are finally being uncovered. The HCV core and NS5A proteins co-localize on cytoplasmic lipid droplets (c......LDs) or on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) at different stages of particle assembly. Current knowledge on assembly and release is primarily based on studies in genotype 2a cell culture systems; however, given the high genetic heterogeneity of HCV, variations might exist among genotypes. Here, we developed novel HCV strain...... JFH1-based recombinants expressing core-NS2 and NS5A from genotypes 1-7, and analysed core and NS5A co-localization in infected cells. Huh7.5 cells were transfected with RNA of core-NS2/NS5A recombinants and putative adaptive mutations were analysed by reverse genetics. Adapted core-NS2/NS5A...

  12. Two unusual hepatitis C virus subtypes, 2j and 2q, in Spain: Identification by nested-PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margall, N; March, F; Español, M; Torras, X; Gallego, A; Coll, P

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have reported the use of the NS5B gene to subtype hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other HCV genes, such as HCV-5' UTR, Core (C) and E1, have also been used. In some studies, NS5B have been used together with 5'-UTR or C genes to improve genotyping results obtained using commercial procedures. Only two studies in Spain have compared molecular techniques versus commercial procedures regarding the efficacy of HCV subtyping. The aim of this study was to determine whether nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region was more reliable than commercial procedures to subtype HCV. We analyzed the results of HCV genotyping in [726] serum specimens collected from 2001 to 2013. From 2001 to 2011, we used PCR and INNO-LiPA hybridization or its new version Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (471 samples). From 2012 to 2013, we used nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region (255 cases). This method used two pairs of primers to amplify the RNA of the sample converted to DNA by retrotranscription. The amplification product of 270 base pairs was further sequenced. To identify the subtype, the sequences obtained were compared to those in the international database: http://hcv.lanl.gov./content/sequence/, HCV/ToolsOutline.html and Geno2pheno[hcv] http://hcv.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/index.php. Nested PCR of a NS5B region and sequencing identified all but one subtype (0.4%, 1/255), differentiated all 1a subtypes from 1b subtypes, and characterized all HCV 2-4 subtypes. This approach also distinguished two subtypes, 2j and 2q, that had rarely been detected previously in Spain. However, commercial procedures failed to subtype 12.7% (60/471) of samples and to genotype 0.6% of specimens (3/471). Nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region improved the subtyping of HCV in comparison with classical procedures and identified two rare subtypes in Spain: 2j and 2q. However, full length genome sequencing is recommended to confirm HCV 2j and 2q subtypes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, E; Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Edlin, B; Gallien, S; Klinker, H; Boesecke, C; Kokordelis, P; Rockstroh, J K

    2017-07-01

    Studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels remain stable over time in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), while spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA during the persistent infection phase has been documented only rarely among those with the CC interleukin (IL)-28B genotype. This study describes HCV RNA profiles and factors associated with changes over time in HCV RNA levels in the ESPRIT study. HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals positive for HCV RNA were included in the study. Follow-up was counted from the first HCV RNA positive test and censored at the initiation of interferon-based treatment. HCV RNA and IL-28B measurements were performed in the same reference laboratory. Random effects mixed models were used to analyse changes over time in HCV RNA. A total of 312 ESPRIT patients were included in the study (151 in the arm receiving subcutaneous recombinant IL-2 and 161 in the control arm). Most of the patients were white (89%) and male (76%), and they had a median of 5 HCV RNA measurements per person [interquartile range (IQR) 3-6; range 1-9]. Median follow-up was 5 years (IQR: 2-6 years). At baseline, 96% of patients were taking cART and 93% had undetectable HIV RNA. Mean HCV RNA levels decreased by 13% per year over the study period [95% confidence interval (CI) 8-18%; P < 0.0001]. Baseline HCV RNA levels and the change over time in HCV RNA did not differ by randomization arm (P = 0.16 and P = 0.56, respectively). Nine individuals spontaneously cleared HCV RNA during follow-up [IL-28B genotypes: CC, five patients (56%); CT, four patients (44%)]. HCV RNA levels decreased over time in this population with well-controlled HIV infection. Spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA was documented in five individuals with IL-28B genotype CC and four with the CT genotype. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  14. Successful retreatment with grazoprevir and elbasvir for patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b, who discontinued prior treatment with NS5A inhibitor-including regimens due to adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Takahashi, Koji; Wu, Shuang; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Saito, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Kazufumi; Kiyono, Soichiro; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Kato, Naoya

    2018-03-23

    Sustained virologic response (SVR) by interferon and interferon-free treatment can results in the reduction of advanced liver fibrosis and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Recent interferon-free treatment for HCV shortens the duration of treatment and leads to higher SVR rates, without any serious adverse events. However, it is important to retreat patients who have had treatment-failure with HCV non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor-including regimens. Combination of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir only leads to approximately 100% SVR rates in HCV genotype (GT1b), NS5A inhibitor-naïve patients in Japan. This combination is not an indication for severe renal disease or heart disease, and these patients should be treated or retreated with a different regimen. Retreatment with HCV non-structural protein 3/4A inhibitor, grazoprevir, and HCV NS5A inhibitor, elbasvir, successfully eradicated HCV RNA in three patients with HCV genotype 1b infection who discontinued prior interferon-free treatments including HCV NS5A inhibitors due to adverse events within 2 weeks. Retreatment with the 12-week combination regimen of grazoprevir and elbasvir is effective for HCV GT1b patients who discontinue the HCV NS5A inhibitor-including regimens within 2 weeks. The treatment response may be related to the short duration of initial treatment, which did not produce treatment-emergent RASs.

  15. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize the palm subdomain of hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, P; Lahser, F; Xia, E; Sodowich, B; Lai, V C; Hong, Z; Zhong, W

    2001-06-01

    The nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) which plays an essential role in viral RNA replication. Antibodies that specifically recognize NS5B will have utilities in monitoring NS5B production and subcellular localization, as well as in structure-function studies. In this report, three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 16A9C9, 16D9A4 and 20A12C7, against a recombinant NS5B protein (genotype 1a, H-77 strain) were produced. These mAbs specifically recognize HCV NS5B, but not RdRps of polivirus (PV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) or GB virus B (GBV-B). The mAbs can readily detect NS5B in cellular lysates of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells constitutively expressing the nonstructural region of HCV (NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5A-NS5B). NS5B proteins of different HCV genotypes/subtypes (1a, 1b, 2a, 2c, 5a) showed varied affinity for these mAbs. Interestingly, the epitopes for the mAbs were mapped to the palm subdomain (amino acid 188-370) of the HCV RdRp as determined by immunoblotting analysis of a panel of HCV/GBV-B chimeric NS5B proteins. The binding site was mapped between amino acid 231 and 267 of NS5B for 16A9C9, and between 282 and 372 for 16D9A4 and 20A12C7. Furthermore, these mAbs showed no inhibitory effect on the NS5B polymerase activity in vitro.

  16. Resistance Patterns Associated with HCV NS5A Inhibitors Provide Limited Insight into Drug Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs have significantly improved the treatment of infection with the hepatitis C virus. A promising class of novel antiviral agents targets the HCV NS5A protein. The high potency and broad genotypic coverage are favorable properties. NS5A inhibitors are currently assessed in advanced clinical trials in combination with viral polymerase inhibitors and/or viral protease inhibitors. However, the clinical use of NS5A inhibitors is also associated with new challenges. HCV variants with decreased susceptibility to these drugs can emerge and compromise therapy. In this review, we discuss resistance patterns in NS5A with focus prevalence and implications for inhibitor binding.

  17. Direct binding of ledipasvir to HCV NS5A: mechanism of resistance to an HCV antiviral agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyock Joo Kwon

    Full Text Available Ledipasvir, a direct acting antiviral agent (DAA targeting the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A protein, exhibits picomolar activity in replicon cells. While its mechanism of action is unclear, mutations that confer resistance to ledipasvir in HCV replicon cells are located in NS5A, suggesting that NS5A is the direct target of ledipasvir. To date co-precipitation and cross-linking experiments in replicon or NS5A transfected cells have not conclusively shown a direct, specific interaction between NS5A and ledipasvir. Using recombinant, full length NS5A, we show that ledipasvir binds directly, with high affinity and specificity, to NS5A. Ledipasvir binding to recombinant NS5A is saturable with a dissociation constant in the low nanomolar range. A mutant form of NS5A (Y93H that confers resistance to ledipasvir shows diminished binding to ledipasvir. The current study shows that ledipasvir inhibits NS5A through direct binding and that resistance to ledipasvir is the result of a reduction in binding affinity to NS5A mutants.

  18. Comprehensive Screening for Naturally Occurring Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Direct-Acting Antivirals in the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B Genes in Worldwide Isolates of Viral Genotypes 1 to 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño-Galindo, Juan Ángel; Salvatierra, Karina; González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier

    2016-04-01

    There is no comprehensive study available on the natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymorphism in sites associated with resistance including all viral genotypes which may present variable susceptibilities to particular direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). This study aimed to analyze the frequencies, genetic barriers, and evolutionary histories of naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the six main HCV genotypes. A comprehensive analysis of up to 103 RAVs was performed in 2,901, 2,216, and 1,344 HCV isolates for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes, respectively. We report significant intergenotypic differences in the frequencies of natural RAVs for these three HCV genes. In addition, we found a low genetic barrier for the generation of new RAVs, irrespective of the viral genotype. Furthermore, in 1,126 HCV genomes, including sequences spanning the three genes, haplotype analysis revealed a remarkably high frequency of viruses carrying more than one natural RAV to DAAs (53% of HCV-1a, 28.5% of HCV-1b, 67.1% of HCV-6, and 100% of genotype 2, 3, 4, and 5 haplotypes). With the exception of HCV-1a, the most prevalent haplotypes showed RAVs in at least two different viral genes. Finally, evolutionary analyses revealed that, while most natural RAVs appeared recently, others have been efficiently transmitted over time and cluster in well-supported clades. In summary, and despite the observed high efficacy of DAA-based regimens, we show that naturally occurring RAVs are common in all HCV genotypes and that there is an overall low genetic barrier for the selection of resistance mutations. There is a need for natural DAA resistance profiling specific for each HCV genotype. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus Particle Assembly Involves Phosphorylation of NS5A by the c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Shota; Takeuchi, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Sun, Xuedong; Honjoh, Chisato; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Hotta, Hak; Sada, Kiyonao

    2015-09-04

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is thought to regulate the replication of viral RNA and the assembly of virus particles in a serine/threonine phosphorylation-dependent manner. However, the host kinases that phosphorylate NS5A have not been fully identified. Here, we show that HCV particle assembly involves the phosphorylation of NS5A by the c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of c-Abl reduces the production of infectious HCV (J6/JFH1) particles in Huh-7.5 cells without markedly affecting viral RNA translation and replication. NS5A is tyrosine-phosphorylated in HCV-infected cells, and this phosphorylation is also reduced by the knockdown of c-Abl. Mutational analysis reveals that NS5A tyrosine phosphorylation is dependent, at least in part, on Tyr(330) (Tyr(2306) in polyprotein numbering). Mutation of this residue to phenylalanine reduces the production of infectious HCV particles but does not affect the replication of the JFH1 subgenomic replicon. These findings suggest that c-Abl promotes HCV particle assembly by phosphorylating NS5A at Tyr(330). © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. NS3 from Hepatitis C Virus Strain JFH-1 Is an Unusually Robust Helicase That Is Primed To Bind and Unwind Viral RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ting; Ren, Xiaoming; Adams, Rebecca L.; Pyle, Anna Marie; Ou, J. -H. James

    2017-10-25

    Hepatitis C viruses (HCV) encode a helicase enzyme that is essential for viral replication and assembly (nonstructural protein 3 [NS3]). This helicase has become the focus of extensive basic research on the general helicase mechanism, and it is also of interest as a novel drug target. Despite the importance of this protein, mechanistic work on NS3 has been conducted almost exclusively on variants from HCV genotype 1. Our understanding of NS3 from the highly active HCV strains that are used to study HCV genetics and mechanism in cell culture (such as JFH-1) is lacking. We therefore set out to determine whether NS3 from the replicatively efficient genotype 2a strain JFH-1 displays novel functional or structural properties. Using biochemical assays for RNA binding and duplex unwinding, we show that JFH-1 NS3 binds RNA much more rapidly than the previously studied NS3 variants from genotype 1b. Unlike NS3 variants from other genotypes, JFH-1 NS3 binds RNA with high affinity in a functionally active form that is capable of immediately unwinding RNA duplexes without undergoing rate-limiting conformational changes that precede activation. Unlike other superfamily 2 (SF2) helicases, JFH-1 NS3 does not require long 3' overhangs, and it unwinds duplexes that are flanked by only a few nucleotides, as in the folded HCV genome. To understand the physical basis for this, we solved the crystal structure of JFH-1 NS3, revealing a novel conformation that contains an open, positively charged RNA binding cleft that is primed for productive interaction with RNA targets, potentially explaining robust replication by HCV JFH-1.

    IMPORTANCEGenotypes of HCV are as divergent as different types of flavivirus, and yet mechanistic features of HCV variants are presumed to be held in common. One of the most well-studied components of the HCV replication complex is a helicase known as nonstructural protein 3 (NS3). We set out to determine whether this important

  1. New modalities in the treatment of HCV in pre and post - transplantation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Filiz; Durand, Christine M; Gürakar, Ahmet

    2015-05-01

    End-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) secondary to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are the leading indications for liver transplantation (LT) in developed countries. Recurrence of HCV following LT is universal if the recipient has detectable serum HCV RNA at the time of LT. Recurrent HCV has an accelerated course and is associated with poor long term patient and graft survival. Interferon (IFN)-based regimens have achieved low Sustained Virological Rates (SVR) in this setting and are associated with a high rate of adverse events, resulting in treatment discontinuation. With advances in understanding the HCV life cycle, drugs targeting specific steps, particularly inhibiting the NS3/4A protease, NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase and the NS5A protein, have been developed. Sofosbuvir (SOF), a nucleotide analogue inhibitor of NS5B polymerase was the first compound to enter the market. Combinations of SOF with new HCV antivirals from other classes have allowed for IFN-free regimens with low rates of adverse events and SVR rates >90%. With the availability of newer agents, the approach to the treatment of HCV infection during the pre-and post-liver transplantation period has changed. We will hereby review the current status of HCV treatment and discuss the potential future therapies in the transplant setting.

  2. Mechanistic Characterization of GS-9190 (Tegobuvir), a Novel Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, I-hung; Vliegen, Inge; Peng, Betty; Yang, Huiling; Hebner, Christy; Paeshuyse, Jan; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Fenaux, Martijn; Tian, Yang; Mabery, Eric; Qi, Xiaoping; Bahador, Gina; Paulson, Matthew; Lehman, Laura S.; Bondy, Steven; Tse, Winston; Reiser, Hans; Lee, William A.; Schmitz, Uli; Neyts, Johan; Zhong, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    GS-9190 (Tegobuvir) is a novel imidazopyridine inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication in vitro and has demonstrated potent antiviral activity in patients chronically infected with genotype 1 (GT1) HCV. GS-9190 exhibits reduced activity against GT2a (JFH1) subgenomic replicons and GT2a (J6/JFH1) infectious virus, suggesting that the compound's mechanism of action involves a genotype-specific viral component. To further investigate the GS-9190 mechanism of action, we utilized the susceptibility differences between GT1b and GT2a by constructing a series of replicon chimeras where combinations of 1b and 2a nonstructural proteins were encoded within the same replicon. The antiviral activities of GS-9190 against the chimeric replicons were reduced to levels comparable to that of the wild-type GT2a replicon in chimeras expressing GT2a NS5B. GT1b replicons in which the β-hairpin region (amino acids 435 to 455) was replaced by the corresponding sequence of GT2a were markedly less susceptible to GS-9190, indicating the importance of the thumb subdomain of the polymerase in this effect. Resistance selection in GT1b replicon cells identified several mutations in NS5B (C316Y, Y448H, Y452H, and C445F) that contributed to the drug resistance phenotype. Reintroduction of these mutations into wild-type replicons conferred resistance to GS-9190, with the number of NS5B mutations correlating with the degree of resistance. Analysis of GS-9190 cross-resistance against previously reported NS5B drug-selected mutations showed that the resistance pattern of GS-9190 is different from other nonnucleoside inhibitors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that GS-9190 represents a novel class of nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitors that interact with NS5B likely through involvement of the β-hairpin in the thumb subdomain. PMID:21746939

  3. Prevalence of NS5B resistance-associated variants in treatment-naïve Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song; Xing, Huichun; Feng, Shenghu; Ju, Wei; Liu, Shunai; Wang, Xiaomei; Ou, Weini; Cheng, Jun; Pan, Calvin Q

    2018-02-01

    There is little information on the association between baseline non-structural protein (NS) 5b resistance-associated variants (RAVs) and treatment failure in hepatitis C patients. This study examined the frequencies of natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in an Asian cohort. Samples from Asian HCV patients enrolled between October 2009 and September 2014 were analyzed for NS5B RAVs within the region from amino acid 230 to 371. Serum samples were tested by PCR genotyping, with sequence alignment performed using the neighbor-joining method. NS5B was detected by Sanger sequencing followed by Geno2pheno analysis. NS5B RAVs were detected in 80.52% (1199/1489) of patients; 68.4% (1019/1489) and 79.7% (1186/1489) were associated with resistance to sofosbuvir (SOF) and dasabuvir (DSV), respectively. These RAVs were present in 95% (1004/1058) of genotype 1b patients. When genotypes 1b and 2a were compared, SOF-associated RAVs were detected at a higher frequency in genotype 1b (94.8% [1004/1058] vs. 2.9% [9/309]; χ 2 = 1054.433, P C316H/N was more common in genotype 1b (94.7% [1002/1058] vs. 0% [0/309]; χ 2 = 1096.014, P C316Y/H/N/W was higher in genotype 1b (94.7% [1002/1058] vs. 0% [0/309]; χ 2 = 1096.014, P < 0.001). In conclusion, baseline SOF and DSV RAVs are common in Asian HCV patients and predominantly occur in genotype 1b.

  4. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

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    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun, E-mail: ydu@uark.edu

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  5. Identification of nucleotides in the 5'UTR and amino acids substitutions that are essential for the infectivity of 5'UTR-NS5A recombinant of hepatitis C virus genotype 1b (strain Con1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinqian; Feng, Shengjun; Liu, Xi; Guo, Mingzhe; Chen, Mingxiao; Chen, Yiyi; Rong, Liang; Xia, Jinyu; Zhou, Yuanping; Zhong, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping

    2018-05-01

    Genotype 1b strain Con1 represents an important reference in the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here, we aimed to develop an advanced infectious Con1 recombinant. We found that previously identified mutations A1226G/F1464L/A1672S/Q1773H permitted culture adaption of Con1 Core-NS5A (C-5A) recombinant containing 5'UTR and NS5B-3'UTR from JFH1 (genotype 2a), thus acquired additional mutations L725H/F886L/D2415G. C-5A containing all seven mutations (C-5A_7m) replicated efficiently in Huh7.5 and Huh7.5.1 cells and had an increased infectivity in SEC14L2-expressing Huh7.5.1 cells. Incorporation of Con1 NS5B was deleterious to C-5A_7m, however Con1 5'UTR was permissive but attenuated the virus. Nucleotides G1, A4, and G35 primarily accounted for the viral attenuation without affecting RNA translation. C-5A_7m was inhibited dose-dependently by simeprevir and daclatasvir, and substitutions at A4, A29, A34, and G35 conferred resistance to miR-122 antagonism. The novel Con1 5'UTR-NS5A recombinant, adaptive mutations, and critical nucleotides described here will facilitate future studies of HCV culture systems and virus-host interaction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Different mechanisms of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase activation by cyclophilin A and B in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Leiyun; Tian, Xiao; Gao, Yayi; Watashi, Koichi; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Wakita, Takaji; Kohara, Michinori; Toyoda, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Cyclophilins (CyPs) are cellular proteins that are essential to hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Since cyclosporine A was discovered to inhibit HCV infection, the CyP pathway contributing to HCV replication is a potential attractive stratagem for controlling HCV infection. Among them, CyPA is accepted to interact with HCV nonstructural protein (NS) 5A, although interaction of CyPB and NS5B, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), was proposed first. CyPA, CyPB, and HCV RdRp were expressed in bacteria and purified using combination column chromatography. HCV RdRp activity was analyzed in vitro with purified CyPA and CyPB. CyPA at a high concentration (50× higher than that of RdRp) but not at low concentration activated HCV RdRp. CyPB had an allosteric effect on genotype 1b RdRp activation. CyPB showed genotype specificity and activated genotype 1b and J6CF (2a) RdRps but not genotype 1a or JFH1 (2a) RdRps. CyPA activated RdRps of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 2a. CyPB may also support HCV genotype 1b replication within the infected cells, although its knockdown effect on HCV 1b replicon activity was controversial in earlier reports. CyPA activated HCV RdRp at the early stages of transcription, including template RNA binding. CyPB also activated genotype 1b RdRp. However, their activation mechanisms are different. These data suggest that both CyPA and CyPB are excellent targets for the treatment of HCV 1b, which shows the greatest resistance to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cyclosporin A associated helicase-like protein facilitates the association of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase with its cellular cyclophilin B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Morohashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyclosporin A (CsA is well known as an immunosuppressive drug useful for allogeneic transplantation. It has been reported that CsA inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV genome replication, which indicates that cellular targets of CsA regulate the viral replication. However, the regulation mechanisms of HCV replication governed by CsA target proteins have not been fully understood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show a chemical biology approach that elucidates a novel mechanism of HCV replication. We developed a phage display screening to investigate compound-peptide interaction and identified a novel cellular target molecule of CsA. This protein, named CsA associated helicase-like protein (CAHL, possessed RNA-dependent ATPase activity that was negated by treatment with CsA. The downregulation of CAHL in the cells resulted in a decrease of HCV genome replication. CAHL formed a complex with HCV-derived RNA polymerase NS5B and host-derived cyclophilin B (CyPB, known as a cellular cofactor for HCV replication, to regulate NS5B-CyPB interaction. CONCLUSIONS: We found a cellular factor, CAHL, as CsA associated helicase-like protein, which would form trimer complex with CyPB and NS5B of HCV. The strategy using a chemical compound and identifying its target molecule by our phage display analysis is useful to reveal a novel mechanism underlying cellular and viral physiology.

  8. Cyclosporin A associated helicase-like protein facilitates the association of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase with its cellular cyclophilin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Kengo; Sahara, Hiroeki; Watashi, Koichi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sunoki, Takashi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Takakusagi, Kaori; Miyashita, Hiroki; Sato, Noriyuki; Tanabe, Atsushi; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio

    2011-04-29

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is well known as an immunosuppressive drug useful for allogeneic transplantation. It has been reported that CsA inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome replication, which indicates that cellular targets of CsA regulate the viral replication. However, the regulation mechanisms of HCV replication governed by CsA target proteins have not been fully understood. Here we show a chemical biology approach that elucidates a novel mechanism of HCV replication. We developed a phage display screening to investigate compound-peptide interaction and identified a novel cellular target molecule of CsA. This protein, named CsA associated helicase-like protein (CAHL), possessed RNA-dependent ATPase activity that was negated by treatment with CsA. The downregulation of CAHL in the cells resulted in a decrease of HCV genome replication. CAHL formed a complex with HCV-derived RNA polymerase NS5B and host-derived cyclophilin B (CyPB), known as a cellular cofactor for HCV replication, to regulate NS5B-CyPB interaction. We found a cellular factor, CAHL, as CsA associated helicase-like protein, which would form trimer complex with CyPB and NS5B of HCV. The strategy using a chemical compound and identifying its target molecule by our phage display analysis is useful to reveal a novel mechanism underlying cellular and viral physiology.

  9. Sensitive luminescent reporter viruses reveal appreciable release of hepatitis C virus NS5A protein into the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Nicholas S; Aloia, Amanda L; Joyce, Michael A; Chulanetra, Monrat; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Beard, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    The HCV NS5A protein is essential for viral RNA replication and virus particle assembly. To study the viral replication cycle and NS5A biology we generated an infectious HCV construct with a NanoLuciferase (NLuc) insertion within NS5A. Surprisingly, beyond its utility as a sensitive reporter of cytoplasmic viral RNA replication, we also observed strong luminescence in cell culture fluids. Further analysis using assembly-defective viruses and subgenomic replicons revealed that infectious virus production was not required for extracellular NS5A-NLuc activity but was associated with enrichment of extracellular NS5A-NLuc in intermediate-density fractions similar to those of exosomes and virus particles. Additionally, BRET analysis indicated that intracellular and extracellular forms of NS5A may adopt differing conformations. Importantly, infection studies using a human liver chimeric mouse model confirmed robust infection in vivo and ready detection of NLuc activity in serum. We hypothesise that the presence of NS5A in extracellular fluids contributes to HCV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. HCV-RNA quantification in liver bioptic samples and extrahepatic compartments, using the abbott RealTime HCV assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, FrancescoPaolo; Cento, Valeria; Sorbo, Maria Chiara; Manuelli, Matteo Ciancio; Lenci, Ilaria; Sforza, Daniele; Di Carlo, Domenico; Milana, Martina; Manzia, Tommaso Maria; Angelico, Mario; Tisone, Giuseppe; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the performance of a rapid method to quantify HCV-RNA in the hepatic and extrahepatic compartments, by using for the first time the Abbott RealTime HCV-assay. Non-tumoral (NT), tumoral (TT) liver samples, lymph nodes and ascitic fluid from patients undergoing orthotopic-liver-transplantation (N=18) or liver resection (N=4) were used for the HCV-RNA quantification; 5/22 patients were tested after or during direct acting antivirals (DAA) treatment. Total RNA and DNA quantification from tissue-biopsies allowed normalization of HCV-RNA concentrations in IU/μg of total RNA and IU/10 6 liver-cells, respectively. HCV-RNA was successfully quantified with high reliability in liver biopsies, lymph nodes and ascitic fluid samples. Among the 17 untreated patients, a positive and significant HCV-RNA correlation between serum and NT liver-samples was observed (Pearson: rho=0.544, p=0.024). Three DAA-treated patients were HCV-RNA "undetectable" in serum, but still "detectable" in all tested liver-tissues. Differently, only one DAA-treated patient, tested after sustained-virological-response, showed HCV-RNA "undetectability" in liver-tissue. HCV-RNA was successfully quantified with high reliability in liver bioptic samples and extrahepatic compartments, even when HCV-RNA was "undetectable" in serum. Abbott RealTime HCV-assay is a good diagnostic tool for HCV quantification in intra- and extra-hepatic compartments, whenever a bioptic sample is available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Region in Patients with Cirrhosis Using an Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Fahriye; Ciftci, Sevgi; Akyuz, Filiz; Abaci, Neslihan; Cakiris, Aris; Akyuz, Umit; Demir, Kadir; Besisik, Fatih; Ustek, Duran; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin

    2017-09-01

    HCV (Hepatitis C Virus) is genetically more diverse than HBV and HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and exists as quasispecies within infected individuals. This is due to the lack of efficient proofreading of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Consequently, quasispecies emerge depending on the mutation rate of the viral polymerase, which may display a high level of genetic variability in a population. In infected individuals, HCV replicates and circulates as quasispecies composed of a complex mixture of different but closely related genomes that undergoes continuous change due to competitive selection and cooperation between arising mutants. The aim of this study is to investigate mutations in the NS5A region as a whole, including ISDR, PKRBD, IRRDR, and V3 of HCV genotype 1b cirrhosis patients being naive and nonresponders, treated with IFN (interferon) + ribavirin (RBN) by using an ultra-deep pyrosequencing method (UDPS). During the study, five patients (four females, and one male, mean age 59.8 ± 11 years) with HCV related cirrhosis were analyzed. Three patients received IFN + RBN for six months, but two patients did not receive any therapy. HCV-RNA concentrations in patients' sera were determined using a COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR Test, Version 2.0. Genotyping was performed by using a commercial reverse hybridization method, Line Probe Assay. The quasispecies for the NS5A region were investigated using UDPS. All five patients were HCV genotype 1b (Mean Child-Pugh score 7.2 ± 1.9, 2 pts Child A, 2 pts Child B, and one pt Child C) but only one patient had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 19 different mutations were detected in each of the five patients (ranging from 3 to 6 mutations per patient). In all five patients, several mutations in the ISDR and PKR-BD regions were detected. On the other hand, mutations in the V3 and IRRDR regions were only detected in one patient. UDPS is a new sequencing technology and a very sensitive method in detection

  12. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Misao; Ariumi, Yasuo; Hijikata, Makoto; Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi; Wakita, Takaji; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. ► PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. ► HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. ► INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  13. Y-box-binding protein 1 interacts with hepatitis C virus NS3/4A and influences the equilibrium between viral RNA replication and infectious particle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Melançon, Pierre; Racine, Marie-Ève; Baril, Martin; Lamarre, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protein has several essential roles in the virus life cycle, most probably through dynamic interactions with host factors. To discover cellular cofactors that are co-opted by HCV for its replication, we elucidated the NS3/4A interactome using mass spectrometry and identified Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as an interacting partner of NS3/4A protein and HCV genomic RNA. Importantly, silencing YB-1 expression decreased viral RNA replication and severely impaired the propagation of the infectious HCV molecular clone JFH-1. Immunofluorescence studies further revealed a drastic HCV-dependent redistribution of YB-1 to the surface of the lipid droplets, an important organelle for HCV assembly. Core and NS3 protein-dependent polyprotein maturation were shown to be required for YB-1 relocalization. Unexpectedly, YB-1 knockdown cells showed the increased production of viral infectious particles while HCV RNA replication was impaired. Our data support that HCV hijacks YB-1-containing ribonucleoparticles and that YB-1-NS3/4A-HCV RNA complexes regulate the equilibrium between HCV RNA replication and viral particle production.

  14. Small interfering RNA targeted to stem-loop II of the 5' untranslated region effectively inhibits expression of six HCV genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Srikanta

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antiviral action of interferon alpha targets the 5' untranslated region (UTR used by hepatitis C virus (HCV to translate protein by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES mechanism. Although this sequence is highly conserved among different clinical strains, approximately half of chronically infected hepatitis C patients do not respond to interferon therapy. Therefore, development of small interfering RNA (siRNA targeted to the 5'UTR to inhibit IRES mediated translation may represent an alternative approach that could circumvent the problem of interferon resistance. Results Four different plasmid constructs were prepared for intracellular delivery of siRNAs targeting the stem loop II-III of HCV 5' UTR. The effect of siRNA production on IRES mediated translation was investigated using chimeric clones between the gene for green fluorescence protein (GFP and IRES sequences of six different HCV genotypes. The siRNA targeted to stem loop II effectively mediated degradation of HCV IRES mRNA and inhibited GFP expression in the case of six different HCV genotypes, where as siRNAs targeted to stem loop III did not. Furthermore, intracytoplasmic expression of siRNA into transfected Huh-7 cells efficiently degraded HCV genomic RNA and inhibited core protein expression from infectious full-length infectious clones HCV 1a and HCV 1b strains. Conclusion These in vitro studies suggest that siRNA targeted to stem-loop II is highly effective inhibiting IRES mediated translation of the major genotypes of HCV. Stem-loop II siRNA may be a good target for developing an intracellular immunization strategy based antiviral therapy to inhibit hepatitis C virus strains that are not inhibited by interferon.

  15. Preclinical and Clinical Resistance Profile of EDP-239, a Novel Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Christopher M; Brasher, Bradley B; Polemeropoulos, Alex; Rhodin, Michael H J; McAllister, Nicole; Wong, Kelly A; Jones, Christopher T; Jiang, Lijuan; Lin, Kai; Or, Yat Sun

    2016-10-01

    EDP-239, a potent and selective hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor developed for the treatment of HCV infection, has been investigated in vitro and in vivo This study sought to characterize genotypic changes in the HCV NS5A sequence of genotype 1 (GT1) replicons and to compare those changes to GT1 viral RNA mutations isolated from clinical trial patients. Resistance selection experiments in vitro using a subgenomic replicon identified resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) at GT1a NS5A amino acid positions 24, 28, 30, 31, and 93 that confer various degrees of resistance to EDP-239. Key RAMs were similarly identified in GT1b NS5A at amino acid positions 31 and 93. Mutations F36L in GT1a and A92V in GT1b do not confer resistance to EDP-239 individually but were found to enhance the resistance of GT1a K24R and GT1b Y93H. RAMs were identified in GT1 patients at baseline or after dosing with EDP-239 that were similar to those detected in vitro Baseline RAMs identified at NS5A position 93 in GT1, or positions 28 or 30 in GT1a only, correlated with a reduced treatment response. RAMs at additional positions were also detected and may have contributed to reduced EDP-239 efficacy. The most common GT1a and GT1b RAMs found to persist up to weeks 12, 24, or 48 were those at NS5A positions 28, 30, 31, 58 (GT1a only), and 93. Those RAMs persisting at the highest frequencies up to weeks 24 or 48 were L31M and Q30H/R for GT1a and L31M and Y93H for GT1b. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01856426.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Naturally occurring resistance mutations within the core and NS5B regions in hepatitis C genotypes, particularly genotype 5a, in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabdial-Sing, N; Blackard, J T; Puren, A J; Mahomed, A; Abuelhassan, W; Mahlangu, J; Vermeulen, M; Bowyer, S M

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 1 million South Africans are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV). The standard of care (SOC) in South Africa is combination therapy (pegylated interferon and ribavirin). HCV genotypes and/or mutations in the core/non-structural regions have been associated with response to therapy and/or disease progression. This study examines mutations in the core (29-280 amino acids, including ∼ 90 E1 amino acids) and NS5B (241-306 amino acids) regions on pre-treatment isolates from patients attending Johannesburg hospitals or asymptomatic South African blood donors. Diversity within known CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell epitopes was also explored. Samples grouped into subtypes 1a(N = 10) 1b(N = 12), 3a(N = 5), 4a(N = 3) and 5a(N = 61). Two mutations, associated with interferon resistance-R70Q and T110N-were present in 29 genotype 5a core sequences. No resistance mutation to NS5B nucleotide inhibitors, sofosbuvir was found. Six putative CD8+ and one CD4+ T-cell epitope sequence in the core region showed binding scores of <300 IC50nM to HLA alleles frequently observed in the South African population. No known CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell epitopes were mapped in the NS5B region. The analysis begs the question whether those infected with genotype 5a will benefit better on interferon-free combination therapies. This study provides new insight into one of the lesser studied HCV genotypes and compares the diversity seen in a large pre-treatment cohort with other subtypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. QSAR study of HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors using the genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression (GA-MLR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, Hamid; Khanzadeh, Marziyeh; Mozaffari, Shahla; Bostanifar, Mohammad Hassan; Avval, Zhila Mohajeri; Aalizadeh, Reza; Pourbasheer, Eslam

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study has been employed for predicting the inhibitory activities of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase inhibitors . A data set consisted of 72 compounds was selected, and then different types of molecular descriptors were calculated. The whole data set was split into a training set (80 % of the dataset) and a test set (20 % of the dataset) using principle component analysis. The stepwise (SW) and the genetic algorithm (GA) techniques were used as variable selection tools. Multiple linear regression method was then used to linearly correlate the selected descriptors with inhibitory activities. Several validation technique including leave-one-out and leave-group-out cross-validation, Y-randomization method were used to evaluate the internal capability of the derived models. The external prediction ability of the derived models was further analyzed using modified r(2), concordance correlation coefficient values and Golbraikh and Tropsha acceptable model criteria's. Based on the derived results (GA-MLR), some new insights toward molecular structural requirements for obtaining better inhibitory activity were obtained.

  18. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

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    Kuroki, Misao [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ariumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ariumi@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Hijikata, Makoto [Department of Viral Oncology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Shimotohno, Kunitada [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-8516 (Japan); Kato, Nobuyuki [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  19. An NS5A single optimized method to determine genotype, subtype and resistance profiles of Hepatitis C strains.

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    Elisabeth Andre-Garnier

    Full Text Available The objective was to develop a method of HCV genome sequencing that allowed simultaneous genotyping and NS5A inhibitor resistance profiling. In order to validate the use of a unique RT-PCR for genotypes 1-5, 142 plasma samples from patients infected with HCV were analysed. The NS4B-NS5A partial region was successfully amplified and sequenced in all samples. In parallel, partial NS3 sequences were analyzed obtained for genotyping. Phylogenetic analysis showed concordance of genotypes and subtypes with a bootstrap >95% for each type cluster. NS5A resistance mutations were analyzed using the Geno2pheno [hcv] v0.92 tool and compared to the list of known Resistant Associated Substitutions recently published. In conclusion, this tool allows determination of HCV genotypes, subtypes and identification of NS5A resistance mutations. This single method can be used to detect pre-existing resistance mutations in NS5A before treatment and to check the emergence of resistant viruses while undergoing treatment in major HCV genotypes (G1-5 in the EU and the US.

  20. Determinazione quantitativa di HCV-RNA: valutazione comparativa dei saggi Abbott Real-Time e Versant bDNA v.3

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    Aldo Manzin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA measurement before, during and after antiviral therapy has become an essential tool in the management of interferon-based treatment of HCV-related infections. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR has been largely used to obtain quantitative data, but laborious, time-consuming post-PCR handling steps are required to gain valuable results. Real time (RT PCR now provides advantages over end-point (EP PCR due to its improved rapidity, sensitivity, reproducibility and the reduced risk of carry-over contamination, and has now proven itself to be valuable for the more precise monitoring of viral load kinetics and assessing antiviral response.The Abbott Real-Time HCV-RNA is a recently introduced assay for the automated processing of clinical samples and HCV-RNA quantitation: its basic technology relies on use of fluorescent linear probes (dynamic range using 0.5 ml as input target= 12-108 IU/mL and a hybridization/detection step at low temperature (35°C, which allows target mismatches to be tolerated. To determine the clinical application of the Abbott Real-Time assay and defining its correlation with the Bayer Versant bDNA v.3 assay, 68 consecutive samples from unselected HCV-infected patients were retrospectively analysed with RT and the results obtained using the two tests compared.A good correlation was found between RT-PCR and bDNA: 97% of samples tested had a result within a 0.5 log HCV IU/mL difference (bias=0.15 log, whereas 6 samples negative with bDNA gave positive results with Abbott RT (range, 1.89-3.07 log IU/mL and “in-house” qualitative RT-PCR assays.

  1. Cell culture-adaptive mutations of NS5A affect replication of hepatitis C virus differentially depending on the viral genotypes.

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    Chung, Aeri; Jin, Bora; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Kim, Seungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Most of HCV RNAs require cell culture-adaptive mutations for efficient replication in cell culture and a number of such mutations have been described including a well-known S2204I substitution mutation in NS5A protein. In contrast, the replication of genotype 2a JFH1 RNA in cell culture does not require any cell culture-adaptive mutation. Rather, the presence of S2204I mutation impaired the JFH1 RNA replication. In this study, we examined the effect of reversions and substitutions of NS5A cell culture-adaptive mutations on virus replication in different genotypic backgrounds after either placing genotype 1a NS5A in the genotype 2a JFH1 or vice versa. The results from this investigation suggest that the S2204I mutation affects HCV RNA replication differentially depending on the viral genotypes but that the effect was not simply explained by the genotypic background. Perhaps, the effect of the S2204I mutation on HCV replication reflects both intra- and intergenic interactions of NS5A protein. J. Med. Virol. 89:146-152, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Rab5 Enhances Classical Swine Fever Virus Proliferation and Interacts with Viral NS4B Protein to Facilitate Formation of NS4B Related Complex

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    Jihui Lin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical swine fever virus (CSFV is a fatal pig pestivirus and causes serious financial losses to the pig industry. CSFV NS4B protein is one of the most important viral replicase proteins. Rab5, a member of the small Rab GTPase family, is involved in infection and replication of numerous viruses including hepatitis C virus and dengue virus. Until now, the effects of Rab5 on the proliferation of CSFV are poorly defined. In the present study, we showed that Rab5 could enhance CSFV proliferation by utilizing lentivirus-mediated constitutive overexpression and eukaryotic plasmid transient overexpression approaches. On the other hand, lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA knockdown of Rab5 dramatically inhibited virus production. Co-immunoprecipitation, glutathione S-transferase pulldown and laser confocal microscopy assays further confirmed the interaction between Rab5 and CSFV NS4B protein. In addition, intracellular distribution of NS4B-Red presented many granular fluorescent signals (GFS in CSFV infected PK-15 cells. Inhibition of basal Rab5 function with Rab5 dominant negative mutant Rab5S34N resulted in disruption of the GFS. These results indicate that Rab5 plays a critical role in facilitating the formation of the NS4B related complexes. Furthermore, it was observed that NS4B co-localized with viral NS3 and NS5A proteins in the cytoplasm, suggesting that NS3 and NS5A might be components of the NS4B related complex. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Rab5 positively modulates CSFV propagation and interacts with NS4B protein to facilitate the NS4B related complexes formation.

  3. In Vitro Antiviral Activity and Resistance Profile of the Next-Generation Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Inhibitor Pibrentasvir.

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    Ng, Teresa I; Krishnan, Preethi; Pilot-Matias, Tami; Kati, Warren; Schnell, Gretja; Beyer, Jill; Reisch, Thomas; Lu, Liangjun; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Irvin, Michelle; Tripathi, Rakesh; Maring, Clarence; Randolph, John T; Wagner, Rolf; Collins, Christine

    2017-05-01

    Pibrentasvir (ABT-530) is a novel and pan-genotypic hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A inhibitor with 50% effective concentration (EC 50 ) values ranging from 1.4 to 5.0 pM against HCV replicons containing NS5A from genotypes 1 to 6. Pibrentasvir demonstrated similar activity against a panel of chimeric replicons containing HCV NS5A of genotypes 1 to 6 from clinical samples. Resistance selection studies were conducted using HCV replicon cells with NS5A from genotype 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 4a, 5a, or 6a at a concentration of pibrentasvir that was 10- or 100-fold over its EC 50 for the respective replicon. With pibrentasvir at 10-fold over the respective EC 50 , only a small number of colonies (0.00015 to 0.0065% of input cells) with resistance-associated amino acid substitutions were selected in replicons containing genotype 1a, 2a, or 3a NS5A, and no viable colonies were selected in replicons containing NS5A from other genotypes. With pibrentasvir at 100-fold over the respective EC 50 , very few colonies (0.0002% of input cells) were selected by pibrentasvir in genotype 1a replicon cells while no colonies were selected in other replicons. Pibrentasvir is active against common resistance-conferring substitutions in HCV genotypes 1 to 6 that were identified for other NS5A inhibitors, including those at key amino acid positions 28, 30, 31, or 93. The combination of pibrentasvir with HCV inhibitors of other classes produced synergistic inhibition of HCV replication. In summary, pibrentasvir is a next-generation HCV NS5A inhibitor with potent and pan-genotypic activity, and it maintains activity against common amino acid substitutions of HCV genotypes 1 to 6 that are known to confer resistance to currently approved NS5A inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Ng et al.

  4. Hepatitis C virus translation preferentially depends on active RNA replication.

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    Helene Minyi Liu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA initiates its replication on a detergent-resistant membrane structure derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in the HCV replicon cells. By performing a pulse-chase study of BrU-labeled HCV RNA, we found that the newly-synthesized HCV RNA traveled along the anterograde-membrane traffic and moved away from the ER. Presumably, the RNA moved to the site of translation or virion assembly in the later steps of viral life cycle. In this study, we further addressed how HCV RNA translation was regulated by HCV RNA trafficking. When the movement of HCV RNA from the site of RNA synthesis to the Golgi complex was blocked by nocodazole, an inhibitor of ER-Golgi transport, HCV protein translation was surprisingly enhanced, suggesting that the translation of viral proteins occurred near the site of RNA synthesis. We also found that the translation of HCV proteins was dependent on active RNA synthesis: inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by an NS5B inhibitor resulted in decreased HCV viral protein synthesis even when the total amount of intracellular HCV RNA remained unchanged. Furthermore, the translation activity of the replication-defective HCV replicons or viral RNA with an NS5B mutation was greatly reduced as compared to that of the corresponding wildtype RNA. By performing live cell labeling of newly synthesized HCV RNA and proteins, we further showed that the newly synthesized HCV proteins colocalized with the newly synthesized viral RNA, suggesting that HCV RNA replication and protein translation take place at or near the same site. Our findings together indicate that the translation of HCV RNA is coupled to RNA replication and that the both processes may occur at the same subcellular membrane compartments, which we term the replicasome.

  5. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

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    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  6. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

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    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  7. Natural Polymorphisms Conferring Resistance to HCV Protease and Polymerase Inhibitors in Treatment-Naïve HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients in China.

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    Kali Zhou

    Full Text Available The advent of direct-acting agents (DAAs has improved treatment of HCV in HIV co-infection, but may be limited by primary drug resistance. This study reports the prevalence of natural polymorphisms conferring resistance to NS3/4A protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected individuals in China.Population based NS3/4A sequencing was completed for 778 treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected patients from twelve provinces. NS3 sequences were amplified by nested PCR using in-house primers for genotypes 1-6. NS5B sequencing was completed for genotyping in 350 sequences. Resistance-associated variants (RAVs were identified in positions associated with HCV resistance.Overall, 72.8% (566/778 of all HCV sequences had at least one RAV associated with HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor resistance. Variants were found in 3.6% (7/193 of genotype 1, 100% (23/23 of genotype 2, 100% (237/237 of genotype 3 and 92% (299/325 of genotype 6 sequences. The Q80K variant was present in 98.4% of genotype 6a sequences. High-level RAVs were rare, occurring in only 0.8% of patients. 93% (64/69 patients with genotype 1b also carried the C316N variant associated with NS5B low-level resistance.The low frequency of high-level RAVs associated with primary HCV DAA resistance among all genotypes in HIV/HCV co-infected patients is encouraging. Further phenotypic studies and clinical research are needed.

  8. Maternal hepatitis C (HCV) infection and Anti-D immunoglobulin therapy: study testing antibodies, RNA and Genotype of HCV in Baghdad.

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    Al-Kubaisy, Waqar; Daud, Suzanna; Al-Kubaisi, Mustafa Waseem; Al-Kubaisi, Omar Waseem; Abdullah, Nik Nairan

    2018-04-30

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem. It is a major contributor to end-stage liver disease. Worldwide, 1-8% of all pregnant women were infected. Women with viral hepatitis may be at an increased risk of pregnancy complications. There are several obstetrics intervention acts as risk factors, which are specific to women pertaining the HCV infection; anti-D immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy may be one of them. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of HCV antibodies (anti-HCV), RNA, and genotype distribution among women with anti-D Ig therapy. A cross sectional study was conducted. A sample of 154 Rhesus negative (Rh - ve) pregnant women regardless of the anti-D Ig therapy was collected. Anti-HCV were tested using third generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA-3) and immunoblot assay (Lia Tek-111), subsequently. In addition, 89 serum samples were subjected to molecular analysis using RT-PCR and DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) method for the detection of HCV-RNA and genotypes. Anti-HCV, and HCV-RNA seroprevalence were significantly higher (17.1, 35.5%) among women with anti-D Ig than their counter group (6.4, 13.16%), p = .038, .018, respectively. Significant direct positive dose response correlation (r = 0.78, p = .005) had been seen between number of anti-D Ig therapy and anti-HCV seropositive rate. Anti-D Ig therapy act as a risk factor (odds ratio (OR) = 3.01, 95%CI: 1.01-8.9) especially from the third dose onward. Women with anti-D Ig therapy were at higher risk (3.6 times more) of positive HCV-RNA (OR =3.6, 95%CI =1.19-10.837). Genotype HCV-1b showed higher prevalent (52.9%) among the recipients of anti-D Ig therapy while genotype HCV-3a (6.6%) was the lowest. Our study showed that Anti-D immunoglobulin therapy acts as a risk factor for acquiring HCV infection. Screening for HCV should be recommended for all recipients of anti-D Ig. Not only HCV antibodies but HCV-RNA detection being recommended for the diagnosis of HCV

  9. Identification of specific regions in hepatitis C virus core, NS2 and NS5A that genetically interact with p7 and co-ordinate infectious virus production.

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    Gouklani, H; Beyer, C; Drummer, H; Gowans, E J; Netter, H J; Haqshenas, G

    2013-04-01

    The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small, integral membrane protein that plays a critical role in virus replication. Recently, we reported two intergenotypic JFH1 chimeric viruses encoding the partial or full-length p7 protein of the HCV-A strain of genotype 1b (GT1b; Virology; 2007; 360:134). In this study, we determined the consensus sequences of the entire polyprotein coding regions of the wild-type JFH1 and the revertant chimeric viruses and identified predominant amino acid substitutions in core (K74M), NS2 (T23N, H99P) and NS5A (D251G). Forward genetic analysis demonstrated that all single mutations restored the infectivity of the defective chimeric genomes suggesting that the infectious virus production involves the association of p7 with specific regions in core, NS2 and NS5A. In addition, it was demonstrated that the NS2 T23N facilitated the generation of infectious intergenotypic chimeric virus encoding p7 from GT6 of HCV. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Discovery of a Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Replicase Palm Site Allosteric Inhibitor (BMS-929075) Advanced to Phase 1 Clinical Studies

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    Yeung, Kap-Sun; Beno, Brett R.; Parcella, Kyle; Bender, John A.; Grant-Young, Katherine A.; Nickel, Andrew; Gunaga, Prashantha; Anjanappa, Prakash; Bora, Rajesh Onkardas; Selvakumar, Kumaravel; Rigat, Karen; Wang, Ying-Kai; Liu, Mengping; Lemm, Julie; Mosure, Kathy; Sheriff, Steven; Wan, Changhong; Witmer, Mark; Kish, Kevin; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Shu, Yue-Zhong; Parker, Dawn; Haskell, Roy; Ng, Alicia; Gao, Qi; Colston, Elizabeth; Raybon, Joseph; Grasela, Dennis M.; Santone, Kenneth; Gao, Min; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Sinz, Michael; Soars, Matthew G.; Knipe, Jay O.; Roberts, Susan B.; Kadow, John F.

    2017-05-04

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B replicase is a prime target for the development of direct-acting antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. Inspired by the overlay of bound structures of three structurally distinct NS5B palm site allosteric inhibitors, the high-throughput screening hit anthranilic acid 4, the known benzofuran analogue 5, and the benzothiadiazine derivative 6, an optimization process utilizing the simple benzofuran template 7 as a starting point for a fragment growing approach was pursued. A delicate balance of molecular properties achieved via disciplined lipophilicity changes was essential to achieve both high affinity binding and a stringent targeted absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion profile. These efforts led to the discovery of BMS-929075 (37), which maintained ligand efficiency relative to early leads, demonstrated efficacy in a triple combination regimen in HCV replicon cells, and exhibited consistently high oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic parameters across preclinical animal species. The human PK properties from the Phase I clinical studies of 37 were better than anticipated and suggest promising potential for QD administration.

  11. HCV viraemia in anti-HCV-negative haemodialysis patients: Do we need HCV RNA detection test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Griveas, Ioannis; Sveroni, Eirini; Argiana, Vasiliki; Kalliaropoulos, Antonios; Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Deutsch, Melanie

    2018-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still common among dialysis patients, but the natural history of HCV in this group is not completely understood. The KDIGO HCV guidelines of 2009 recommend that chronic haemodialysis patients be screened for HCV antibody upon admission to the dialysis clinic and every 6 months thereafter if susceptible to HCV infection. However, previous studies have shown the presence of HCV viraemia in anti-HCV-negative haemodialysis patients as up to 22%. To evaluate the presence of HCV viraemia, using HCV RNA detection, among anti-HCV-negative haemodialysis patients from a tertiary dialysis unit in Athens. We enrolled 41 anti-HCV-negative haemodialysis patients diagnosed with third-generation enzyme immunoassay. HCV viraemia was evaluated using a sensitive (cut-off: 12 IU/mL) reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (COBAS AmpliPrep/TaqMan system) for HCV RNA. None of the 41 anti-HCV-negative haemodialysis patients were shown to be viraemic. Routine HCV RNA testing appears not to be necessary in anti-HCV-negative haemodialysis patients.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Inhibitors: Current and Future Perspectives

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    Kazi Abdus Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is considered a serious health-care problem all over the world. A good number of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs against HCV infection are in clinical progress including NS3-4A protease inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors as well as host targeted inhibitors. Two NS3-4A protease inhibitors (telaprevir and boceprevir have been recently approved for the treatment of hepatitis C in combination with standard of care (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. The new therapy has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR; however, the adverse effects associated with this therapy are still the main concern. In addition to the emergence of viral resistance, other targets must be continually developed. One such underdeveloped target is the helicase portion of the HCV NS3 protein. This review article summarizes our current understanding of HCV treatment, particularly with those of NS3 inhibitors.

  13. Design, synthesis and identification of silicon-containing HCV NS5A inhibitors with pan-genotype activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baomin; Gai, Kuo; Qin, Hui; Liu, Xushi; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Qin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Deyang; Shen, Hengqiao; Song, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xiaojin; Xu, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yinsheng

    2018-03-25

    Modification of a HCV NS5A inhibitor, ombitasvir, led to the identification of 10d with improved pan-genotype NS5A inhibition and better pharmacokinetic properties. The key structural changes to ombitasvir include bioisosteric replacement of carbon with silicon atom. Compared with ombitasvir, the activity of anti-HCV genotypes (GT 1 to 6) of 10d is increased to some extent, especially the inhibitory activity against genotype 3a and 6a is increased by more than seven times, and the dog's in vivo pharmacokinetics properties were also superior to ombitasvir. Further drug evaluation showed that 10d was similar to ombitasvir on plasma protein binding and liver distribution profiles, with no cytotoxicity and no inhibitory effect on both CYP 450 and hERG ligand binding. However, permeability assay results indicated that 10d was not the substrate of P-gp or BCRP transporter, which is different from that of ombitasvir. The results of a 14-day repeat-dose toxicity study identified no toxicity with 10d. Our findings in preclinical tests suggest that the silicon-containing compound 10d could be worthy of continued study as a potential drug candidate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of naturally occurring NS5A resistance-associated substitutions in patients infected with hepatitis C virus subtype 1a, 1b, and 3a, co-infected or not with HIV in Brazil.

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    Malta, Fernanda; Gaspareto, Karine Vieira; Lisboa-Neto, Gaspar; Carrilho, Flair José; Mendes-Correa, Maria Cássia; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2017-11-13

    Non-structural 5A protein (NS5A) resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) have been identified in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), even prior to exposure to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). Selection for these variants occurs rapidly during treatment and, in some cases, leads to antiviral treatment failure. DAAs are currently the standard of care for hepatitis C treatment in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, in Brazil, the prevalence of pre-existing NS5A RASs is largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of naturally occurring NS5A RASs in Brazilian patients infected with HCV as either a monoinfection or coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Direct Sanger sequencing of the NS5A region was performed in 257 DAA-naïve patients chronically infected with HCV (156 monoinfected with HCV and 101 coinfected with HIV/HCV). The frequencies of specific RASs in monoinfected patients were 14.6% for HCV GT-1a (M28 V and Q30H/R), 6.0% for GT-1b (L31F/V and Y93H), and 22.6% for GT-3a (A30K and Y93H). For HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, the frequencies of RAS were 3.9% for GT-1a (M28 T and Q30H/R), and 11.1% for GT-1b (Y93H); no RASs were found in GT-3a sequences. Substitutions that may confer resistance to NS5A inhibitors exist at baseline in Brazilian DAA-naïve patients infected with HCV GT-1a, -1b, and -3a. Standardization of RAS definitions is needed to improve resistance analyses and to facilitate comparisons of substitutions reported across studies worldwide. Therapeutic strategies should be optimized to efficiently prevent DAA treatment failure due to selection for RASs, especially in difficult-to-cure patients.

  15. Porcine Mx1 Protein Inhibits Classical Swine Fever Virus Replication by Targeting Nonstructural Protein NS5B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Gao, Zhi-Can; Liu, Chun-Chun; Zhang, Yun-Na; Hou, Jin-Xiu; Li, Zhao-Yao; Kan, Lin; Li, Wen-Liang; Zhou, Bin

    2018-04-01

    Mx proteins are interferon (IFN)-induced GTPases that have broad antiviral activity against a wide range of RNA and DNA viruses; they belong to the dynamin superfamily of large GTPases. In this study, we confirmed the anti-classical swine fever virus (CSFV) activity of porcine Mx1 in vitro and showed that porcine Mx2 (poMx2), human MxA (huMxA), and mouse Mx1 (mmMx1) also have anti-CSFV activity in vitro Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments revealed that depletion of endogenous poMx1 or poMx2 enhanced CSFV replication, suggesting that porcine Mx proteins are responsible for the antiviral activity of interferon alpha (IFN-α) against CSFV infection. Confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, glutathione S -transferase (GST) pulldown, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) demonstrated that poMx1 associated with NS5B, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of CSFV. We used mutations in the poMx1 protein to elucidate the mechanism of their anti-CSFV activity and found that mutants that disrupted the association with NS5B lost all anti-CSV activity. Moreover, an RdRp activity assay further revealed that poMx1 undermined the RdRp activities of NS5B. Together, these results indicate that porcine Mx proteins exert their antiviral activity against CSFV by interacting with NS5B. IMPORTANCE Our previous studies have shown that porcine Mx1 (poMx1) inhibits classical swine fever virus (CSFV) replication in vitro and in vivo , but the molecular mechanism of action remains largely unknown. In this study, we dissect the molecular mechanism of porcine Mx1 and Mx2 against CSFV in vitro Our results show that poMx1 associates with NS5B, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of CSFV, resulting in the reduction of CSFV replication. Moreover, the mutants of poMx1 further elucidate the mechanism of their anti-CSFV activities. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Structure-based drug design of novel peptidomimetic cellulose derivatives as HCV-NS3 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Noha A; Elshemey, Wael M

    2017-10-15

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) represents a global health threat not only due to the large number of reported worldwide HCV infections, but also due to the absence of a reliable vaccine for its prevention. HCV NS3 protease is one of the most important targets for drug design aiming at the deactivation of HCV. In the present work, molecular docking simulations are carried out for suggested novel NS3 protease inhibitors applied to the Egyptian genotype 4. These inhibitors are modifications of dimer cellulose by adding a hexa-peptide to the cellulose at one of the positions 2, 3, 6, 2', 3' or 6'. Results show that the inhibitor compound with the hexa-peptide at position 6 shows significantly higher simulation docking score with HCV NS3 protease active site. This is supported by low total energy value of docking system, formation of two H-bonds with HCV NS3 protease active site residues, high binding affinity and increased stability in the interaction system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  18. In Vitro Antiviral Activity and Resistance Profile Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Inhibitor Ledipasvir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guofeng; Tian, Yang; Doehle, Brian; Peng, Betty; Corsa, Amoreena; Lee, Yu-Jen; Gong, Ruoyu; Yu, Mei; Han, Bin; Xu, Simin; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Perron, Michel; Xu, Yili; Mo, Hongmei; Pagratis, Nikos; Link, John O; Delaney, William

    2016-01-11

    Ledipasvir (LDV; GS-5885), a component of Harvoni (a fixed-dose combination of LDV with sofosbuvir [SOF]), is approved to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here, we report key preclinical antiviral properties of LDV, including in vitro potency, in vitro resistance profile, and activity in combination with other anti-HCV agents. LDV has picomolar antiviral activity against genotype 1a and genotype 1b replicons with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 0.031 nM and 0.004 nM, respectively. LDV is also active against HCV genotypes 4a, 4d, 5a, and 6a with EC50 values of 0.11 to 1.1 nM. LDV has relatively less in vitro antiviral activity against genotypes 2a, 2b, 3a, and 6e, with EC50 values of 16 to 530 nM. In vitro resistance selection with LDV identified the single Y93H and Q30E resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the NS5A gene; these RAVs were also observed in patients after a 3-day monotherapy treatment. In vitro antiviral combination studies indicate that LDV has additive to moderately synergistic antiviral activity when combined with other classes of HCV direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents, including NS3/4A protease inhibitors and the nucleotide NS5B polymerase inhibitor SOF. Furthermore, LDV is active against known NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitor RAVs with EC50 values equivalent to those for the wild type. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Persistence of Circulating Hepatitis C Virus Antigens-Specific Immune Complexes in Patients with Resolved HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke-Qin; Cui, Wei

    2018-05-01

    Our recent study indicated the possible presence of detectable hepatitis C virus antigens (HCV-Ags) after denaturation of sera with resolved HCV (R-HCV) infection. The present study determined and characterized persistent HCV-Ags-specific immune complexes (ICs) in these patients. Sixty-eight sera with R-HCV and 34 with viremic HCV (V-HCV) infection were tested for free and IC-bound HCV-Ags using HCV-Ags enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the presence of HCV-Ags-specific ICs by immunoprecipitation and Western blot (IP-WB), HCV ICs containing HCV virions using IP and HCV RNA RT-PCR, and correlation of HCV ICs with clinical presentation in these patients. Using HCV-Ags EIA, we found 57.4% of sera with R-HCV infection were tested positive for bound, but not free HCV-Ags. Using pooled or individual anti-HCV E1/E2, cAg, NS3, NS4b, and/or NS5a to precipitate HCV-specific-Ags, we confirmed persistent HCV-Ags ICs specific to various HCV structural and non-structural proteins not only in V-HCV infection, but also in R-HCV infection. Using IP and HCV RNA PCR, we then confirmed the presence of HCV virions within circulating ICs in V-HCV, but not in R-HCV sera. Multivariable analysis indicated significant and independent associations of persistent circulating HCV-Ags-specific ICs with both age and the presence of cirrhosis in patients with R-HCV infection. Various HCV-Ag-specific ICs, but not virions, persist in 57.4% of patients who had spontaneous or treatment-induced HCV clearance for 6 months to 20 years. These findings enriched our knowledge on HCV pathogenesis and support further study on its long-term clinical relevance, such as extrahepatic manifestation, transfusion medicine, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

  20. Characterization of vaniprevir, a hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibitor, in patients with HCV genotype 1 infection: safety, antiviral activity, resistance, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawitz, Eric; Sulkowski, Mark; Jacobson, Ira; Kraft, Walter K; Maliakkal, Benedict; Al-Ibrahim, Mohamed; Gordon, Stuart C; Kwo, Paul; Rockstroh, Juergen Kurt; Panorchan, Paul; Miller, Michelle; Caro, Luzelena; Barnard, Richard; Hwang, Peggy May; Gress, Jacqueline; Quirk, Erin; Mobashery, Niloufar

    2013-09-01

    Vaniprevir is a competitive inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease that has potent anti-HCV activity in preclinical models. This placebo-controlled dose-ranging study assessed the safety, tolerability, and antiviral efficacy of vaniprevir monotherapy in patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection. Treatment-naive and treatment-experienced non-cirrhotic adult patients with baseline HCV RNA >10(6)IU/ml were randomized to receive placebo or vaniprevir at doses of 125 mg qd, 600 mg qd, 25mg bid, 75 mg bid, 250 mg bid, 500 mg bid, and 700 mg bid for 8 days. Forty patients (82.5% male, 75% genotype 1a) received at least one dose of placebo or vaniprevir. After 1 week of vaniprevir, the decrease in HCV RNA from baseline ranged from 1.8 to 4.6 log₁₀IU/ml across all treatment groups, and there was a greater than dose-proportional increase in vaniprevir exposure at doses above 75 mg bid. The most commonly reported drug-related adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea (n=5) and nausea (n=5). No pattern of laboratory or ECG abnormalities was observed, all AEs resolved during the study, and there were no discontinuations due to AEs. No serious AEs were reported. Resistance-associated amino acid variants were identified at positions R155 and D168 in patients infected with genotype 1a virus. Vaniprevir monotherapy demonstrated potent antiviral activity in patients with chronic genotype 1 HCV infection, and was generally well tolerated with no serious AEs or discontinuations due to AEs. Further development of vaniprevir, including studies in combination with other anti-HCV agents, is ongoing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels remain stable over time in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), while spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA during the persistent infection phase has been documented only rarely among tho...

  2. Differential sensitivity of 5'UTR-NS5A recombinants of hepatitis C virus genotypes 1-6 to protease and NS5A inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Humes, Daryl

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy will benefit from the preclinical evaluation of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in infectious culture systems that test the effects on different virus genotypes. We developed HCV recombinants comprising the 5' untranslated region-NS5A (5-5A...... daclatasvir. The 1a(TN) 5-5A and JFH1-independent full-length viruses had similar levels of sensitivity to the DAA agents, validating the 5-5A recombinants as surrogates for full-length viruses in DAA testing. Compared with the 1a(TN) full-length virus, the 3a(S52) 5-5A recombinant was highly resistant to all...... protease inhibitors, and the 4a(ED43) recombinant was highly resistant to telaprevir and boceprevir, but most sensitive to other protease inhibitors. Compared with other protease inhibitors, MK-5172 had exceptional potency against all HCV genotypes. The NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir had the highest potency...

  3. A retrospective case-control study of hepatitis C virus infection and oral lichen planus in Japan: association study with mutations in the core and NS5A region of hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Japanese patients with oral lichen planus and identify the impact of amino acid (aa) substitutions in the HCV core region and IFN-sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) of nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) associated with lichen planus. Methods In this retrospective study, 59 patients (group 1-A) with oral lichen planus among 226 consecutive patients who visited our hospital and 85 individuals (group 1-B, controls) with normal oral mucosa were investigated for the presence of liver disease and HCV infection. Risk factors for the presence of oral lichen planus were assessed by logistic regression analysis. We compared aa substitutions in the HCV core region (70 and/or 91) and ISDR of NS5A of 12 patients with oral lichen planus (group 2-A) and 7 patients who did not have oral lichen planus (group 2-B) among patients (high viral loads, genotype 1b) who received interferon (IFN) therapy in group1-A. Results The prevalence of anti-HCV and HCV RNA was 67.80% (40/59) and 59.32% (35/59), respectively, in group 1-A and 31.76% (27/85) and 16.47% (14/85), respectively, in group 1-B. The prevalence of anti-HCV (P oral lichen planus. The adjusted odds ratios for these three factors were 6.58, 3.53 and 2.58, respectively, and each was statistically significant. No significant differences in viral factors, such as aa substitutions in the core region and ISDR of NS5A, were detected between the two groups (groups 2-A and -B). Conclusion We observed a high prevalence of HCV infection in patients with oral lichen planus. Longstanding HCV infection, hypoalbuminemia, and smoking were significant risk factors for the presence of oral lichen planus in patients. It is advisable for Japanese patients with lichen planus to be tested for HCV infection during medical examination. PMID:22490000

  4. Quantitation of HCV RNA in liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C Quantificação do RNA-HCV no fígado de pacientes com hepatite C crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de Lôurdes Candolo MARTINELLI

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims - Liver HCV RNA has been quantitated in few studies and the feasibility and the role of this parameter in the evaluation of patients with chronic HCV hepatitis still warrant study. Our aim was to determine the concentrations of HCV RNA in the liver of chronic HCV patients and to correlate the results with serum viral load. We also studied the relation of levels of HCV RNA in the liver with serum aminotransferases levels and with the presence of cirrhosis. Methods - Twenty patients (14 males, aged 28 to 61 years were studied. Twelve were infected by HCV type 1, six by type 3 and one by type 5. Percutaneous liver biopsy samples were obtained from 14 patients, and the remainder from liver explant in patients undergoing OLT. Twelve had chronic hepatitis and eight cirrhosis. HCV RNA levels were determined by bDNA. Results - HCV RNA levels below the detection limit were found in one liver and in five serum samples. HCV RNA (mean ± SD was 2.1 x 10(8 ± 2.2 x 10(8Eq/gm in the liver and 94 x 10(5 ± 93 x 10(5Eq/mL in serum, with a significant correlation between these values (r = 0.89; P Introdução/Objetivos - Poucos estudos avaliam a quantificação do RNA-HCV no fígado, portanto a praticabilidade e a aplicação desse parâmetro na avaliação de pacientes com hepatite C crônica ainda não estão definidas. O objetivo foi determinar as concentrações do RNA-HCV no fígado de pacientes com infecção crônica pelo vírus C da hepatite e correlacionar os resultados com a carga viral do soro. Foram também estudadas a relação dos níveis de RNA-HCV no fígado com os de aminotransferases no soro e com a presença de cirrose. Métodos - Foram estudados 20 pacientes (14 homens, 28 a 61 anos. A genotipagem do vírus da hepatite C revelou: tipo 1 (12 pacientes, tipo 3 (6 pacientes , tipo 5 (1 paciente. Amostras de fígado foram obtidas por via percutânea em 14 pacientes e de explantes de fígado de pacientes submetidos a transplante em

  5. Direct anti-HCV agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingquan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease, NS5B protein (polymerase and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi, simeprevir (Olysio, and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the “cure HCV” goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others.

  6. dsRNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR and its Role in Stress, Signaling and HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane F. Meurs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR plays multiple roles in cells, in response to different stress situations. As a member of the interferon (IFN‑Stimulated Genes, PKR was initially recognized as an actor in the antiviral action of IFN, due to its ability to control translation, through phosphorylation, of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2a. As such, PKR participates in the generation of stress granules, or autophagy and a number of viruses have designed strategies to inhibit its action. However, PKR deficient mice resist most viral infections, indicating that PKR may play other roles in the cell other than just acting as an antiviral agent. Indeed, PKR regulates several signaling pathways, either as an adapter protein and/or using its kinase activity. Here we review the role of PKR as an eIF2a kinase, its participation in the regulation of the NF-kB, p38MAPK and insulin pathways, and we focus on its role during infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. PKR binds the HCV IRES RNA, cooperates with some functions of the HCV core protein and may represent a target for NS5A or E2. Novel data points out for a role of PKR as a pro-HCV agent, both as an adapter protein and as an eIF2a-kinase, and in cooperation with the di-ubiquitin-like protein ISG15. Developing pharmaceutical inhibitors of PKR may help in resolving some viral infections as well as stress-related damages.

  7. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caval, Vincent; Piver, Eric; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Pagès, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. ► In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. ► Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. ► Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. ► Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  8. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caval, Vincent [INSERM U966, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte de Medecine, 10 Bd. Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France); Piver, Eric [INSERM U966, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte de Medecine, 10 Bd. Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France); Service de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire, CHRU de Tours (France); Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc [LaboRetro, ENS-Lyon INSERM, U758, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France); Pages, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.pages@univ-tours.fr [INSERM U966, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte de Medecine, 10 Bd. Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France); Service de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire, CHRU de Tours (France)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  9. Identification of novel small molecule inhibitors against NS2B/NS3 serine protease from Zika virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Ren, Jinhong; Nocadello, Salvatore; Rice, Amy J.; Ojeda, Isabel; Light, Samuel; Minasov, George; Vargas, Jason; Nagarathnam, Dhanapalan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC); (NWU); (Novalex); (DNSK)

    2016-12-26

    Zika flavivirus infection during pregnancy appears to produce higher risk of microcephaly, and also causes multiple neurological problems such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. The Zika virus is now widespread in Central and South America, and is anticipated to become an increasing risk in the southern United States. With continuing global travel and the spread of the mosquito vector, the exposure is expected to accelerate, but there are no currently approved treatments against the Zika virus. The Zika NS2B/NS3 protease is an attractive drug target due to its essential role in viral replication. Our studies have identified several compounds with inhibitory activity (IC50) and binding affinity (KD) of ~5–10 μM against the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease from testing 71 HCV NS3/NS4A inhibitors that were initially discovered by high-throughput screening of 40,967 compounds. Competition surface plasmon resonance studies and mechanism of inhibition analyses by enzyme kinetics subsequently determined the best compound to be a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.5 μM. We also determined the X-ray structure of the Zika NS2B-NS3 protease in a “pre-open conformation”, a conformation never observed before for any flavivirus proteases. This provides the foundation for new structure-based inhibitor design.

  10. Performance of the new Bayer VERSANT HCV RNA 3.0 assay for quantitation of hepatitis C virus RNA in plasma and serum: Conversion to international units and comparison with the Roche COBAS amplicor HCV monitor, version 2.0, assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, Marcel; Sentjens, Roel; Rebers, Sjoerd; Weegink, Christine; Weel, Jan; Sol, Cees; Boom, René

    2002-01-01

    We have evaluated the VERSANT HCV RNA 3.0. Assay (HCV 3.0 bDNA assay) (Bayer Diagnostics, Berkeley, Calif.), which is an improved signal amplification procedure for the HCV 2.0 bDNA assay for the quantitation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum or plasma of HCV-infected individuals. The HCV 3.0

  11. Viral replication. Structural basis for RNA replication by the hepatitis C virus polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Todd C; Perry, Jason K; Murakami, Eisuke; Barauskas, Ona; Feng, Joy; Cho, Aesop; Fox, David; Wetmore, Diana R; McGrath, Mary E; Ray, Adrian S; Sofia, Michael J; Swaminathan, S; Edwards, Thomas E

    2015-02-13

    Nucleotide analog inhibitors have shown clinical success in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, despite an incomplete mechanistic understanding of NS5B, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Here we study the details of HCV RNA replication by determining crystal structures of stalled polymerase ternary complexes with enzymes, RNA templates, RNA primers, incoming nucleotides, and catalytic metal ions during both primed initiation and elongation of RNA synthesis. Our analysis revealed that highly conserved active-site residues in NS5B position the primer for in-line attack on the incoming nucleotide. A β loop and a C-terminal membrane-anchoring linker occlude the active-site cavity in the apo state, retract in the primed initiation assembly to enforce replication of the HCV genome from the 3' terminus, and vacate the active-site cavity during elongation. We investigated the incorporation of nucleotide analog inhibitors, including the clinically active metabolite formed by sofosbuvir, to elucidate key molecular interactions in the active site. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. NS5A resistance-associated substitutions in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus: Prevalence and effect on treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuzem, Stefan; Mizokami, Masashi; Pianko, Stephen; Mangia, Alessandra; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Martin, Ross; Svarovskaia, Evguenia; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Doehle, Brian; Hedskog, Charlotte; Yun, Chohee; Brainard, Diana M; Knox, Steven; McHutchison, John G; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei; Chuang, Wan-Long; Jacobson, Ira; Dore, Gregory J; Sulkowski, Mark

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of NS5A inhibitors for the treatment of patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be affected by the presence of NS5A resistance-associated substitutions (RASs). We analyzed data from 35 phase I, II, and III studies in 22 countries to determine the pretreatment prevalence of various NS5A RASs, and their effect on outcomes of treatment with ledipasvir-sofosbuvir in patients with genotype 1 HCV. NS5A gene deep sequencing analysis was performed on samples from 5397 patients in Gilead clinical trials. The effect of baseline RASs on sustained virologic response (SVR) rates was assessed in the 1765 patients treated with regimens containing ledipasvir-sofosbuvir. Using a 15% cut-off, pretreatment NS5A and ledipasvir-specific RASs were detected in 13% and 8% of genotype 1a patients, respectively, and in 18% and 16% of patients with genotype 1b. Among genotype 1a treatment-naïve patients, SVR rates were 91% (42/46) vs. 99% (539/546) for those with and without ledipasvir-specific RASs, respectively. Among treatment-experienced genotype 1a patients, SVR rates were 76% (22/29) vs. 97% (409/420) for those with and without ledipasvir-specific RASs, respectively. Among treatment-naïve genotype 1b patients, SVR rates were 99% for both those with and without ledipasvir-specific RASs (71/72 vs. 331/334), and among treatment-experienced genotype 1b patients, SVR rates were 89% (41/46) vs. 98% (267/272) for those with and without ledipasvir-specific RASs, respectively. Pretreatment ledipasvir-specific RASs that were present in 8-16% of patients have an impact on treatment outcome in some patient groups, particularly treatment-experienced patients with genotype 1a HCV. The efficacy of treatments using NS5A inhibitors for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can be affected by the presence of NS5A resistance-associated substitutions (RASs). We reviewed results from 35 clinical trials where patients with genotype 1 HCV infection

  13. Humanized-VHH Transbodies that Inhibit HCV Protease and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasak Jittavisutthikul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for safe and broadly effective anti-HCV agents that can cope with genetic multiplicity and mutations of the virus. In this study, humanized-camel VHHs to genotype 3a HCV serine protease were produced and were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, penetratin (PEN. Human hepatic (Huh7 cells transfected with the JFH-1 RNA of HCV genotype 2a and treated with the cell penetrable nanobodies (transbodies had a marked reduction of the HCV RNA intracellularly and in their culture fluids, less HCV foci inside the cells and less amounts of HCV core antigen in culture supernatants compared with the infected cells cultured in the medium alone. The PEN-VHH-treated-transfected cells also had up-regulation of the genes coding for the host innate immune response (TRIF, TRAF3, IRF3, IL-28B and IFN-β, indicating that the cell penetrable nanobodies rescued the host innate immune response from the HCV mediated-suppression. Computerized intermolecular docking revealed that the VHHs bound to residues of the protease catalytic triad, oxyanion loop and/or the NS3 N-terminal portion important for non-covalent binding of the NS4A protease cofactor protein. The so-produced transbodies have high potential for testing further as a candidate for safe, broadly effective and virus mutation tolerable anti-HCV agents.

  14. Preclinical Characterization and Human Microdose Pharmacokinetics of ITMN-8187, a Nonmacrocyclic Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Ravi; Pan, Lin; Schaefer, Caralee; Nicholas, John; Lim, Sharlene; Misialek, Shawn; Stevens, Sarah; Hooi, Lisa; Aleskovski, Natalia; Ruhrmund, Donald; Kossen, Karl; Huang, Lea; Yap, Sophia; Beigelman, Leonid; Serebryany, Vladimir; Liu, Jyanwei; Sastry, Srikonda; Seiwert, Scott; Buckman, Brad

    2017-01-01

    The current paradigm for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection involves combinations of agents that act directly on steps of the HCV life cycle. Here we report the preclinical characteristics of ITMN-8187, a nonmacrocyclic inhibitor of the NS3/4A HCV protease. X-ray crystallographic studies of ITMN-8187 and simeprevir binding to NS3/4A protease demonstrated good agreement between structures. Low nanomolar biochemical potency was maintained against NS3/4A derived from HCV genotypes 1, 2b, 4, 5, and 6. In cell-based potency assays, half-maximal reduction of genotype 1a and 1b HCV replicon RNA was afforded by 11 and 4 nM doses of ITMN-8187, respectively. Combinations of ITMN-8187 with other directly acting antiviral agents in vitro displayed additive antiviral efficacy. A 30-mg/kg of body weight dose of ITMN-8187 administered for 4 days yielded significant viral load reductions through day 5 in a chimeric mouse model of HCV. A 3-mg/kg oral dose administered to rats, dogs, or monkeys yielded concentrations in plasma 16 h after dosing that exceeded the half-maximal effective concentration of ITMN-8187. Human microdose pharmacokinetics showed low intersubject variability and prolonged oral absorption with first-order elimination kinetics compatible with once-daily dosing. These preclinical characteristics compare favorably with those of other NS3/4A inhibitors approved for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Nonstructural protein 5A is incorporated into hepatitis C virus low-density particle through interaction with core protein and microtubules during intracellular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Kuen Lai

    Full Text Available Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A of hepatitis C virus (HCV serves dual functions in viral RNA replication and virus assembly. Here, we demonstrate that HCV replication complex along with NS5A and Core protein was transported to the lipid droplet (LD through microtubules, and NS5A-Core complexes were then transported from LD through early-to-late endosomes to the plasma membrane via microtubules. Further studies by cofractionation analysis and immunoelectron microscopy of the released particles showed that NS5A-Core complexes, but not NS4B, were present in the low-density fractions, but not in the high-density fractions, of the HCV RNA-containing virions and associated with the internal virion core. Furthermore, exosomal markers CD63 and CD81 were also detected in the low-density fractions, but not in the high-density fractions. Overall, our results suggest that HCV NS5A is associated with the core of the low-density virus particles which exit the cell through a preexisting endosome/exosome pathway and may contribute to HCV natural infection.

  16. [Determination of drug resistance mutations of NS3 inhibitors in chronic hepatitis C patients infected with genotype 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şanlıdağ, Tamer; Sayan, Murat; Akçalı, Sinem; Kasap, Elmas; Buran, Tahir; Arıkan, Ayşe

    2017-04-01

    Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) such as NS3 protease inhibitors is the first class of drugs used for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) treatment. NS3 inhibitors (PI) with low genetic barrier have been approved to be used in the CHC genotype 1 infections, and in the treatment of compensated liver disease including cirrhosis together with pegile interferon and ribavirin. Consequently, the development of drug resistance during DAA treatment of CHC is a major problem. NS3 resistant variants can be detected before treatment as they can occurnaturally. The aim of this study was to investigate new and old generation NS3 inhibitors resistance mutations before DAA treatment in hepatitis C virus (HCV) that were isolated from CHC. The present study was conducted in 2015 and included 97 naive DAA patients infected with HCV genotype 1, who were diagnosed in Manisa and Kocaeli cities of Turkey. Magnetic particle based HCV RNA extraction and than RNA detection and quantification were performed using commercial real-time PCR assay QIASypmhony + Rotorgene Q/ArtusHCV QS-RGQ and COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Tests. HCV NS3 viral protease genome region was amplified with PCR and mutation analysis was performed by Sanger dideoxy sequencing technique of NS3 protease codons (codon 32-185). HCV NS3 protease inhibitors; asunaprevir, boceprevir, faldaprevir, grazoprevir, pariteprevir, simeprevir and telaprevir were analysed for resistant mutations by Geno2pheno-HCV resistance tool. HCV was genotyped in all patients and 88 patients (n= 88/97, 91%) had genotype 1. Eight (n= 8/97, 8.2%) and 80 (n= 80/97, 82.4%) HCC patients were subgenotyped as 1a and 1b, respectively. Many aminoacid substitutions and resistance mutations were determined in 39/88 (44%) patients in the study group. Q80L, S122C/N, S138W were defined as potential substitutions (6/88 patients; 7%); R109K, R117C, S122G, I132V, I170V, N174S were described as potential resistance (34/88 patients; 39%); V36L, T54S, V55A, Q80H were

  17. Performance comparison of new generation HCV core antigen test versus HCV RNA test in management of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetiner, Salih; Çetin Duran, Alev; Kibar, Filiz; Yaman, Akgün

    2017-06-01

    The study has evaluated the performance of HCV core antigen (Cag) test by comparing HCV RNA PCR assay which is considered the gold standard for management of HCV infection. Totally, 132 samples sent for HCV RNA (real-time PCR) test were included in the study. Anti-HCV antibody test and HCV Cag test were performed by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CMEI). Anti-HCV test was positive in all samples. HCV RNA was detected in 112/132 (84.8%) samples, and HCV Cag in 105/132 (79.5%). The most common HCV genotype was genotype 1 (86%). Considering the HCV RNA test as gold standard; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of Cag test were found to be 93.75%, 100%, 100%, 74.07% and 94.69%, respectively, and paired test results were detected as highly concordant. A high level of correlation was seen between HCV RNA and Cag tests, however, the concordance between the two tests appeared to be disrupted at viral loads lower than 10 3 IU/mL. On the contrary, the correlation reached significance for the values higher than 10 3 IU/mL. Viral loads were in the 17-2500IU/mL range for the negative results for Cag test. Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed a considerably high correlation. The concordance between HCV RNA and Cag tests was disrupted under a viral load lower than 10 3 IU/mL. Therefore, it would be appropriate to consider cost effectiveness, advantages and limitations of the HCV RNA and Cag tests during the decision on which method to use for patient management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Model to Understand Viral Polymerase Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Sesmero

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral polymerases replicate and transcribe the genomes of several viruses of global health concern such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and Ebola virus. For this reason they are key targets for therapies to treat viral infections. Although there is little sequence similarity across the different types of viral polymerases, all of them present a right-hand shape and certain structural motifs that are highly conserved. These features allow their functional properties to be compared, with the goal of broadly applying the knowledge acquired from studying specific viral polymerases to other viral polymerases about which less is known. Here we review the structural and functional properties of the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B in order to understand the fundamental processes underlying the replication of viral genomes. We discuss recent insights into the process by which RNA replication occurs in NS5B as well as the role that conformational changes play in this process.

  19. Cloning and expression of NS3 helicase fragment of hepatitis C virus and the study of its immunoreactivity in HCV infected patients

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    Mahrou Sadri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Hepatitis C is a major cause of liver failure worldwide. Current therapies applied for this disease are not fully effective and produce side effects in most cases. Non-structural protein 3 helicase (NS3 of HCV is one of the key enzymes in viral replication and infection. Therefore, this region is a promising target to design new drugs and therapies against HCV infection. The aim of this study was cloning and expression of HCV NS3 helicase fragment in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 using pET102/D-TOPO expression vector and studying immunoreactivity of the expressed antigen in Iranian infected with hepatitis C. Materials and Methods: The viral RNA was extracted from the serum of HCV infected patient. The NS3 helicase region was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR product was directionally cloned into the expression vector pET102/D-TOPO and transformed into the BL21 strain of E. coli (DE3. The transformed bacteria were then induced by adding 1mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG into the culture medium to enhance the protein expression. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were carried out to identify the protein under investigation, and finally purified recombinant fusion protein was used as the antigen for ELISA method. Results: Theinsertion of theDNA fragment of the NS3 regioninto the expression vectorwas further confirmed by PCR and sequencing. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the successful expression of the recombinant protein of interest. Furthermore, immunoreactivity of fusion NS3 helicase was confirmed by ELISA and western blotting. Conclusion: It seems that this recombinant protein could be a useful source of antigen for future studies on HCV diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Hepatitis C virus expressing reporter tagged NS5A protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C reporter viruses containing Core through NS2 of prototype isolates of all major HCV genotypes and the remaining genes of isolate JFH1, by insertion of reporter genes in domain III of HCV NS5A were developed. A deletion upstream of the inserted reporter gene sequence conferred favorable...... growth kinetics in Huh7.5 cells to these viruses. These reporter viruses can be used for high throughput analysis of drug and vaccine candidates as well as patient samples. JFH1-based intergenotypic recombinants with genotype specific homotypic 5'UTR, or heterotypic 5'UTR (either of genotype 1a (strain H...

  1. Terminal structures of West Nile virus genomic RNA and their interactions with viral NS5 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hongping; Zhang Bo; Shi Peiyong

    2008-01-01

    Genome cyclization is essential for flavivirus replication. We used RNases to probe the structures formed by the 5'-terminal 190 nucleotides and the 3'-terminal 111 nucleotides of the West Nile virus (WNV) genomic RNA. When analyzed individually, the two RNAs adopt stem-loop structures as predicted by the thermodynamic-folding program. However, when mixed together, the two RNAs form a duplex that is mediated through base-pairings of two sets of RNA elements (5'CS/3'CSI and 5'UAR/3'UAR). Formation of the RNA duplex facilitates a conformational change that leaves the 3'-terminal nucleotides of the genome (position - 8 to - 16) to be single-stranded. Viral NS5 binds specifically to the 5'-terminal stem-loop (SL1) of the genomic RNA. The 5'SL1 RNA structure is essential for WNV replication. The study has provided further evidence to suggest that flavivirus genome cyclization and NS5/5'SL1 RNA interaction facilitate NS5 binding to the 3' end of the genome for the initiation of viral minus-strand RNA synthesis

  2. HCV-induced autophagosomes are generated via homotypic fusion of phagophores that mediate HCV RNA replication.

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    Linya Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces autophagy to promote its replication, including its RNA replication, which can take place on double-membrane vesicles known as autophagosomes. However, how HCV induces the biogenesis of autophagosomes and how HCV RNA replication complex may be assembled on autophagosomes were largely unknown. During autophagy, crescent membrane structures known as phagophores first appear in the cytoplasm, which then progress to become autophagosomes. By conducting electron microscopy and in vitro membrane fusion assay, we found that phagophores induced by HCV underwent homotypic fusion to generate autophagosomes in a process dependent on the SNARE protein syntaxin 7 (STX7. Further analyses by live-cell imaging and fluorescence microscopy indicated that HCV-induced phagophores originated from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Interestingly, comparing with autophagy induced by nutrient starvation, the progression of phagophores to autophagosomes induced by HCV took significantly longer time, indicating fundamental differences in the biogenesis of autophagosomes induced by these two different stimuli. As the knockdown of STX7 to inhibit the formation of autophagosomes did not affect HCV RNA replication, and purified phagophores could mediate HCV RNA replication, the assembly of the HCV RNA replication complex on autophagosomes apparently took place during the formative stage of phagophores. These findings provided important information for understanding how HCV controlled and modified this important cellular pathway for its own replication.

  3. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of hepatitis C virus binds to its coding region RNA stem-loop structure, 5BSL3.2, and its negative strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Hiroshi; Yuhashi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2010-05-01

    The hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a key enzyme involved in viral replication. Interaction between NS5B RdRp and the viral RNA sequence is likely to be an important step in viral RNA replication. The C-terminal half of the NS5B-coding sequence, which contains the important cis-acting replication element, has been identified as an NS5B-binding sequence. In the present study, we confirm the specific binding of NS5B to one of the RNA stem-loop structures in the region, 5BSL3.2. In addition, we show that NS5B binds to the complementary strand of 5BSL3.2 (5BSL3.2N). The bulge structure of 5BSL3.2N was shown to be indispensable for tight binding to NS5B. In vitro RdRp activity was inhibited by 5BSL3.2N, indicating the importance of the RNA element in the polymerization by RdRp. These results suggest the involvement of the RNA stem-loop structure of the negative strand in the replication process.

  4. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bagaglio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4% in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2% in 1a isolates, p = 0.040. Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1% G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5% harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001. Finally, 28 (2.3% G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001. In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs.

  5. Prevalence of polymorphisms with significant resistance to NS5A inhibitors in treatment-naive patients with hepatitis C virus genotypes 1a and 3a in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Ida; Kjellin, Midori; Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Bondeson, Kåre; Wesslén, Lars; Lannergard, Anders; Lennerstrand, Johan

    2015-08-01

    The future treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will be combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) that not only target multiple viral targets, but are also effective against different HCV genotypes. Of the many drug targets in HCV, one promising target is the non-structural 5A protein (NS5A), against which inhibitors, namely daclatasvir, ledipasvir and ombitasvir, have shown potent efficacy. However, since HCV is known to have very high sequence diversity, development of resistance is a problem against but not limited to NS5A inhibitors (i.e. resistance also found against NS3-protease and NS5B non-nucleoside inhibitors), when used in suboptimal combinations. Furthermore, it has been shown that natural resistance against DAAs is present in treatment-naïve patients and such baseline resistance will potentially complicate future treatment strategies. A pan-genotypic population-sequencing method with degenerated primers targeting the NS5A region was developed. We have investigated the prevalence of baseline resistant variants in 127 treatment-naïve patients of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2b and 3a. The method could successfully sequence more than 95% of genotype 1a, 1b and 3a samples. Interpretation of fold resistance data against the NS5A inhibitors was done with the help of earlier published phenotypic data. Baseline resistance variants associated with high resistance (1000-50,000-fold) was found in three patients: Q30H or Y93N in genotype 1a patients and further Y93H in a genotype 3a patient. Using this method, baseline resistance can be examined and the data could have a potential role in selecting the optimal and cost-efficient treatment for the patient.

  6. Baseline NS5A resistance associated substitutions may impair DAA response in real-world hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Itzíar; Arias, Ana; Benítez-Gutiérrez, Laura; Lledó, Gemma; Requena, Silvia; Cuesta, Miriam; Cuervas-Mons, Valentín; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2018-03-01

    Oral DAA have demonstrated high efficacy as treatment of hepatitis C. However, the presence of resistance-associated substitutions (RAS) at baseline has occasionally been associated with impaired treatment response. Herein, we examined the impact of baseline RAS at the HCV NS5A gene region on treatment response in a real-life setting. All hepatitis C patients treated with DAA including NS5A inhibitors at our institution were retrospectively examined. The virus NS5A gene was analyzed using population sequencing at baseline and after 24 weeks of completing therapy in all patients that failed. All changes recorded at positions 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 58, 62, 92, and 93 were considered. A total of 166 patients were analyzed. HCV genotypes were as follows: G1a (31.9%), G1b (48.2%), G3 (10.2%), and G4 (9.6%). Overall, 69 (41.6%) patients were coinfected with HIV and 46.7% had advanced liver fibrosis (Metavir F3-F4). Sixty (36.1%) patients had at least one RAS at baseline, including M28A/G/T (5), Q30X (12), L31I/F/M/V (6), T58P/S (25), Q/E62D (1), A92 K (7), and Y93C/H (15). Overall, 4.8% had two or more RAS, being more frequent in G4 (12.5%) followed by G1b (6.3%) and G1a (1.9%). Of 10 (6%) patients that failed DAA therapy, five had baseline NS5A RAS. No association was found for specific baseline RAS, although changes at position 30 were more frequent in failures than cures (22.2% vs 6.4%, P = 0.074). Moreover, the presence of two or more RAS at baseline was more frequent in failures (HR: 7.2; P = 0.029). Upon failure, six patients showed emerging RAS, including Q30C/H/R (3), L31M (1), and Y93C/H (2). Baseline NS5A RAS are frequently seen in DAA-naïve HCV patients. Two or more baseline NS5A RAS were found in nearly 5% and were significantly associated to DAA failure. Therefore, baseline NS5A testing should be considered when HCV treatment is planned with NS5A inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Efficient infectious cell culture systems of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) prototype strains HCV-1 and H77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Mikkelsen, Lotte; Bukh, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The first discovered and sequenced hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and the first in vivo infectious HCV clones originated from the HCV prototype strains HCV-1 and H77, respectively, both widely used in research of this important human pathogen. In the present study, we developed efficient infectious cell culture systems for these genotype 1a strains by using the HCV-1/SF9_A and H77C in vivo infectious clones. We initially adapted a genome with the HCV-1 5'UTR-NS5A (where UTR stands for untranslated region) and the JFH1 NS5B-3'UTR (5-5A recombinant), including the genotype 2a-derived mutations F1464L/A1672S/D2979G (LSG), to grow efficiently in Huh7.5 cells, thus identifying the E2 mutation S399F. The combination of LSG/S399F and reported TNcc(1a)-adaptive mutations A1226G/Q1773H/N1927T/Y2981F/F2994S promoted adaptation of the full-length HCV-1 clone. An HCV-1 recombinant with 17 mutations (HCV1cc) replicated efficiently in Huh7.5 cells and produced supernatant infectivity titers of 10(4.0) focus-forming units (FFU)/ml. Eight of these mutations were identified from passaged HCV-1 viruses, and the A970T/I1312V/C2419R/A2919T mutations were essential for infectious particle production. Using CD81-deficient Huh7 cells, we further demonstrated the importance of A970T/I1312V/A2919T or A970T/C2419R/A2919T for virus assembly and that the I1312V/C2419R combination played a major role in virus release. Using a similar approach, we found that NS5B mutation F2994R, identified here from culture-adapted full-length TN viruses and a common NS3 helicase mutation (S1368P) derived from viable H77C and HCV-1 5-5A recombinants, initiated replication and culture adaptation of H77C containing LSG and TNcc(1a)-adaptive mutations. An H77C recombinant harboring 19 mutations (H77Ccc) replicated and spread efficiently after transfection and subsequent infection of naive Huh7.5 cells, reaching titers of 10(3.5) and 10(4.4) FFU/ml, respectively. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered in 1989 with

  8. Structure-Based Mutational Analysis of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chun-Ling; Pan, Wen-Ching; Liaw, Shwu-Huey; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Hwang, Lih-Hwa; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2001-01-01

    The carboxyl terminus of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) possesses ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity. Based on the conserved sequence motifs and the crystal structures of the helicase domain, 17 mutants of the HCV NS3 helicase were generated. The ATP hydrolysis, RNA binding, and RNA unwinding activities of the mutant proteins were examined in vitro to determine the functional role of the mutated residues. The data revealed that Lys-210 in the Walker A motif and Asp-290, Glu-291, and His-293 in the Walker B motif were crucial to ATPase activity and that Thr-322 and Thr-324 in motif III and Arg-461 in motif VI significantly influenced ATPase activity. When the pairing between His-293 and Gln-460, referred to as gatekeepers, was replaced with the Asp-293/His-460 pair, which makes the NS3 helicase more like the DEAD helicase subgroup, ATPase activity was not restored. It thus indicated that the whole microenvironment surrounding the gatekeepers, rather than the residues per se, was important to the enzymatic activities. Arg-461 and Trp-501 are important residues for RNA binding, while Val-432 may only play a coadjutant role. The data demonstrated that RNA helicase activity was possibly abolished by the loss of ATPase activity or by reduced RNA binding activity. Nevertheless, a low threshold level of ATPase activity was found sufficient for helicase activity. Results in this study provide a valuable reference for efforts under way to develop anti-HCV therapeutic drugs targeting NS3. PMID:11483774

  9. Characterization of the expression and immunogenicity of the ns4b protein of human coronavirus 229E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chagnon, F; Lamarre, A; Lachance, C

    1998-01-01

    to demonstrate the expression of ns4b in HCV-229E-infected cells using flow cytometry. Given a previously reported contiguous five amino acid shared region between ns4b and myelin basic protein, a purified recombinant histidine-tagged ns4b protein and (or) human myelin basic protein were injected into mice......Sequencing of complementary DNAs prepared from various coronaviruses has revealed open reading frames encoding putative proteins that are yet to be characterized and are so far only described as nonstructural (ns). As a first step in the elucidation of its function, we characterized the expression...... and immunogenicity of the ns4b gene product from strain 229E of human coronavirus (HCV-229E), a respiratory virus with a neurotropic potential. The gene was cloned and expressed in bacteria. A fusion protein of ns4b with maltose-binding protein was injected into rabbits to generate specific antibodies that were used...

  10. Engineered toxins "zymoxins" are activated by the HCV NS3 protease by removal of an inhibitory protein domain.

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    Assaf Shapira

    Full Text Available The synthesis of inactive enzyme precursors, also known as "zymogens," serves as a mechanism for regulating the execution of selected catalytic activities in a desirable time and/or site. Zymogens are usually activated by proteolytic cleavage. Many viruses encode proteases that execute key proteolytic steps of the viral life cycle. Here, we describe a proof of concept for a therapeutic approach to fighting viral infections through eradication of virally infected cells exclusively, thus limiting virus production and spread. Using the hepatitis C virus (HCV as a model, we designed two HCV NS3 protease-activated "zymogenized" chimeric toxins (which we denote "zymoxins". In these recombinant constructs, the bacterial and plant toxins diphtheria toxin A (DTA and Ricin A chain (RTA, respectively, were fused to rationally designed inhibitor peptides/domains via an HCV NS3 protease-cleavable linker. The above toxins were then fused to the binding and translocation domains of Pseudomonas exotoxin A in order to enable translocation into the mammalian cells cytoplasm. We show that these toxins exhibit NS3 cleavage dependent increase in enzymatic activity upon NS3 protease cleavage in vitro. Moreover, a higher level of cytotoxicity was observed when zymoxins were applied to NS3 expressing cells or to HCV infected cells, demonstrating a potential therapeutic window. The increase in toxin activity correlated with NS3 protease activity in the treated cells, thus the therapeutic window was larger in cells expressing recombinant NS3 than in HCV infected cells. This suggests that the "zymoxin" approach may be most appropriate for application to life-threatening acute infections where much higher levels of the activating protease would be expected.

  11. Low prevalence of HCV infection with predominance of genotype 4 among HIV patients living in Libreville, Gabon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Ndjoyi-Mbiguino

    Full Text Available Gabon is an endemic area for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV and the risk of co-infection is high.Between November 2015 and April 2016, we conducted retrospective study on HCV infection among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA. A total of 491 PLHA were included in this study and tested for the presence of HCV infection. HIV viral loads were obtained using the Generic HIV viral Load® assay and the CD4+ T cells count was performed using BD FACSCount™ CD4 reagents. HCV screening was performed using the MP Diagnostics HCV ELISA 4.0 kit. HCV genotypes were determined by sequence analysis of NS5B and Core regions. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the groups. Chi-2 test and Fisher's Exact Test were used to compare prevalence.HCV seroprevalence was 2.9% (14/491, (95% confidence interval (CI:1.4-4.3%. The percentage of HCV viremic patients, defined by the detection of HCV RNA in plasma, was 57% (8/14, representing 1.6% of the total population. HCV seroprevalence and replicative infection were not statistically differ with gender. The percentage of co-infection increased with age. No correlation with CD4+ T cells count and HIV viral load level was registered in this study. Identified HCV strains were predominantly of genotype 4 (87.5% including 4k, 4e, 4g, 4p, 4f and 4c subtypes. Only one strain belonged to genotype 2 (subtype 2q. Analysis of the NS5B region did not reveal the presence of resistance-associated substitutions for sofosbuvir.A systematic screening of hepatitis C is therefore strongly recommended as well as genotyping of HCV strains in order to adapt treatments for the specific case of people living with HIV/AIDS in Central Africa.

  12. Comparison of a newly developed automated and quantitative hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen test with the HCV RNA assay for clinical usefulness in confirming anti-HCV results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesli, Recep; Polat, Hakki; Terzi, Yuksel; Kurtoglu, Muhammet Guzel; Uyar, Yavuz

    2011-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health care problem. Diagnosis of HCV infection is mainly based on the detection of anti-HCV antibodies as a screening test with serum samples. Recombinant immunoblot assays are used as supplemental tests and for the final detection and quantification of HCV RNA in confirmatory tests. In this study, we aimed to compare the HCV core antigen test with the HCV RNA assay for confirming anti-HCV results to determine whether the HCV core antigen test may be used as an alternative confirmatory test to the HCV RNA test and to assess the diagnostic values of the total HCV core antigen test by determining the diagnostic specificity and sensitivity rates compared with the HCV RNA test. Sera from a total of 212 treatment-naive patients were analyzed for anti-HCV and HCV core antigen both with the Abbott Architect test and with the molecular HCV RNA assay consisting of a reverse transcription-PCR method as a confirmatory test. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the HCV core antigen assay compared to the HCV RNA test were 96.3%, 100%, 100%, and 89.7%, respectively. The levels of HCV core antigen showed a good correlation with those from the HCV RNA quantification (r = 0.907). In conclusion, the Architect HCV antigen assay is highly specific, sensitive, reliable, easy to perform, reproducible, cost-effective, and applicable as a screening, supplemental, and preconfirmatory test for anti-HCV assays used in laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

  13. An oligonucleotide complementary to the SL-B1 domain in the 3'-end of the minus-strand RNA of the hepatitis C virus inhibits in vitro initiation of RNA synthesis by the viral polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigadas, Sandrine; Ventura, Michel; Andreola, Marie-Line; Michel, Justine; Gryaznov, Sergei; Tarrago-Litvak, Laura; Litvak, Simon; Astier-Gin, Therese

    2003-01-01

    We describe oligonucleotides (ODNs) that inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in vitro. From a series of 13 ODNs complementary to the 3'-end of the minus-strand HCV RNA, only 4 inhibited RNA synthesis with IC 50 values lower than 1 μM. The inhibition was sequence-specific, since no effect was observed when the ODNs were used with a noncomplementary template. The introduction of a 2'-O-methyl modification increased the inhibitor activity 11-fold (IC 50 = 50 nM) in just 1 (ODN7) of the 4 inhibitory ODNs. ODNs did not inhibit RNA synthesis by interfering with the elongation process as no short RNAs products were detected. We also show that ODN7 did not prevent binding of NS5B to the template or cause polymerase trapping by the duplex RNA/ODN. Our data demonstrate that ODN7 inhibits the initiation process, most probably by modifying structural features present at the 3'-end of the minus-strand RNA

  14. Hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 subtype identification in new HCV drug development and future clinical practice.

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    Stéphane Chevaliez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the development of new specific inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV enzymes and functions that may yield different antiviral responses and resistance profiles according to the HCV subtype, correct HCV genotype 1 subtype identification is mandatory in clinical trials for stratification and interpretation purposes and will likely become necessary in future clinical practice. The goal of this study was to identify the appropriate molecular tool(s for accurate HCV genotype 1 subtype determination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large cohort of 500 treatment-naïve patients eligible for HCV drug trials and infected with either subtype 1a or 1b was studied. Methods based on the sole analysis of the 5' non-coding region (5'NCR by sequence analysis or reverse hybridization failed to correctly identify HCV subtype 1a in 22.8%-29.5% of cases, and HCV subtype 1b in 9.5%-8.7% of cases. Natural polymorphisms at positions 107, 204 and/or 243 were responsible for mis-subtyping with these methods. A real-time PCR method using genotype- and subtype-specific primers and probes located in both the 5'NCR and the NS5B-coding region failed to correctly identify HCV genotype 1 subtype in approximately 10% of cases. The second-generation line probe assay, a reverse hybridization assay that uses probes targeting both the 5'NCR and core-coding region, correctly identified HCV subtypes 1a and 1b in more than 99% of cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the context of new HCV drug development, HCV genotyping methods based on the exclusive analysis of the 5'NCR should be avoided. The second-generation line probe assay is currently the best commercial assay for determination of HCV genotype 1 subtypes 1a and 1b in clinical trials and practice.

  15. Engineered Toxins “Zymoxins” Are Activated by the HCV NS3 Protease by Removal of an Inhibitory Protein Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Assaf; Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Nahary, Limor; Litvak-Greenfeld, Dana; Zemel, Romy; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Benhar, Itai

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of inactive enzyme precursors, also known as “zymogens,” serves as a mechanism for regulating the execution of selected catalytic activities in a desirable time and/or site. Zymogens are usually activated by proteolytic cleavage. Many viruses encode proteases that execute key proteolytic steps of the viral life cycle. Here, we describe a proof of concept for a therapeutic approach to fighting viral infections through eradication of virally infected cells exclusively, thus limiting virus production and spread. Using the hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a model, we designed two HCV NS3 protease-activated “zymogenized” chimeric toxins (which we denote “zymoxins”). In these recombinant constructs, the bacterial and plant toxins diphtheria toxin A (DTA) and Ricin A chain (RTA), respectively, were fused to rationally designed inhibitor peptides/domains via an HCV NS3 protease-cleavable linker. The above toxins were then fused to the binding and translocation domains of Pseudomonas exotoxin A in order to enable translocation into the mammalian cells cytoplasm. We show that these toxins exhibit NS3 cleavage dependent increase in enzymatic activity upon NS3 protease cleavage in vitro. Moreover, a higher level of cytotoxicity was observed when zymoxins were applied to NS3 expressing cells or to HCV infected cells, demonstrating a potential therapeutic window. The increase in toxin activity correlated with NS3 protease activity in the treated cells, thus the therapeutic window was larger in cells expressing recombinant NS3 than in HCV infected cells. This suggests that the “zymoxin” approach may be most appropriate for application to life-threatening acute infections where much higher levels of the activating protease would be expected. PMID:21264238

  16. H1-A, a compound isolated from Fusarium oxysporum inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 serine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yan-Gang; Zhu, Bao-Quan

    2016-04-01

    The present study was aimed to isolate the active compounds from the fermentation products of Fusarium oxysporum, which had hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitory activity. A bioactive compound was isolated by reverse-phase silica-gel column chromatography, silica-gel column chromatography, semi-preparative reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and then its molecular structure was elucidated based on the spectrosopic analysis. As a result, the compound (H1-A, 1) Ergosta-5, 8 (14), 22-trien-7-one, 3-hydroxy-,(3β, 22E) was isolated and identified. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report on the isolation of H1-A from microorganisms with the inhibitory activity of NS3 protease. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of liposome encapsulated HVR1 and NS3 regions of genotype 3 HCV, either singly or in combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupte Gouri M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus displays a high rate of mutation and exists as a quasispecies in infected patients. In the absence of an effective universal vaccine, genotype-specific vaccine development represents an alternative. We have attempted to develop a genotype 3 based, liposome encapsulated HCV vaccine with hypervariable region-1 (HVR1 and non-structural region-3 (NS3 components. Results HCV RNA extracted from serum samples of 49 chronically infected patients was PCR amplified to obtain HVR1 region. These amplified products were cloned to obtain 20 clones per sample in order to identify the quasispecies pattern. The HVR1 consensus sequence, along with three variants was reverse transcribed to obtain peptides. The peptides were checked for immunoreactivity individually, as a pool or as a single peptide tetramer interspersed with four glycine residues. Anti-HCV positivity varied from 42.6% (tetramer to 92.2% (variant-4 when 115 anti-HCV positive sera representing genotypes 1, 3, 4 and 6 were screened. All the 95 anti-HCV negatives were scored negative by all antigens. Mice were immunized with different liposome encapsulated or Al(OH3 adjuvanted formulations of HVR1 variants and recombinant NS3 protein, and monitored for anti-HVR1 and anti-NS3 antibody titres, IgG isotypes and antigen specific cytokine levels. A balanced Th1/Th2 isotyping response with high antibody titres was observed in most of the liposome encapsulated antigen groups. The effect of liposomes and aluminium hydroxide on the expression of immune response genes was studied using Taqman Low Density Array. Both Th1 (IFN-gamma, Il18 and Th2 (Il4 genes were up regulated in the liposome encapsulated HVR1 variant pool-NS3 combination group. In-vitro binding of the virus to anti-HVR1 antibodies was demonstrated. Conclusion The optimum immunogen was identified to be combination of peptides of HVR1 consensus sequence and its variants along with pNS3 encapsulated in liposomes

  18. Natural prevalence of resistance-associated variants in hepatitis C virus NS5A in genotype 3a-infected people who inject drugs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andreas; Siemann, Holger; Groten, Svenja; Ross, R Stefan; Scherbaum, Norbert; Timm, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are the most important risk group for incident Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In PWID in Europe HCV genotype 3a is highly prevalent. Unfortunately, many of the recently developed directly acting antiviral drugs against HCV (DAAs) are suboptimal for treatment of this genotype. Detection of resistance-associated variants (RAV) in genotype 3a may help to optimize treatment decisions, however, robust protocols for amplification and sequencing of HCV NS5A as an important target for treatment of genotype 3a are currently lacking. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol for sequencing of HCV NS5A in genotype 3a and to determine the frequency of RAVs in treatment-naïve PWID living in Germany. The full NS5A region was amplified and sequenced from 110 HCV genotype 3a infected PWID using an in-house PCR protocol. With the established protocol the complete NS5A region was successfully amplified and sequenced from 110 out of 112 (98.2%) genotype 3a infected PWID. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences from PWID together with unrelated genotype 3a sequences from a public database showed a scattered distribution without geographic clustering. Viral polymorphisms A30K and Y93H known to confer resistance in a GT3a replication model were present in 8 subjects (7.2%). A protocol for amplification of nearly all GT3a samples was successfully established. Substitutions conferring resistance to NS5A inhibitors were detected in a few treatment-naive PWID. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of constrained peptides that bind to and preferentially inhibit the activity of the hepatitis C viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Anthony; Zaccardi, Joe; Mullen, Stanley; Olland, Stephane; Orlowski, Mark; Feld, Boris; Labonte, Patrick; Mak, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A class of disulfide constrained peptides containing a core motif FPWG was identified from a screen of phage displayed library using the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) as a bait. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that three highly purified synthetic constrained peptides bound to immobilized NS5B with estimated K d values ranging from 30 to 60 μM. In addition, these peptides inhibited the NS5B activity in vitro with IC 50 ranging from 6 to 48 μM, whereas in contrast they had no inhibitory effect on the enzymatic activities of calf thymus polymerase α, human polymerase β, RSV polymerase, and HIV reverse transcriptase in vitro. Two peptides demonstrated conformation-dependent inhibition since their synthetic linear versions were not inhibitory in the NS5B assay. A constrained peptide with the minimum core motif FPWG retained selective inhibition of NS5B activity with an IC 50 of 50 μM. Alanine scan analyses of a representative constrained peptide, FPWGNTW, indicated that residues F1 and W7 were critical for the inhibitory effect of this peptide, although residues P2 and N5 had some measurable inhibitory effect as well. Further analyses of the mechanism of inhibition indicated that these peptides inhibited the formation of preelongation complexes required for the elongation reaction. However, once the preelongation complex was formed, its activity was refractory to peptide inhibition. Furthermore, the constrained peptide FPWGNTW inhibited de novo initiated RNA synthesis by NS5B from a poly(rC) template. These data indicate that the peptides confer selective inhibition of NS5B activity by binding to the enzyme and perturbing an early step preceding the processive elongation step of RNA synthesis

  20. Stability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels among interferon-naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals treated with combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Peters, L; Reekie, J

    2013-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals.......Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals....

  1. High rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence in HIV-infected individuals with spontaneous HCV RNA clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Soriano, V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Following resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, recurrence has been shown to occur in some persons with repeated exposure to HCV. We aimed to investigate the rate and factors associated with HCV RNA recurrence among HIV-1-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA cle......-up. Our findings underline the importance of maintaining focus on preventive measures to reduce IDU and sharing of contaminated needles. Clinicians should maintain a high degree of vigilance to identify patients with new HCV infection early....

  2. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galiano V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Galiano,1 Pablo Garcia-Valtanen,2 Vicente Micol,3,4 José Antonio Encinar3 1Physics and Computer Architecture Department, Miguel Hernández University (UMH, Elche, Spain; 2Experimental Therapeutics Laboratory, Hanson and Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 3Molecular and Cell Biology Institute, Miguel Hernández University (UMH, Elche, Spain; 4CIBER: CB12/03/30038, Physiopathology of the Obesity and Nutrition, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Palma de Mallorca, Spain Abstract: The dengue virus (DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5 contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <-10.5 kcal/mol were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Keywords: virtual screening, molecular

  3. NS5A Sequence Heterogeneity and Mechanisms of Daclatasvir Resistance in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 4 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nannan; Hernandez, Dennis; Ueland, Joseph; Yang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fei; Sims, Karen; Yin, Philip D; McPhee, Fiona

    2016-01-15

    Daclatasvir is an NS5A inhibitor approved for treatment of infection due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes (GTs) 1-4. To support daclatasvir use in HCV genotype 4 infection, we examined a diverse genotype 4-infected population for HCV genotype 4 subtype prevalence, NS5A polymorphisms at residues associated with daclatasvir resistance (positions 28, 30, 31, or 93), and their effects on daclatasvir activity in vitro and clinically. We performed phylogenetic analysis of genotype 4 NS5A sequences from 186 clinical trial patients and 43 sequences from the European HCV database, and susceptibility analyses of NS5A polymorphisms and patient-derived NS5A sequences by using genotype 4 NS5A hybrid genotype 2a replicons. The clinical trial patients represented 14 genotype 4 subtypes; most prevalent were genotype 4a (55%) and genotype 4d (27%). Daclatasvir 50% effective concentrations for 10 patient-derived NS5A sequences representing diverse phylogenetic clusters were ≤0.080 nM. Most baseline sequences had ≥1 NS5A polymorphism at residues associated with daclatasvir resistance; however, only 3 patients (1.6%) had polymorphisms conferring ≥1000-fold daclatasvir resistance in vitro. Among 46 patients enrolled in daclatasvir trials, all 20 with baseline resistance polymorphisms achieved a sustained virologic response. Circulating genotype 4 subtypes are genetically diverse. Polymorphisms conferring high-level daclatasvir resistance in vitro are uncommon before therapy, and clinical data suggest that genotype 4 subtype and baseline polymorphisms have minimal impact on responses to daclatasvir-containing regimens. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. Robust HCV Genotype 3a Infectious Cell Culture System Permits Identification of Escape Variants With Resistance to Sofosbuvir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez Almeida, Santseharay; Mikkelsen, Lotte S.; Gottwein, Judith M.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) effectively eradicate chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, although HCV genotype 3a is less responsive to these drugs. We aimed to develop genotype 3a infectious cultures and study the effects of inhibitors of NS5A and NS5B and resistance to...

  5. Treating hepatitis C: can you teach old dogs new tricks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Charles M; You, Shihyun

    2005-12-01

    Viruses depend on host-derived factors for their efficient genome replication. Here, we demonstrate that a cellular peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase), cyclophilin B (CyPB), is critical for the efficient replication of the hepatitis C virus genome. CyPB interacted with the HCV RNA polymerase NS5B to directly stimulate its RNA binding activity. Both the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated reduction of endogenous CyPB expression and the induced loss of NS5B binding to CyPB decreased the levels of HCV replication. Thus, CyPB functions as a stimulatory regulator of NS5B in HCV replication machinery. This regulation mechanism for viral replication identifies CyPB as a target for antiviral therapeutic strategies.

  6. Resistance-Associated NS5A Variants of Hepatitis C Virus Are Susceptible to Interferon-Based Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Itakura

    Full Text Available The presence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs of hepatitis C virus (HCV attenuates the efficacy of direct acting antivirals (DAAs. The objective of this study was to characterize the susceptibility of RAVs to interferon-based therapy.Direct and deep sequencing were performed to detect Y93H RAV in the NS5A region. Twenty nine genotype 1b patients with detectable RAV at baseline were treated by a combination of simeprevir, pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The longitudinal changes in the proportion of Y93H RAV during therapy and at breakthrough or relapse were determined.By direct sequencing, Y93H RAV became undetectable or decreased in proportion at an early time point during therapy (within 7 days in 57% of patients with both the Y93H variant and wild type virus at baseline when HCV RNA was still detectable. By deep sequencing, the proportion of Y93H RAV against Y93 wild type was 52.7% (5.8%- 97.4% at baseline which significantly decreased to 29.7% (0.16%- 98.3% within 7 days of initiation of treatment (p = 0.023. The proportion of Y93H RAV was reduced in 21 of 29 cases (72.4% and a marked reduction of more than 10% was observed in 14 cases (48.7%. HCV RNA reduction was significantly greater for Y93H RAV (-3.65±1.3 logIU/mL/day than the Y93 wild type (-3.35±1.0 logIU/mL/day (p<0.001.Y93H RAV is more susceptible to interferon-based therapy than the Y93 wild type.

  7. Resistance-Associated NS5A Variants of Hepatitis C Virus Are Susceptible to Interferon-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Jun; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Mayu; Takada, Hitomi; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Itakura, Yoshie; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Yasui, Yutaka; Suzuki, Shoko; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuka; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Izumi, Namiki

    2015-01-01

    The presence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) attenuates the efficacy of direct acting antivirals (DAAs). The objective of this study was to characterize the susceptibility of RAVs to interferon-based therapy. Direct and deep sequencing were performed to detect Y93H RAV in the NS5A region. Twenty nine genotype 1b patients with detectable RAV at baseline were treated by a combination of simeprevir, pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The longitudinal changes in the proportion of Y93H RAV during therapy and at breakthrough or relapse were determined. By direct sequencing, Y93H RAV became undetectable or decreased in proportion at an early time point during therapy (within 7 days) in 57% of patients with both the Y93H variant and wild type virus at baseline when HCV RNA was still detectable. By deep sequencing, the proportion of Y93H RAV against Y93 wild type was 52.7% (5.8%- 97.4%) at baseline which significantly decreased to 29.7% (0.16%- 98.3%) within 7 days of initiation of treatment (p = 0.023). The proportion of Y93H RAV was reduced in 21 of 29 cases (72.4%) and a marked reduction of more than 10% was observed in 14 cases (48.7%). HCV RNA reduction was significantly greater for Y93H RAV (-3.65±1.3 logIU/mL/day) than the Y93 wild type (-3.35±1.0 logIU/mL/day) (p<0.001). Y93H RAV is more susceptible to interferon-based therapy than the Y93 wild type.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Celecoxib Derivatives as Possible Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, Antioxidant, Anticancer and Anti-HCV Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amartya Basu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel N-(3-substituted aryl/alkyl-4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-2-ylidene-4-[5-(4-methylphenyl-3-(trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamides 2a–e were synthesized by the addition of ethyl a-bromoacetate and anhydrous sodium acetate in dry ethanol to N-(substituted aryl/alkylcarbamothioyl-4-[5-(4-methylphenyl-3-(trifluoro-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzene sulfonamides 1a–e, which were synthesized by the reaction of alkyl/aryl isothiocyanates with celecoxib. The structures of the isolated products were determined by spectral methods and their anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antioxidant, anticancer and anti-HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp activities evaluated. The compounds were also tested for gastric toxicity and selected compound 1a was screened for its anticancer activity against 60 human tumor cell lines. These investigations revealed that compound 1a exhibited anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and further did not cause tissue damage in liver, kidney, colon and brain compared to untreated controls or celecoxib. Compounds 1c and 1d displayed modest inhibition of HCV NS5B RdRp activity. In conclusion, N-(ethylcarbamothioyl-4-[5-(4-methylphenyl-3-(trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamide (1a may have the potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent.

  9. Hepatitis C virus induces E6AP-dependent degradation of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Munakata

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-strand RNA virus that frequently causes persistent infections and is uniquely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. While the mechanism(s by which the virus promotes cancer are poorly defined, previous studies indicate that the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B, forms a complex with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb, targeting it for degradation, activating E2F-responsive promoters, and stimulating cellular proliferation. Here, we describe the mechanism underlying pRb regulation by HCV and its relevance to HCV infection. We show that the abundance of pRb is strongly downregulated, and its normal nuclear localization altered to include a major cytoplasmic component, following infection of cultured hepatoma cells with either genotype 1a or 2a HCV. We further demonstrate that this is due to NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb and its subsequent degradation via the proteasome. The NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb requires the ubiquitin ligase activity of E6-associated protein (E6AP, as pRb abundance was restored by siRNA knockdown of E6AP or overexpression of a dominant-negative E6AP mutant in cells containing HCV RNA replicons. E6AP also forms a complex with pRb in an NS5B-dependent manner. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of pRb in which the HCV NS5B protein traps pRb in the cytoplasm, and subsequently recruits E6AP to this complex in a process that leads to the ubiquitination of pRb. The disruption of pRb/E2F regulatory pathways in cells infected with HCV is likely to promote hepatocellular proliferation and chromosomal instability, factors important for the development of liver cancer.

  10. Dynamic changes in HCV RNA levels and viral quasispecies in a patient with chronic hepatitis C after telaprevir-based treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijne, Joep; Sullivan, James C.; Kieffer, Tara L.; Botfield, Martyn; Shames, Ben; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Weegink, Christine; Reesink, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Background: Telaprevir is a selective inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus NS3 center dot 4A serine protease. Treatment with telaprevir resulted in a rapid HCV-RNA decline in chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 patients. Objectives: To report the clinical and viral course of a patient treated with

  11. Analysis of hepatitis C NS5A resistance associated polymorphisms using ultra deep single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfors, Assar; Leenheer, Daniël; Bergqvist, Anders; Ameur, Adam; Lennerstrand, Johan

    2016-02-01

    Development of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) resistance against direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), including NS5A inhibitors, is an obstacle to successful treatment of HCV when DAAs are used in sub-optimal combinations. Furthermore, it has been shown that baseline (pre-existing) resistance against DAAs is present in treatment naïve-patients and this will potentially complicate future treatment strategies in different HCV genotypes (GTs). Thus the aim was to detect low levels of NS5A resistant associated variants (RAVs) in a limited sample set of treatment-naïve patients of HCV GT1a and 3a, since such polymorphisms can display in vitro resistance as high as 60000 fold. Ultra-deep single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing with the Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) RSII instrument was used to detect these RAVs. The SMRT sequencing was conducted on ten samples; three of them positive with Sanger sequencing (GT1a Q30H and Y93N, and GT3a Y93H), five GT1a samples, and two GT3a non-positive samples. The same methods were applied to the HCV GT1a H77-plasmid in a dilution series, in order to determine the error rates of replication, which in turn was used to determine the limit of detection (LOD), as defined by mean + 3SD, of minority variants down to 0.24%. We found important baseline NS5A RAVs at levels between 0.24 and 0.5%, which could potentially have clinical relevance. This new method with low level detection of baseline RAVs could be useful in predicting the most cost-efficient combination of DAA treatment, and reduce the treatment duration for an HCV infected individual. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  13. Indeterminate RIBA results were associated with the absence of hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV-RNA) in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Felicidade Mota; Zarife, Maria Alice Sant'ana; Reis, Eliana Almeida Gomes; G Reis, Mitermayer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is diagnosed by the presence of antibodies and is supplemented by confirmatory testing methods, such as recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) and HCV-RNA detection. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of RIBA testing to diagnose HCV infection in blood donors positive for anti-HCV antibodies. A total of 102 subjects positive for anti-HCV determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation of Bahia (HEMOBA) were later assessed with new samples using the Abbott Architect anti-HCV test (Abbott Diagnostics, Wiesbaden, Germany), the RIBA III test (Chiron RIBA HCV 3.0 SIA, Chiron Corp., Emeryville, CA, USA), the polymerase chain reaction (PCR; COBAS® AMPLICOR HCV Roche Diagnostics Corp., Indianapolis, IN, USA) and line probe assay (LiPA - Siemens, Tarrytown, NY, USA) genotyping for HCV diagnosis. Of these new samples, 38.2% (39/102) were positive, 57.8% (59/102) were negative and 3.9% (4/102) were indeterminate for anti-HCV; HCV-RNA was detected in 22.5% (23/102) of the samples. RIBA results were positive in 58.1% (25/43), negative in 9.3% (4/43) and indeterminate in 32.6% (14/43) of the samples. The prevailing genotypes were 1 (78.3%, 18/23), 3 (17.4%, 4/23) and 2 (4.3%, 1/23). All 14 samples with indeterminate RIBA results had undetectable viral loads (detection limit ≤50 IU/mL). Of these samples, 71.4% (10/14) were reevaluated six months later. Eighty percent (8/10) of these samples remained indeterminate by RIBA, and 20% (2/10) were negative. In this study, individuals with indeterminate RIBA results had no detectable HCV-RNA.

  14. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced interferon resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qashqari, Hanadi; Al-Mars, Amany; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Maged; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the foremost causes of chronic liver disease affecting over 300 million globally. HCV contains a positive-stranded RNA of ~9600 nt and is surrounded by the 5' and 3'untranslated regions (UTR). The only successful treatment regimen includes interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. Like many other viruses, HCV has also evolved various mechanisms to circumvent the IFN response by blocking (1) downstream signaling actions via STAT1, STAT2, IRF9 and JAK-STAT pathways and (2) repertoire of IFN Stimulatory Genes (ISGs). Several studies have identified complex host demographic and genetic factors as well as viral genetic heterogeneity associated with outcomes of IFN therapy. The genetic predispositions of over 2000 ISGS may render the patients to become resistant, thus identification of such parameters within a subset of population are necessary for management corollary. The ability of various HCV genotypes to diminish IFN antiviral responses plays critical role in the establishment of chronic infection at the acute stage of infection, thus highlighting importance of the resistance in HCV treated groups. The recently defined role of viral protein such as C, E2, NS3/NS4 and NS5A proteins in inducing the IFN resistance are discussed in this article. How the viral and host genetic composition and epistatic connectivity among polymorphic genomic sites synchronizes the evolutionary IFN resistance trend remains under investigation. However, these signals may have the potential to be employed for accurate prediction of therapeutic outcomes. In this review article, we accentuate the significance of host and viral components in IFN resistance with the aim to determine the successful outcome in patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Host cell killing by the West Nile Virus NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex: NS3 alone is sufficient to recruit caspase-8-based apoptotic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, Mathura P.; Chambers, Jerome A.; Pankhong, Panyupa; Chattergoon, Michael; Attatippaholkun, Watcharee; Dang, Kesen; Shah, Neelima; Weiner, David B.

    2006-01-01

    The West Nile Virus (WNV) non-structural proteins 2B and 3 (NS2B-NS3) constitute the proteolytic complex that mediates the cleavage and processing of the viral polyprotein. NS3 recruits NS2B and NS5 proteins to direct protease and replication activities. In an effort to investigate the biology of the viral protease, we cloned cDNA encoding the NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex from brain tissue of a WNV-infected dead crow, collected from the Lower Merion area (Merion strain). Expression of the NS2B-NS3 gene cassette induced apoptosis within 48 h of transfection. Electron microscopic analysis of NS2B-NS3-transfected cells revealed ultra-structural changes that are typical of apoptotic cells including membrane blebbing, nuclear disintegration and cytoplasmic vacuolations. The role of NS3 or NS2B in contributing to host cell apoptosis was examined. NS3 alone triggers the apoptotic pathways involving caspases-8 and -3. Experimental results from the use of caspase-specific inhibitors and caspase-8 siRNA demonstrated that the activation of caspase-8 was essential to initiate apoptotic signaling in NS3-expressing cells. Downstream of caspase-3 activation, we observed nuclear membrane ruptures and cleavage of the DNA-repair enzyme, PARP in NS3-expressing cells. Nuclear herniations due to NS3 expression were absent in the cells treated with a caspase-3 inhibitor. Expression of protease and helicase domains themselves was sufficient to trigger apoptosis generating insight into the apoptotic pathways triggered by NS3 from WNV

  16. Indeterminate RIBA results were associated with the absence of hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV-RNA in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicidade Mota Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is diagnosed by the presence of antibodies and is supplemented by confirmatory testing methods, such as recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA and HCV-RNA detection. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of RIBA testing to diagnose HCV infection in blood donors positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Methods: A total of 102 subjects positive for anti-HCV determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA at the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation of Bahia (HEMOBA were later assessed with new samples using the Abbott Architect anti-HCV test (Abbott Diagnostics, Wiesbaden, Germany, the RIBA III test (Chiron RIBA HCV 3.0 SIA, Chiron Corp., Emeryville, CA, USA, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR; COBAS® AMPLICOR HCV Roche Diagnostics Corp., Indianapolis, IN, USA and line probe assay (LiPA - Siemens, Tarrytown, NY, USA genotyping for HCV diagnosis. Results: Of these new samples, 38.2% (39/102 were positive, 57.8% (59/102 were negative and 3.9% (4/102 were indeterminate for anti-HCV; HCV-RNA was detected in 22.5% (23/102 of the samples. RIBA results were positive in 58.1% (25/43, negative in 9.3% (4/43 and indeterminate in 32.6% (14/43 of the samples. The prevailing genotypes were 1 (78.3%, 18/23, 3 (17.4%, 4/23 and 2 (4.3%, 1/23. All 14 samples with indeterminate RIBA results had undetectable viral loads (detection limit ≤50 IU/mL. Of these samples, 71.4% (10/14 were reevaluated six months later. Eighty percent (8/10 of these samples remained indeterminate by RIBA, and 20% (2/10 were negative. Conclusions: In this study, individuals with indeterminate RIBA results had no detectable HCV-RNA.

  17. Subtype Specific Differences in NS5A Domain II Reveals Involvement of Proline at Position 310 in Cyclosporine Susceptibility of Hepatitis C Virus

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    Israr-ul H. Ansari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is susceptible to cyclosporine (CsA and other cyclophilin (CypA inhibitors, but the genetic basis of susceptibility is controversial. Whether genetic variation in NS5A alters cell culture susceptibility of HCV to CypA inhibition is unclear. We constructed replicons containing NS5A chimeras from genotypes 1a, 2a and 4a to test how variation in carboxy terminal regions of NS5A altered the genotype 1b CsA susceptibility. All chimeric replicons including genotype 1b Con1LN-wt replicon exhibited some cell culture sensitivity to CsA with genotype 4a being most sensitive and 1a the least. The CypA binding pattern of truncated NS5A genotypes correlated with the susceptibility of these replicons to CsA. The Con1LN-wt replicon showed increased susceptibility towards CsA when proline at position 310P was mutated to either threonine or alanine. Furthermore, a 15 amino acid long peptide fused N terminally to GFP coding sequences confirmed involvement of proline at 310 in CypA binding. Our findings are consistent with CypA acting on multiple prolines outside of the previously identified CypA binding sites. These results suggest multiple specific genetic variants between genotype 1a and 1b in the C-terminus of NS5A alter the CsA susceptibility of replicons, and some variants may oppose the effects of others.

  18. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Po-Yuan; Chen, Steve S-L

    2013-01-01

    So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS) protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp) infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (co)receptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  19. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

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    Po-Yuan Ke

    Full Text Available So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (coreceptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  20. Drug: D10165 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B inhibitor ... HCV NS5B is RNA-dependent RNA polymerase(RdRP). Treatment of hepatitis C NS5B polymerase ... CAS: 1071517-39-9 PubChem: 135626883 ChEMBL: CHEMBL1076263 LigandBox: D10165 ...

  1. The evaluation of Recombinant Immunoblot assay (RIBA and HCV-RNA test results in patients with low titer Anti-HCV positivity

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    Berrin Uzun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Laboratory diagnosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is based on the detection of anti-HCV antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (EIA or chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA techniques. However, a consensus related to the problem of low titer (Serum/Cut-off; S/C= 1.0 anti-HCV antibodies is still lacking. The study attempts to evaluate the clinical status of the patients with low titer anti-HCV antibodies detected by third generation anti-HCV tests during February 2013- May 2014 retrospectively. Methods: Serum samples were studied by Advia Centaur XP autoanalyser (Bayer-Siemens, Germany for anti-HCV, and line immunoassay (Inno-LIATM HCV Score, İnnogenetics, Belgium for anti-HCV confirmatory test, Cobas AmpliPre/Cobas AMPLICOR HCV Test (Roche diagnostics, Switzerland for HCV RNA. Results: A total of 55.631 serum samples were studied, and 55 of them were anti-HCV positive of which with low antibody levels (sample/cutoff [S/CO]. S/CO values ranged from 1.15 to 6.15. Seventeen (31% of patients who have low antibody levels were defined as positive and 2 (4% patients were intermittent and 36 (65% patients were negative with line immunoassay. HCV-RNA was not detected in any of the samples. Conclusions: It is thought that antibody positivity must be verified in cases of recurrent reactivity when considering the cost-effectiveness of molecular tests. In the study was concluded that the use of molecular tests would be appropriate diagnosis, and the effectiveness of treatment if necessary after evaluation of patients with biochemical analysis. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (4: 553-556

  2. Naturally Occurring Resistance-Associated Variants to Hepatitis C Virus Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents in Treatment-Naive HCV Genotype 6a-Infected Patients

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    Zhanyi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs antiviral therapy has drastically improved the prognosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV patients. However, the viral drug resistance-associated variants (RAVs can limit the efficacy of DAAs. For the HCV-6a is not the predominant prevalent genotype; the data on the prevalence of naturally occurring RAVs in it is scarce. Our study aims to assess the prevalence of RAVs in treatment-naive HCV-6a patients. Methods. Nested PCR assays were performed on 95 HCV-6a patients to amplify HCV viral regions of NS3, NS5A, and NS5B. Results. In NS3/4A region, we detected Q80K in 95.5% isolates (84/88 and D168E in 2.3% isolates (2/88. In NS5A region, we detected Q30R in 93.2% isolates (82/88, L31M in 4.6% isolates (4/88, and H58P in 6.8% isolates (6/88. In NS5B region, we detected A15G in 2.3% isolates (2/88, S96T in 1.1% isolates (1/88, and S282T in 20.7% isolates (17/88 and we detected I482L in 100% isolates (4/4, V494A in 50% isolates (2/4, and V499A in 100% isolates (4/4. Conclusions. RAVs to DAAs preexist in treatment-naive HCV-6a patients. Further studies should address the issue of the impact of RAVs in response to DAA therapies for HCV-6a patients.

  3. Undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA during syphilis infection in two HIV/HCV-co-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Knudsen, Andreas; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, elicits a vigorous immune response in the infected host. This study sought to describe the impact of syphilis infection on hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. METHODS: Patients......-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 kDa (IP-10). RESULTS: Undetectable HCV RNA at the time of early latent syphilis infection was observed in 2 patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. After treatment of the syphilis infection, HCV RNA levels increased again in patient 1, whereas...... patient 2 initiated HCV therapy and remained HCV RNA-negative. Available plasma samples obtained before and after the episode with undetectable HCV RNA were phylogenetically identical, making the possibility of spontaneous clearance and HCV reinfection less likely. The IL-10, TNF-α, and IP-10 levels...

  4. Variation of transaminases, HCV-RNA levels and Th1/Th2 cytokine production during the post-partum period in pregnant women with chronic hepatitis C.

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    Angeles Ruiz-Extremera

    Full Text Available This study analyses the evolution of liver disease in women with chronic hepatitis C during the third trimester of pregnancy and the post-partum period, as a natural model of immune modulation and reconstitution. Of the 122 mothers recruited to this study, 89 were HCV-RNA+ve/HIV-ve and 33 were HCV-RNA-ve/HIV-ve/HCVantibody+ve and all were tested during the third trimester of pregnancy, at delivery and post-delivery. The HCV-RNA+ve mothers were categorized as either Type-A (66%, with an increase in ALT levels in the post-partum period (>40 U/L; P<0.001 or as Type-B (34%, with no variation in ALT values. The Type-A mothers also presented a significant decrease in serum HCV-RNA levels in the post-delivery period (P<0.001 and this event was concomitant with an increase in Th1 cytokine levels (INFγ, P = 0.04; IL12, P = 0.01 and IL2, P = 0.01. On the other hand, the Type-B mothers and the HCV-RNA-ve women presented no variations in either of these parameters. However, they did present higher Th1 cytokine levels in the partum period (INFγ and IL2, P<0.05 than both the Type-A and the HCV-RNA-ve women. Cytokine levels at the moment of delivery do not constitute a risk factor associated with HCV vertical transmission. It is concluded that differences in the ALT and HCV-RNA values observed in HCV-RNA+ve women in the postpartum period might be due to different ratios of Th1 cytokine production. In the Type-B women, the high partum levels of Th1 cytokines and the absence of post-partum variation in ALT and HCV-RNA levels may be related to permanent Th1 cytokine stimulation.

  5. An autochthonous case of hepatitis C virus genotype 5a in Brazil: phylogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, L.C.; Souto, F.J.D.; do Espirito-Santo, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Genotype 5 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been rarely identified in South America. A female of African descent who never left Brazil was found to be infected by this genotype in Mato Grosso state, Central Brazil. The patient denied drug injections and revealed that she had received blood...... transfusions several years before. One of her blood donors was identified and tested negative for anti-HCV and HCV RNA, as were her husband and offspring. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 and NS5B regions confirmed that this HCV strain belonged to genotype 5a. However, the E1 region analysis indicates that our...

  6. Antiviral Effect of Ribavirin against HCV Associated with Increased Frequency of G-to-A and C-to-U Transitions in Infectious Cell Culture Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Mens, Helene; Gottwein, Judith M

    2018-01-01

    -polymerase gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced to estimate genetic distances. We confirm that the antiviral effect of all three RBV-drug forms on HCV relies on induction of specific transitions (G-to-A and C-to-U). These mutations lead to generation of non-infectious virions, reflected by decreased spread......Ribavirin (RBV) is a broad-spectrum antiviral active against a wide range of RNA viruses. Despite having been used for decades in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the precise mechanism of action of RBV is unknown. In other viruses, it inhibits propagation by increasing...... the rate of G-to-A and C-to-U transitions. Here, we utilized the J6/JFH1 HCV cell-culture system to investigate whether RBV inhibits HCV through the same mechanism. Infected Huh7.5 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of RBV or its phosphorylated forms. A fragment of the HCV NS5B...

  7. Host-derived apolipoproteins play comparable roles with viral secretory proteins Erns and NS1 in the infectious particle formation of Flaviviridae.

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    Takasuke Fukuhara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphipathic α-helices of exchangeable apolipoproteins have shown to play crucial roles in the formation of infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV particles through the interaction with viral particles. Among the Flaviviridae members, pestivirus and flavivirus possess a viral structural protein Erns or a non-structural protein 1 (NS1 as secretory glycoproteins, respectively, while Hepacivirus including HCV has no secretory glycoprotein. In case of pestivirus replication, the C-terminal long amphipathic α-helices of Erns are important for anchoring to viral membrane. Here we show that host-derived apolipoproteins play functional roles similar to those of virally encoded Erns and NS1 in the formation of infectious particles. We examined whether Erns and NS1 could compensate for the role of apolipoproteins in particle formation of HCV in apolipoprotein B (ApoB and ApoE double-knockout Huh7 (BE-KO, and non-hepatic 293T cells. We found that exogenous expression of either Erns or NS1 rescued infectious particle formation of HCV in the BE-KO and 293T cells. In addition, expression of apolipoproteins or NS1 partially rescued the production of infectious pestivirus particles in cells upon electroporation with an Erns-deleted non-infectious RNA. As with exchangeable apolipoproteins, the C-terminal amphipathic α-helices of Erns play the functional roles in the formation of infectious HCV or pestivirus particles. These results strongly suggest that the host- and virus-derived secretory glycoproteins have overlapping roles in the viral life cycle of Flaviviridae, especially in the maturation of infectious particles, while Erns and NS1 also participate in replication complex formation and viral entry, respectively. Considering the abundant hepatic expression and liver-specific propagation of these apolipoproteins, HCV might have evolved to utilize them in the formation of infectious particles through deletion of a secretory viral glycoprotein gene.

  8. Multiple Introduction and Naturally Occuring Drug Resistance of HCV among HIV-Infected Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan: An Origin of China's HIV/HCV Epidemics.

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    Min Chen

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 epidemic in China historically stemmed from intravenous drug users (IDUs in Yunnan. Due to a shared transmission route, hepatitis C virus (HCV/HIV-1 co-infection is common. Here, we investigated HCV genetic characteristics and baseline drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan.Blood samples of 432 HIV-1/HCV co-infected IDUs were collected from January to June 2014 in six prefectures of Yunnan Province. Partial E1E2 and NS5B genes were sequenced. Phylogenetic, evolutionary and genotypic drug resistance analyses were performed.Among the 293 specimens successfully genotyped, seven subtypes were identified, including subtypes 3b (37.9%, 111/293, 3a (21.8%, 64/293, 6n (14.0%, 41/293, 1b (10.6%, 31/293, 1a (8.2%, 24/293, 6a (5.1%, 15/293 and 6u (2.4%, 7/293. The distribution of HCV subtypes was mostly related to geographic location. Subtypes 3b, 3a, and 6n were detected in all six prefectures, however, the other four subtypes were detected only in parts of the six prefectures. Phylogeographic analyses indicated that 6n, 1a and 6u originated in the western prefecture (Dehong and spread eastward and showed genetic relatedness with those detected in Burmese. However, 6a originated in the southeast prefectures (Honghe and Wenshan bordering Vietnam and was transmitted westward. These subtypes exhibited different evolutionary rates (between 4.35×10-4 and 2.38×10-3 substitutions site-1 year-1 and times of most recent common ancestor (tMRCA, between 1790.3 and 1994.6, suggesting that HCV was multiply introduced into Yunnan. Naturally occurring resistance-associated mutations (C316N, A421V, C445F, I482L, V494A, and V499A to NS5B polymerase inhibitors were detected in direct-acting antivirals (DAAs-naïve IDUs.This work reveals the temporal-spatial distribution of HCV subtypes and baseline HCV drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. The findings enhance our understanding of the characteristics and

  9. Prevalence of pre-treatment hepatitis C virus NS5A resistance associated amino-acid substitutions in genotype 1A infected patients in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Stewart, Amanda; Goldstein, Emily; MacLean, Alasdair; Gunson, Rory

    2018-04-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) NS5A resistance associated amino-acid substitutions (RAS) can exist at baseline in treatment naïve individuals and have been shown to be associated with lower rates of sustained virological response (SVR) for patients infected with HCV genotype 1A (G1A) following treatment with NS5A inhibitors. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of baseline NS5A resistance in Scotland. The study population consisted of 531 treatment naïve, G1A infected patients. The patient samples were collected between March and September 2017. The NS5A region was amplified and sequenced. Baseline NS5A resistance in Scotland is high (16.8%) and is comparable to rates reported by a number of previously published studies. The high rate of baseline RAS, together with the high cost of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), supports resistance testing to guide current patient treatment. However, given the rate at which new DAAs are currently being licensed with ever broader genotype efficacy and higher SVR rates, baseline resistance testing may not be required in the near future. Baseline NS5A inhibitor resistance is high. The results of the present study support performing resistance testing at baseline for current regimens. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. PCBP2 enhances the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV by stabilizing the mRNA of STAT1 and STAT2.

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    Zhongshuai Xin

    Full Text Available Interferon-α (IFN-α is a natural choice for the treatment of hepatitis C, but half of the chronically infected individuals do not achieve sustained clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV during treatment with IFN-α alone. The virus can impair IFN-α signaling and cellular factors that have an effect on the viral life cycles. We found that the protein PCBP2 is down-regulated in HCV-replicon containing cells (R1b. However, the effects and mechanisms of PCBP2 on HCV are unclear. To determine the effect of PCBP2 on HCV, overexpression and knockdown of PCBP2 were performed in R1b cells. Interestingly, we found that PCBP2 can facilitate the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV, although the RNA level of HCV was unaffected by either the overexpression or absence of PCBP2 in R1b cells. RIP-qRT-PCR and RNA half-life further revealed that PCBP2 stabilizes the mRNA of STAT1 and STAT2 through binding the 3'Untranslated Region (UTR of these two molecules, which are pivotal for the IFN-α anti-HCV effect. RNA pull-down assay confirmed that there were binding sites located in the C-rich tracts in the 3'UTR of their mRNAs. Stabilization of mRNA by PCBP2 leads to the increased protein expression of STAT1 and STAT2 and a consistent increase of phosphorylated STAT1 and STAT2. These effects, in turn, enhance the antiviral effect of IFN-α. These findings indicate that PCBP2 may play an important role in the IFN-α response against HCV and may benefit the HCV clinical therapy.

  11. Antiviral Stilbene 1,2-Diamines Prevent Initiation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication at the Outset of Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaminza, Pablo; Pitram, Suresh M.; Dreux, Marlene; Krasnova, Larissa B.; Whitten-Bauer, Christina; Dong, Jiajia; Chung, Josan; Fokin, Valery V.; Sharpless, K. Barry; Chisari, Francis V.

    2011-01-01

    The recent development of a cell culture model of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the JFH-1 molecular clone has enabled discovery of new antiviral agents. Using a cell-based colorimetric screening assay to interrogate a 1,200-compound chemical library for anti-HCV activity, we identified a family of 1,2-diamines derived from trans-stilbene oxide that prevent HCV infection at nontoxic, low micromolar concentrations in cell culture. Structure-activity relationship analysis of ∼300 derivatives synthesized using click chemistry yielded compounds with greatly enhanced low nanomolar potency and a >1,000:1 therapeutic ratio. Using surrogate models of HCV infection, we showed that the compounds selectively block the initiation of replication of incoming HCV RNA but have no impact on viral entry, primary translation, or ongoing HCV RNA replication, nor do they suppress persistent HCV infection. Selection of an escape variant revealed that NS5A is directly or indirectly targeted by this compound. In summary, we have identified a family of HCV inhibitors that target a critical step in the establishment of HCV infection in which NS5A translated de novo from an incoming genomic HCV RNA template is required to initiate the replication of this important human pathogen. PMID:21430055

  12. Pharmacoinformatics approach for investigation of alternative potential hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B inhibitors

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    Mirza MU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Usman Mirza,1 Noor-Ul-Huda Ghori,2 Nazia Ikram,3 Abdur Rehman Adil,4 Sadia Manzoor3 1Centre for Research in Molecular Medicine (CRiMM, The University of Lahore, Lahore, 2Atta-ur-Rehman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, 3Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan; 4Centre for Excellence in Molecular Biology (CEMB, The University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the major viruses affecting the world today. It is a highly variable virus, having a rapid reproduction and evolution rate. The variability of genomes is due to hasty replication catalyzed by nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B which is also a potential target site for the development of anti-HCV agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved sofosbuvir as a novel oral NS5B inhibitor for the treatment of HCV. Unfortunately, it is much highlighted for its pricing issues. Hence, there is an urgent need to scrutinize alternate therapies against HCV that are available at affordable price and do not have associated side effects. Such a need is crucial especially in underdeveloped countries. The search for various new bioactive compounds from plants is a key part of pharmaceutical research. In the current study, we applied a pharmacoinformatics-based approach for the identification of active plant-derived compounds against NS5B. The results were compared to docking results of sofosbuvir. The lead compounds with high-binding ligands were further analyzed for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters based on in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET profile. The results showed the potential alternative lead compounds that can be developed into commercial drugs having high binding energy and promising ADMET properties. Keywords: hepatitis C, NS5B inhibitors, molecular docking, Auto

  13. Antiviral Activity and Resistance Analysis of NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor Grazoprevir and NS5A Inhibitor Elbasvir in Hepatitis C Virus GT4 Replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Ingravallo, Paul; Chase, Robert; Nickle, David; Qiu, Ping; Howe, Anita; Lahser, Frederick C

    2017-07-01

    Although genotype 4 (GT4)-infected patients represent a minor overall percentage of the global hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected population, the high prevalence of the genotype in specific geographic regions coupled with substantial sequence diversity makes it an important genotype to study for antiviral drug discovery and development. We evaluated two direct-acting antiviral agents-grazoprevir, an HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and elbasvir, an HCV NS5A inhibitor-in GT4 replicons prior to clinical studies in this genotype. Following a bioinformatics analysis of available GT4 sequences, a set of replicons bearing representative GT4 clinical isolates was generated. For grazoprevir, the 50% effective concentration (EC 50 ) against the replicon bearing the reference GT4a (ED43) NS3 protease and NS4A was 0.7 nM. The median EC 50 for grazoprevir against chimeric replicons encoding NS3/4A sequences from GT4 clinical isolates was 0.2 nM (range, 0.11 to 0.33 nM; n = 5). The difficulty in establishing replicons bearing NS3/4A resistance-associated substitutions was substantially overcome with the identification of a G162R adaptive substitution in NS3. Single NS3 substitutions D168A/V identified from de novo resistance selection studies reduced grazoprevir antiviral activity by 137- and 47-fold, respectively, in the background of the G162R replicon. For elbasvir, the EC 50 against the replicon bearing the reference full-length GT4a (ED43) NS5A gene was 0.0002 nM. The median EC 50 for elbasvir against chimeric replicons bearing clinical isolates from GT4 was 0.0007 nM (range, 0.0002 to 34 nM; n = 14). De novo resistance selection studies in GT4 demonstrated a high propensity to suppress the emergence of amino acid substitutions that confer high-potency reductions to elbasvir. Phenotypic characterization of the NS5A amino acid substitutions identified (L30F, L30S, M31V, and Y93H) indicated that they conferred 15-, 4-, 2.5-, and 7.5-fold potency losses, respectively, to elbasvir

  14. Genetic diversity of NS3 protease from Brazilian HCV isolates and possible implications for therapy with direct-acting antiviral drugs

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    Allan Peres-da-Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV NS3 protease has been one of the molecular targets of new therapeutic approaches. Its genomic sequence variability in Brazilian HCV isolates is poorly documented. To obtain more information on the magnitude of its genetic diversity, 114 Brazilian HCV samples were sequenced and analysed together with global reference sequences. Genetic distance (d analyses revealed that subtype 1b had a higher degree of heterogeneity (d = 0.098 than subtypes 1a (d = 0.060 and 3a (d = 0.062. Brazilian isolates of subtype 1b were distributed in the phylogenetic tree among sequences from other countries, whereas most subtype 1a and 3a sequences clustered into a single branch. Additional characterisation of subtype 1a in clades 1 and 2 revealed that all but two Brazilian subtype 1a sequences formed a distinct and strongly supported (approximate likelihood-ratio test = 93 group of sequences inside clade 1. Moreover, this subcluster inside clade 1 presented an unusual phenotypic characteristic in relation to the presence of resistance mutations for macrocyclic inhibitors. In particular, the mutation Q80K was found in the majority of clade 1 sequences, but not in the Brazilian isolates. These data demonstrate that Brazilian HCV subtypes display a distinct pattern of genetic diversity and reinforce the importance of sequence information in future therapeutic approaches.

  15. DEB025 (Alisporivir inhibits hepatitis C virus replication by preventing a cyclophilin A induced cis-trans isomerisation in domain II of NS5A.

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    Lotte Coelmont

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available DEB025/Debio 025 (Alisporivir is a cyclophilin (Cyp-binding molecule with potent anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV activity both in vitro and in vivo. It is currently being evaluated in phase II clinical trials. DEB025 binds to CypA, a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase which is a crucial cofactor for HCV replication. Here we report that it was very difficult to select resistant replicons (genotype 1b to DEB025, requiring an average of 20 weeks (four independent experiments, compared to the typically <2 weeks with protease or polymerase inhibitors. This indicates a high genetic barrier to resistance for DEB025. Mutation D320E in NS5A was the only mutation consistently selected in the replicon genome. This mutation alone conferred a low-level (3.9-fold resistance. Replacing the NS5A gene (but not the NS5B gene from the wild type (WT genome with the corresponding sequence from the DEB025(res replicon resulted in transfer of resistance. Cross-resistance with cyclosporine A (CsA was observed, whereas NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitors retained WT-activity against DEB025(res replicons. Unlike WT, DEB025(res replicon replicated efficiently in CypA knock down cells. However, DEB025 disrupted the interaction between CypA and NS5A regardless of whether the NS5A protein was derived from WT or DEB025(res replicon. NMR titration experiments with peptides derived from the WT or the DEB025(res domain II of NS5A corroborated this observation in a quantitative manner. Interestingly, comparative NMR studies on two 20-mer NS5A peptides that contain D320 or E320 revealed a shift in population between the major and minor conformers. These data suggest that D320E conferred low-level resistance to DEB025 probably by reducing the need for CypA-dependent isomerisation of NS5A. Prolonged DEB025 treatment and multiple genotypic changes may be necessary to generate significant resistance to DEB025, underlying the high barrier to resistance.

  16. Efficacy of NS5A Inhibitors Against Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes 1–7 and Escape Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M.; Pham, Long V.; Mikkelsen, Lotte S.

    2018-01-01

    , or that contained RAS previously reported from patients. Results: NS5A inhibitors had varying levels of efficacy against original and resistant viruses. Only velpatasvir and pibrentasvir had uniform high activity against all HCV genotypes tested. RAS hotspots in NS5A were found at amino acids 28, 30, 31, and 93...

  17. An OPTIMIZE study retrospective analysis for management of telaprevir-treated hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients by use of the Abbott RealTime HCV RNA assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Christoph; Dierynck, Inge; Cloherty, Gavin; Ghys, Anne; Janssen, Katrien; Luo, Donghan; Witek, James; Buti, Maria; Picchio, Gaston; De Meyer, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI)-based response-guided triple therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are still widely used. Noncirrhotic treatment-naive and prior relapser patients receiving telaprevir-based treatment are eligible for shorter, 24-week total therapy if HCV RNA is undetectable at both weeks 4 and 12. In this study, the concordance in HCV RNA assessments between the Roche High Pure System/Cobas TaqMan and Abbott RealTime HCV RNA assays and the impacts of different HCV RNA cutoffs on treatment outcome were evaluated. A total of 2,629 samples from 663 HCV genotype 1 patients receiving telaprevir/pegylated interferon/ribavirin in OPTIMIZE were analyzed using the High Pure System and reanalyzed using Abbott RealTime (limits of detection, 15.1 IU/ml versus 8.3 IU/ml; limits of quantification, 25 IU/ml versus 12 IU/ml, respectively). Overall, good concordance was observed between the assays. Using undetectable HCV RNA at week 4, 34% of the patients would be eligible for shorter treatment duration with Abbott RealTime versus 72% with the High Pure System. However, using Abbott RealTime, a similar proportion (74%) would be eligible. Of the patients receiving 24-week total therapy, 87% achieved a sustained virologic response with undetectable HCV RNA by the High Pure System or Abbott RealTime; however, 92% of the patients with undetectable HCV RNA by Abbott RealTime achieved a sustained virologic response. Using undetectable HCV RNA as the cutoff, the more sensitive Abbott RealTime assay would identify fewer patients eligible for shorter treatment than the High Pure System. Our data confirm the Abbott RealTime assay, to determine eligibility for shortened PI-based HCV treatment. (The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01241760.). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of PBMCs unravels B cell mediated immunopathogenic imprints of HCV vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Emily; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Murphy, Alison; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Zhang, Xi; Sneller, Michael; Poonia, Bhawna; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2017-01-01

    B cell depletion therapy using rituximab has been shown to be effective in achieving remission in patients with HCV-mixed cryoglobulinemic (MC) vasculitis. Previously, we have demonstrated abnormalities in peripheral immune cells involving neutrophils, chemotaxis, and innate immune activation among patients with HCV-MC vasculitis when compared to HCV patients without vasculitis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of B cell depletion therapy on transcriptional profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after riruximab therapy, in order to unravel the pathogenic mechanism involved in HCV-MC vasculitis induced by abnormal B cell proliferation. DNA microarray analysis was performed using RNA from PBMCs from seven patients with HCV-MC vasculitis and seven normal volunteers. DNA was hybridized to Affymetrix U133A chips. After normalization, differentially expressed gene list with treatment was generated using partitional clustering. RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to validate DNA microarray findings. Differentially expressed genes included B cells and non-B cell genes. Validation of genes using purified cell subsets demonstrated distinct effect of B cell depletion therapy on non-B cells, such as monocytes, T cells, and NK cells. Notably, B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) levels were persistently elevated in patients who subsequently relapsed. In conclusion, pathogenesis of HCV-MC vasculitis is mediated by abnormal proliferation of B cells, driven by BLyS, leading to significant effects on non-B cells in mediating symptomatology. Future therapeutics using a combination approach of B cell depletion and proliferation may be desired to achieve long-term remission.

  19. Point -of -care testing (POCT) in molecular diagnostics: Performance evaluation of GeneXpert HCV RNA test in diagnosing and monitoring of HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ekta; Agarwala, Pragya; Kumar, Guresh; Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Molecular testing at the point-of-care may turn out to be game changer for HCV diagnosis and treatment monitoring, through increased sensitivity, reduced turnaround time, and ease of performance. One such assay GeneXpert ® has recently been released. Comparative analysis between performances of GeneXpert ® and Abbott HCV-RNA was done. 174 HCV infected patients were recruited and, one time plasma samples from 154 patients and repeated samples from 20 patients, obtained at specific treatment time-points (0, 4, 12 and 24) weeks were serially re-tested on Xpert ® . Genotype 3 was the commonest, seen in 80 (66%) of the cases, genotype 1 in 34 (28.3%), genotype 4 in 4 (3.3%) and genotypes 2 and 5 in 1 (0.8%) each. Median HCV RNA load was 4.69 log 10 (range: 0-6.98log 10 ) IU/ml. Overall a very good correlation was seen between the two assays (R 2 =0.985), concordance of the results between the assays was seen in 138 samples (89.6%). High and low positive standards were tested ten times on Xpert ® to evaluate the precision and the coefficient of variation was 0.01 for HPC and 0.07 for the LPC. Monitoring of patients on two different regimes of treatment, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and sofosbuvir plus ribavirin was done by both the systems at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Perfect correlation between the assays in the course of therapy at different treatment time- point in genotypes 3 and 1 was seen. The study demonstrates excellent performance of the Xpert ® HCV assay in viral load assessment and in treatment course monitoring consistency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Halisulfate 3 and Suvanine as Novel Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase from a Marine Sponge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Furuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an important etiological agent that is responsible for the development of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 helicase is a possible target for novel drug development due to its essential role in viral replication. In this study, we identified halisulfate 3 (hal3 and suvanine as novel NS3 helicase inhibitors, with IC50 values of 4 and 3 µM, respectively, from a marine sponge by screening extracts of marine organisms. Both hal3 and suvanine inhibited the ATPase, RNA binding, and serine protease activities of NS3 helicase with IC50 values of 8, 8, and 14 µM, and 7, 3, and 34 µM, respectively. However, the dengue virus (DENV NS3 helicase, which shares a catalytic core (consisting mainly of ATPase and RNA binding sites with HCV NS3 helicase, was not inhibited by hal3 and suvanine, even at concentrations of 100 µM. Therefore, we conclude that hal3 and suvanine specifically inhibit HCV NS3 helicase via an interaction with an allosteric site in NS3 rather than binding to the catalytic core. This led to the inhibition of all NS3 activities, presumably by inducing conformational changes.

  1. Variability and resistance mutations in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease in patients not treated with protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bonome Zeminian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of treatment of chronic hepatitis C is to achieve a sustained virological response, which is defined as exhibiting undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA levels in serum following therapy for at least six months. However, the current treatment is only effective in 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1, the most prevalent genotype in Brazil. Inhibitors of the serine protease non-structural protein 3 (NS3 have therefore been developed to improve the responses of HCV-infected patients. However, the emergence of drug-resistant variants has been the major obstacle to therapeutic success. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms in the NS3 genomic region of HCV from 37 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 had not been treated with protease inhibitors. Plasma viral RNA was used to amplify and sequence the HCV NS3 gene. The results indicate that the catalytic triad is conserved. A large number of substitutions were observed in codons 153, 40 and 91; the resistant variants T54A, T54S, V55A, R155K and A156T were also detected. This study shows that resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms are present in the NS3 region of HCV in patients who have not been treated with protease inhibitors, data that are important in determining the efficiency of this new class of drugs in Brazil.

  2. Production of infectious genotype 1b virus particles in cell culture and impairment by replication enhancing mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pietschmann

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV replicons, studies of the intracellular steps of the viral replication cycle became possible. These RNAs are capable of self-amplification in cultured human hepatoma cells, but save for the genotype 2a isolate JFH-1, efficient replication of these HCV RNAs requires replication enhancing mutations (REMs, previously also called cell culture adaptive mutations. These mutations cluster primarily in the central region of non-structural protein 5A (NS5A, but may also reside in the NS3 helicase domain or at a distinct position in NS4B. Most efficient replication has been achieved by combining REMs residing in NS3 with distinct REMs located in NS4B or NS5A. However, in spite of efficient replication of HCV genomes containing such mutations, they do not support production of infectious virus particles. By using the genotype 1b isolate Con1, in this study we show that REMs interfere with HCV assembly. Strongest impairment of virus formation was found with REMs located in the NS3 helicase (E1202G and T1280I as well as NS5A (S2204R, whereas a highly adaptive REM in NS4B still allowed virus production although relative levels of core release were also reduced. We also show that cells transfected with the Con1 wild type genome or the genome containing the REM in NS4B release HCV particles that are infectious both in cell culture and in vivo. Our data provide an explanation for the in vitro and in vivo attenuation of cell culture adapted HCV genomes and may open new avenues for the development of fully competent culture systems covering the therapeutically most relevant HCV genotypes.

  3. Crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS5 protein reveals a conformation similar to Japanese encephalitis virus NS5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Anup K.; Cyr, Matthew; Longenecker, Kenton; Tripathi, Rakesh; Sun, Chaohong; Kempf, Dale J. (AbbVie)

    2017-02-21

    The rapid spread of the recentZika virus(ZIKV) epidemic across various countries in the American continent poses a major health hazard for the unborn fetuses of pregnant women. To date, there is no effective medical intervention. The nonstructural protein 5 ofZika virus(ZIKV-NS5) is critical for ZIKV replication through the 5'-RNA capping and RNA polymerase activities present in its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, respectively. The crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV-NS5 protein has been determined at 3.05 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space groupP21212 and containing two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure is similar to that reported for the NS5 protein fromJapanese encephalitis virusand suggests opportunities for structure-based drug design targeting either its MTase or RdRp domain.

  4. Characterization of purified Sindbis virus nsP4 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubach, Jon K.; Wasik, Brian R.; Rupp, Jonathan C.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard W.; Smith, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    The Sindbis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsP4) is responsible for the replication of the viral RNA genome. In infected cells, nsP4 is localized in a replication complex along with the other viral non-structural proteins. nsP4 has been difficult to homogenously purify from infected cells due to its interactions with the other replication proteins and the fact that its N-terminal residue, a tyrosine, causes the protein to be rapidly turned over in cells. We report the successful expression and purification of Sindbis nsP4 in a bacterial system, in which nsP4 is expressed as an N-terminal SUMO fusion protein. After purification the SUMO tag is removed, resulting in the isolation of full-length nsP4 possessing the authentic N-terminal tyrosine. This purified enzyme is able to produce minus-strand RNA de novo from plus-strand templates, as well as terminally add adenosine residues to the 3' end of an RNA substrate. In the presence of the partially processed viral replicase polyprotein, P123, purified nsP4 is able to synthesize discrete template length minus-strand RNA products. Mutations in the 3' CSE or poly(A) tail of viral template RNA prevent RNA synthesis by the replicase complex containing purified nsP4, consistent with previously reported template requirements for minus-strand RNA synthesis. Optimal reaction conditions were determined by investigating the effects of time, pH, and the concentrations of nsP4, P123 and magnesium on the synthesis of RNA

  5. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5E3 (Canada); Babiuk, Lorne A. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Liu, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.liu@usask.ca [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5E3 (Canada)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  6. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. → HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. → HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. → Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. → Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  7. Theory Meets Experiment: Metal Ion Effects in HCV Genomic RNA Kissing Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhen Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The long-range base pairing between the 5BSL3. 2 and 3′X domains in hepatitis C virus (HCV genomic RNA is essential for viral replication. Experimental evidence points to the critical role of metal ions, especially Mg2+ ions, in the formation of the 5BSL3.2:3′X kissing complex. Furthermore, NMR studies suggested an important ion-dependent conformational switch in the kissing process. However, for a long time, mechanistic understanding of the ion effects for the process has been unclear. Recently, computational modeling based on the Vfold RNA folding model and the partial charge-based tightly bound ion (PCTBI model, in combination with the NMR data, revealed novel physical insights into the role of metal ions in the 5BSL3.2-3′X system. The use of the PCTBI model, which accounts for the ion correlation and fluctuation, gives reliable predictions for the ion-dependent electrostatic free energy landscape and ion-induced population shift of the 5BSL3.2:3′X kissing complex. Furthermore, the predicted ion binding sites offer insights about how ion-RNA interactions shift the conformational equilibrium. The integrated theory-experiment study shows that Mg2+ ions may be essential for HCV viral replication. Moreover, the observed Mg2+-dependent conformational equilibrium may be an adaptive property of the HCV genomic RNA such that the equilibrium is optimized to the intracellular Mg2+ concentration in liver cells for efficient viral replication.

  8. A translational study of resistance emergence using sequential direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C using ultra-deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiromi; Hayes, C Nelson; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Tsuge, Masataka; Miki, Daiki; Takahashi, Shoichi; Ochi, Hidenori; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-09-01

    Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) have recently been developed and are ultimately hoped to replace interferon-based therapy. However, DAA monotherapy results in rapid emergence of resistant strains and DAAs must be used in combinations that present a high genetic barrier to resistance, although viral kinetics of multidrug-resistant strains remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study is to track the emergence and fitness of resistance using combinations of telaprevir and NS5A or NS5B inhibitors with genotype 1b clones. HCV-infected chimeric mice were treated with DAAs, and resistance was monitored using direct and ultra-deep sequencing. Combination therapy with telaprevir and BMS-788329 (NS5A inhibitor) reduced serum HCV RNA to undetectable levels. The presence of an NS3-V36A telaprevir resistance mutation resulted in poor response to telaprevir monotherapy but showed significant HCV reduction when telaprevir was combined with BMS-788329. However, a BMS-788329-resistant strain emerged at low frequency. Infection with a BMS-788329-resistant NS5A-L31V mutation rapidly resulted in gain of an additional NS5A-Y93A mutation that conferred telaprevir resistance during combination therapy. Infection with dual NS5AL31V/NS5AY93H mutations resulted in poor response to combination therapy and development of telaprevir resistance. Although HCV RNA became undetectable soon after the beginning of combination therapy with BMS-788329 and BMS-821095 (NS5B inhibitor), rebound with emergence of resistance against all three drugs occurred. Triple resistance also occurred following infection with the NS3V36A/NS5AL31V/NS5AY93H triple mutation. Resistant strains easily develop from cloned virus strains. Sequential use of DAAs should be avoided to prevent emergence of multidrug-resistant strains.

  9. Detergent-resistant membrane association of NS2 and E2 during hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Saravanabalaji; Saravanabalaji, Dhanaranjani; Yi, MinKyung

    2015-04-01

    membranes. We then showed that NS2 regulates E2 localization to the DRM, consistent with its role in recruiting E2 to the virus assembly sites. We also showed that short-term treatment with the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) not only disrupted the DRM localization of Core, NS2, and E2 but also specifically inhibited intracellular virus assembly without affecting HCV RNA replication. Thus, our data support the role of the DRM as a platform for particle assembly process. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Analytical and clinical performance of the Hologic Aptima HCV Quant Dx Assay for the quantification of HCV RNA in plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Pedersen, Martin Schou; Johansen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    obtained from 13 patients undergoing treatment with DAAs. RESULTS: Deming regression of results from 187 plasma samples with HCV RNA >2 Log IU/mL indicated that the Aptima assay quantified higher than the CAPCTMv2 test for HCV RNA >4.9 Log IU/mL. The linearity of the Aptima assay was excellent across...

  11. HCV Genotype 6a Escape From and Resistance to Velpatasvir, Pibrentasvir, and Sofosbuvir in Robust Infectious Cell Culture Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Long V; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M

    2018-01-01

    V was able to propagate and escape in the presence of pibrentasvir with emergence of NS5A-L28S, conferring a high level of resistance to this inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of HCV genotype 6a isolated from patients can be adapted to propagate in cultured cells, permitting studies of the complete...... infectious cell culture models of HCV genotype 6a infection to study the effects of these inhibitors and the development of resistance. METHODS: The consensus sequences of prototype strains HK2 (MG717925) and HK6a (MG717928), originating from serum of patients with chronic HCV infection, were determined...... by Sanger sequencing of genomes amplified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vitro noninfectious full-length clones of these 6a strains were subsequently adapted in Huh7.5 cells, primarily by using substitutions identified in JFH1-based Core-NS5A and Core-NS5B genotype 6a recombinants...

  12. HCV Genotype 6a Escape from and Resistance to Velpatasvir, Pibrentasvir, and Sofosbuvir in Robust Infectious Cell Culture Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Long; Ramirez Almeida, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith Margarete

    was able to propagate and escape in the presence of pibrentasvir with emergence of NS5A-L28S, conferring a high level of resistance to this inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of HCV genotype 6a isolated from patients can be adapted to propagate in cultured cells, permitting studies of the complete life cycle...... infectious cell culture models of HCV genotype 6a infection to study the effects of these inhibitors and the development of resistance. METHODS: The consensus sequences of prototype strains HK2 (MG717925) and HK6a (MG717928), originating from serum of patients with chronic HCV infection, were determined...... by Sanger sequencing of genomes amplified by reverse transcription-PCR. In vitro non-infectious full-length clones of these 6a strains were subsequently adapted in Huh7.5 cells, primarily by using substitutions identified in JFH1-based core-NS5A and core-NS5B genotype 6a recombinants. We studied...

  13. HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdel Fatah Fahmy Hanno

    2013-06-27

    Jun 27, 2013 ... tested positively for HCV RNA in PBMCs at the end of treatment had an overall significantly ... chronic hepatitis C, the history of previous use of antiviral medicine or .... Although hepatocytes are considered to be primary targets of. HCV, clinical .... 6. Yamagiwa S, Matsuda Y, Ichida T, Honda Y, Takamura M,.

  14. Indeterminate RIBA results were associated with the absence of hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV-RNA) in blood donors

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Felicidade Mota; Zarife, Maria Alice Sant'ana; Reis, Eliana Almeida Gomes; G. Reis, Mitermayer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is diagnosed by the presence of antibodies and is supplemented by confirmatory testing methods, such as recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) and HCV-RNA detection. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of RIBA testing to diagnose HCV infection in blood donors positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Methods: A total of 102 subjects positive for anti-HCV determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at the Hematology and Hemotherapy Found...

  15. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  16. Genetic Barrier to Direct Acting Antivirals in HCV Sequences Deposited in the European Databank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Alexandre Kliemann

    Full Text Available Development of resistance results from mutations in the viral genome, and the presence of selective drug pressure leads to the emergence of a resistant virus population. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of genetic variability on the genetic barrier to drug resistance to DAAs.The genetic barrier was quantified based on the number and type of nucleotide mutations required to impart resistance, considering full-length HCV NS3, NS5A and NS5B regions segregated by genotype into subtypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b and 3a. This study analyzeds 789 NS3 sequences, 708 sequences and 536 NS5B sequences deposited in the European Hepatitis C Virus Database, in the following resistance-associated positions: NS3: F43/I/L/S/V, Q80K/R, R155K/G, A156G/S/T and D168A/C/E/G/H/N/T/V/Y; NS5A: L/M28A/T/V, Q30E/H/R, L31F/I/M/V, H58D or P58S and Y93C/F/H/N/S; NS5B: S282P/R/T, C316H/N/Y, S368T, Y448C/H, S556G/R, D559R.Variants that require only one transversion in NS3 were found in 4 positions and include F43S, R80K, R155K/G and A156T. The genetic barrier to resistance shows subtypic differences at position 155 of the NS3 gene where a single transition is necessary in subtype 1a. In the NS5A gene, 5 positions where only one nucleotide change can confer resistance were found, such as L31M which requires one transversion in all subtypes, except in 0.28% of 1b sequences; and R30H, generated by a single transition, which was found in 10.25% of the sequences of genotype 1b. Other subtypic differences were observed at position 58, where resistance is less likely in genotype 1a because a transversion is required to create the variant 58S. For the NS5B inhibitors, the genetic barrier at positions conferring resistance was nearly identical in subtypes 1a and 1b, and single transitions or transversions were necessary in 5 positions to generate a drug-resistant variant of HCV. The positions C316Y and S556D required only one transition in all genotypes, Y448H and S556 G

  17. Structural features of NS3 of Dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 in solution and insight into RNA binding and the inhibitory role of quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ankita; Saw, Wuan Geok; Subramanian Manimekalai, Malathy Sony; Grüber, Ardina; Joon, Shin; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Grüber, Gerhard

    2017-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), which has four serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4), is the causative agent of the viral infection dengue. DENV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) comprises a serine protease domain and an RNA helicase domain which has nucleotide triphosphatase activities that are essential for RNA replication and viral assembly. Here, solution X-ray scattering was used to provide insight into the overall structure and flexibility of the entire NS3 and its recombinant helicase and protease domains for Dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 in solution. The DENV-2 and DENV-4 NS3 forms are elongated and flexible in solution. The importance of the linker residues in flexibility and domain-domain arrangement was shown by the compactness of the individual protease and helicase domains. Swapping of the 174 PPAVP 179 linker stretch of the related Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 into DENV-2 NS3 did not alter the elongated shape of the engineered mutant. Conformational alterations owing to RNA binding are described in the protease domain, which undergoes substantial conformational alterations that are required for the optimal catalysis of bound RNA. Finally, the effects of ATPase inhibitors on the enzymatically active DENV-2 and DENV-4 NS3 and the individual helicases are presented, and insight into the allosteric effect of the inhibitor quercetin is provided.

  18. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in Kadun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis C virus genotype 1b was found in the entire HCV RNA positive sample. Conclusions: The findings of 6.2% prevalence of HCV infection based on HCV RNA test confirmed that there is Hepatitis C virus in ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  20. Discrepancy between Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and NS4-Based Serotypes: Association with Their Subgenomic Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Nwe Win

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes plays an important role in the direct-acting agent era. Discrepancies between HCV genotyping and serotyping assays are occasionally observed. Eighteen samples with discrepant results between genotyping and serotyping methods were analyzed. HCV serotyping and genotyping were based on the HCV nonstructural 4 (NS4 region and 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR, respectively. HCV core and NS4 regions were chosen to be sequenced and were compared with the genotyping and serotyping results. Deep sequencing was also performed for the corresponding HCV NS4 regions. Seventeen out of 18 discrepant samples could be sequenced by the Sanger method. Both HCV core and NS4 sequences were concordant with that of genotyping in the 5′-UTR in all 17 samples. In cloning analysis of the HCV NS4 region, there were several amino acid variations, but each sequence was much closer to the peptide with the same genotype. Deep sequencing revealed that minor clones with different subgenotypes existed in two of the 17 samples. Genotyping by genome amplification showed high consistency, while several false reactions were detected by serotyping. The deep sequencing method also provides accurate genotyping results and may be useful for analyzing discrepant cases. HCV genotyping should be correctly determined before antiviral treatment.

  1. Designing cyclopentapeptide inhibitor as potential antiviral drug for dengue virus ns5 methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Syarifuddin; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Zubaidi, Ahmad Ardilla

    2012-01-01

    NS5 methyltransferase (Mtase) has a crucial role in the replication of dengue virus. There are two active sites on NS5 Mtase i.e., SAM and RNA-cap binding sites. Inhibition of the NS5 Mtase activity is expected to prevent the propagation of dengue virus. This study was conducted to design cyclic peptide ligands as enzyme inhibitors of dengue virus NS5 Mtase through computational approach. Cyclopentapeptides were designed as ligand of SAM binding site as much as 1635 and 736 cyclopentpeptides were designed as ligand of RNA-cap binding site. Interaction between ligand and NS5 Mtase has been conducted on the Docking simulation. The result shows that cyclopentapeptide CTWYC was the best peptide candidate on SAM binding site, with estimated free binding energy -30.72 kca/mol. Cyclopentapeptide CYEFC was the best peptide on RNA-cap binding site with estimated free binding energy -22.89 kcal/mol. Both peptides did not have tendency toward toxicity properties. So it is expected that both CTWYC and CYEFC ligands could be used as a potential antiviral drug candidates, which can inhibit the SAM and RNA-cap binding sites of dengue virus NS5 Mtase.

  2. Molecular Signature in HCV-Positive Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli De Re

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive, single-stranded RNA virus, which has been associated to different subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL. Cumulative evidence suggests an HCV-related antigen driven process in the B-NHL development. The underlying molecular signature associated to HCV-related B-NHL has to date remained obscure. In this review, we discuss the recent developments in this field with a special mention to different sets of genes whose expression is associated with BCR coupled to Blys signaling which in turn was found to be linked to B-cell maturation stages and NF-κb transcription factor. Even if recent progress on HCV-B-NHL signature has been made, the precise relationship between HCV and lymphoma development and phenotype signature remain to be clarified.

  3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces formation of stress granules whose proteins regulate HCV RNA replication and virus assembly and egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigorta, Urtzi; Heim, Markus H; Boyd, Bryan; Wieland, Stefan; Chisari, Francis V

    2012-10-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic structures that are induced in response to environmental stress, including viral infections. Here we report that hepatitis C virus (HCV) triggers the appearance of SGs in a PKR- and interferon (IFN)-dependent manner. Moreover, we show an inverse correlation between the presence of stress granules and the induction of IFN-stimulated proteins, i.e., MxA and USP18, in HCV-infected cells despite high-level expression of the corresponding MxA and USP18 mRNAs, suggesting that interferon-stimulated gene translation is inhibited in stress granule-containing HCV-infected cells. Finally, in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown experiments, we found that the stress granule proteins T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1), TIA1-related protein (TIAR), and RasGAP-SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) are required for efficient HCV RNA and protein accumulation at early time points in the infection and that G3BP1 and TIA-1 are required for intracellular and extracellular infectious virus production late in the infection, suggesting that they are required for virus assembly. In contrast, TIAR downregulation decreases extracellular infectious virus titers with little effect on intracellular RNA content or infectivity late in the infection, suggesting that it is required for infectious particle release. Collectively, these results illustrate that HCV exploits the stress granule machinery at least two ways: by inducing the formation of SGs by triggering PKR phosphorylation, thereby downregulating the translation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes, and by co-opting SG proteins for its replication, assembly, and egress.

  4. Alterations in microRNA expression profile in HCV-infected hepatoma cells: Involvement of miR-491 in regulation of HCV replication via the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Hisashi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Hosui, Atsushi; Nawa, Takatoshi; Kodama, Takahiro; Shimizu, Satoshi; Hikita, Hayato; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Kanto, Tatsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Hayashi, Norio [Kansai Rosai Hospital, 3-1-69, Inabaso, Amagasaki 660-8511 (Japan); Takehara, Tetsuo, E-mail: takehara@gh.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} HCV infection upregulated miR-192, -194, -215, downregulated miR-320, -491. {yields} Transfection of miR-192, -215, and -491 enhanced HCV replication. {yields} Transfection of miR-491 inhibited Akt phosphorylation. {yields} Akt inhibition could be responsible for augmentation of HCV replication by miR-491. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of microRNA (miRNA) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in hepatoma cells. Using miRNA array analysis, miR-192/miR-215, miR-194, miR-320, and miR-491 were identified as miRNAs whose expression levels were altered by HCV infection. Among them, miR-192/miR-215 and miR-491 were capable of enhancing replication of the HCV replicon as well as HCV itself. HCV IRES activity or cell proliferation was not increased by forced expression of miR-192/miR-215 or miR-491. Investigation of signaling pathways revealed that miR-491 specifically suppressed the phosphoinositol-3 (PI3) kinase/Akt pathway. Under inhibition of PI3 kinase by LY294002, the suppressive effect of miR-491 on HCV replication was abolished, indicating that suppression of HCV replication by miR-491 was dependent on the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway. miRNAs altered by HCV infection would then affect HCV replication, which implies a complicated mechanism for regulating HCV replication. HCV-induced miRNA may be involved in changes in cellular properties including hepatocarcinogenesis.

  5. Pegylated interferon and ribavirin promote early evolution of nonstructural 5A protein in individuals with hepatitis C who demonstrate a response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Yuan, He-Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Reeck, Amanda; Shelton, Janel; Attar, Nahid; Zhang, Song; Neumann, Avidan U; Carney, David S; Gale, Michael; Lee, William M

    2009-09-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) quasispecies diversity is more likely to affect early viral decline during treatment of hepatitis C than is having human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We evaluated the influence of HCV therapy on changes in the nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein. Fifteen patients with HCV genotype 1 infection with or without HIV infection were recruited for the present study, and the decrease in the HCV RNA level was measured at early time points. The evolution of HCV NS5A quasispecies within the first week was analyzed by comparing the clones observed at later times in the study with the baseline consensus sequence of individual patients. The response to therapy was defined as an early response (ER; ie, an HCV RNA level <615 IU/mL at week 4) or a slow response (SR; ie, a detectable HCV RNA level at week 4). HIV infection did not affect early viral kinetics. At baseline, lower diversity was seen in NS5A and in the amino and carboxyl termini of patients with an ER, compared with those with an SR. Rapid evolution of the NS5A genetic region occurred in patients with an ER (P = .01) but not in those with an SR (P = .73). The evolution was the result of an increase in the number of amino acid substitutions in the carboxyl region (P = .02) in patients with an ER. Selective pressure appears to result in more-marked changes in individuals with an ER than in those with an SR. The carboxyl terminus was subject to the most change and may be an important determinant of phenotypic resistance to interferon-based therapy.

  6. Morphological and biochemical characterization of the membranous hepatitis C virus replication compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, David; Hoppe, Simone; Saher, Gesine; Krijnse-Locker, Jacomine; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces rearrangements of intracellular membranes that are thought to serve as a scaffold for the assembly of the viral replicase machinery. The most prominent membranous structures present in HCV-infected cells are double-membrane vesicles (DMVs). However, their composition and role in the HCV replication cycle are poorly understood. To gain further insights into the biochemcial properties of HCV-induced membrane alterations, we generated a functional replicon containing a hemagglutinin (HA) affinity tag in nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B), the supposed scaffold protein of the viral replication complex. By using HA-specific affinity purification we isolated NS4B-containing membranes from stable replicon cells. Complementing biochemical and electron microscopy analyses of purified membranes revealed predominantly DMVs, which contained viral proteins NS3 and NS5A as well as enzymatically active viral replicase capable of de novo synthesis of HCV RNA. In addition to viral factors, co-opted cellular proteins, such as vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein A (VAP-A) and VAP-B, that are crucial for viral RNA replication, as well as cholesterol, a major structural lipid of detergent-resistant membranes, are highly enriched in DMVs. Here we describe the first isolation and biochemical characterization of HCV-induced DMVs. The results obtained underline their central role in the HCV replication cycle and suggest that DMVs are sites of viral RNA replication. The experimental approach described here is a powerful tool to more precisely define the molecular composition of membranous replication factories induced by other positive-strand RNA viruses, such as picorna-, arteri- and coronaviruses.

  7. Development and characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-7 cell culture systems: role of CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I and effect of antiviral drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Jensen, Tanja B

    2009-01-01

    strains, as well as subtype 1b and 2b strains, we have completed a panel of culture systems for all major HCV genotypes. Efficient growth in Huh7.5 cells depended on adaptive mutations for HK6a/JFH1 (6a/2a, in E1 and E2) and J4/JFH1 (1b/2a, in NS2 and NS3); viability of J8/JFH1 (2b/2a) and QC69/JFH1 (7a/2......a) did not require adaptation. To facilitate comparative studies, we generated virus stocks of genotype 1-7 recombinants with infectivity titers of 10(3.7) to 10(5.2) 50% tissue culture infectious dose/mL and HCV RNA titers of 10(7.0) to 10(7.9) IU/mL. Huh7.5 cultures infected with genotype 1....... Recently, HCV research has been accelerated by cell culture systems based on the unique growth capacity of strain JFH1 (genotype 2a). By development of JFH1-based intergenotypic recombinants containing Core, envelope protein 1 and 2 (E1, E2), p7, and nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) of genotype 6a and 7a...

  8. Addition of ribavirin to daclatasvir plus asunaprevir for chronic hepatitis C 1b patients with baseline NS5A resistance-associated variants improved response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chun-Ming; Liu, Chun-Jen; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Chen, Pei-Jer

    2017-04-01

    Daclatasvir is a nonstructural protein 5A inhibitor with potent activity against hepatitis C virus genotypes 1-6 in vitro, and asunaprevir is a nonstructural protein 3 protease inhibitor with activity against genotypes 1, 4, 5, and 6. Despite a 90% sustained virologic response (SVR) rate, the SVR rate in patients with baseline NS5A-L31/Y93H polymorphisms decreased to around 40%. Therefore, an alternative regimen under the consideration of cost-effectiveness would be important. Whether the addition of ribavirin could improve the SVR rate among this group of patients remains unknown and hence our case series was reported. For six adult chronic hepatitis C 1b patients with a pre-existing NS5A-Y93H (>20%) polymorphism, we added ribavirin (800 mg/d) to daclatasvir/asunaprevir for 24 weeks and followed through 12-weeks post-treatment. Four of these patients received interferon/ribavirin treatment before but relapsed, while the other two were naïve cases. Two of them had liver cirrhosis and one had hepatocellular carcinoma postcurative therapy. The primary efficacy end-point was undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA (hepatitis C virus RNA level ofhepatitis C patients with NS5A-Y93H polymorphism, the addition of ribavirin to daclatasvir/asunaprevir may increase the SVR12 rate with minimal side effects, and thus deserves more comprehensive trials in resource-limited areas. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Resistance Analyses of Japanese Hepatitis C-Infected Patients Receiving Sofosbuvir or Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir Containing Regimens in Phase 3 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, M; Dvory-Sobol, H; Izumi, N; Nishiguchi, S; Doehle, B; Svarovskaia, E S; De-Oertel, S; Knox, S; Brainard, D M; Miller, M D; Mo, H; Sakamoto, N; Takehara, T; Omata, M

    2016-10-01

    High rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) has been achieved in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT)1 and GT2 infection treated with ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) ±ribavirin (RBV) and SOF+RBV, respectively. We evaluated the effect of baseline HCV NS5A and NS5B resistance-associated variants (RAVs) on treatment outcome and characterized variants at virologic failure. Baseline deep sequencing for NS5A and NS5B genes was performed for all GT1 patients. Deep sequencing of NS5A (GT1 only) and NS5B (GT1 and GT2) was performed for patients who failed treatment or discontinued early with detectable HCV RNA (i.e., >25 IU/mL). In patients with HCV GT1 infection, 22.3% (GT1a: 2/11; GT1b: 74/330) had ≥1 baseline NS5A RAV. The most frequent NS5A RAVs in GT1b were Y93H (17.9%, 59/330) and L31M (2.4%, 8/330). Despite the presence of NS5A RAVs at baseline, 100% and 97% of patients achieved SVR12, compared with 100% and 99% for those with no NS5A RAVs with LDV/SOF and LDV/SOF+RBV, respectively. All patients with NS5B RAVs at baseline achieved SVR12. Of the 153 patients with GT2 infection (GT2a 60.1%, GT2b 39.9%), 3.3% (5/153) experienced viral relapse. No S282T or other NS5B RAVs were detected at baseline or relapse; no change in susceptibility to SOF or RBV was observed at relapse. In conclusion, LDV/SOF and SOF+RBV demonstrate a high barrier to resistance in Japanese patients with HCV GT1 and GT2 infection. The presence of baseline NS5A RAVs did not impact treatment outcome in GT1 Japanese patients treated with LDV/SOF for 12 weeks. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of dried blood spot samples for hepatitis C virus detection and quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Brunna Lemos Crespo; do Espírito-Santo, Márcia Paschoal; Marques, Vanessa Alves; Miguel, Juliana Custódio; da Silva, Elisangela Ferreira; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2016-09-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) could be an excellent alternative for HCV diagnosis, since it is less invasive and can be stored and transported without refrigeration. The aim of this study was to optimize quantitative and qualitative methods for HCV detection in DBS. DBS and serum samples were collected from 99 subjects (59 anti-HCV/HCV RNA positive and 40 seronegative samples). Seven extraction methods and different PCR parameters were evaluated in DBS samples in the quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) developed to amplify the 5' noncoding region of HCV. A qualitative PCR for amplification of NS5B region of HCV was also valued and the nested-PCR sequenced. The qRT-PCR showed good correlation to commercial assay for HCV viral measurement in serum. To quantify HCV RNA in DBS, it was necessary to increase reverse transcriptase and cDNA concentration. HCV RNA quantification in DBS demonstrated sensitivity of 65.9%, 100% of specificity and kappa statistic of 0.65. The median viral load of DBS samples was 5.38 log10 copies/ml (minimum value=1.76 and maximum value=10.48 log10 copies/ml). HCV RNA was detected in NS5B regions and nucleotide sequences obtained in 43 serum and 11 DBS samples. The presence of the same subtype was observed in paired serum and DBS samples. In this study, it was possible to demonstrate that, despite the low sensitivity, the optimized protocol was able to determine the viral load, as well as, the infecting HCV genotype, validating the usefulness of DBS for viral load determination and molecular epidemiology studies of HCV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutagenesis of Dengue Virus Protein NS2A Revealed a Novel Domain Responsible for Virus-Induced Cytopathic Effect and Interactions between NS2A and NS2B Transmembrane Segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Tian, Jia Ni; Wu, Jian-Sung; Wu, Su-Ying; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yueh, Andrew

    2017-06-15

    The NS2A protein of dengue virus (DENV) has eight predicted transmembrane segments (pTMS1 to -8) and participates in RNA replication, virion assembly, and host antiviral response. However, the roles of specific amino acid residues within the pTMS regions of NS2A during the viral life cycle are not clear. Here, we explore the function of DENV NS2A by introducing a series of alanine substitutions into the N-terminal half (pTMS1 to -4) of the protein in the context of a DENV infectious clone or subgenomic replicon. Six NS2A mutants (NM5, -7, -9, and -17 to -19) around pTMS1 and -2 displayed a novel phenotype showing a >1,000-fold reduction in virus yield, an absence of plaque formation despite wild-type-like replicon activity, and infectious-virus-like particle yields. HEK-293 cells infected with the six NS2A mutant viruses failed to cause a virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) by MitoCapture staining, cell proliferation, and lactate dehydrogenase release assays. Sequencing analyses of pseudorevertant viruses derived from lethal-mutant viruses revealed two consensus reversion mutations, leucine to phenylalanine at codon 181 (L181F) within pTMS7 of NS2A and isoleucine to threonine at codon 114 (I114T) within NS2B. The introduction of an NS2A-L181F mutation into the lethal (NM15, -16, -25, and -33) and CPE-defective (NM7, -9, and -19) mutants substantially rescued virus infectivity and virus-induced CPE, respectively, whereas the NS2B-L114T mutation rescued the NM16, -25, and -33 mutants. In conclusion, the results revealed the essential roles of the N-terminal half of NS2A in RNA replication and virus-induced CPE. Intramolecular interactions between pTMSs of NS2A and intermolecular interactions between the NS2A and NS2B proteins were also implicated. IMPORTANCE The characterization of the N-terminal (current study) and C-terminal halves of DENV NS2A is the most comprehensive mutagenesis study to date to investigate the function of NS2A during the flaviviral life cycle

  12. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K; Weiner, David B; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-03-07

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14 th vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection.

  13. Il controllo di qualità nell’impiego della PCR applicata alla determinazione qualitativa dell’HCV-RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Giuliani

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA in samples of plasma/serum has become an essential part of the diagnosis and management of HCV-infected patients. Qualitative HCV-RNA tests are used to identify acute HCV infections as well as chronic HCV carriers.In recent years,a variety of commercial and non commercial test systems have been developed for this purpose. Each of these methods is calibrate with proprietary standards and exhibits its own sensitivity (detection limit and specificity. Obviously, laboratories performing HCV-RNA test should report accurate and reliable results regardless of the type of assay used.Where commercial kit are used for part of or the complete analytical procedure, documented validation points already covered by the kit manufacturer can substitute for the validation by the user.Nevertheless, the performance of the kit with respect to its intended use has to be demonstrated by the user. One of the best ways to assess the performance of individual laboratories for validation of qualitative HCV-RNA test is determine: 1. Specificity. In order to validate the specificity of the analytical procedure, at least 100 HCV-RNA-negative plasma pools should be tested and shown to be non-reactive. 2. Positive cut-off point (detection limit/sensitivity.The positive cut-off point (as defined in the Ph Eur General Method 2. 6. 21 is the minimum number of the target sequences per volume sample which can be detected in 95% of test runs.A dilution series of a working reagent or reference material, which has been calibrated against the WHO HCV International Standard (96/790, should be tested on different days to examine variation between test runs.At least 3 independent dilution series should be tested with a sufficient number of replicates at each dilution to give a total number of 24 test results for each dilution to enable a statistical analysis of the results; 3. Robustness.To demonstrate robustness, at least 20 HCV-RNA negative plasma

  14. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, and interferon-based therapy cures only 40 to 80% of patients, depending on HCV genotype. Research was accelerated by genotype 2a (strain JFH1) infectious cell culture systems. We previously developed viable JFH1-based...... (HC-TN and DH6), 1b (DH1 and DH5), and 3a (DBN) isolates, using previously identified adaptive mutations. Introduction of mutations from isolates of the same subtype either led to immediate efficient virus production or accelerated culture adaptation. The DH6 and DH5 recombinants without introduced...... mutations did not adapt to culture. Universal adaptive effects of mutations in NS3 (Q1247L, I1312V, K1398Q, R1408W, and Q1496L) and NS5A (V2418L) were investigated for JFH1-based genotype 1 to 5 core-NS2 recombinants; several mutations conferred adaptation to H77C (1a), J4 (1b), S52 (3a), and SA13 (5a...

  15. PBDE: Structure-Activity Studies for the Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Abdus Salam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The helicase portion of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 is considered one of the most validated targets for developing direct acting antiviral agents. We isolated polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE 1 from a marine sponge as an NS3 helicase inhibitor. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of PBDE (1 on the essential activities of NS3 protein such as RNA helicase, ATPase, and RNA binding activities. The structure-activity relationship analysis of PBDE (1 against the HCV ATPase revealed that the biphenyl ring, bromine, and phenolic hydroxyl group on the benzene backbone might be a basic scaffold for the inhibitory potency.

  16. Successful retreatment with sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir for cirrhotic patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b, who discontinued the prior treatment with asunaprevir plus daclatasvir: A case series and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Koji; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Takada, Nobuo; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Imazeki, Fumio; Kato, Naoya

    2018-01-01

    Background Interferon-free treatment results in higher sustained virologic response (SVR) rates, with no serious adverse events in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. However, in some patients with treatment-failure in HCV NS5A inhibitor-including interferon-free regimens, the treatment-emergent HCV NS5A resistance-associated variants (RAVs), which are resistant to interferon-free retreatment including HCV NS5A inhibitors, are observed. In HCV-infected Japanese patients with daclatasvir and asunaprevir treatment failure, retreatment with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir could lead to only ∼70% SVR rates. Case summary Three HCV genotype (GT)-1b-infected cirrhotic patients who discontinued the combination of daclatasvir and asunaprevir due to adverse drug reactions within 4 weeks; retreatment with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir combination could result in SVR in these patients without RAVs. One HCV GT-1b-infected cirrhotic patient who discontinued the combination of daclatasvir and asunaprevir due to viral breakthrough at week 10; retreatment with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir combination for this patient with the treatment-emergent HCV NS5A RAV-Y93H resulted in viral relapse at week 4 after the end of the treatment. Conclusion Retreatment with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir is effective for HCV GT-1b patients who discontinue the combination of daclatasvir and asunaprevir within 4 weeks. The treatment response should be related to the existence of treatment-emergent HCV NS5A RAVs, but may not be related to the short duration of treatment. PMID:29435197

  17. HCV Virus and Lymphoid Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tsutsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the viruses known to cause hepatic cancer. HCV is also believed to be involved in malignant lymphoma. In this paper, we investigated characteristics of malignant lymphoma cases that were anti-HCV antibody (HCV-Ab positive. We were able to perform pathological examinations on 13 out of 14 HCV-positive cases. Of these, lymphoid tissues of 10 stained positive for HCV-Ab. There was no significant correlation between the degree of HCV staining and the rate of recurrence or resistance to treatment. However, there did appear to be a consistent decrease in the amount of HCV-RNA between pre- and posttreatment among HCV-Ab-positive cases; that is, treatment-resistant cases that exhibited resistance from the first treatment and recurrent cases more frequently had a higher HCV level at treatment termination compared to the pretreatment level. This suggests that the HCV virus either accelerates oncogenesis by direct interaction with B cells or indirectly affects lymphoma prognosis.

  18. Evaluation of automated RNA-extraction technology and a qualitative HCV assay for sensitivity and detection of HCV RNA in pool-screening systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, M.; Habibuw, M. R.; Rebers, S. P.; Boom, R.; Reesink, H. W.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was the evaluation of NAT technology for the detection of HCV RNA in plasma pools according to the recommendations of the Paul Ehrlich Institute (5000 IU/mL/donation) and the Committee for Proprietary Medical Products (100 IU/mL/manufacturing pool). STUDY

  19. Detection of HCV core antigen and its diagnostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo compare the abilities of the hepatitis C virus (HCV core antigen (cAg test and the HCV RNA assay for confirming anti-HCV presence in order to determine the clinical utility of the HCV-cAg as an alternative or confirmatory diagnostic tool. MethodsSerum samples collected from 158 patients diagnosed with HCV infection were subjected to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based HCV-cAg test. The optical density (OD measured values were used to calculate the ratio of specimen absorbance to the cutoff value (S/CO. Simultaneously, the serum samples were subjected to PCR-based nucleic acid amplification quantitative fluorescence detection of HCV RNA. ResultsNone of the serum samples had a S/CO value <1 for the HCV-cAg test (100% negative, but all of the samples had a S/CO value >5 (100% positive. The HCV-cAg test sensitivity was 87.05%, specificity was 76.67%, positive predictive value was 9653%, and negative predictive value was 44.23%. As the S/CO value gradually increased, the significantly higher positive coincident rate of the HCV RNA test decreased. The HCV RNA negative coincident rate was significantly higher than that of the HCV-cAg test. HCV-cAg S/CO values between 1 and 2 corresponded to an HCV RNA values between 1.0×103 copies/ml and 1.0×104 copies/ml. The highest S/CO value obtained was 1.992. ConclusionThe HCV-cAg test is comparable to the HCV RNA assay for diagnosing HCV infection.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M. Knodel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodel, Markus M; Nägel, Arne; Reiter, Sebastian; Vogel, Andreas; Targett-Adams, Paul; McLauchlan, John; Herrmann, Eva; Wittum, Gabriel

    2018-01-08

    Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE) upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nägel, Arne; Reiter, Sebastian; Vogel, Andreas; McLauchlan, John; Herrmann, Eva; Wittum, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE) upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles. PMID:29316722

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Knodel, Markus

    2018-01-08

    Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE) upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles.

  4. Detection of HCV-RNA by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Biotinylated and Radioiodinated Primers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Cheon, Jun Hong; Chung, Yoon Young; Park, Hung Dong; Chung, Young Hwa; Lee, Young Sang

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical applicability of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) kit of HCV-RNA using biotinylated and radioiodinated primers. Study subjects were 118 patients with positive anti-HCV. HCV-RNA in patients serum was extracted by guanidium thiocyanate method. After first amplification, the product was reamplified by primers labelled with biotin and I-125. The final amplification product was detected by counting the radioactivity after incubation in avidin coated tubes. In 51 samples, the test was repeated for evaluation of reproducibility. This new method was also compared with conventional RT-PCR methods in 34 samples from patients with chronic liver disease. The results were as follows, 1) HCV-RNA was positive in 85(97%)of 88 patients with chronic liver disease, and in 23 (73%) of 30 patients with normal liver function. 2) In comparison with conventional method, HCV-RNA was detected in 32(94%) of 34 patients with new method, whereas in 27(79% ) of the same group with conventional method 3) Repeated test with new method in 52 samples demonstrated 82% of concordant result. In conclusion, new method with biotinylated and radioiodinated primers was more sensitive than conventional method. However, great care must be taken for quality control because there were considerable interassay variation and possibility of false positivity and false negativity.

  5. Detection of HCV-RNA by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Biotinylated and Radioiodinated Primers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Cheon, Jun Hong; Chung, Yoon Young; Park, Hung Dong; Chung, Young Hwa; Lee, Young Sang [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical applicability of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) kit of HCV-RNA using biotinylated and radioiodinated primers. Study subjects were 118 patients with positive anti-HCV. HCV-RNA in patients serum was extracted by guanidium thiocyanate method. After first amplification, the product was reamplified by primers labelled with biotin and I-125. The final amplification product was detected by counting the radioactivity after incubation in avidin coated tubes. In 51 samples, the test was repeated for evaluation of reproducibility. This new method was also compared with conventional RT-PCR methods in 34 samples from patients with chronic liver disease. The results were as follows, 1) HCV-RNA was positive in 85(97%)of 88 patients with chronic liver disease, and in 23 (73%) of 30 patients with normal liver function. 2) In comparison with conventional method, HCV-RNA was detected in 32(94%) of 34 patients with new method, whereas in 27(79% ) of the same group with conventional method 3) Repeated test with new method in 52 samples demonstrated 82% of concordant result. In conclusion, new method with biotinylated and radioiodinated primers was more sensitive than conventional method. However, great care must be taken for quality control because there were considerable interassay variation and possibility of false positivity and false negativity.

  6. Adapted J6/JFH1-based Hepatitis C virus recombinants with genotype-specific NS4A show similar efficacies against lead protease inhibitors, alpha interferon, and a putative NS4A inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Sanne B; Serre, Stéphanie B N

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate studies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4A, we aimed at developing J6/JFH1-based recombinants with genotype 1- to 7-specific NS4A proteins. We developed efficient culture systems expressing NS4A proteins of genotypes (isolates) 1a (H77 and TN), 1b (J4), 2a (J6), 4a (ED43), 5a (SA13), 6a...... (HK6a), and 7a (QC69), with peak infectivity titers of ∼3.5 to 4.5 log10 focus-forming units per ml. Except for genotype 2a (J6), growth depended on adaptive mutations identified in long-term culture. Genotype 1a, 1b, and 4a recombinants were adapted by amino acid substitutions F772S (p7) and V1663A...... (NS4A), while 5a, 6a, and 7a recombinants required additional substitutions in the NS3 protease and/or NS4A. We demonstrated applicability of the developed recombinants for study of antivirals. Genotype 1 to 7 NS4A recombinants showed similar responses to the protease inhibitors telaprevir (VX-950...

  7. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protein polynucleotide-stimulated nucleoside triphosphatase and comparison with the related pestivirus and flavivirus enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzich, J A; Tamura, J K; Palmer-Hill, F; Warrener, P; Grakoui, A; Rice, C M; Feinstone, S M; Collett, M S

    1993-01-01

    Sequence motifs within the nonstructural protein NS3 of members of the Flaviviridae family suggest that this protein possesses nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) and RNA helicase activity. The RNA-stimulated NTPase activity of this protein from prototypic members of the Pestivirus and Flavivirus genera has recently been established and enzymologically characterized. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the NS3 protein from a member of the third genus of Flaviviridae, human hepatitis C virus (HCV), also possesses a polynucleotide-stimulated NTPase activity. Characterization of the purified HCV NTPase activity showed that it exhibited reaction condition optima with respect to pH, MgCl2, and salt identical to those of the representative pestivirus and flavivirus enzymes. However, each NTPase also possessed several unique properties when compared with one another. Notably, the profile of polynucleotide stimulation of the NTPase activity was distinct for the three enzymes. The HCV NTPase was the only one whose activity was significantly enhanced by a deoxyribopolynucleotide. Additional distinguishing features among the three enzymes relating to the kinetic properties of their NTPase activities are discussed. These studies provide a foundation for investigation of the putative RNA helicase activity of these proteins and for further study of the role of the NS3 proteins of members of the Flaviviridae in the replication cycle of these viruses. Images PMID:8396675

  8. HBV-DNA in hemodialysis patients infected by HCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Yousefi, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk for both hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and they may coexist. To determine the prevalence and clinical impact of HBV and HCV infection, we studied poly chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR on the blood samples of 90 HD patients in Kerman, Iran. ELISA test was used to detect anti-HBc, anti-HBs and HBs Ag. We found that 30 out of 90 (33.3%) patients were PCR-RT-PCR positive for HCV-RNA. No HBV-DNA (0%) was detected through the PCR study in both positive and negative HCV-RNA patient groups. Though none of the samples was HBsAg positive, 10 (33.3%) HCV-RNA positive patients were anti-HBc positive, and 12 (40.7%) were anti-HBs positive. We conclude that prevalence of hepatitis C infection is high in HD patients in our region, but not associated with active HBV infection. (author)

  9. Identification of the transcripts associated with spontaneous HCV clearance in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV

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    Yue Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV influences the outcome and natural disease progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. While the majority of HCV mono-infected and HCV/HIV co-infected subjects develop chronic HCV infection, 20–46% of mono- and co-infected subjects spontaneously clear HCV infection. The mechanism underlying viral clearance is not clearly understood. Analysis of differential cellular gene expression (mRNA between HIV-infected patients with persistent HCV infection or spontaneous clearance could provide a unique opportunity to decipher the mechanism of HCV clearance. Methods Plasma RNA from HIV/HCV co-infected subjects who cleared HCV and those who remained chronically infected with HCV was sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. The sequencing results were analyzed to identify transcripts that are associated with HCV clearance by measuring differential gene expression in HIV/HCV co-infected subjects who cleared HCV and those who remained chronically infected with HCV. Results We have identified plasma mRNA, the levels of which are significantly elevated (at least 5 fold, False Discovery Rate (FDR <0.05 before HCV infection in subjects who cleared HCV compared to those who remained chronically infected. Upon further analysis of these differentially expressed genes, before and after HCV infection, we found that before HCV infection 12 genes were uniquely upregulated in the clearance group compared to the chronically infected group. Importantly, a number of these 12 genes and their upstream regulators (such as CCL3, IL17D, LBP, SOCS3, NFKBIL1, IRF are associated with innate immune response functions. Conclusions These results suggest that subjects who spontaneously clear HCV may express these unique genes associated with innate immune functions.

  10. Connecting rules from paired miRNA and mRNA expression data sets of HCV patients to detect both inverse and positive regulatory relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Renhua; Liu, Qian; Liu, Tao; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Background Intensive research based on the inverse expression relationship has been undertaken to discover the miRNA-mRNA regulatory modules involved in the infection of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the leading cause of chronic liver diseases. However, biological studies in other fields have found that inverse expression relationship is not the only regulatory relationship between miRNAs and their targets, and some miRNAs can positively regulate a mRNA by binding at the 5' UTR of the mRNA. Result...

  11. Flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network: a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canard Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Flavivirus encompasses more than 50 distinct species of arthropod-borne viruses, including several major human pathogens, such as West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and the four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV type 1-4. Each year, flaviviruses cause more than 100 million infections worldwide, some of which lead to life-threatening conditions such as encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. Among the viral proteins, NS3 and NS5 proteins constitute the major enzymatic components of the viral replication complex and are essential to the flavivirus life cycle. Results We report here the results of a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen to identify the interactions between human host proteins and the flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins. Using our screen results and literature curation, we performed a global analysis of the NS3 and NS5 cellular targets based on functional annotation with the Gene Ontology features. We finally created the first flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network and analysed the topological features of this network. Our proteome mapping screen identified 108 human proteins interacting with NS3 or NS5 proteins or both. The global analysis of the cellular targets revealed the enrichment of host proteins involved in RNA binding, transcription regulation, vesicular transport or innate immune response regulation. Conclusions We proposed that the selective disruption of these newly identified host/virus interactions could represent a novel and attractive therapeutic strategy in treating flavivirus infections. Our virus-host interaction map provides a basis to unravel fundamental processes about flavivirus subversion of the host replication machinery and/or immune defence strategy.

  12. 2′-O Methylation of Internal Adenosine by Flavivirus NS5 Methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongping; Chang, David C.; Hua, Maggie Ho Chia; Lim, Siew Pheng; Chionh, Yok Hian; Hia, Fabian; Lee, Yie Hou; Kukkaro, Petra; Lok, Shee-Mei; Dedon, Peter C.; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2012-01-01

    RNA modification plays an important role in modulating host-pathogen interaction. Flavivirus NS5 protein encodes N-7 and 2′-O methyltransferase activities that are required for the formation of 5′ type I cap (m7GpppAm) of viral RNA genome. Here we reported, for the first time, that flavivirus NS5 has a novel internal RNA methylation activity. Recombinant NS5 proteins of West Nile virus and Dengue virus (serotype 4; DENV-4) specifically methylates polyA, but not polyG, polyC, or polyU, indicating that the methylation occurs at adenosine residue. RNAs with internal adenosines substituted with 2′-O-methyladenosines are not active substrates for internal methylation, whereas RNAs with adenosines substituted with N6-methyladenosines can be efficiently methylated, suggesting that the internal methylation occurs at the 2′-OH position of adenosine. Mass spectroscopic analysis further demonstrated that the internal methylation product is 2′-O-methyladenosine. Importantly, genomic RNA purified from DENV virion contains 2′-O-methyladenosine. The 2′-O methylation of internal adenosine does not require specific RNA sequence since recombinant methyltransferase of DENV-4 can efficiently methylate RNAs spanning different regions of viral genome, host ribosomal RNAs, and polyA. Structure-based mutagenesis results indicate that K61-D146-K181-E217 tetrad of DENV-4 methyltransferase forms the active site of internal methylation activity; in addition, distinct residues within the methyl donor (S-adenosyl-L-methionine) pocket, GTP pocket, and RNA-binding site are critical for the internal methylation activity. Functional analysis using flavivirus replicon and genome-length RNAs showed that internal methylation attenuated viral RNA translation and replication. Polymerase assay revealed that internal 2′-O-methyladenosine reduces the efficiency of RNA elongation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that flavivirus NS5 performs 2′-O methylation of internal adenosine of

  13. The amino-terminus of the hepatitis C virus (HCV p7 viroporin and its cleavage from glycoprotein E2-p7 precursor determine specific infectivity and secretion levels of HCV particle types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Denolly

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Viroporins are small transmembrane proteins with ion channel activities modulating properties of intracellular membranes that have diverse proviral functions. Hepatitis C virus (HCV encodes a viroporin, p7, acting during assembly, envelopment and secretion of viral particles (VP. HCV p7 is released from the viral polyprotein through cleavage at E2-p7 and p7-NS2 junctions by signal peptidase, but also exists as an E2p7 precursor, of poorly defined properties. Here, we found that ectopic p7 expression in HCVcc-infected cells reduced secretion of particle-associated E2 glycoproteins. Using biochemical assays, we show that p7 dose-dependently slows down the ER-to-Golgi traffic, leading to intracellular retention of E2, which suggested that timely E2p7 cleavage and p7 liberation are critical events to control E2 levels. By studying HCV mutants with accelerated E2p7 processing, we demonstrate that E2p7 cleavage controls E2 intracellular expression and secretion levels of nucleocapsid-free subviral particles and infectious virions. In addition, our imaging data reveal that, following p7 liberation, the amino-terminus of p7 is exposed towards the cytosol and coordinates the encounter between NS5A and NS2-based assembly sites loaded with E1E2 glycoproteins, which subsequently leads to nucleocapsid envelopment. We identify punctual mutants at p7 membrane interface that, by abrogating NS2/NS5A interaction, are defective for transmission of infectivity owing to decreased secretion of core and RNA and to increased secretion of non/partially-enveloped particles. Altogether, our results indicate that the retarded E2p7 precursor cleavage is essential to regulate the intracellular and secreted levels of E2 through p7-mediated modulation of the cell secretory pathway and to unmask critical novel assembly functions located at p7 amino-terminus.

  14. Combination treatment with hepatitis C virus protease and NS5A inhibitors is effective against recombinant genotype 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Sanne B; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    With the development of directly acting antivirals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy entered a new era. However, rapid selection of resistance mutations necessitates combination therapy. To study combination therapy in infectious culture systems, we aimed at developing HCV semi-full-length (semi...... to single-drug treatment, combination treatment with relatively low concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir suppressed infection with all five recombinants. Escaped viruses primarily had substitutions at amino acids in the NS3 protease and NS5A domain I reported to be genotype 1 resistance mutations...

  15. Transmission of HCV to a chimpanzee using virus particles produced in an RNA-transfected HepG2 cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S; Kalkeri, G; McClure, H M; Garry, R F; Clejan, S; Thung, S N; Murthy, K K

    2001-10-01

    It was demonstrated previously that HepG2 cells produce negative strand RNA and virus-like particles after transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) cDNA clone [Dash et al. (1997) American Journal of Pathology, 151:363-373]. To determine in vivo infectivity of these in vitro synthesized viral particles, a chimpanzee was inoculated intravenously with HCV derived from HepG2 cells. The infected chimpanzee was examined serially for elevation of liver enzymes, for the presence of HCV RNA in the serum by reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), anti-HCV antibodies in the serum, and inflammation in the liver. The chimpanzee developed elevated levels of liver enzymes after the second week, but the levels fluctuated over a 10-week period. HCV RNA was detected in the serum of the chimpanzee at the second, seventh and ninth weeks after inoculation, and remained positive up to 25 weeks. Liver biopsies at Weeks 18 and 19 revealed of mild inflammation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of HCV recovered from the infected chimpanzee at the second and ninth weeks showed 100% sequence homology with the clone used for transfection studies. Serum anti-HCV antibodies were not detected by EIA during the 25 weeks follow-up period. These results suggest that intravenous administration of the virus-like particles derived from RNA-transfected HepG2 cells are infectious, and therefore, the pMO9.6-T7 clone is an infectious clone. These results provide new information that in vitro synthesized HCV particles produced from full-length HCV clone can cause infection in a chimpanzee. This study will facilitate the use of innovative approaches to the study of assembly of HCV particles and mechanisms of virus infectivity in cell culture. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Zebrafish as a potential model organism for drug test against hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun-Bao Ding

    Full Text Available Screening and evaluating anti- hepatitis C virus (HCV drugs in vivo is difficult worldwide, mainly because of the lack of suitable small animal models. We investigate whether zebrafish could be a model organism for HCV replication. To achieve NS5B-dependent replication an HCV sub-replicon was designed and created with two vectors, one with HCV ns5b and fluorescent rfp genes, and the other containing HCV's 5'UTR, core, 3'UTR and fluorescent gfp genes. The vectors containing sub-replicons were co-injected into zebrafish zygotes. The sub-replicon amplified in liver showing a significant expression of HCV core RNA and protein. The sub-replicon amplification caused no abnormality in development and growth of zebrafish larvae, but induced gene expression change similar to that in human hepatocytes. As the amplified core fluorescence in live zebrafish was detectable microscopically, it rendered us an advantage to select those with replicating sub-replicon for drug experiments. Ribavirin and oxymatrine, two known anti-HCV drugs, inhibited sub-replicon amplification in this model showing reduced levels of HCV core RNA and protein. Technically, this method had a good reproducibility and is easy to operate. Thus, zebrafish might be a model organism to host HCV, and this zebrafish/HCV (sub-replicon system could be an animal model for anti-HCV drug screening and evaluation.

  17. New preclinical antimalarial drugs potently inhibit hepatitis C virus genotype 1b RNA replication.

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    Youki Ueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection causes chronic liver diseases and is a global health problem. Although new triple therapy (pegylated-interferon, ribavirin, and telaprevir/boceprevir has recently been started and is expected to achieve a sustained virologic response of more than 70% in HCV genotype 1 patients, there are several problems to be resolved, including skin rash/ageusia and advanced anemia. Thus a new type of anti-HCV drug is still needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recently developed HCV drug assay systems using HCV-RNA-replicating cells (e.g., HuH-7-derived OR6 and Li23-derived ORL8 were used to evaluate the anti-HCV activity of drug candidates. During the course of the evaluation of anti-HCV candidates, we unexpectedly found that two preclinical antimalarial drugs (N-89 and its derivative N-251 showed potent anti-HCV activities at tens of nanomolar concentrations irrespective of the cell lines and HCV strains of genotype 1b. We confirmed that replication of authentic HCV-RNA was inhibited by these drugs. Interestingly, however, this anti-HCV activity did not work for JFH-1 strain of genotype 2a. We demonstrated that HCV-RNA-replicating cells were cured by treatment with only N-89. A comparative time course assay using N-89 and interferon-α demonstrated that N-89-treated ORL8 cells had more rapid anti-HCV kinetics than did interferon-α-treated cells. This anti-HCV activity was largely canceled by vitamin E. In combination with interferon-α and/or ribavirin, N-89 or N-251 exhibited a synergistic inhibitory effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that the preclinical antimalarial drugs N-89 and N-251 exhibited very fast and potent anti-HCV activities using cell-based HCV-RNA-replication assay systems. N-89 and N-251 may be useful as a new type of anti-HCV reagents when used singly or in combination with interferon and/or ribavirin.

  18. Hepatitis C virus NS5A protein is a substrate for the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity of cyclophilins A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoulle, Xavier; Badillo, Aurélie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Verdegem, Dries; Landrieu, Isabelle; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Lippens, Guy

    2009-05-15

    We report here a biochemical and structural characterization of domain 2 of the nonstructural 5A protein (NS5A) from the JFH1 Hepatitis C virus strain and its interactions with cyclophilins A and B (CypA and CypB). Gel filtration chromatography, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and finally NMR spectroscopy all indicate the natively unfolded nature of this NS5A-D2 domain. Because mutations in this domain have been linked to cyclosporin A resistance, we used NMR spectroscopy to investigate potential interactions between NS5A-D2 and cellular CypA and CypB. We observed a direct molecular interaction between NS5A-D2 and both cyclophilins. The interaction surface on the cyclophilins corresponds to their active site, whereas on NS5A-D2, it proved to be distributed over the many proline residues of the domain. NMR heteronuclear exchange spectroscopy yielded direct evidence that many proline residues in NS5A-D2 form a valid substrate for the enzymatic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity of CypA and CypB.

  19. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus-resistant association substitutions to direct-acting antiviral agents in treatment-naïve hepatitis C genotype 1b-infected patients in western China

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    Li Z

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhao Li,* Zhi-wei Chen,* Hu Li, Hong Ren, Peng Hu Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute for Viral Hepatitis, Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Infectious Diseases, Chinese Ministry of Education, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work. Background: Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV are potent and highly efficacious. However, resistance-associated substitutions (RASs relevant to DAAs can impair treatment effectiveness even at baseline. Moreover, the prevalence of baseline RASs in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients in western China is still unclear. Materials and methods: Direct sequencing of the HCV NS3, NS5A, and NS5B regions was performed in baseline serum samples of 70 DAAs treatment-naïve HCV 1b-infected patients in western China. The sequences were analyzed with MEGA version 5.05 software. Evolutionary patterns of RASs and amino-acid covariance patterns in the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes were analyzed by MEGA and Cytoscape (version 3.2.1, respectively.Results: The presence of at least one RAS in the NS3 region (C16S, T54S, Q80R/L, A87T, R117H, S122G, V132I, V170I was observed in 85.48% (53 of 62 of patients, RASs in the NS5A region (L28M, R30Q, Q54H, P58S/T, Q62H/R, Y93H were observed in 42.42% (28 of 66 of patients, and RASs in the NS5B region (N142S, A300T, C316N, A338V, S365A, L392I, M414L, I424V, A442T, V499A, S556G were observed in 100% (44 of 44 of patients. Evolutionary patterns of RASs and amino-acid covariance patterns for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes are reported.Conclusion: The prevalence of RASs relevant to DAAs detected in the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B regions of HCV 1b from DAA treatment-naïve patients is high. Therefore, more attention should be paid to RASs associated with DAAs in the upcoming DAA-treatment era in China. Keywords: hepatitis C virus, unstructured proteins, resistance

  20. Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Mediated Microglial Inflammation via TLR2/TLR6 MyD88/NF-κB Pathway and Toll Like Receptor Ligand Treatment Furnished Immune Tolerance.

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    Ayilam Ramachandran Rajalakshmy

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests the neurotrophic potential of hepatitis C virus (HCV. HCV NS3 protein is one of the potent antigens of this virus mediating inflammatory response in different cell types. Microglia being the immune surveillance cells in the central nervous system (CNS, the inflammatory potential of NS3 on microglia was studied. Role of toll like receptor (TLR ligands Pam2CSK3 and Pam3CSK4 in controlling the NS3 mediated microglial inflammation was studied using microglial cell line CHME3.IL (Interleukin-8, IL-6, TNF-α (Tumor nicrosis factor alpha and IL-1β gene expressions were measured by semi quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR. ELISA was performed to detect IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10 secretion. FACS (Flourescent activated cell sorting was performed to quantify TLR1, TLR2, TLR6, MyD88 (Myeloid differntiation factor 88, IkB-α (I kappaB alpha and pNF-κB (phosphorylated nuclear factor kappaB expression. Immunofluorescence staining was performed for MyD88, TLR6 and NF-κB (Nuclear factor kappaB. Student's t-test or One way analysis of variance with Bonferoni post hoc test was performed and p < 0.05 was considered significant.Microglia responded to NS3 by secreting IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β via TLR2 or TLR6 mediated MyD88/NF-κB pathway. Transcription factor NF-κB was involved in activating the cytokine gene expression and the resultant inflammatory response was controlled by NF-κB inhibitor, Ro106-9920, which is known to down regulate pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Activation of the microglia by TLR agonists Pam3CSK4 and Pam2CSK4 induced immune tolerance against NS3. TLR ligand treatment significantly down regulated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the microglia. IL-10 secretion was suggested as the possible mechanism by which TLR agonists induced immune tolerance. NS3 as such was not capable of self-inducing immune tolerance in microglia.In conclusion, NS3 protein was capable of activating

  1. Occult HCV Infection (OCI) Diagnosis in Cirrhotic and Non-cirrhotic Naïve Patients by Intra-PBMC Nested Viral RNA PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Alla, Mohamed Darwish Ahmed; Elibiary, Saleh Ahmed; Wu, George Y; El-Awady, Mostafa Kamel

    2017-12-28

    Background and Aims: Occult HCV infections (OCIs) include IgG antibody seronegative cryptogenic (COCIs), as well as seropositive secondary naïve (SNOCIs) and experienced (SEOCIs) cases. We used peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cell (PBMC)-PCR to evaluate COCIs and SNOCIs prevalence, serum HCV spontaneous disappearance (SCSD) in naïve cirrhotics and non-cirrhotics, intra-PBMC HCV-RNA strands in relation to cirrhosis density in naïve non-viremia cases, and HCV-RNA seroconversion after 1 year of solitary naïve intra-PBMC infection. Methods: The anti-HCV IgG antibody-positive naïve-patients ( n = 785) were classified into viremic ( n = 673) and non-viremic [ n = 112, including non-cirrhotics ( n = 55) and cirrhotics ( n = 57)], and 62 controls without evidence of HCV-infection. Controls and post-HCV non-viremia cases ( n = 62+112 = 174) were submitted to hepatic Fibroscan-Elastography evaluation. All subjects ( n = 847) were screened for intra-PBMC HCV-RNA sense and antisense strands by nested-PCR. Results: Naïve-OCI cases (4.84%) that were diagnosed by PBMC-PCR significantly raised the total numbers of HCV-infection to 714 ( p = 0.01). The percent positivity of SNOCIs (34.82%) was significantly higher than for asymptomatic-COCIs (3.125%, p = 0.0001). Comparing PBMC-PCR with single-step-reverse-transcription (SRT)-PCR for identification of SCSD in naïve IgG antibody-positive non-viremia patients ( n = 112) revealed a decline in SCSD prevalence by PBMC-PCR (from 14.27% to 9.3%), regardless of presence of hepatic cirrhosis ( p = 0.03). SCSD was found to be higher by PBMC-PCR in non-cirrhotics compared to cirrhotics ( p = 0.0001), with an insignificant difference when using SRT-PCR ( p = 0.45). Intra-PBMC HCV-RNA infection was significantly more frequent in cirrhotics compared to both non-cirrhotics and controls ( p < 0.0005). An increased hepatic fibrosis density was recognized in intra-PBMC HCV-RNA infection with sense ( p = 0.0001) or antisense strand ( p = 0

  2. Functional analysis of microRNA-122 binding sequences of hepatitis C virus and identification of variants with high resistance against specific antagomir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-ping; Pham, Long; Uzcategui, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA miR-122 stimulates the replication and translation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA through binding to two adjacent sites S1 and S2 within the HCV 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). We previously demonstrated that the miR-122 antagomir miravirsen (SPC3649) suppressed the infection of JFH1-based...... recombinants with HCV genotype 1-6 5'UTR-NS2 in human hepatoma Huh7.5 cells. However, specific S1 mutations were permitted and conferred viral resistance to miravirsen treatment. Using the J6 (genotype 2a) 5'UTR-NS2 JFH1-based recombinant, we here performed reverse-genetics analysis of S1 (ACACUCCG...... or combined GA at positions 2-3 of 5'E were permitted. In S1 and S2, several single mutations were allowed at specific positions. UCC to CGA change at position 4-3-2 of S1, S2, or both S1 and S2 (S1/S2), as well as C to G change at position 2 of S1/S2 were permitted. We found that 5'E mutations did not confer...

  3. Spontaneous viral clearance, viral load, and genotype distribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in HIV-infected patients with anti-HCV antibodies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, Vincent; Mocroft, Amanda; Rockstroh, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variables influencing serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels and genotype distribution in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are not well known, nor are factors determining spontaneous clearance after exposure to HCV in this population. METHODS: All HCV...... for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were more likely to have spontaneously cleared HCV than were those negative for HBsAg (43% vs. 21%; aOR, 2.91 [95% CI, 1.94-4.38]). Of patients with HCV viremia, 786 (53%) carried HCV genotype 1, and 53 (4%), 440 (29%), and 217 (15%) carried HCV genotype 2, 3, and 4...

  4. Detection and quantification of serum or plasma HCV RNA: mini review of commercially available assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou-Guillemette, Helene; Lunel-Fabiani, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    The treatment schedule (combination of compounds, doses, and duration) and the virological follow-up for management of antiviral treatment in patients chronically infected by HCV is now well standardized, but to ensure good monitoring of the treated patients, physicians need rapid, reproducible, and sensitive molecular virological tools with a wide range of detection and quantification of HCV RNA in blood samples. Several assays for detection and/or quantification of HCV RNA are currently commercially available. Here, all these assays are detailed, and a brief description of each step of the assay is provided. They are divided into two categories by method: those based on signal amplification and those based on target amplification. These two categories are then divided into qualitative, quantitative, and quantitative detection assays. The real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assays are the most promising strategy in the HCV virological area.

  5. Genetic History of Hepatitis C Virus in Venezuela: High Diversity and Long Time of Evolution of HCV Genotype 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbarán, Maria Z.; Di Lello, Federico A.; Sulbarán, Yoneira; Cosson, Clarisa; Loureiro, Carmen L.; Rangel, Héctor R.; Cantaloube, Jean F.; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan; Pujol, Flor H.

    2010-01-01

    Background The subtype diversity of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes is unknown in Venezuela. Methodology/Principal Findings Partial sequencing of the NS5B region was performed in 310 isolates circulating in patients from 1995 to 2007. In the samples collected between 2005 and 2007, HCV genotype 1 (G1) was the most common genotype (63%), composed as expected of mainly G1a and G1b. G2 was the second most common genotype (33%), being G2a almost absent and G2j the most frequent subtype. Sequence analysis of the core region confirmed the subtype assignment performed within the NS5b region in 63 isolates. The complete genome sequence of G2j was obtained. G2j has been described in France, Canada and Burkina Fasso, but it was not found in Martinique, where several subtypes of G2 circulate in the general population. Bayesian coalescence analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of G2j around 1785, before the introduction of G1b (1869) and G1a (1922). While HCV G1a and G1b experienced a growth reduction since 1990, coincident with the time when blood testing was implemented in Venezuela, HCV G2j did not seem to reach growth equilibrium during this period. Conclusions/Significance Assuming the introduction of G2j from Africa during the slave trade, the high frequency of G2j found in Venezuela could suggest: 1- the introduction of African ethnic groups different from the ones introduced to Martinique or 2- the occurrence of a founder effect. This study represents an in-depth analysis of the subtype diversity of HCV in Venezuela, which is still unexplored in the Americas and deserves further studies. PMID:21179440

  6. Genetic history of hepatitis C virus in Venezuela: high diversity and long time of evolution of HCV genotype 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Z Sulbarán

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The subtype diversity of the hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes is unknown in Venezuela. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Partial sequencing of the NS5B region was performed in 310 isolates circulating in patients from 1995 to 2007. In the samples collected between 2005 and 2007, HCV genotype 1 (G1 was the most common genotype (63%, composed as expected of mainly G1a and G1b. G2 was the second most common genotype (33%, being G2a almost absent and G2j the most frequent subtype. Sequence analysis of the core region confirmed the subtype assignment performed within the NS5b region in 63 isolates. The complete genome sequence of G2j was obtained. G2j has been described in France, Canada and Burkina Fasso, but it was not found in Martinique, where several subtypes of G2 circulate in the general population. Bayesian coalescence analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (MRCA of G2j around 1785, before the introduction of G1b (1869 and G1a (1922. While HCV G1a and G1b experienced a growth reduction since 1990, coincident with the time when blood testing was implemented in Venezuela, HCV G2j did not seem to reach growth equilibrium during this period. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Assuming the introduction of G2j from Africa during the slave trade, the high frequency of G2j found in Venezuela could suggest: 1- the introduction of African ethnic groups different from the ones introduced to Martinique or 2- the occurrence of a founder effect. This study represents an in-depth analysis of the subtype diversity of HCV in Venezuela, which is still unexplored in the Americas and deserves further studies.

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of hepatitis C virus NS3 protease domain during and following treatment with narlaprevir, a potent NS3 protease inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijne, J.; Thomas, X. V.; Rebers, S. P.; Weegink, C. J.; Treitel, M. A.; Hughes, E.; Bergmann, J. F.; de Knegt, R. J.; Janssen, H. L. A.; Reesink, H. W.; Molenkamp, R.; Schinkel, J.

    2013-01-01

    Narlaprevir, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated robust antiviral activity in a placebo-controlled phase 1 study. To study evolutionary dynamics of resistant variants, the NS3 protease sequence was clonally analysed in thirty-two HCV genotype 1-infected

  8. Cellular Hsp27 interacts with classical swine fever virus NS5A protein and negatively regulates viral replication by the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shifeng; Luo, Mingyang; Jiang, Shengnan; Liu, Jiayu; Ding, Chunying; Zhang, Qinghuan; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Tu, Changchun; Sun, Jinfu

    2018-05-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nonstructural protein NS5A is a multifunctional protein functioning in regulation of viral genome replication, protein translation and assembly by interaction with viral or host proteins. Here, heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) has been identified as a novel binding partner of NS5A by using His tag "pull down" coupled with shotgun LC-MS/MS, with interaction of both proteins further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and laser confocal assays. In PK-15 cells, silencing of Hsp27 expression by siRNA enhanced CSFV replication, and upregulation of Hsp27 inhibited viral proliferation. Additionally, we have shown that overexpression of Hsp27 increased NF-κB signaling induced by TNFα. Blocking NF-κB signaling in PK-15 cells overexpressing Hsp27 by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) eliminated the inhibition of CSFV replication by Hsp27. These findings clearly demonstrate that the inhibition of CSFV replication by Hsp27 is mediated via the NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New hepatitis C virus genotype 1 subtype naturally harbouring resistance-associated mutations to NS5A inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordeig, Laura; Garcia-Cehic, Damir; Gregori, Josep; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Nieto-Aponte, Leonardo; Perales, Celia; Llorens, Meritxell; Chen, Qian; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, Maria; Esteban, Rafael; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Quer, Josep

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a highly divergent virus currently classified into seven major genotypes and 86 subtypes (ICTV, June 2017), which can have differing responses to therapy. Accurate genotyping/subtyping using high-resolution HCV subtyping enables confident subtype identification, identifies mixed infections and allows detection of new subtypes. During routine genotyping/subtyping, one sample from an Equatorial Guinea patient could not be classified into any of the subtypes. The complete genomic sequence was compared to reference sequences by phylogenetic and sliding window analysis. Resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) were assessed by deep sequencing. The unclassified HCV genome did not belong to any of the existing genotype 1 (G1) subtypes. Sliding window analysis along the complete genome ruled out recombination phenomena suggesting that it belongs to a new HCV G1 subtype. Two NS5A RASs (L31V+Y93H) were found to be naturally combined in the genome which could limit treatment possibilities in patients infected with this subtype.

  10. HIV and HCV coinfection: prevalence, associated factors and genotype characterization in the Midwest Region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Solange Zacalusni; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Lorenzo, Paulo Cesar; Puga, Marco Antonio Moreira; Tanaka, Tayana Serpa Ortiz; Thomaz, Danilo Yamamoto; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel; Druzian, Angelita Fernandes; Lindenberg, Andréa Siqueira Campos; Torres, Marina Sawada; Pereira, Sérgio A; Villar, Livia Melo; Lampe, Elisabete; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study on prevalence, associated factors and genotype distribution of HCV infection was conducted among 848 HIV-infected patients recruited at reference centers in the Midwest Region of Brazil. The prevalence rate of HIV-HCV coinfection was 6.9% (95% CI: 5.2 to 8.6). In multivariable analysis, increasing age, use of illicit drugs (injection and non-injection), a history of blood transfusion before 1994, and the absence of a steady partnership were significant independent associated factors for HIV-HCV coinfection. The phylogenetic analysis based on the NS5B region revealed the presence of two major circulating genotypes of HCV: genotypes 1 (58.3%) and 3 (41.7%). The prevalence of HIV-HCV coinfection was lower than those reported in studies conducted with HIV-infected patients in different regions of Brazil, due to the fact that illicit drug use is not a frequent mode of HIV transmission in this region of Brazil. Serologic screening of HIV-patients for HCV before initiating antiretroviral treatment, a comprehensive identification of associated factors, and the implementation of effective harm reduction programs are highly recommended to provide useful information for treatment and to prevent HCV coinfection in these patients.

  11. Novel Electron Spin Resonance-Enzyme Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Occult Hepatitis B Infection in HCV Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Badawi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B virus infection in patients who lack detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg is called occult hepatitis B infection (OHB. The very low level of HBV genome may hamper its detection by molecular techniques. Recently, a highly sensitive EIA utilizing a novel modified electron spin resonance (ESR technique (modified ESR-EIA was developed to detect HBsAg by measuring stabilized nitroxide radicals. Aim: to detect occult HBV infection, using ESR-EIA among HCV-related chronic liver disease (CLD Egyptian patients who were seronegative for HBsAg by standard EIA. Methods: The study was conducted on two periods of time; in 1st period, 72 inpatients in Tropical Medicine Department of TBRI, were enrolled in the study. They were divided into two groups; 44 seropositive anti-HCV patients (Group I, 28 seronegative anti-HCV patients (Group II. Sera were subjected to virological assays for HBsAg, HBeAg, anti-HBc IgM, anti-HBc IgG, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HCV RNA. We also examined serum HBV DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique and real-time detection polymerase chain reaction (RTD-PCR. In the 2nd period; modified ESR-EIA was applied on 32 TBRI inpatients, 23 in Tropical Medicine Department (Group I and 9 from hemodialysis unit (Group II with HCV-related CLD. Results: OHB was detected in 18.1% and 86.9% of our patients in 2002 and 2006 respectively. In phase 1, there was a higher detection rate among HCV patients in Group I (25% than Group II (7%, with higher prevalence (52.4% in patients with positive HCV RNA in Group I versus those with negative HCV viremia (8% in Group II. HBV DNA by either PCR or RTD-PCR was negative in all patients of both groups as the HBV viral load of the samples were below detectable level of the methods used; less than 100 copies/ml. None of 9 hemodialysis patients were positive for OHB. Conclusion: The newly developed quantitative ESR-EIA technique represents a great evolution for screening and

  12. Structural insight and flexible features of NS5 proteins from all four serotypes of Dengue virus in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saw, Wuan Geok; Tria, Giancarlo; Grüber, Ardina; Subramanian Manimekalai, Malathy Sony; Zhao, Yongqian; Chandramohan, Arun; Srinivasan Anand, Ganesh; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-10-31

    Infection by the four serotypes ofDengue virus(DENV-1 to DENV-4) causes an important arthropod-borne viral disease in humans. The multifunctional DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is essential for capping and replication of the viral RNA and harbours a methyltransferase (MTase) domain and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain. In this study, insights into the overall structure and flexibility of the entire NS5 of all fourDengue virusserotypes in solution are presented for the first time. The solution models derived revealed an arrangement of the full-length NS5 (NS5FL) proteins with the MTase domain positioned at the top of the RdRP domain. The DENV-1 to DENV-4 NS5 forms are elongated and flexible in solution, with DENV-4 NS5 being more compact relative to NS5 from DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3. Solution studies of the individual MTase and RdRp domains show the compactness of the RdRp domain as well as the contribution of the MTase domain and the ten-residue linker region to the flexibility of the entire NS5. Swapping the ten-residue linker between DENV-4 NS5FL and DENV-3 NS5FL demonstrated its importance in MTase–RdRp communication and in concerted interaction with viral and host proteins, as probed by amide hydrogen/deuterium mass spectrometry. Conformational alterations owing to RNA binding are presented.

  13. Comparison of cobas HCV GT against Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 (LiPA) with confirmation by Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusrina, Falah; Chua, Cui Wen; Lee, Chun Kiat; Chiu, Lily; Png, Tracy Si-Yu; Khoo, Mui Joo; Yan, Gabriel; Lee, Guan Huei; Yan, Benedict; Lee, Hong Kai

    2018-05-01

    Correct identification of infecting hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype is helpful for targeted antiviral therapy. Here, we compared the HCV genotyping performance of the cobas HCV GT assay against the Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 (LiPA) assay, using 97 archived serum samples. In the event of discrepant or indeterminate results produced by either assay, the core and NS5B regions were sequenced. Of the 97 samples tested by the cobas, 25 (26%) were deemed indeterminate. Sequencing analyses confirmed 21 (84%) of the 25 samples as genotype 6 viruses with either subtype 6m, 6n, 6v, 6xa, or unknown subtype. Of the 97 samples tested by the LiPA, thirteen (13%) were deemed indeterminate. Seven (7%) were assigned with genotype 1, with unavailable/inconclusive results from the core region of the LiPA. Notably, the 7 samples were later found to be either genotype 3 or 6 by sequencing analyses. Moreover, 1 sample by the LiPA was assigned as genotypes 4 (cobas: indeterminate) but were later found to be genotype 3 by sequencing analyses, highlighting its limitation in assigning the correct genotype. The cobas showed similar or slightly higher accuracy (100%; 95% CI 94-100%) compared to the LiPA (99%; 95% CI 92-100%). Twenty-six percent of the 97 samples tested by the cobas had indeterminate results, mainly due to its limitation in identifying genotype 6 other than subtypes 6a and 6b. This presents a significant assay limitation in Southeast Asia, where genotype 6 infection is highly prevalent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance of ARCHITECT HCV core antigen test with specimens from US plasma donors and injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Dawson, George J; Teshale, Eyasu; Le, Thao; Cheng, Kevin; Drobeniuc, Jan; Ward, John; Kamili, Saleem

    2015-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen is a serological marker of current HCV infection. The aim of this study was mainly to evaluate the performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT HCV core antigen assay with specimens from US plasma donors and injecting drug users. A total of 551 serum and plasma samples with known anti-HCV and HCV RNA status were tested for HCV core antigen using the Abbott ARCHITECT HCV core antigen test. HCV core antigen was detectable in 100% of US plasma donor samples collected during the pre-seroconversion phase of infection (anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive). Overall sensitivity of the HCV core antigen assay was 88.9-94.3% in samples collected after seroconversion. The correlation between HCV core antigen and HCV RNA titers was 0.959. HCV core antigen testing may be reliably used to identify current HCV infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Host apolipoprotein B messenger RNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G is an innate defensive factor and drug target against hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zong-Gen; Zhao, Zhi-Yun; Li, Yan-Ping; Wang, Yu-Ping; Hao, Lan-Hu; Fan, Bo; Li, Yu-Huan; Wang, Yue-Ming; Shan, Yong-Qiang; Han, Yan-Xing; Zhu, Yan-Ping; Li, Jian-Rui; You, Xue-Fu; Li, Zhuo-Rong; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2011-04-01

    Host cellular factor apolipoprotein B messenger RNA (mRNA)-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (hA3G) is a cytidine deaminase that inhibits a group of viruses including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). In the continuation of our research on hA3G, we found that hA3G stabilizing compounds significantly inhibited hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Therefore, this study investigated the role of hA3G in HCV replication. Introduction of external hA3G into HCV-infected Huh7.5 human hepatocytes inhibited HCV replication; knockdown of endogenous hA3G enhanced HCV replication. Exogenous HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) decreased intracellular hA3G and therefore enhanced HCV proliferation, suggesting that the presence of Vif might be an explanation for the HIV-1/HCV coinfection often observed in HIV-1(+) individuals. Treatment of the HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells with RN-5 or IMB-26, two known hA3G stabilizing compounds, increased intracellular hA3G and accordingly inhibited HCV replication. The compounds inhibit HCV through increasing the level of hA3G incorporated into HCV particles, but not through inhibiting HCV enzymes. However, G/A hypermutation in the HCV genome were not detected, suggesting a new antiviral mechanism of hA3G in HCV, different from that in HIV-1. Stabilization of hA3G by RN-5 was safe in vivo. hA3G appears to be a cellular restrict factor against HCV and could be a potential target for drug discovery. 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. HCV IRES-mediated core expression in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhao

    Full Text Available The lack of small animal models for hepatitis C virus has impeded the discovery and development of anti-HCV drugs. HCV-IRES plays an important role in HCV gene expression, and is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. In this study, we report a zebrafish model with a biscistron expression construct that can co-transcribe GFP and HCV-core genes by human hepatic lipase promoter and zebrafish liver fatty acid binding protein enhancer. HCV core translation was designed mediated by HCV-IRES sequence and gfp was by a canonical cap-dependent mechanism. Results of fluorescence image and in situ hybridization indicate that expression of HCV core and GFP is liver-specific; RT-PCR and Western blotting show that both core and gfp expression are elevated in a time-dependent manner for both transcription and translation. It means that the HCV-IRES exerted its role in this zebrafish model. Furthermore, the liver-pathological impact associated with HCV-infection was detected by examination of gene markers and some of them were elevated, such as adiponectin receptor, heparanase, TGF-β, PDGF-α, etc. The model was used to evaluate three clinical drugs, ribavirin, IFNα-2b and vitamin B12. The results show that vitamin B12 inhibited core expression in mRNA and protein levels in dose-dependent manner, but failed to impact gfp expression. Also VB12 down-regulated some gene transcriptions involved in fat liver, liver fibrosis and HCV-associated pathological process in the larvae. It reveals that HCV-IRES responds to vitamin B12 sensitively in the zebrafish model. Ribavirin did not disturb core expression, hinting that HCV-IRES is not a target site of ribavirin. IFNα-2b was not active, which maybe resulted from its degradation in vivo for the long time. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of the zebrafish model for screening of anti-HCV drugs targeting to HCV-IRES. The zebrafish system provides a novel evidence of using zebrafish as a HCV model organism.

  17. NS3 protease resistance-associated substitutions in liver tissue and plasma samples from patients infected by hepatitis C virus genotype 1A or 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsica, Giulia; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Messina, Emanuela; Hasson, Hamid; Lazzarin, Adriano; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Bagaglio, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The presence of naturally occurring resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) in the HCV-protease domain has been poorly investigated in the liver, the main site of HCV replication. We evaluated the natural resistance of the virus to NS3 protease inhibitors in liver tissue and plasma samples taken from HCV-infected patients. RASs were investigated by means of viral population sequencing in liver tissue samples from 18 HCV-infected patients harbouring genotype 1a or genotype 1b; plasma samples from 12 of these patients were also available for virological investigation. A discordant genotype was found in two of the 12 patients (16.6%) who provided samples from both compartments. Sequence analysis of the NS3 protease domain showed the presence of RASs in four of the 18 liver tissue samples (22.2%), two of which showed cross-resistance to protease inhibitors in clinical use or phase 2-3 trials. The analysis of the 12 paired tissues and plasma samples excluded the presence of RASs in the plasma compartment. The dominance of discordant genotypes in the paired liver and plasma samples of some HCV-infected patients suggests mixed infection possibly leading to the selective advantage of different genotype in the two compartments. The presence of RASs at intra-hepatic level is not uncommon and may lead to the early emergence of cross-resistant strains.

  18. Impact of Immunogenetic IL28B Polymorphism on Natural Outcome of HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli De Re

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of investigating whether interleukin 28B gene (IL28B rs1297860 polymorphism is associated with different hepatitis C (HCV infection statuses, we compared IL28B allelic distribution in an Italian case series of 1050 patients with chronic infection and different outcomes, 47 individuals who spontaneously cleared HCV, and 178 blood donors. Furthermore, we compared IL28B variants among 3882 Caucasian patients with chronic infection, 397 with spontaneous clearance, and 1366 blood donors reported in PubMed. Overall data confirmed a relation between IL28B C allele and HCV spontaneous clearance. Furthermore, we found that IL28B T allele had a weak relation with chronic HCV progression to hepatocellular carcinoma. Study findings are in accordance with the hepatocellular carcinogenic model where IL28B TT genotype, by promoting a persistent chronic hepatitis which leads to both hepatocyte injury and chronic inflammation, could facilitate HCC development. Conversely, patients with lymphoproliferative disorders had not any significantly different IL28B rs1297860 allelic distribution than those with chronic HCV, but, like all chronic HCV-related diseases, they showed a lower CC frequency than patients who spontaneously cleared HCV. Study results confirmed the model of persistent HCV infection as a risk factor for the pathogenesis of both liver and lymphoproliferative disorders.

  19. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asafi, M S; Tekpinar, M; Yildirim, A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated. (paper)

  20. HCV and HBV coexist in HBsAg-negative patients with HCV viremia; possibility of coinfection in these patients must be considered in HBV-high endemic area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soon [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and is highly associated with HBV infection in Korea. It has been suggested that HCV core protein may impair the polymerase activity of HBV in vitro, potentially lowering HBV titre in coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to confirm the coexistence of HBV viremia in HCV infected patients HCC who have apparent HBsAg seronegativity. The serological profiles of HBV and HCV in 616 patients with HCC were analysed and coinfection rate of HBV and HCV investigated. Sera were obtained from 16 patients who were both anti-HCV and HCV RNA positive but HbsAg negative, and tested for HBV BY PCR. As a control group, sera were obtained from 15 patients with HCC and 30 non-A abd non-B chronic hepatitis patients without HCC; both were anti-HCV, HCV-RNA, and HBsAg negative and tested for HBV PCR. Of 616 patients with HCC, 450 (73.1 %) had current HBV infection, 48 (7.8 %) had anti-HCV antibodies, and nine (1.5 %) had viral markers of both HCV abd HBV by serological profiles. Of 27 the patients with HCV viremia and HBsAg seronegativity, 14 (51.9 %) showed HBV viremia by PCR. In contrast, of the 75 patients in the control group who were both HCV PCR negative and HBsAg negative, five (11.1 %) showed HBV viremia by PCR. The PCR for HBV revealed coexistent HBV viremia in HCV viremia patients, despite HBsAg negativity by EIA. In HBV-endemic areas, the possibility of coinfection of HBV in HBsAg-negative patients with HCV viremia should be considered and molecular analysis for HBV-DNA performed. (author). 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. HCV and HBV coexist in HBsAg-negative patients with HCV viremia; possibility of coinfection in these patients must be considered in HBV-high endemic area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soon

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and is highly associated with HBV infection in Korea. It has been suggested that HCV core protein may impair the polymerase activity of HBV in vitro, potentially lowering HBV titre in coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to confirm the coexistence of HBV viremia in HCV infected patients HCC who have apparent HBsAg seronegativity. The serological profiles of HBV and HCV in 616 patients with HCC were analysed and coinfection rate of HBV and HCV investigated. Sera were obtained from 16 patients who were both anti-HCV and HCV RNA positive but HbsAg negative, and tested for HBV BY PCR. As a control group, sera were obtained from 15 patients with HCC and 30 non-A abd non-B chronic hepatitis patients without HCC; both were anti-HCV, HCV-RNA, and HBsAg negative and tested for HBV PCR. Of 616 patients with HCC, 450 (73.1 %) had current HBV infection, 48 (7.8 %) had anti-HCV antibodies, and nine (1.5 %) had viral markers of both HCV abd HBV by serological profiles. Of 27 the patients with HCV viremia and HBsAg seronegativity, 14 (51.9 %) showed HBV viremia by PCR. In contrast, of the 75 patients in the control group who were both HCV PCR negative and HBsAg negative, five (11.1 %) showed HBV viremia by PCR. The PCR for HBV revealed coexistent HBV viremia in HCV viremia patients, despite HBsAg negativity by EIA. In HBV-endemic areas, the possibility of coinfection of HBV in HBsAg-negative patients with HCV viremia should be considered and molecular analysis for HBV-DNA performed. (author). 18 refs., 4 tabs

  2. HCV subtype characterization among injection drug users: implication for a crucial role of Zhenjiang in HCV transmission in China.

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    Chiyu Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HCV transmission is closely associated with drug-trafficking routes in China. However, the transmission route of HCV in Eastern China remains unclear. Here, we investigate the role of Zhenjiang city of Jiangsu province, an important transportation hub linking Shanghai with other regions of China, in HCV transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 141 whole blood samples were collected from injection drug users (IDUs in Zhenjiang and then tested for HCV infection. Of them, 115 HCV positive plasmas were subjected to RNA extraction, RT-PCR amplification, and sequencing. The subtype characterization and the evolutionary origin of HCV strains circulating in Zhenjiang were determined using polygenetic or phylogeographic analyses. Seven HCV subtypes 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6e and 6n were detected among Zhenjiang IDUs, showing a complex HCV epidemic. The most predominant subtypes were 3a (38% and 1b (26.8%. Among these subtypes, subtypes 3b, 6n and 6e originated from Southwestern China (i.e., Yunnan and/or Guangxi, subtypes 2a and 6a from Southern China (i.e., Guangdong, subtype 1b from Central (i.e., Henan and Northwestern (i.e., Xinjiang China, and subtype 3a from Southwestern (i.e., Yunnan and Northwestern (i.e., Xinjiang China. From Zhenjiang, subtypes 1b and 2a were further spread to Eastern (i.e., Shanghai and Northern (i.e., Beijing China, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The mixing of seven HCV subtypes in Zhenjiang from all quarters of China indicates that as an important middle station, Zhenjiang plays a crucial role in HCV transmission, just as it is important in population migration between other regions of China and Eastern China.

  3. HCV Specific IL-21 Producing T Cells but Not IL-17A Producing T Cells Are Associated with HCV Viral Control in HIV/HCV Coinfection.

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    Sonya A MacParland

    Full Text Available Decreased hepatitis C virus (HCV clearance, faster cirrhosis progression and higher HCV RNA levels are associated with Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection. The CD4+ T helper cytokines interleukin (IL-21 and IL-17A are associated with virus control and inflammation, respectively, both important in HCV and HIV disease progression. Here, we examined how antigen-specific production of these cytokines during HCV mono and HIV/HCV coinfection was associated with HCV virus control.We measured HCV-specific IL-21 and IL-17A production by transwell cytokine secretion assay in PBMCs from monoinfected and coinfected individuals. Viral control was determined by plasma HCV RNA levels.In acutely infected individuals, those able to establish transient/complete HCV viral control tended to have stronger HCV-specific IL-21-production than non-controllers. HCV-specific IL-21 production also correlated with HCV viral decline in acute infection. Significantly stronger HCV-specific IL-21 production was detected in HAART-treated coinfected individuals. HCV-specific IL-17A production was not associated with lower plasma HCV RNA levels in acute or chronic HCV infection and responses were stronger in HIV coinfection. HCV-specific IL-21/ IL-17A responses did not correlate with microbial translocation or fibrosis. Exogenous IL-21 treatment of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells from monoinfected individuals enhanced their function although CD8+ T cells from coinfected individuals were somewhat refractory to the effects of IL-21.These data show that HCV-specific IL-21 and IL-17A-producing T cells are induced in HIV/HCV coinfection. In early HIV/HCV coinfection, IL-21 may contribute to viral control, and may represent a novel tool to enhance acute HCV clearance in HIV/HCV coinfected individuals.

  4. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  5. Treatment response in HCV related chronic hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.B.; Hussain, T.; Hussain, S.; Masood, A.; Kazmi, Y.; Tariq, W.Z.; Karamat, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the virological response to treatment with interferon and ribavirin in-patients with hepatitis C related liver disease. Material and Methods: Two hundred seventy-nine patients were included in the study. These patients had taken interferon and ribavirin treatment for HCV related chronic hepatitis, and were referred to AFIP for HCV RNA testing by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) between January 2002 and September 2002. Out of 279 cases, 229 had taken the treatment for 06 or 12 months and were tested for end-of-treatment response (ETR). Fifty patients had completed there treatment regimens of 6 or 12 months treatment, at least 24 weeks before their PCR test and were having follow-up testing for sustained viral response (SVR). The sera of these patients were tested for HCV RNA by PCR, using a commercial kit of Amplicor (Roche) for qualitative detection of HCV RNA. Results: Out of 229 cases tested for end-of-treatment response, 198 (86.5%) had no detectable HCV RNA (responders) and 31 (13.50%) were PCR positive (non-responders). Thirty-eight out of 50 cases, tested for a sustained viral response, had a negative result for HCV PCR thus showing sustained response rate of 76%. Conclusion: The viral remission/response to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy in our patients was better than that quoted in other regions. (author)

  6. HCV Core Antigen Testing for Diagnosis of HCV Infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiman, J. Morgan; Tran, Trang M.; Schumacher, Samuel G; White, Laura F.; Ongarello, Stefano; Cohn, Jennifer; Easterbrook, Philippa J.; Linas, Benjamin P.; Denkinger, Claudia M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection requires both a positive HCV antibody screen and confirmatory nucleic acid test (NAT). HCV core antigen (HCVcAg) is a potential alternative to NAT. Purpose This systematic review evaluated the accuracy of diagnosis of active HCV infection among adults and children for five HCVcAg tests compared to NAT. Data Sources EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane from 1990 through March 31, 2016. Study Selection Cohort, cross-sectional, and randomized controlled trials were included without language restriction Data Extraction Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed quality using an adapted Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. Data Synthesis 44 studies evaluated 5 index tests. Studies for the ARCHITECT had the highest quality, while those for Ortho ELISA were the lowest. From bivariate analyses, the sensitivity and specificity with 95% CI were: ARCHITECT 93.4% (90.1, 96.4) and 98.8% (97.4, 99.5), Ortho ELISA 93.2% (81.6, 97.7) and 99.2% (87.9, 100), and Hunan Jynda 59.5% (46.0, 71.7) and 82.9% (58.6, 94.3). Insufficient data were available for a meta-analysis for Lumipulse and Lumispot. In three quantitative studies using ARCHITECT, HCVcAg correlated closely with HCV RNA above 3000 IU/mL. Limitations There was insufficient data on covariates such as HIV or HBV status for sub-group analyses. Few studies reported genotypes of isolates and there were scant data for genotypes 4, 5, and 6. Most studies were conducted in high resource settings within reference laboratories. Conclusions HCVcAg assays with signal amplification have high sensitivity, high specificity, and good correlation with HCV RNA above 3000 IU/mL. HCVcAg assays have the potential to replace NAT in high HCV prevalence settings. PMID:27322622

  7. Hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 3 interacts with cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase and partially inhibits its activity.

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    Chiu-Ping Fang

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is etiologically involved in liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and B-cell lymphomas. It has been demonstrated previously that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3 is involved in cell transformation. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid screening experiment was conducted to identify cellular proteins interacting with HCV NS3 protein. Cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase (cdN, dNT-1 was found to interact with HCV NS3 protein. Binding domains of HCV NS3 and cellular cdN proteins were also determined using the yeast two-hybrid system. Interactions between HCV NS3 and cdN proteins were further demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis in cultured cells. The cellular cdN activity was partially repressed by NS3 protein in both the transiently-transfected and the stably-transfected systems. Furthermore, HCV partially repressed the cdN activity while had no effect on its protein expression in the systems of HCV sub-genomic replicons and infectious HCV virions. Deoxyribonucleotidases are present in most mammalian cells and involve in the regulation of intracellular deoxyribonucleotides pools by substrate cycles. Control of DNA precursor concentration is essential for the maintenance of genetic stability. Reduction of cdN activity would result in the imbalance of DNA precursor concentrations. Thus, our results suggested that HCV partially reduced the cdN activity via its NS3 protein and this may in turn cause diseases.

  8. Cyclophilin Inhibitors Remodel the Endoplasmic Reticulum of HCV-Infected Cells in a Unique Pattern Rendering Cells Impervious to a Reinfection.

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    Udayan Chatterji

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of action by which cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI interfere with the HCV life cycle remain poorly understood. We reported that CypI and NS5A inhibitors (NS5Ai, but not other classes of anti-HCV agents, prevent assembly of double membrane vesicles (DMVs, which protect replication complexes. We demonstrated that both NS5A and the isomerase cyclophilin A (CypA are required for DMV formation. Here, we examined whether CypI mediate an additional antiviral effect that could further explain the high efficacy of CypI. We identified a unique action of CypI. CypI remodel the organization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of HCV-infected cells, but not of uninfected cells. This effect is specific since it was not observed for other classes of anti-HCV agents including NS5Ai, and has no effect on the viability of CypI-treated cells. Since ER serves as platform for the establishment of HCV replication complexes, we asked whether the ER reorganization by CypI would prevent cells from being newly infected. Remarkably, CypI-treated HCV-pre-infected cells remain totally impervious to a reinfection, suggesting that the CypI-mediated ER reorganization prevents a reinfection. This block is not due to residual CypI since CypI-resistant HCV variants also fail to infect these cells. The ER reorganization by CypI is rapid and reversible. This study provides the first evidence that CypI trigger a unique ER reorganization of infected cells, rendering cells transiently impervious to a reinfection. This study further suggests that the HCV-induced ER rearrangement represents a key target for the development of new therapies.

  9. Translation of the flavivirus kunjin NS3 gene in cis but not its RNA sequence or secondary structure is essential for efficient RNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijlman, Gorben P; Kondratieva, Natasha; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies using trans-complementation analysis of Kunjin virus (KUN) full-length cDNA clones harboring in-frame deletions in the NS3 gene demonstrated the inability of these defective complemented RNAs to be packaged into virus particles (W. J. Liu, P. L. Sedlak, N. Kondratieva, and A. A. Khromykh, J. Virol. 76:10766-10775). In this study we aimed to establish whether this requirement for NS3 in RNA packaging is determined by the secondary RNA structure of the NS3 gene or by the essential role of the translated NS3 gene product. Multiple silent mutations of three computer-predicted stable RNA structures in the NS3 coding region of KUN replicon RNA aimed at disrupting RNA secondary structure without affecting amino acid sequence did not affect RNA replication and packaging into virus-like particles in the packaging cell line, thus demonstrating that the predicted conserved RNA structures in the NS3 gene do not play a role in RNA replication and/or packaging. In contrast, double frameshift mutations in the NS3 coding region of full-length KUN RNA, producing scrambled NS3 protein but retaining secondary RNA structure, resulted in the loss of ability of these defective RNAs to be packaged into virus particles in complementation experiments in KUN replicon-expressing cells. Furthermore, the more robust complementation-packaging system based on established stable cell lines producing large amounts of complemented replicating NS3-deficient replicon RNAs and infection with KUN virus to provide structural proteins also failed to detect any secreted virus-like particles containing packaged NS3-deficient replicon RNAs. These results have now firmly established the requirement of KUN NS3 protein translated in cis for genome packaging into virus particles.

  10. Detection of HIV and HCV RNA in semen from Brazilian coinfected men using multiplex PCR before and after semen washing Detecção do RNA do HIV e HCV em sêmen de homens brasileiros, usando PCR multiplex antes e depois do "semen washing"

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    Cynthia Liliane Motta do Canto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Prolonged survival of patients under HAART has resulted in new demands for assisted reproductive technologies. HIV serodiscordant couples wish to make use of assisted reproduction techniques in order to avoid viral transmission to the partner or to the newborn. It is therefore essential to test the effectiveness of techniques aimed at reducing HIV and HCV loads in infected semen using molecular biology tests. METHODS: After seminal analysis, semen samples from 20 coinfected patients were submitted to cell fractioning and isolation of motile spermatozoa by density gradient centrifugation and swim-up. HIV and HCV RNA detection tests were performed with RNA obtained from sperm, seminal plasma and total semen. RESULTS: In pre-washing semen, HIV RNA was detected in 100% of total semen samples, whereas HCV RNA was concomitantly amplified in only one specimen. Neither HIV nor HCV were detected either in the swim-up or in the post-washing semen fractions. CONCLUSIONS: Reduction of HIV and/or HCV shedding in semen by density gradient centrifugation followed by swim-up is an efficient method. These findings lead us to believe that, although semen is rarely found to contain HCV, semen processing is highly beneficial for HIV/HCV coinfected individuals.O aumento da sobrevida dos pacientes que utilizam terapêutica antiretroviral altamente eficaz (HAART- Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy trouxe uma nova demanda de casais sorodiscordantes que desejam filhos. Como esses casais não podem abandonar o uso de preservativos, torna-se indispensável tratar o sêmen infectado com técnicas laboratoriais eficazes que além de isolar os melhores espermatozóides, reduzam a carga viral do HIV e HCV a níveis indetectáveis. Para isso, são utilizadas técnicas de semen washing, associadas a testes ultra sensíveis de biologia molecular. Após análise seminal, sêmen de 20 pacientes co-infectados HIV-HCV foram submetidos a fracionamento celular e

  11. NMR analysis of the dynamic exchange of the NS2B cofactor between open and closed conformations of the West Nile virus NS2B-NS3 protease.

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    Xun-Cheng Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two-component NS2B-NS3 proteases of West Nile and dengue viruses are essential for viral replication and established targets for drug development. In all crystal structures of the proteases to date, the NS2B cofactor is located far from the substrate binding site (open conformation in the absence of inhibitor and lining the substrate binding site (closed conformation in the presence of an inhibitor. METHODS: In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy of isotope and spin-labeled samples of the West Nile virus protease was used to investigate the occurrence of equilibria between open and closed conformations in solution. FINDINGS: In solution, the closed form of the West Nile virus protease is the predominant conformation irrespective of the presence or absence of inhibitors. Nonetheless, dissociation of the C-terminal part of the NS2B cofactor from the NS3 protease (open conformation occurs in both the presence and the absence of inhibitors. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors can shift the conformational exchange equilibria so that over 90% of the West Nile virus protease molecules assume the closed conformation. The West Nile virus protease differs from the dengue virus protease, where the open conformation is the predominant form in the absence of inhibitors. CONCLUSION: Partial dissociation of NS2B from NS3 has implications for the way in which the NS3 protease can be positioned with respect to the host cell membrane when NS2B is membrane associated via N- and C-terminal segments present in the polyprotein. In the case of the West Nile virus protease, discovery of low-molecular-weight inhibitors that act by breaking the association of the NS2B cofactor with the NS3 protease is impeded by the natural affinity of the cofactor to the NS3 protease. The same strategy can be more successful in the case of the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease.

  12. NS5A resistance leading to failure of 24-week therapy with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and ribavirin for the treatment of hepatitis C genotype 1a infection in a HIV-1 co-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevastianova, Ksenia; Dean, Jonathan; Bannan, Ciaran; Coghlan, Miriam; Farrell, Gillian; Murray, Catherine; De Gascun, Cillian F; Bergin, Colm

    2016-09-01

    Herein we report a previously undescribed case of treatment-emergent non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) resistance mutations, Q30H and Y93C, leading to a failure of 24-week course of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir+ribavirin therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1a in interferon-experienced, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patient with cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptive mutations enhance assembly and cell-to-cell transmission of a high-titer hepatitis C virus genotype 5a Core-NS2 JFH1-based recombinant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Christian K; Prentoe, Jannick; Meredith, Luke W

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Recombinant hepatitis C virus (HCV) clones propagated in human hepatoma cell cultures yield relatively low infectivity titers. Here, we adapted the JFH1-based Core-NS2 recombinant SA13/JFH1C3405G,A3696G (termed SA13/JFH1orig), of the poorly characterized genotype 5a, to Huh7.5 cells......-titer production of diverse HCV strains would be advantageous. Our study offers important functional data on how cell culture-adaptive mutations identified in genotype 5a JFH1-based HCVcc permit high-titer culture by affecting HCV genesis through increasing virus assembly and HCV fitness by enhancing the virus...... specific infectivity and cell-to-cell transmission ability, without influencing the biophysical particle properties. High-titer HCVcc like the one described in this study may be pivotal in future vaccine-related studies where large quantities of infectious HCV particles are necessary....

  14. HIV AND HCV COINFECTION: PREVALENCE, ASSOCIATED FACTORS AND GENOTYPE CHARACTERIZATION IN THE MIDWEST REGION OF BRAZIL

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    Solange Zacalusni Freitas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study on prevalence, associated factors and genotype distribution of HCV infection was conducted among 848 HIV-infected patients recruited at reference centers in the Midwest Region of Brazil. The prevalence rate of HIV-HCV coinfection was 6.9% (95% CI: 5.2 to 8.6. In multivariable analysis, increasing age, use of illicit drugs (injection and non-injection, a history of blood transfusion before 1994, and the absence of a steady partnership were significant independent associated factors for HIV-HCV coinfection. The phylogenetic analysis based on the NS5B region revealed the presence of two major circulating genotypes of HCV: genotypes 1 (58.3% and 3 (41.7%. The prevalence of HIV-HCV coinfection was lower than those reported in studies conducted with HIV-infected patients in different regions of Brazil, due to the fact that illicit drug use is not a frequent mode of HIV transmission in this region of Brazil. Serologic screening of HIV-patients for HCV before initiating antiretroviral treatment, a comprehensive identification of associated factors, and the implementation of effective harm reduction programs are highly recommended to provide useful information for treatment and to prevent HCV coinfection in these patients.

  15. Transmission of hepatitis C virus among intravenous drug users in the Uppsala region of Sweden

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    Axel Danielsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiology and transmission patterns of hepatitis C virus (HCV are important subjects as we enter a new era of treatment with directly acting antivirals (DAAs. The highest prevalence of HCV in developed countries is found among intravenous drug users (IDUs, where unsafe needle sharing practices provide the main route of infection. Efforts to prohibit the continuous spread of HCV among these groups have been initiated by the community services and health care providers. Our goal was to understand how HCV was transmitted among IDUs within a limited population group. We provide a retrospective study (2005–2007 of the HCV transmission patterns in a population of IDUs in the Uppsala region of Sweden. Method: Eighty-two serum samples were collected from IDUs in Uppsala County. Our reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR and sequencing method enabled a comprehensive genetic analysis for a broad spectrum of genotypes of two relatively conserved regions, NS5B and NS3, that encodes for the viral polymerase and protease, respectively. HCV RNA in serum samples was amplified and sequenced with in-house primers. Sequence similarities between individuals and subgroups were analyzed with maximum likelihood (ML phylogenetic trees. Published HCV reference sequences from other geographic regions and countries were also included for clarity. Results: Phylogenetic analysis was possible for 59 NS5B (72% and 29 NS3 (35% sequences from Uppsala patients. Additionally, we also included 15 NS3 sequences from Örebro patients, making a total of 44 NS3 sequences for the analysis. By analyzing the NS3 sequences, two transmission sets were found between the IDUs (>98% sequence identity, with one set consisting of two individuals and another set consisting of three individuals. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis done with our serum samples displayed clusters that distinguished them from the reference sequences. Conclusion: Our

  16. Geographic distribution of hepatitis C virus genotype 6 subtypes in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkarathamrongsin, Srunthron; Praianantathavorn, Kesmanee; Hacharoen, Nisachol; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Poovorawan, Yong

    2010-02-01

    The nucleotide sequence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 6 found mostly in south China and south-east Asia, displays profound genetic diversity. The aim of this study to determine the genetic variability of HCV genotype 6 (HCV-6) in Thailand and locate the subtype distribution of genotype 6 in various geographic areas. Four hundred nineteen anti-HCV positive serum samples were collected from patients residing in - the central part of the country. HCV RNA positive samples based on reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the 5'UTR were amplified with primers specific for the core and NS5B regions. Nucleotide sequences of both regions were analyzed for the genotype by phylogenetic analysis. To determine geographic distribution of HCV-6 subtypes, a search of the international database on subtype distribution in the respective countries was conducted. Among 375 HCV RNA positive samples, 71 had HCV-6 based on phylogenetic analysis of partial core and NS5B regions. The subtype distribution in order of predominance was 6f (56%), 6n (22%), 6i (11%), 6j (10%), and 6e (1%). Among the 13 countries with different subtypes of HCV-6, most sequences have been reported from Vietnam. Subtype 6f was found exclusively in Thailand where five distinct HCV-6 subtypes are circulating. HCV-6, which is endemic in south China and south-east Asia, displays profound genetic diversity and may have evolved over a considerable period of time. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Identification of Hydroxyanthraquinones as Novel Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Atsushi; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Endoh, Miduki; Miyamoto, Tatsuki; Tanaka, Junichi; Abdus Salam, Kazi; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Tani, Hidenori; Yamashita, Atsuya; Moriishi, Kohji; Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Noda, Naohiro

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important etiological agent of severe liver diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV genome encodes nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase, which is a potential anti-HCV drug target because its enzymatic activity is essential for viral replication. Some anthracyclines are known to be NS3 helicase inhibitors and have a hydroxyanthraquinone moiety in their structures; mitoxantrone, a hydroxyanthraquinone analogue, is also known to inhibit NS3 helicase. Therefore, we hypothesized that the hydroxyanthraquinone moiety alone could also inhibit NS3 helicase. Here, we performed a structure–activity relationship study on a series of hydroxyanthraquinones by using a fluorescence-based helicase assay. Hydroxyanthraquinones inhibited NS3 helicase with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The inhibitory activity varied depending on the number and position of the phenolic hydroxyl groups, and among different hydroxyanthraquinones examined, 1,4,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone strongly inhibited NS3 helicase with an IC50 value of 6 µM. Furthermore, hypericin and sennidin A, which both have two hydroxyanthraquinone-like moieties, were found to exert even stronger inhibition with IC50 values of 3 and 0.8 µM, respectively. These results indicate that the hydroxyanthraquinone moiety can inhibit NS3 helicase and suggest that several key chemical structures are important for the inhibition. PMID:26262613

  18. Identification of Hydroxyanthraquinones as Novel Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase

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    Atsushi Furuta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an important etiological agent of severe liver diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV genome encodes nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 helicase, which is a potential anti-HCV drug target because its enzymatic activity is essential for viral replication. Some anthracyclines are known to be NS3 helicase inhibitors and have a hydroxyanthraquinone moiety in their structures; mitoxantrone, a hydroxyanthraquinone analogue, is also known to inhibit NS3 helicase. Therefore, we hypothesized that the hydroxyanthraquinone moiety alone could also inhibit NS3 helicase. Here, we performed a structure–activity relationship study on a series of hydroxyanthraquinones by using a fluorescence-based helicase assay. Hydroxyanthraquinones inhibited NS3 helicase with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The inhibitory activity varied depending on the number and position of the phenolic hydroxyl groups, and among different hydroxyanthraquinones examined, 1,4,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone strongly inhibited NS3 helicase with an IC50 value of 6 µM. Furthermore, hypericin and sennidin A, which both have two hydroxyanthraquinone-like moieties, were found to exert even stronger inhibition with IC50 values of 3 and 0.8 µM, respectively. These results indicate that the hydroxyanthraquinone moiety can inhibit NS3 helicase and suggest that several key chemical structures are important for the inhibition.

  19. [Clinical benefit of HCV core antigen assay in patients receiving interferon and ribavirin combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Masahiko; Jokyu, Ritsuko; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2006-02-01

    A highly sensitive second generation HCV core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and kinetics data between commercially available core antigen assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag, and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor Test, Version 2 to estimate the predictive benefit of sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 59 patients treated with interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We found a good correlation between HCV core Ag and HCV RNA level regardless of genotype. Although the sensitivity of the core antigen assay was lower than PCR, the dynamic range was broader than that of the PCR assay, so that we did not need to dilute the samples in 59 patients. We detected serial decline of core Ag levels in 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days after interferon combination therapy. The decline of core antigen levels was significant in SVR patients compared to non-SVR as well as in genotype 2a, 2b patients compared to 1b. Core antigen-negative on day 1 could predict all 10 SVR patients (PPV = 100%), whereas RNA-negative could predict 22 SVR out of 25 on day 14 (PPV = 88.0%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core antigen on day 14 became SVR(NPV = 100%), although NPV was 91.2% on RNA negativity. An easy, simple, low cost new HCV core antigen detecting system seems to be useful for assessing and monitoring IFN treatment for HCV.

  20. Rheumatoid Case with HCV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bita Behnava; Seyed-Moayed Alavian

    2005-01-01

    Case Presentation:A 46-year-old woman referred to our center due to abnormality in aminotransferase level during check up. She had a history of blood transfusion 12 years ago. Anti-HCV Ab by ELISA method and HCV RNA by RT-PCR were positive. HCV RNA by Amplicor HCV monitor test counted 800,000 IU/ml and the genotype was 3a by Specific Primer-Targeted Region Core method. Laboratory evaluation revealed: Hb 11.9 mg/dl, WBC 5000 /ml, platelet count 190,000/ ml, ALT 70 IU/ml, AST 65 IU/ml, Alk phos...

  1. Recombinant immunoblot assay reaction patterns and hepatitis C virus RNA in blood donors and non-A, non-B hepatitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresters, D.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Cuypers, H. T.; Reesink, H. W.; Winkel, I. N.; van Exel-Oehlers, P. J.; van Drimmelen, A. A.; Jansen, P. L.; van der Poel, C. L.; Lelie, P. N.

    1993-01-01

    To establish the value of the second-generation recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA-2) and cDNA polymerase chain reaction (cDNA PCR) for confirmation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, anti-HCV reaction patterns and the presence of HCV RNA were examined in 610 blood donors and 255 non-A, non-B

  2. Protein clustering and RNA phylogenetic reconstruction of the influenza A [corrected] virus NS1 protein allow an update in classification and identification of motif conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla-Reyes, Edgar E; Chavaro-Pérez, David A; Piten-Isidro, Elvira; Gutiérrez-González, Luis H; Santos-Mendoza, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus (IAV), coded by its third most diverse gene, interacts with multiple molecules within infected cells. NS1 is involved in host immune response regulation and is a potential contributor to the virus host range. Early phylogenetic analyses using 50 sequences led to the classification of NS1 gene variants into groups (alleles) A and B. We reanalyzed NS1 diversity using 14,716 complete NS IAV sequences, downloaded from public databases, without host bias. Removal of sequence redundancy and further structured clustering at 96.8% amino acid similarity produced 415 clusters that enhanced our capability to detect distinct subgroups and lineages, which were assigned a numerical nomenclature. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic reconstruction using RNA sequences indicated the previously identified deep branching separating group A from group B, with five distinct subgroups within A as well as two and five lineages within the A4 and A5 subgroups, respectively. Our classification model proposes that sequence patterns in thirteen amino acid positions are sufficient to fit >99.9% of all currently available NS1 sequences into the A subgroups/lineages or the B group. This classification reduces host and virus bias through the prioritization of NS1 RNA phylogenetics over host or virus phenetics. We found significant sequence conservation within the subgroups and lineages with characteristic patterns of functional motifs, such as the differential binding of CPSF30 and crk/crkL or the availability of a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif. To understand selection pressures and evolution acting on NS1, it is necessary to organize the available data. This updated classification may help to clarify and organize the study of NS1 interactions and pathogenic differences and allow the drawing of further functional inferences on sequences in each group, subgroup and lineage rather than on a strain-by-strain basis.

  3. Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Promotes Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral M1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carina F; Read, Eliot K C; Wise, Helen M; Amorim, Maria J; Digard, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Influenza A virus mRNAs are transcribed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in the cell nucleus before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Segment 7 produces two major transcripts: an unspliced mRNA that encodes the M1 matrix protein and a spliced transcript that encodes the M2 ion channel. Export of both mRNAs is dependent on the cellular NXF1/TAP pathway, but it is unclear how they are recruited to the export machinery or how the intron-containing but unspliced M1 mRNA bypasses the normal quality-control checkpoints. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization to monitor segment 7 mRNA localization, we found that cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced M1 mRNA was inefficient in the absence of NS1, both in the context of segment 7 RNPs reconstituted by plasmid transfection and in mutant virus-infected cells. This effect was independent of any major effect on steady-state levels of segment 7 mRNA or splicing but corresponded to a ∼5-fold reduction in the accumulation of M1. A similar defect in intronless hemagglutinin (HA) mRNA nuclear export was seen with an NS1 mutant virus. Efficient export of M1 mRNA required both an intact NS1 RNA-binding domain and effector domain. Furthermore, while wild-type NS1 interacted with cellular NXF1 and also increased the interaction of segment 7 mRNA with NXF1, mutant NS1 polypeptides unable to promote mRNA export did neither. Thus, we propose that NS1 facilitates late viral gene expression by acting as an adaptor between viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery to promote their nuclear export. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of a wide variety of mammalian and avian species that threatens public health and food security. A fuller understanding of the virus life cycle is important to aid control strategies. The virus has a small genome that encodes relatively few proteins that are often multifunctional. Here, we characterize a new function for the NS1 protein, showing that, as well as

  4. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-01-01

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway

  5. Activity of a potent hepatitis C virus polymerase inhibitor in the chimpanzee model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; He, Yupeng; Lu, Liangjun; Lim, Hock Ben; Tripathi, Rakesh L; Middleton, Tim; Hernandez, Lisa E; Beno, David W A; Long, Michelle A; Kati, Warren M; Bosse, Todd D; Larson, Daniel P; Wagner, Rolf; Lanford, Robert E; Kohlbrenner, William E; Kempf, Dale J; Pilot-Matias, Tami J; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2007-12-01

    A-837093 is a potent and specific nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It possesses nanomolar potencies in both enzymatic and replicon-based cell culture assays. In rats and dogs this compound demonstrated an oral plasma half-life of greater than 7 h, and its bioavailability was >60%. In monkeys it had a half-life of 1.9 h and 15% bioavailability. Its antiviral efficacy was evaluated in two chimpanzees infected with HCV in a proof-of-concept study. The design included oral dosing of 30 mg per kg of body weight twice a day for 14 days, followed by a 14-day posttreatment observation. Maximum viral load reductions of 1.4 and 2.5 log(10) copies RNA/ml for genotype 1a- and 1b-infected chimpanzees, respectively, were observed within 2 days after the initiation of treatment. After this initial drop in the viral load, a rebound of plasma HCV RNA was observed in the genotype 1b-infected chimpanzee, while the genotype 1a-infected chimpanzee experienced a partial rebound that lasted throughout the treatment period. Clonal analysis of NS5B gene sequences derived from the plasma of A-837093-treated chimpanzees revealed the presence of several mutations associated with resistance to A-837093, including Y448H, G554D, and D559G in the genotype 1a-infected chimpanzee and C316Y and G554D in the genotype 1b-infected chimpanzee. The identification of resistance-associated mutations in both chimpanzees is consistent with the findings of in vitro selection studies, in which many of the same mutations were selected. These findings validate the antiviral efficacy and resistance development of benzothiadiazine HCV polymerase inhibitors in vivo.

  6. HCV Transmission between serodiscordant couples through sexual route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.S.A.; Khalid, S.R.; Naseer, M.; Mirza, R.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the rate of transmission of HCV between n spouses through sexual route. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. It was conducted over a period of 4 years from June 2009 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: One hundred and sixty eight consecutive patients confirmed to have HCV infection by PCR for HCV RNA were enrolled in the study. Their spouses were also included in the study, and it was established through PCR for HCV RNA that the spouses were not suffering from HCV infection. All couples were inducted in the study within the first two months of starting the study. Therefore, the maximum and minimum follow-up time was 48 months and 46 months, respectively. The spouses were questioned for HCV risk factors and were tested for HCV antibodies six monthly. Once spouses were found to be anti-HCV positive, their HCV status was confirmed with PCR for HCV RNA. Results: Out of 168 patients, 90 (53.57%) were males and 78 (46.43%) were females. PCR for HCV RNA was found to be positive in 4 of 168 (2.38%) spouses. All the se 4 couples in whom HCV transmission was found had genotype 3a. Out of the 4 spouses who tested positive for HCV RNA PCR, 3 (75%) were females and 1 (25%) was male. So HCV infection was transmitted in 3 out of 90 (3.33 %) and 1 out of 78 (1.28%) female and male spouses, respectively. In PCR for HCV RNA positive and negative spouses, the duration of marriage was 202 +- 53 and 199 +- 49 weeks; and the number of total sexual intercourses was 171 +- 93 and 169 +- 89, respectively. Conclusion: HCV transmission among serodiscordant couples in our setup did occur. The overall rate of transmission was 2.38%. The rate of transmission from male to female (3.33%) was higher than female to male (1.28%). However, a large scale study conducted over a longer duration of time is needed to recommend protected sex in serodiscordant couples if either partner is suffering

  7. Molecular dynamic simulation of complex NS2B-NS3 DENV2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several vaccines have been developed against the disease, but they only ... a two component NS2B-NS3 protease that cleaves viral precursor proteins, and ... The results provide conformational changes of enzyme-inhibitor complex that is ...

  8. Rift Valley fever virus NS{sub S} gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M.; Schmaljohn, Connie S., E-mail: Connie.s.schmaljohn.civ@mail.mil

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NS{sub S} gene, but not the N, G{sub N} or NS{sub M} genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NS{sub S}, confirming that expression of NS{sub S} is likely responsible for this phenomenon. - Highlights: • Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection alters the localization of host mRNA. • mRNA accumulates in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. • NS{sub S} is likely responsible for mRNA relocalization to the nucleus.

  9. Seroprevalence of anti-HCV and hepatitis B surface antigen in HIV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tankhiwale S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is known to influence the natural history of infections with certain hepatitis viruses and interactions between HIV and hepatitis viruses may potentiate HIV replication. There is high degree of epidemiological similarity between hepatitis B virus and HIV as regard to high-risk group and route of transmission. Transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV through blood transfusion and intravenous drug abuse is well documented. Present study deals with the study of concurrent infection of HBV and HCV with HIV infection. In the study of 110 HIV seropositive patients, 34(30.4% were positive for HBV and 8(7.27% for HCV. The difference of concomitant infection was highly significant compared to controls. (p value < 0.0001. Heterosexual high risk behaviour was observed in 89(80.91% of 110 HIV positive patients, out of which 23(25.8% and 5(5.62% were HBsAg and anti-HCV positive respectively. History of transmission was unclear in remaining patients. Concomitant infection of HIV and HBV was found to be significantly more in the symptomatic group (40.68% compared to asymptomatic group (19.6%. As HIV infection is known to affect the natural history of both HBV and HCV infection, screening of their concurrent association is necessary.

  10. Development of a New Structural Class of Broadly Acting HCV Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors Leading to the Discovery of MK-8876

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, Casey C.; Palani, Anandan; Chang, Wei; Holloway, M. Katharine; Lesburg, Charles A.; Li, Peng; Liverton, Nigel; Meinke, Peter T.; Olsen, David B.; Peng, Xuanjia; Soll, Richard M.; Ummat, Ajay; Wu, Jie; Wu, Jin; Zorn, Nicolas; Ludmerer, Steven W. (Merck); (WuXi App Tec)

    2017-07-25

    Studies directed at developing a broadly acting non-nucleoside inhibitor of HCV NS5B led to the discovery of a novel structural class of 5-aryl benzofurans that simultaneously interact with both the palm I and palm II binding regions. An initial candidate was potent in vitro against HCV GT1a and GT1b replicons, and induced multi-log reductions in HCV viral load when orally dosed to chronic GT1 infected chimpanzees. However, in vitro potency losses against clinically relevant GT1a variants prompted a further effort to develop compounds with sustained potency across a broader array of HCV genotypes and mutants. Ultimately, a biology and medicinal chemistry collaboration led to the discovery of the development candidate MK-8876. MK-8876 demonstrated a pan-genotypic potency profile and maintained potency against clinically relevant mutants. It demonstrated moderate bioavailability in rats and dogs, but showed low plasma clearance characteristics consistent with once-daily dosing. Herein we describe the efforts which led to the discovery of MK-8876, which advanced into Phase 1 monotherapy studies for evaluation and characterization as a component of an all-oral direct-acting drug regimen for the treatment of chronic HCV infection.

  11. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH interaction with 3' ends of Japanese encephalitis virus RNA and colocalization with the viral NS5 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Shih-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Replication of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV genome depends on host factors for successfully completing their life cycles; to do this, host factors have been recruited and/or relocated to the site of viral replication. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, a cellular metabolic protein, was found to colocalize with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5 in JEV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation further indicated that GAPDH remained relatively constant in the cytosol, while increasing at 12 to 24 hours postinfection (hpi and decreasing at 36 hpi in the nuclear fraction of infected cells. In contrast, the redistribution patterns of GAPDH were not observed in the uninfected cells. Co-immunoprecipitation of GAPDH and JEV NS5 protein revealed no direct protein-protein interaction; instead, GAPDH binds to the 3' termini of plus- and minus-strand RNAs of JEV by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Accordingly, GAPDH binds to the minus strand more efficiently than to the plus strand of JEV RNAs. This study highlights the findings that infection of JEV changes subcellular localization of GAPDH suggesting that this metabolic enzyme may play a role in JEV replication.

  12. A new HCV genotype 6 subtype designated 6v was confirmed with three complete genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhong; Xia, Xueshan; Li, Chunhua; Maneekarn, Niwat; Xia, Wenjie; Zhao, Wenhua; Feng, Yue; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Fu, Yongshui; Lu, Ling

    2009-03-01

    Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 6 is classified into 21 subtypes, 6a-6u, new variants continue to be identified. To characterize the full-length genomes of three novel HCV genotype 6 variants: KMN02, KM046 and KM181. From sera of patients with HCV infection, the entire HCV genome was amplified by RT-PCR followed by direct DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The sera contained HCV genomes of 9461, 9429, and 9461nt in length, and each harboured a single ORF of 9051nt. The genomes showed 95.3-98.1% nucleotide similarity to each other and 72.2-75.4% similarity to 23 genotype 6 reference sequences, which represent subtypes 6a-6u and unassigned variants km41 and gz52557. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that they were genotype 6, but were subtypically distinct. Based on the current criteria of HCV classification, they were designed to represent a new subtype, 6v. Analysis of E1 and NS5B region partial sequences revealed two additional related variants, CMBD-14 and CMBD-86 that had been previously reported in northern Thailand and sequences dropped into Genbank. Three novel HCV genotype 6 variants were entirely sequenced and designated subtype 6v.

  13. Disruption of Claudin-1 Expression by miRNA-182 Alters the Susceptibility to Viral Infectivity in HCV Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Riad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available HCV entry involves a complex interplay between viral and host molecules. During post-binding interactions, the viral E2 complexes with CD81 receptor for delivery to the tight junction proteins CLDN1 and OCLN, which aid in viral internalization. Targeting HCV entry receptors represents an appealing approach to inhibit viral infectivity. This study aimed at investigating the impact of targeting CLDN1 by microRNAs on HCV infectivity. miR-155 was previously shown to target the 3′UTR of CLDN1 mRNA. Therefore, miR-155 was used as a control in this study. In-silico analysis and luciferase reporter assay were utilized to identify potential targeting miRNAs. The impact of the identified miRNAs on CLDN1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by qRT-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting, respectively. The role of the selected miRNAs on HCV infectivity was assessed by measuring the viral load following the ectopic expression of the selected miRNAs. miR-182 was identified in-silico and by experimental validation to target CLDN1. Both miR-155 and miR-182 inhibited CLDN1 mRNA and protein expression in infected Huh7 cells. Ectopic expression of miR-155 increased, while miR-182 reduced the viral load. In conclusion, despite repressing CLDN1, the impact of miR-155 and miR-182 on HCV infectivity is contradictory. Ectopic miR-182 expression is suggested as an upstream regulator of the entry factor CLDN1, harnessing HCV infection.

  14. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  15. Prevalence of mixed hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes among recently diagnosed dialysis patients with HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A Al Balwi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is considered a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease that may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of multiple (mixed HCV genotypes in Saudi patients recently diagnosed with HCV infection and their association with various clinical risk factors. We examined a total of 1,292 newly diagnosed HCV-positive cases between January 2006 and July 2009 at the Molecular Pathology Laboratory, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh. The clinical and laboratory data of the study patients were collected. The HCV-RNA viral load and its genotyping were carried out with RT-PCR technology to assist in the follow-up and management of HCV-infected patients undergoing antiviral therapy. Twenty-two patients (1.7% were found to have mixed HCV genotypes; of them, mixed genotypes associated with genotype-4 were seen in 19 patients (86%, mixed genotypes associated with genotype-1 were found in 68.4%, with genotype-3 in 26.3% and with genotype-2 in 5.3%. Additionally, mixed genotypes associated with genotype-1 were seen in three cases (13.6%; they were associated with genotype-2 in two (66.7% and with genotype-5 in one patient (33.3%. In conclusion, the prevalence rate of mixed HCV genotypes in the cohort of the newly infected Saudi patients was 1.7%, with genotype-4 being the most frequent genotype encountered.

  16. [Low-molecular-weight regulators of biogenic polyamine metabolism affect cytokine production and expression of hepatitis С virus proteins in Huh7.5 human hepatocarcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalova, O V; Lesnova, E I; Samokhvalov, E I; Permyakova, K Yu; Ivanov, A V; Kochetkov, S N; Kushch, A A

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces the expression of the genes of proinflammatory cytokines, the excessive production of which may cause cell death, and contribute to development of liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinoma. The relationship between cytokine production and metabolic disorders in HCV-infected cells remains obscure. The levels of biogenic polyamines, spermine, spermidine, and their precursor putrescine, may be a potential regulator of these processes. The purpose of the present work was to study the effects of the compounds which modulate biogenic polyamines metabolism on cytokine production and HCV proteins expression. Human hepatocarcinoma Huh7.5 cells have been transfected with the plasmids that encode HCV proteins and further incubated with the following low-molecular compounds that affect different stages of polyamine metabolism: (1) difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), the inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of polyamines; (2) N,N'-bis(2,3-butane dienyl)-1,4-diaminobutane (MDL72.527), the inhibitor of proteins involved in polyamine degradation; and (3) synthetic polyamine analog N^(I),N^(II)-diethylnorspermine (DENSpm), an inducer of polyamine degradation enzyme. The intracellular accumulation and secretion of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and TGF-β) was assessed by immunocytochemistry and in the immunoenzyme assay, while the cytokine gene expression was studied using reverse transcription and PCR. The effects of the compounds under analysis on the expression of HCV proteins were analyzed using the indirect immunofluorescence with anti-HCV monoclonal antibodies. It has been demonstrated that, in cells transfected with HCV genes, DFMO reduces the production of three out of four tested cytokines, namely, TNF-α and TGF-β in cells that express HCV core, Е1Е2, NS3, NS5A, and NS5B proteins, and IL-1β in the cells that express HCV core, Е1Е2, and NS3 proteins. MDL72527 and DENSpm decreased cytokine production

  17. Highly Efficient JFH1-Based Cell-Culture System for Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a: Failure of Homologous Neutralizing-Antibody Treatment to Control Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tanja B; Gottwein, Judith Margarete; Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer

    2008-01-01

    of recovered genomes and reverse-genetic studies. Receptor blockage was performed with anti-CD81 and anti-SR-BI. For neutralization experiments, SA13/JFH1 or JFH1-based viruses of other genotypes were incubated with patient sera. Results. @nbsp; SA13/JFH1 with NS2 and NS3 mutations yielded infectivity titers......Background. @nbsp; Recently, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) cell-culture system was developed that employed strain JFH1 (genotype 2a), and JFH1-based intra- and intergenotypic recombinants now permit functional studies of the structural genes (Core, E1, and E2), p7, and NS2 of genotypes 1-4. The goal...... was to adapt the system to employ genotype 5. Methods. @nbsp; Huh7.5 cells infected with SA13/JFH1, containing Core-NS2 of strain SA13 (genotype 5a), were monitored for Core expression and for supernatant infectivity and HCV-RNA titers. Adaptive mutations of SA13/JFH1 were identified by sequence analysis...

  18. HIV, HBV, and HCV molecular epidemiology among trans (transvestites, transsexuals, and transgender) sex workers in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carobene, Mauricio; Bolcic, Federico; Farías, María Sol Dos Ramos; Quarleri, Jorge; Avila, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Commercial sex work is frequent among male-to-female transvestites, transsexuals and transgenders in Argentina, leading to high susceptibility to HIV, HBV, and HCV among other sexually transmitted infections. In a global context of scarce data on the trans sex workers population, this study was aimed to study the genomic characterization of these viruses. Plasma presence of HIV, HBV, and HCV genomic material was evaluated in samples from 273 trans sex workers. Genomic sequences of HIV-gag, pol, and vif-vpu genes, HBV-S gene, and HCV-5'UT and NS5B genes were obtained. Molecular characterization involved phylogenetic analysis and several in silico tools. Resistance-associated mutations in HIV and HBV pol genes were also analyzed. The HIV genomic characterization in 62 trans sex workers samples showed that 54.8% of the isolates corresponded to BF intersubtype recombinants, and 38.7% to subtype B. The remaining were classified as subtypes C (4.8%) and A (1.6%). HBV and HCV co-infection prevalence among HIV positive trans sex workers yielded rates of 3.2% and 6.5% respectively. Drug resistance-associated mutations were found in 12/62 (19%) HIV pol sequences, but none among HBV. Based on phylogenetic relationships, HIV isolates characterized as subtypes BF and B appeared intermingled with those from other high-risk groups. Despite trans sex workers declared not to have received antiviral treatment, complex drug resistance-associated mutation patterns were found in several HIV isolates. Planned prevention, screening, and treatment are needed to reduce further transmission and morbidity. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Zayas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV nonstructural protein (NS5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2. We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core-RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles.

  20. Recombinant Nonstructural 3 Protein, rNS3, of Hepatitis C Virus Along With Recombinant GP96 Induce IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Mokarram, Pooneh; Kamali sarvestani, Eskandar; Bolhassani, Azam; Mostafavi Pour, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease and to date there has been no vaccine development to prevent this infection. Among non-structural HCV proteins, NS3 protein is an excellent goal for a therapeutic vaccine, due to its large size and less variation in conserved regions. The immunogenic properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) for instance GP96 have prompted investigations into their function as strong adjuvant to improve innate and adaptive immunity. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine additive effects of recombinant GP96 (rGP96) fragments accompanied by rNS3 on expression levels of α5integrin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12 and TNFα, in Antigen Presenting Cells (APCs). Materials and Methods Recombinant viral proteins (rNS3 and rRGD-NS3), N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of GP96 were produced and purified from E. coli in order to treat the cells; mouse spleen Dendritic Cells (DCs) and THP-1 macrophages. Results Our results showed that rNT-GP96 alone significantly increases the expression level of IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin in THP-1 macrophages and DCs, while IL-12 and TNFα expression levels were unaffected by either rNS3 or rRGD-NS3. Interestingly, the co-addition of these recombinant proteins with rNT-GP96 increased IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin expression. Pearson Correlation showed a direct association between α5integrin with IL-12 and TNF-α expression. Conclusions we have highlighted the role of rNS3 plus rNT-GP96 mediated by α5integrin in producing IL-12 and TNFα. It can be suggested that rNT-GP96 could enhance immunity characteristic of rNS3 protein via production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24032046

  1. Molecular genotyping of HCV infection in seropositive blood donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarin, Siti Noraziah Abu; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    This study is to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in seropositive blood donor. RNA was extracted from 32 positive samples in National Blood Centre and Melaka Hospital. The core and NS5B sequences were obtained from 23 samples. Genotype 3a is most prevalent in this study followed by genotype 1a. Evidence of mixed-genotypes (3a and 1b) infections was found in 5 subjects.

  2. Consideration of Viral Resistance for Optimization of Direct Antiviral Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Julia; Susser, Simone; Berkowski, Caterina; Perner, Dany; Zeuzem, Stefan; Sarrazin, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Different highly effective interferon-free treatment options for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are currently available. Pre-existence of resistance associated variants (RAVs) to direct antiviral agents (DAAs) reduces sustained virologic response (SVR) rates by 3-53% in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected patients depending on different predictors and the DAA regimen used. Frequencies of single and combined resistance to NS3, NS5A and NS5B inhibitors and consequences for the applicability of different treatment regimens are unknown. Parallel population based sequencing of HCV NS3, NS5A and NS5B genes in 312 treatment-naïve Caucasian HCV genotype 1 infected patients showed the presence of major resistant variants in 20.5% (NS3), 11.9% (NS5A), and 22.1% (NS5B) with important differences for HCV subtypes. In NS3, Q80K was observed in 34.7% and 2.1% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively while other RAVs to second generation protease inhibitors were detected rarely (1.4%). Within NS5A RAVs were observed in 7.1% of subtype 1a and 17.6% in subtype 1b infected patients. RAVs to non-nucleoside NS5B inhibitors were observed in 3.5% and 44.4% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively. Considering all three DAA targets all subtype 1a and 98.6% of subtype 1b infected patients were wildtype for at least one interferon free DAA regimen currently available. In conclusion, baseline resistance testing allows the selection of at least one RAVs-free treatment option for nearly all patients enabling a potentially cost- and efficacy-optimized treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  3. Consideration of Viral Resistance for Optimization of Direct Antiviral Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Dietz

    Full Text Available Different highly effective interferon-free treatment options for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection are currently available. Pre-existence of resistance associated variants (RAVs to direct antiviral agents (DAAs reduces sustained virologic response (SVR rates by 3-53% in hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infected patients depending on different predictors and the DAA regimen used. Frequencies of single and combined resistance to NS3, NS5A and NS5B inhibitors and consequences for the applicability of different treatment regimens are unknown. Parallel population based sequencing of HCV NS3, NS5A and NS5B genes in 312 treatment-naïve Caucasian HCV genotype 1 infected patients showed the presence of major resistant variants in 20.5% (NS3, 11.9% (NS5A, and 22.1% (NS5B with important differences for HCV subtypes. In NS3, Q80K was observed in 34.7% and 2.1% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively while other RAVs to second generation protease inhibitors were detected rarely (1.4%. Within NS5A RAVs were observed in 7.1% of subtype 1a and 17.6% in subtype 1b infected patients. RAVs to non-nucleoside NS5B inhibitors were observed in 3.5% and 44.4% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively. Considering all three DAA targets all subtype 1a and 98.6% of subtype 1b infected patients were wildtype for at least one interferon free DAA regimen currently available. In conclusion, baseline resistance testing allows the selection of at least one RAVs-free treatment option for nearly all patients enabling a potentially cost- and efficacy-optimized treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  4. Inhibition of protease-inhibitor resistant hepatitis C virus replicons and infectious virus by intracellular intrabodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Zemel, Romy; Bachmatov, Larissa; Jangra, Rohit K.; Shapira, Assaf; Villanueva, Rodrigo; Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.; Benhar, Itai; Tur-Kaspa, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common cause of chronic liver disease and a serious threat to human health. The HCV NS3/4A serine protease is necessary for viral replication and innate immune evasion, and represents a well-validated target for specific antiviral therapy. We previously reported the isolation of single-chain antibodies (scFvs) that inhibit NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Expressed intracellularly (intrabodies), these scFvs blocked NS3-mediated proliferation of NS3-transfected cells. Here we show that anti-NS3 scFvs suppress HCV RNA replication when expressed intracellularly in Huh7 hepatoma cells bearing either subgenomic or genome-length HCV RNA replicons. The expression of intrabodies directed against NS3 inhibited the autonomous amplification of HCV replicons resistant to small molecule inhibitors of the NS3/4A protease, and replicons derived from different HCV genotypes. The combination of intrabodies and interferon-α had an additive inhibitory effect on RNA replication in the replicon model. Intrabody expression also inhibited production of infectious HCV in a cell culture system. The NS3 protease activity was inhibited by the intrabodies in NS3-expressing cells. In contrast, cell-free synthesis of HCV RNA by preformed replicase complexes was not inhibited by intrabodies, suggesting that the major mode of inhibition of viral replication is inhibition of NS3/4A protease activity and subsequent suppression of viral polyprotein processing. PMID:20705106

  5. Portulaca oleracea L. as a Prospective Candidate Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Sobia; Hussain, Ishtiaq; Tariq, Muhammad Ilyas; Ijaz, Bushra; Iqbal, Shahid; Qamar-ul-Zaman; Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide health problem affecting about 300 million individuals. HCV causes chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death. Many side effects are associated with the current treatment options. Natural products that can be used as anti-HCV drugs are thus of considerable potential significance. NS3 serine protease (NS3-SP) is a target for the screening of antiviral activity against HCV. The present work explores plants with anti-HCV potential, isolating possible lead compounds. Ten plants, used for medicinal purposes against different infections in rural areas of Pakistan, were collected. The cellular toxicity effects of methanolic extracts of the plants on the viability of Huh-7 cells were studied through the Trypan blue dye exclusion method. Following this, the anti-HCV potential of phytoextracts was assessed by infecting liver cells with HCV-3a-infected serum inoculum. Only the methanolic extract of Portulaca oleracea L. (PO) exhibited more than 70% inhibition. Four fractions were obtained through bioassay-guided extraction of PO. Subsequent inhibition of all organic extract fractions against NS3 serine protease was checked to track the specific target in the virus. The results showed that the PO methanolic crude and ethyl acetate extract specifically abridged the HCV NS3 protease expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Hence, PO extract and its constituents either alone or with interferon could offer a future option to treat chronic HCV.

  6. Arbidol: a broad-spectrum antiviral that inhibits acute and chronic HCV infection

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    Pécheur Eve-Isabelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arbidol (ARB is an antiviral compound that was originally proven effective for treatment of influenza and several other respiratory viral infections. The broad spectrum of ARB anti-viral activity led us to evaluate its effect on hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and replication in cell culture. Long-term ARB treatment of Huh7 cells chronically replicating a genomic length genotype 1b replicon resulted in sustained reduction of viral RNA and protein expression, and eventually cured HCV infected cells. Pre-treatment of human hepatoma Huh7.5.1 cells with 15 μM ARB for 24 to 48 hours inhibited acute infection with JFH-1 virus by up to 1000-fold. The inhibitory effect of ARB on HCV was not due to generalized cytotoxicity, nor to augmentation of IFN antiviral signaling pathways, but involved impaired virus-mediated membrane fusion. ARB's affinity for membranes may inhibit several aspects of the HCV lifecycle that are membrane-dependent.

  7. Gelatin nanoparticles enhance delivery of hepatitis C virus recombinant NS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Salwa; George, Marina A; El-Shorbagy, Haidan M; Bassiony, Heba; Farroh, Khaled Y; Youssef, Tareq; Salaheldin, Taher A

    2017-01-01

    Development of an effective non-viral vaccine against hepatitis C virus infection is of a great importance. Gelatin nanoparticles (Gel.NPs) have an attention and promising approach as a viable carrier for delivery of vaccine, gene, drug and other biomolecules in the body. The present study aimed to develop stable Gel.NPs conjugated with nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) gene of Hepatitis C Virus genotype 4a (HCV4a) as a safe and an efficient vaccine delivery system. Gel.NPs were synthesized and characterized (size: 150±2 nm and zeta potential +17.6 mv). NS2 gene was successfully cloned and expressed into E. coli M15 using pQE-30 vector. Antigenicity of the recombinant NS2 protein was confirmed by Western blotting to verify the efficiency of NS2 as a possible vaccine. Then NS2 gene was conjugated to gelatin nanoparticles and a successful conjugation was confirmed by labeling and imaging using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM). Interestingly, the transformation of the conjugated NS2/Gel.NPs complex into E. coli DH5-α was 50% more efficient than transformation with the gene alone. In addition, conjugated NS2/Gel.NPs with ratio 1:100 (w/w) showed higher transformation efficiency into E. coli DH5-α than the other ratios (1:50 and 2:50). Gel.NPs effectively enhanced the gene delivery in bacterial cells without affecting the structure of NS2 gene and could be used as a safe, easy, rapid, cost-effective and non-viral vaccine delivery system for HCV.

  8. Strong vaccine-induced CD8 T-cell responses have cytolytic function in a chimpanzee clearing HCV infection.

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    Babs E Verstrepen

    Full Text Available A single correlate of effective vaccine protection against chronic HCV infection has yet to be defined. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses in four chimpanzees, immunized with core-E1-E2-NS3 and subsequently infected with HCV1b. Viral clearance was observed in one animal, while the other three became chronically infected. In the animal that cleared infection, NS3-specific CD8 T-cell responses were observed to be more potent in terms of frequency and polyfunctionality of cytokine producing cells. Unique to this animal was the presence of killing-competent CD8 T-cells, specific for NS3 1258-1272, being presented by the chimpanzee MHC class I molecule Patr-A*03∶01, and a high affinity recognition of this epitope. In the animals that became chronically infected, T-cells were able to produce cytokines against the same peptide but no cytolysis could be detected. In conclusion, in the animal that was able to clear HCV infection not only cytokine production was observed but also cytolytic potential against specific MHC class I/peptide-combinations.

  9. Association of IL28B SNPs rs12979860 and rs8099917 on Hepatitis C Virus-RNA Status in Donors/Recipients of Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

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    King-Wah Chiu

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of IL28B single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs8099917 and rs12979860 in the donors and recipients on the outcome of Hepatitis C virus-RNA clearance after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT. The rs8099917 and rs12979860 genotypes in 50 donor and recipients pairs were explored on the pre-operative day (POD and post-operative day 30 (POD30. There was a significant difference in HCV-RNA clearance before (12%, 6/50 and after (48%, 24/50 liver transplantation (P < 0.001. The rs8099917 genotype TT was dominant in both the recipients (82%, 41/50 and donors (86%, 43/50, but had no significant effect on HCV-RNA clearance (87.5%, 21/24 and recurrence (76.9%, 20/26 after LDLT. One recipient was detected with genotype GG on POD, which changed to genotype GT on POD30. Prevalence of rs12979860 genotype CT was 98% (49/50 recipient and 92% (46/50 donor and prevalence of genotype CC was 2% (1/50 recipient and 8% (4/50 donor on POD and POD30, respectively. Of the 4 recipients with rs12979860 genotype CC on POD30, 3 recipients (12.5%, 3/24 exhibited HCV clearance and 1 experienced recurrence (3.9%, 1/26, however, this was not statistically significant. In conclusion, alterations in IL28B SNP genotype may occur after LDLT, leading to modifications in the host genome or donor proteome by HCV. This predicted mechanism will need to be investigated further.

  10. Naturally occurring NS3 resistance-associated variants in hepatitis C virus genotype 1: Their relevance for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Natalia; Betancour, Gabriela; Gámbaro, Fabiana; Hernández, Nelia; López, Pablo; Chiodi, Daniela; Sánchez, Adriana; Boschi, Susana; Fajardo, Alvaro; Sóñora, Martín; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar

    2016-09-02

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 130-150 million infected individuals worldwide. HCV is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment options in developing countries involve pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin as dual therapy or in combination with one or more direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA). The emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) after treatment reveals the great variability of this virus leading to a great difficulty in developing effective antiviral strategies. Baseline RAVs detected in DAA treatment-naïve HCV-infected patients could be of great importance for clinical management and outcome prediction. Although the frequency of naturally occurring HCV NS3 protease inhibitor mutations has been addressed in many countries, there are only a few reports on their prevalence in South America. In this study, we investigated the presence of RAVs in the HCV NS3 serine protease region by analysing a cohort of Uruguayan patients with chronic hepatitis C who had not been treated with any DAAs and compare them with the results found for other South American countries. The results of these studies revealed that naturally occurring mutations conferring resistance to NS3 inhibitors exist in a substantial proportion of Uruguayan treatment-naïve patients infected with HCV genotype 1 enrolled in these studies. The identification of these baseline RAVs could be of great importance for patients' management and outcome prediction in developing countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel hepacivirus with an unusually long and intrinsically disordered NS5A protein in a wild Old World primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauck, Michael; Sibley, Samuel D; Lara, James; Purdy, Michael A; Khudyakov, Yury; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Switzer, William M; Chapman, Colin A; Hughes, Austin L; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H; Goldberg, Tony L

    2013-08-01

    GB virus B (GBV-B; family Flaviviridae, genus Hepacivirus) has been studied in New World primates as a model for human hepatitis C virus infection, but the distribution of GBV-B and its relatives in nature has remained obscure. Here, we report the discovery of a novel and highly divergent GBV-B-like virus in an Old World monkey, the black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza), in Uganda. The new virus, guereza hepacivirus (GHV), clusters phylogenetically with GBV-B and recently described hepaciviruses infecting African bats and North American rodents, and it shows evidence of ancient recombination with these other hepaciviruses. Direct sequencing of reverse-transcribed RNA from blood plasma from three of nine colobus monkeys yielded near-complete GHV genomes, comprising two distinct viral variants. The viruses contain an exceptionally long nonstructural 5A (NS5A) gene, approximately half of which codes for a protein with no discernible homology to known proteins. Computational structure-based analyses indicate that the amino terminus of the GHV NS5A protein may serve a zinc-binding function, similar to the NS5A of other viruses within the family Flaviviridae. However, the 521-amino-acid carboxy terminus is intrinsically disordered, reflecting an unusual degree of structural plasticity and polyfunctionality. These findings shed new light on the natural history and evolution of the hepaciviruses and on the extent of structural variation within the Flaviviridae.

  12. HBV And HCV Molecular Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor H. Pujol

    2007-02-01

    hepatitis C virus (HCV. Six genotypes and a large number of subtypes in each genotype have been described for this member of the Flaviviridae family. Infections with HCV genotype 1 are associated with the lowest therapeutic success. HCV genotype 1b has also been more frequently associated with a more severe liver disease. However, this association seems to be due to the fact that individuals infected with this genotype have a longer mean duration of infection. HCV genotypes 1, 2, and 3 have a worldwide distribution and display an apidemic pattern of distribution. HCV subtypes 1a and 1b are the most common genotypes in the United States and are also are predominant in Europe, while in Japan, subtype 1b is predominant. Although HCV subtypes 2a and 2b are relatively common in America, Europe, and Japan, subtype 2c is found commonly in northern Italy. HCV genotype 3a is frequent in intravenous drug abusers in Europe and the United States. HCV genotype 4 appears to be prevalent in Africa and theMiddle East, and genotypes 5 and 6 seem to be confined to South Africa and Asia, respectively. These last genotypes display an endemic pattern of distribution. In addition, a change in the frequency of the prevailing genotypes has been described in several countries: in general, HCV genotype 1b is being displaced by genotypes 3a and/or 2. Coalescent studies have allowed to describe the epidemic pattern of dissemination of some HCV subtypes in specific countries, generally around 100 years ago. The origin of this virus is still an open question, but several studies traces it diversification only around 1,000 years ago.

    The replication of HCV is dependent on a RNA-polymerase RNA dependent which lacks proofreading activity, which confers to this virus a high rate of variability. This virus circulates as a quasispecies. This population dynamic inside a single strain confers to this virus the ability to

  13. Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors: A Light at the End of the Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Baril, Martin; Lamarre, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious and growing threat to human health. The current treatment provides limited efficacy and is poorly tolerated, highlighting the urgent medical need for novel therapeutics. The membrane-targeted NS3 protein in complex with the NS4A comprises a serine protease domain (NS3/4A protease) that is essential for viral polyprotein maturation and contributes to the evasion of the host innate antiviral immunity by HCV. Therefore, the NS3/4A protease represents an attractive target for drug discovery, which is tied in with the challenge to develop selective small-molecule inhibitors. A rational drug design approach, based on the discovery of N-terminus product inhibition, led to the identification of potent and orally bioavailable NS3 inhibitors that target the highly conserved protease active site. This review summarizes the NS3 protease inhibitors currently challenged in clinical trials as one of the most promising antiviral drug class, and possibly among the first anti-HCV agents to be approved for the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:21994705

  14. Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors: A Light at the End of the Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chatel-Chaix

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a serious and growing threat to human health. The current treatment provides limited efficacy and is poorly tolerated, highlighting the urgent medical need for novel therapeutics. The membrane-targeted NS3 protein in complex with the NS4A comprises a serine protease domain (NS3/4A protease that is essential for viral polyprotein maturation and contributes to the evasion of the host innate antiviral immunity by HCV. Therefore, the NS3/4A protease represents an attractive target for drug discovery, which is tied in with the challenge to develop selective small-molecule inhibitors. A rational drug design approach, based on the discovery of N-terminus product inhibition, led to the identification of potent and orally bioavailable NS3 inhibitors that target the highly conserved protease active site. This review summarizes the NS3 protease inhibitors currently challenged in clinical trials as one of the most promising antiviral drug class, and possibly among the first anti-HCV agents to be approved for the treatment of HCV infection.

  15. Exploring the molecular basis of dsRNA recognition by NS1 protein of influenza A virus using molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dabo; Sun, Huijun; Shen, Yulin; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2011-12-01

    The frequent outbreak of influenza pandemic and the limited available anti-influenza drugs highlight the urgent need for the development of new antiviral drugs. The dsRNA-binding surface of nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus (NS1A) is a promising target. The detailed understanding of NS1A-dsRNA interaction will be valuable for structure-based anti-influenza drug discovery. To characterize and explore the key interaction features between dsRNA and NS1A, molecular dynamics simulation combined with MM-GBSA calculations were performed. Based on the MM-GBSA calculations, we find that the intermolecular van der Waals interaction and the nonpolar solvation term provide the main driving force for the binding process. Meanwhile, 17 key residues from NS1A were identified to be responsible for the dsRNA binding. Compared with the wild type NS1A, all the studied mutants S42A, T49A, R38A, R35AR46A have obvious reduced binding free energies with dsRNA reflecting in the reduction of the polar and/or nonpolar interactions. In addition, the structural and energy analysis indicate the mutations have a small effect to the backbone structures but the loss of side chain interactions is responsible for the decrease of the binding affinity. The uncovering of NS1A-dsRNA recognition mechanism will provide some useful insights and new chances for the development of anti-influenza drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence and presentation of hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infection in Vietnamese Americans via serial community serologic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kelvin; Van Nguyen, Thai; Shen, Duke; Xia, Victor; Tran, Diep; Banh, Khanh; Ruan, Victor; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is reportedly high in Vietnamese Americans (VAs), but most previous studies did not assess full HBV serology, and not the prevalence of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection simultaneously. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of different HBV serologies and HCV infection in VAs. This study was based on the data collected by testing for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb IgG), anti-HBs antibody (HBsAb), and anti-HCV antibody (anti-HCV) in a series of community screening in VAs in Orange County, California. In 1,405 VA participants, the mean age was 51 (17-87) years, 45.1% were males; 68.2%, married; 97.2%, born in Vietnam. Most of the participants were non-US born with their primary language being non-English and with limited access to health care. Of the 1,405 cases, 124 (8.8%) were confirmed HBV infection by HBsAg+; 81 (5.8%), HCV infection by anti-HCV+; including four (0.3%) with HBV/HCV coinfection. Twelve percent of the participants with confirmed HBV infection thought they were previously tested negative, while 29.7% of the participants with confirmed HCV infection thought they were previously tested negative. In this cohort, 15.4% were HBsAg-/HBsAb-/HBcAb IgG-, i.e. being susceptible to HBV infection. In HCV infected participants, 65.4% were born between 1945 and 1965. This large serial survey and screening in the Vietnamese American community confirmed the rates of HBV and HCV infection to be as high as 8.8% and 5.8%, respectively. We have also identified factors related to HBV and HCV infection in this high-risk population.

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of Novel Inhibitors against the NS2B-NS3 Protease of Dengue Fever Virus Type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh Hanh Nguyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of potent therapeutic compounds against dengue virus is urgently needed. The NS2B-NS3 protease (NS2B-NS3pro of dengue fever virus carries out all enzymatic activities needed for polyprotein processing and is considered to be amenable to antiviral inhibition by analogy. Virtual screening of 300,000 compounds using Autodock 3 on the GVSS platform was conducted to identify novel inhibitors against the NS2B-NS3pro. Thirty-six compounds were selected for in vitro assay against NS2B-NS3pro expressed in Pichia pastoris. Seven novel compounds were identified as inhibitors with IC50 values of 3.9 ± 0.6–86.7 ± 3.6 μM. Three strong NS2B-NS3pro inhibitors were further confirmed as competitive inhibitors with Ki values of 4.0 ± 0.4, 4.9 ± 0.3, and 3.4 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between amino acid residues in the NS3pro active site with inhibition compounds were also identified.

  18. HCV core protein-induced down-regulation of microRNA-152 promoted aberrant proliferation by regulating Wnt1 in HepG2 cells.

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    Shifeng Huang

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been reported to regulate cellular microRNAs (miRNAs. The HCV core protein is considered to be a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCV-HCC, but HCV core-regulated miRNAs are largely unknown. Our preliminary experiments revealed significant down-regulation of microRNA-152 (miR-152 by HCV core protein in HepG2 cells. Through target gene prediction softwares, Wnt1 was predicted to be a potential target of miR-152. The present study was initiated to investigate whether miR-152 is aberrantly regulated by the HCV core protein, and involved in the regulation of the aberrant proliferation of HCV-HCC cells.MiR-152 levels were examined by stem-loop real-time RT-PCR (SLqRT-PCR. Cell proliferation was analyzed by MTT and colony formation assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Luciferase reporter assay was conducted to confirm miRNA-target association. Wnt1 expression was determined by real-time qPCR and Western blotting.HCV core protein significantly suppressed miR-152 expression, and led to significant Wnt1 up-regulation with a concomitant aberrantly promoted proliferation. Moreover, we validated that miR-152 inhibition promoted, while miR-152 mimics inhibited cell proliferation. Using, qRT-PCR and western blot, Wnt1 was demonstrated to be regulated by miR-152. Luciferase activity assay showed that while miR-152 mimics significantly reduced the luciferase activity by 83.76% (P<0.0001, miR-152 inhibitor showed no effect on luciferase reporter. Most notably, salvage expression of miR-152 after Ad-HCV core infection for 24 h almost totally reversed the proliferation-promoting effect of the HCV core protein, and meanwhile, reduced the expression of both Wnt1 mRNA and protein to basal levels.These findings provide important evidence that the reduced miR-152 expression by HCV core protein can indirectly lose an inhibitory effect on Wnt1, which might, at least partially lead to cell

  19. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5A favors upregulation of gluconeogenic and lipogenic gene expression leading towards insulin resistance: a metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaiz, Fahed; Manzoor, Sobia; Iqbal, Jawed; McRae, Steven; Javed, Farrakh; Ahmed, Qazi Laeeque; Waris, Gulam

    2014-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a lethal blood-borne infection often associated with a number of pathologies such as insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities. Insulin is a key hormone that regulates the expression of metabolic pathways and favors homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrated the molecular mechanism of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A)-induced metabolic dysregulation. We showed that transient expression of HCV NS5A in human hepatoma cells increased lipid droplet formation through enhanced lipogenesis. We also showed increased transcriptional expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1α and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT-1) in NS5A-expressing cells. On the other hand, there was significantly reduced transcriptional expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in cells expressing HCV NS5A. Furthermore, increased gluconeogenic gene expression was observed in HCV-NS5A-expressing cells. In addition, it was also shown that HCV-NS5A-expressing hepatoma cells show serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, thereby hampering metabolic activity and contributing to insulin resistance. Therefore, this study reveals that HCV NS5A is involved in enhanced gluconeogenic and lipogenic gene expression, which triggers metabolic abnormality and impairs insulin signaling pathway.

  20. Discovery of Dengue Virus NS4B Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Dong, Hongping; Zou, Bin; Karuna, Ratna; Wan, Kah Fei; Zou, Jing; Susila, Agatha; Yip, Andy; Shan, Chao; Yeo, Kim Long; Xu, Haoying; Ding, Mei; Chan, Wai Ling; Gu, Feng; Seah, Peck Gee; Liu, Wei; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Kang, CongBao; Lescar, Julien; Blasco, Francesca; Smith, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to -4) represent the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral pathogens in humans. No clinically approved vaccine or antiviral is currently available for DENV. Here we report a spiropyrazolopyridone compound that potently inhibits DENV both in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitor was identified through screening of a 1.8-million-compound library by using a DENV-2 replicon assay. The compound selectively inhibits DENV-2 and -3 (50% effective concentration [EC50], 10 to 80 nM) but not DENV-1 and -4 (EC50, >20 μM). Resistance analysis showed that a mutation at amino acid 63 of DENV-2 NS4B (a nonenzymatic transmembrane protein and a component of the viral replication complex) could confer resistance to compound inhibition. Genetic studies demonstrate that variations at amino acid 63 of viral NS4B are responsible for the selective inhibition of DENV-2 and -3. Medicinal chemistry improved the physicochemical properties of the initial “hit” (compound 1), leading to compound 14a, which has good in vivo pharmacokinetics. Treatment of DENV-2-infected AG129 mice with compound 14a suppressed viremia, even when the treatment started after viral infection. The results have proven the concept that inhibitors of NS4B could potentially be developed for clinical treatment of DENV infection. Compound 14a represents a potential preclinical candidate for treatment of DENV-2- and -3-infected patients. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV) threatens up to 2.5 billion people and is now spreading in many regions in the world where it was not previously endemic. While there are several promising vaccine candidates in clinical trials, approved vaccines or antivirals are not yet available. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a spiropyrazolopyridone as a novel inhibitor of DENV by targeting the viral NS4B protein. The compound potently inhibits two of the four serotypes of DENV (DENV-2 and -3) both in vitro and in vivo. Our

  1. Enhanced and sustained CD8+ T cell responses with an adenoviral vector-based hepatitis C virus vaccine encoding NS3 linked to the MHC class II chaperone protein invariant chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Marianne; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bukh, Jens

    2011-01-01

    memory. Functionally, the AdIiNS3-vaccinated mice had a significantly increased cytotoxic capacity compared with the AdNS3 group. The AdIiNS3-induced CD8(+) T cells protected mice from infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HCV NS3 of heterologous 1b strains, and studies in knockout mice...

  2. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  3. Patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) during colonoscopy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Candelas, Fernando; Guiral, Silvia; Carbó, Rosa; Valero, Ana; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; González, Francisco; Bracho, Maria Alma

    2010-09-08

    No recognized risk factors can be identified in 10-40% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients suggesting that the modes of transmission involved could be underestimated or unidentified. Invasive diagnostic procedures, such as endoscopy, have been considered as a potential HCV transmission route; although the actual extent of transmission in endoscopy procedures remains controversial. Most reported HCV outbreaks related to nosocomial acquisition have been attributed to unsafe injection practices and use of multi-dose vials. Only a few cases of likely patient-to-patient HCV transmission via a contaminated colonoscope have been reported to date. Nosocomial HCV infection may have important medical and legal implications and, therefore, possible transmission routes should be investigated. In this study, a case of nosocomial transmission of HCV from a common source to two patients who underwent colonoscopy in an endoscopy unit is reported. A retrospective epidemiological search after detection of index cases revealed several potentially infective procedures: sample blood collection, use of a peripheral catheter, anesthesia and colonoscopy procedures. The epidemiological investigation showed breaches in colonoscope reprocessing and deficiencies in the recording of valuable tracing data. Direct sequences from the NS5B region were obtained to determine the extent of the outbreak and cloned sequences from the E1-E2 region were used to establish the relationships among intrapatient viral populations. Phylogenetic analyses of individual sequences from viral populations infecting the three patients involved in the outbreak confirmed the patient pointed out by the epidemiological search as the source of the outbreak. Furthermore, the sequential order in which the patients underwent colonoscopy correlates with viral genetic variability estimates. Patient-to-patient transmission of HCV could be demonstrated although the precise route of transmission remained unclear. Viral

  4. Assessment of Drug Binding Potential of Pockets in the NS2B/NS3 Dengue Virus Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelia, F.; Iryani; Sari, P. Y.; Parikesit, A. A.; Bakri, R.; Toepak, E. P.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2018-04-01

    Every year an endemic dengue fever estimated to affect over 390 million cases in over 128 countries occurs. However, the antigen types which stimulate the human immune response are variable, as a result, neither effective vaccines nor antiviral treatments have been successfully developed for this disease. The NS2B/NS3 protease of the dengue virus (DENV) responsible for viral replication is a potential drug target. The ligand-enzyme binding site determination is a key role in the success of virtual screening of new inhibitors. The NS2B/NS3 protease of DENV (PDB ID: 2FOM) has two pockets consisting of 37 (Pocket 1) and 27 (Pocket 2) amino acid residues in each pocket. In this research, we characterized the amino acid residues for binding sites in NS3/NS2B based on the hydrophobicity, the percentage of charged residues, volume, depth, ΔGbinding, hydrogen bonding and bond length. The hydrophobic percentages of both pockets are high, 59 % (Pocket 1) and 41% (Pocket 2) and the percentage of charged residues in Pocket 1 and 2 are 22% and 48%, and the pocket volume is less than 700 Å3. An interaction analysis using molecular docking showed that interaction between the ligand complex and protein in Pocket 1 is more negative than Pocket 2. As a result, Pocket 1 is the better potential target for a ligand to inhibit the action of NS2B/NS3 DENV.

  5. Production of infectious chimeric hepatitis C virus genotype 2b harboring minimal regions of JFH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Asako; Kato, Takanobu; Akazawa, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Nao; Date, Tomoko; Masaki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Nomoto, Akio; Wakita, Takaji

    2012-02-01

    To establish a cell culture system for chimeric hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2b, we prepared a chimeric construct harboring the 5' untranslated region (UTR) to the E2 region of the MA strain (genotype 2b) and the region of p7 to the 3' UTR of the JFH-1 strain (genotype 2a). This chimeric RNA (MA/JFH-1.1) replicated and produced infectious virus in Huh7.5.1 cells. Replacement of the 5' UTR of this chimera with that from JFH-1 (MA/JFH-1.2) enhanced virus production, but infectivity remained low. In a long-term follow-up study, we identified a cell culture-adaptive mutation in the core region (R167G) and found that it enhanced virus assembly. We previously reported that the NS3 helicase (N3H) and the region of NS5B to 3' X (N5BX) of JFH-1 enabled replication of the J6CF strain (genotype 2a), which could not replicate in cells. To reduce JFH-1 content in MA/JFH-1.2, we produced a chimeric viral genome for MA harboring the N3H and N5BX regions of JFH-1, combined with a JFH-1 5' UTR replacement and the R167G mutation (MA/N3H+N5BX-JFH1/R167G). This chimeric RNA replicated efficiently, but virus production was low. After the introduction of four additional cell culture-adaptive mutations, MA/N3H+N5BX-JFH1/5am produced infectious virus efficiently. Using this chimeric virus harboring minimal regions of JFH-1, we analyzed interferon sensitivity and found that this chimeric virus was more sensitive to interferon than JFH-1 and another chimeric virus containing more regions from JFH-1 (MA/JFH-1.2/R167G). In conclusion, we established an HCV genotype 2b cell culture system using a chimeric genome harboring minimal regions of JFH-1. This cell culture system may be useful for characterizing genotype 2b viruses and developing antiviral strategies.

  6. Docking, synthesis and bioassay studies of imine derivatives as potential inhibitors for dengue NS2B/ NS3 serine protease

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    Neni Frimayanti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To search imine derivatives as new active agents against dengue type 2 NS2B/NS3 using molecular docking, since there is no effective vaccine against flaviviral infections. Methods: In this research, molecular docking was performed for a series of imine derivatives and the information obtained from the docking studies was used to explore the binding modes of these imine derivatives with dengue type 2 NS2B/NS3 serine protease. A set of imine were synthesized and bioassay study of the inhibitory activities of these compounds was then performed. Results: The results indicated that MY8 and MY4 have the ability to inhibit DEN2 NS2B/NS3 proteolytic activity. Conclusions: These two compounds were chosen as the reference for the next stage in drug design as new inhibitor agents against NS2B/NS3.

  7. QSAR studies of the bioactivity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitors by multiple linear regression (MLR) and support vector machine (SVM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zijian; Wang, Maolin; Yan, Aixia

    2017-07-01

    In this study, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using various descriptor sets and training/test set selection methods were explored to predict the bioactivity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitors by using a multiple linear regression (MLR) and a support vector machine (SVM) method. 512 HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors and their IC 50 values which were determined by the same FRET assay were collected from the reported literature to build a dataset. All the inhibitors were represented with selected nine global and 12 2D property-weighted autocorrelation descriptors calculated from the program CORINA Symphony. The dataset was divided into a training set and a test set by a random and a Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) method. The correlation coefficients (r 2 ) of training sets and test sets were 0.75 and 0.72 for the best MLR model, 0.87 and 0.85 for the best SVM model, respectively. In addition, a series of sub-dataset models were also developed. The performances of all the best sub-dataset models were better than those of the whole dataset models. We believe that the combination of the best sub- and whole dataset SVM models can be used as reliable lead designing tools for new NS3/4A protease inhibitors scaffolds in a drug discovery pipeline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of detection and quantification of HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA using dried blood spot (DBS) samples - a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Berit; Roberts, Teri; Cohn, Jennifer; Greenman, Jamie; Camp, Johannes; Ishizaki, Azumi; Messac, Luke; Tuaillon, Edouard; van de Perre, Philippe; Pichler, Christine; Denkinger, Claudia M; Easterbrook, Philippa

    2017-11-01

    The detection and quantification of hepatitis B (HBV) DNA and hepatitis C (HCV) RNA in whole blood collected on dried blood spots (DBS) may facilitate access to diagnosis and treatment of HBV and HCV infection in resource-poor settings. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of DBS compared to venous blood samples for detection and quantification of HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA in two systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the diagnostic accuracy of HBV DNA and HCV RNA from DBS compared to venous blood samples. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Global Health, Web of Science, LILAC and Cochrane library for studies that assessed diagnostic accuracy with DBS. Heterogeneity was assessed and where appropriate pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity were generated using bivariate analyses with maximum likelihood estimates and 95% confidence intervals. We also conducted a narrative review on the impact of varying storage conditions or different cut-offs for detection from studies that undertook this in a subset of samples. The QUADAS-2 tool was used to assess risk of bias. In the quantitative synthesis for diagnostic accuracy of HBV-DNA using DBS, 521 citations were identified, and 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Overall quality of studies was rated as low. The pooled estimate of sensitivity and specificity for HBV-DNA was 95% (95% CI: 83-99) and 99% (95% CI: 53-100), respectively. In the two studies that reported on cut-offs and limit of detection (LoD) - one reported a sensitivity of 98% for a cut-off of ≥2000 IU/ml and another reported a LoD of 914 IU/ml using a commercial assay. Varying storage conditions for individual samples did not result in a significant variation of results. In the synthesis for diagnostic accuracy of HCV-RNA using DBS, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria, and this included six additional studies to a previously published review. The pooled sensitivity and specificity was 98% (95% CI:95-99) and 98% (95% CI:95-99.0), respectively

  9. Visualization and measurement of ATP levels in living cells replicating hepatitis C virus genome RNA.

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    Tomomi Ando

    Full Text Available Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is the primary energy currency of all living organisms and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Although ATP requirements during viral lifecycles have been examined in a number of studies, a method by which ATP production can be monitored in real-time, and by which ATP can be quantified in individual cells and subcellular compartments, is lacking, thereby hindering studies aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms by which viral replication energized by ATP is controlled. In this study, we investigated the fluctuation and distribution of ATP in cells during RNA replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family. We demonstrated that cells involved in viral RNA replication actively consumed ATP, thereby reducing cytoplasmic ATP levels. Subsequently, a method to measure ATP levels at putative subcellular sites of HCV RNA replication in living cells was developed by introducing a recently-established Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based ATP indicator, called ATeam, into the NS5A coding region of the HCV replicon. Using this method, we were able to observe the formation of ATP-enriched dot-like structures, which co-localize with non-structural viral proteins, within the cytoplasm of HCV-replicating cells but not in non-replicating cells. The obtained FRET signals allowed us to estimate ATP concentrations within HCV replicating cells as ∼5 mM at possible replicating sites and ∼1 mM at peripheral sites that did not appear to be involved in HCV replication. In contrast, cytoplasmic ATP levels in non-replicating Huh-7 cells were estimated as ∼2 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate changes in ATP concentration within cells during replication of the HCV genome and increased ATP levels at distinct sites within replicating cells. ATeam may be a powerful tool for the study of energy metabolism during replication of the viral genome.

  10. Detection of hepatitis C viral RNA sequences in fresh and paraffin-embedded liver biopsy specimens of non-A, non-B hepatitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresters, D.; Cuypers, H. T.; Reesink, H. W.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Schipper, M. E.; Boeser-Nunnink, B. D.; Lelie, P. N.; Jansen, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    In this study methods of HCV-RNA detection in fresh frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver biopsies are described. Of 22 untreated chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis patients and 6 control patients, a plasma sample and part of a liver biopsy were freshly frozen for hepatitis C virus (HCV)

  11. A clinical, epidemological, laboratorial, histological and ultrasonographical evaluation of anti-HCV EIA-2 positive blood donors Avaliação clínica, epidemiológica, laboratorial, histológica e ultrassonográfica de doadores de sangue anti-HCV EIA-2 positivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando L. GONÇALES JR

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Between 1992 and 1997, 790 blood donors with anti-HCV EIA-2 strongly reagent (relationship between the sample optical density/cut-off > 3 detected at the blood bank serological screening, were evaluated in ambulatory environment. They were all negative for Chagas disease, syphilis, hepatitis B (HBsAg and AIDS. Blood samples were collected at the first ambulatorial evaluation, for hemogram, biochemical tests and new serological tests for HCV (anti-HCV EIA-2. In blood samples of 226 repeatedly reagent anti-HCV EIA-2 blood donors, supplementary "immunoblot" test for HCV (RIBA-2 was used. In 209 donors, the presence of HCV-RNA was investigated by the PCR test. The abdominal ultrasonography was realized in 366 donors. In 269 patients liver biopsy was performed for the histopathological study. The follow-up of blood donors showed that 95.6% were repeatedly EIA-2 reagent, 94% were symptomless and denied any hepatitis history, with only 2% mentioning previous jaundice. In 47% of this population at least one risk factor has been detected for the HCV transmission, the use of intravenous drugs being the main one (27.8%. Blood transfusion was the second factor for HCV transmission (27.2%. Hepatomegaly was detected in 54% of the cases. Splenomegaly and signs of portal hypertension have seldom been found in the physical examination, indicating a low degree of hepatic compromising in HCV. Abdominal ultrasound showed alterations in 65% of the subjects, being the steatosis the most frequent (50%. In 83.5% of the donors submitted to the liver biopsy, the histopathological exam showed the presence of chronic hepatitis, usually classified as active (89% with mild or moderate grade in most of the cases (99.5%. The histopathological exam of the liver was normal in 1.5% of blood donors. The RIBA-2 test and the HCV-RNA investigation by PCR were positive in respectively 91.6 and 75% of the anti-HCV EIA-2 reagent donors. The HCV-RNA research was positive in 82% of the

  12. Computer Aided Screening of Phytochemicals from Garcinia against the Dengue NS2B/NS3 Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Tahir Ul; Mumtaz, Arooj; Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Azhar, Samia; Fatima, Tabeer; Hassan, Muhammad; Hussain, Syed Sajid; Akram, Waheed; Idrees, Sobia

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus NS2/NS3 protease because of its ability to cleave viral proteins is considered as an attractive target to screen antiviral agents. Medicinal plants contain a variety of phytochemicals that can be used as drug against different diseases and infections. Therefore, this study was designed to uncover possible phytochemical of different classes (Aromatic, Carbohydrates, Lignin, Saponins, Steroids, Tannins, Terpenoids, Xanthones) that could be used as inhibitors against the NS2B/NS3 protease of DENV. With the help of molecular docking, Garcinia phytochemicals found to be bound deeply inside the active site of DENV NS2B/NS3 protease among all tested phytochemicals and had interactions with catalytic triad (His51, Asp75, Ser135). Thus, it can be concluded from the study that these Gracinia phytochemicals could serve as important inhibitors to inhibit the viral replication inside the host cell. Further in-vitro investigations require confirming their efficacy.

  13. Nanomechanical microcantilever operated in vibration modes with use of RNA aptamer as receptor molecules for label-free detection of HCV helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sang-Myung; Eom, Kilho; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Park, Jung Ho; Yoon, Dae Sung; Kim, Tae Song

    2007-11-30

    We report the nanomechanical microcantilevers operated in vibration modes (oscillation) with use of RNA aptamers as receptor molecules for label-free detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase. The nanomechanical detection principle is that the ligand-receptor binding on the microcantilever surface induces the dynamic response change of microcantilevers. We implemented the label-free detection of HCV helicase in the low concentration as much as 100 pg/ml from measuring the dynamic response change of microcantilevers. Moreover, from the recent studies showing that the ligand-receptor binding generates the surface stress on the microcantilever, we estimate the surface stress, on the oscillating microcantilevers, induced by ligand-receptor binding, i.e. binding between HCV helicase and RNA aptamer. In this article, it is suggested that the oscillating microcantilevers with use of RNA aptamers as receptor molecules may enable one to implement the sensitive label-free detection of very small amount of small-scale proteins.

  14. Frequency of anti-HCV antibodies in patients with lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahboob, A.; Haroon, T.S.; Iqbal, Z.; Butt, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of anti-HCV antibodies, identify risk factors associated with HCV infection and to screen asymptomatic carries in patients with lichen planus. Subjects and Methods: A total of 184 clinically diagnosed cased of lichen (LP) were selected for the study. Blood samples of all the patients were tested for anti hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV-Ab). Polymerase chain reaction for hepatitis C virus was done in patients with positive anti-HCV-Ab. Trancutaneous liver biopsy was performed in 7 patients with positive HCV-RNA. The histopathological results were evaluated using validated Metavir and Knodell scoring systems. Results: Out of 184 LP patients, 43 (23.4%) were anti-HCV antibodies positive. Females were predominantly affected and male to female ratio was 1:5.1. Maximum positively for anti-HCV was observed in age group 31-40 years (39.53%) followed by 41-50 years (25.58%). Eighty-one percent patients had history of dental treatment and 63% had received multiple injections for various ailments. Forty percent patients had family history of jaundice while 26% had jaundice in the past. Ten out of 16 anti-HCV antibody positive patients, checked for HCV-RNA, had high levels of virus in blood. Transcutaneous liver biopsy done in 7 patients revealed underlying liver disease at various stages. Four patients treated with alpha-interferon and ribazole therapy for liver disease, showed marked improvement in their skin disease. Conclusion: A high prevalence of HCV infection was detected in patients with lichen planus. Patients with lichen planus should be screened for HCV carrier state. (author)

  15. Naturally occurring hepatitis C virus protease inhibitors resistance-associated mutations among chronic hepatitis C genotype 1b patients with or without HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Renwen; Zhang, Xiaxia; Xia, Wei; Wu, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the frequency of natural mutations in hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected protease inhibitor (PI)-naive patients. Population sequence of the non-structural (NS)3 protease gene was evaluated in 90 HCV mono-infected and 96 HIV/HCV co-infected PI treatment-naive patients. The natural prevalence of PI resistance mutations in both groups was compared. Complete HCV genotype 1b NS3 sequence information was obtained for 152 (81.72%) samples. Seven sequences (8.33%) of the 84 HCV mono-infected patients and 21 sequences (30.88%) of the 68 HIV/HCV co-infected patients showed amino acid substitutions associated with HCV PI resistance. There was a significant difference in the natural prevalence of PI resistance mutations between these two groups (P = 0.000). The mutations T54S, R117H and N174F were observed in 1.19%, 5.95% and 1.19% of HCV mono-infected patients. The mutations F43S, T54S, Q80K/R, R155K, A156G/V, D168A/E/G and V170A were found in 1.47%, 4.41%, 1.47%/1.47%, 2.94%, 23.53%/1.47%, 1.47%/1.47%/1.47% and 1.47% of HIV/HCV co-infected patients, respectively. In addition, the combination mutations in the NS3 region were detected only in HIV/HCV genotype 1b co-infected patients. Naturally occurring HCV PI resistance mutations existed in HCV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected genotype 1b PI-naive patients. HIV co-infection was associated with a greater frequency of PI resistance mutations. The impact of HIV infection on baseline HCV PI resistance mutations and treatment outcome in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients should be further analyzed. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  16. Ebselen inhibits hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase binding to nucleic acid and prevents viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Weiner, Warren S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simpson, Denise S; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Marvin, Rachel K; Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Isailovic, Dragan; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2014-10-17

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is both a protease, which cleaves viral and host proteins, and a helicase that separates nucleic acid strands, using ATP hydrolysis to fuel the reaction. Many antiviral drugs, and compounds in clinical trials, target the NS3 protease, but few helicase inhibitors that function as antivirals have been reported. This study focuses on the analysis of the mechanism by which ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3-one), a compound previously shown to be a HCV antiviral agent, inhibits the NS3 helicase. Ebselen inhibited the abilities of NS3 to unwind nucleic acids, to bind nucleic acids, and to hydrolyze ATP, and about 1 μM ebselen was sufficient to inhibit each of these activities by 50%. However, ebselen had no effect on the activity of the NS3 protease, even at 100 times higher ebselen concentrations. At concentrations below 10 μM, the ability of ebselen to inhibit HCV helicase was reversible, but prolonged incubation of HCV helicase with higher ebselen concentrations led to irreversible inhibition and the formation of covalent adducts between ebselen and all 14 cysteines present in HCV helicase. Ebselen analogues with sulfur replacing the selenium were just as potent HCV helicase inhibitors as ebselen, but the length of the linker between the phenyl and benzisoselenazol rings was critical. Modifications of the phenyl ring also affected compound potency over 30-fold, and ebselen was a far more potent helicase inhibitor than other, structurally unrelated, thiol-modifying agents. Ebselen analogues were also more effective antiviral agents, and they were less toxic to hepatocytes than ebselen. Although the above structure-activity relationship studies suggest that ebselen targets a specific site on NS3, we were unable to confirm binding to either the NS3 ATP binding site or nucleic acid binding cleft by examining the effects of ebselen on NS3 proteins lacking key cysteines.

  17. Analytical characteristics and comparative evaluation of Aptima HCV quant Dx assay with the Abbott RealTime HCV assay and Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV quantitative test v2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worlock, A; Blair, D; Hunsicker, M; Le-Nguyen, T; Motta, C; Nguyen, C; Papachristou, E; Pham, J; Williams, A; Vi, M; Vinluan, B; Hatzakis, A

    2017-04-04

    The Aptima HCV Quant Dx assay (Aptima assay) is a fully automated quantitative assay on the Panther® system. This assay is intended for confirmation of diagnosis and monitoring of HCV RNA in plasma and serum specimens. The purpose of the testing described in this paper was to evaluate the performance of the Aptima assay. The analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, precision, and linearity of the Aptima assay were assessed. The performance of the Aptima assay was compared to two commercially available HCV assays; the Abbott RealTime HCV assay (Abbott assay, Abbott Labs Illinois, USA) and the Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS Taqman HCV Quantitative Test v2.0 (Roche Assay, Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton CA, USA). The 95% Lower Limit of Detection (LoD) of the assay was determined from dilutions of the 2nd HCV WHO International Standard (NIBSC 96/798 genotype 1) and HCV positive clinical specimens in HCV negative human plasma and serum. Probit analysis was performed to generate the 95% predicted detection limits. The Lower Limit of Quantitation (LLoQ) was established for each genotype by diluting clinical specimens and the 2nd HCV WHO International Standard (NIBSC 96/798 genotype 1) in HCV negative human plasma and serum. Specificity was determined using 200 fresh and 536 frozen HCV RNA negative clinical specimens including 370 plasma specimens and 366 serum specimens. Linearity for genotypes 1 to 6 was established by diluting armored RNA or HCV positive clinical specimens in HCV negative serum or plasma from 8.08 log IU/mL to below 1 log IU/mL. Precision was tested using a 10 member panel made by diluting HCV positive clinical specimens or spiking armored RNA into HCV negative plasma and serum. A method comparison was conducted against the Abbott assay using 1058 clinical specimens and against the Roche assay using 608 clinical specimens from HCV infected patients. In addition, agreement between the Roche assay and the Aptima assay using specimens with low

  18. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  19. HCV and HCC molecular epidemiology

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    Flor H. Pujol

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    iHepatitis C virus (HCV is a member of the family Flaviviridae, responsible for the majority of the non-A non-B post-transfusion hepatitis before 1990. Around 170 millions persons in the world are thought to be infected with this virus. A high number of HCV-infected people develop cirrhosis and from these, a significant proportion progresses to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Six HCV genotypes and a large number of subtypes in each genotype have been described. Infections with HCV genotype 1 are associated with the lowest therapeutic success. HCV genotypes 1, 2, and 3 have a worldwide distribution. HCV subtypes 1a and 1b are the most common genotypes in the United States and are also are predominant in Europe, while in Japan, subtype 1b is predominant. Although HCV subtypes 2a and 2b are relatively common in America, Europe, and Japan, subtype 2c is found commonly in northern Italy. HCV genotype 3a is frequent in intravenous drug abusers in Europe and the United States. HCV genotype 4 appears to be prevalent in Africa and the Middle East, and genotypes 5 and 6 seem to be confined to South Africa and Asia, respectively. HCC accounts for approximately 6% of all human cancers. Around 500,000 to 1 million cases occur annually worldwide, with HCC being the fifth common malignancy in men and the ninth in women. HCC is frequently a consequence of infection by HBV and HCV. The first line of evidences comes from epidemiologic studies. While HBV is the most frequent cause of HCC in many countries of Asia and South America, both HBV and HCV are found at similar frequencies, and eventually HCV at a higher frequency than HBV, among HCC patients in Europe, North America, and Japan. The cumulative appearance rate of HCC might be higher for HCV

  20. [Prevalence of positive markers for hepatitis B (HBV Ags) and hepatitis C (Anti-HCV) in health personnel at the Social Security Institute of Mexico State and Municipalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Huezo, M S; Sánchez-Hernández, E; Camacho, M C; Mejia-López, M D; Rebollo-Vargas, J

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of serum markers of viral hepatitis in health-care workers seems to be similar to that described in the general population, even though this group would appear at increased risk because exposure to potentially infectious material. There is scarce information available in Mexico in this regard. To define the prevalence of serum markers for hepatitis C (anti-HCV antibodies) and hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen, HBsAg) in health-care workers at the Instituto de Seguridad Social del Estado de Mexico y Municipios (ISSEMYM) and to establish the presence of viremia in subjects with positive serum markers. Health-care workers from ISSEMyM with unknown hepatitis serologic status participated voluntarily in this trial. They completed a written questionnaire detailing potential risk factors for viral hepatitis and provided a blood sample. A total of 374 health-care workers were included. Seven subjects (1.8%) were positive, 5 for anti-HCV antibodies (1.3%) and 2 for HBsAg (0.5%). None of these subjects had detectable serum HCV RNA or HBV DNA on further testing. The frequency of positive serum markers for viral hepatitis in this group of healthcare workers is similar to the estimated prevalence among the general population in Mexico. No case of active infection defined by positive viremia was encountered in this group of subjects.

  1. Synthetic lipophilic antioxidant BO-653 suppresses HCV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Fumihiko; Sudoh, Masayuki; Arai, Masaaki; Kohara, Michinori

    2013-02-01

    The influence of the intracellular redox state on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle is poorly understood. This study demonstrated the anti-HCV activity of 2,3-dihydro-5-hydroxy-2,2-dipentyl-4,6-di-tert-butylbenzofuran (BO-653), a synthetic lipophilic antioxidant, and examined whether BO-653's antioxidant activity is integral to its anti-HCV activity. The anti-HCV activity of BO-653 was investigated in HuH-7 cells bearing an HCV subgenomic replicon (FLR3-1 cells) and in HuH-7 cells infected persistently with HCV (RMT-tri cells). BO-653 inhibition of HCV replication was also compared with that of several hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants. BO-653 suppressed HCV replication in FLR3-1 and RMT-tri cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The lipophilic antioxidants had stronger anti-HCV activities than the hydrophilic antioxidants, and BO-653 displayed the strongest anti-HCV activity of all the antioxidants examined. Therefore, the anti-HCV activity of BO-653 was examined in chimeric mice harboring human hepatocytes infected with HCV. The combination treatment of BO-653 and polyethylene glycol-conjugated interferon-α (PEG-IFN) decreased serum HCV RNA titer more than that seen with PEG-IFN alone. These findings suggest that both the lipophilic property and the antioxidant activity of BO-653 play an important role in the inhibition of HCV replication. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Endogenous hepatitis C virus homolog fragments in European rabbit and hare genomes replicate in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Silva

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV, the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus and hare (Lepus europaeus genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity.

  3. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV NS5 is a viral nonstructural protein that carries both methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp domains. It is a key component of the viral RNA replicase complex that presumably includes other viral nonstructural and cellular proteins. The biochemical properties of JEV NS5 have not been characterized due to the lack of a robust in vitro RdRp assay system, and the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of RNA synthesis by JEV NS5 remain to be elucidated. Results To characterize the biochemical properties of JEV RdRp, we expressed in Escherichia coli and purified an enzymatically active full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein with a hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus. The purified NS5 protein, but not the mutant NS5 protein with an Ala substitution at the first Asp of the RdRp-conserved GDD motif, exhibited template- and primer-dependent RNA synthesis activity using a poly(A RNA template. The NS5 protein was able to use both plus- and minus-strand 3'-untranslated regions of the JEV genome as templates in the absence of a primer, with the latter RNA being a better template. Analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation site using the 3'-end 83 nucleotides of the JEV genome as a minimal RNA template revealed that the NS5 protein specifically initiates RNA synthesis from an internal site, U81, at the two nucleotides upstream of the 3'-end of the template. Conclusion As a first step toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms for JEV RNA replication and ultimately for the in vitro reconstitution of viral RNA replicase complex, we for the first time established an in vitro JEV RdRp assay system with a functional full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein and characterized the mechanisms of RNA synthesis from nonviral and viral RNA templates. The full-length recombinant JEV NS5 will be useful for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and for the

  4. Needlestick accident resulting in occupational transmission of HCV: Report of two cases

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    Eunice B Martin Chaves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV through needlestick injury is a serious problem worldwide. Occupational transmission of HCV is estimated at an average rate between 0,5% and 0,75%. There are factors associated with increased risk of transmission, such as deep injuries, procedures involving hollow-bore needle placement in the source patient’s vein or artery, and high HCV RNA titer in the source patient. We describe two cases of HCV seroconversion in nursing assistants after different risk needlestick injuries.   A transmissão ocupacional do vírus da hepatite C (VHC através de acidentes com material perfurocortante é um problema global. Essa transmissão é estimada, em média, entre 0,5% e 0,75%. Alguns fatores estão associados ao aumento do risco de transmissão, tais como lesões profundas, procedimentos que envolvam colocação da agulha em veia ou artéria, e altos títulos de HCV-RNA no paciente-fonte. Descrevemos dois casos de soroconversão ao VHC em auxiliares de enfermagem após acidentes com agulhas.

  5. Signals Involved in Regulation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Genome Translation and Replication.

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    Niepmann, Michael; Shalamova, Lyudmila A; Gerresheim, Gesche K; Rossbach, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) preferentially replicates in the human liver and frequently causes chronic infection, often leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. HCV is an enveloped virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the family Flaviviridae and has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive orientation. The HCV RNA genome is translated and replicated in the cytoplasm. Translation is controlled by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), while also downstream elements like the cis -replication element (CRE) in the coding region and the 3' UTR are involved in translation regulation. The cis -elements controlling replication of the viral RNA genome are located mainly in the 5'- and 3'-UTRs at the genome ends but also in the protein coding region, and in part these signals overlap with the signals controlling RNA translation. Many long-range RNA-RNA interactions (LRIs) are predicted between different regions of the HCV RNA genome, and several such LRIs are actually involved in HCV translation and replication regulation. A number of RNA cis -elements recruit cellular RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of HCV translation and replication. In addition, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) binds to two target sites at the 5' end of the viral RNA genome as well as to at least three additional target sites in the coding region and the 3' UTR. It is involved in the regulation of HCV RNA stability, translation and replication, thereby largely contributing to the hepatotropism of HCV. However, we are still far from completely understanding all interactions that regulate HCV RNA genome translation, stability, replication and encapsidation. In particular, many conclusions on the function of cis -elements in HCV replication have been obtained using full-length HCV genomes or near-full-length replicon systems. These include both genome ends, making it difficult to decide if a cis -element in question acts on HCV

  6. Interferon-Free Hepatitis C Treatment before and after Liver Transplantation: The Role of HCV Drug Resistance

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    Bruno Roche

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the leading causes of end-stage liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation (LT in most countries. All patients who undergo LT with detectable serum HCV RNA experience graft reinfection progressing to cirrhosis within five years in 20% to 30% of them. Obtaining a sustained virological response (SVR greatly improves overall and graft survival. Until 2011, standard antiviral therapy using PEGylated interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin (RBV was the only effective therapy, with an SVR rate around 30% in this setting. For patients infected with genotype 1, first generation NS3/4A protease inhibitors (PIs, boceprevir (BOC or telaprevir (TVR, associated with PEG-IFN and RBV for 48 weeks have increased the SVR rates to 60% in non-transplant patients. However, tolerability and drug-drug interactions with calcineurin inhibitors (CNI are both limiting factors of their use in the liver transplant setting. Over recent years, the efficacy of antiviral C therapy has improved dramatically using new direct-acting antiviral (DAA agents without PEG-IFN and/or RBV, leading to SVR rates over 90% in non-transplant patients. Results available for transplant patients showed a better efficacy and tolerability and less drug-drug interactions than with first wave PIs. However, some infrequent cases of viral resistance have been reported using PIs or NS5A inhibitors pre- or post-LT that can lead to difficulties in the management of these patients.

  7. Signals Involved in Regulation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Genome Translation and Replication

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    Michael Niepmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV preferentially replicates in the human liver and frequently causes chronic infection, often leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. HCV is an enveloped virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the family Flaviviridae and has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive orientation. The HCV RNA genome is translated and replicated in the cytoplasm. Translation is controlled by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR, while also downstream elements like the cis-replication element (CRE in the coding region and the 3′ UTR are involved in translation regulation. The cis-elements controlling replication of the viral RNA genome are located mainly in the 5′- and 3′-UTRs at the genome ends but also in the protein coding region, and in part these signals overlap with the signals controlling RNA translation. Many long-range RNA–RNA interactions (LRIs are predicted between different regions of the HCV RNA genome, and several such LRIs are actually involved in HCV translation and replication regulation. A number of RNA cis-elements recruit cellular RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of HCV translation and replication. In addition, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122 binds to two target sites at the 5′ end of the viral RNA genome as well as to at least three additional target sites in the coding region and the 3′ UTR. It is involved in the regulation of HCV RNA stability, translation and replication, thereby largely contributing to the hepatotropism of HCV. However, we are still far from completely understanding all interactions that regulate HCV RNA genome translation, stability, replication and encapsidation. In particular, many conclusions on the function of cis-elements in HCV replication have been obtained using full-length HCV genomes or near-full-length replicon systems. These include both genome ends, making it difficult to decide if a cis-element in

  8. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir for treatment of hepatitis C virus in sofosbuvir-experienced, NS5A treatment-naïve patients: Findings from two randomized trials.

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    Tam, Edward; Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Mantry, Parvez S; Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Ghali, Peter; Kang, Minhee; Haubrich, Richard; Shen, Xianlin; Ni, Liyun; Camus, Gregory; Copans, Amanda; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Guyer, Bill; Brown, Robert S

    2018-06-01

    We report data from two similarly designed studies that evaluated the efficacy, safety, and optimal duration of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) ± ribavirin (RBV) for retreatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) in individuals who failed to achieve sustained virological response (SVR) with prior SOF-based, non-NS5A inhibitor-containing regimens. The RESCUE study enrolled HCV mono-infected adults with genotype (GT) 1 or 4. Non-cirrhotic participants were randomized to 12 weeks of LDV/SOF or LDV/SOF + RBV. Compensated cirrhotic participants were randomized to LDV/SOF + RBV (12 weeks) or LDV/SOF (24 weeks). The AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5348 study randomized genotype 1 adults with HCV/HIV co-infection to LDV/SOF + RBV (12 weeks) or LDV/SOF (24 weeks). Both studies used SVR at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) as the primary endpoint. In the RESCUE study, 82 participants were randomized and treated, and all completed treatment. Overall, SVR12 was 88% (72/82); 81-100% in non-cirrhotic participants treated with LDV/SOF or LDV/SOF + RBV for 12 weeks and 80-92% in cirrhotic participants treated with LDV/SOF + RBV for 12 weeks or LDV/SOF for 24 weeks. Adverse events (AEs), mostly mild-to-moderate in severity, were experienced by 78% of participants, with headache and fatigue most frequently reported. One serious AE, not related to treatment, was observed. No premature discontinuations of study drug, or deaths occurred. In the A5348 study, seven participants were randomized (cirrhotic n = 1; GT1a n = 5) and all attained SVR12, with no serious AEs or premature discontinuations. In this SOF-experienced, NS5A inhibitor-naïve population, which included participants with cirrhosis or HCV/HIV co-infection, high SVR12 rates were achieved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit L protein interacts with Flavivirus NS5 and may modulate yellow fever virus replication.

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    Morais, Ana Ts; Terzian, Ana Cb; Duarte, Danilo Vb; Bronzoni, Roberta Vm; Madrid, Maria Cfs; Gavioli, Arieli F; Gil, Laura Hvg; Oliveira, Amanda G; Zanelli, Cleslei F; Valentini, Sandro R; Rahal, Paula; Nogueira, Mauricio L

    2013-06-22

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) belongs to the Flavivirus genus and causes an important disease. An alarming resurgence of viral circulation and the expansion of YFV-endemic zones have been detected in Africa and South America in recent years. NS5 is a viral protein that contains methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, which are essential for viral replication, and the interactions between NS5 and cellular proteins have been studied to better understand viral replication. The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction of the NS5 protein with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit L (eIF3L) and to evaluate the role of eIF3L in yellow fever replication. To identify interactions of YFV NS5 with cellular proteins, we performed a two-hybrid screen using the YFV NS5 RdRp domain as bait with a human cDNA library, and RNApol deletion mutants were generated and analyzed using the two-hybrid system for mapping the interactions. The RNApol region involved was segmented into three fragments and analyzed using an eIF3L-expressing yeast strain. To map the NS5 residues that are critical for the interactions, we performed site-direct mutagenesis in segment 3 of the interaction domain (ID) and confirmed the interaction using in vitro assays and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation. The significance of eIF3L for YFV replication was investigated using eIF3L overexpression and RNA interference. In this work, we describe and characterize the interaction of NS5 with the translation factor eIF3L. The interaction between NS5 and eIF3L was confirmed using in vitro binding and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation assays. This interaction occurs at a region (the interaction domain of the RNApol domain) that is conserved in several flaviviruses and that is, therefore, likely to be relevant to the genus. eIF3L overexpression and plaque reduction assays showed a slight effect on YFV replication, indicating that the interaction of eIF3L with YFV NS5 may play a role

  10. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection

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    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a “chain terminator”. Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  11. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

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    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  12. Seroprevalence, genotypic distribution and potential risk factors of hepatitis B and C virus infections among adults in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Mayumi; Svay, Somana; Lim, Olline; Hok, Sirany; Goto, Noboru; Ohisa, Masayuki; Akita, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Junko; Do, Son Huy; Katayama, Keiko; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Tanaka, Junko

    2015-04-01

    We investigated hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among adults in Siem Reap, Cambodia, to consider the prevention strategy in cooperation with the Ministry of Health in Cambodia. Serological tests for determining HBV and HCV infections and questionnaires were performed from 2010 to 2012 among the general population in the province of Siem Reap. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to clarify the factors related to HBV and HCV infections. There were 483 participants, comprising 194 men and 289 women (age range, 18-89 years). The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen was not very high at 4.6%, while anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) was high at 38.5%. All HBV DNA samples were classified as genotype C. Anti-HBc showed the trend that the older the age, the higher the positive rate (P = 0.0002). The prevalence of HCV RNA and anti-HCV were 2.3% and 5.8%, respectively. HCV RNA was detected in 39.3% of anti-HCV positive samples and most of them were classified as genotype 6 (54.5%) and 1 (27.3%). Remarkably, in multivariate logistic regression analysis, history of operation and blood transfusion were significantly associated with the positivity for HBV infection and HCV RNA, respectively. Our results showed that operation and blood transfusion were potential risk factors for HBV and HCV infection, respectively, and supposed that horizontal HBV transmission may be frequent in adults in Cambodia. Hence, for reducing HBV and HCV infections, it is necessary to improve the safety of blood and medical treatment. © 2014 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  13. HCV IRES domain IIb affects the configuration of coding RNA in the 40S subunit's decoding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses a structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNA to recruit the translation machinery to the viral RNA and begin protein synthesis without the ribosomal scanning process required for canonical translation initiation. Different IRES structural domains are used in this process, which begins with direct binding of the 40S ribosomal subunit to the IRES RNA and involves specific manipulation of the translational machinery. We have found that upon initial 40S subunit binding, the stem-loop domain of the IRES that contains the start codon unwinds and adopts a stable configuration within the subunit's decoding groove. This configuration depends on the sequence and structure of a different stem-loop domain (domain IIb) located far from the start codon in sequence, but spatially proximal in the IRES•40S complex. Mutation of domain IIb results in misconfiguration of the HCV RNA in the decoding groove that includes changes in the placement of the AUG start codon, and a substantial decrease in the ability of the IRES to initiate translation. Our results show that two distal regions of the IRES are structurally communicating at the initial step of 40S subunit binding and suggest that this is an important step in driving protein synthesis.

  14. Evaluation of the Abbott Real Time HCV genotype II assay for Hepatitis C virus genotyping.

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    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Berk, Elife; Gokahmetoglu, Selma; Ercal, Baris Derya; Celik, Ilhami

    2015-01-01

    The determination of HCV genotypes and subtypes is very important for the selection of antiviral therapy and epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay in HCV genotyping of HCV infected patients in Kayseri, Turkey. One hundred patients with chronic hepatitis C admitted to our hospital were evaluated between June 2012 and December 2012, HCV RNA levels were determined by the COBAS® AmpliPrep/COBAS® TaqMan® 48 HCV test. HCV genotyping was investigated by the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay. With the exception of genotype 1, subtypes of HCV genotypes could not be determined by Abbott assay. Sequencing analysis was used as the reference method. Genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 were observed in 70, 4, 2 and 24 of the 100 patients, respectively, by two methods. The concordance between the two systems to determine HCV major genotypes was 100%. Of 70 patients with genotype 1, 66 showed infection with subtype 1b and 4 with subtype 1a by Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay. Using sequence analysis, 61 showed infection with subtype 1b and 9 with subtype 1a. In determining of HCV genotype 1 subtypes, the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P>0.05). HCV genotype 4 and 3 samples were found to be subtype 4d and 3a, respectively, by sequence analysis. There were four patients with genotype 2. Sequence analysis revealed that two of these patients had type 2a and the other two had type 2b. The Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay yielded results consistent with sequence analysis. However, further optimization of the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay for subtype identification of HCV is required.

  15. Demonstration of Hepatitis C Virus RNA with In Situ Hybridization Employing a Locked Nucleic Acid Probe in Humanized Liver of Infected Chimeric Mice and in Needle-Biopsied Human Liver

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    Kazuya Shiogama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In situ hybridization (ISH with high sensitivity has been requested to demonstrate hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE sections of the liver. Methods. ISH employing a locked-nucleic-acid- (LNA-modified oligonucleotide probe and biotin-free catalyzed signal amplification system (CSAII was applied to HCV-RNA detection in the liver tissue. Nested reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was performed for HCV genotyping using total RNA extracted from FFPE sections. The target tissues included FFPE tissue sections of humanized livers in HCV-infected chimeric mice (HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, and 2a and noninfected and of needle-biopsied livers from HCV-infected patients. Results. HCV-RNA was demonstrated with the ISH technique in HCV-infected liver tissues from both chimeric mice and 9 (82% of 11 patients with HCV infection. The HCV signals were sensitive to RNase. Nested RT-PCR confirmed the genotype in 8 (73% of 11 livers (type 1b: 6 lesions and type 2a: 2 lesions. HCV-RNA was not identified in chronic hepatitis B lesions, fatty liver, autoimmune hepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusion. ISH using the LNA-modified oligonucleotide probe and CSAII was applicable to detecting HCV-RNA in routinely prepared FFPE liver specimens.

  16. HBV or HCV Coinfection in HIV-1-Infected Pregnant Women in France: Prevalence and Pregnancy Outcomes.

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    Benhammou, Valérie; Tubiana, Roland; Matheron, Sophie; Sellier, Pierre; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Chenadec, Jérôme Le; Marel, Emmanuelle; Khoshnood, Babak; Warszawski, Josiane

    2018-04-15

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in HIV-infected persons but their impact on pregnant HIV-infected women is understudied. We explored whether these coinfections are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and lower response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Pregnancies in HIV-1-infected women included in the ANRS French Perinatal Cohort between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed if HBV and HCV infection statuses were available. Among 4236 women, the prevalence of HBV (HBs Ag+) and HCV (RNA+) were 6.2% (95% confidence interval: 5.4 to 6.8) and 1.7% (1.3 to 2.1), respectively. HCV coinfection was strongly associated with a history of drug use; HBV coinfection was 6 times more frequent in women born in Sub-Saharan Africa than in European France. Baseline HIV viral load, CD4 count, and HIV care during pregnancy were similar in coinfected and monoinfected HIV mothers, except that 90% of HBV/HIV women were receiving tenofovir and/or lamivudine or emtricitabine. HCV coinfection was significantly associated with cholestasis [adjusted odds ratio: 4.1 (1.5-10.8), P = 0.005], preterm delivery [3.0 (1.6-5.7), P HIV-infected women, chronic HBV infection, mostly treated using targeted ART, had no major impact on the course of pregnancy. By contrast, chronic HCV infection was associated with a higher risk of obstetrical complications and a poorer immune-virological response to ART. It is yet unknown whether cure of HCV infection before conception can limit these adverse outcomes.

  17. Stable replication of the EBNA1/OriP-mediated baculovirus vector and its application to anti-HCV gene therapy

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    Chang Myint OO

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the main causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Although combined interferon-α-ribavirin therapy is effective for about 50% of the patients with HCV, better therapies are needed and preventative vaccines have yet to be developed. Short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs inhibit gene expression by RNA interference. The application of transient shRNA expression is limited, however, due to the inability of the shRNA to replicate in mammalian cells and its inefficient transduction. The duration of transgene (shRNA expression in mammalian cells can be significantly extended using baculovirus-based shRNA-expressing vectors that contain the latent viral protein Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1 and the origin of latent viral DNA replication (OriP sequences. These recombinant vectors contain compatible promoters and are highly effective for infecting primary hepatocyte and hepatoma cell lines, making them very useful tools for studies of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Here, we report the use of these baculovirus-based vector-derived shRNAs to inhibit core-protein expression in full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV replicon cells. Results We constructed a long-term transgene shRNA expression vector that contains the EBV EBNA1 and OriP sequences. We also designed baculovirus vector-mediated shRNAs against the highly conserved core-protein region of HCV. HCV core protein expression was inhibited by the EBNA1/OriP baculovirus vector for at least 14 days, which was considerably longer than the 3 days of inhibition produced by the wild-type baculovirus vector. Conclusion These findings indicate that we successfully constructed a long-term transgene (shRNA expression vector (Ac-EP-shRNA452 using the EBNA1/OriP system, which was propagated in Escherichia coli and converted into mammalian cells. The potential anti-HCV activity of the long-term transgene (shRNA expression vector was evaluated with the view

  18. Analysis of in vitro replicated human hepatitis C virus (HCV for the determination of genotypes and quasispecies

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    Chelyapov Nickolas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isolation and self-replication of infectious HCV has been a difficult task. However, this is needed for the purposes of developing rational drugs and for the analysis of the natural virus. Our recent report of an in vitro system for the isolation of human HCV from infected patients and their replication in tissue culture addresses this challenge. At California Institute of Molecular Medicine several isolates of HCV, called CIMM-HCV, were grown for over three years in cell culture. This is a report of the analysis of CIMM-HCV isolates for subtypes and quasispecies using a 269 bp segment of the 5'UTR. HCV RNA from three patients and eleven CIMM-HCV were analyzed for this purpose. All isolates were essentially identical. Isolates of HCV from one patient were serially transmitted into fresh cells up to eight times and the progeny viruses from each transmission were compared to each other and also to the primary isolates from the patient's serum. Some isolates were also transmitted to different cell types, while others were cultured continuously without retransmission for over three years. We noted minor sequence changes when HCV was cultured for extended periods of time. HCV in T-cells and non-committed lymphoid cells showed a few differences when compared to isolates obtained from immortalized B-cells. These viruses maintained close similarity despite repeated transmissions and passage of time. There were no subtypes or quasispecies noted in CIMM-HCV.

  19. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling.

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    Siew Pheng Lim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV or Zika virus (ZIKV. The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5. This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a "de novo" initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a "closed" conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the "GDD" active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed "N pocket". Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1-2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses.

  20. Interference of transcription across H-NS binding sites and repression by H-NS.

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    Rangarajan, Aathmaja Anandhi; Schnetz, Karin

    2018-05-01

    Nucleoid-associated protein H-NS represses transcription by forming extended DNA-H-NS complexes. Repression by H-NS operates mostly at the level of transcription initiation. Less is known about how DNA-H-NS complexes interfere with transcription elongation. In vitro H-NS has been shown to enhance RNA polymerase pausing and to promote Rho-dependent termination, while in vivo inhibition of Rho resulted in a decrease of the genome occupancy by H-NS. Here we show that transcription directed across H-NS binding regions relieves H-NS (and H-NS/StpA) mediated repression of promoters in these regions. Further, we observed a correlation of transcription across the H-NS-bound region and de-repression. The data suggest that the transcribing RNA polymerase is able to remodel the H-NS complex and/or dislodge H-NS from the DNA and thus relieve repression. Such an interference of transcription and H-NS mediated repression may imply that poorly transcribed AT-rich loci are prone to be repressed by H-NS, while efficiently transcribed loci escape repression. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evolution of simeprevir-resistant variants over time by ultra-deep sequencing in HCV genotype 1b.

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    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Mariko; Saitoh, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2014-08-01

    Using ultra-deep sequencing technology, the present study was designed to investigate the evolution of simeprevir-resistant variants (amino acid substitutions of aa80, aa155, aa156, and aa168 positions in HCV NS3 region) over time. In Toranomon Hospital, 18 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1b, received triple therapy of simeprevir/PEG-IFN/ribavirin (DRAGON or CONCERT study). Sustained virological response rate was 67%, and that was significantly higher in patients with IL28B rs8099917 TT than in those with non-TT. Six patients, who did not achieve sustained virological response, were tested for resistant variants by ultra-deep sequencing, at the baseline, at the time of re-elevation of viral loads, and at 96 weeks after the completion of treatment. Twelve of 18 resistant variants, detected at re-elevation of viral load, were de novo resistant variants. Ten of 12 de novo resistant variants become undetectable over time, and that five of seven resistant variants, detected at baseline, persisted over time. In one patient, variants of Q80R at baseline (0.3%) increased at 96-week after the cessation of treatment (10.2%), and de novo resistant variants of D168E (0.3%) also increased at 96-week after the cessation of treatment (9.7%). In conclusion, the present study indicates that the emergence of simeprevir-resistant variants after the start of treatment could not be predicted at baseline, and the majority of de novo resistant variants become undetectable over time. Further large-scale prospective studies should be performed to investigate the clinical utility in detecting simeprevir-resistant variants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin: effective in patients with hepatitis C who failed interferon alfa/ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynard, Thierry; Colombo, Massimo; Bruix, Jordi; Schiff, Eugene; Terg, Ruben; Flamm, Steven; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo; Carrilho, Flair; Schmidt, Warren; Berg, Thomas; McGarrity, Thomas; Heathcote, E Jenny; Gonçales, Fernando; Diago, Moises; Craxi, Antonio; Silva, Marcelo; Bedossa, Pierre; Mukhopadhyay, Pabak; Griffel, Louis; Burroughs, Margaret; Brass, Clifford; Albrecht, Janice

    2009-05-01

    Treatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin produces a sustained virologic response (SVR) in approximately 60% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. Alternate options are needed for patients who relapse or do not respond to therapy. This prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study evaluated efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2b (1.5 microg/kg/wk) plus weight-based ribavirin (800-1400 mg/day) in 2333 chronic HCV-infected patients with significant fibrosis/cirrhosis whose previous interferon alfa/ribavirin therapy failed. Patients with undetectable HCV-RNA at treatment week (TW) 12 received 48 weeks of therapy; patients with detectable HCV-RNA at TW12 could enter maintenance studies at TW18; 188 patients with low/detectable HCV-RNA at TW12 continued therapy at the investigator's request. Overall, 22% of the patients attained SVR (56% with undetectable HCV-RNA and 12% with low/detectable HCV-RNA at TW12). SVR was better in relapsers (38%) than nonresponders (14%), regardless of previous treatment, and in patients previously treated with interferon-alfa/ribavirin (25%) than peginterferon alfa-ribavirin (17%). Predictors of response in patients with undetectable HCV-RNA at TW12 were genotype (2/3 vs 1, respectively; odds ratio [OR] 2.4; P 600,000 IU/mL; OR, 1.4; P = .0223). These factors plus previous treatment and response were overall predictors of SVR. Safety was similar among fibrosis groups. Peginterferon alfa-2b plus weight-based ribavirin is effective and safe in patients who failed interferon alfa/ribavirin therapy. Genotype, baseline viral load, and fibrosis stage were predictors of response.

  3. Nonstructural 3 Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Modulates the Tribbles Homolog 3/Akt Signaling Pathway for Persistent Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Si C.; Pham, Tu M.; Nguyen, Lam N.; Park, Eun-Mee; Lim, Yun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often causes chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the mechanisms underlying HCV-induced liver pathogenesis are still not fully understood. By transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis, we recently identified host genes that were significantly differentially expressed in cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Of these, tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) was selected for further characterization. TRIB3 was initially identified as a binding partner of protein kinase B (also known as Akt). TRIB3 blocks the phosphorylation of Akt and induces apoptosis under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. HCV has been shown to enhance Akt phosphorylation for its own propagation. In the present study, we demonstrated that both mRNA and protein levels of TRIB3 were increased in the context of HCV replication. We further showed that promoter activity of TRIB3 was increased by HCV-induced ER stress. Silencing of TRIB3 resulted in increased RNA and protein levels of HCV, whereas overexpression of TRIB3 decreased HCV replication. By employing an HCV pseudoparticle entry assay, we further showed that TRIB3 was a negative host factor involved in HCV entry. Both in vitro binding and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that HCV NS3 specifically interacted with TRIB3. Consequently, the association of TRIB3 and Akt was disrupted by HCV NS3, and thus, TRIB3-Akt signaling was impaired in HCV-infected cells. Moreover, HCV modulated TRIB3 to promote extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, activator protein 1 (AP-1) activity, and cell migration. Collectively, these data indicate that HCV exploits the TRIB3-Akt signaling pathway to promote persistent viral infection and may contribute to HCV-mediated pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE TRIB3 is a pseudokinase protein that acts as an adaptor in signaling pathways for important cellular processes. So far, the functional involvement of

  4. Prevalence of relevant NS5A resistance-associated substitutions to elbasvir in genotype 1a hepatitis C virus patients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Claudia; Esteban-Cartelle, Beatriz; Mate-Cano, Irene; Sánchez-Carrillo, Marta; Resino, Salvador; Briz, Verónica

    2018-05-01

    Resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) to the new HCV NS5A inhibitor elbasvir may limit its efficacy and lead to virological failure in HCV-GT1a-infected patients. There are no data outside clinical trials evaluating their prevalence and impact in grazoprevir/elbasvir in GT1a-infected patients in Spain. A multicentre cross-sectional study of 632 initial patients was conducted. In 13 of these patients, the sample could not be amplified or a consensus sequence by Sanger sequencing could not be performed. Ultimately, 617 HCV-G1a-infected individuals treated at 84 Spanish hospitals from the 17 autonomous communities plus the 2 autonomous cities of Spain were analysed. HCV population sequencing was used to identify RAS to elbasvir and the mutational pattern and drug sensitivity were confirmed by geno2pheno[HCV]. Viruses bearing RASs to elbasvir were present in 6.2% of HCV-G1a infected patients. The most common RASs were the Y93C/H/N and Q30E/H/R (2.4% and 2.3%, respectively). Only 3.4% of the identified RASs to elbasvir conferred reduced susceptibility to elbasvir by geno2pheno[HCV], which exclusively identified the positions Q30H/R (n=7) and Y93C/H/N (n=8) as single mutations and Q30H+Y93H (n=4) and Q30R+Y93H (n=2) as double mutations as the major RASs to elbasvir. A lower prevalence of RASs to elbasvir was observed in our HCV-G1a Spanish cohort than reported previously in clinical trials evaluating patients from the USA. This information may be essential to guide the implementation of grazoprevir/elbasvir in Spain and to manage G1a-infected patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Mutations of the interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) correlate with the complexity of hypervariable region (HVR)-1 in the Japanese variant of hepatitis C virus (HCV) type 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Isao; Fukuda, Yoshihide; Katano, Yoshiaki; Toyoda, Hidenori; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Kumada, Takashi; Nakano, Satoshi

    2004-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b comprises mainly two subtypes in Japan, each named for its geographic prevalence (Japan-specific, J type; worldwide, W type). Because the newly identified subtypes have not been fully characterized, the present study directed this issue from virological viewpoints such as hypervariable region (HVR)-1 as well as interferon (IFN) sensitivity-determining region (ISDR). Fifty chronic hepatitis patients with HCV 1b (31 men and 19 women; mean age 50.5 years) were enrolled, and J/W type was determined according to envelope 1 (E1) sequence as described previously (23 J type and 27 W type). Correlations between age, number of HVR-1 clones, HVR-1 diversity, and ISDR mutations were analyzed in J and W type patients independently. In addition, the sequences of the three HCV regions obtained for the determination of the above genetic factors were studied phylogenetically. The number of HVR-1 clones was significantly higher for J type in comparison with W type (P = 0.044). In the J type-infected patients, the ISDR mutation number was correlated inversely with HVR-1 clone number (P = 0.0001, r = -0.734) and HVR-1 diversity (P = 0.0001, r = -0.722). However, this correlation was not observed in the W type patients. W type patients showed a significant correlation between age and HVR-1 clone number (P = 0.015, r = 0.462). Phylogenetic study revealed that the nonstructural (NS) 5A sequence, which is obtained for ISDR type determination, can distinguish between J and W types. The inverse correlation in J type patients between ISDR mutations and HVR-1 complexity may explain the usefulness of the ISDR for prediction of IFN response only in Japanese patients. This suggests that the ISDR is not directly related to IFN responsiveness, but the degree of HVR-1 complexity may be more important.

  6. NS3 protease polymorphisms and genetic barrier to drug resistance of distinct hepatitis C virus genotypes from worldwide treatment-naïve subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, L L; Soares, M A; Santos, A F

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors have been primarily designed against genotype 1, the one with the lowest response to dual therapy. However, less evidence of their efficacy on non-1 genotypes is available, and any such information is mostly concentrated on genotypes 2-4. This study evaluated HCV protease resistance profiles in the major six HCV genotypes and identified genetic barrier (GB) profiles to each available protease inhibitor across HCV strains from different locations worldwide. We obtained 15 099 HCV sequences from treatment-naïve subjects retrieved at the Los Alamos HCV Sequence Database. The wild-type codons of different HCV genotypes were used to analyse the smallest number of nucleotide substitution steps required for changing that codon to the closest one associated with drug resistance. The 36L and 175L RAVs were found as genetic signatures of genotypes 2-5, while the 80K RAV was found in all genotype 5 sequences. Genotypes 4 and 6 showed a higher GB to RAV mutations conferring resistance to telaprevir, while genotypes 2-5 presented baseline resistance to that drug, carrying the 36L mutation. Genotype 4 had a higher GB to simeprevir resistance, requiring three substitutions to acquire the 155K mutation. Subtype 1b showed a higher GB than subtype 1a to resistance for most PIs, with RAVs at codons 36 and 155. Geographic disparities were also found in frequencies of certain RAVs in genotypes 2 and 3. Under a scenario of unprecedented evolution of anti-HCV direct-acting agents, the genetic composition of the circulating HCV sequences should be evaluated worldwide to choose the most appropriate/feasible therapeutic schemes with the highest genetic barriers to resistance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cost effectiveness of screening strategies for early identification of HIV and HCV infection in injection drug users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Cipriano

    Full Text Available To estimate the cost, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness of HIV and HCV screening of injection drug users (IDUs in opioid replacement therapy (ORT.Dynamic compartmental model of HIV and HCV in a population of IDUs and non-IDUs for a representative U.S. urban center with 2.5 million adults (age 15-59.We considered strategies of screening individuals in ORT for HIV, HCV, or both infections by antibody or antibody and viral RNA testing. We evaluated one-time and repeat screening at intervals from annually to once every 3 months. We calculated the number of HIV and HCV infections, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs.Adding HIV and HCV viral RNA testing to antibody testing averts 14.8-30.3 HIV and 3.7-7.7 HCV infections in a screened population of 26,100 IDUs entering ORT over 20 years, depending on screening frequency. Screening for HIV antibodies every 6 months costs $30,700/QALY gained. Screening for HIV antibodies and viral RNA every 6 months has an ICER of $65,900/QALY gained. Strategies including HCV testing have ICERs exceeding $100,000/QALY gained unless awareness of HCV-infection status results in a substantial reduction in needle-sharing behavior.Although annual screening for antibodies to HIV and HCV is modestly cost effective compared to no screening, more frequent screening for HIV provides additional benefit at less cost. Screening individuals in ORT every 3-6 months for HIV infection using both antibody and viral RNA technologies and initiating ART for acute HIV infection appears cost effective.

  8. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit E binds to classical swine fever virus NS5A and facilitates viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Mingyang; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Tu, Changchun; Sun, Jinfu

    2018-02-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) NS5A protein is a multifunctional protein, playing critical roles in viral RNA replication, translation and assembly. To further explore its functions in viral replication, interaction of NS5A with host factors was assayed using a his-tag "pull down" assay coupled with shotgun LC-MS/MS. Host protein translation initiation factor 3 subunit E was identified as a binding partner of NS5A, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization analysis. Overexpression of eIF3E markedly enhanced CSFV genomic replication, viral protein expression and production of progeny virus, and downregulation of eIF3E by siRNA significantly decreased viral proliferation in PK-15 cells. Luciferase reporter assay showed an enhancement of translational activity of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV by eIF3E and a decrease in cellular translation by NS5A. These data indicate that eIF3E plays an important role in CSFV replication, thereby identifying it as a potential target for inhibition of the virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Test of IL28B polymorphisms in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with PegIFN and ribavirin depends on HCV genotypes: results from a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Jia

    Full Text Available Many studies have been published on the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP near the IL28B gene and response to the combined treatments of pegylated-interferon (PegIFN and ribavirin (RBV in chronic HCV-infected patients, but without identical conclusions. The aim of this study was to assess impact of the IL28B polymorphisms on the effect of HCV standard treatment using meta-analysis based method.Association studies between polymorphisms of rs12979860 or rs8099917 and response to PegIFN/RBV treatment in chronic HCV patients were retrieved from PubMed. Data of qualified studies on sustained virological response (SVR in different genotypes were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis method in Stata 10 software.Thirty-four papers, containing 46 independent studies, were included in the analysis. In the HCV G1/4 patients without treatment history, individuals carrying rs12979860 CC genotype were more likely to achieve SVR (OR 3.97, 95%CI 3.29-4.80 compared to those carrying CT/TT genotypes. Similar results were observed in the HCV G1/4 patients with unsuccessful or unknown treatment history (OR 3.76, 95%CI 2.67-5.28 or in the patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (OR 5.20, 95%CI 3.04-8.90. However, associations could not be observed in HCV G2/3 patients. For rs8099917, similar results were obtained for genotype TT compared to genotypes TG/GG, indicating that TT genotype was significantly associated with better treatment response in patients infected with genotype 1 or 4 HCV, but not genotype 2 or 3 HCV.Polymorphisms of rs12979860 and rs8099917 near IL28B only associate with the treatment response to PegIFN/RBV in patients infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4 but not with genotype 2 or 3, irrespective of the previous treatment history or HIV co-infected status. Therefore, identification of IL28B genotypes is necessary only in patients infected with relatively difficult-to-treat genotype 1 or 4 HCV.

  10. Innate Immune Evasion Mediated by Flaviviridae Non-Structural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-10-07

    Flaviviridae-caused diseases are a critical, emerging public health problem worldwide. Flaviviridae infections usually cause severe, acute or chronic diseases, such as liver damage and liver cancer resulting from a hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and high fever and shock caused by yellow fever. Many researchers worldwide are investigating the mechanisms by which Flaviviridae cause severe diseases. Flaviviridae can interfere with the host's innate immunity to achieve their purpose of proliferation. For instance, dengue virus (DENV) NS2A, NS2B3, NS4A, NS4B and NS5; HCV NS2, NS3, NS3/4A, NS4B and NS5A; and West Nile virus (WNV) NS1 and NS4B proteins are involved in immune evasion. This review discusses the interplay between viral non-structural Flaviviridae proteins and relevant host proteins, which leads to the suppression of the host's innate antiviral immunity.

  11. Dynamic Nucleolar Targeting of Dengue Virus Polymerase NS5 in Response to Extracellular pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Johanna E.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Heaton, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleolar subcompartment of the nucleus is increasingly recognized as an important target of RNA viruses. Here we document for the first time the ability of dengue virus (DENV) polymerase, nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), to accumulate within the nucleolus of infected cells and to target green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the nucleolus of live transfected cells. Intriguingly, NS5 exchange between the nucleus and nucleolus is dynamically modulated by extracellular pH, responding rapidly and reversibly to pH change, in contrast to GFP alone or other nucleolar and non-nucleolar targeted protein controls. The minimal pH-sensitive nucleolar targeting region (pHNTR), sufficient to target GFP to the nucleolus in a pH-sensitive fashion, was mapped to NS5 residues 1 to 244, with mutation of key hydrophobic residues, Leu-165, Leu-167, and Val-168, abolishing pHNTR function in NS5-transfected cells, and severely attenuating DENV growth in infected cells. This is the first report of a viral protein whose nucleolar targeting ability is rapidly modulated by extracellular stimuli, suggesting that DENV has the ability to detect and respond dynamically to the extracellular environment. IMPORTANCE Infections by dengue virus (DENV) threaten 40% of the world's population yet there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapeutic to treat infections. Understanding the molecular details that govern effective viral replication is key for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Here, we describe for the first time dynamic trafficking of DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) to the subnuclear compartment, the nucleolus. We demonstrate that NS5's targeting to the nucleolus occurs in response to acidic pH, identify the key amino acid residues within NS5 that are responsible, and demonstrate that their mutation severely impairs production of infectious DENV. Overall, this study identifies a unique subcellular trafficking event and suggests that DENV is able to detect and respond

  12. Hepatitis A virus infection suppresses hepatitis C virus replication and may lead to clearance of HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deterding, Katja; Tegtmeyer, Björn; Cornberg, Markus; Hadem, Johannes; Potthoff, Andrej; Böker, Klaus H W; Tillmann, Hans L; Manns, Michael P; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2006-12-01

    The significance of hepatitis A virus (HAV) super-infection in patients with chronic hepatitis C had been a matter of debate. While some studies suggested an incidence of fulminant hepatitis A of up to 35%, this could not be confirmed by others. We identified 17 anti-HCV-positive patients with acute hepatitis A from a cohort of 3170 anti-HCV-positive patients recruited at a single center over a period of 12 years. Importantly, none of the anti-HCV-positive patients had a fulminant course of hepatitis A. HCV-RNA was detected by PCR in 84% of the anti-HCV-positive/anti-HAV-IgM-negative patients but only in 65% of anti-HCV-positive patients with acute hepatitis A (p=0.03), indicating suppression of HCV replication during hepatitis A. Previous HAV infection had no effect on HCV replication. After recovery from hepatitis A, an increased HCV replication could be demonstrated for 6 out of 9 patients with serial quantitative HCV-RNA values available while 2 patients remained HCV-RNA negative after clearance of HAV throughout follow-up of at least 2 years. HAV super-infection is associated with decreased HCV-RNA replication which may lead to recovery from HCV in some individuals. Fulminant hepatitis A is not frequent in patients with chronic hepatitis C recruited at a tertiary referral center.

  13. Diverse Effects of Cyclosporine on Hepatitis C Virus Strain Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Naoto; Watashi, Koichi; Hishiki, Takayuki; Goto, Kaku; Inoue, Daisuke; Hijikata, Makoto; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Nobuyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a production system for infectious particles of hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizing the genotype 2a JFH1 strain has been developed. This strain has a high capacity for replication in the cells. Cyclosporine (CsA) has a suppressive effect on HCV replication. In this report, we characterize the anti-HCV effect of CsA. We observe that the presence of viral structural proteins does not influence the anti-HCV activity of CsA. Among HCV strains, the replication of genotype 1b replicons was strongly suppressed by treatment with CsA. In contrast, JFH1 replication was less sensitive to CsA and its analog, NIM811. Replication of JFH1 did not require the cellular replication cofactor, cyclophilin B (CyPB). CyPB stimulated the RNA binding activity of NS5B in the genotype 1b replicon but not the genotype 2a JFH1 strain. These findings provide an insight into the mechanisms of diversity governing virus-cell interactions and in the sensitivity of these strains to antiviral agents. PMID:16611911

  14. Interaction of Hepatitis C virus proteins with pattern recognition receptors

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    Imran Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an important human pathogen that causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. This positive stranded RNA virus is extremely efficient in establishing persistent infection by escaping immune detection or hindering the host immune responses. Recent studies have discovered two important signaling pathways that activate the host innate immunity against viral infection. One of these pathways utilizes members of Toll-like receptor (TLR family and the other uses the RNA helicase retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I as the receptors for intracellular viral double stranded RNA (dsRNA, and activation of transcription factors. In this review article, we summarize the interaction of HCV proteins with various host receptors/sensors through one of these two pathways or both, and how they exploit these interactions to escape from host defense mechanisms. For this purpose, we searched data from Pubmed and Google Scholar. We found that three HCV proteins; Core (C, non structural 3/4 A (NS3/4A and non structural 5A (NS5A have direct interactions with these two pathways. Core protein only in the monomeric form stimulates TLR2 pathway assisting the virus to evade from the innate immune system. NS3/4A disrupts TLR3 and RIG-1 signaling pathways by cleaving Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-beta (TRIF and Cardif, the two important adapter proteins of these signaling cascades respectively, thus halting the defense against HCV. NS5A downmodulates the expressions of NKG2D on natural killer cells (NK cells via TLR4 pathway and impairs the functional ability of these cells. TLRs and RIG-1 pathways have a central role in innate immunity and despite their opposing natures to HCV proteins, when exploited together, HCV as an ever developing virus against host immunity is able to accumulate these mechanisms for near unbeatable survival.

  15. [Comparison of eight screening tests for ant-HCV antibody].

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    Deguchi, Matsuo; Kagita, Masanori; Yamashita, Naoko; Nakano, Takasi; Tahara, Kazuko; Asari, Seishi; Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2002-09-01

    We compared eight HCV screening tests for detection of anti-HCV antibody; Ortho Quick Chaser HCV Ab (QC), Ortho HCV Ab ELISA III (ELISA), Ortho HVC Ab PA test III (PA), Lumipulse II Ortho HCV (LUMI), IMx HCV.DAINAPACKII (IMx), ARCHITECT HCV (ARCH), Immucheck.F-HCV C50 Ab (Immu), RANREAM HCV Ab Ex II (RAN). Sera from six hundred patients were examined by these eight screening tests. The positive rates of the eight screening tests were from 9.0% to 13.2%. Forty-five sera showed discrepant results between the eight screening tests, and about half of them showed weak positive reaction and/or false positive. Twenty-five of the forty-five sera were negative for ant-HCV antibody in the CHIRON RIBA III confirmatory test, and forty-four of them were negative for HCV-RNA in the PCR method. The agreement rates between the two reagents were from 95.5% to 99.2%, but were not always high between the two reagents that used similar antigen. The specificities and sensitivities evaluated by using the RIBA III confirmatory test were excellent in ELISA, LUMI, IMx, ARCH and Immu. Three BBI seroconversion panels were used to compare the positive readings in the initial stage of HCV infection by eight screening tests. ELISA and ARCH showed the earliest positive readings, and then IMx, LUMI = RAN, PA, QC and Immu in this order. These findings indicate that ELISA and ARCH were the most excellent in the sensitivity, specificity and early diagnosis of HCV infection. However, we must pay attention to the weak positive reaction in the screening tests, because there is a possibility of "false positive".

  16. HIV Infection Status as a Predictor of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Testing in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartel, Anthony K.; Morgan, Rebecca L.; Rein, David B.; Brown, Kimberly Ann; Kil, Natalie B.; Massoud, Omar I.; Fallon, Michael B.; Smith, Bryce D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Receipt of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA testing following a positive HCV antibody (anti-HCV+) test result to establish current infection is a quality indicator for HCV-related care. This study examines HIV infection status as a predictor of HCV RNA test receipt after an anti-HCV+ result in the primary care setting. Methods Electronic medical records of anti-HCV+ patients from a multisite retrospective study of patients aged ≥18 years who utilized one or more primary care outpatient services during 2005–2010 were analyzed in 2014. A multivariable logistic regression model examined the independent relationships between patient characteristics and receipt of HCV RNA testing. Results Among 1,115 anti-HCV+ patients, 133 (11.9%) were also HIV-positive. Of these, 77.4% (n=103) underwent HCV RNA testing to determine current infection status. By contrast, 66.7% (n=654/980) of anti-HCV+ patients who were HIV-negative received HCV RNA testing. Following multivariable adjustment, the odds of receiving HCV RNA testing were higher among anti-HCV+ patients who were also HIV-positive (AOR=1.9, 95% CI=1.2, 3.0), compared with their HIV-negative counterparts. Elevated alanine aminotransferase level was also associated with receipt of HCV RNA testing (AOR=1.9, 95% CI=1.4, 2.4). Black race was associated with decreased odds of receiving HCV RNA testing (AOR=0.7, 95% CI=0.5, 1.0). Conclusions HIV infection status is independently associated with the likelihood of receiving HCV RNA testing following an anti-HCV+ result. One quarter of anti-HCV+ patients who were also HIV-positive and one third of their HIV-negative counterparts, respectively, did not receive testing to establish active HCV infection, which is imperative for appropriate care and treatment. PMID:25896194

  17. Functional RNA structures throughout the Hepatitis C Virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca L; Pirakitikulr, Nathan; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2017-06-01

    The single-stranded Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) genome adopts a set of elaborate RNA structures that are involved in every stage of the viral lifecycle. Recent advances in chemical probing, sequencing, and structural biology have facilitated analysis of RNA folding on a genome-wide scale, revealing novel structures and networks of interactions. These studies have underscored the active role played by RNA in every function of HCV and they open the door to new types of RNA-targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Andrographolide exerts anti-hepatitis C virus activity by up-regulating haeme oxygenase-1 via the p38 MAPK/Nrf2 pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ching; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Young, Kung-Chia; Sun, Hung-Yu; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Chen, Wei-Chun; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity of andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone extracted from Andrographis paniculata, and to identify the signalling pathway involved in its antiviral action. Using HCV replicon and HCVcc infectious systems, we identified anti-HCV activity of andrographolide by measuring protein and RNA levels. A reporter activity assay was used to determine transcriptional regulation of anti-HCV agents. A specific inhibitor and short hairpin RNAs were used to investigate the mechanism responsible for the effect of andrographolide on HCV replication. In HCV replicon and HCVcc infectious systems, andrographolide time- and dose-dependently suppressed HCV replication. When combined with IFN-α, an inhibitor targeting HCV NS3/4A protease (telaprevir), or NS5B polymerase (PSI-7977), andrographolide exhibited a significant synergistic effect. Andrographolide up-regulated the expression of haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), leading to increased amounts of its metabolite biliverdin, which was found to suppress HCV replication by promoting the antiviral IFN responses and inhibiting NS3/4A protease activity. Significantly, these antiviral effects were attenuated by an HO-1-specific inhibitor or HO-1 gene knockdown, indicating that HO-1 contributed to the anti-HCV activity of andrographolide. Andrographolide activated p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which stimulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated HO-1 expression, and this was found to be associated with its anti-HCV activity. Our results demonstrate that andrographolide has the potential to control HCV replication and suggest that targeting the Nrf2-HO-1 signalling pathway might be a promising strategy for drug development. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Riboregulation of the bacterial actin-homolog MreB by DsrA small noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Bastien; Fortas, Emilie; Martret, Claire; Cech, Grzegorz; Kloska, Anna; Caulet, Stephane; Barbet, Marion; Trépout, Sylvain; Marco, Sergio; Taghbalout, Aziz; Busi, Florent; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Arluison, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial actin-homolog MreB is a key player in bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis and is required for the maintenance of the rod-like morphology of Escherichia coli. However, how MreB cellular levels are adjusted to growth conditions is poorly understood. Here, we show that DsrA, an E. coli small noncoding RNA (sRNA), is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mreB. DsrA is required for the downregulation of MreB cellular concentration during environmentally induced slow growth-rates, mainly growth at low temperature and during the stationary phase. DsrA interacts in an Hfq-dependent manner with the 5' region of mreB mRNA, which contains signals for translation initiation and thereby affects mreB translation and stability. Moreover, as DsrA is also involved in the regulation of two transcriptional regulators, σ(S) and the nucleoid associated protein H-NS, which negatively regulate mreB transcription, it also indirectly contributes to mreB transcriptional down-regulation. By using quantitative analyses, our results evidence the complexity of this regulation and the tangled interplay between transcriptional and post-transcriptional control. As transcription factors and sRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulators use different timescales, we propose that the sRNA pathway helps to adapt to changes in temperature, but also indirectly mediates long-term regulation of MreB concentration. The tight regulation and fine-tuning of mreB gene expression in response to cellular stresses is discussed in regard to the effect of the MreB protein on cell elongation.

  20. IFN-Alpha receptor-1 upregulation in PBMC from HCV naïve patients carrying cc genotype. possible role of IFN-lambda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Lalle

    Full Text Available IL-28B gene polymorphisms predict better therapeutic response and spontaneous clearance of HCV. Moreover, higher expression of IFN-lambda has been reported in patients with the rs12979860 CC favourable genotype. The study aim was to establish possible relationships between IL-28B rs12979860 genotypes and expression of IFN-alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR-1 in naïve HCV patients, and to explore the possible role of IFN-lambda.IFNAR-1 mRNA levels were measured in PBMC from naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C with different IL-28 genotypes. The ability of IFN-lambda to up-regulate the expression of IFNAR-1 was established in PBMC from healthy donors carrying different IL-28B genotypes.Lower IFNAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in PBMC from HCV-infected naïve patients as compared to healthy donors. In healthy donors, IFNAR-1 mRNA levels were independent from IL-28B genotype, while in HCV patients, an increasing gradient was observed in TT vs CT vs CC carriers. In the latter group, a direct correlation between IFNAR-1 and endogenous IL-28B expression was observed. Moreover, IFN-lambda up-regulated IFNAR-1 expression in normal PBMC in a time-and dose-dependent manner, with a more effective response in CC vs TT carriers.Endogenous levels of IFN-lambda may be responsible for partial restoration of IFNAR-1 expression in HCV patients with favourable IL-28 genotype. This, in turn, may confer to CC carriers a response advantage to either endogenous or exogenous IFN-alpha, representing the biological basis for the observed association between CC genotype and favourable outcome of either natural infection (clearance vs chronicization or IFN therapy.

  1. Hepatitis C virus non-structural 5B protein interacts with cyclin A2 and regulates viral propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Long; Ngo, HT; Lim, YS

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires host cellular proteins for its own propagation. To identify the cellular factors necessary for HCV propagation, we have recently screened the small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting cell cycle genes using cell culture grown HCV (HCVcc...

  2. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease genotyping and drug concentration determination during triple therapy with telaprevir or boceprevir for chronic infection with genotype 1 viruses, southeastern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherfi, Sarah; Solas, Caroline; Motte, Anne; Moreau, Jacques; Borentain, Patrick; Mokhtari, Saadia; Botta-Fridlund, Danielle; Dhiver, Catherine; Portal, Isabelle; Ruiz, Jean-Marie; Ravaux, Isabelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Stein, Andreas; Gérolami, René; Brouqui, Philippe; Tamalet, Catherine; Colson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir, the two first hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs), considerably increase rates of sustained virologic response in association with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in chronic HCV genotype 1 infections. The 30 first patients treated by telaprevir or boceprevir including anti-HCV therapies since 2011 in Marseille University hospitals, France, were monitored. HCV loads and plasmatic concentrations of telaprevir and boceprevir were determined on sequential blood samples. HCV NS3 protease gene population sequencing was performed at baseline of treatment and in case of treatment failure. Fifteen patients (including 7 co-infected with HIV) received telaprevir and the other 15 patients (including 4 co-infected with HIV) received boceprevir. At baseline, HCV NS3 protease from six patients harbored amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance. Treatment failure occurred at week 12 for 7 patients. Amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance were observed in six of these cases. HCV NS3 R155K and T54A/S mutants, all of genotype 1a, were found from four patients. Median (interquartile range) plasma concentrations were 3,092 ng/ml (2,320-3,525) for telaprevir and 486 ng/ml (265-619) for boceprevir. For HIV-HCV co-infected patients, median concentrations were 3,162 ng/ml (2,270-4,232) for telaprevir and 374 ng/ml (229-519) for boceprevir. Plasma drug concentration monitoring revealed undetectable concentrations for two patients at week 4, and probable non-adherence to therapy for another patient. These findings indicate that routine HCV NS3 protease sequencing and plasma PI concentration monitoring might be helpful to characterize cases of therapy failure, at a cost dramatically low compared to that of anti-HCV therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Baseline Polymorphisms and Emergence of Drug Resistance in the NS3/4A Protease of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 following Treatment with Faldaprevir and Pegylated Interferon Alpha 2a/Ribavirin in Phase 2 and Phase 3 Studies.

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    Berger, K L; Scherer, J; Ranga, M; Sha, N; Stern, J O; Quinson, A-M; Kukolj, G

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of data pooled from multiple phase 2 (SILEN-C1 to 3) and phase 3 studies (STARTVerso1 to 4) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3/4A (NS3/4A) protease inhibitor faldaprevir plus pegylated interferon alpha/ribavirin (PR) provides a comprehensive evaluation of baseline and treatment-emergent NS3/4A amino acid variants among HCV genotype-1 (GT-1)-infected patients. Pooled analyses of GT-1a and GT-1b NS3 population-based pretreatment sequences (n = 3,124) showed that faldaprevir resistance-associated variants (RAVs) at NS3 R155 and D168 were rare (<1%). No single, noncanonical NS3 protease or NS4A cofactor baseline polymorphism was associated with a reduced sustained virologic response (SVR) to faldaprevir plus PR, including Q80K. The GT-1b NS3 helicase polymorphism T344I was associated with reduced SVR to faldaprevir plus PR (P < 0.0001) but was not faldaprevir specific, as reduced SVR was also observed with placebo plus PR. Among patients who did not achieve SVR and had available NS3 population sequences (n = 507 GT-1a; n = 349 GT-1b), 94% of GT-1a and 83% of GT-1b encoded faldaprevir treatment-emergent RAVs. The predominant GT-1a RAV was R155K (88%), whereas GT-1b encoded D168 substitutions (78%) in which D168V was predominant (67%). The novel GT-1b NS3 S61L substitution emerged in 7% of virologic failures as a covariant with D168V, most often among the faldaprevir breakthroughs; S61L in combination with D168V had a minimal impact on faldaprevir susceptibility compared with that for D168V alone (1.5-fold difference in vitro). The median time to loss of D168 RAVs among GT-1b-infected patients who did not have a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks posttreatment (non-SVR12) after virologic failure was 5 months, which was shorter than the 14 months for R155 RAVs among GT-1a-infected non-SVR12 patients, suggesting that D168V is less fit than R155K in the absence of faldaprevir selective pressure. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  4. Genetic Diversity and Selective Pressure in Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes 1-6: Significance for Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment and Drug Resistance.

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    Cuypers, Lize; Li, Guangdi; Libin, Pieter; Piampongsant, Supinya; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Theys, Kristof

    2015-09-16

    Treatment with pan-genotypic direct-acting antivirals, targeting different viral proteins, is the best option for clearing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in chronically infected patients. However, the diversity of the HCV genome is a major obstacle for the development of antiviral drugs, vaccines, and genotyping assays. In this large-scale analysis, genome-wide diversity and selective pressure was mapped, focusing on positions important for treatment, drug resistance, and resistance testing. A dataset of 1415 full-genome sequences, including genotypes 1-6 from the Los Alamos database, was analyzed. In 44% of all full-genome positions, the consensus amino acid was different for at least one genotype. Focusing on positions sharing the same consensus amino acid in all genotypes revealed that only 15% was defined as pan-genotypic highly conserved (≥99% amino acid identity) and an additional 24% as pan-genotypic conserved (≥95%). Despite its large genetic diversity, across all genotypes, codon positions were rarely identified to be positively selected (0.23%-0.46%) and predominantly found to be under negative selective pressure, suggesting mainly neutral evolution. For NS3, NS5A, and NS5B, respectively, 40% (6/15), 33% (3/9), and 14% (2/14) of the resistance-related positions harbored as consensus the amino acid variant related to resistance, potentially impeding treatment. For example, the NS3 variant 80K, conferring resistance to simeprevir used for treatment of HCV1 infected patients, was present in 39.3% of the HCV1a strains and 0.25% of HCV1b strains. Both NS5A variants 28M and 30S, known to be associated with resistance to the pan-genotypic drug daclatasvir, were found in a significant proportion of HCV4 strains (10.7%). NS5B variant 556G, known to confer resistance to non-nucleoside inhibitor dasabuvir, was observed in 8.4% of the HCV1b strains. Given the large HCV genetic diversity, sequencing efforts for resistance testing purposes may need to be

  5. RNA chaperoning and intrinsic disorder in the core proteins of Flaviviridae.

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    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Gabus, Caroline; Ficheux, Damien; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2008-02-01

    RNA chaperone proteins are essential partners of RNA in living organisms and viruses. They are thought to assist in the correct folding and structural rearrangements of RNA molecules by resolving misfolded RNA species in an ATP-independent manner. RNA chaperoning is probably an entropy-driven process, mediated by the coupled binding and folding of intrinsically disordered protein regions and the kinetically trapped RNA. Previously, we have shown that the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a potent RNA chaperone that can drive profound structural modifications of HCV RNA in vitro. We now examined the RNA chaperone activity and the disordered nature of core proteins from different Flaviviridae genera, namely that of HCV, GBV-B (GB virus B), WNV (West Nile virus) and BVDV (bovine viral diarrhoea virus). Despite low-sequence similarities, all four proteins demonstrated general nucleic acid annealing and RNA chaperone activities. Furthermore, heat resistance of core proteins, as well as far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested that a well-defined 3D protein structure is not necessary for core-induced RNA structural rearrangements. These data provide evidence that RNA chaperoning-possibly mediated by intrinsically disordered protein segments-is conserved in Flaviviridae core proteins. Thus, besides nucleocapsid formation, core proteins may function in RNA structural rearrangements taking place during virus replication.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of efficacy and safety of HCV treatment in HCV-HIV coinfected patients: significant associations with IL28B and SOCS3 gene variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Vidal

    Full Text Available This was a safety and efficacy pharmacogenetic study of a previously performed randomized trial which compared the effectiveness of treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with pegylated interferon alpha (pegIFNα 2a vs. 2b, both with ribavirin, for 48 weeks, in HCV-HIV coinfected patients.The study groups were made of 99 patients (efficacy pharmacogenetic substudy and of 114 patients (safety pharmacogenetic substudy. Polymorphisms in the following candidate genes IL28B, IL6, IL10, TNFα, IFNγ, CCL5, MxA, OAS1, SOCS3, CTLA4 and ITPA were assessed. Genotyping was carried out using Sequenom iPLEX-Gold, a single-base extension polymerase chain reaction. Efficacy end-points assessed were: rapid, early and sustained virological response (RVR, EVR and SVR, respectively. Safety end-points assessed were: anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, flu-like syndrome, gastrointestinal disturbances and depression. Chi square test, Student's T test, Mann-Whitney U test and logistic regression were used for statistic analyses.As efficacy is concerned, IL28B and CTLA4 gene polymorphisms were associated with RVR (p<0.05 for both comparisons. Nevertheless, only polymorphism in the IL28B gene was associated with SVR (p = 0.004. In the multivariate analysis, the only gene independently associated with SVR was IL28B (OR 2.61, 95%CI 1.2-5.6, p = 0.01. With respect to safety, there were no significant associations between flu-like syndrome or depression and the genetic variants studied. Gastrointestinal disturbances were associated with ITPA gene polymorphism (p = 0.04. Anemia was associated with OAS1 and CTLA4 gene polymorphisms (p = 0.049 and p = 0.045, respectively, neutropenia and thromobocytopenia were associated with SOCS3 gene polymorphism (p = 0.02 and p = 0.002, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, the associations of the SOCS3 gene polymorphism with neutropenia (OR 0.26, 95%CI 0.09-0.75, p = 0.01 and thrombocytopenia (OR

  7. Persistent replication of a hepatitis C virus genotype 1b-based chimeric clone carrying E1, E2 and p6 regions from GB virus B in a New World monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Saori; Mori, Ken-Ichi; Higashino, Atsunori; Iwasaki, Yuki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Maki, Noboru; Akari, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The development of effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccines is essential for the prevention of further HCV dissemination, especially in developing countries. Therefore the aim of this study is to establish a feasible and immunocompetent surrogate animal model of HCV infection that will help in evaluation of the protective efficacy of newly developing HCV vaccine candidates. To circumvent the narrow host range of HCV, an HCV genotype 1b-based chimeric clone carrying E1, E2 and p6 regions from GB virus B (GBV-B), which is closely related to HCV, was generated. The chimera between HCV and GBV-B, named HCV/G, replicated more efficiently as compared with the HCV clone in primary marmoset hepatocytes. Furthermore, it was found that the chimera persistently replicated in a tamarin for more than 2 years after intrahepatic inoculation of the chimeric RNA. Although relatively low (chimeric RNA was found in the pellet fraction obtained by ultracentrifugation of the plasma at 73 weeks, indicating production of the chimeric virus. Our results will help establish a novel non-human primate model for HCV infection on the basis of the HCV/G chimera in the major framework of the HCV genome. © 2015 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co-infected...... patients (HCV genotype 1 (n = 16), 2 (n = 2), and 3 (n = 3)). Lower baseline IP-10 was significantly associated with a rapid decline in HCV RNA, in particular with the first phase reduction, and similar cut-off levels ( 600 pg/ml) as in HCV mono-infected patients apply. In conclusion, baseline IP......-10 infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  9. [Effect of Hepatitis C virus proteins on the production of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines in Huh7.5 human hepatoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalova, O V; Lesnova, E I; Permyakova, K Yu; Samokhvalov, E I; Ivanov, A V; Kochetkov, S N; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a widespread dangerous human pathogen. Up to 80% of HCV-infected individuals develop chronic infection, which is often accompanied by liver inflammation and fibrosis and, at terminal stages, liver cirrhosis and cancer. Treatment of patients with end-stage liver disease is often ineffective, and even patients with suppressed HCV replication have higher risk of death as compared with noninfected subjects. Therefore, investigating the mechanisms that underlie HCV pathogenesis and developing treatments for virus-associated liver dysfunction remain an important goal. The effect of individual HCV proteins on the production of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines in hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7.5 cells was analyzed in a systematic manner. Cells were transfected with plasmids encoding HCV proteins. Cytokine production and secretion was accessed by immunocytochemistry and ELISA of the culture medium, and transcription of the cytokine genes was assessed using reverse transcription and PCR. HCV proteins proved to differ in effect on cytokine production. Downregulation of interleukin 6 (IL-6) production was observed in cells expressing the HCV core, NS3, and NS5A proteins. Production of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) was lower in cells expressing the core proteins, NS3, or E1/E2 glycoproteins. A pronounced increase in production and secretion of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was observed in response to expression of the HCV E1/E2 glycoproteins. A higher biosynthesis, but a lower level in the cell culture medium, was detected for interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in cells harboring NS4 and IL-6 in cells expressing NS5В. The finding was possibly explained by protein-specific retention and consequent accumulation of the respective cytokines in the cell.

  10. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

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    Maarit Neuvonen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homology 3 (SH3 domains of amphiphysin-1 and -2. Nsp3 proteins of Semliki Forest (SFV, Sindbis (SINV, and Chikungunya viruses all showed avid and SH3-dependent binding to amphiphysins. Upon alphavirus infection the intracellular distribution of amphiphysin was dramatically altered and colocalized with nsP3. Mutations in nsP3 disrupting the amphiphysin SH3 binding motif as well as RNAi-mediated silencing of amphiphysin-2 expression resulted in impaired viral RNA replication in HeLa cells infected with SINV or SFV. Infection of Balb/c mice with SFV carrying an SH3 binding-defective nsP3 was associated with significantly decreased mortality. These data establish SH3 domain-mediated binding of nsP3 with amphiphysin as an important host cell interaction promoting alphavirus replication.

  11. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

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    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predominance of hepatitis C virus Q80K among NS3 baseline-resistance-associated amino acid variants in direct-antiviral-agent-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis: single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Tina; Proietti, Alex; Boglione, Lucio; Milia, Maria Grazia; Allice, Tiziano; Burdino, Elisa; Orofino, Giancarlo; Bonora, Stefano; Di Perri, Giovanni; Ghisetti, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    In the era of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping tests at baseline are controversial. The HCV NS3-Q80K polymorphism is associated with resistance to the recently approved NS3 inhibitor simeprevir (SMV) when combined with PEG-interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) and alternative therapy should be considered for patients with baseline Q80K. The aim of this study was to provide an estimate of Q80K prevalence at baseline in a study group of 205 DAA-naïve patients (21% of them with HIV coinfection) using NS3 full-population direct sequencing to detect resistance-associated amino acid variants (RAVs). NS3 RAVs were identified in 56 patients (27.3%). Q80K was the most frequently reported one (41%), in both HIV/HCV-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected patients, but it was only detectable in cases of HCV-subtype 1a infection. Therefore, in clinical practice, an NS3-Q80K genotyping test prior to simeprevir plus PEG-IFN/RBV treatment is highly recommended.

  13. Promiscuous prediction and conservancy analysis of CTL binding epitopes of HCV 3a viral proteome from Punjab Pakistan: an In Silico Approach

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    Idrees Muhammad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HCV is a positive sense RNA virus affecting approximately 180 million people world wide and about 10 million Pakistani populations. HCV genotype 3a is the major cause of infection in Pakistani population. One of the major problems of HCV infection especially in the developing countries that limits the limits the antiviral therapy is the long term treatment, high dosage and side effects. Studies of antigenic epitopes of viral sequences of a specific origin can provide an effective way to overcome the mutation rate and to determine the promiscuous binders to be used for epitope based subunit vaccine design. An in silico approach was applied for the analysis of entire HCV proteome of Pakistani origin, aimed to identify the viral epitopes and their conservancy in HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3 of diverse origin. Results Immunoinformatic tools were applied for the predictive analysis of HCV 3a antigenic epitopes of Pakistani origin. All the predicted epitopes were then subjected for their conservancy analysis in HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3 of diverse origin (worldwide. Using freely available web servers, 150 MHC II epitopes were predicted as promiscuous binders against 51 subjected alleles. E2 protein represented the 20% of all the predicted MHC II epitopes. 75.33% of the predicted MHC II epitopes were (77-100% conserve in genotype 3; 47.33% and 40.66% in genotype 1 and 2 respectively. 69 MHC I epitopes were predicted as promiscuous binders against 47 subjected alleles. NS4b represented 26% of all the MHC I predicted epitopes. Significantly higher epitope conservancy was represented by genotype 3 i.e. 78.26% and 21.05% for genotype 1 and 2. Conclusions The study revealed comprehensive catalogue of potential HCV derived CTL epitopes from viral proteome of Pakistan origin. A considerable number of predicted epitopes were found to be conserved in different HCV genotype. However, the number of conserved epitopes in HCV genotype 3 was

  14. Hepatitis C Virus Replication Depends on Endosomal Cholesterol Homeostasis.

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    Stoeck, Ina Karen; Lee, Ji-Young; Tabata, Keisuke; Romero-Brey, Inés; Paul, David; Schult, Philipp; Lohmann, Volker; Kaderali, Lars; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes massive rearrangements of intracellular membranes, resulting in a membranous web (MW) composed of predominantly double-membrane vesicles (DMVs), the presumed sites of RNA replication. DMVs are enriched for cholesterol, but mechanistic details on the source and recruitment of cholesterol to the viral replication organelle are only partially known. Here we focused on selected lipid transfer proteins implicated in direct lipid transfer at various endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane contact sites. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown identified several hitherto unknown HCV dependency factors, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer domain protein 3 (STARD3), oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 1A and -B (OSBPL1A and -B), and Niemann-Pick-type C1 (NPC1), all residing at late endosome and lysosome membranes and required for efficient HCV RNA replication but not for replication of the closely related dengue virus. Focusing on NPC1, we found that knockdown or pharmacological inhibition caused cholesterol entrapment in lysosomal vesicles concomitant with decreased cholesterol abundance at sites containing the viral replicase factor NS5A. In untreated HCV-infected cells, unesterified cholesterol accumulated at the perinuclear region, partially colocalizing with NS5A at DMVs, arguing for NPC1-mediated endosomal cholesterol transport to the viral replication organelle. Consistent with cholesterol being an important structural component of DMVs, reducing NPC1-dependent endosomal cholesterol transport impaired MW integrity. This suggests that HCV usurps lipid transfer proteins, such as NPC1, at ER-late endosome/lysosome membrane contact sites to recruit cholesterol to the viral replication organelle, where it contributes to MW functionality. IMPORTANCE A key feature of the replication of positive-strand RNA viruses is the rearrangement of the host cell

  15. A conformational switch high-throughput screening assay and allosteric inhibition of the flavivirus NS2B-NS3 protease.

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    Matthew Brecher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The flavivirus genome encodes a single polyprotein precursor requiring multiple cleavages by host and viral proteases in order to produce the individual proteins that constitute an infectious virion. Previous studies have revealed that the NS2B cofactor of the viral NS2B-NS3 heterocomplex protease displays a conformational dynamic between active and inactive states. Here, we developed a conformational switch assay based on split luciferase complementation (SLC to monitor the conformational change of NS2B and to characterize candidate allosteric inhibitors. Binding of an active-site inhibitor to the protease resulted in a conformational change of NS2B and led to significant SLC enhancement. Mutagenesis of key residues at an allosteric site abolished this induced conformational change and SLC enhancement. We also performed a virtual screen of NCI library compounds to identify allosteric inhibitors, followed by in vitro biochemical screening of the resultant candidates. Only three of these compounds, NSC135618, 260594, and 146771, significantly inhibited the protease of Dengue virus 2 (DENV2 in vitro, with IC50 values of 1.8 μM, 11.4 μM, and 4.8 μM, respectively. Among the three compounds, only NSC135618 significantly suppressed the SLC enhancement triggered by binding of active-site inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it inhibits the conformational change of NS2B. Results from virus titer reduction assays revealed that NSC135618 is a broad spectrum flavivirus protease inhibitor, and can significantly reduce titers of DENV2, Zika virus (ZIKV, West Nile virus (WNV, and Yellow fever virus (YFV on A549 cells in vivo, with EC50 values in low micromolar range. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of NSC135618 is only moderate with CC50 of 48.8 μM on A549 cells. Moreover, NSC135618 inhibited ZIKV in human placental and neural progenitor cells relevant to ZIKV pathogenesis. Results from binding, kinetics, Western blot, mass spectrometry and

  16. Hepatitis B virus reactivation after treatment for hepatitis C in hemodialysis patients with HBV/HCV coinfection

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    Raul Carlos Wahle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In coinfected HBV/HCV patients, HBV replication is usually suppressed by HCV over the time. No study to date has evaluated the HBV viremia in long-term follow-up after HCV treatment in hemodialysis patients with HBV/HCV coinfection. This study aimed to assess the evolution of HBV viremia after HCV treatment in this special population. Ten hemodialysis patients with HBV/HCV coinfection with dominant HCV infection (HBV lower than 2000 IU/mL and significant fibrosis were treated with interferon-alpha 3 MU 3×/week for 12 months and could be followed for at least 36 months after HCV treatment. Six cases of HBV reactivation (60% during follow-up were observed and 5/6 had been successfully treated for HCV. Patients with HBV reactivation received anti-HBV therapy. Our preliminary findings indicate that treatment of hepatitis C in HBV/HCV coinfected hemodialysis patients may favor HBV reactivation. Thus, continued monitoring of HBV viremia must be recommended and prompt anti-HBV therapy should be implemented.

  17. High false-negative rate of anti-HCV among Egyptian patients on regular hemodialysis.

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    El-Sherif, Assem; Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Aboelfotoh, Atef; Abdelkarim, Magdy; Saied Mohammad, Abdel-Gawad; Abdallah, Abdallah Mahmoud; Mostafa, Sadek; Elmestikawy, Amr; Elwassief, Ahmed; Salah, Mohamed; Abdelbaseer, Mohamed Ali; Abdelwahab, Kouka Saadeldin

    2012-07-01

    Routine serological testing for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among hemodialysis (HD) patients is currently recommended. A dilemma existed on the value of serology because some investigators reported a high rate of false-negative serologic testing. In this study, we aimed to detect the false-negative rate of anti-HCV among Egyptian HD patients. Seventy-eight HD patients, negative for anti-HCV, anti-HIV, and hepatitis B surface antigen, were tested for HCV RNA by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the next step, the viral load was quantified by real-time PCR in RT-PCR-positive patients. Risk factors for HCV infection, as well as clinical and biochemical indicators of liver disease, were compared between false-negative and true-negative anti-HCV HD patients. The frequency of false-negative anti-HCV was 17.9%. Frequency of blood transfusion, duration of HD, dialysis at multiple centers, and diabetes mellitus were not identified as risk factors for HCV infection. The frequency of false-negative results had a linear relation to the prevalence of HCV infection in the HD units. Timely identification of HCV within dialysis units is needed in order to lower the risk of HCV spread within the HD units. The high false-negative rate of anti-HCV among HD patients in our study justifies testing of a large scale of patients for precious assessment of effectiveness of nucleic acid amplification technology testing in screening HD patient. © 2012 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2012 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  18. Early diagnosis of dengue in travelers: comparison of a novel real-time RT-PCR, NS1 antigen detection and serology.

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    Huhtamo, Eili; Hasu, Essi; Uzcátegui, Nathalie Y; Erra, Elina; Nikkari, Simo; Kantele, Anu; Vapalahti, Olli; Piiparinen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    The increased traveling to dengue endemic regions and the numerous epidemics have led to a rise in imported dengue. The laboratory diagnosis of acute dengue requires several types of tests and often paired samples are needed for obtaining reliable results. Although several diagnostic methods are available, proper comparative data on their performance are lacking. To compare the performance of novel methods including a novel pan-DENV real-time RT-PCR and a commercially available NS1 capture-EIA in regard to IgM detection for optimizing the early diagnosis of DENV in travelers. A panel of 99 selected early phase serum samples of dengue patients was studied by real-time RT-PCR, NS1 antigen ELISA, IgM-EIA, IgG-IFA and cell culture virus isolation. The novel real-time RT-PCR was shown specific and sensitive for detection of DENV-1-4 RNA and suitable for diagnostic use. The diagnostic rate using combination of RNA and IgM detection was 99% and using NS1 and IgM detection 95.9%. The results of RNA and NS1 antigen detection disagreed in 15.5% of samples that had only RNA or NS1 antigen detected. The diagnostic rates of early samples are higher when either RNA or NS1 antigen detection is combined with IgM detection. Besides the differences in the RNA and NS1 detection assays, the observed discrepancy of results could suggest individual variation or differences in timing of these markers in patient serum. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High prevalence of Hepatitis C virus genotype 6 in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Duc Anh; Leuangwutiwong, Pornsawan; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Luplertlop, Nattanej; Bach, Hoa Khanh; Akkarathamrongsin, Srunthron; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to update the prevalence of the various Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Vietnamese blood donors. One hundred and three HCV antibody-positive plasma samples were collected from blood donors at the National Institute of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Hanoi, Vietnam. All specimens were subjected to RT-PCR of the 5' untranslated region (UTR) to confirm the presence of HCV RNA. The core and NS5B regions of thh positive samples were subsequently amplified by RT-PCR followed by direct sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Seventy out of 103 samples (68.0%) were RNA positive. Core and NS5B were successfully amplified and sequences were obtained for 70 and 65 samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that genotype 6a was the most predominant among Vietnamese blood donors with a prevalence of 37.1% (26/70), followed by genotype 1a at 30.0% (21/70) and genotype 1b at 17.1% (12/70). The prevalence of two other genotype 6 variants, 6e and 61 was 8.6% and 1.4%, respectively. Further analysis of recent studies showed that the geographic distribution of genotype 6 covered mainly southern China and the mainland of Southeast Asia including Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar. The GenBank accession numbers for the sequences reported in this study are FJ768772-FJ768906.

  20. HBV reactivation in patients with HCV/HBV cirrhosis on treatment with direct-acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, V; Ferraro, D; Licata, A; Bavetta, M G; Petta, S; Bronte, F; Colomba, G; Craxì, A; Di Marco, V

    2018-01-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) hepatitis and overt or occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection may reactivate HBV when HCV is suppressed or cleared by direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). We assessed the prevalence of overt or previous HBV coinfection and the risk of HBV reactivation in patients with HCV cirrhosis treated with DAAs. This was a retrospective cohort of 104 consecutive patients with HCV cirrhosis treated with DAAs. Serum HCV-RNA and HBV-DNA were tested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of DAAs therapy and at week 12 of follow-up. At the start of DAAs, eight patients (7.7%) were HBsAg positive/HBeAg negative with undetectable HBV-DNA and low levels of quantitative HBsAg (four on nucleos(t)ide analogues [NUCs] and four inactive carriers), 37 patients (35.6%) had markers of previous HBV infection (25 anti-HBc positive, 12 anti-HBc/anti-HBs positive) and 59 (56.7%) had no evidence of HBV infection. Sixty-seven patients (64.4%) were HCV-RNA negative at week 4 and 98 (94.2%) achieved sustained virological response. All four HBsAg-positive patients treated with NUCs remained HBV-DNA negative, but three of four untreated patients showed an increase in HBV-DNA of 2-3 log without a biochemical flare and achieved HBV-DNA suppression when given NUCs. During or after DAAs, by conventional assay, HBV-DNA remained not detectable in all 37 anti-HBc-positive patients but in three of them (8.1%) HBV-DNA became detectable with a highly sensitive PCR. HBV reactivation is likely to occur in untreated HBV/HCV-coinfected cirrhotic patients when they undergo HCV treatment with DAAs. Pre-emptive therapy with NUCs should be considered in this setting. Anti-HBc-positive patients rarely reactivate HBV without clinical or virological outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Robust hepatitis C genotype 3a cell culture releasing adapted intergenotypic 3a/2a (S52/JFH1) viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, J.M.; Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Hoegh, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Recently, full viral life cycle hepatitis C virus (HCV) cell culture systems were developed for strain JFH1 (genotype 2a) and an intragenotypic 2a/2a genome (J6/JFH). We aimed at exploiting the unique JFH1 replication characteristics to develop culture systems for genotype 3a......, which has a high prevalence worldwide. METHODS: Huh7.5 cells were transfected with RNA transcripts of an intergenotypic 3a/JFH1 recombinant with core, E1, E2, p7, and NS2 of the 3a reference strain S52, and released viruses were passaged. Cultures were examined for HCV core and/or NS5A expression...... (immunostaining), HCV RNA titers (real-time PCR), and infectivity titers (50% tissue culture infectious dose). The role of mutations identified by sequencing of recovered S52/JFH1 viruses was analyzed by reverse genetics studies. RESULTS: S52/JFH1 and J6/JFH viruses passaged in Huh7.5 cells showed comparable...

  2. Evidence of intratypic recombination in natural populations of hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colina, R.; Garcia-Aguirre, L.; Cristina, J.; Casane, D.; Vasquez, S.; Khan, Baldip

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has high genomic variability and, since its discovery, at least six different types and an increasing number of subtypes have been reported. Genotype 1 is the most prevalent genotype found in South America. In the present study, three different genomic regions (5 UTR, core and NS5B) of four HCV strains isolated from Peruvian patients were sequenced in order to investigate the congruence of HCV genotyping for these three genomic regions. Phylogenetic analysis using 5 UTR-core sequences found strain PE22 to be related to subtype 1a. To test the possibility of genetic recombination, phylogenetic studies were carried out, revealing that a crossover event had taken place in the NS5B protein. We discuss the consequences of this observation on HCV genotype classification, laboratory diagnosis and treatment of HCV infection

  3. Frequency of hepatitis C viral RNA in anti-hepatitis C virus non-reactive blood donors with normal alanine aminotransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.; Moinuddin, A.; Ahmed, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of HCV RNA in an anti-HCV non-reactive blood donor population with normal ALT, and its cost effectiveness. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Baqai Institute of Haematology, Baqai Medical University, Karachi, and Combined Military Hospital, Malir Cantt, Karachi, from May 2006 to April 2008. Methodology: After initial interview and mini-medical examination, demographic data of blood donors was recorded, and anti-HCV, HBsAg and HIV were screened by third generation ELISA. Those reactive to anti-HCV, HbsAg and/or HIV were excluded. Four hundred consecutive donors with ALT within the reference range of 15-41 units/L were included in study. HCV RNA RT-PCR was performed on 5 sample mini-pools using Bio-Rad Real time PCR equipment. Results: All 400 donors were male, with mean age 27 years SD + 6.2. ALT of blood donors varied between 15-41 U/L with mean of 31.5+6.4 U/L, HCV RNA was detected in 2/400 (0.5%) blood donors. Screening one blood bag for HCV RNA costs Rs 4,000.00 equivalent to 50 US dollars, while screening through 5 sample mini-pools was Rs. 800.00 equivalent to approximately 10 US dollars. Conclusion: HCV RNA frequency was 0.5% (2/400) in the studied anti-HCV non-reactive normal ALT blood donors. Screening through mini-pools is more cost-effective. (author)

  4. Sequencing of the Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Jacka

    Full Text Available Since the identification of hepatitis C virus (HCV, viral sequencing has been important in understanding HCV classification, epidemiology, evolution, transmission clustering, treatment response and natural history. The length and diversity of the HCV genome has resulted in analysis of certain regions of the virus, however there has been little standardisation of protocols. This systematic review was undertaken to map the location and frequency of sequencing on the HCV genome in peer reviewed publications, with the aim to produce a database of sequencing primers and amplicons to inform future research. Medline and Scopus databases were searched for English language publications based on keyword/MeSH terms related to sequence analysis (9 terms or HCV (3 terms, plus "primer" as a general search term. Exclusion criteria included non-HCV research, review articles, duplicate records, and incomplete description of HCV sequencing methods. The PCR primer locations of accepted publications were noted, and purpose of sequencing was determined. A total of 450 studies were accepted from the 2099 identified, with 629 HCV sequencing amplicons identified and mapped on the HCV genome. The most commonly sequenced region was the HVR-1 region, often utilised for studies of natural history, clustering/transmission, evolution and treatment response. Studies related to genotyping/classification or epidemiology of HCV genotype generally targete