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  1. Prevalence of mixed hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes among recently diagnosed dialysis patients with HCV infection

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    Mohammed A Al Balwi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is considered a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease that may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of multiple (mixed HCV genotypes in Saudi patients recently diagnosed with HCV infection and their association with various clinical risk factors. We examined a total of 1,292 newly diagnosed HCV-positive cases between January 2006 and July 2009 at the Molecular Pathology Laboratory, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh. The clinical and laboratory data of the study patients were collected. The HCV-RNA viral load and its genotyping were carried out with RT-PCR technology to assist in the follow-up and management of HCV-infected patients undergoing antiviral therapy. Twenty-two patients (1.7% were found to have mixed HCV genotypes; of them, mixed genotypes associated with genotype-4 were seen in 19 patients (86%, mixed genotypes associated with genotype-1 were found in 68.4%, with genotype-3 in 26.3% and with genotype-2 in 5.3%. Additionally, mixed genotypes associated with genotype-1 were seen in three cases (13.6%; they were associated with genotype-2 in two (66.7% and with genotype-5 in one patient (33.3%. In conclusion, the prevalence rate of mixed HCV genotypes in the cohort of the newly infected Saudi patients was 1.7%, with genotype-4 being the most frequent genotype encountered.

  2. Presence of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in HCV serum negative patients during interferon and ribavirin therapy.

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    Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Wysocki, Jacek; Pernak, Monika; Nowicka, Karina; Zawada, Mariola; Rembowska, Jolanta; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Mańkowski, Przemysław; Nowak, Jerzy

    2007-02-01

    Identification of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA in blood serum is crucial for hepatitis C diagnosis and for appropriate treatment. Detection of HCV-RNA in blood serum is used for therapy monitoring of patients with hepatitis C. Despite HCV-RNA elimination from blood serum during treatment in some patients, HCV viremia appears again after the completion of therapy. The aim of this study was to assess HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of hepatitis C patients in relation to HCV-RNA and antibodies to HCV in the serum. The study involved 71 patients undergoing anti-viral therapy (interferon and ribavirin). RNA isolated from serum and PBMCs was examined for the presence of HCV-RNA by an RT-PCR technique using specific oligonucleotide primers or by commercially available kits. In order to show the possible presence of HCV sequences in PBMCs, molecular DNA probes were constructed with a PCR amplicon and biotin-labelled by nick translation, and FISH and extended chromatin fibers in situ hybridization (ECFs-FISH) techniques were used. A 24-month follow-up study revealed that 34 out of 59 patients (58%) eliminated HCV-RNA from their sera. In the serum negative group, HCV-RNA was detected in PBMCs of 2 patients. The presence of HCV-RNA in PBMCs was confirmed by the FISH technique. In the ECFs-FISH procedure, no signal was found in all examined patients. Our data suggest that PBMCs infected with HCV can serve as a virus reservoir. HCV-RNA serum negative patients who have HCV-RNA in their leukocytes after completion of anti-viral therapy would be at great risk of hepatitis C recurrence. These HCV-RNA serum negative but PBMCs positive patients would be a potential source of HCV spread.

  3. Undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA during syphilis infection in two HIV/HCV-co-infected patients

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    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Knudsen, Andreas; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, elicits a vigorous immune response in the infected host. This study sought to describe the impact of syphilis infection on hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. METHODS: Patients...... with chronic HIV/HCV and syphilis co-infection were identified by their treating physicians from 1 October 2010 to 31 December 2013. Stored plasma samples obtained before, during, and after syphilis infection were analysed for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF......-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 kDa (IP-10). RESULTS: Undetectable HCV RNA at the time of early latent syphilis infection was observed in 2 patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. After treatment of the syphilis infection, HCV RNA levels increased again in patient 1, whereas...

  4. Detection of HCV-RNA in saliva of patients with chronic hepatitis C.

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    Couzigou, P; Richard, L; Dumas, F; Schouler, L; Fleury, H

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have provided conflicting results on the presence of hepatitis C virus-RNA in saliva. In this study, 23 (62%) of 37 patients tested positive for hepatitis C virus-RNA in saliva, using polymerase chain reaction analysis. A slightly greater proportion had a sporadic rather than a parenteral origin of chronic hepatitis C. These results provide a biological basis for saliva as a possible source of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but do not necessarily imply transmission by thi...

  5. Identification of Variants of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Entry Factors in Patients Highly Exposed to HCV but Remaining Uninfected: An ANRS Case-Control Study.

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    Fouquet, Baptiste; Ghosn, Jade; Quertainmont, Yann; Salmon, Dominique; Rioux, Christophe; Duvivier, Claudine; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Misrahi, Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes persistent infection in 75% of cases and is a major public health problem worldwide. More than 92% of intravenous drug users (IDU) infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are seropositive for HCV, and it is conceivable that some HIV-1-infected IDU who remain uninfected by HCV may be genetically resistant.Here we conducted a case-control study to identify mutations in HCV entry coreceptors in HIV-infected IDU who remained uninfected by HCV. We recruited 138 patients, comprising 22 HIV+ HCV- case IDU and 116 HIV+ HCV+ control IDU. We focused on coreceptors in which point mutations are known to abolish HCV infectivity in vitro. Our previous study of the Claudin-1 gene revealed no specific variants in the same case population. Here we performed direct genomic sequencing of the Claudin-6, Claudin-9, Occludin and Scavenger receptor-B1 (SCARB1) gene coding regions. Most HIV+ HCV- IDU had no mutations in HCV coreceptors. However, two HIV+ HCV- patients harbored a total of four specific mutations/variants of HCV entry factors that were not found in the HIV+ HCV+ controls. One case patient harbored heterozygous variants of both Claudin-6 and Occludin, and the other case patient harbored two heterozygous variants of SCARB1. This suggests that HCV resistance might involve complex genetic events and factors other than coreceptors, a situation similar to that reported for HIV-1 resistance.

  6. Identification of Variants of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Entry Factors in Patients Highly Exposed to HCV but Remaining Uninfected: An ANRS Case-Control Study.

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    Baptiste Fouquet

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV causes persistent infection in 75% of cases and is a major public health problem worldwide. More than 92% of intravenous drug users (IDU infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 are seropositive for HCV, and it is conceivable that some HIV-1-infected IDU who remain uninfected by HCV may be genetically resistant.Here we conducted a case-control study to identify mutations in HCV entry coreceptors in HIV-infected IDU who remained uninfected by HCV. We recruited 138 patients, comprising 22 HIV+ HCV- case IDU and 116 HIV+ HCV+ control IDU. We focused on coreceptors in which point mutations are known to abolish HCV infectivity in vitro. Our previous study of the Claudin-1 gene revealed no specific variants in the same case population. Here we performed direct genomic sequencing of the Claudin-6, Claudin-9, Occludin and Scavenger receptor-B1 (SCARB1 gene coding regions. Most HIV+ HCV- IDU had no mutations in HCV coreceptors. However, two HIV+ HCV- patients harbored a total of four specific mutations/variants of HCV entry factors that were not found in the HIV+ HCV+ controls. One case patient harbored heterozygous variants of both Claudin-6 and Occludin, and the other case patient harbored two heterozygous variants of SCARB1. This suggests that HCV resistance might involve complex genetic events and factors other than coreceptors, a situation similar to that reported for HIV-1 resistance.

  7. Claudin-6 and Occludin Natural Variants Found in a Patient Highly Exposed but Not Infected with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Do Not Confer HCV Resistance In Vitro.

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    Lucie Fénéant

    Full Text Available The clinical course of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is highly variable between infected individual hosts: up to 80% of acutely HCV infected patients develop a chronic infection while 20% clear infection spontaneously. Spontaneous clearance of HCV infection can be predicted by several factors, including symptomatic acute infection, favorable IFNL3 polymorphisms and gender. In our study, we explored the possibility that variants in HCV cell entry factors might be involved in resistance to HCV infection. In a same case patient highly exposed but not infected by HCV, we previously identified one mutation in claudin-6 (CLDN6 and a rare variant in occludin (OCLN, two tight junction proteins involved in HCV entry into hepatocytes. Here, we conducted an extensive functional study to characterize the ability of these two natural variants to prevent HCV entry. We used lentiviral vectors to express Wildtype or mutated CLDN6 and OCLN in different cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. HCV infection was then investigated using cell culture produced HCV particles (HCVcc as well as HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp expressing envelope proteins from different genotypes. Our results show that variants of CLDN6 and OCLN expressed separately or in combination did not affect HCV infection nor cell-to-cell transmission. Hence, our study highlights the complexity of HCV resistance mechanisms supporting the fact that this process probably not primarily involves HCV entry factors and that other unknown host factors may be implicated.

  8. Claudin-6 and Occludin Natural Variants Found in a Patient Highly Exposed but Not Infected with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Do Not Confer HCV Resistance In Vitro.

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    Fénéant, Lucie; Ghosn, Jade; Fouquet, Baptiste; Helle, François; Belouzard, Sandrine; Vausselin, Thibaut; Séron, Karin; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Dubuisson, Jean; Misrahi, Micheline; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is highly variable between infected individual hosts: up to 80% of acutely HCV infected patients develop a chronic infection while 20% clear infection spontaneously. Spontaneous clearance of HCV infection can be predicted by several factors, including symptomatic acute infection, favorable IFNL3 polymorphisms and gender. In our study, we explored the possibility that variants in HCV cell entry factors might be involved in resistance to HCV infection. In a same case patient highly exposed but not infected by HCV, we previously identified one mutation in claudin-6 (CLDN6) and a rare variant in occludin (OCLN), two tight junction proteins involved in HCV entry into hepatocytes. Here, we conducted an extensive functional study to characterize the ability of these two natural variants to prevent HCV entry. We used lentiviral vectors to express Wildtype or mutated CLDN6 and OCLN in different cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. HCV infection was then investigated using cell culture produced HCV particles (HCVcc) as well as HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) expressing envelope proteins from different genotypes. Our results show that variants of CLDN6 and OCLN expressed separately or in combination did not affect HCV infection nor cell-to-cell transmission. Hence, our study highlights the complexity of HCV resistance mechanisms supporting the fact that this process probably not primarily involves HCV entry factors and that other unknown host factors may be implicated.

  9. Detection of HCV RNA in saliva does not correlate with salivary flow or xerostomia in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

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    de Mattos Camargo Grossmann, Soraya; Teixeira, Rosângela; de Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; do Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in saliva and its possible association with xerostomia and hyposalivation in patients with chronic hepatitis C. One hundred and thirty-six patients with confirmed diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C were prospectively analyzed before HCV treatment. The prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation was clinically evaluated. HCV RNA was investigated in saliva samples by qualitative PCR test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to verify associations. Xerostomia was reported by 48 (35.3%) patients, whereas hyposalivation was observed in 26 (19.1%). HCV RNA was positive in the saliva of 53 (39.0%) patients. An association among HCV RNA-positive saliva with xerostomia or hyposalivation was not observed. Our results demonstrate that the detection of HCV in saliva does not correlate with salivary flow or xerostomia in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of hepatitis non-treatment causes in a cohort of HCV and HCV/HIV infected patients

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    Karen Pereira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The decision to start hepatitis C virus (HCV treatment and its timing remains controversial. As new treatment regimens are approved, it is essential to identify patients eligible for each regimen in a timed and tailored approach. This study aims to identify the reasons to defer treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection in both HCV and HCV/HIV infected patients. Materials and Methods: Retrospective observational study of a cohort of HCV chronically infected patients with or without HIV infection, followed in an infectious disease clinic in Lisbon. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical, immunologic and virologic data were collected. Statistical analysis was performed with Microsoft Office®- Excel 2012. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, t-test, Chi-square and correlation analysis were performed for a significant p value<0.05. Results: The study included 669 patients, 225 patients infected with HCV (group A and 444 patients co-infected with HCV/HIV (group B. The comparative analysis of those groups (A vs. B showed: mean age was 49.4 years versus 46.9 (p<0.01, mean time since HCV diagnosis was 9.5 versus 14.6 years (p=0.558 both groups shared a male predominance and HCV acquisition due to intravenous drug use. Regarding genotype characterization, the predominant was 1a in both groups (p<0.01. Evaluation of IL28B polymorphism revealed CC 15.5% (A versus 9.45% (B (p<0.01. Group B mean TCD4 count was 585 cells/µL (mean percentage 27.1%. There was spontaneous viral clearance in 10.7% (A versus 4.1% (B (p<0.01. There were treated 52.0% (A versus 32.2% (B patients (p<0.01. For the untreated ones (107 – group A vs 270 – group B, no reason was identified for treatment deferral in 32.5% (A versus 48.0% (B patients. The most frequent reasons for deferring treatment were: withdrawal to follow-up (33.7%, active staging of disease (7.2%, alcohol abuse (6.0% and advanced age (6.0% in group A versus low TCD4 cell count (17.1%, loss to follow-up (7.5%, poor

  11. [Prevalence of response to anti-HBV infection in patients on maintenance hemodialysis infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV)].

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    Muszytowski, M; Manitius, J; Ruszkiewicz-Fołda, M

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the antibody response to hepatitis B vaccine in 42 hemodialysis patients; 8 of them were diagnosed as having HCV infection before vaccination. Hemodialysis patients received four doses of recombinant HB vaccine (Engerix-B, SKB, 40 micrograms per dose). Seroconversion occurred in 71.4% of all hemodialysis patients; in 79.4% of HCV-negative and in 37.5% of HCV-positive patients. Effective immunity (anti-HBs titer higher than 100 m IU/ml) was observed in 12.5% of HCV positive and in 35.3% of HCV-negative patients. We conclude that HCV infection may modify or postpone the response to hepatitis B vaccine.

  12. [Antigenicity of hepatitis C virus F protein and serum prevalence of anti-F in HCV-infected patients].

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    Shao, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Wen-Bin; Yu, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2006-12-01

    To examine the antigenicity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) F protein and investigate serum prevalence of anti-F in HCV-infected patients. Eleven pairs of overlapping primers were used to synthesize the full-length HCV f gene, from which the truncated HCV f65 gene fragment was amplified by PCR. HCV f65 gene was then cloned into pET32a(+), and transformed into E. coli strain Plyss (DE3). This recombinant E.coli was induced by IPTG for the production of HCV F65 protein. The expressed HCV F65 protein, purified by Ni-NTA agarose, was further used in ELISA to detect serum anti-F, and to immunize rabbits for making polyclonal anti-F. The rabbit polyclonal anti-F was purified by Staphylococcus aureus protein A agarose. After recombinant pET32a(+)-f65 was constructed successfully, HCV F65 protein was expressed and purified. The purified HCV F65 protein was used as a capture antigen in ELISA to detect serum anti-F in HCV infected patients (n = 30). The result showed that the mean A450 value and the positive rate of serum anti-F were 0.125+/-0.061 and 63.3%, respectively. The rabbit-derived polyclonal anti-F reacted specifically with HCV F65 protein, of which the titer was 1:30,000. Our expressed HCV F65 protein is of antigenicity, and can be used to determine serum anti-F. Anti-F IgG does exist in the sera of the HCV-infected patients. Moreover, the rabbit-derived polyclonal anti-F can be used to detect HCV F protein.

  13. Serum Islet Cell Autoantibodies During Interferon α Treatment in Patients With HCV-Genotype 4 Chronic Hepatitis

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    Gamal Badra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide and HCV genotype 4 (HCV4 is predominant in African and Middle Eastern countries. It is well established that interferon-α (IFNa treatment for HCV may trigger serum autoantibodies against pancreatic islet cells (ICA in a subgroup of patients. Available data on the incidence of ICA during IFNa therapy for chronic HCV4 infection are not conclusive. We investigated the appearance of ICA in 40 naïve Egyptian patients (38 males, 32 ± 6 years with histologically defined chronic HCV4 infection undergoing IFNa treatment at a dose of 9-million U/week for 24 weeks. Serum samples were collected at baseline and following IFNa therapy and ICA were detected using indirect immunofluorescence. Baseline evaluation indicated that 2/40 (5% patients had detectable serum ICA. After the completion of the treatment scheme, 12/38 (32% previously ICA negative patients became ICA positive; however, no patient developed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT or diabetes during follow-up. In conclusion, we submit that IFNa treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC may induce serum ICA in one-third of Egyptian patients with HCV4. These autoantibodies, however, do not lead to alterations in glucose metabolism.

  14. Identification of Genotype 2 HCV in Serotype-1 Hepatitis C Patients Unresponsive to Daclatasvir plus Asunaprevir Treatment.

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    Inoue, Jun; Kanno, Atsushi; Wakui, Yuta; Miura, Masahito; Kobayashi, Tomoo; Morosawa, Tatsuki; Kogure, Takayuki; Kakazu, Eiji; Ninomiya, Masashi; Fujisaka, Yasuyuki; Umetsu, Teruyuki; Takai, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takuya; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-01-01

    It is important to determine the genotypes or serotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients before treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), because the effects of DAAs differ among genotypes. In Japan, two tests for HCV typing are available clinically, but only serotyping, not genotyping, is approved by the public health insurance. Although most serotype-1 Japanese patients are infected with genotype 1b HCV, it is known that a small proportion of patients show different results from two typing methods. This study focused on such patients and the effectiveness of treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir (DCV/ASV) was evaluated. We analyzed 644 DCV/ASV-treated patients with serotype 1 or genotype 1b, and among them, 166 serotype-1 patients received a commercial-based direct sequencing (DS) test for resistant-associated variants of genotype 1b HCV. We found four patients (2.4%) with DS test failure, suggesting that the PCR primers targeting genotype 1b may not match. Importantly, none of the four patients achieved a sustained virological response. Our in-house DS test analyzing the 5'-untranslated region and coding regions for NS4 and NS5B of HCV showed that three of the four patients were infected with genotype 2 HCV, and one patient was infected with genotype 1a HCV. No recombinant virus of different genotypes was found. This study indicates that a subset of serotype-1 hepatitis C patients is infected with HCV of genotype 2 or 1a in Japan and that DCV/ASV is not effective for such patients. Thus, attention should be paid to DAA treatment without HCV genotyping.

  15. Spontaneous viral clearance, viral load, and genotype distribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in HIV-infected patients with anti-HCV antibodies in Europe

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    Soriano, Vincent; Mocroft, Amanda; Rockstroh, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variables influencing serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels and genotype distribution in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are not well known, nor are factors determining spontaneous clearance after exposure to HCV in this population. METHODS: All HCV...

  16. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection

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    Pil Soo Sung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  17. GB virus C (GBV-C) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-coinfected patients receiving HCV treatment: importance of the GBV-C genotype.

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    Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Blackard, Jason T; Zheng, Hui; Addo, Marylyn M; Lin, Wenyu; Robbins, Gregory K; Sherman, Kenneth E; Zdunek, Dietmar; Hess, Georg; Chung, Raymond T

    2006-08-15

    Persistent GB virus C (GBV-C) coinfection leads to slower human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression. Despite the existence of multiple GBV-C genotypes, their relevance to the progression of HIV disease is unknown. We therefore investigated (1) the prevalence and genotype of GBV-C in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-coinfected patients and (2) the impact of HCV treatment on GBV-C RNA clearance. We retrospectively studied 130 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients initiating HCV therapy. Anti-E2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR were used to detect and quantify GBV-C infection. GBV-C genotype was determined by sequencing the 5' untranslated region. GBV-C infection (past or current) was identified in 111 (85%) of the patients. Ongoing GBV-C replication was detected in 40 patients. Coinfection with GBV-C genotype 2 was associated with significantly higher CD4(+) cell counts. After 24 weeks of HCV therapy, GBV-C RNA clearance was observed in 50% of patients, although this was not associated with changes in HIV load or with CD4(+) cell counts. Sustained GBV-C RNA clearance was observed in 31% of patients with GBV-C RNA detected at baseline. GBV-C coinfection was extremely common. GBV-C RNA clearance with HCV therapy was associated with neither short-term loss of HIV control nor impaired immune status. The association of GBV-C genotype 2 with higher CD4(+) cell counts merits further study.

  18. Hepatitis C virus genotype and subtype distribution in Chinese chronic hepatitis C patients: nationwide spread of HCV genotypes 3 and 6.

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    Ju, Wei; Yang, Song; Feng, Shenghu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Shunai; Xing, Huichun; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Liying; Cheng, Jun

    2015-07-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and subtype are related to disease progression and response to antiviral therapy. Current HCV genotype and subtype distribution data, especially for genotypes 3 and 6, are limited in China. Our purpose was to investigate the current HCV genotype and subtype distributions in chronic hepatitis C patients in China. Chronic hepatitis C patients (n = 1012) were enrolled, and demographic information and possible transmission risk factors were collected. Serum samples were subjected to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, followed by direct DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the NS5B and core/E1 regions to determine HCV genotypes/subtypes. The geographical distributions of HCV genotypes/subtypes were analyzed. Demographic information and transmission risk factors were compared between different HCV genotypes/subtypes. Four genotypes and seven subtypes of HCV were detected in 970 patients. Subtypes 1b, 2a, 3a, 6a, 3b, 6n, and 1a were detected at frequencies of 71.96%, 19.90%, 3.20%, 2.16%, 1.96%, 0.41%, and 0.41%, respectively. Genotypes 3 and 6 showed an increasingly wide geographic distribution over time. Patients with subtypes 1b and 2a were older than those with 3a, 3b, 6a, and 6n subtypes (p genotype 1 and 2 patients underwent blood transfusion than those with genotype 3 (all p genotype 3 and 6 patients had a history of intravenous drug use than those with genotypes 1 and 2 (all p genotype 3 and 6 HCV infections have already spread nationwide from southern and western China.

  19. Inhibition of translation initiation factors might be the potential therapeutic targets for HCV patients with hepatic iron overload.

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    Liu, Yiping; An, Daizhi; Sun, Rubao; Jin, Lianqun; Wang, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Standard therapy, interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and ribavirin, remains the only available option for treatment of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, iron overload, a common finding among HCV patients, have a poor response to treatment with current therapy. These data suggest that both host and viral factors are involved in the determination of the outcome of the therapy. Currently, novel antiviral compounds focus on the development of indirect antiviral drugs. The process of the viral translation is considered as the potential therapeutic targets. Coincidentally, study has found that hepatic iron load enhances the levels of eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3), which is essential for HCV translation. Reversely, iron chelation could reduce eIF3 p170 translation. Our hypothesis is that iron overload may specifically enhance cellular eIFs. As a result, the cellular mechanisms, in patients with iron overload, are utilized for translating viral mRNA into protein. Thus, treatment strategies that target eIFs should be an exceptionally good candidate therapeutic method for HCV patients with hepatic iron overload. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Survey of both hepatitis B virus (HBsAg and hepatitis C virus (HCV-Ab coinfection among HIV positive patients

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    Pournia Yadollah

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV, HBVand HCV is major public health concerns. Because of shared routes of transmission, HIV-HCV coinfection and HIV-HBV coinfection are common. HIV-positive individuals are at risk of coinfection with HBV and HCV infections. The prevalence rates of coinfection with HBV and HCV in HIV-patients have been variable worldwide depending on the geographic regions, and the type of exposure. Aim This study aimed to examine HBV and HCV coinfection serologically and determine the shared and significant factors in the coinfection of HIV-positive patients. Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out on 391 HIV-positive patients including 358 males and 33 females in Lorestan province, west Iran, to survey coinfection with HBsAg and anti-HCV. The retrospective demographic data of the subjects was collected and the patients' serums were analyzed by ELISA kits including HBsAg and anti-HCV. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS software (15 and Chi-square. Fisher's exact test with 5% error intervals was used to measure the correlation of variables and infection rates. Results The results of the study indicated that the prevalence of coinfection in HIV-positive patients with hepatitis viruses was 94.4% (370 in 391, out of whom 57 (14.5% cases were HBsAg positive, 282 (72% cases were anti-HCV positive, and 31 (7.9% cases were both HBsAg and anti-HCV positive. Conclusion There was a significant correlation between coinfection with HCV and HBV and/or both among HIV-positive patients depending on different variables including sex, age, occupation, marital status, exposure to risk factors.(p

  1. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in saliva samples from patients with seric anti-HCV antibodies

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    Patrícia L. Gonçalves

    Full Text Available We examined the frequency of HCV-RNA in saliva samples from anti-HCV positive patients. Both plasma and saliva samples from 39 HCV patients (13 with normal liver enzymes, 19 with abnormal liver enzymes and 13 with cirrhosis were investigated. Stimulated saliva and fresh plasma were centrifuged (900 x g,10 min and stored at -70ºC, after the addition of guanidine isothiocyanate RNA extraction buffer. HCV-RNA was detected by RT- nested-PCR (amplification of HCV-cDNA for two rounds, using HCV primers 939/209 and 940/211. HCV genotyping was carried out by RFLP (using Mva I and Hinf 1 or Hae III and Rsa I restriction enzymes. Thirty-two out of 39 (82%; 95% CI=70-94% anti-HCV-positive patients had HCV-RNA in plasma samples. Eight out of 39 (20.5%; 95% CI=6.6-34.4% had HCV-RNA in the saliva. The HCV genotype in saliva samples from these patients matched the genotype found for plasma HCV-RNA. No significant correlation between the presence of HCV and either age, gender, HCV genotype or any risk factor for HCV infection was found. The observed prevalence (20.5% of anti HCV positive patients or 25% of the patients with HCV-RNA in plasma was lower than that previously reported from other countries. The low frequency of HCV-RNA in saliva samples observed in our study may be due to the use of cell-free saliva. Other authors reporting higher frequencies of HCV-RNA in saliva used whole saliva, without centrifugation.

  2. Why don't we treat chronic hepatitis C in HIV patients? Results from a cohort of HIV-HCV coinfected patients from the southeast of Spain

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    C Smilg Nicolás

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: To know the different reasons why we decide not to treat or to delay the antiviral treatment against HCV in HIV coinfected patients. Methods: Prospective cohort of HIV and HCV coinfected patients, followed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Santa Lucia Universitary Hospital (Cartagena, Spain between 1/12/2011 and 28/02/2012 in which we made transitory elastography. We evaluated the main reasons that moved us to decide not to treat or to delay the antiviral treatment against HCV: social-familiar-laboral reasons; neuro-psychiatric severe diseases; patient decision; low grade hepatic fibrosis; previous failure to pegylated interferon (IFN and ribavirin (RBV in no-1 genotype patients; delay in the approval of the triple therapy with INF-RBV and a protease inhibitor (boceprevir or telaprevir by the Regional Sanitary Authority; active alcohol abuse; active diseases that contraindicate the antiviral treatment, incomplete study of HCV (VL of HCV, genotype, ILB28, abdominal ecography; previous intolerance against IFN-RBV and severe thrombocytopenia (<50×109/L. Summary of results: The cohort included 109 patients, being 27 of them females (25% and 82 males (75%, with a median of age of 45.8 years (SD: 6.2. In 98 patients (90% we decided not to treat or to delay the antiviral treatment against HCV for one or more of the following reasons: 37 (34% presented low grade hepatic fibrosis (<9.5 kpascal or F0-F2; 19 (17% had neuro-psychiatric diseases; 18 (16.5% were waiting for the approval of triple therapy by the Regional Sanitary Authority; 10 (9.2% did not want to be treated; 10 (9.2% had failure to IFN-RBV in no-1 genotype; 6 (5.5% had social-familiar-laboral reasons; 6 (5.5% presented active severe diseases; 4 (3.7% were waiting to complete HCV study; 3 (2.8% presented active alcohol abuse; 3 (2.8% had previous intolerance against IFN-RBV treatment and 2 (2% had severe thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: In our cohort of HIV-HCV

  3. Etiology of hepatitis G virus (HGV) and hepatitis type C virus (HCV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis G virus (HGV) and hepatitis type C virus (HCV) may implicate malignant lymphoma including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) for inducing the proliferative process of lymphocytes. In this study, the molecular and serologic prevalence of HGV and HCV infections was evaluated in patients with NHL and compared ...

  4. The history of hepatitis C virus (HCV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 permitted basic research to unravel critical components of a complex life cycle for this important human pathogen. HCV is a highly divergent group of viruses classified in 7 major genotypes and a great number of subtypes, and circulating in infected...

  5. Psychiatric and substance use disorders in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients: does HCV clearance matter? [Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales (ANRS) HEPAVIH CO13 cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, L; Lions, C; Winnock, M; Lang, J-P; Loko, M-A; Rosenthal, E; Marchou, B; Valantin, M-A; Morlat, P; Roux, P; Sogni, P; Spire, B; Poizot-Martin, I; Lacombe, K; Lascoux-Combe, C; Duvivier, C; Neau, D; Dabis, F; Salmon-Ceron, D; Carrieri, M P

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this nested study was to assess the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in a sample of HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients according to their HCV status. The nested cross-sectional study, untitled HEPAVIH-Psy survey, was performed in a subset of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients enrolled in the French Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales (ANRS) CO13 HEPAVIH cohort. Psychiatric disorders were screened for using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI 5.0.0). Among the 286 patients enrolled in the study, 68 (24%) had never received HCV treatment, 87 (30%) were treatment nonresponders, 44 (15%) were currently being treated and 87 (30%) had a sustained virological response (SVR). Of the 286 patients enrolled, 121 patients (42%) screened positive for a psychiatric disorder other than suicidality and alcohol/drug abuse/dependence, 40 (14%) screened positive for alcohol abuse/dependence, 50 (18%) screened positive for drug abuse/dependence, 50 (17.5%) were receiving an antidepressant treatment and 69 (24%) were receiving an anxiolytic. Patients with an SVR did not significantly differ from the other groups in terms of psychiatric disorders. Patients receiving HCV treatment screened positive less often for an anxiety disorder. The highest rate of drug dependence/abuse was among HCV treatment-naïve patients. Psychiatric disorders were frequent in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients and their rates were comparable between groups, even for patients achieving an SVR. Our results emphasize the need for continuous assessment and care of coinfected patients, even after HCV clearance. Drug addiction remains an obstacle to access to HCV treatment. Despite the recent advent and continued development of directly acting antiviral agents (DAAs), it is still crucial to offer screening and comprehensive care for psychiatric and addictive disorders. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  6. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-10 HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in Kadun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the distribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and subtypes among blood donors and outpatients attendees positive for antibody to HCV (anti-HCV). Justification: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) continues to be a major disease burden on the world and Man is the only known natural host of Hepatitis C ...

  8. CD3(+)CD56(+) Natural Killer-Like T Cells Display Anti-HCV Activity but Are Functionally Impaired in HIV(+) Patients With Acute Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokordelis, Pavlos; Krämer, Benjamin; Boesecke, Christoph; Voigt, Esther; Ingiliz, Patrick; Glässner, Andreas; Wolter, Franziska; Srassburg, Christian P; Spengler, Ulrich; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Nattermann, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the role of CD3(+)CD56(+) natural killer (NK)-like T cells in HIV(+) patients with acute hepatitis C. Frequency, phenotype, and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity of CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T cells were studied in 36 HIV(+) patients with acute hepatitis C. As controls, 12 patients with chronic HCV/HIV coinfection, 8 HIV monoinfected patients, and 12 healthy donors were enrolled in this study. CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T-cell-mediated inhibition of HCV replication was analyzed using the HuH7A2HCVreplicon model. The CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T-cell phenotype and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion were studied by flow cytometry. Interleukin 12/interleukin 15 stimulated CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T cells from healthy donors effectively block HCV replication in vitro in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Accordingly, we found that blocking of IFN-γ with a specific antibody significantly reduced the antiviral activity of CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T cells. However, when CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T cells from HIV(+) patients were studied, we found HIV infection to be associated with a significantly impaired IFN-γ production, irrespective of HCV coinfection. Accordingly, CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T cells from HIV(+) patients were significantly less effective in blocking HCV replication in vitro than cells from healthy individuals. Taken together, our data indicate that HIV infection is associated with an impaired anti-HCV activity of CD3(+)CD56(+) NK-like T cells, which might represent a novel mechanism of dysregulated immune response in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.

  9. Effects of different anti-HIV therapies on progression of hepatitis C in HCV/HIV-coinfected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Hongqing

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the effect of protease inhibitors (PIs- or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs-based therapy on the progression of hepatitis C in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection. MethodsA total of 273 patients initially diagnosed with HCV/HIV coinfection were enrolled and divided into PIs group (n=135 and NNRTIs group (n=138 to receive PIs-based therapy and NNRTIs-based therapy, respectively, for one year. Laboratory indices, such as HCV RNA, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (TBil, albumin (Alb, laminin (LN, cholyglycine (CG, type III procollagen (PCIII, type IV collagen (CIV, prothrombin activity (PTA, and cholinesterase (CHE, were quantified before and after treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS 11.5 software; enumeration data were analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and non-normal data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. ResultsAfter the end of treatment, PTA, CHE, TBil, Alb, ALT, AST, CG, and LN levels were significantly higher in NNRTIs group than in PIs [PTA: 77% (67%-109% vs 68% (56%-91%; CHE: 6717.00 U/L (5951.00-7622.00 U/L vs 586200 U/L (4392.00-8539.25 U/L; TBil: 10.95 μmol/L (8.10-14.32 μmol/L vs 8.60 μmol/L (8.00-9.50 μmol/L; Alb: 43.90 mmol/L (39.65-48.20 mmol/L vs 38.90 mmol/L (36.00-45.00 mmol/L; ALT: 52.50 U/L (30.00-93.50 U/L vs 36.20 U/L (30.30-40.40 U/L; AST: 49.00 U/L (33.00-80.00 U/L vs 31.30 U/L (29.70-38.70 U/L; CG: 16.78 μg/ml (3.26-29.32 μg/ml vs 3.26 μg/ml (102-688 μg/ml; LN: 34.40 ng/ml (16.71-46.54 ng/ml vs 34.05 ng/ml (33.42-64.33 ng/ml; P<0.01 or P<0.05]. ConclusionNNRTIs-based therapy can accelerate the progression of hepatitis C in HCV/HIV-coinfected patients.

  10. Effect of hepatitis C treatment on CD4+ T-cell counts and the risk of death in HIV-HCV-coinfected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars

    2012-01-01

    treatment. RESULTS: In total, 780/6,433 (12%) HIV-HCV-coinfected patients initiated HCV treatment (interferon [IFN] and ribavirin n=692, IFN alone n=88). CD4(+) T-cell counts decreased during the first 12 weeks of treatment (P... for comparing HCV-treated with -untreated individuals was 0.72 (95% CI 0.43, 1.21). The estimated hazard ratio for liver-related death was 0.57 (95% CI 0.21, 1.55). CONCLUSIONS: Despite its effect in reducing CD4(+) T-cell counts, the effect of HCV treatment on mortality was in the direction of benefit and our......BACKGROUND: The short- and long-term effects of anti-hepatitis C treatment on mortality in the HIV-HCV-coinfected population have not been evaluated in observational cohorts. Such evaluations must use methods that allow for time-varying prognostic factors that both predict treatment...

  11. PD-1 expression on peripheral CD8+ TEM/TEMRA subsets closely correlated with HCV viral load in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weidong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight correlation between host circulating CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response and control of viral replication is classical characteristic of long-term HCV infection. CD8+ T cell maturation/activation markers are expected to be associated with viral replication and disease progression in chronic HCV infection. The aim of the present study was to explore novel markers on CD8+ T cells with ability to evaluate HCV viral replication and disease progression. Methods PBMCs were isolated from 37 chronic HCV-infected patients and 17 healthy controls. Distributed pattern of CD8+ T cells subsets and expression of PD-1, CD38, HLA-DR and CD127 were analyzed by flow cytometry. The correlation between expression of surface markers and HCV viral load or ALT was studied. Results Declined naïve and increased TEMRA CD8+ T subsets were found in HCV-infected individuals compared with healthy controls. Percentage and MFI of PD-1, CD38 and HLA-DR on all CD8+ T cell subsets were higher in HCV-infected patients than healthy controls. In contrast, CD127 expression on CD8+ TCM showed an opposite trend as PD-1, CD38 and HLA-DR did. In chronic HCV infection, MFI of PD-1 on CD8+ TEM (p Conclusion PD-1 level on peripheral CD8+ TEM/TEMRA was highly correlated with HCV viral load in chronic HCV-infected patients, which made PD-1 a novel indicator to evaluate HCV replication and disease progression in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  12. Xerostomia, hyposalivation and sialadenitis in patients with chronic hepatitis C are not associated with the detection of HCV RNA in saliva or salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Soraya de Mattos Camargo; Teixeira, Rosângela; Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa de; Gleber-Netto, Frederico Omar; Araújo, Flávio Marcos Gomes; Araújo, Filipe Maia; Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira do

    2010-11-01

    Salivary gland disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) have been considered oral extrahepatic manifestations, reinforcing the hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a sialotropic virus. Hence, the authors investigated the prevalence of HCV RNA in saliva and salivary glands and its possible association with xerostomia, hyposalivation and sialadenitis in patients with CHC. In 65 patients with confirmed CHC, the HCV RNA was investigated by nested RT-PCR in saliva samples and minor salivary glands. Xerostomia, hyposalivation, clinical and histopathological evidence of sialadenitis were also evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to verify associations. HCV RNA was detected in the saliva of 26/65 (40.0%) patients and in 12/65 (18.5%) salivary glands. Xerostomia was reported by 23/65 (35.4%) patients, and hyposalivation was diagnosed in 13/65 (20.0%) patients. Sialadenitis was confirmed by histopathological features in 31/65 (47.7%) patients. Twelve (38.7%) of the 31 patients with sialadenitis presented HCV RNA in saliva and 2/31 (6.5%) in salivary glands. No associations were found between xerostomia, hyposalivation or sialadenitis and the detection of HCV RNA in saliva or in salivary glands. Although xerostomia, hyposalivation and sialadenitis are frequent findings in CHC patients, our study did not confirm the association between the detection of HCV RNA in saliva or salivary glands with these salivary gland disorders. However, an indirect role of HCV by immune-mediated virus mechanisms in the pathogenesis of salivary gland disorders in this group of patients cannot be ruled out.

  13. The International development of PROQOL-HCV: An instrument to assess the health-related quality of life of patients treated for Hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew Richard; Herrmann, Susan Elizabeth; Chassany, Olivier; Lalanne, Christophe; Da Silva, Mariliza Henrique; Galano, Eliana; Carrieri, Patrizia M; Estellon, Vincent; Sogni, Philippe; Duracinsky, Martin

    2016-08-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) compromises Health-related Quality of Life (HRQL) with detriments to Physical, Mental and Social health domains. Treatment with interferon and ribavirin is associated with side effects which further impair HRQL. New treatments appear potent, effective and tolerable. However, Patient Reported Outcomes instruments that capture the impact on HRQL for people with hepatitis C are largely non-specific and will be needed in the new treatment era. Therefore, we developed a conceptually valid multidimensional model of HCV-specific quality of life and pilot survey instrument, the Patient Reported Outcome Quality of Life survey for HCV (PROQOL-HCV). HCV patients from France (n = 30), Brazil (n = 20) and Australia (n = 20) were interviewed to investigate HCV-HRQL issues raised in the scientific literature and by treatment specialists. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and translated into English and French. Fifteen content dimensions were derived from the qualitative analysis, refined and fitted to four domains: (1) Physical Health included: fatigue, pain, sleep, sexual impairment and physical activity; (2) Mental Health: psychological distress, psychosocial impact, and cognition; (3) Social Health: support, stigma, social activity, substance use; (4) TREATMENT: management, side effects, and fear of treatment failure. The impact of some dimensions extended beyond their primary domain including: physical activity, cognition, sleep, sexual impairment, and the three treatment dimensions. A bank of 300 items was constructed to reflect patient reports and, following expert review, reduced to a 72-item pilot questionnaire. We present a conceptually valid multidimensional model of HCV-specific quality of life and the pilot survey instrument, PROQOL-HCV. The model is widely inclusive of the experience of hepatitis C and the first to include the treatment dimension.

  14. Long-Term Consequences of Hepatitis C Viral Clearance on the CD4 (+ T Cell Lymphocyte Course in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dazley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term impact of pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin treatment outcome on CD4 T cell course in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus is largely unclear in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HCV-RNA clearance by standard anti-HCV therapy on long-term CD4 cells recovery in HIV/HCV patients on successful combined antiretroviral therapy. We retrospectively enrolled HIV/HCV-coinfected patients on HIV medications and treated for hepatitis C. CD4 + T cell counts were registered at baseline and after hepatitis C therapy. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of CD4 + T cell change following the anti-HCV treatment outcome. Of the 116 patients enrolled, 54 (46.6% reached a sustained virological response. During a follow-up of 24 months, the SVR group showed a mean annual increase in CD4 + T cell from baseline of 84 cells/ll at 1 year and of a further 38 cells/ll within the second year (P=0.01, 0.001, resp.. An insignificant mean increase of 77 cells/ll occurred in the non-SVR group within month 24 (P=0.06. Variables associated with greater CD4 gains were higher nadir, lower preinterferon CD4 counts, and lower body mass index (BMI.

  15. The International development of PROQOL-HCV: An instrument to assess the health-related quality of life of patients treated for Hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Andrew Richard; Herrmann, Susan Elizabeth; Chassany, Olivier; Lalanne, Christophe; Da Silva, Mariliza Henrique; Galano,Eliana; Carrieri, Patrizia M.; Estellon, Vincent; Sogni, Philippe; Duracinsky, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) compromises Health-related Quality of Life (HRQL) with detriments to Physical, Mental and Social health domains. Treatment with interferon and ribavirin is associated with side effects which further impair HRQL. New treatments appear potent, effective and tolerable. However, Patient Reported Outcomes instruments that capture the impact on HRQL for people with hepatitis C are largely non-specific and will be needed in the new treatment era. Therefore, we deve...

  16. seroprevalence of hav, hbv, hcv, and hev among acute hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-30

    00100, Nairobi, J. Ngaira, Jomo Kenyatta. University of ... (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and hepatitis E virus .... analysis was carried out using SPSS 11.5 computer software.

  17. Investigation of viral escape mutations within HCV p7 during treatment with amantadine in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermehren, Annika; Welsch, Christoph; Elsler, Ulrike; Vermehren, Johannes; Herrmann, Eva; Sarrazin, Christoph; von Wagner, Michael; Susser, Simone; Hofmann, Wolf Peter; Kronenberger, Bernd; Zeuzem, Stefan; Mihm, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Combination of several direct-acting antiviral agents will be necessary to overcome viral resistance in interferon-free treatment regimens for chronic HCV infection. HCV p7 inhibitors may be part of such combination regimens. Understanding why amantadine, despite showing inhibition of HCV p7 in vitro, appears ineffective in clinical trials, may help in the design of novel HCV p7 inhibitors. So far it is unknown whether viral escape mutations within HCV p7 explain the ineffectiveness of amantadine in vivo. Pretreatment HCV p7 was directly sequenced in 157 consecutive patients with chronic HCV genotype 1b infection who had been treated with amantadine/placebo plus pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN)-α2a/ribavirin within a multicentre clinical trial. Triple therapy was preceded by 2 weeks of amantadine/placebo monotherapy. In nine patients, clonal sequencing was performed at baseline and after 2 weeks of amantadine/placebo monotherapy. Changes of the relative frequency of amino acid substitutions by ≥20% between pretreatment and week 2 of monotherapy were considered potential resistance mutations if they were only found in patients receiving amantadine but not in patients receiving placebo. Seven substitutions fulfilling these criteria were identified in the subset of patients with clonal sequencing. However, none of these substitutions were associated with treatment outcome in the complete cohort of patients receiving triple therapy with amantadine. Potential viral escape mutations within HCV p7 do not seem to play a major role for treatment response to antiviral therapy with amantadine and PEG-IFN-α2a/ribavirin in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1b infection.

  18. Detection limit of architect hepatitis C core antigen assay in correlation with HCV RNA, and renewed confirmation algorithm for reactive anti-HCV samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottiger, Cornelia; Gygli, Nicole; Huber, Andreas R

    2013-11-01

    hepatitis C infections are detected by anti-HCV screening tests. Reactive anti-HCV results give no information about the presence or absence of hepatitis C viruses, or of unspecific reactivity. To obtain information about the viral load, HCV RNA measurements, following a reactive anti-HCV result, are performed in well equipped and specialised laboratories. Anti-HCV immunoblots are the only means to exclude non specific reactivity. The measurement of HCV core antigen (HCV-Ag), as an alternative to HCV RNA, is discussed, as it can be analysed on the same instrument as anti-HCV. The detection limit of HCV-Ag is crucial to use it in lieu of HCV RNA, in regard of the different genotypes. A renewed algorithm is proposed to exclude unspecific reactivity of anti-HCV. Samples were tested on Architect i2000SR (Abbott) for anti-HCV and HCV-Ag. HCV RNA measurements were obtained by Cobas Ampliprep/Taqman (Roche) or m2000rt(®) (Abbott). Comparison between HCV-Ag and HCV RNA from 126 samples of 101 patients with chronic hepatitis C gave linear regression R(2) 0.89, slope 0.885 and intercept -2.258, which were independent of the genotypes. The detection limit of HCV-Ag was between 2.4 and 4.5 Log(10)IU/mL. A renewed algorithm for confirmation of reactive anti-HCV results is proposed: active or resolved hepatitis C infections or false reactivity can be differentiated by sequenced reflex testing due to HCV-Ag, anti-HCV immunoblot and HCV RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Naturally Occurring Resistance-Associated Variants to Hepatitis C Virus Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents in Treatment-Naive HCV Genotype 6a-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanyi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs antiviral therapy has drastically improved the prognosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV patients. However, the viral drug resistance-associated variants (RAVs can limit the efficacy of DAAs. For the HCV-6a is not the predominant prevalent genotype; the data on the prevalence of naturally occurring RAVs in it is scarce. Our study aims to assess the prevalence of RAVs in treatment-naive HCV-6a patients. Methods. Nested PCR assays were performed on 95 HCV-6a patients to amplify HCV viral regions of NS3, NS5A, and NS5B. Results. In NS3/4A region, we detected Q80K in 95.5% isolates (84/88 and D168E in 2.3% isolates (2/88. In NS5A region, we detected Q30R in 93.2% isolates (82/88, L31M in 4.6% isolates (4/88, and H58P in 6.8% isolates (6/88. In NS5B region, we detected A15G in 2.3% isolates (2/88, S96T in 1.1% isolates (1/88, and S282T in 20.7% isolates (17/88 and we detected I482L in 100% isolates (4/4, V494A in 50% isolates (2/4, and V499A in 100% isolates (4/4. Conclusions. RAVs to DAAs preexist in treatment-naive HCV-6a patients. Further studies should address the issue of the impact of RAVs in response to DAA therapies for HCV-6a patients.

  20. Raltegravir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine in an HIV-Infected patient with HCV chronic hepatitis, NNRTI intolerance and protease inhibitors-induced severe liver Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortu F

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background in HIV-infected patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis, liver impairment and drug toxicity may substantially reduce the number of possible therapeutic options. Case Description we here describe the case of an HCV-HIV coinfected woman who had repeated severe episodes of drug-related liver toxicity with indinavir, saquinavir, fosamprenavir, and darunavir, with minimal further therapeutic options left in this class. Previous treatment-limiting side effects with efavirenz and nevirapine also precluded use of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Introduction of an integrase-inhibitor regimen based on raltegravir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine allowed a prompt achievement of undetectable viral load and a substantial rise of CD4 count to high levels, with no subsequent episodes of hepatic toxicity, and no other side effects. Conclusions given the relatively common prevalence of HCV-related chronic hepatitis among people with HIV, raltegravir might represent an important alternative option for a substantial number of patients who cannot be treated with protease inhibitors or NNRTI because of drug-related hepatic toxicity.

  1. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co-infected pa......The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-infected patients (HCV genotype 1 (n = 16), 2 (n = 2), and 3 (n = 3)). Lower baseline IP-10 was significantly associated with a rapid decline in HCV RNA, in particular with the first phase reduction, and similar cut-off levels ( 600 pg/ml) as in HCV mono-infected patients apply. In conclusion, baseline IP......-10 therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  2. Strategies to manage hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedemeyer, H; Duberg, A S; Buti, M

    2014-01-01

    and (ii) increasing efficacy and treatment rate. This analysis suggests that successful diagnosis and treatment of a small proportion of patients can contribute significantly to the reduction of disease burden in the countries studied. The largest reduction in HCV-related morbidity and mortality occurs......The number of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections is projected to decline while those with advanced liver disease will increase. A modeling approach was used to forecast two treatment scenarios: (i) the impact of increased treatment efficacy while keeping the number of treated patients constant...

  3. [Benefits of a preventive psychiatric accompaniment in patients Hepatitis C Virus seropositive (HCV): prospective study concerning 39 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J-Ph; Meyer, N; Doffoel, M

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis C represents a major public health challenge due to its chronic evolution and major complications (eg liver tumor and cirrhosis). New treatment strategies (interferon pégylé +/- ribavirine) have recently improved the prognosis except in case of poor compliance. Psychiatric comorbidity, especially affective disorders, is commonly associated with hepatitis C and constitutes the main cause of poor compliance, therapeutic discontinuations and treatment contra-indication. At this moment of new therapeutic protocols and the possibility of curing HCV infections, it is of utmost importance to widen antiviral treatment in many indications, to upgrade compliance, and to limit therapeutic discontinuations. In this context, where anxious and depressive disorders are the main reasons for failure in curing, it is necessary to anticipate the appearance of these troubles within an earlier multidisciplinary taking in charge. The primary aim of our study is to emphasize the utility of a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric evaluation, preventive follow-up and preventive treatment. The secondary objective is to show that a previous story of depression or use of drugs should not be considered as an insuperable contra-indication provoding the implementation of a specific follow-up. Thirty nine interferon treated patients were included in a prospective study. Our data confirm the high rate (28%) of Major Depressive Disorders among the population of hepatitis C treated patients in a preventive follow-up. A previous story of alcoholism, of suicide attempt or break off treatment with Major Depressive disorders might be predictive of such a complication. According to the subjective feeling of these patients with previous break'off treatment associated, specific psychiatric follow-up may improve tolerance for the treatment. 39 patients (17 men and 22 women) accepted, on (or after) the non-systematic proposal of their hepatologist, to consult the psychiatrist of the

  4. Quantitation of HCV RNA in liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C Quantificação do RNA-HCV no fígado de pacientes com hepatite C crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de Lôurdes Candolo MARTINELLI

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims - Liver HCV RNA has been quantitated in few studies and the feasibility and the role of this parameter in the evaluation of patients with chronic HCV hepatitis still warrant study. Our aim was to determine the concentrations of HCV RNA in the liver of chronic HCV patients and to correlate the results with serum viral load. We also studied the relation of levels of HCV RNA in the liver with serum aminotransferases levels and with the presence of cirrhosis. Methods - Twenty patients (14 males, aged 28 to 61 years were studied. Twelve were infected by HCV type 1, six by type 3 and one by type 5. Percutaneous liver biopsy samples were obtained from 14 patients, and the remainder from liver explant in patients undergoing OLT. Twelve had chronic hepatitis and eight cirrhosis. HCV RNA levels were determined by bDNA. Results - HCV RNA levels below the detection limit were found in one liver and in five serum samples. HCV RNA (mean ± SD was 2.1 x 10(8 ± 2.2 x 10(8Eq/gm in the liver and 94 x 10(5 ± 93 x 10(5Eq/mL in serum, with a significant correlation between these values (r = 0.89; P Introdução/Objetivos - Poucos estudos avaliam a quantificação do RNA-HCV no fígado, portanto a praticabilidade e a aplicação desse parâmetro na avaliação de pacientes com hepatite C crônica ainda não estão definidas. O objetivo foi determinar as concentrações do RNA-HCV no fígado de pacientes com infecção crônica pelo vírus C da hepatite e correlacionar os resultados com a carga viral do soro. Foram também estudadas a relação dos níveis de RNA-HCV no fígado com os de aminotransferases no soro e com a presença de cirrose. Métodos - Foram estudados 20 pacientes (14 homens, 28 a 61 anos. A genotipagem do vírus da hepatite C revelou: tipo 1 (12 pacientes, tipo 3 (6 pacientes , tipo 5 (1 paciente. Amostras de fígado foram obtidas por via percutânea em 14 pacientes e de explantes de fígado de pacientes submetidos a transplante em

  5. Occult HCV infection: an unexpected finding in a population unselected for hepatic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Marco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Occult Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a new pathological entity characterized by presence of liver disease and absence or very low levels of detectable HCV-RNA in serum. Abnormal values of liver enzymes and presence of replicative HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells are also observed. Aim of the study was to evaluate occult HCV occurrence in a population unselected for hepatic disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We chose from previous epidemiological studies three series of subjects (n = 276, age range 40-65 years unselected for hepatic disease. These subjects were tested for the presence of HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA in plasma and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by using commercial systems. All subjects tested negative for HCV antibodies and plasma HCV-RNA and showed normal levels of liver enzymes; 9/276 patients (3.3% were positive for HCV-RNA in PBMCs, identifying a subset of subjects with potential occult HCV infection. We could determine the HCV type for 8 of the 9 patients finding type 1a (3 patients, type 1b (2 patients, and type 2a (3 patients. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show evidence that occult HCV infection may occur in a population unselected for hepatic disease. A potential risk of HCV infection spread by subjects harbouring occult HCV infection should be considered. Design of prospective studies focusing on the frequency of infection in the general population and on the clinical evolution of occult HCV infection will be needed to verify this unexpected finding.

  6. Role of Non-hepatic Medical Comorbidity and Functional Limitations in Predicting Mortality in Patients with HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Yamini; White, Donna L; El-Serag, Hashem B; Ramsey, David; Richardson, Peter; Kuzniarek, Jill; Shukla, Richa; Tansel, Aylin; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2017-01-01

    Medical comorbidities and functional status limitations are determinants of mortality in many chronic diseases. The extent to which survival in the rapidly aging cohort of patients with HCV is affected by these competing causes of mortality remains unclear. We sought to determine the effect of medical/functional comorbidities on survival after adjusting for liver disease severity in a cohort of patients with HCV infection. We prospectively recruited consecutive patients from an HCV clinic 2009-2014. We calculated an index of survival (Schonberg Index, SI) based on age, gender, medical comorbidities, and functional status variables. We defined cirrhosis with the FibroSure test (F3/4-F4). We used multivariable Cox modeling to assess association between functional/survival measure and survival after adjustment for severity of liver disease. The cohort consisted of 1052 HCV patients. The average age was 56.8 years; 36 % had cirrhosis. The mean SI was 8.2 (SD = 2.7). During a mean follow-up of 5610 person-years, 102 (9.7 %) patients died. In unadjusted analysis, higher baseline SI predicted mortality (HR 1.17; 95 % CI 1.09-1.25). SI similarly predicted mortality in cirrhotic patients (HR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.13-1.34) and non-cirrhotic patients (HR 1.21, 95 % CI 1.08-1.36). This did not change after adjusting for age, drug use, or coronary artery disease. Comorbidities and functional limitations predict higher mortality in patients with HCV; this relationship is independent of cirrhosis. Use of general prognostic indices may help identify HCV patients at high risk for mortality, which could further guide clinical care in a manner not achievable with assessment of liver disease alone.

  7. Liver histology in co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and Hepatitis G virus (HGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STRAUSS Edna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As little is known about liver histology in the co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis G virus (HGV, HGV RNA was investigated in 46 blood donors with hepatitis C, 22 of them with liver biopsy: co-infection HCV / HGV (n = 6 and HCV isolated infection (n = 16. Besides staging and grading of inflammation at portal, peri-portal and lobular areas (Brazilian Consensus, the fibrosis progression index was also calculated. All patients had no symptoms or signs of liver disease and prevalence of HGV / HCV co-infection was 15.2%. Most patients had mild liver disease and fibrosis progression index, calculated only in patients with known duration of infection, was 0.110 for co-infection and 0.130 for isolated HCV infection, characterizing these patients as "slow fibrosers". No statistical differences could be found between the groups, although a lesser degree of inflammation was always present in co-infection. In conclusion co-infection HCV / HGV does not induce a more aggressive liver disease, supporting the hypothesis that HGV is not pathogenic.

  8. Cloning and expression of NS3 helicase fragment of hepatitis C virus and the study of its immunoreactivity in HCV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrou Sadri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Hepatitis C is a major cause of liver failure worldwide. Current therapies applied for this disease are not fully effective and produce side effects in most cases. Non-structural protein 3 helicase (NS3 of HCV is one of the key enzymes in viral replication and infection. Therefore, this region is a promising target to design new drugs and therapies against HCV infection. The aim of this study was cloning and expression of HCV NS3 helicase fragment in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 using pET102/D-TOPO expression vector and studying immunoreactivity of the expressed antigen in Iranian infected with hepatitis C. Materials and Methods: The viral RNA was extracted from the serum of HCV infected patient. The NS3 helicase region was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR product was directionally cloned into the expression vector pET102/D-TOPO and transformed into the BL21 strain of E. coli (DE3. The transformed bacteria were then induced by adding 1mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG into the culture medium to enhance the protein expression. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were carried out to identify the protein under investigation, and finally purified recombinant fusion protein was used as the antigen for ELISA method. Results: Theinsertion of theDNA fragment of the NS3 regioninto the expression vectorwas further confirmed by PCR and sequencing. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the successful expression of the recombinant protein of interest. Furthermore, immunoreactivity of fusion NS3 helicase was confirmed by ELISA and western blotting. Conclusion: It seems that this recombinant protein could be a useful source of antigen for future studies on HCV diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, E; Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Edlin, B; Gallien, S; Klinker, H; Boesecke, C; Kokordelis, P; Rockstroh, J K

    2017-07-01

    Studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels remain stable over time in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), while spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA during the persistent infection phase has been documented only rarely among those with the CC interleukin (IL)-28B genotype. This study describes HCV RNA profiles and factors associated with changes over time in HCV RNA levels in the ESPRIT study. HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals positive for HCV RNA were included in the study. Follow-up was counted from the first HCV RNA positive test and censored at the initiation of interferon-based treatment. HCV RNA and IL-28B measurements were performed in the same reference laboratory. Random effects mixed models were used to analyse changes over time in HCV RNA. A total of 312 ESPRIT patients were included in the study (151 in the arm receiving subcutaneous recombinant IL-2 and 161 in the control arm). Most of the patients were white (89%) and male (76%), and they had a median of 5 HCV RNA measurements per person [interquartile range (IQR) 3-6; range 1-9]. Median follow-up was 5 years (IQR: 2-6 years). At baseline, 96% of patients were taking cART and 93% had undetectable HIV RNA. Mean HCV RNA levels decreased by 13% per year over the study period [95% confidence interval (CI) 8-18%; P < 0.0001]. Baseline HCV RNA levels and the change over time in HCV RNA did not differ by randomization arm (P = 0.16 and P = 0.56, respectively). Nine individuals spontaneously cleared HCV RNA during follow-up [IL-28B genotypes: CC, five patients (56%); CT, four patients (44%)]. HCV RNA levels decreased over time in this population with well-controlled HIV infection. Spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA was documented in five individuals with IL-28B genotype CC and four with the CT genotype. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  10. hcv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    ABSTRACT. Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health concern. The aim of this study was to ascertain the seroprevalence and risk factors of HCV antibodies among pregnant women in Anyigba, Kogi State North Central Nigeria. Materials and methods:Blood samples (5mls) were collected from ...

  11. Hepatic steatosis progresses faster in HIV mono-infected than HIV/HCV co-infected patients and is associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembroke, Thomas; Deschenes, Marc; Lebouché, Bertrand; Benmassaoud, Amine; Sewitch, Maida; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Halme, Alex; Vuille-Lessard, Elise; Pexos, Costa; Klein, Marina B; Sebastiani, Giada

    2017-10-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) seems common in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the relative effect of HIV, as well as hepatitis C virus (HCV) in those co-infected, and the influence of HS on liver fibrosis progression are unclear. The LIVEr disease in HIV (LIVEHIV) is a Canadian prospective cohort study using transient elastography and associated controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) to screen for HS and liver fibrosis, in unselected HIV-infected adults. HS progression was defined as development of any grade HS (CAP ⩾248dB/m), or transition to severe HS (CAP >292dB/m), for those with any grade HS at baseline. Fibrosis progression was defined as development of significant liver fibrosis (liver stiffness measurement [LSM] >7.1kPa), or transition to cirrhosis (LSM >12.5kPa) for those with significant liver fibrosis at baseline. Cox regression analysis was used to assess predictors of HS and fibrosis progression. A prospective cohort study was conducted, which included 726 HIV-infected patients (22.7% HCV co-infected). Prevalence of any grade HS did not differ between HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected patients (36.1% vs. 38.6%, respectively). 313 patients were followed for a median of 15.4 (interquartile range 8.5-23.0) months. The rate of HS progression was 37.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 29.2-49.0) and 21.9 (95% CI 15.6-30.7) per 100 person-years in HIV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection, respectively. HCV co-infection was an independent negative predictor of HS progression (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.50, 95% CI 0.28-0.89). HS predicted liver fibrosis progression in HIV mono-infection (aHR 4.18, 95% CI 1.21-14.5), but not in HIV/HCV co-infection. HS progresses faster and is associated with liver fibrosis progression in HIV mono-infection but not in HIV/HCV co-infection. Lay summary: Fatty liver is the most frequent liver disease in Western countries. People living with HIV seem at high risk of fatty liver due to

  12. The Irish paradigm on the natural progression of hepatitis C virus infection: an investigation in a homogeneous patient population infected with HCV 1b (review).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Liam J

    2012-02-03

    The aetiological agent of chronic hepatitis C is the hepatitis C virus. The hepatitis C virus is spread by parenteral transmission of body fluids, primarily blood or blood products. In 1989, after more than a decade of research, HCV was isolated and characterised. The hepatitis C viral genome is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA molecule approximately 9.4 kb in length, which encodes a polyprotein of about 3100 amino acids. There are 6 main genotypes of HCV, each further stratified by subtype. In 1994, a cohort of women was identified in Ireland as having been iatrogenically exposed to the hepatitis C virus. The women were all young and exposed as a consequence of the receipt of HCV 1b contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin. The source of the infection was identified as an acutely infected female. As part of a voluntary serological screening programme involving 62,667 people, 704 individuals were identified as seropositive for exposure to the hepatitis C virus; 55.4% were found to be positive for the viral genome 17 years after exposure. Of these women 98% had evidence of inflammation, but surprisingly, a remarkable 49% showed no evidence of fibrosis. Clinicopathology and virological analysis has identified associations between viral load and the histological activity index for inflammation, and, between inflammation and levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase. Infection at a younger age appears to protect individuals from progression to advanced liver disease. Molecular analyses of host immunogenetic elements shows that particular class II human leukocyte associated antigen alleles are associated with clearance of the hepatitis C virus. Additional class II alleles have been identified that are associated with stable viraemia over an extended period of patient follow-up. Although, investigation of large untreated homogeneous cohorts is likely to become more difficult, as the efficacy of anti-viral therapy improves, further investigation of host and viral

  13. Antiretroviral Effects on Host Lipoproteins Are Associated With Changes in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Levels in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/HCV Coinfected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggie, Susanna; Patel, Keyur; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chow, Shein-Chung; Johnson, Victoria; Guyton, John R.; Muir, Andrew J.; Sulkowski, Mark; Hicks, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of antiretroviral-induced dyslipidemia on hepatitis C virus (HCV) biogenesis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfected patients. This study used serum samples from antiretroviral-naive HIV/HCV patients initiating their first regimen as part of AIDS Clinical Trials Group study protocols (A5142, A5202). Initiation of antiretrovirals increased most lipoproteins and apolipoproteins. In the multivariable model, changes in apolipoproteins were associated with changes in log10 HCV RNA from baseline to week-24 of therapy. Off-target lipogenic changes need to be considered in the context of liver and other metabolic disease in HIV/HCV patients. PMID:26110167

  14. Hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 subtype identification in new HCV drug development and future clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Chevaliez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the development of new specific inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV enzymes and functions that may yield different antiviral responses and resistance profiles according to the HCV subtype, correct HCV genotype 1 subtype identification is mandatory in clinical trials for stratification and interpretation purposes and will likely become necessary in future clinical practice. The goal of this study was to identify the appropriate molecular tool(s for accurate HCV genotype 1 subtype determination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large cohort of 500 treatment-naïve patients eligible for HCV drug trials and infected with either subtype 1a or 1b was studied. Methods based on the sole analysis of the 5' non-coding region (5'NCR by sequence analysis or reverse hybridization failed to correctly identify HCV subtype 1a in 22.8%-29.5% of cases, and HCV subtype 1b in 9.5%-8.7% of cases. Natural polymorphisms at positions 107, 204 and/or 243 were responsible for mis-subtyping with these methods. A real-time PCR method using genotype- and subtype-specific primers and probes located in both the 5'NCR and the NS5B-coding region failed to correctly identify HCV genotype 1 subtype in approximately 10% of cases. The second-generation line probe assay, a reverse hybridization assay that uses probes targeting both the 5'NCR and core-coding region, correctly identified HCV subtypes 1a and 1b in more than 99% of cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the context of new HCV drug development, HCV genotyping methods based on the exclusive analysis of the 5'NCR should be avoided. The second-generation line probe assay is currently the best commercial assay for determination of HCV genotype 1 subtypes 1a and 1b in clinical trials and practice.

  15. Immune Responses to HCV and Other Hepatitis Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Hyung; Rehermann, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Summary Five human hepatitis viruses cause most acute and chronic liver disease worldwide. Over the past 25 years hepatitis C virus (HCV) in particular has received much interest because of its ability to persist in most immunocompetent adults and the lack of a protective vaccine. Here we examine innate and adaptive immune responses to HCV infection. Although HCV activates an innate immune response, it employs an elaborate set of mechanisms to evade interferon (IFN)-based antiviral immunity. By comparing innate and adaptive immune responses to HCV with those to hepatitis A and B viruses, we suggest that prolonged innate immune activation impairs the development of successful adaptive immune responses. Comparative immunology furthermore provides insights into the maintenance of immune protection. We conclude by discussing prospects for an HCV vaccine and future research needs for the hepatitis viruses. PMID:24439265

  16. High rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence in HIV-infected individuals with spontaneous HCV RNA clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Soriano, V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Following resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, recurrence has been shown to occur in some persons with repeated exposure to HCV. We aimed to investigate the rate and factors associated with HCV RNA recurrence among HIV-1-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA...... clearance in the EuroSIDA cohort. METHODS: All HIV-infected patients with documented prior spontaneous HCV clearance, and at least one subsequently collected plasma sample, were examined. The last sample was tested for HCV RNA and those with HCV RNA ≥ 615 IU/mL were defined as having HCV recurrence...... (IDUs). The median time between the first and last samples was 3.6 years (interquartile range 2.0-5.8 years). After adjustment, those on combination antiretroviral therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.44; 95% CI 0.20-0.99; P = 0.046] and older persons (OR 0.51 per 10 years older; 95% CI 0.28-0.95; P = 0.033) were...

  17. Exosomes from Hepatitis C Infected Patients Transmit HCV Infection and Contain Replication Competent Viral RNA in Complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodys, Karen; Bala, Shashi; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies targeting receptor-mediated entry of HCV into hepatocytes confer limited therapeutic benefits. Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells; however, their role in HCV infection remains obscure. Here, we show that exosomes isolated from sera of chronic HCV infected patients or supernatants of J6/JFH1-HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells contained HCV RNA. These exosomes could mediate viral receptor-independent transmission of HCV to hepatocytes. Negative sense HCV RNA, indicative of replication competent viral RNA, was present in exosomes of all HCV infected treatment non-responders and some treatment-naïve individuals. Remarkably, HCV RNA was associated with Ago2, HSP90 and miR-122 in exosomes isolated from HCV-infected individuals or HCV-infected Huh7.5 cell supernatants. Exosome-loading with a miR-122 inhibitor, or inhibition of HSP90, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and proton pumps, significantly suppressed exosome-mediated HCV transmission to naïve cells. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for HCV transmission by blood-derived exosomes and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:25275643

  18. Exosomes from hepatitis C infected patients transmit HCV infection and contain replication competent viral RNA in complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukong, Terence N; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kodys, Karen; Bala, Shashi; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies targeting receptor-mediated entry of HCV into hepatocytes confer limited therapeutic benefits. Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells; however, their role in HCV infection remains obscure. Here, we show that exosomes isolated from sera of chronic HCV infected patients or supernatants of J6/JFH1-HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells contained HCV RNA. These exosomes could mediate viral receptor-independent transmission of HCV to hepatocytes. Negative sense HCV RNA, indicative of replication competent viral RNA, was present in exosomes of all HCV infected treatment non-responders and some treatment-naïve individuals. Remarkably, HCV RNA was associated with Ago2, HSP90 and miR-122 in exosomes isolated from HCV-infected individuals or HCV-infected Huh7.5 cell supernatants. Exosome-loading with a miR-122 inhibitor, or inhibition of HSP90, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and proton pumps, significantly suppressed exosome-mediated HCV transmission to naïve cells. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for HCV transmission by blood-derived exosomes and highlight potential therapeutic strategies.

  19. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antibodies in pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health concern. The aim of this study was to ascertain the seroprevalence and risk factors of HCV antibodies among pregnant women in Anyigba, Kogi State North Central Nigeria. Materials and methods:Blood samples (5mls) were collected from one hundred ...

  20. Historical epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in selected countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruggmann, P; Berg, T; Øvrehus, A L H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading indicator for liver disease. New treatment options are becoming available, and there is a need to characterize the epidemiology and disease burden of HCV. Data for prevalence, viremia, genotype, diagnosis and treatment were obtained thro...

  1. Efficient infectious cell culture systems of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) prototype strains HCV-1 and H77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Mikkelsen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The first discovered and sequenced hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and the first in vivo infectious HCV clones originated from the HCV prototype strains HCV-1 and H77, respectively, both widely used in research of this important human pathogen. In the present study, we developed...... efficiently after transfection and subsequent infection of naive Huh7.5 cells, reaching titers of 10(3.5) and 10(4.4) FFU/ml, respectively. IMPORTANCE: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered in 1989 with the cloning of the prototype strain HCV-1 genome. In 1997, two molecular clones of H77, the other HCV...

  2. Liver Fibrosis in HCV Monoinfected and HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients: Dysregulation of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and Their Tissue Inhibitors TIMPs and Effect of HCV Protease Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latronico, Tiziana; Mascia, Claudia; Pati, Ilaria; Zuccala, Paola; Mengoni, Fabio; Marocco, Raffaella; Tieghi, Tiziana; Belvisi, Valeria; Lichtner, Miriam; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2016-03-26

    An imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) may contribute to liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C (HCV) infection. We measured the circulating levels of different MMPs and TIMPs in HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients and evaluated the potential for anti-HCV therapy to modulate MMP and TIMP levels in HCV subjects. We analyzed 83 plasma samples from 16 HCV monoinfected patients undergoing dual or triple anti-HCV therapy, 15 HIV/HCV coinfected patients with undetectable HIV load, and 10 healthy donors (HD). Levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were measured by a SearchLight Multiplex Immunoassay Kit. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were the highest expressed MMPs among all the analyzed samples and their levels significantly increased in HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected subjects compared to HD. TIMP-1 levels were significantly higher in HCV and HIV/HCV subjects compared to HD and were correlated with liver stiffness. These findings raise the possibility of using circulating TIMP-1 as a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis in HCV infection. A longitudinal study demonstrated that MMP-9 levels significantly decreased (40% reduction from baseline) in patients receiving dual as well as triple direct-acting antivirals (DAA) anti-HCV therapy, which had no effect on MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2. As the dysregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 may reflect inflammatory processes in the liver, the decrease of MMP-9 following HCV protease inhibitor treatment suggests a positive effect on the reduction of liver inflammation.

  3. Proteome analysis of liver cells expressing a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon and biopsy specimens of posttransplantation liver from HCV-infected patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacobs, J. M.; Diamond, D. L.; Chan, E. Y.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Qian, W.; Šťastná, Miroslava; Baas, T.; Camp II, D. G .H.; Carithers Jr., R. L.; Smith, R. D.; Katze, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 12 (2005), s. 7558-7569 ISSN 0022-538X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : proteome analysis * hepatitis C Virus * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.178, year: 2005

  4. Activation of extrinsic apoptosis pathway in HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients, irrespective of liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuth, Thijs; Van Baarle, Debbie; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Van Erpecum, Karel J; Siersema, Peter D; Arends, Joop E

    2014-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased levels of peripheral T cell apoptosis. We aimed to study whether T cell apoptosis markers indicate pathways that may contribute to clinical progression in HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Activation of the extrinsic apoptosis pathways was measured by levels of death receptor Fas, initiator caspase 8 and effector caspases 3 and 7 activity and Annexin V binding on peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells of HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients, as well as healthy controls and HIV-infected, hepatitis B virus-infected and primary biliary cirrhosis disease controls. Association with liver fibrosis was assessed by biopsy or by transient elastography. HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients displayed enhanced peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cell apoptosis. Caspase 8 activity was highest in HIV-HCV coinfection, without enhanced downstream activity of caspases 3 and 7. Level of peripheral T cell apoptosis was independent of liver fibrosis or other disease parameters in all disease groups. The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is upregulated in HCV monoinfection and HIV-HCV coinfection, but this is independent of liver disease severity.

  5. The Case of anti-HCV Negative Chronic Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Rossina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives a brief literary reference relating to contemporary aspects of serological diagnosis of hepatitis C, and understands a clinical example of chronic hepatitis C in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with the absence of circulating antibodies to HCV classes M, and G for almost 2 years.

  6. Stability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels among interferon-naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals treated with combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grint, D; Peters, L; Reekie, J; Soriano, V; Kirk, O; Knysz, B; Suetnov, O; Lazzarin, A; Ledergerber, B; Rockstroh, J K; Mocroft, A

    2013-07-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals. Mixed models were used to analyse the natural history of HCV RNA changes over time in HIV-positive patients with chronic HCV infection. A total of 1541 individuals, predominantly White (91%), male (73%), from southern (35%) and western central Europe (23%) and with HCV genotype 1 (58%), were included in the analysis. The median follow-up time was 5.0 years [interquartile range (IQR) 2.8 to 8.3 years]. Among patients not on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HCV RNA levels increased by a mean 27.6% per year [95% confidence interval (CI) 6.1-53.5%; P = 0.0098]. Among patients receiving cART, HCV RNA levels were stable, increasing by a mean 2.6% per year (95% CI -1.1 to 6.5%; P = 0.17). Baseline HCV RNA levels were 25.5% higher (95% CI 8.8 to 39.1%; P = 0.0044) in individuals with HCV genotype 1 compared with HCV genotypes 2, 3 and 4. A 1 log HIV-1 RNA copies/mL increase in HIV RNA was associated with a 10.9% increase (95% CI 2.3 to 20.2%; P = 0.012) in HCV RNA. While HCV RNA levels increased significantly in patients prior to receiving cART, among those treated with cART HCV RNA levels remained stable over time. © 2013 British HIV Association.

  7. Effect of HCV Core Antigen and RNA Clearance during Therapy with Direct Acting Antivirals on Hepatic Stiffness Measured with Shear Wave Elastography in Patients with Chronic Viral Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Łucejko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess a combination of novel measures of therapeutic success in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC infection, we evaluated liver stiffness (LS with shear wave elastography and hepatitis C virus core antigen (HCVcAg concentrations. We followed 34 patients during and after treatment with direct acting antivirals. All patients achieved a sustained virologic and serologic response and a significant increase of albumin levels. Decreases of alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP level were observed during the treatment and follow-up period. A significant decrease in LS was observed between baseline, end of treatment (EOT, and at 24- and 96-week post-treatment follow-up. LS decline between EOT and 96-week follow-up (FU96 was observed in 79% of patients. Significant LS changes were seen in patients with advanced fibrosis, particularly in cirrhotics and in patients with ALT exceeding 100 IU/mL. There was a positive correlation between ALT activity and LS changes at the baseline versus FU96. A negative correlation was demonstrated between individual HCVcAg baseline concentrations and reduction of LS at the baseline versus FU96. In conclusion, we observed that LS significantly declined during and after antiviral treatment. It was accompanied by improvement in some liver function measures, and disappearance of both HCVcAg and HCV ribonucleic acid (HCV RNA.

  8. Multicenter evaluation of the Elecsys® anti-HCV II assay for the diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Juan I; van Helden, Josef; Alborino, Flora; Bürgisser, Philippe; Cellerai, Cristina; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Eiras, Adolfo; Rodriguez, Maria I; Ghisetti, Valeria; Gleich, Michael; Imdahl, Roland; Kaiser, Claudia; Möller, Petra; Wetlitzky, Olaf; Segovia, Manuel; Schennach, Harald; Mühlbacher, Annelies

    2013-08-01

    Routine screening of patients at risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a priority given recent improvements in therapeutic options and the asymptomatic nature of most chronic infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay, a new qualitative antibody immunoassay, compared with currently available assays, and assess its suitability for routine diagnostic testing. The sensitivity of the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II, ARCHITECT® Anti-HCV, AxSYM® HCV 3.0, PRISM® HCV, Vitros® ECi Anti-HCV, Elecsys® Anti-HCV, and ADVIA Centaur® HCV assays was compared using commercially available seroconversion panels and samples from patients known to be HCV positive and infected with HCV genotypes 1-6. Specificity was investigated using samples from blood donors, unselected hospitalized patients, and patients with potential cross-reacting factors or from high-risk groups. The Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay detected more positive bleeds than the comparator assays, was more sensitive in recognizing early HCV infection, and correctly identified all 765 samples known to be HCV positive, regardless of genotype. The overall specificity of the Elecsys(®) Anti-HCV II assay was 99.84% (n=6,850) using blood donor samples, 99.66% (n=3,922) using samples from unselected hospitalized patients, and 99.66% (n=2,397) using samples from patients with potentially cross-reacting factors or from high-risk groups. The specificity of the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay was superior or equal to the comparator assays. In conclusion, the Elecsys® Anti-HCV II assay is a sensitive and specific assay suitable for routine use in the reliable detection of anti-HCV antibodies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Psychometric evaluation of the hepatitis C virus patient-reported outcomes (HCV-PRO) instrument: validity, responsiveness, and identification of the minimally important difference in a phase 2 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roger T; Baran, Robert W; Erickson, Pennifer; Revicki, Dennis A; Dietz, Birgitta; Gooch, Katherine

    2014-04-01

    To describe the psychometric properties and identify the minimally important difference (MID) of the hepatitis C virus patient-reported outcomes (HCV-PRO) instrument. Chronic HCV infection and associated treatments negatively affect PROs of function and well-being. In a phase 2 trial, HCV-infected patients received direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for 12 weeks with peg-interferon/ribavirin (peg-IFN/RBV) for 48 weeks, or placebo plus peg-IFN/RBV. The HCV-PRO total score, SF-36 PCS and MCS scores, EQ-5D-3L, and EQ VAS were measured at baseline, week 8, end of DAA treatment (EODT), end of peg-IFN/RBV treatment (EOT), and posttreatment week 24 (SVR24). Convergent validity of the HCV-PRO was assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficients. Discriminant validity was assessed by analyzing mean HCV-PRO total scores by EQ-5D anxiety/depression and pain/discomfort domain scores (none vs. some) and presence/absence of depression or fatigue adverse events. MID was identified through effect size (ES) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses (HCV-PRO response vs. SF-36 PCS/MCS and EQ VAS MID thresholds). In 74 patients (22 % female; 81 % White; 51 % ≥50 years), correlations (0.64-0.96) between HCV-PRO total scores, SF-36 PCS/MCS scores, and EQ VAS scores at all time points supported convergent validity. HCV-PRO total scores were reduced to 10-30 points in patients impaired by depression, pain, or fatigue symptoms. Impact of peg-IFN/RBV regimen on HCV-PRO ES increased over time (EODT -0.76; EOT -0.93). ES and ROC curve analyses indicated an MID of -10 points. The HCV-PRO was valid and responsive in the population studied. An MID of -10 points represented a threshold of clinical significance for the HCV-PRO.

  10. The pharmacology and activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs: a review of their use as an adjuvant treatment in patients with HBV and HCV chronic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Different DNA and RNA viruses exploit common strategies to support their persistence and replication in infected individuals. In particular, the hepatitis B virus (HBV and the hepatitis C virus (HCV cause major health problems worldwide. These pathogens exert an immunosuppressive role by inducing the persistent activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and an increased synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The suppression of this proinflammatory network by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to decrease viral replication. Materials and methods: In this review, the role of inflammation in the support of viral replication and NSAIDs and ketoprofen pharmacology are briefly discussed. In addition, studies that have investigated the use of NSAIDs for the treatment of HBV and HCV chronic hepatitis, which were identified by a systematic literature search of PubMed and MEDLINE, are reported. Results: To date, pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN and/or nucleot(side analogues and PEG-IFN and ribavirin remain the standard therapy for HBV and HCV chronic hepatitis, respectively. Discussion: The use of NSAIDs in patients with chronic viral hepatitis has only a ‘‘historical’’ interest. Nevertheless, the possible usefulness of ketoprofen with PEG-IFN and ribavirin for HCVinfected patients, non-responders to standard therapy or with genotype 1, should be evaluated in future clinical studies.

  11. High prevalence of syphilis, HBV, and HCV co-infection, and low rate of effective vaccination against hepatitis B in HIV-infected patients in West China hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Chen, Qixia; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Bin Wei, Yu Gou; Tao, Chuanmin

    2017-08-09

    To investigate the epidemiological features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, and syphilis infection among HIV-infected patients in West China Hospital. A retrospective study was conducted with HIV-infected patients from 2014 to 2016 in West China hospital, SCU. Serum makers for HBV, HCV, and syphilis were detected. Among 894 HIV-infected patients, the prevalence of HIV/HBV, HIV/HCV, HIV/syphilis co-infections was 14.4%, 5.7%, and 18.9% respectively. HIV/HBV/HCV, HIV/HCV/syphilis, and HIV/HBV/syphilis triple co-infection was 7 (0.7%), 12(1.3%), 29(3.2%) respectively. The rate of effective vaccination against HBV was only 7.7% in HIV-infected patients. Age (OR = 0.243 95% CI: 0.114 -0.518), ethnicity (OR = 3.654 95% CI: 1.849-7.218) and education level (OR = 0.140 95% CI: 0.033-0.606) are risk factors affecting HIV/HCV co-infection. A high prevalence of HIV/syphilis, HIV/HBV, and HIV/ HCV co-infection can be observed in west China. The rate for HIV-infected patients who were effectively vaccinated against HBV was fewer than 10%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. All-oral daclatasvir plus asunaprevir for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b infection: a sub-analysis in Asian patients from the HALLMARK DUAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jia-Horng; Lee, Youn-Jae; Heo, Jeong; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Young-Suk; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Torbeyns, Anne; Hughes, Eric; Bhore, Rafia; Noviello, Stephanie

    2016-10-01

    Daclatasvir plus asunaprevir (DCV + ASV) has demonstrated potent antiviral activity in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b (GT-1b) infection in the HALLMARK DUAL trial. This post hoc analysis was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of this treatment in Asian patients. Treatment-naive patients were randomly assigned (2:1; double-blinded) to receive DCV (60 mg once daily) plus ASV (100 mg twice daily) or placebo for 12 weeks. Subsequently, placebo patients entered another study, and the remaining patients continued treatment for an additional 12 weeks. Non-responders to peginterferon/ribavirin and ineligible/intolerant patients received dual therapy for 24 weeks. Sustained virological response at post-treatment Week 12 [sustained virological response (SVR)12] and safety outcomes were evaluated. This post hoc analysis included 186 Asian patients (Korean, 78; Taiwanese, 85; others, 23), of whom 32.3% were cirrhotic. SVR12 was observed in 92.3, 78.6 and 80.0% of treatment-naive, ineligible/intolerant and non-responder patients, respectively, and was comparable with non-Asian patients. SVR12 by baseline factors including age, viral load, interleukin-28B genotype and cirrhosis status was similar between the Asian sub-cohorts. Among 18 Asian patients with NS5A-Y93H or NS5A-L31M/V resistance-associated variants (RAVs), seven patients achieved SVR12. Multivariate regression analysis showed a significant influence of NS5A RAVs in both Asian and non-Asian cohorts. The incidence of serious adverse events in Asian patients was low (7.2%). Two Taiwanese patients had elevated alanine aminotransferase (≥5.1 × ULN); both achieved SVR12. All-oral dual therapy with DCV + ASV resulted in high SVR rates and was well tolerated in Asian patients with HCV GT-1b infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. 21 CFR 610.47 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... Disease Agents § 610.47 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an establishment... after a donor tests reactive for evidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection when tested under § 610...

  14. Evaluation of a total hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay for the detection of antigenaemia in anti-HCV positive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcavi, Pierpaolo; Medici, Maria Cristina; Casula, Francesca; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Pinardi, Federica; Calderaro, Adriana; Chezzi, Carlo; Dettori, Giuseppe

    2004-07-01

    A new, sensitive enzyme immunoassay has been developed for detecting and quantifying total hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen in anti-HCV positive or negative sera ("trak-C", Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Raritan, NJ). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of trak-C as an additional laboratory diagnostic marker of viraemia. The performance was compared to HCV-RNA detection in the "screening" of sera from a large heterogeneous population of hospitalised patients and outpatients. Six hundred and eighteen anti-HCV negative sera, 405 anti-HCV positive/HCV-RNA negative sera, 604 anti-HCV positive/HCV-RNA positive sera and 67 anti-HCV negative sera containing antigens or antibodies potentially interfering with the performance of the assay were analysed. Supplemental HCV antibody testing was performed using a commercial strip immunoblot assay. HCV-RNA was investigated using a qualitative commercial assay. A quantitative commercial RT-PCR was used for the analysis of selected samples. Sensitivity and specificity values were 94.7 and 100%, respectively. The latter was also confirmed when anti-HCV negative samples containing potentially interfering antigens/antibodies were examined. Sensitivity below 100% was probably due to an antigenaemia below the detection limit of trak-C. Besides, because 65.6% of HCV-RNA positive/trak-C negative samples presented specific antibodies against all four RIBA antigens, the hypothesis was raised that, in some cases, the dissociation step efficiency could be sub-optimal. In conclusion, trak-C seems suitable for identifying HCV infection on large based populations. It is a rapid to perform, reliable and specific assay that can be adapted to any laboratory setting. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co-Infection Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics in Abuja, Nigeria. ... with this virus complicates issues related to diagnosis, clinical disease progression, monitoring disease activity, treatment options and basic immunology.

  16. Low prevalence of hepatitis B and C among tuberculosis patients in Duhok Province, Kurdistan: Are HBsAg and anti-HCV prerequisite screening parameters in tuberculosis control program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muayad A Merza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/background: Viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, infections and tuberculosis (TB are a global public health concern. Co-infection with HBV or HCV among TB patients may potentiate the risk of hepatotoxicity induced by anti-TB drugs. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of HBV and HCV among TB patients included in the Duhok National Tuberculosis Program (NTP. Methods: The Duhok NTP Center is a specialized institution in Duhok City, Iraq, concerned with management and follow-up of TB patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the center between June 2015 and May 2016. All documented TB patients were analyzed on the basis of socio-demographic and other characteristics. Thereafter, all patients underwent screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results obtained were analyzed by entering the data in binary format into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. A p value of <.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Two-hundred fourteen documented TB patients were recruited in this study, with 127 (59.3% males and 87 (40.7% females. The mean age of the patients was 40.34 years (±20.29. Of the total number of patients, four cases (1.8% were HBsAg-positive and one case (0.9% was positive for anti-HCV. The variables significantly associated with HBV were history of surgical dental procedure [odds ratio (OR, 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI, −0.01 to 0.04; p = .03], and nationality (OR, 13.67; 95% CI, 0.46–210.85; p = .007. Conclusion: The prevalence of HBV and HCV co-infection among TB patients in this study was low. This may be explained by the low rate of blood transfusion among the patients, the very low prevalence of HIV infections in Kurdistan, the negative history of injection drug use, and adherence to universal infection-control measures, including vaccination for HBV

  17. The Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) among Lichen Planus Patients and Its Clinical Pattern at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (U.A.T.H), Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Ukonu Agwu; Augustine, Uhunmwangho

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between hepatitis C virus and Lichen Planus have been widely reported in the literature; although there are wide geographical variations in the reported prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in patients with lichen planus. This study seeks to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus among lichen planus patients and its clinical morphological type in the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada Abuja, Nigeria. Materials/Methods: This study was conducted between January 2010 and December, 2011 at the out patients Dermatological unit of the department of medicine at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital Gwagwalada Abuja, Nigeria. Consecutive patients who had body eruptions suspected to be lichen planus were recruited and histology done for confirmation. The control group included patients’ relations and some dermatology patients known to have low risk of hepatitis C virus infection and liver function tests done for both subjects and control after obtaining oral consent from them to participate in the study. Result: Anti- HCV antibodies were detected in nine cases (21.4%) and one case (3.3%) in the control group. This was statistically significant difference between the HCV antibody among the subject and control group (Plichen planus was the most frequent clinical type. Liver function test was not statistically significant among the subject and control group. Conclusion: Lichen planus and Hepatitis C virus appear to have a relationship and the prevalence rate was higher among the subject as compared to the control group in our environment. PMID:22980383

  18. Test of IL28B polymorphisms in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with PegIFN and ribavirin depends on HCV genotypes: results from a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Jia

    Full Text Available Many studies have been published on the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP near the IL28B gene and response to the combined treatments of pegylated-interferon (PegIFN and ribavirin (RBV in chronic HCV-infected patients, but without identical conclusions. The aim of this study was to assess impact of the IL28B polymorphisms on the effect of HCV standard treatment using meta-analysis based method.Association studies between polymorphisms of rs12979860 or rs8099917 and response to PegIFN/RBV treatment in chronic HCV patients were retrieved from PubMed. Data of qualified studies on sustained virological response (SVR in different genotypes were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis method in Stata 10 software.Thirty-four papers, containing 46 independent studies, were included in the analysis. In the HCV G1/4 patients without treatment history, individuals carrying rs12979860 CC genotype were more likely to achieve SVR (OR 3.97, 95%CI 3.29-4.80 compared to those carrying CT/TT genotypes. Similar results were observed in the HCV G1/4 patients with unsuccessful or unknown treatment history (OR 3.76, 95%CI 2.67-5.28 or in the patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (OR 5.20, 95%CI 3.04-8.90. However, associations could not be observed in HCV G2/3 patients. For rs8099917, similar results were obtained for genotype TT compared to genotypes TG/GG, indicating that TT genotype was significantly associated with better treatment response in patients infected with genotype 1 or 4 HCV, but not genotype 2 or 3 HCV.Polymorphisms of rs12979860 and rs8099917 near IL28B only associate with the treatment response to PegIFN/RBV in patients infected with HCV genotype 1 or 4 but not with genotype 2 or 3, irrespective of the previous treatment history or HIV co-infected status. Therefore, identification of IL28B genotypes is necessary only in patients infected with relatively difficult-to-treat genotype 1 or 4 HCV.

  19. Pretransplant interferon prevents hepatitis C virus-associated glomerulonephritis in renal allografts by HCV-RNA clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzado, Josep M; Casanovas-Taltavull, Teresa; Torras, Joan; Baliellas, Carme; Gil-Vernet, Salvador; Grinyó, Josep M

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of pretransplant interferon administration on the occurrence of post-transplant de novo glomerulonephritis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive renal allografts. From December 1992 to December 2000, 78 HCV-positive patients received a renal allograft in our unit. Fifteen out of 78 received pretransplant interferon for 1 year. Hepatitis C virus was investigated by serology and qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hepatitis C virus-related de novo glomerulonephritis (membranoproliferative or membranous) was suggested by proteinuria (>1.5 g/24 h) and/or microhematuria and always diagnosed by renal biopsy. Of 15 HCV-positive recipients who received pretransplant interferon, 10 (67%) became HCV-RNA negative at the time of transplantation and only one out of the 15 (6.7%) developed de novo glomerulonephritis (this patient was HCV-RNA positive at transplantation). Among non-interferon-treated allograft recipients, 28.7% had negative HCV-RNA and 12 out of 63 (19%) developed de novo glomerulonephritis (9, membranoproliferative; 3 membranous), all 12 having positive HCV-RNA at transplantation (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, pretransplant interferon may reduce the occurrence of post-transplant HCV-related de novo glomerulonephritis. Our results suggest that the indication for pretransplant interferon should be extended to treat all HCV-RNA positive candidates for renal transplantation.

  20. A Review of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and the Current Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the primary cause of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and end- stage liver disease. The addition of protease inhibitor with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin (triple therapy) for genotype 1 infected patients, are the current standard of care. Method: Data was sourced ...

  1. Hepatitis C virus recurrence after liver transplantation: relationship to anti-HCV core IgM, genotype, and level of viremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, J; Carte, B; Lozano, J L; Casafont, F; Rivero, M; de la Cruz, F; Pons-Romero, F

    1997-09-01

    Factors that determine the severity of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-recurrent disease in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for HCV cirrhosis have not been clearly identified. To address this issue, we evaluated the histological and virological outcome in 25 patients who underwent OLT for HCV cirrhosis. HCV-RNA was detected by qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The HCV genotype also was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-HCV core IgM was tested by ELISA. Disease severity was expressed as a histological score. Sixteen patients had evidence of HCV-recurrent disease. HCV-RNA levels before transplantation (p = 0.029) and after transplantation (15 days, p = 0.004; 90 days, p = 0.040; 360 days, p = 0.010) were significantly higher among patients who subsequently developed recurrent hepatitis than among those who did not. The presence of anti-HCV core IgM before (p = 0.044) and after OLT (15 days, p = 0.017; 90 days, p = 0.037; and 360 days, p = 0.040) was significantly related to recurrence of hepatitis. The genotype was not related to the level of viremia, to the prevalence of recurrent hepatitis, to the presence of anti-HCV core IgM, or to disease severity. The recurrence of HCV hepatitis in patients undergoing OLT for HCV cirrhosis is related to higher levels of viremia and the presence of anti-HCV core IgM, but not to the HCV genotype. However, disease severity is not related to viremia levels, HCV genotype, or positivity of anti-HCV core IgM.

  2. Transmission of HCV infection among long-term hospitalized onco-haematological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, D; Wysocki, J; Rembowska, J; Pernak, M; Lewandowski, K; Nowak, T; Nowicka-Kujawska, K; Nowak, J

    2003-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is becoming a substantial problem in long-term hospitalized patients. Onco-haematological patients undergoing chemotherapy are especially prone to HCV infection. These patients are usually immunosuppressed and therefore antibodies to HCV are not produced despite the presence of HCV RNA in peripheral blood. The aim of the study was to see how often long-term hospitalized patients acquired HCV infection, and what were the possible sources and routes of virus transmission. The study involved 129 children with lymphoproliferative diseases, 36 patients with solid tumours, and 61 healthcare workers from onco-haematological wards. All were HCV RNA and anti-HCV negative at the time of first hospitalization. During a two and a half-year follow-up study among 165 onco-haematological patients, HCV RNA appeared in 87 in subsequent hospitalizations. The majority of infections were (82/87) were 1a genotype, 2 were 1b, 1 was 1a + 1b and 1 was 1a + 3a. In an attempt to establish the origin of HCV infection, healthcare workers were screened for HCV genotyping. All HCV-infected staff working on wards had the same genotype (1a). None of the staff was infected with 1b genotype. As the most prevalent genotype in Polish blood donors is 1b, HCV infection in onco-haematological patients is most likely due to horizontal transmission, probably involving genotype 1a, and potential horizontal transmission of HCV is implied by the presence of 1a genotype of HCV in saliva and urine of selected patients. Spread of hospital HCV infection among children may be facilitated by micro-injury of the skin and mucosa. Early detection of HCV RNA is important in such immunosuppressed patients, as they are not able to produce anti-HCV antibodies. This may enable the introduction of prophylactic steps to prevent the spread of HCV infection by horizontal transmission. Copyright 2003 The Hospital Infection Society

  3. [Recurrence of hepatitis caused by hepatitis c virus in patients receiving a liver transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, J; Casafont, F; Carte, B; Lozano, J L; Fábrega, E; Sánchez-Antolín, G; Dueñas, C; Pons Romero, F

    1997-01-25

    Liver disease due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an increasingly frequent indication for liver transplantation. We performed a clinical and virological study of 20 HCV-infected liver transplant recipients to correlate virological markers with histological recurrence of disease. In ninety-four patients who were given transplants for end-stage cirrhosis, IgG and IgM antibodies to HCV and IgM to HCV tested by ELISA; all samples were further examined in a four-antigen recombinant immunoblot assay (2-RIBA). HCV viremia was measured by the conventional nested PCR, HCV genotype was determined by PCR amplification using type-specific primers. We have analyzed de novo infection by HCV, HCV recurrence and the influence of genotype in these recurrence. Nineteen of 20 antibody-positive patients (95%) had HCV RNA before transplantation. All 19 patients who were viremic before transplantation had persistent infection after LT. HCV genotype 1b was the predominant type before and after LT (75%). Ten of the 20 (50%) patients developed histological findings of chronic hepatitis (CH) in liver allografts. HCV recurrent liver disease after LT was not related with HCV genotype. Of 4 deaths after transplant in hepatitis C group, only one was related to recurrent disease. We have not found de novo hepatitis C. Our results indicate the general persistence of hepatitis C virus infection and the excellent short-term prognosis after liver transplantation. Chronic hepatitis by HCV in liver transplant was not related with HCV genotype.

  4. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, L

    2017-01-01

    with the CC interleukin (IL)-28B genotype. This study describes HCV RNA profiles and factors associated with changes over time in HCV RNA levels in the ESPRIT study. METHODS: HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals positive for HCV RNA were included in the study. Follow-up was counted from the first HCV RNA positive...... test and censored at the initiation of interferon-based treatment. HCV RNA and IL-28B measurements were performed in the same reference laboratory. Random effects mixed models were used to analyse changes over time in HCV RNA. RESULTS: A total of 312 ESPRIT patients were included in the study (151...

  5. [Cognitive performances in workers with chronic virus hepatitis (HBV-HCV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, E; Squadrito, G; Abbate, C; Raimondo, G; Trimarchi, F; Barbaro, M

    2007-01-01

    Chronic condition in subjects with chronic viral hepatitis determines issues neuropsychic. The sample of 21 workers suffering from chronic viral hepatitis in drug treatment has been studied with a battery of standardized tests to assess the cognitive performance, the neurobehavioral effects and psychological disorders that interfere with quality of life, comparing the results of subjects with HBV with those of subjects suffering from HCV. The results showed that both subjects with chronic HBV and HCV have relational-work restrictions that determine long periods of absence from the workplace, with the depression, anxiety, irritability and dysphoria. It is that in patients with chronic HCV physical functioning is significantly impaired with clinical manifestations of the disease that lead to major depression and deficit cognitive function.

  6. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik; Laursen, Alex Lund; Schlichting, Poul; Weis, Nina

    2012-06-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented below. Annual updates will be available at the websites of the societies. As this present English version has been written six months after the Danish 2011 version, it contains minor changes that will be integrated in the Danish 2012 version, available at the end this year. Viral hepatitis is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic countries, probably infected at birth or early childhood in their country of origin, while the majority of patients with HCV infection have been infected by drug use. For both groups it is estimated that only half of the patients have been diagnosed, of whom only 20% attends specialized care for their chronic viral hepatitis. According to the Danish National Board of Health, patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be followed with regular intervals, at clinics specialized in either infectious diseases or gastroenterology/hepatology. The primary aim is to identify patients with significant liver disease to initiate treatment in order to prevent development of cirrhosis and death. This is primarily done by liver biopsy, but screening for fibrosis with non-invasive methods such as elastography may be sufficient in some patients. Patients with established cirrhosis should enter screening programs for complications such as esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. HCV and HBV coexist in HBsAg-negative patients with HCV viremia; possibility of coinfection in these patients must be considered in HBV-high endemic area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soon [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and is highly associated with HBV infection in Korea. It has been suggested that HCV core protein may impair the polymerase activity of HBV in vitro, potentially lowering HBV titre in coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to confirm the coexistence of HBV viremia in HCV infected patients HCC who have apparent HBsAg seronegativity. The serological profiles of HBV and HCV in 616 patients with HCC were analysed and coinfection rate of HBV and HCV investigated. Sera were obtained from 16 patients who were both anti-HCV and HCV RNA positive but HbsAg negative, and tested for HBV BY PCR. As a control group, sera were obtained from 15 patients with HCC and 30 non-A abd non-B chronic hepatitis patients without HCC; both were anti-HCV, HCV-RNA, and HBsAg negative and tested for HBV PCR. Of 616 patients with HCC, 450 (73.1 %) had current HBV infection, 48 (7.8 %) had anti-HCV antibodies, and nine (1.5 %) had viral markers of both HCV abd HBV by serological profiles. Of 27 the patients with HCV viremia and HBsAg seronegativity, 14 (51.9 %) showed HBV viremia by PCR. In contrast, of the 75 patients in the control group who were both HCV PCR negative and HBsAg negative, five (11.1 %) showed HBV viremia by PCR. The PCR for HBV revealed coexistent HBV viremia in HCV viremia patients, despite HBsAg negativity by EIA. In HBV-endemic areas, the possibility of coinfection of HBV in HBsAg-negative patients with HCV viremia should be considered and molecular analysis for HBV-DNA performed. (author). 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Is travel-time to a specialist centre a risk factor for non-referral, non-attendance and loss to follow-up among patients with hepatitis C (HCV) infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astell-Burt, Thomas; Flowerdew, Robin; Boyle, Paul; Dillon, John

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about why many people diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection fail to reach and stay within specialist care services. We used a Geographic Information System and logit regression to investigate whether travel-time to a specialist centre was associated with an increased likelihood of non-referral, non-attendance and loss to follow-up among persons diagnosed with HCV between 1991 and 2003 in Tayside, Scotland (UK). Information was available on referral to, and utilisation of, the single HCV specialist centre in Tayside between 1991 and 2006. Longer travel-time to a specialist centre was associated with an increased likelihood of non-referral to a specialist centre following diagnosis (Odds Ratio: 1.25, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.09, 1.44). Patients living further from an HCV specialist centre were less likely to be referred to it for treatment that could cure their HCV infection. Neither a history of intravenous drug use (IDU), nor area deprivation predicted non-referral. Subsequent to referral, travel-time to a specialist centre was not associated with either non-attendance (0.83 (0.56, 1.21)) or loss to follow-up (0.98 (0.78, 1.22)), although a history of IDU was a strong predictor of both non-attendance and loss to follow-up. Non-attendance was less likely among older patients, while loss to follow-up was more common among those living in deprived areas. Once referred, patients appear able to cope with stress and financial cost of long and frequent journeys to hospital. However, as rates of referral improve from more geographically remote areas, long travel-times to an HCV specialist centre may become an important factor determining future utilisation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. HCV clearance patterns in saliva and serum of patients with chronic HCV infection under interferon plus ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz Dios, P; Castro, A; Rodríguez, I; Reforma, N G; Castro, M; Eirea, M; Hermida, M

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA is often present in saliva of HCV-infected patients, with plasma viral load being the only known predictable factor. Interferon plus ribavirin therapy yields a sustained reduction in HCV viremia. This study aimed to assess the presence of HCV in saliva and serum specimens from patients undergoing this combination therapy (CT). Paired serum and saliva specimens were collected from 44 chronic HCV-infected patients at basal time, 4 and 12 weeks after CT onset, at the end of treatment and 6 months latter. Serum HCV-RNA levels were determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) Amplicor system. Presence of HCV-RNA in saliva was tested by a highly sensitive non-commercialized nested-PCR. The HCV-RNA was detected in 26 saliva specimens at basal time (59.1%). In 34.1% of cases, a concordance viral clearance pattern in serum and saliva was observed in both responders (pattern 1a) and non-responders (pattern 1b). In pattern 2 (13.6% of cases), HCV was detected longer during CT in serum than in saliva (pattern 2a) or in saliva than in serum (pattern 2b). In 11.3% of patients, viral clearance was corroborated either in their serum (pattern 3a) or in their saliva (pattern 3b), but not in both fluids. Of the eight primary responders with 1a clearance pattern, seven were sustained responders. None of the patients with 2a clearance pattern was a sustained responder. Of the two primary responders showing the 3b salivary pattern, one had already relapsed in the first 6 months of follow up. The present results suggest that the monitoring of salivary levels of HCV would be a helpful means of determining sustained antiviral effects of interferon and ribavirin in the treatment of HCV disease.

  10. Boceprevir plus pegylated interferon/ribavirin to re-treat hepatitis C virus genotype 1 in HIV–HCV co-infected patients: final results of the Spanish BOC HIV–HCV Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laguno

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Response-guided therapy with BOC in combination with PEG-IFN/RBV led to an overall SVR rate of 67%, but an SVR rate of only 51% in patients with cirrhosis. The therapy was generally well tolerated. Although the current standards of care do not include BOC + PEG-IFN/RBV, the authors believe that this combination can be beneficial in situations where new HCV direct antiviral agent interferon-free therapies are not available yet.

  11. HCV antibody quantitative levels in liver transplant patients: do they have any relevance in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashok; Menegus, Marilyn; Mohanka, Ravi; Orloff, Mark; Abt, Peter; Mantry, Parvez; Bozorgzadeh, Adel

    2006-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is not directly cytopathic to the hepatocytes; however, host immune response against the virus does cause hepatic injury. Production of the HCV antibody is a host immune response to a viral antigen. The currently used HCV antibody assay is a qualitative, not quantitative, assessment. In this study, we sought to quantitatively estimate HCV antibody levels in patients who had undergone liver transplantations at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, and correlate these levels with HCV RNA viral load, genotype, severity of recurrence, and anti-HCV treatment. From 39 liver transplantation patients, we obtained 141 blood samples for quantitative HCV RNA to measure HCV antibody levels quantitatively. Most antibody levels were within a narrow range with a mean of 32.9+/-5.1. Samples with undetectable RNA had a mean antibody level of 31.4+/-8.0, and samples with a positive RNA had mean level of 33.0+/-4.6. The mean antibody levels were significantly higher for patients with genotype 1 (n=33) compared with those with genotype 2 (n=5) (33.2 vs 29.1; P=.007). No correlation was found between antibody levels and severity of hepatic injury with regard to hepatitis activity index or fibrosis score. Six patients with no response to anti-HCV treatment had no change in their mean antibody levels (33.7 vs 34.5). Ten patients who responded to anti-HCV therapy had lower mean levels after therapy, but the changes were not significant (34.2 vs 30.4). Antibody levels in this study did not correlate with viral load or hepatic injury. However, genotype-2 patients had significantly lower levels compared with genotype-1 patients, and patients who responded to anti-HCV therapy demonstrated decreased antibody levels.

  12. Detection of occult hepatitis B virus among chronic hepatitis C patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Concurrent infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are increasingly recognized in patients with chronic hepatitis. In Egypt, the last decade showed a remarkable decline in HBV infection associated with remarkable rise in HCV infection. The probable impact of occult HBV in patients ...

  13. 77 FR 30293 - Recommendations for the Identification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... an email to [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Hepatitis C virus infection is a contagious... illness. It results from infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is spread primarily through...

  14. Prevalence and Factors Associated with HCV (Hepatitis C Virus Seropositivity in Islamabad, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Ali Qazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 150-200 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C. Prevalence is higher in some countries in Asia and Africa. Only limited information about the epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection especially in females is available. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies and the possible factors for transmission in the female population of a largely urban city Islamabad. A cross sectional study was conducted from May 2006 to August 2006 in Islamabad. We select 252 female households (n=252 following the selection criteria. The primary outcome variables were HCV seropositivity and factors like history of major surgical procedure, blood transfusion, Intravenous drug use etc. The results showed mean age of the sample was 33.21 (±9.95 years and HCV seropositivity was present in 62 (24.6% females. Final Forward Stepwise multiple logistic regression showed blood transfusion [OR, 10.094 95% CI 1.950-52.257], dental procedure [OR, 5.381 95% CI 2.315-12.507] and dilation and curettage [OR, 3.869 95% 1.867-8.015] were significantly associated with HCV seropositivity in females. The study highlights poor quality of care provided and a massive need to educate general population including patients as well as health professionals and allied health workers.

  15. Prevalence and Factors Associated with HCV (Hepatitis C Virus Seropositivity in Islamabad, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Ali Qazi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nAn estimated 150-200 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C. Prevalence is higher in some countries in Asia and Africa. Only limited information about the epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection especially in females is available. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies and the possible factors for transmission in the female population of a largely urban city Islamabad. A cross sectional study was conducted from May 2006 to August 2006 in Islamabad. We select 252 female households (n=252 following the selection criteria. The primary outcome variables were HCV seropositivity and factors like history of major surgical procedure, blood transfusion, Intravenous drug use etc. The results showed mean age of the sample was 33.21 (±9.95 years and HCV seropositivity was present in 62 (24.6% females. Final Forward Stepwise multiple logistic regression showed blood transfusion [OR, 10.094 95% CI 1.950-52.257], dental procedure [OR, 5.381 95% CI 2.315-12.507] and dilation and curettage [OR, 3.869 95% 1.867-8.015] were significantly associated with HCV seropositivity in females. The study highlights poor quality of care provided and a massive need to educate general population including patients as well as health professionals and allied health workers.

  16. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) status in newborns born to HCV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group one: 30 women HCV antibody (Ab) positive/HCV RNA negative. Group two: 30 women HCV Ab positive/ HCV RNA positive. Newborn sera were subjected to HCV antibody testing, and detection of HCV viral RNA by PCR. Results: None of the newborns born to PCR negative females undergoing ICSI cycles showed ...

  17. Correlation of Hepatitis C Antibody Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Saliva of Hepatitis C Seropositive Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gökhan Açıkgöz; Murat İnanç Cengiz; İlker Keskiner; Şereften Açıkgöz; Murat Can; Aydan Açıkgöz

    2009-01-01

    Search for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in body fluids other than blood is important when assessing possible nonparenteral routes of viral transmission. However, the role of oral fluids in HCV transmission remains controversial. Our aim was to compare the prevalence of HCV antibody (HCV Ab) levels in saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of HCV seropositive hemodialysis patients. Serum, saliva and GCF samples were collected from thirty-nine patients. Samples were analyzed for HCV Ab using th...

  18. Impaired Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)–Specific Interferon-γ Responses in Individuals With HIV Who Acquire HCV Infection: Correlation With CD4+ T-Cell Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Dore, Gregory J.; Matthews, Gail; Hellard, Margaret; Yeung, Barbara; Rawlinson, William D.; White, Peter A.; Kaldor, John M.; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Ffrench, Rosemary A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies examining the effect of coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the HCV-specific immune response in acute HCV infection are limited. This study directly compared acute HCV-specific T-cell responses and cytokine profiles between 20 HIV/HCV-coinfected and 20 HCV-monoinfected subjects, enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC), using HCV peptide enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and multiplex in vitro cytokine production assays. HIV/HCV coinfection had a detrimental effect on the HCV-specific cytokine production in acute HCV infection, particularly on HCV-specific interferon γ (IFN-γ) production (magnitude P = .004; breadth P = .046), which correlated with peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts (ρ = 0.605; P = .005) but not with detectable HIV viremia (ρ = 0.152; P = .534). PMID:22949308

  19. Impaired hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific interferon-γ responses in individuals with HIV who acquire HCV infection: correlation with CD4(+) T-cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail; Hellard, Margaret; Yeung, Barbara; Rawlinson, William D; White, Peter A; Kaldor, John M; Lloyd, Andrew R; Ffrench, Rosemary A

    2012-11-15

    Studies examining the effect of coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the HCV-specific immune response in acute HCV infection are limited. This study directly compared acute HCV-specific T-cell responses and cytokine profiles between 20 HIV/HCV-coinfected and 20 HCV-monoinfected subjects, enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC), using HCV peptide enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and multiplex in vitro cytokine production assays. HIV/HCV coinfection had a detrimental effect on the HCV-specific cytokine production in acute HCV infection, particularly on HCV-specific interferon γ (IFN-γ) production (magnitude P = .004; breadth P = .046), which correlated with peripheral CD4(+) T-cell counts (ρ = 0.605; P = .005) but not with detectable HIV viremia (ρ = 0.152; P = .534).

  20. Stability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels among interferon-naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals treated with combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Peters, L; Reekie, J

    2013-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals....

  1. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Registry Veterans in VHA Care in 2015, for the Nation, by VISN and by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report describes the number of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) registry Veterans in VHA care in 2015 based on serologic evidence of HCV infection status (HCV Positive)...

  2. Detection of occult hepatitis B virus among chronic hepatitis C patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola Abd El Kader Mahmoud

    2015-09-12

    Sep 12, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Concurrent infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus. (HCV) are increasingly recognized in patients with chronic hepatitis. In Egypt, the last decade showed a remarkable decline in HBV infection associated with remarkable rise in HCV infection. The probable impact ...

  3. Is response to anti-hepatitis C virus treatment predictive of mortality in hepatitis C virus/HIV-positive patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Raben, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term clinical outcomes after hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment of HIV/HCV patients are not well described. We aimed to compare the risk of all-cause and liver-related death (LRD) according to HCV treatment response in HIV/HCV patients in the multicohort study Collaboration...

  4. [HCV and HBV prevalence in hemodialyzed pediatric patients. Multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañero-Velasco, M C; Mutti, J E; Gonzalez, J E; Alonso, A; Otegui, L; Adragna, M; Antonuccio, M; Laso, M; Montenegro, M; Repetto, L; Brandi, M; Canepa, J; Baimberg, E

    1998-01-01

    Hemodialized pediatric patients are a risk population for the hepatitis B and C virus infection. The aim of this paper was to study the serum prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in hemodialized children. We study 61 pediatric patients at hemodialisis, 12 on renal transplant, range between 2 and 20 years old (mean: 12.9 years), 23 male and 38 female. The specific anti-HCV IgC were measured by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA Abbott) and confirmed by LIA-TEK (Organon). The anti-HBV were measured by ELISA Abbott and transaminases by cinetic method (ASAT: 29 UI/L and ALT: 33 UI/L). The 19.7% of studied children were HCV (+) and 29.5% were HBV (+), 38.9% of them were HbsAg (+) and 50% anti-HBs (+). The HCV and HBV infection was more elevated in relation to the transfusion number and the hemodilisis time. The elevation of ALT/ASAT activity isn't a right infection index for HCV and HBV in this children.

  5. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Complications in HIV/HCV-Co-infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedimo, Roger; Abodunde, Oladapo

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen to thirty percent of HIV-infected persons in North America and Europe are co-infected with chronic hepatitis C (HCV). The latter is associated with a significant number of extra-hepatic metabolic complications that could compound HIV-associated increased cardiovascular risk. This article reviews the basic science and epidemiologic and clinical evidence for increased cardio-metabolic risk among HIV/HCV-co-infected patients and discusses potential underlying mechanisms. We will finally review the impact of control of HCV viremia on the cardio-metabolic morbidity and mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. HCV infection is associated with a number of immune-related complications such as cryoglobulinemia but also metabolic complications including dyslipidemias, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. The incidence of these complications is higher among HIV-co-infected patients and might contribute to increased mortality. The potential mechanisms of increased cardiovascular risk among HIV/HCV-co-infected subjects include endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and immune activation, the cardio-metabolic effects of HCV-induced hepatic steatosis and fibrosis or insulin resistance, and chronic kidney disease. However, epidemiologic studies show discordant findings as to whether HCV co-infection further increases the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (acute myocardial infarctions and strokes) among HIV-infected patients. Nonetheless, successful treatment of HCV is associated with significant improvements in cardio-metabolic risk factors including diabetes mellitus. HCV co-infection is associated with a higher incidence of metabolic complications-and likely increased risk of cardiovascular events-that might contribute to increased mortality in HIV. These appear to improve with successful HCV therapy.

  6. Humoral Immune Response in Japanese Acute Hepatitis Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Yamaguchi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response to acute infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV is not yet perfectly clear in terms of immunoglobulin (Ig response, diversity of HCV antigen, and the relation with hepatitis severity and antibody response.  Serum IgM and IgG anti-HCV levels in patients with HCV and either acute hepatitis (AH or fulminant hepatitis (FH were investigated; the diversity of HCV antigen was investigated by RIBA test III.  Of 22 AH patients, 12 (54.5% were positive for IgM anti-HCV, mainly reacting to HCV core protein. The mean interval until the appearance of IgM anti-HCV after onset was 24.1±26.2 days. IgG anti-HCV mainly reacted to both core and NS-3 antigen, appearing 42.6±42.1 days after onset.  From a serial study of 15 AH patients, it was considered that in seven AH patients (46.7%, the IgM response would precede the IgG response. In another two AH patients, IgM anti-HCV was not detected during the acute disease phase. Of 48 chronic hepatitis patients with HCV-RNA, 40 patients were positive for IgM anti-HCV.  Therefore, IgM anti-HCV was useful for diagnosis in some of the AH patients, but it was difficult to use for distinguishing between acute and chronic infection. All four FH patients with HCV-RNA were positive for both IgM and IgG antibody to HCV at onset. Their antibody titres were higher than those of AH patients. These results suggested that, as in FH due to HBV, FH due to HCV could induce strong and rapid humoral immunity.

  7. Engaging HIV-HCV co-infected patients in HCV treatment: the roles played by the prescribing physician and patients' beliefs (ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH cohort, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon-Ceron Dominique

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment for the hepatitis C virus (HCV may be delayed significantly in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Our study aims at identifying the correlates of access to HCV treatment in this population. Methods We used 3-year follow-up data from the HEPAVIH ANRS-CO13 nationwide French cohort which enrolled patients living with HIV and HCV. We included pegylated interferon and ribavirin-naive patients (N = 600 at enrolment. Clinical/biological data were retrieved from medical records. Self-administered questionnaires were used for both physicians and their patients to collect data about experience and behaviors, respectively. Results Median [IQR] follow-up was 12[12-24] months and 124 patients (20.7% had started HCV treatment. After multiple adjustment including patients' negative beliefs about HCV treatment, those followed up by a general practitioner working in a hospital setting were more likely to receive HCV treatment (OR[95%CI]: 1.71 [1.06-2.75]. Patients followed by general practitioners also reported significantly higher levels of alcohol use, severe depressive symptoms and poor social conditions than those followed up by other physicians. Conclusions Hospital-general practitioner networks can play a crucial role in engaging patients who are the most vulnerable and in reducing existing inequities in access to HCV care. Further operational research is needed to assess to what extent these models can be implemented in other settings and for patients who bear the burden of multiple co-morbidities.

  8. Dynamics of HCV RNA levels during acute hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya; Matthews, Gail V; Amin, Janaki; Petoumenos, Kathy; Hellard, Margaret; Rawlinson, William; Lloyd, Andrew; Kaldor, John; Dore, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding viral dynamics during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can provide important insights into immunopathogenesis and guide early treatment. The aim of this study was investigating the dynamics of HCV RNA and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels during recent HCV infection in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC). ATAHC was a prospective study of the natural history of recently acquired HCV infection. Longitudinal HCV RNA and ALT levels were compared among individuals with ultimately persistent infection and spontaneous clearance outcomes. Among those with HCV persistence (n=104) and HCV clearance (n=30), median HCV RNA (5.2 vs. 4.1 log IU/mL, respectively) and ALT levels (779 vs. 1765 IU/L, respectively) were high during month two following infection, and then declined during months three and four in both groups. Among those with HCV persistence, median HCV RNA was 2.9 log IU/mL during months four, increased to 5.5 log IU/mL during month five, and remained subsequently relatively stable. Among those with HCV clearance, median HCV RNA was undetectable by month five. Median HCV RNA levels were comparable between individuals with HCV persistence and HCV clearance during month three following infection (3.2 vs. 3.5 log IU/mL, respectively; P=0.935), but markedly different during month five (5.5 vs. 1.0 log IU/mL, respectively; P<0.001). In conclusion, dynamics of HCV RNA levels in those with HCV clearance and HCV persistence diverged between months three and five following infection, with the latter time-point being potentially useful for commencing early treatment. PMID:25042465

  9. Sofosbuvir and ledipasvir for HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Elana S; Kottilil, Shyam; Polis, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a chronic infection that disproportionately impacts people living with HIV. In the past, HCV therapy was less effective in individuals with HIV co-infection. However, the advent of direct-acting antivirals has revolutionized HCV treatment with high rates of success in patients both with and without HIV. In this paper, we review the evidence supporting the use of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) for the treatment of HCV in patients with HIV co-infection. Articles searchable on MEDLINE/PubMed were reviewed to provide context for use of LDV/SOF in individuals with HCV and HIV co-infection. This treatment is highly effective in achieving HCV cure or sustained virologic response, however further studies need to done to address efficacy of treatment in people with uncontrolled HIV, concerns regarding drug-interactions with antiretroviral therapy, and potential for shorter duration treatment.

  10. Presence of hepatitis C (HCV) infection in Baby Boomers with Medicare is independently associated with mortality and resource utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayiner, M; Wymer, M; Golabi, P; Ford, J; Srishord, I; Younossi, Z M

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus is common among Baby Boomers (BB). As this cohort ages, they will increasingly become Medicare eligible. To evaluate resource utilisation and mortality of BB-Medicare recipients with HCV. We used in-patient and out-patient Medicare databases (2005-2010). HCV was identified using ICD-9 codes. Outcomes included resource utilisation [payment/case and in-patient length of stay (LOS)] and short-term mortality. Of 1 153 862 BB Medicare recipients (2005-2010), 3.2% (N = 37 365) had HCV. During this period, in-patient Medicare-BB (39 793-55 235) and their claims (78 924-106 232) increased. Furthermore, their overall mortality increased from 8.94% to 10.25% (P Baby Boomer Medicare recipients, diagnosis of HCV is independently associated with higher mortality and resource utilisation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in HCV/HIV co-infected patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roe, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    While hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses are attenuated in HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients compared to those infected with HCV alone, the reasons for this remain unclear. In this study, the proportions of regulatory, naïve, and memory T cells, along with chemokine receptor expression, were measured in co-infected and mono-infected patients to determine if there is an alteration in the phenotypic profile of lymphocytes in these patients. HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients had increased proportions of CD4(+) naïve cells and decreased proportions of CD4(+) effector cells when compared to HCV mono-infected patients. The proportions of CD4(+) Tregs and CD4(+) CXCR3(+) T cells were also significantly lower in co-infected patients. A decrease in CD4(+) Tregs and subsequent loss of immunosuppressive function may contribute to the accelerated progression to liver disease in co-infected individuals. Dysregulation of immune responses following reduction in the proportions of CD4(+) CXCR3(+) Th-1 cells may contribute to the reduced functional capacity of HCV-specific immune responses in co-infected patients. The findings of this study provide new information on the T-cell immunophenotype in HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients when compared to those infected with HCV alone, and may provide insight into why cell-mediated immune responses are diminished during HCV infection.

  12. Exploiting hepatitis C virus activation of NFkappaB to deliver HCV-responsive expression of interferons alpha and gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matskevich, A A; Strayer, D S

    2003-10-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) may lead to liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment for HCV includes high systemic doses of interferonalpha (IFNalpha), which is effective in less than half of patients and may have severe side effects. We designed conditional IFNalpha and IFNgamma expression constructs to be triggered by HCV-induced activation of NFkappaB, and delivered these using highly efficient recombinant Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors. NFkappaB activates the HIV-1NL4-3 long terminal repeat (HIVLTR) as a promoter, which accounts for the conditional transgene expression. Human hepatocyte lines and primary rat hepatocytes (PRH) were transduced with SV[HIVLTR](IFN) vectors, and transfected with HCV cDNA. Production of human and murine IFNalpha and IFNgamma in cytosol and culture supernatants was measured. HCV activated the HIVLTR to produce and secrete IFNs, and did so largely through the NFkappaB binding sites of the HIVLTR. Levels of IFNs secreted, and the magnitude of induction in response to HCV, were greater in hepatocyte lines than in primary cultured hepatocytes. However, even in the latter, supernatant IFNalpha concentrations achieved by this approach were similar to therapeutic serum concentrations sought in systemic IFNalpha-treated patients. In coculture studies, secreted IFNalpha activated its cognate response elements in untransduced cells, suggesting that its potential inhibitory effects on HCV may not be limited to transduced cells. Although HCV replication in culture is difficult to assess, HCV-induced IFNalpha production demonstrably reduced HCV transcription. Conditional expression of IFNs within the liver may represent an attractive approach to therapy of severe chronic HCV infection that could avoid the side effects of systemic treatment regimens.

  13. High awareness of hepatitis C virus (HCV) but limited knowledge of HCV complications among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, Femke A. E.; Prins, Maria; Davidovich, Udi; Stolte, Ineke G.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a sexually transmitted infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in high-income countries. Little is reported about HCV awareness among MSM, although this is essential for developing targeted prevention strategies. We, therefore, studied HCV

  14. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Vaccination against Hepatitis C Virus (HCV: Developments and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian E. Major

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies in patients and chimpanzees that spontaneously clear Hepatitis C Virus (HCV have demonstrated that natural immunity to the virus is induced during primary infections and that this immunity can be cross protective. These discoveries led to optimism regarding prophylactic HCV vaccines and a number of studies in the chimpanzee model have been performed, all of which resulted in modified infections after challenge but did not always prevent persistence of the virus. Therapeutic vaccine strategies have also been pursued in an effort to reduce the costs and side effects associated with anti-viral drug treatment. This review summarizes the studies performed thus far in both patients and chimpanzees for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination, assesses the progress made and future perspectives.

  15. Exosome-associated hepatitis C virus in cell cultures and patient plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziqing [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Zhang, Xiugen [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Yu, Qigui [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); He, Johnny J., E-mail: johnny.he@unthsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • HCV occurs in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. • Exosome-associated HCV is infectious and resistant to neutralizing antibodies. • More exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV is present in patient plasma. - Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects its target cells in the form of cell-free viruses and through cell–cell contact. Here we report that HCV is associated with exosomes. Using highly purified exosomes and transmission electron microscopic imaging, we demonstrated that HCV occurred in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. Exosome-associated HCV was infectious and resistant to neutralization by an anti-HCV neutralizing antibody. There were more exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV detected in the plasma of HCV-infected patients. These results suggest exosome-associated HCV as an alternative form for HCV infection and transmission.

  16. Daclatasvir plus Asunaprevir Treatment for Real-World HCV Genotype 1-Infected Patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Arai, Makoto; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background. All-oral combination of direct-acting antivirals could lead to higher sustained virologic response (SVR) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. In the present study, we examined the efficacy and safety of the dual oral treatment with HCV nonstructural protein (NS) 5A inhibitor daclatasvir (DCV) plus HCV NS3/4A inhibitor asunaprevir (ASV) for 24 weeks in real-world HCV genotype 1-infected Japanese individuals. Methods. After screening for HCV NS5A resistance-associated variants (RAVs) by PCR invader assay, a total of 54 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1 treated with DCV plus ASV were retrospectively analyzed. SVR12 was used for evaluation of the virologic response. Results. Of the total 54 patients, 46 patients (85.2%) were treated with DCV plus ASV for 24 weeks and achieved SVR12. The other 8 patients (14.8%) discontinued this treatment before 24 weeks due to adverse events. Of these 8 patients, 5 and 3 patients did and did not achieve SVR12, respectively. Finally, 51 of 54 (94.4%) patients achieved SVR12. Conclusion. Treatment with DCV and ASV after screening for HCV NS5A RAVs by PCR invader assay is effective and safe in the treatment of real-world HCV genotype 1-infected patients in Japan.

  17. Safety analysis of raltegravir/truvada regimen in HIV/HCV co-infected patients without switchback after HCV treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ehret

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to drug-drug interactions of HIV- and HCV-specific antivirals when initiating an HCV-therapy, the antiretroviral therapy (ART often has to be changed. The spectrum of applicable antiretrovirals is small, therefore many patients were switched to raltegravir/truvada (RAL/TVD in our cohort. Due to the relatively low genetic barrier of RAL, this regimen may be endangered to fail, if the NRTI backbone is not fully active because of pre-existing NRTI resistance. We investigated the long-term follow-up and safety of RAL/TVD in co-infected patients after hepatitis C virus (HCV therapy was stopped and the protective antiretroviral effect of interferon ended. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients initiated a direct-acting antiviral (DAA containing HCV therapy (8x faldaprevir, 6x telaprevir, 2x daclatasvir and 4x simeprevir between 11/2011 and 01/2013. Seventeen were switched to RAL/TVD, three patients were not treated before, but started with the regimen. Diagnosis of HIV infection was dated between 1985 and 2010. The HI-viral suppression was monitored retrospectively to date. Results: Thirteen of the twenty patients (65% remained on RAL/TVD after finishing HCV treatment, for seven patients, no data about their ART continuation was available, after HCV therapy had stopped. All remaining thirteen patients showed an HI-viral load below detection limit up to date (for 15 to 22 months, median 20 months. Only for four patients, historic resistance data were available but none showed NRTI mutations. Conclusions: Switch to RAL/TVD as HIV ART due to initiating HCV therapy was safe for the observed small cohort even in long-term follow-up without switchback or a second ART switch. However, resistance data for the cohort was little, showing no NRTI mutations, indicating a relatively safe setting. Since no further data is available, physicians should keep in mind ART history, historical therapy failure and HIV-resistance while switching ART to

  18. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) interaction with astrocytes: nonproductive infection and induction of IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziqing; Zhao, Fang; He, Johnny J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities in more than 50 % of chronically infected subjects. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the HCV interactions with astrocytes, one of the putative HCV target cells in the brain. We demonstrated that primary human astrocytes (PHA) were very inefficiently infected by HCV, either in the cell-free form or through cell-cell contact. We then determined the potential restriction steps of HCV infection and replication in these cells. PHA expressed all known HCV receptors but failed to support HCV entry. HCV IRES-mediated RNA translation was functional in PHA and further enhanced by miR122 expression. Nevertheless, PHA did not support HCV replication regardless of miR122 expression. To our great surprise, we found that HCV exposure induced robust IL-18 expression in PHA and exhibited direct neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results showed that astrocytes did not support productive HCV infection and replication, but HCV interactions with astrocytes and neurons alone might be sufficient to cause CNS dysfunction.

  19. Angiogenic output in viral hepatitis, C and B, and HCV-associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed A. Abdel Mohsen

    2014-07-04

    Jul 4, 2014 ... and HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Mohamed A. Abdel Mohsen a, ... but not significant. Conclusion: The increased hepatic angiogenesis in chronic HCV and HBV could provide the molecular basis for .... On the other hand, HBV encoded proteins as HBx protein which stabilizes and facilitates ...

  20. HEPATITIS C VIRUS (HCV) SEROPREVALENCE, ANTIGENAEMIA AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Omolola Beatrice; Adesina, Kikelomo Temilola; Fadeyi, Abayomi; Popoola, Gbenga

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is a significant public health challenge with potential risk of progressing to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Actively infected mothers can transmit the virus to their babies who may develop liver cirrhosis and HCC as young adults. We determined the seroprevalence of HCV, its antigenaemia and associated risk factors among pregnant women. We recruited 400 pregnant women and tested their serum for HCV antibodies using immune-chromatographic test and determined the HCV core antigenaemia among HCV sero-positives by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA). The bio-socio-demographic variables of the participants were statistically correlated to the test results. Seroprevalence of HCV was 5.8% (23/400) and the prevalence of HCV core antigenaemia was 73.9% (17/23). None of the bio-socio-demographic variables of the participants and other known risk factors evaluated had. significant influence on either seroprevalence of HCV or its antigenaemia. Only the employment status of the participants' husbands (p = 0.01) significantly affected seropositivity of HCV. HCV core antigenaemia is high among pregnant women who have antibodies to HCV in our environment and this signifies an active hepatitis C virus infection.

  1. Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir Plus Ribavirin for Treatment of HCV Infection in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael; Everson, Gregory T; Flamm, Steven L; Kumar, Princy; Landis, Charles; Brown, Robert S; Fried, Michael W; Terrault, Norah A; O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Vargas, Hugo E; Kuo, Alexander; Schiff, Eugene; Sulkowski, Mark S; Gilroy, Richard; Watt, Kymberly D; Brown, Kimberly; Kwo, Paul; Pungpapong, Surakit; Korenblat, Kevin M; Muir, Andrew J; Teperman, Lewis; Fontana, Robert J; Denning, Jill; Arterburn, Sarah; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Brandt-Sarif, Theo; Pang, Phillip S; McHutchison, John G; Reddy, K Rajender; Afdhal, Nezam

    2015-09-01

    There are no effective and safe treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of patients who have advanced liver disease. In this phase 2, open-label study, we assessed treatment with the NS5A inhibitor ledipasvir, the nucleotide polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir, and ribavirin in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1 or 4. Cohort A enrolled patients with cirrhosis and moderate or severe hepatic impairment who had not undergone liver transplantation. Cohort B enrolled patients who had undergone liver transplantation: those without cirrhosis; those with cirrhosis and mild, moderate, or severe hepatic impairment; and those with fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis. Patients were assigned randomly (1:1) to receive 12 or 24 weeks of a fixed-dose combination tablet containing ledipasvir and sofosbuvir, once daily, plus ribavirin. The primary end point was sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12). We enrolled 337 patients, 332 (99%) with HCV genotype 1 infection and 5 (1%) with HCV genotype 4 infection. In cohort A (nontransplant), SVR12 was achieved by 86%-89% of patients. In cohort B (transplant recipients), SVR12 was achieved by 96%-98% of patients without cirrhosis or with compensated cirrhosis, by 85%-88% of patients with moderate hepatic impairment, by 60%-75% of patients with severe hepatic impairment, and by all 6 patients with fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis. Response rates in the 12- and 24-week groups were similar. Thirteen patients (4%) discontinued the ledipasvir and sofosbuvir combination prematurely because of adverse events; 10 patients died, mainly from complications related to hepatic decompensation. The combination of ledipasvir, sofosbuvir, and ribavirin for 12 weeks produced high rates of SVR12 in patients with advanced liver disease, including those with decompensated cirrhosis before and after liver transplantation. ClinTrials.gov: NCT01938430. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Are RA patients from a non-endemic HCV population screened for HCV? A cross-sectional analysis of three different settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner-Taylor, Cassandra Michelle; Erhard-Ramírez, Alejandro; Garza-Elizondo, Mario Alberto; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge Antonio; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Marco Ulises; Vega-Morales, David; Arana-Guajardo, Ana

    In Mexico, other risk factors are associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV): prior heroin users, living alone, widower, and northern region residence. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are considered immunosuppressed and HCV testing is recommended before treatment. The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of HCV testing in RA patients in three different medical care settings in a non-endemic area. A retrospective observational study was performed using medical records from 960 RA patients describing the indications for HCV testing. The test was performed in 28.6% and the HCV overall frequency was 0.36%. Population characteristics were not associated with an increased risk of HCV infection; therefore, anti-HCV positivity was low. The main reason for testing was before starting biological agents. Due to the low pre-test probability, testing for HCV infection should be personalized; i.e., according to disease prevalence in a particular geographical location and the individual risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of HCV Infections Among Hemodialysis Patients in Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1527 patients (11%) who were HCV free at the start of the study. By the end of the study, a total of 42.2% were found to be anti-HCV reactive. Conclusion: The study demonstrated high prevalence of anti-HCV in HD units in Al Gharbiyah Governorate. Similar studies must be conducted in all Egyptian governorates' HD units ...

  4. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C virus...

  5. CXCL10 Decreases GP73 Expression in Hepatoma Cells at the Early Stage of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Golgi protein 73 (GP73, which is up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, has recently been identified as a novel serum marker for HCC diagnosis. Several reports also noted the increased levels of GP73 expression in chronic liver disease in patients with acute hepatitis of various etiologies, chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and alcoholic liver disease. The molecular mechanisms of GP73 expression in HCV related liver disease still need to be determined. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of HCV infection on GP73 expression. GP73 was highly expressed in Huh7, Hep3B, 293T and HUVEC cells, and was low-expressed in HepG2 cells. HCV infection led to down-regulation of GP73 in Huh7 and HepG2/CD81 cells at the early stage of infection. CXCL10 decreased GP73 expression in Huh7 and HepG2 cells. Up-regulation of GP73 was noted in hepatocytes with cytopathic effect at advanced stage of HCV infection, and further research is needed to determine the unknown factors affecting GP73 expression. In conclusion, our study provided additional evidence for the roles of GP73 in liver disease.

  6. Optical diagnostic of hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) from human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis is the second most common disease worldwide with half of the cases arising in the developing world. The mortality associated with hepatitis B and C can be reduced if the disease is detected at the early stages of development. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to detect biochemical changes accompanying hepatitis progression. Raman spectra were acquired from 20 individuals with six hepatitis B infected patients, six hepatitis C infected patients and eight healthy patients in order to gain an insight into the determination of biochemical changes for early diagnostic. The human blood serum was examined at a 532 nm excitation laser source. Raman characteristic peaks were observed in normal sera at 1006, 1157 and 1513 cm-1, while in the case of hepatitis B and C these peaks were found to be blue shifted with decreased intensity. New Raman peaks appeared in HBV and HCV infected sera at 1194, 1302, 844, 905, 1065 and 1303 cm-1 respectively. A Mat lab subroutine and frequency domain filter program is developed and applied to signal processing of Raman scattering data. The algorithms have been successfully applied to remove the signal noise found in experimental scattering signals. The results show that Raman spectroscopy displays a high sensitivity to biochemical changes in blood sera during disease progression resulting in exceptional prediction accuracy when discriminating between normal and malignant. Raman spectroscopy shows enormous clinical potential as a rapid non-invasive diagnostic tool for hepatitis and other infectious diseases.

  7. Limited but increasing use of treatment for hepatitis C across Europe in patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Rockstroh, J; Soriano, V

    2006-01-01

    Uptake of hepatitis C (HCV) treatment in HIV-coinfected patients is not well described. Of 2356 HCV-seropositive patients, 180 (7.6%) started HCV treatment with interferon-based therapies. In multivariate Poisson-regression models, there was a 38% increase per year in the incidence of starting HCV...... treatment (95% CI 26 - 51%, pHIV-coinfected patients, it remains infrequent and variable...

  8. Correlation of autoimmune reactivity with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV infection in histologically proven chronic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantha S

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To comprehensively study the possibility of autoimmune reactivity by hepatitis viruses B and C (HBV & HCV in Indian chronic liver disease (CLD patients. METHODS: One hundred and sixty histopathologically proven CLD cases and 100 matched controls were analysed for viral serology for HBV and HCV and autoimmune serology for antinuclear antibody (ANA, anti smooth muscle antibody (ASMA and Liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM using standard immunofluorescence technique. RESULTS: 43.7% of cases were chronic hepatitis B while 16.2% were positive for HCV. CLD-B cases showed ANA positivity in 27.1% and ASMA positivity in 25.7%. CLD-C cases revealed 26.9%, 46.1% and 11.1% positivity for ANA, ASMA and LKM antibodies respectively. These rates and titres of autoantibodies were statistically significant (p=<0.02 when compared with that of controls. Conclusions: Based on the pattern of autoantibody positivity, it could be concluded that chronic HBV infection may induce autoimmune hepatitis (AIH type I and chronic HCV infection might trigger AIH - Type II in Indian CLD cases.

  9. Hepatitis C virus (HCV): ever in reliable partnerships? | Yalena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no preventive vaccine against HCV and treatment, consisting of interferon alpha plus Ribavirin, is generally effective in less than 50% of cases. HCV has evolved ... Issues regarding tropism, disease progression and antiviral treatment response, among other aspects, are discussed. Data accumulated reveal that ...

  10. Hepatitis C virus (HCV): ever in reliable partnerships?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-06-16

    Jun 16, 2006 ... hemophiliacs, multiple changes in HCV genotypes were observed in 58 % of the subjects, over a 3–15- ..... increase in HCV RNA levels in hemophiliacs (Eyster et. Amoador-Canizares and Duenas-Carrera .... and colleagues results showed that, among women who continued to receive protease inhibitors ...

  11. Geno2pheno[HCV] - A Web-based Interpretation System to Support Hepatitis C Treatment Decisions in the Era of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhav Kalaghatgi

    Full Text Available The face of hepatitis C virus (HCV therapy is changing dramatically. Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs specifically targeting HCV proteins have been developed and entered clinical practice in 2011. However, despite high sustained viral response (SVR rates of more than 90%, a fraction of patients do not eliminate the virus and in these cases treatment failure has been associated with the selection of drug resistance mutations (RAMs. RAMs may be prevalent prior to the start of treatment, or can be selected under therapy, and furthermore they can persist after cessation of treatment. Additionally, certain DAAs have been approved only for distinct HCV genotypes and may even have subtype specificity. Thus, sequence analysis before start of therapy is instrumental for managing DAA-based treatment strategies. We have created the interpretation system geno2pheno[HCV] (g2p[HCV] to analyse HCV sequence data with respect to viral subtype and to predict drug resistance. Extensive reviewing and weighting of literature related to HCV drug resistance was performed to create a comprehensive list of drug resistance rules for inhibitors of the HCV protease in non-structural protein 3 (NS3-protease: Boceprevir, Paritaprevir, Simeprevir, Asunaprevir, Grazoprevir and Telaprevir, the NS5A replicase factor (Daclatasvir, Ledipasvir, Elbasvir and Ombitasvir, and the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Dasabuvir and Sofosbuvir. Upon submission of up to eight sequences, g2p[HCV] aligns the input sequences, identifies the genomic region(s, predicts the HCV geno- and subtypes, and generates for each DAA a drug resistance prediction report. g2p[HCV] offers easy-to-use and fast subtype and resistance analysis of HCV sequences, is continuously updated and freely accessible under http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/index.php. The system was partially validated with respect to the NS3-protease inhibitors Boceprevir, Telaprevir and Simeprevir by using data generated with recombinant

  12. Active hepatitis C infection and HCV genotypes prevalent among the IDUs of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uz Zaman Khaleeq

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Injection drug users (IDUs are considered as a high risk group to develop hepatitis C due to needle sharing. In this study we have examined 200 injection drug users from various regions of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province for the prevalence of active HCV infection and HCV genotypes by Immunochromatographic assays, RT-PCR and Type-specific PCR. Our results indicated that 24% of the IDUs were actively infected with HCV while anti HCV was detected among 31.5% cases. Prevalent HCV genotypes were HCV 2a, 3a, 4 and 1a. Majority of the IDUs were married and had attained primary or middle school education. 95% of the IDUs had a previous history of needle sharing. Our study indicates that the rate of active HCV infection among the IDUs is higher with comparatively more prevalence of the rarely found HCV types in KPK. The predominant mode of HCV transmission turned out to be needle sharing among the IDUs.

  13. Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun (Scripps)

    2012-10-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

  14. Genotyping and infection rate of GBV-C among Iranian HCV- infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Reza; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Hosseini, Seyed Younes; Yaghobi, Ramin; Shahzamani, Kiana

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis G virus/GB virus-C (HGV/GBV-C) is a newly identified member of the Flaviviridae family. Its clinical significance in chronic hepatitis C infection remains controversial. There is a geographical difference in the distribution of GBV-C in the world. The frequency of GBV-C infection among hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients varies. The aim of the current study was to determine the prevalence and genotypes of GBV-C among Iranian patients infected with chronic HCV. Infection with GBV-C was surveyed in 71 chronic confirmed hepatitis C infected patients. These samples were collected at the Digestive Disease Research Center (DDRC) of Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran from January to October 2007. The 5'-UTR region of GBV-C RNA was detected using a novel in-house touchdown nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the products were sequenced and the results were aligned and phylogenically analyzed. Of the 71 HCV-infected patients, 31 (43.6%) were found positive for GBV-C RNA. Sequencing and phylogenic analysis showed that the samples were Genotype 2 of GBV-C. It seems that there is a high rate of GBV-C infection among Iranian patients infected with chronic HCV. In comparison with the six reference genotypes, it was observed that all the samples were categorized in Genotype 2 of GBV-C, prevalent in North America, Africa and in European countries.

  15. Intrahepatic Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells from HCV-infected patients show an exhausted phenotype but can inhibit HCV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, E; Bordoni, V; Sacchi, A; Visco-Comandini, U; Montalbano, M; Taibi, C; Casetti, R; Lalle, E; D'Offizi, G; Capobianchi, M R; Agrati, C

    2018-01-02

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence results from inefficiencies of both innate and adaptive immune responses to eradicate the infection. A functional impairment of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells was described but few data are available on Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells in the liver that, however, represents the battlefield in the HCV/host interaction. Aim of this work was to compare circulating and intrahepatic Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells in chronic HCV-infected patients (HCVpos) and in HCV-negative (HCVneg) subjects. Phenotypic and functional analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Anti-HCV activity was analyzed by using an in vitro autologous liver culture system. Independently from HCV infection, the liver was enriched of Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells expressing an effector/activated phenotype. In contrast, an enrichment of PD-1 expressing Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells was observed both in the peripheral blood and in the liver of HCVpos patients, probably due to a persistent antigenic stimulation. Moreover, a lower frequency of IFN-γ producing Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells was observed in the liver of HCVpos patients, suggesting a functional impairment in the cytokine production in HCVpos liver. Despite this hypo-responsiveness, intrahepatic Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells are able to exert an anti-HCV activity after specific stimulation. Altogether, our data show that HCV infection induced a dysregulation of intrahepatic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells that maintain their anti-HCV activity after specific stimulation. A study aimed to evaluate the mechanisms of the antiviral activity may be useful to identify new pathways able to improve Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells intrahepatic function during HCV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Are anti-interferon antibodies the cause of failure in: chronic HCV hepatitis treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alci Barone

    Full Text Available A follow-up study was made of 94 chronic hepatitis C patients at a hepatitis clinic in Brazil, after interferon alpha (IFN-alpha therapy, to determine the influence of anti-interferon antibodies on treatment outcome. Patients diagnosed as having chronic hepatitis C, confirmed by PCR (HCV RNA and liver biopsy, were treated with interferon alpha 2a or 2b for at least six months, and were followed up for 24 weeks after termination of treatment in order to assess biochemical, virological and clinical pathology responses. Only 6% of the 94 patients developed anti-IFN antibodies, 70% presented a biochemical response and 23% maintained a sustained virological response. Clinical evaluation revealed that in only 2 patients was there progression of fibrosis; the necro-inflammatory score indicated that 72% maintained the same activity, 12% had worsening necro-inflammatory activity, and the remaining 16% had decreased activity. There was no significant correlation of demographic and laboratory variables with levels of anti-interferon antibodies. Similarly, biochemical and virological responses were not influenced by anti-interferon antibodies. Multivariate analysis by logistic regression revealed that clinical pathological parameters, staging and necro-inflammatory activity did not influence the response to the virus.

  17. Treatment extension benefits HCV genotype I patients without rapid virological response : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, T. J. G.; Slavenburg, S.; van Oijen, M. G. H.; Drenth, J. P. H.

    Background: Current guidelines recommend 48 weeks of treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for patients infected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype I. Several clinical trials have investigated the efficacy of treatment duration longer than 48 weeks, but yielded discordant

  18. Prevalence and impact of GBV-C, SEN-V and HBV occult infections in HIV-HCV co-infected patients on HCV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroth, Lionel; Carrat, Fabrice; Larrat, Sylvie; Goderel, Isabelle; Martha, Benoit; Payan, Christopher; Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise; Bani-Sadr, Firouze; Perronne, Christian; Cacoub, Patrice; Pol, Stanislas; Morand, Patrice

    2008-12-01

    It has been suggested that, in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, co-infections with other viruses may affect the response to HCV therapy. We aimed to assess the prevalence of GBV-C, SEN-V and occult HBV infections, their impact on HCV and HIV infections and on the response to HCV therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. Three-hundred and sixty eight patients were tested before starting interferon-ribavirin for the presence of occult hepatitis B DNA, GBV-C RNA and SEN-V DNA by using real time PCR. Clinical, immunological, virological, histological characteristics and response to HCV therapy were compared according to the presence or not of each viral co-infection. HBV DNA, GBV-C RNA and SEN-V DNA were found in 5 (1.4%, CI95%: 0.2-2.4%), 104 (29.9%, CI95%: 25.1-34.7%) and 209 patients (57.9%, CI95%: 52.8-63.0%), respectively. GBV-C positive patients had significantly higher CD4 count at baseline, during and after HCV therapy, even after stratification on antiretroviral treatment. No other significant difference was observed according to the presence or not of GBV-C or SEN-V co-infection, in particular regarding virological responses to HCV combination therapy. There is no reason to withhold HCV therapy in HIV infected patients who have access to HAART, because of occult HBV, GBV-C or SEN-V co-infections.

  19. Apoptosis and clinical severity in patients with psoriasis and HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami A Gabr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been proposed that hepatitis C virus (HCV antigens are involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and may contribute to severity of the disease. Increased expression of the apoptosis-regulating proteins p53 and tTG and decreased levels of bcl-2 in the keratinocytes of the skin of psoriatic patients have been reported. Aim: This study aims to identify the serum levels of apoptosis-regulating proteins in patients with psoriasis and without HCV infection and to study the relation between clinical severity of psoriasis and the presence of HCV infection. Materials and Methods: Disease severity was assessed by psoriasis area severity index score (PASI of 90 patients with psoriasis grouped as mild (n = 30, moderate (n = 30 and severe (n = 30; 20 healthy individuals were used as controls. All groups were subjected for complete history taking, clinical examination, and tests for liver function and HCV infection. The serum levels of apoptosis related proteins: p53, tTG and bcl-2 were estimated by enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA. Results: There was a statistically significant (P < 0.001 correlation between clinical severity of psoriasis and presence of HCV antibodies and HCV-mRNA. In addition, significantly (P < 0.001 raised serum p53 and tTG, and reduced bcl-2 were observed among HCV-positive patients as compared to HCV-negative patients and control patients. Conclusion: These results conclude that clinical severity of psoriasis is affected by the presence of HCV antibodies and overexpression of apoptotic related proteins. In addition, altered serum levels of apoptosis-regulating proteins could be useful prognostic markers and therapeutic targets of psoriatic disease.

  20. HIV and HCV Co-Culture Promotes Profibrogenic Gene Expression through an Epimorphin-Mediated ERK Signaling Pathway in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shi

    Full Text Available Accelerated fibrosis in patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has been a major cause of mortality in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART era. However, the role of co-infection in accelerating the progression of liver fibrosis, particularly with regard to the effects of co-infection on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, remains unclear. We hypothesized that HIV and HCV induce liver fibrosis synergistically by altering the regulation of epimorphin production, and thereby indirectly alter HSC function. Here, we examined the effects of epimorphin on HSC proliferation and invasion, and the changes in fibrogenesis-related gene activity in HSCs (LX2 in the presence of inactivated CXCR4-tropic HIV and HCV (JFH1. The combination of HIV and HCV significantly increased epimorphin expression, which increased the proliferation and invasion capabilities of HSCs. Epimorphin also induced the expression of profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1 in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK-dependent manner. These data indicated that the effects of HIV/HCV co-infection on hepatic fibrosis might be mediated in part by EPM. Strategies to limit the expression of EPM might represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent the progression of hepatic fibrosis during HIV/HCV co-infection.

  1. A model of the health and economic impact of posttransfusion hepatitis C: application to cost-effectiveness analysis of further expansion of HCV screening protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A; Sanz, C

    2000-10-01

    Cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to decide the value of further expansion of the screening protocols for HCV in blood donors. However, such analyses are hampered by imperfect knowledge of the health and economic repercussions of posttransfusion hepatitis C (PTHC). A Monte Carlo simulation of a Markov model representing the outcomes of patients transfused with HCV-infective blood was used to estimate the health and economic impact of PTHC and to calculate the cost-effectiveness ratio of various HCV screening methods. Median survival for hypothetical patients with PTHC and for controls without hepatitis was 11.25 and 11.75 years, respectively. Overall, 12.3 percent of patients receiving HCV-infective blood will develop chronic hepatitis, 9.3 percent will progress to liver failure, and 9. 25 percent will eventually die of liver disease after a median time of 20.75 years (range, 6-70). Ninety-one percent of the infected blood recipients had no reduction in life expectancy due to PTHC, and the average loss per patient was 0.754 years. The present value of the lifetime health costs incurred by patients with PTHC is $6330 per case. HCV antibody testing increases the patients' life expectancy by 20.4 hours per blood collection tested, and it results in net savings by decreasing the number of patients that will require treatment for liver disease in the future. Adding HCV NAT increases the patients' life expectancy by 0.08 hours per blood collection tested, at a cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,829,611 per QALY gained. PTHC has low health benefits because of the advanced age of many blood recipients. Testing donors for HCV antibodies results in net savings for the health care system, despite low health benefits. Adding HCV NAT would produce little additional gain at a very high cost.

  2. Psychiatric barriers to readiness for treatment for hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection among injection drug users: clinical experience of an addiction psychiatrist in the HIV-HCV coinfection clinic of a public health hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheft, Harriet; Fontenette, Dominique C

    2005-04-15

    Among injection drug users, psychological and psychiatric barriers to readiness for treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection include mood and anxiety disorders, cognitive deficits, temperament disorders, and personality vulnerabilities, as well as ongoing drug use. Many aspects of these barriers can be overcome with direct treatment or social support. To establish effective treatment for HCV infection in this population of patients, it is essential that the patient and providers develop a rapport that allows for active communication. It is also important that the patient make an effort to adhere to the treatment requirements and that the patient receive the appropriate evaluation and management of treatable barriers.

  3. seroprevalence and risk factors of hepatitis c virus in patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    ABSTRACT. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease resulting in cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. It is believed to ... Key words: Hepatitis C virus, seroprevalence, patients, blood donors, risk factors. INTRODUCTION. Hepatitis .... America (17) and corroborates the level of infection rate of HCV in those ...

  4. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic...

  5. Association of HCV Core Antigen Seropositivity with Long-Term Mortality in Patients on Regular Hemodialysis

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    Akihiko Kato

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV antibody seropositivity is independently associated with poor prognosis in hemodialysis (HD patients. However, anti-HCV antibody cannot distinguish between patients with active infection and those who have recovered from infection. We therefore aimed in this study to examine the association of HCV core antigen (HCVcAg seropositivity with mortality in HD patients. We first measured serum HCVcAg using an immunoradiometric assay and anti-HCV antibody in 405 patients on regular HD, and followed them for 104 months. There were 82 patients (20.2% who had been positive for anti-HCV antibodies; 57 (69.5% of these were positive for HCVcAg. During the follow-up, 29 patients were excluded, so we tested the association of HCVcAg seropositivity with all-cause, cardiovascular (CV and non-CV mortalities in 376 patients. A total of 209 patients (55.6% had expired during the observational period, 92 out of them due to CV causes. After adjusting for comorbid parameters, HCVcAg was independently associated with overall mortality (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.05–2.47, p < 0.05. HCV infection was significantly related to liver disease-related mortality. Past HCV infection also contributed to CV mortality (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.27–5.45, p < 0.01. In contrast, anti-HCV antibody and HCVcAg seropositivities did not associate with infectious disease-related and cancer-related (expect for hepatocellular carcinoma mortality. It follows from these findings that HCVcAg serology is associated with all-cause and CV mortality in HD patients.

  6. Transient elastography: A non-invasive tool for assessing liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Vecchi, Valentina; Soresi, Maurizio; Colomba, Claudia; Mazzola, Giovanni; Colletti, Pietro; Mineo, Maurizio; Di Carlo, Paola; La Spada, Emanuele; Vizzini, Giovanni; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of advanced liver fibrosis (ALF) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV/HCV patients using transient elastography, and to identify factors associated with ALF. METHODS: Between September 2008 and October 2009, 71 HIV mono-infected, 57 HIV/HCV co-infected and 53 HCV mono-infected patients on regular follow-up at our Center were enrolled in this study. Alcohol intake, the main parameters of liver function, presence of HCV-RNA, HIV-RNA, duration of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and CD4 cell count were recorded. ALF was defined as liver stiffness (LS) ≥ 9.5 kPa. To estimate liver fibrosis (LF) a further 2 reliable biochemical scores, aspartate aminotransferase platelet ratio index (APRI) and FIB-4, were also used. RESULTS: LS values of co-infected patients were higher than in either HIV or HCV mono-infected patients (χ2MH = 4, P 9.5 kPa. There was no significant correlation between extent of LF and HAART exposure or duration of HAART exposure, in particular with specific dideoxynucleoside analogues. CONCLUSION: ALF was more frequent in co-infected than mono-infected patients. This result correlated with lower CD4 levels. Protective immunological effects of HAART on LF progression outweigh its hepatotoxic effects. PMID:21049556

  7. Correlates of HCV seropositivity among familial contacts of HCV positive patients

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    Matera Antonio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determinants of intrafamilial HCV transmission are still being debated. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlates of HCV seropositivity among familial contacts of HCV positive patients in Italy. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 175 HCV positive patients (index cases, recruited from Policlinico Gemelli in Rome as well as other hospitals in Central Italy between 1995 and 2000 (40% female, mean age 57 ± 15.2 years, and 259 familial contacts. Differences in proportions of qualitative variables were tested with non-parametric tests (χ2, Yates correction, Fisher exact test, and a p value Results Seropositivity for HCV was found in 8.9% of the contacts. From the univariate analysis, risk factors significantly associated to HCV positivity in the contacts were: intravenous drug addiction (p = 0.004 and intercourse with drug addicts (p = 0.005. The only variables associated significantly and independently to HCV seropositivity in patients' contacts were intercourse with drug addicts (OR = 19.28; 95% CI: 2.01 – 184.94, the retirement status from work (OR = 3.76; 95% CI: 1.17 – 11.98, the time of the relationship (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.11 and tattoos (OR = 7.68; 95% CI: 1.00 – 60.20. Conclusion The present study confirms that having intercourse with a drug addict is the most significant risk factor for intrafamilial HCV transmission. The association with retirement status from work could be related to both a long-term relationship with an index case and past exposure to common risk factors.

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in hemodialysis patients in Maracaibo, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Monsalve-Castillo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Over a two year period, the incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection was evaluated in 29 hemodialysis patients, aged between 15 and 75 years (mean ± SD: 45 ± 39.5 years, from the University Hospital Hemodyalisis Unit, Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela. Anti-HCV antibodies were determined using a fourth generation ELISA (Innotest HCV Ab IV kit and positive blood samples were tested using a recombinant assay kit (Inno-LIA HCV Ab III, both kits from Innogenetics N.V., Belgium. The findings indicate a lack of HCV seroconversion in the hemodialysis patients over the study period, confirmed by the recombinant assay. Risk factors for HCV infection were 0.3270 (95% confidence interval: 0.01323-8.080 in patients undergoing hemodialysis. The findings suggest a lack of significant sources for HCV infection due to the preventive measures to avoid its transmission in the hemodialysis unit.

  9. Socioeconomic status in HCV infected patients – risk and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oml

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lars Haukali Omland,1 Merete Osler,2 Peter Jepsen,3,4 Henrik Krarup,5 Nina Weis,6 Peer Brehm Christensen,7 Casper Roed,1 Henrik Toft Sørensen,3 Niels Obel1 On behalf of the DANVIR Cohort Study1Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Research Center for Prevention and Health, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark; 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 4Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 5Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 6Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark; 7Department of Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Odense, DenmarkBackground and aims: It is unknown whether socioeconomic status (SES is a risk factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection or a prognostic factor following infection.Methods: From Danish nationwide registries, we obtained information on three markers of SES: employment, income, and education. In a case control design, we examined HCV infected patients and controls; conditional logistic regression was employed to obtain odds ratios (ORs for HCV infection for each of the three SES markers, adjusting for the other two SES markers, comorbidity, and substance abuse. In a cohort design, we used Cox regression analysis to compute mortality rate ratios (MRRs for each of the three SES markers, adjusting for the other two SES markers, comorbidity level, age, substance abuse, and gender.Results: When compared to employed persons, ORs for HCV infection were 2.71 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.24–3.26 for disability pensioners and 2.24 (95% CI: 1.83–2.72 for the unemployed. When compared to persons with a high income, ORs were 1.64 (95% CI: 1.34–2.01 for low income persons and 1.19 (95% CI: 1.02–1.40 for

  10. Beneficial therapeutic effects of Nigella sativa and/or Zingiber officinale in HCV patients in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moneim, Adel; Morsy, Basant M; Mahmoud, Ayman M; Abo-Seif, Mohamed A; Zanaty, Mohamed I

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a major global health burden and Egypt has the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. The current study was designed to evaluate the beneficial therapeutic effects of ethanolic extracts of Nigella sativa, Zingiber officinale and their mixture in Egyptian HCV patients. Sixty volunteer patients with proven HCV and fifteen age matched healthy subjects were included in this study. Exclusion criteria included patients on interferon alpha (IFN-α) therapy, infection with hepatitis B virus, drug-induced liver diseases, advanced cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or other malignancies, blood picture abnormalities and major severe illness. Liver function enzymes, albumin, total bilirubin, prothrombin time and concentration, international normalized ratio, alpha fetoprotein and viral load were all assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. Ethanolic extracts of Nigella sativa and Zingiber officinale were prepared and formulated into gelatinous capsules, each containing 500 mg of Nigella sativa and/or Zingiber officinale. Clinical response and incidence of adverse drug reactions were assessed initially, periodically, and at the end of the study. Both extracts as well as their mixture significantly ameliorated the altered viral load, alpha fetoprotein, liver function parameters; with more potent effect for the combined therapy. In conclusion, administration of Nigella sativa and/or Zingiber officinale ethanolic extracts to HCV patients exhibited potential therapeutic benefits via decreasing viral load and alleviating the altered liver function, with more potent effect offered by the mixture.

  11. Lipoprotein lipase inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV infection by blocking virus cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maillard

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of HCV is that its life cycle depends on lipoprotein metabolism. Viral morphogenesis and secretion follow the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL biogenesis pathway and, consequently, infectious HCV in the serum is associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes TRL within chylomicrons and VLDL but, independently of its catalytic activity, it has a bridging activity, mediating the hepatic uptake of chylomicrons and VLDL remnants. We previously showed that exogenously added LPL increases HCV binding to hepatoma cells by acting as a bridge between virus-associated lipoproteins and cell surface heparan sulfate, while simultaneously decreasing infection levels. We show here that LPL efficiently inhibits cell infection with two HCV strains produced in hepatoma cells or in primary human hepatocytes transplanted into uPA-SCID mice with fully functional human ApoB-lipoprotein profiles. Viruses produced in vitro or in vivo were separated on iodixanol gradients into low and higher density populations, and the infection of Huh 7.5 cells by both virus populations was inhibited by LPL. The effect of LPL depended on its enzymatic activity. However, the lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin restored only a minor part of HCV infectivity, suggesting an important role of the LPL bridging function in the inhibition of infection. We followed HCV cell entry by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-envelope and anti-core antibodies. These analyses demonstrated the internalization of virus particles into hepatoma cells and their presence in intracellular vesicles and associated with lipid droplets. In the presence of LPL, HCV was retained at the cell surface. We conclude that LPL efficiently inhibits HCV infection by acting on TRL associated with HCV particles through mechanisms involving its lipolytic function, but mostly its bridging function. These mechanisms lead to immobilization of the virus at the cell

  12. Prediction of Intraoperative Blood Loss during Total Knee Arthroplasty in HCV+ and HCV- Patients with Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurkhina, E S; Polyanskaya, T Yu; Zorenko, V Yu; Nesterenko, V M

    2017-03-01

    We examined HCV+ and HCV- hemophilia A patients with knee arthropathy and hematocrit above 38.5%. The mean density of erythrocytes was studied by the phthalate method, intraoperative blood loss was assessed gravimetrically. The volume of blood loss in HCV+ patients with manifest adhesive process and chronic synovitis varied from 300 to 1900 ml, in patients with moderate adhesive process from 400 to 1500 ml. The volume of blood loss in HCV- patients was 300-800 ml. A positive correlation between the blood loss volume and mean density of erythrocytes was detected. Blood loss >1000 ml during total knee arthroplasty can be expected in patients with hemophilia A with HCV and high mean density of erythrocytes. Blood loss >1000 ml is unlikely in HCV- and HCV+ patients with the mean density of erythrocytes not surpassing the normal values.

  13. Assessment of immunological changes in Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Egyptian chronic HCV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoman, Sahar; Nabil, Mohamed; Tabl, Ashraf; Ghanem, Hussam; kafrawy, Sherif El

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays a major role in liver pathology. Similar to other members of the herpesvirus family, EBV establishes a persistent infection in more than 90% of adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of EBV and chronic hepatitis C co-infection (HCV) on biochemical and immunological responses in patients. The study was conducted in 62 patients and 33 apparently healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups: group I, consisting of 31 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), group II, consisting of eight patients with EBV infection and without HCV infection and group III, consisting of 23 patients with EBV and chronic HCV. The percentage of CD3+ cells, helper CD4+ cells and CD19+ B-cells was measured by flow cytometry. Human interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-15 levels were measured by an ELISA. The levels of liver alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzymes were higher in EBV/HCV patients compared to that in EBV and HCV mono-infected patients. EBV/HCV patients had significantly reduced percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ cells compared to EBV patients. Serum IFN-γ levels were significantly reduced in EBV/HCV patients (3.86 pg/mL) compared to CHC patients (6.76 pg/mL) and normal controls (4.69 pg/mL). A significant increase in serum IL-15 levels was observed in EBV/HCV patients (67.7 pg/mL) compared to EBV patients (29.3 pg/mL). Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV and EBV co-infection can potentiate immune response dampening in patients. PMID:25317700

  14. Assessment of immunological changes in Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Egyptian chronic HCV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Shoman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV plays a major role in liver pathology. Similar to other members of the herpesvirus family, EBV establishes a persistent infection in more than 90% of adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of EBV and chronic hepatitis C co-infection (HCV on biochemical and immunological responses in patients. The study was conducted in 62 patients and 33 apparently healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups: group I, consisting of 31 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC, group II, consisting of eight patients with EBV infection and without HCV infection and group III, consisting of 23 patients with EBV and chronic HCV. The percentage of CD3+ cells, helper CD4+ cells and CD19+ B-cells was measured by flow cytometry. Human interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-15 levels were measured by an ELISA. The levels of liver alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzymes were higher in EBV/HCV patients compared to that in EBV and HCV mono-infected patients. EBV/HCV patients had significantly reduced percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ cells compared to EBV patients. Serum IFN-γ levels were significantly reduced in EBV/HCV patients (3.86 pg/mL compared to CHC patients (6.76 pg/mL and normal controls (4.69 pg/mL. A significant increase in serum IL-15 levels was observed in EBV/HCV patients (67.7 pg/mL compared to EBV patients (29.3 pg/mL. Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV and EBV co-infection can potentiate immune response dampening in patients.

  15. High prevalence of antibodies to core+1/ARF protein in HCV-infected patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassela, Katerina; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Charpantidis, Stefanos; Koskinas, John; Mylopoulou, Theodora; Mimidis, Konstantinos; Sarrazin, Christoph; Grammatikos, Georgios; Mavromara, Penelope

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) possesses a second open reading frame (ORF) within the core gene encoding an additional protein, known as the alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), F or core+1. The biological significance of the core+1/ARF protein remains elusive. However, several independent studies have shown the presence of core+1/ARFP antibodies in chronically HCV-infected patients. Furthermore, a higher prevalence of core+1/ARFP antibodies was detected in patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the incidence of core+1/ARFPantibodies in chronically HCV-infected patients at different stages of cirrhosis in comparison to chronically HCV-infected patients at earlier stages of disease. Using ELISA, we assessed the prevalence of anti-core+1 antibodies in 30 patients with advanced cirrhosis [model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) ≥15] in comparison with 50 patients with mild cirrhosis (MELD core+1 antibodies, in contrast with 16.5 % of non-cirrhotic HCV patients. Moreover, there was significantly higher positivity for anti-core+1 antibodies in HCV patients with advanced cirrhosis (36.7 %) compared to those with early cirrhosis (24 %) (Pcore+1 antibodies in HCV patients with HCC, suggest that core+1 protein may have a role in virus-associated pathogenesis, and provide evidence to suggest that the levels of anti-core+1 antibodies may serve as a marker for disease progression.

  16. Low prevalence of HCV infection with predominance of genotype 4 among HIV patients living in Libreville, Gabon.

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    Angélique Ndjoyi-Mbiguino

    Full Text Available Gabon is an endemic area for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV and the risk of co-infection is high.Between November 2015 and April 2016, we conducted retrospective study on HCV infection among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA. A total of 491 PLHA were included in this study and tested for the presence of HCV infection. HIV viral loads were obtained using the Generic HIV viral Load® assay and the CD4+ T cells count was performed using BD FACSCount™ CD4 reagents. HCV screening was performed using the MP Diagnostics HCV ELISA 4.0 kit. HCV genotypes were determined by sequence analysis of NS5B and Core regions. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the groups. Chi-2 test and Fisher's Exact Test were used to compare prevalence.HCV seroprevalence was 2.9% (14/491, (95% confidence interval (CI:1.4-4.3%. The percentage of HCV viremic patients, defined by the detection of HCV RNA in plasma, was 57% (8/14, representing 1.6% of the total population. HCV seroprevalence and replicative infection were not statistically differ with gender. The percentage of co-infection increased with age. No correlation with CD4+ T cells count and HIV viral load level was registered in this study. Identified HCV strains were predominantly of genotype 4 (87.5% including 4k, 4e, 4g, 4p, 4f and 4c subtypes. Only one strain belonged to genotype 2 (subtype 2q. Analysis of the NS5B region did not reveal the presence of resistance-associated substitutions for sofosbuvir.A systematic screening of hepatitis C is therefore strongly recommended as well as genotyping of HCV strains in order to adapt treatments for the specific case of people living with HIV/AIDS in Central Africa.

  17. [Model-based estimates of the risk of HCV transmission from infected patients to gynaecologic and obstetric staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gańczak, Maria; Szczeniowski, Adam; Jurewicz, Alina; Karakiewicz, Beata; Szych, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The risk of acquiring the hepatitis C virus (HCV) through percutaneous occupational exposure is dependent on three key variables: number of injuries, probability of a percutaneous injury transmitting HCV and prevalence of HCV infection in the patient population. To estimate the prevalence of HCV infection in the gynaecological/obstetric patient population and thereafter estimate the risk of HCV transmission to personnel through occupational exposure. The prevalence of anti-HCV was estimated through an anonymous serosurvey of gynaecological/ obstetric patients in 15 randomly selected hospitals in West Pomerania, Poland, from February 2008 to January 2009. Using own published data on the percutaneous injuries during gynaecological/obstetric surgeries and results obtained from serologic survey, the risk of annual occupational transmission of HCV to personnel was then derived with the use of a mathematical model. The prevalence of anti-HCV infection for 528 gynaecological/obstetric patients, aged 18-83 (median 45), was 0.76% (4/528; 95%CI: 0.29-1.93%). The estimated risk of HCV transmission from an HCV infected patient to an uninfected staff member may vary over a wide range (0.00007-0.1%), being dependent on the type of exposure; the average risk for a midwife was 0.0038% per annum (0.15% risk over a 40 year professional career). The estimated risk for a gynaecologist/obstetrician was 0.0076% and 0.30% respectively. The risk of an individual member of a gynaecological/obstetric staff acquiring HCV through occupational exposure is low, however a credible hazard still exists. One in 130 patients hospitalized at gynaecological/obstetric wards showed markers of HCV infection. Therefore, staff members should be encouraged to observe standard precautions regarding sharps injury prevention and present themselves for post-exposure management in case of need.

  18. Performance characteristics of a combined hepatitis C virus core antigen and anti–hepatitis C virus antibody test in different patient groups

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    Jeng-Fu Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the performance of a hepatitis C virus (HCV antigen/antibody combination test [Murex HCV Antigen/Antibody Combination Test (Murex Ag/Ab test] by comparing it with the current third-generation HCV antibody enzyme immunoassay (anti-HCV. A total of 403 serum samples were consecutively collected from four patient groups: healthy controls (n=100; HCV-infected patients (HCV group, n=102; Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HCV-infected patients (HIV/HCV group, n=100; and patients with uremia (uremia group, n=101. Performances were evaluated for the Murex Ag/Ab, anti-HCV, and HCV RNA in the HIV/HCV and uremia patient groups. In the HCV group, all 102 samples showed concordant positive and negative results for anti-HCV, Murex Ag/Ab, and HCV RNA tests. In the HIV/HCV group, all 100 samples were positive for both anti-HCV and Murex Ag/Ab tests, whereas 88 patients (88% were HCV RNA positive. In the uremia group, 14 (69.0% of the 23 anti-HCV-positive patients were HCV RNA positive, whereas 14 (77.8% of the 18 Murex Ag/Ab–positive patients were HCV RNA positive. None of anti-HCV-negative or Murex Ag/Ab–negative patients were HCV RNA positive. Based on the HCV RNA assay, the sensitivities for both anti-HCV and Murex Ag/Ab assays were 100%, whereas the specificities of these two assays were 89.7% and 95.4%, respectively. With good sensitivity and specificity, the Murex Ag/Ab assay could be a useful alternative diagnostic tool, especially in immunocompromised populations, such as patients with uremia or those infected with HIV.

  19. HBV reactivation in patients with HCV/HBV cirrhosis on treatment with direct-acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, V; Ferraro, D; Licata, A; Bavetta, M G; Petta, S; Bronte, F; Colomba, G; Craxì, A; Di Marco, V

    2017-07-13

    Anecdotal reports suggest that patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) hepatitis and overt or occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection may reactivate HBV when HCV is suppressed or cleared by direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). We assessed the prevalence of overt or previous HBV coinfection and the risk of HBV reactivation in patients with HCV cirrhosis treated with DAAs. This was a retrospective cohort of 104 consecutive patients with HCV cirrhosis treated with DAAs. Serum HCV-RNA and HBV-DNA were tested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of DAAs therapy and at week 12 of follow-up. At the start of DAAs, eight patients (7.7%) were HBsAg positive/HBeAg negative with undetectable HBV-DNA and low levels of quantitative HBsAg (four on nucleos(t)ide analogues [NUCs] and four inactive carriers), 37 patients (35.6%) had markers of previous HBV infection (25 anti-HBc positive, 12 anti-HBc/anti-HBs positive) and 59 (56.7%) had no evidence of HBV infection. Sixty-seven patients (64.4%) were HCV-RNA negative at week 4 and 98 (94.2%) achieved sustained virological response. All four HBsAg-positive patients treated with NUCs remained HBV-DNA negative, but three of four untreated patients showed an increase in HBV-DNA of 2-3 log without a biochemical flare and achieved HBV-DNA suppression when given NUCs. During or after DAAs, by conventional assay, HBV-DNA remained not detectable in all 37 anti-HBc-positive patients but in three of them (8.1%) HBV-DNA became detectable with a highly sensitive PCR. HBV reactivation is likely to occur in untreated HBV/HCV-coinfected cirrhotic patients when they undergo HCV treatment with DAAs. Pre-emptive therapy with NUCs should be considered in this setting. Anti-HBc-positive patients rarely reactivate HBV without clinical or virological outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir for HCV in Patients Coinfected with HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggie, Susanna; Cooper, Curtis; Saag, Michael; Workowski, Kimberly; Ruane, Peter; Towner, William J.; Marks, Kristen; Luetkemeyer, Anne; Baden, Rachel P.; Sax, Paul E.; Gane, Edward; Santana-Bagur, Jorge; Stamm, Luisa M.; Yang, Jenny C.; German, Polina; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Ni, Liyun; Pang, Phillip S.; McHutchison, John G.; Stedman, Catherine A.M.; Morales-Ramirez, Javier O.; Bräu, Norbert; Jayaweera, Dushyantha; Colson, Amy E.; Tebas, Pablo; Wong, David K.; Dieterich, Douglas; Sulkowski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Effective treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains an unmet medical need. METHODS We conducted a multicenter, single-group, open-label study involving patients coinfected with HIV-1 and genotype 1 or 4 HCV receiving an antiretroviral regimen of tenofovir and emtricitabine with efavirenz, rilpivirine, or raltegravir. All patients received ledipasvir, an NS5A inhibitor, and sofosbuvir, a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor, as a single fixed-dose combination for 12 weeks. The primary end point was a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after the end of therapy. RESULTS Of the 335 patients enrolled, 34% were black, 55% had been previously treated for HCV, and 20% had cirrhosis. Overall, 322 patients (96%) had a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after the end of therapy (95% confidence interval [CI], 93 to 98), including rates of 96% (95% CI, 93 to 98) in patients with HCV genotype 1a, 96% (95% CI, 89 to 99) in those with HCV genotype 1b, and 100% (95% CI, 63 to 100) in those with HCV genotype 4. Rates of sustained virologic response were similar regardless of previous treatment or the presence of cirrhosis. Of the 13 patients who did not have a sustained virologic response, 10 had a relapse after the end of treatment. No patient had confirmed HIV-1 viro-logic rebound. The most common adverse events were headache (25%), fatigue (21%), and diarrhea (11%). No patient discontinued treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks provided high rates of sustained virologic response in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HCV genotype 1 or 4. (Funded by Gilead Sciences; ION-4 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02073656.) PMID:26196665

  1. The present and future disease burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with today's treatment paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razavi, H; Waked, I; Sarrazin, C

    2014-01-01

    The disease burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is expected to increase as the infected population ages. A modelling approach was used to estimate the total number of viremic infections, diagnosed, treated and new infections in 2013. In addition, the model was used to estimate the change in the tot...

  2. HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdel Fatah Fahmy Hanno

    2013-06-27

    Jun 27, 2013 ... Objectives: To study hepatitis virus C (HCV) RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (PBMCs) of patients with chronic HCV infection, and explore the relationship between the HCV. RNA in the PBMCs and response to interferon (IFN) therapy. Methods: Twenty-five patients with chronic viral hepatitis C ...

  3. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... for their chronic viral hepatitis. Clinical care: According to the Danish National Board of Health, patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be followed with regular intervals, at clinics specialized in either infectious diseases or gastroenterology/hepatology. The primary aim is to identify patients...... screening programs for complications such as esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma....

  4. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... for their chronic viral hepatitis. CLINICAL CARE: According to the Danish National Board of Health, patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be followed with regular intervals, at clinics specialized in either infectious diseases or gastroenterology/hepatology. The primary aim is to identify patients...... screening programs for complications such as esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma....

  5. A Review of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and the Current Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    deliveries from HCV infected women . The incidence is higher (14%-17%) in patients co- infected ... from women of childbearing age before initiation of HCV treatment. Women who are pregnant or attempting to ... infection; persons with hemophilia who received clotting factor concentrate prior to 1987, persons who have ...

  6. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  7. NAFLD and NASH in HCV Infection: Prevalence and Significance in Hepatic and Extrahepatic Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Elio Adinolfi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review and up to date the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and their significance in both accelerating progression of HCV-related liver disease and development of HCV-associated extrahepatic diseases. The reported mean prevalence of HCV-related NAFLD was 55%, whereas NASH was reported in 4%–10% of cases. HCV genotype 3 directly induces fatty liver deposition, namely “viral steatosis” and it is associated with the highest prevalence and degree of severity, whereas, HCV non-3 genotype infection showed lower prevalence of steatosis, which is associated with metabolic factors and insulin resistance. The host’s genetic background predisposes him or her to the development of steatosis. HCV’s impairment of lipid and glucose metabolism causes fatty liver accumulation; this seems to be a viral strategy to optimize its life cycle. Irrespective of insulin resistance, HCV-associated NAFLD, in a degree-dependent manner, contributes towards accelerating the liver fibrosis progression and development of hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing liver inflammation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, NAFLD is associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and atherosclerosis. In addition, HCV-related “metabolic steatosis” impairs the response rate to interferon-based treatment, whereas it seems that “viral steatosis” may harm the response rate to new oral direct antiviral agents. In conclusion, a high prevalence of NAFLD occurs in HCV infections, which is, at least in part, induced by the virus, and that NAFLD significantly impacts progression of the liver disease, therapeutic response, and some extrahepatic diseases.

  8. High awareness of hepatitis C virus (HCV) but limited knowledge of HCV complications among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, Femke A E; Prins, Maria; Davidovich, Udi; Stolte, Ineke G

    2014-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a sexually transmitted infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in high-income countries. Little is reported about HCV awareness among MSM, although this is essential for developing targeted prevention strategies. We, therefore, studied HCV awareness and knowledge among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM from the Amsterdam Cohort Studies (ACS). During two visits, 1 year apart and starting in October 2007, MSM from the ACS answered questions regarding HCV awareness, knowledge of HCV transmission (7 items), complications (8 items) and sexual risk behaviour. We examined the percentage of HCV awareness and correctly answered knowledge items, and whether awareness and knowledge improved significantly over time. Using logistic regression, we studied whether HIV status and sexual risk behaviour were associated with awareness. Seventy percent (312/444) of HIV-negative and 80% (74/92) of HIV-positive MSM reported to have ever heard of HCV on the first visit. Overall, awareness increased with 9% between the first and second visit (p awareness was borderline significant (OR 1.49, 95% CI 0.97-2.30). Compared with knowledge of transmission routes, knowledge of complications appeared to be limited. In the ACS, awareness of HCV is high, particularly among those reporting group sex, an important risk factor for HCV transmission. The majority of participants had good knowledge of transmission routes, but limited knowledge of complications of chronic HCV infection. HCV prevention messages could be strengthened, therefore, by further addressing the complications of HCV infection.

  9. Sofosbuvir and Ledipasvir for 8 Weeks for the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection in HCV-Monoinfected and HIV-HCV-Coinfected Individuals: Results From the German Hepatitis C Cohort (GECCO-01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingiliz, Patrick; Christensen, Stefan; Kimhofer, Torben; Hueppe, Dietrich; Lutz, Thomas; Schewe, Knud; Busch, Heiner; Schmutz, Günther; Wehmeyer, Malte H; Boesecke, Christoph; Simon, Karl-Georg; Berger, Florian; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Baumgarten, Axel; Mauss, Stefan

    2016-11-15

    Shortening the duration of treatment with HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) leads to substantial cost reductions. According to the label, sofosbuvir and ledipasvir can be prescribed for 8 weeks (SL8) in noncirrhotic women or men with HCV genotype 1 and low viral loads. However, real-world data about the efficacy and safety of SL8 are largely missing. Interim results from an ongoing prospective, multicenter cohort of 9 treatment centers in Germany (GECCO). All patients started on treatment with HCV DAAs since January 2014 were included. This report describes safety and efficacy outcomes in 210 patients with HCV monoinfection and 35 with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-HCV coinfection given SL8 in a real-world setting. Of 1353 patients included into the GECCO cohort until December 2015, a total of 1287 had complete data sets for this analysis; 337 (26.2%) fulfilled the criteria for SL8 according to the package insert, but only 193 (57.2%) were eventually treated for 8 weeks. Another 52 patients did not fulfill the criteria but were treated for 8 weeks. SL8 was generally well tolerated. The overall sustained virologic response rate 12 weeks after the end of treatment was 93.5% (186 of 199). The on-treatment response rate was 99.4% (159 of 160) in HCV-monoinfected and 96.4% (27 of 28) in HIV-HCV-coinfected patients. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. SL8 seems highly effective and safe in well-selected HCV-monoinfected and HIV-HCV-coinfected patients in a real-world setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Incidence of Severe Hepatotoxicity Related to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Heil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatotoxicity is a concern in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV coinfected patients due to their underlying liver disease. This study assessed the incidence of hepatotoxicity in HIV/HCV co-infected patients in two outpatient infectious diseases clinics. Methods. HIV/HCV co-infected adults were included in this retrospective study if they were PI or NNRTI naïve at their first clinic visit and were initiated on an NNRTI- and/or PI-based antiretroviral regimen. Patients were excluded if they had active or chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV. The primary objective was to determine the overall incidence of severe hepatotoxicity. Results. Fifty-six of the 544 patients identified met inclusion criteria. The incidence of severe hepatotoxicity was 10.7% (6/56 patients. Severe hepatotoxicity occurred with efavirenz (=2, nevirapine (=1, indinavir (=1, nelfinavir (=1, and saquinavir/ritonavir (=1. Conclusion. The incidence of severe hepatotoxicity appears to be low in this retrospective analysis of HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving a PI-and/or NNRTI-based regimen.

  11. Impedimetric genosensor for detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV1) DNA using viral probe on methylene blue doped silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Chaitali; Ingle, Aviraj; Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Pn, Anoop Krishna; Pundir, C S; Narang, Jagriti

    2017-05-01

    An impedimetric genosensor was fabricated for detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 in serum, based on hybridization of the probe with complementary target cDNA from sample. To achieve it, probe DNA complementary to HCVgene was immobilized on the surface of methylene blue (MB) doped silica nanoparticles MB@SiNPs) modified fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode. The synthesized MB@SiNPs was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. This modified electrode (ssDNA/MB@SiNPs/FTO) served both as a signal amplification platform (due to silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) as well as an electrochemical indicator (due to methylene blue (MB)) for the detection of the HCV DNA in patient serum sample. The genosensor was optimized and evaluated. The sensor showed a dynamic linear range 100-10 6 copies/mL, with a detection limit of 90 copies/mL. The sensor was applied for detection of HCV in sera of hepatitis patient and could be renewed. The half life of the sensor was 4 weeks. The MB@SiNPs/FTO electrode could be used for preparation of other gensensors also. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.S. Farag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients.

  13. Preoperative Seroprevalence of HBsAg, Anti-HCV, Anti-HIV in general surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Girgin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Exposure to blood borne pathogens is the most serious occupational health risk faced by health-care workers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative seroprevalences of HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV.Materials and methods: In this study we evaluated the seroprevalence of HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV in 486 preoperative patients who admitted to Dicle University Medical Faculty General Surgery Clinic for elective sur-gical procedures between January 2007 and July 2007; retrospectively. The results were compared with those of 14354 blood donations during the same period as con-trol group.Results: The seroprevalence of HBsAg and anti-HCV were; %6.6 and %1.6 subsequently in preoperative pa-tients. HBsAg and anti-HCV seropositivity rates were lower in the control group. Thus, the positively rates of HBsAg and anti-HCV for preoperative patients should be assessed higher than the data obtained from the blood bank. Anti-HIV seropositivity was not detected in both patient and control group. Conclusion: All healthcare workers must be trained about occupational diseases and vaccinated against he-patitis B. Establishment of universal precautions is nec-essary and these precautions must be strictly followed particularly in the operating room. In addition all patients should be considered as potential carriers.

  14. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... below. Annual updates will be available at the websites of the societies. As this present English version has been written six months after the Danish 2011 version, it contains minor changes that will be integrated in the Danish 2012 version, available at the end this year. Epidemiology: Viral hepatitis...... is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic...

  15. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... below. Annual updates will be available at the websites of the societies. As this present English version has been written six months after the Danish 2011 version, it contains minor changes that will be integrated in the Danish 2012 version, available at the end this year. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Viral hepatitis...... is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic...

  16. Immune biomarker differences and changes comparing HCV mono-infected, HIV/HCV co-infected, and HCV spontaneously cleared patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Kushner

    Full Text Available Immune biomarkers are implicated in HCV treatment response, fibrosis, and accelerated pathogenesis of comorbidities, though only D-dimer and C-reactive protein have been consistently studied. Few studies have evaluated HIV/HCV co-infection, and little longitudinal data exists describing a broader antiviral cytokine response.Fifty immune biomarkers were analyzed at baseline (BL and HCV end of treatment follow-up(FU time point using the Luminex 50-plex assay in plasma samples from 15 HCV-cleared, 24 HCV mono- and 49 HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment, who either did or did not receive pegylated-interferon/ribavirin HCV treatment. Biomarker levels were compared among spontaneous clearance patients, mono- and co-infected, untreated and HCV-treated, and sustained virologic responders (SVR and non-responders (NR at BL and FU using nonparametric analyses. A Bonferroni correction, adjusting for tests of 50 biomarkers, was used to reduce Type I error.Compared to HCV patients at BL, HIV/HCV patients had 22 significantly higher and 4 significantly lower biomarker levels, following correction for multiple testing. There were no significantly different BL levels when comparing SVR and NR in mono- or co-infected patients; however, FU levels changed considerably in co-infected patients, with seven becoming significantly higher and eight becoming significantly lower in SVR patients. Longitudinally between BL and FU, 13 markers significantly changed in co-infected SVR patients, while none significantly changed in co-infected NR patients. There were also no significant changes in longitudinal analyses of mono-infected patients achieving SVR or mono-infected and co-infected groups deferring treatment.Clear differences exist in pattern and quantity of plasma immune biomarkers among HCV mono-infected, HIV/HCV co-infected, and HCV-cleared patients; and with SVR in co-infected patients treated for HCV. Though >90% of patients were male and

  17. Brief Report: High Need to Switch cART or Comedication With the Initiation of DAAs in Elderly HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, E.J.; Smit, C.; Kanter, C.T.M.M. de; Dofferiiof, A.S.M.; Arends, J.E.; Brinkman, K.; Rijnders, B.; Valk, M. van der; Reiss, P.; Burger, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To describe the use of nonantiretroviral comedication and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients coinfected with HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) and to predict the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV. METHODS: This is a

  18. Risk-taking behavior and impulsivity among HCV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Duarte, Adriana; Morais-de-Jesus, Mychelle; Nunes, Ana Paula; Miranda-Pettersen, Karine; Araújo-de-Freitas, Lucas; Netto, Liana R; Santos, Carlos Teles; Codes, Liana; Quarantini, Lucas C

    2016-09-30

    The association between risk behaviors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been extensively studied. It is also proved that impulsivity is associated with risk behaviors. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the association between HCV and impulsivity, a characteristic that can contribute directly to these risk behaviors. This study aimed to investigate HCV-infected individuals' impulsivity and whether this feature mediates risk behavior. Adult patients with liver diseases (n=269) were divided into two groups: viral group (n=157) - patients with HCV and nonviral group (n=112). Risk behaviors were evaluated by a sociodemographic questionnaire. Impulsivity was assessed through Barratt Impulsiveness Scale - BIS-11. Psychiatric comorbidities were investigated by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview 5.0.0. The viral group patients had higher impulsivity than the nonviral group in all domains: attentional impulsivity, motor impulsivity, and nonplanning. Risk behaviors were also shown to be associated with impulsivity levels. Our results suggest that HCV-infected patients are more impulsive than individuals with other liver diseases, even when analyses are controlled for the presence of comorbid mental disorders. In addition, at-risk behavior was significantly mediated by impulsivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF ANTIVIRAL THERAPY FOR CHRONIC HEPATITIS C, CAUSED BY HCV GENOTYPE 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lioznov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluating the effectiveness of 2 therapeutic schemes for chronic hepatitis C (genotype 6 which combined sofosbuvir and ribavirin, one of them also included pegylated interferon. Materials and methods: The study included 110 patients with chronic hepatitis C (genotype 6, who have undergone antiviral therapy (HTP in Hepatology Clinic inHo Chi Minh City,Vietnamfrom November 2015 to July 2016. 24 patients were treated by Pegylated interferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks, 86 patients – by sofosbuvir and ribavirin for 24 weeks. Non-interferon regimen was administered primarily to patients with contraindications to the use of interferon. To monitor the effectiveness of antiviral therapy, quantification of HCV RNA in serum was performed by PCR prior to treatment, at 4th, 12th or 24th week (depending on the observation group from the starting of treatment and at 12th, 24th week after completion of treatment. Results: All patients, who were treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and sofosbuvir, completed the full course of treatment and 100% of them are registered with sustained virological response at 12th and 24th week after the end of antiviral therapy (SVR-12 and SVR-24, respectively. In the group of patients, who treated with ribavirin and sofosbuvir, 97,7% of patients completed full course of treatment (SVR-12 was registered in 93% of patients, and SVR-24 – in 91,9% of patients. Of 75 patients without a history of HCC, SVR24 was registered in 74 people (98,7%, of 11 patients with HCC – in 5 patients (45,5%. SVR-24 was registered in 98% of patients with cirrhosis (F4 without HCC. Conclusion: The results can serve as a justification for the use of these schemes of antiviral therapy for special groups of patients and/or conditions when it is impossible to follow the latest recommendations, which will help to expand the access of patients to effective antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

  20. Correlation of Hepatitis C Antibody Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Saliva of Hepatitis C Seropositive Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Açıkgöz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for hepatitis C virus (HCV in body fluids other than blood is important when assessing possible nonparenteral routes of viral transmission. However, the role of oral fluids in HCV transmission remains controversial. Our aim was to compare the prevalence of HCV antibody (HCV Ab levels in saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of HCV seropositive hemodialysis patients. Serum, saliva and GCF samples were collected from thirty-nine patients. Samples were analyzed for HCV Ab using the Ortho HCV 3.0 SAVe enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. HCH Ab levels in saliva and GCF of all HCV-seropositive patients were statistically compared. Reported here are the results of the study designed to determine the correlation between HCV-RNA positivity in serum and the detection of antibodies in GCF and saliva. One hundred percent (100% of the 39 patients have antibodies to HCV in their serum, 15.4% have antibodies to HCV in GCF, and saliva found out. HCV Ab seropositivity in GCF and saliva was significantly correlated (kappa = 0.462; <.001. This study supports the concept that GCF may be a significant source of HCV in saliva.

  1. Isolation as a strategy for controlling the transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in haemodialysis units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Zuñiga, Jessica I; Loza Munárriz, César; López-Alcalde, Jesús

    2016-08-11

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 2% of the world's population and can cause chronic liver infection and persistent long-term sequelae such as cirrhosis and liver cancer.The prevalence of HCV infection among people on haemodialysis is often higher than the general population. The virus is easily transmitted parenterally, and blood transfusions have previously played a significant role in transmission; however, erythropoietin therapy has reduced the need for transfusions, and coupled with improved screening of donated blood, has significantly decreased transmission by transfusion. Although control of hospital-acquired infection has improved with the advent of biosafety measures, stopping HCV transmission in haemodialysis units remains challenging.Isolating people infected with HCV involves physical separation from others to limit direct or indirect transmission and includes a number of strategies during dialysis. The evidence for isolating people infected with HCV during haemodialysis is sparse with some inconsistencies. To evaluate the benefits and harms of isolation of HCV-infected patients during haemodialysis on the transmission of HCV to other patients. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 26 November 2015 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. We also searched the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (1982 to 2015), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, 1990 to 2015), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (1990 to 2015), and Open Grey (1990 to 2015). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and cluster RCTs evaluating the clinical benefits and harms of isolating HCV-infected patients during haemodialysis on the transmission of HCV to other patients. We considered incidence of dialysis-acquired HCV infection, all-cause mortality, and adverse effects associated with

  2. Altered expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes in an animal model of HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ming-Ling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the gene expression patterns of nonobese hepatic steatosis in affected patients remain unclear, we sought to explore these patterns using an animal model of nonobese hepatic steatosis. Methods We developed mice that conditionally express the hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein regulated by the tetracycline transactivator (tTA. Microarray analyses and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed using liver samples of both the double transgenic mice (DTM, which express both the HCV core and tTA, and single transgenic mice (STM, which express tTA alone, at 2 months of age. Functional categories of genes with altered expression were classified using gene ontology programs. Serum glucose, lipid levels, and systemic blood pressure were also measured. Results Approximately 20–30% of hepatocytes from the DTM were steatotic. No significant differences were observed in the serum glucose, lipid content, or blood pressure levels between the DTM and STM. Gene expression analyses revealed Sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP pathway activation and dysregulation of the following genes involved in lipid metabolism: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1, Apolipoprotein AII, Apolipoprotein CI, acyl-CoA thioesterase I, and fatty acid binding protein 1; in mitochondrial function: solute carrier family 25 member 25 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II; in immune reaction: complement component 3, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus A, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus D, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus E. Conclusion Some genes of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function, and immune reaction and the SREBP pathway are involved in HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis.

  3. The effects of Maraviroc on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ortega Gonzalez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The fibrogenesis analysis in quimeric CCR1 and CCR5 mice revealed that CCR5 mediates its pro-fibrogenic effects in hepatic cells and promoting stellate cells. The blockage of co-receptors could preserve the progression of hepatic fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Objective: To evaluate the beneficial effects on hepatic fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients that are on antiretroviral therapy (ART with CCR5 co-receptor antagonists. Method and materials: A multicentre, retrospective pilot study of the evaluation of hepatic fibrosis at mid- and long-term by non-invasive methods in a HIV/HCV co-infected patients cohort in the Valencian Community (Spain that received ART with a CCR5 co-receptor antagonist. The cut-off points of serum marker tests of hepatic fibrosis were: AST to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI1.5 F2; >2 Cirrhosis and Forns Index6.9>F2 fibrosis. Inclusion criteria was established for HIV/HCV co-infected patients on ART with CCR5 co-receptor antagonists that had no previous history of interferon and ribavirin treatment or those who were null-responders and received CCR5 co-receptor antagonist treatment in the previous year. Patients with HBV infection were excluded. Results: A total of 71 male patients (69% were reported. A CD4 nadir 350 cells/uL. According to genotypes, 50% were G-1a, 14% G-1b, 11% G-3 and 25% G-4. The median duration of treatment with Maraviroc (MVC was the following: 45% took it over a year, 41% over two years and 14% over three years. Before starting treatment with MVC, we observed an initial fibrosis of F0–F1 in 49% of patients, F2–F3 in 24% and F4 in 27%. The medium follow-up was of 18.45 months. Progression to a higher fibrosis level was observed in five patients, 11 patients improved at least one stage and the others were stable over time. There were 38 patients taking MVC over two years, 27 patients in this group (59.38% did not modify their fibrosis, 3 patients (11% progressed and 8 (29

  4. Detection of hepatitis C viral RNA sequences in fresh and paraffin-embedded liver biopsy specimens of non-A, non-B hepatitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresters, D.; Cuypers, H. T.; Reesink, H. W.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Schipper, M. E.; Boeser-Nunnink, B. D.; Lelie, P. N.; Jansen, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    In this study methods of HCV-RNA detection in fresh frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver biopsies are described. Of 22 untreated chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis patients and 6 control patients, a plasma sample and part of a liver biopsy were freshly frozen for hepatitis C virus (HCV)

  5. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Poizot-Martin

    Full Text Available Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients.Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the multicenter French Dat'AIDS cohort. A simulation of drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral treatment and DAAs available in 2015 was performed.Of 16,634 HIV-infected patients, 2,511 had detectable anti-HCV antibodies, of whom 1,196 had a detectable HCV-RNA and were not receiving HCV treatment at the time of analysis. 97.1% of these patients were receiving cART and 81.2% had a plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/mL. cART included combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a boosted protease inhibitor in 43.6%, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 17.3%, an integrase inhibitor in 15.4% and various combinations or antiretroviral drugs in 23.7% of patients. A previous treatment against HCV had been administered in 64.4% of patients. Contraindicated associations/potential interactions were expected between cART and respectively sofosbuvir (0.2%/0%, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (0.2%/67.6%, daclatasvir (0%/49.4%, ombitasvir/boosted paritaprevir (with or without dasabuvir (34.4%/52.2% and simeprevir (78.8%/0%.Significant potential drug-drug interactions are expected between cART and the currently available DAAs in the majority of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and sofosbuvir/daclatasvir with or without ribavirin appeared the most suitable combinations in our population. A close collaboration between hepatologists and HIV/AIDS specialists appears necessary for the management of HCV treatment concomitantly to cART.

  6. Impact of hepatitis C infection on renal transplant patients: a single-center experience in Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzouki, Abdel-Naser Y; Gargoum, Huda M; Habas, Elmukhtar M; Rayani, Amnna A; Othman, Muftah

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on graft and patient survival in a cohort of Libyan renal transplant recipients. Medical records of 241 renal transplant (RT) patients who have been followed-up at the Benghazi Nephrology Center up to February 2010 were reviewed. Based on the presence or absence of anti-HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA in the serum, patients were divided into two groups: HCV-positives and HCV-negatives. Anti-HCV antibodies were detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique and HCV-RNA by the polymerase chain reaction. Of the 241 RT patients, 162 were male and 79 were female. One hundred and ten patients (45.6%) were HCV-positives and 131 (54.4%) were HCV-negatives. Acute graft rejection was significantly higher among HCV-negative than HCV-positive patients (42 patients versus 28 patients, respectively; P<0.001). Conversely, chronic graft rejection was higher among HCV-positives than that among HCV-negative patients (35 patients versus 24 patients, respectively; P<0.05), and this difference became more significant after a 12-month period of transplantation (P<0.01). Seventeen patients died during the follow-up: Seven HCV-positives (6.3%) and 10 HCV-negatives (7.6%), and there was no significant difference in the death rate following RT between the two groups (P=0.08). Among the seven deaths of HCV-positives, liver disease-related complications were the main cause of death in three (42.8%) HCV-positive patients compared with none in the HCV-negative patients. The presence of HCV infection influenced chronic graft survival in RT patients and a higher proportion of HCV-infected patients had hepatic dysfunctions after RT. An increase in fatal liver complications was noted in HCV-positive patients with RT. In addition to pre-RT-specific therapy of HCV infection, all measures should be taken to prevent HCV infection pre- and post-RT. HCV-infected RT recipients need close monitoring for graft

  7. Genetic History of Hepatitis C Virus in Venezuela: High Diversity and Long Time of Evolution of HCV Genotype 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbarán, Maria Z.; Di Lello, Federico A.; Sulbarán, Yoneira; Cosson, Clarisa; Loureiro, Carmen L.; Rangel, Héctor R.; Cantaloube, Jean F.; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan; Pujol, Flor H.

    2010-01-01

    Background The subtype diversity of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes is unknown in Venezuela. Methodology/Principal Findings Partial sequencing of the NS5B region was performed in 310 isolates circulating in patients from 1995 to 2007. In the samples collected between 2005 and 2007, HCV genotype 1 (G1) was the most common genotype (63%), composed as expected of mainly G1a and G1b. G2 was the second most common genotype (33%), being G2a almost absent and G2j the most frequent subtype. Sequence analysis of the core region confirmed the subtype assignment performed within the NS5b region in 63 isolates. The complete genome sequence of G2j was obtained. G2j has been described in France, Canada and Burkina Fasso, but it was not found in Martinique, where several subtypes of G2 circulate in the general population. Bayesian coalescence analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of G2j around 1785, before the introduction of G1b (1869) and G1a (1922). While HCV G1a and G1b experienced a growth reduction since 1990, coincident with the time when blood testing was implemented in Venezuela, HCV G2j did not seem to reach growth equilibrium during this period. Conclusions/Significance Assuming the introduction of G2j from Africa during the slave trade, the high frequency of G2j found in Venezuela could suggest: 1- the introduction of African ethnic groups different from the ones introduced to Martinique or 2- the occurrence of a founder effect. This study represents an in-depth analysis of the subtype diversity of HCV in Venezuela, which is still unexplored in the Americas and deserves further studies. PMID:21179440

  8. seroprevalence of hav, hbv, hcv, and hev among acute hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-30

    00100, Nairobi, J. Ngaira, Jomo Kenyatta. University of ... Co-infection rate with hepatitis Viruses was at 4%, IgM anti-HAV and IgM anti-HEV. 1 % (n=1); IgM .... analysis was carried out using SPSS 11.5 computer software.

  9. Replication Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus in Co-Infected Patients in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Yu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infections contributes to a substantial proportion of liver disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and virological features of HBV-HCV co-infection.Demographic data were collected for 3238 high-risk people from an HCV-endemic region in China. Laboratory tests included HCV antibody and HBV serological markers, liver function tests, and routine blood analysis. Anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed for HCV RNA levels and subgenotypes. HBsAg-positive samples were tested for HBV DNA.A total of 1468 patients had chronic HCV and/or HBV infections. Among them, 1200 individuals were classified as HCV mono-infected, 161 were classified as HBV mono-infected, and 107 were classified as co-infected. The HBV-HCV co-infected patients not only had a lower HBV DNA positive rate compared to HBV mono-infected patients (84.1% versus 94.4%, respectively; P < 0.001. The median HCV RNA levels in HBV-HCV co-infected patients were significantly lower than those in the HCV mono-infected patients (1.18[Interquartile range (IQR 0-5.57] versus 5.87[IQR, 3.54-6.71] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. Furthermore, co-infected patients were less likely to have detectable HCV RNA levels than HCV mono-infected patients (23.4% versus 56.5%, respectively; P < 0.001. Those HBV-HCV co-infected patients had significantly lower median HBV DNA levels than those mono-infected with HBV (1.97[IQR, 1.3-3.43] versus 3.06[IQR, 2-4.28] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. The HBV-HCV co-infection group had higher ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, APRI and FIB-4 levels, but lower ALB and total platelet compared to the HBV mono-infection group, and similar to that of the HCV mono-infected group.These results suggest that co-infection with HCV and HBV inhibits the replication of both viruses. The serologic results of HBV-HCV co-infection in patients suggests more liver injury compared to HBV mono-infected patients, but is

  10. Assessing current nutritional status of patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis in the compensated stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Kenichiro; Bekki, Machiko; Ichinose, Masako; Ikemoto, Michiko; Fujino, Tatsuya; Ryu, Tomoki; Wada, Yoshiyuki; Takami, Yuko; Saitsu, Hideki; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Fukuizumi, Kunitaka; Nakashima, Manabu; Nakamuta, Makoto; Enjoji, Munechika

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional states of Japanese patients with liver cirrhosis have recently shown great diversity, some show protein energy malnutrition and others excessive nutrition and obesity. For there to be adequate guidance regarding dietary treatment, it is important that a patient's current nutritional state be clarified. We assessed nutritive intake in Japanese cirrhotic patients and determined their nutritional problems. Subjects were non-hospitalized patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis in the compensated stage (n=47), chronic hepatitis C (n=46) or healthy volunteers (n=32). A brief self-administered diet history questionnaire was conducted with assistance from a registered dietitian. We categorized patients with cirrhosis according to daily intake of energy and protein; 10.6% had an energy and protein intake within a normal range, 72.4% showed excessive intake, and 17.0% showed insufficient intake of energy or protein. In cirrhotic patients with diabetic complications, the intake levels of energy, proteins, fat and carbohydrates were significantly higher than in patients without diabetes. Moreover, cirrhotic patients had significantly higher intake levels of energy, protein and fat than did chronic hepatitis C patients and healthy individuals. In patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis, insufficient intake of energy and protein was shown in some, while many, especially those with diabetes, showed excessive intake. For nutritive management of cirrhotic patients, the intake of various nutrients should be appropriately assessed and effective nutritional education systems established.

  11. Liver cancer and non-hodgkin lymphoma in hepatitis C virus-infected patients: results from the danvir cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Jepsen, Peter; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection can cause hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and most likely non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). No studies have compared the risk of these cancers between patients with chronic and cleared HCV-infection. The aim of this study was to estimate the 10-year risk of HCC and NHL...... in HCV-infected patients and to compare the risk of these cancers between HCV-infected patients and the general population in Denmark and between patients with chronic and cleared HCV-infection. Nationwide cohorts were used: 11,975 HCV-infected patients in the DANVIR cohort and 71,850 individuals from...

  12. Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with oral lichen planus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease of uncertain etiology. Recent reports suggest that LP is an extrahepatic manifestation of Hepatitis C infection. Objective: To determine the association of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with oral LP and to study the tests of liver function in patients with ...

  13. Association between sustained virological response and all-cause mortality among patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced hepatic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.P. van der Meer (Adriaan); B.J. Veldt (Bart); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H. Wedemeyer (Heiner); J.F. Dufour (Jean-François); F. Lammert (Frank); A. Duarte-Rojo (Andres); E.J. Heathcote (Jenny); M.P. Manns (Michael); L. Kuske (Lorenz); S. Zeuzem (Stefan); W.P. Hofmann (Peter); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract_Context:_ Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection outcomes include liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and liver-related death. _Objective:_ To assess the association between sustained virological response (SVR) and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic HCV

  14. HCV eradication does not impact gut dysbiosis or systemic inflammation in cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, J S; Sterling, R K; Betrapally, N S; Nixon, D E; Fuchs, M; Daita, K; Heuman, D M; Sikaroodi, M; Hylemon, P B; White, M B; Ganapathy, D; Gillevet, P M

    2016-09-01

    Eradication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasing but its residual impact on the pro-inflammatory milieu in cirrhosis, which is associated with gut dysbiosis, is unclear. To define the impact of sustained virological response (SVR) on gut dysbiosis and systemic inflammation in HCV cirrhosis patients. Cirrhotic out-patients with HCV with/without SVR (achieved >1 year prior) and age-matched healthy controls underwent serum and stool collection. Serum was analysed for IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin while stool microbiota analysis was performed using multitagged pyrosequencing. Microbial comparisons were made using UNIFRAC and cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio (lower score indicates dysbiosis). Comparisons were performed between cirrhotics with/without SVR and controls vs. cirrhotic patients. A total of 105 HCV cirrhotics and 45 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Twenty-one patients had achieved SVR using pegylated interferon + ribavrin a median of 15 months prior. No significant differences on demographics, cirrhosis severity, concomitant medications or diabetes were seen between cirrhotics with/without SVR. There was no significant difference in overall microbiota composition (UNIFRAC P = 0.3) overall or within specific microbial families (cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio median 1.3 vs. 1.0, P = 0.45) between groups with/without SVR. This also extended towards IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin levels. Both cirrhosis groups, however, had significant dysbiosis compared to healthy controls [UNIFRAC P = 0.01, cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio (1.1 vs. 2.9, P dysbiosis and a pro-inflammatory systemic milieu, are found in HCV cirrhosis regardless of SVR. This persistent dysbiosis could contribute towards varying rates of improvement after HCV eradication in cirrhosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mechanism of cell infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV)--a new paradigm in virus-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budkowska, Agata

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus, belonging to the Flaviviridae family. HCV infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis worldwide, leading to steatosis, liver cirrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Significant advances in understanding the mechanisms of HCV infection have been made since the development of a cell culture system reproducing the complete HCV cell cycle in vitro. HCV represents a new paradigm in interactions between the virus and its target cell, the human hepatocyte, due to the central role of lipoproteins in the HCV life cycle. Very low density lipoproteins are required for virus particle assembly and secretion. Upon the release, the infectious virus circulates in the blood as triglyceride-rich particles and infects cells using lipoprotein-receptor dependent mechanisms. HCV cell entry is a multi-step process: heparan sulphate and/or low-density lipoprotein receptor are cell surface factors mediating an initial virus attachment; subsequent virus interaction with tetraspanin CD81 and the human scavenger receptor SR-BI, the main HCV receptors, triggers virus movement to the tight junctions and its uptake via Claudin-1 and occludin. Another originality of HCV is that initiation of productive infection requires dynamic microtubules. Whereas other viruses use kinesin or dynein-dependent transport, HCV exploits mechanisms driven by microtubule polymerization to efficiently infect its target cell, in which virus nucleocapsid protein might play a particular role. An improved of understanding of the cellular events involved in HCV cell entry and transport, leading to the initiation of productive HCV infection, may reveal novel targets for anti-viral interventions.

  16. [Characterization of hepatitis C virus in chronic hepatitis patients: genotypes in the State of Amazonas, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ana Ruth; Almeida, Carlos Mauríco de; Fraporti, Liziara; Garcia, Nadja; Lima, Tatiane Amábili de; Maia, Laura Patrícia Viana; Torres, Kátia Luz; Tarragô, Andréa Monteiro; Victória, Flamir; Victória, Marilu; Tateno, Adriana; Levi, José Eduardo; Talhari, Sinésio; Malheiro, Adriana

    2011-10-01

    In the State of Amazonas, data regarding the prevalence of different genotypes of hepatitis C virus remains scarce. The genotype of 69 HCV positive patients was determined. An in-house standardized nested-PCR was used to detect HCV RNA. Genotype assignment was based on type-specific motifs on the sequenced amplicons delimited by primers HC11/HC18 from the 5' untranslated region. Of the 69 patients studied, 65.2% were male and 34.8% were female. Genotype 1 showed the greatest prevalence, followed by 3 and 2. These data suggesting that Manaus is the point of arrival of HCV in the State of Amazonas.

  17. Association of genotypes with viral load and biochemical markers in HCV-infected Sindhi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Riaz

    Full Text Available Abstract The presented study had two objectives. The first was to examine distributions of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV genotypes in Sindh, Pakistan, where HCV is prevalent. The other was to explore clinically relevant relationships between the genotypes, viral load (measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction assays and biochemical markers. For this, 1471 HCV-infected patients in six cities in Sindh were recruited and sampled. HCV genotype distributions varied among the cities, but genotype 3a was most prevalent, followed by 3b, 1a and 1b (detected in 51.5, 22.7. 9.25 and 3.2% of the cases, respectively. No type-specific sequences were detected in serum samples from 189 (12.8% of the 1471 patients. Frequencies of low (600,000 IU/mL serum viral loads were respectively 45.4, 16.5 and 38.1% for patients infected with genotype 3, and 16.9, 36.9 and 46.2%, respectively, for patients with other genotypes. Infection with genotype 1a was associated with significantly higher (p < 0.005 alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase titers than infection with genotype 3a. The results will help in the formulation of treatment strategies.

  18. Evaluation of Cellular Proliferative Activity in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus and Hepatitis C through AgNOR Method

    OpenAIRE

    Carli, João Paulo De; Silva, Soluete Oliveira da; Linden, Maria Salete Sandini; Busin, Carmen Silvia; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Souza, Paulo Henrique Couto

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cellular proliferative potential of oral lichen planus (OLP) lesions from patients without hepatitis C virus (HCV) by means of AgNOR method, as well as the cellular proliferative potential of the normal oral mucosa from patients with HCV, treated or untreated by interferon and ribavirin. A cross-sectional study was developed to investigate four groups: 10 HCV+ patients without clinical signs of OLP who had never been treated for HCV infection - ...

  19. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K; Weiner, David B; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-03-07

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14th vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection.

  20. [Prevalence of hepatitis C, hepatitis B and HIV infection among haemodialysis patients in Ibn-Rochd university hospital, Casablanca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulaajaj, Kawtar; Elomari, Younes; Elmaliki, Bouchra; Madkouri, Bouchra; Zaid, Driss; Benchemsi, Noufissa

    2005-11-01

    The viral infections are frequent in haemodialysis patients, notably those due to the hepatitis C virus (HCV), the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of the hepatitis C, the hepatitis B, the HIV infection in haemodialysis patients and the main risk factors for hepatitis C in the chronic haemodialysis patients treated in haemodialysis unit of Ibn Rochd University Hospital in Casablanca. This retrospective study was performed in 186 chronic haemodialysis patients and showed a high prevalence of HVC infection (76%), the prevalence of HBV infection was at 2%, none of the patients had detectable antibodies of HIV. Among the patients infected by the HCV, the mean duration of dialysis was 8,7 years. The mean number of blood units transfused was 16,5. Seventeen patients (11%) had no history of blood transfusion. In conclusion, the blood transfusion is not considered to be a like a major risk factor of the HCV infection in haemodialysis patients and this since the systematic detection of the anti-HCV antibodies in the blood donors. The nosocomial transmission of HCV seems to be the main risk factor HCV infection in the haemodialysis units requiring a strict adherence to infection control procedures for prevention of HVC infection in haemodialysis patients.

  1. Improve screening of HCV infection by targeting high prevalence aged groups: analysis of a cohort of HCV and HIV co-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Brogueira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis C constitutes a major public health burden. In Portugal, the prevalence is estimated at 1–1.5% (1. Of these, only 30% are presumed to be diagnosed, which reveals that most infections go unknown. The objective of this study is to identify the age-range distribution at HCV diagnosis and to identify the high-prevalence birth groups that could be targeted for screening, as a strategy to increase diagnosis and identify patients who would benefit most from treatment. Methods: Retrospective observational study of a cohort of chronic HCV-infected and HIV co-infected patients followed at an Infectious Diseases Center, diagnosed between 1979 and 2014 (Figure 1. Hepatic fibrosis evaluation was performed by real time elastography using METAVIR score. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, virological and therapeutic data was retrieved from clinical registries. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel 2010®. Chi2, Student T were used for a significant p value of <0.05. Results: Our study assessed a cohort of 665 patients: 442 (66.5% HCV/HIV co-infected and 223 (33.5% HCV monoinfected. There was a male predominance in both groups (74.9% vs 70.9%. The mean age was 47 HCV/HIV vs 49 years; Portuguese origin in 80% vs 83% and African in 14% vs 12%. The most frequently assumed transmission route was by intravenous drug use (IVDU (81% vs 72%, followed by sexual contact (18% vs 20%. Mean age at diagnosis was 32 vs 40 years. Mean time since HCV diagnosis was 14, 6 vs 9, 6 years. Fibrosis stage evaluation by real time elastography was available for 133 (30% and 99 (44.4% patients (HCV/HIV vs HCV: 16% vs 13% F1; 32% vs 33% F2; 31% vs 35% F3; 21% vs 18% F4. The peak prevalence occurred between the birth intervals of 1960–1969 and 1970–1979 for both groups, corresponding to 81% vs 66,8% (p=0.003 (Figure 1. About three quarters of all patients (76% were born between the year of 1960 and 1979, with a prevalence of 70% of IVDU

  2. The prevalence and severity of 25-(OH)-vitamin D insufficiency in HCV infected and in HBV infected patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkan-Kawińska, Aleksandra; Koślińska-Berkan, Ewa; Piekarska, Anna

    2015-05-01

    To assess the prevalence and severity of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This prospective study included 90 patients with chronic hepatitis C and 35 patients with chronic hepatitis B admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department between March 2013 and May 2014. Patients with chronic liver disease other than viral hepatitis, HIV co-infection, advanced liver disease and a history of diseases influencing vitamin D status were excluded. Serum vitamin D measurement as well as liver function, viral load, HCV genotype, interleukin 28 and liver fibrosis assessments were performed. In all patients, the mean vitamin D serum concentration was 18.8 (± 8.9) ng/ml. The mean vitamin D level in HBV infected patients was lower than in HCV infected patients (17.6 ng/ml vs. 19.3 ng/ml; p = 0.43). Vitamin D status was assessed in relation to viral load, HCV genotype, interleukin 28 and sex, but the differences were not significant. In both groups, serum vitamin D levels were significantly lower in winter compared to summer (14.2 ng/ml vs. 23.9 ng/ml in patients infected with HCV [ p D concentrations occur very often, but are not associated with poor virological characteristics. The only factor influencing the vitamin D level was the season.

  3. Viral hepatitis prevalence in patients with active and latent tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooredinvand, Hesam Ahmadi; Connell, David W; Asgheddi, Mahmoud; Abdullah, Mohammed; O'Donoghue, Marie; Campbell, Louise; Wickremasinghe, Melissa I; Lalvani, Ajit; Kon, Onn Min; Khan, Shahid A

    2015-08-07

    To assess the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and association with drug induced liver injury (DILI) in patients undergoing anti-tuberculosis (TB) therapy. Four hundred and twenty nine patients with newly diagnosed TB - either active disease or latent infection - who were due to commence anti-TB therapy between September 2008 and May 2011 were included. These patients were prospectively tested for serological markers of HBV, HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections - hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen, IgG and IgM antibody to HBcAg (anti-HBc), HCV IgG antibody and HIV antibody using a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot assay and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Patients were reviewed at least monthly during the TB treatment initiation phase. Liver function tests were measured prior to commencement of anti-TB therapy and 2-4 wk later. Liver function tests were also performed at any time the patient had significant nausea, vomiting, rash, or felt non-specifically unwell. Fisher's exact test was used to measure significance in comparisons of proportions between groups. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 429 patients, 270 (62.9%) had active TB disease and 159 (37.1%) had latent TB infection. 61 (14.2%) patients had isolated anti-HBc positivity, 11 (2.6%) were also HBsAg positive and 7 (1.6%) were HCV-antibody positive. 16/270 patients with active TB disease compared to 2/159 patients with latent TB infection had markers of chronic viral hepatitis (HBsAg or HCV antibody positive; P = 0.023). Similarly the proportion of HBsAg positive patients were significantly greater in the active vs latent TB infection group (10/43 vs 1/29, P = 0.04). The prevalence of chronic HBV or HCV was significantly higher than the estimated United Kingdom prevalence of 0.3% for each. We found no association

  4. Lack of evidence of hepatitis in patients with oral lichen planus in China: A case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jiangyuan; Zhang, Zhihui; JI, XIAOLI; Su, Sha; Liu, Xiaodan; Xu, Si; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Background China has been one of the countries with high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) liver disease. And lichen planus is an extrahepatic manifestation of patients with chronic HCV infection. This case-control study was conducted to investigate the relationship between oral lichen planus (OLP) and HBV/HCV infection in China. Material and Methods A total of 776 patients, including 150 patients with OLP (Group OLP), 429 inpatients from the Trauma War...

  5. Analysis of in vitro replicated human hepatitis C virus (HCV for the determination of genotypes and quasispecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelyapov Nickolas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isolation and self-replication of infectious HCV has been a difficult task. However, this is needed for the purposes of developing rational drugs and for the analysis of the natural virus. Our recent report of an in vitro system for the isolation of human HCV from infected patients and their replication in tissue culture addresses this challenge. At California Institute of Molecular Medicine several isolates of HCV, called CIMM-HCV, were grown for over three years in cell culture. This is a report of the analysis of CIMM-HCV isolates for subtypes and quasispecies using a 269 bp segment of the 5'UTR. HCV RNA from three patients and eleven CIMM-HCV were analyzed for this purpose. All isolates were essentially identical. Isolates of HCV from one patient were serially transmitted into fresh cells up to eight times and the progeny viruses from each transmission were compared to each other and also to the primary isolates from the patient's serum. Some isolates were also transmitted to different cell types, while others were cultured continuously without retransmission for over three years. We noted minor sequence changes when HCV was cultured for extended periods of time. HCV in T-cells and non-committed lymphoid cells showed a few differences when compared to isolates obtained from immortalized B-cells. These viruses maintained close similarity despite repeated transmissions and passage of time. There were no subtypes or quasispecies noted in CIMM-HCV.

  6. Daclatasvir plus Sofosbuvir for HCV in Patients Coinfected with HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, David L; Ruane, Peter J; Sulkowski, Mark S; Dieterich, Douglas; Luetkemeyer, Anne; Morgan, Timothy R; Sherman, Kenneth E; Dretler, Robin; Fishbein, Dawn; Gathe, Joseph C; Henn, Sarah; Hinestrosa, Federico; Huynh, Charles; McDonald, Cheryl; Mills, Anthony; Overton, Edgar Turner; Ramgopal, Moti; Rashbaum, Bruce; Ray, Graham; Scarsella, Anthony; Yozviak, Joseph; McPhee, Fiona; Liu, Zhaohui; Hughes, Eric; Yin, Philip D; Noviello, Stephanie; Ackerman, Peter

    2015-08-20

    The combination of daclatasvir, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A inhibitor, and the NS5B inhibitor sofosbuvir has shown efficacy in patients with HCV monoinfection. Data are lacking on the efficacy and safety of this combination in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This was an open-label study involving 151 patients who had not received HCV treatment and 52 previously treated patients, all of whom were coinfected with HIV-1. Previously untreated patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either 12 weeks or 8 weeks of daclatasvir at a standard dose of 60 mg daily (with dose adjustment for concomitant antiretroviral medications) plus 400 mg of sofosbuvir daily. Previously treated patients were assigned to undergo 12 weeks of therapy at the same doses. The primary end point was a sustained virologic response at week 12 after the end of therapy among previously untreated patients with HCV genotype 1 who were treated for 12 weeks. Patients had HCV genotypes 1 through 4 (83% with genotype 1), and 14% had compensated cirrhosis; 98% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Among patients with genotype 1, a sustained virologic response was reported in 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 89.8 to 99.2) who were treated for 12 weeks and in 75.6% (95% CI, 59.7 to 87.6) who were treated for 8 weeks among previously untreated patients and in 97.7% (95% CI, 88.0 to 99.9) who were treated for 12 weeks among previously treated patients. Rates of sustained virologic response across all genotypes were 97.0% (95% CI, 91.6 to 99.4), 76.0% (95% CI, 61.8 to 86.9), and 98.1% (95% CI, 89.7 to 100), respectively. The most common adverse events were fatigue, nausea, and headache. There were no study-drug discontinuations because of adverse events. HIV-1 suppression was not compromised. Among previously untreated HIV-HCV coinfected patients receiving daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir for HCV infection, the rate of sustained virologic response across

  7. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bùi Vũ Huy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD, from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724, of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30–39 years (P<0.001, male gender (P<0.001, never married patients (P<0.001, patients with a history of injection drug use (P<0.001, and clinical stages 2–4 (P<0.001. Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married (P<0.001 and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms.

  8. Dental problems delaying the initiation of interferon therapy for HCV-infected patients

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    Nagao Yumiko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been little discussion about the importance of oral management and interferon (IFN therapy, although management of the side effects of therapy for chronic hepatitis C has been documented. This study determined whether dental problems delayed the initiation of IFN therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients. Results We analyzed 570 HCV-infected patients who were admitted to our hospital from December 2003 to June 2010 for treatment consisting of pegylated IFN (Peg-IFN monotherapy or Peg-IFN/ribavirin combination therapy. The group comprised 274 men and 296 women with a mean age 57.2 years. Of the 570 patients, six could not commence Peg-IFN therapy, despite their admission, because of dental problems such as periodontitis, pupitis, and pericoronitis. The ages of six whose dental problems delayed the initiation of Peg-IFN ranged from 25 to 67 years, with a mean age of 47.3 ± 15.2 years. IFN therapy was deferred for 61.3 ± 47.7 days. Among the six subjects for whom IFN treatment was delayed, only one had a salivary flow that was lower than the normal value. Conclusions Treatment of dental infections is required before IFN therapy for HCV infection can be started. To increase the depth of understanding of oral health care, it is hoped that dentists and medical specialists in all areas will hold discussions to generate cooperation.

  9. Dental problems delaying the initiation of interferon therapy for HCV-infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There has been little discussion about the importance of oral management and interferon (IFN) therapy, although management of the side effects of therapy for chronic hepatitis C has been documented. This study determined whether dental problems delayed the initiation of IFN therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. Results We analyzed 570 HCV-infected patients who were admitted to our hospital from December 2003 to June 2010 for treatment consisting of pegylated IFN (Peg-IFN) monotherapy or Peg-IFN/ribavirin combination therapy. The group comprised 274 men and 296 women with a mean age 57.2 years. Of the 570 patients, six could not commence Peg-IFN therapy, despite their admission, because of dental problems such as periodontitis, pupitis, and pericoronitis. The ages of six whose dental problems delayed the initiation of Peg-IFN ranged from 25 to 67 years, with a mean age of 47.3 ± 15.2 years. IFN therapy was deferred for 61.3 ± 47.7 days. Among the six subjects for whom IFN treatment was delayed, only one had a salivary flow that was lower than the normal value. Conclusions Treatment of dental infections is required before IFN therapy for HCV infection can be started. To increase the depth of understanding of oral health care, it is hoped that dentists and medical specialists in all areas will hold discussions to generate cooperation. PMID:20712912

  10. Hepatic fibrosis and serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) as predictors of response to HCV treatment and factors associated with serum AFP normalisation after treatment.

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    El Raziky, Maissa; Attia, Dina; El Akel, Wafaa; Shaker, Olfat; Khatab, Hany; Abdo, Shaimaa; Elsharkawy, Aisha; Esmat, Gamal

    2013-09-01

    Elevated levels of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) can be seen in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and liver cirrhosis without hepatocellular carcinoma and were negatively associated with treatment response. However, factors associated with its changes are not identified. We aimed in this study to verify a cut-off value for AFP as a predictor of response to standard of care (SOC) antiviral therapy in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients and identify factors associated with its changes post treatment. A total of 175 chronic non-cirrhotic HCV-infected patients were evaluated for baseline serum AFP and liver biopsy were classified according to Ishak scoring system of hepatic fibrosis. All patients were scheduled to receive SOC antiviral therapy for 48weeks and had been followed up to week 72. Reassessment of AFP and repeated liver biopsy at week 72 were feasible only in 79 patients. High baseline AFP levels were observed in non-respondents (non-sustained virological respondents (non-SVRs)) (PAFP level decreased in all patients post treatment (P=0.01), especially in the SVRs (PAFP difference (P=0.007, 0.01, 0.012, AFP and hepatic fibrosis stage factors; the best cut-off value for AFP was 3.57ngdl(-1) with 50% sensitivity and 68% specificity with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.55 and for hepatic fibrosis stage was 3, with a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 30% with an AUC of 0.58. In chronic HCV-infected patients, serum AFP below 3.57ngdl(-1) and hepatic fibrosis ⩽stage 3 are expected to have good response to treatment; BMI (25-30kgm(-1)), A2, fibrosis >2 and fibrosis improvement predict AFP change post treatment. Copyright © 2013 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interferon-Free Hepatitis C Treatment before and after Liver Transplantation: The Role of HCV Drug Resistance

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    Bruno Roche

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the leading causes of end-stage liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation (LT in most countries. All patients who undergo LT with detectable serum HCV RNA experience graft reinfection progressing to cirrhosis within five years in 20% to 30% of them. Obtaining a sustained virological response (SVR greatly improves overall and graft survival. Until 2011, standard antiviral therapy using PEGylated interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin (RBV was the only effective therapy, with an SVR rate around 30% in this setting. For patients infected with genotype 1, first generation NS3/4A protease inhibitors (PIs, boceprevir (BOC or telaprevir (TVR, associated with PEG-IFN and RBV for 48 weeks have increased the SVR rates to 60% in non-transplant patients. However, tolerability and drug-drug interactions with calcineurin inhibitors (CNI are both limiting factors of their use in the liver transplant setting. Over recent years, the efficacy of antiviral C therapy has improved dramatically using new direct-acting antiviral (DAA agents without PEG-IFN and/or RBV, leading to SVR rates over 90% in non-transplant patients. Results available for transplant patients showed a better efficacy and tolerability and less drug-drug interactions than with first wave PIs. However, some infrequent cases of viral resistance have been reported using PIs or NS5A inhibitors pre- or post-LT that can lead to difficulties in the management of these patients.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, Efficacy, and Safety of Hepatitis C Virus Drugs in Patients with Liver and/or Renal Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, E.J.; Kanter, C.T. de; Hoek, B. van; Arends, J.E.; Drenth, J.P.; Burger, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients often suffer from liver cirrhosis, which can be complicated by renal impairment. Therefore, in this review we describe the treatment possibilities in HCV patients with hepatic and renal impairment. Cirrhosis alters the structure of the liver, which affects

  13. Pharmacokinetics, Efficacy, and Safety of Hepatitis C Virus Drugs in Patients with Liver and/or Renal Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, Elise J; de Kanter, Clara T M M; van Hoek, Bart; Arends, Joop E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314063242; Drenth, Joost P H; Burger, David M

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients often suffer from liver cirrhosis, which can be complicated by renal impairment. Therefore, in this review we describe the treatment possibilities in HCV patients with hepatic and renal impairment. Cirrhosis alters the structure of the liver, which affects

  14. New pandemics: HIV and AIDS, HCV and chronic hepatitis, Influenza virus and flu

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    Cohen Éric A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New pandemics are a serious threat to the health of the entire world. They are essentially of viral origin and spread at large speed. A meeting on this topic was held in Lyon, France, within the XIXth Jacques Cartier Symposia, a series of France-Québec meetings held every year. New findings on HIV and AIDS, on HCV and chronic hepatitis, and an update on influenza virus and flu were covered during this meeting on December 4 and 5, 2006. Aspects of viral structure, virus-host interactions, antiviral defenses, drugs and vaccinations, and epidemiological aspects were discussed for HIV and HCV. Old and recent data on the flu epidemics ended this meeting.

  15. Spontaneous hepatitis C viral clearance and hepatitis C chronic infection are associated with distinct cytokine profiles in Mexican patients

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    Nora A Fierro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms related to the spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV have been primarily studied in regions where the infection is endemic. Results of prior studies have been extrapolated to populations with low endemicity, such as Mexico. Herein, we determined the cytokine profiles in serum samples from Mexican patients who spontaneously cleared HCV and patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1a. Chronic HCV-infected patients displayed increased interleukin (IL-8 and regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (CCL-5 secretion, whereas patients who spontaneously cleared HCV showed augmented levels of IL-1 alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein-2 (CCL-8, IL-13 and IL-15. Our study suggeststhat cytokine profiles may predict disease outcome during HCV infection.

  16. Spontaneous hepatitis C viral clearance and hepatitis C chronic infection are associated with distinct cytokine profiles in Mexican patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Nora A; González-Aldaco, Karina; Torres-Valadez, Rafael; Trujillo-Trujillo, Maria E; Roman, Sonia; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms related to the spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been primarily studied in regions where the infection is endemic. Results of prior studies have been extrapolated to populations with low endemicity, such as Mexico. Herein, we determined the cytokine profiles in serum samples from Mexican patients who spontaneously cleared HCV and patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1a. Chronic HCV-infected patients displayed increased interleukin (IL)-8 and regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (CCL-5) secretion, whereas patients who spontaneously cleared HCV showed augmented levels of IL-1 alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein-2 (CCL-8), IL-13 and IL-15. Our study suggests that cytokine profiles may predict disease outcome during HCV infection.

  17. Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Urine of Patients with Hepatitis B and C

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    Ömer Faruk Kökoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to determine the role of oxidative stress biomarkers in hepatic damage in hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with chronic hepatitis B, 15 patients with chronic hepatitis C and 30 healthy individuals as a control group were included in this study. Serum alanine-aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels, urine oxidative stress biomarkers such as malondialdehyde (MDA levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD-1 and catalase (CAT activities were measured. Results: Urine MDA levels increased in patients with HBV and HCV compared to the control group. It was higher in HCV patients than HBV patients (p<0.001. Besides, while CAT and SOD-1 activities were decreased in the urine of patients with HCV, they increased in the urine of patients with HBV compared to controls (p<0.05. Furthermore, urine CAT ve SOD-1 activities in patients with HBV were statistically significantly higher than those of the HCV patients (p<0.001. Conclusion: Increase in urine MDA levels in hepatitis forms may be valuable in monitoring in viral hepatitis cases. Also, we thought that insufficiency of antioxidant barrier in patients with HCV may cause oxidative damage, so antioxidant treatment may useful and should be added to the combined therapy for these patients.

  18. Interferon (IFN and Cellular Immune Response Evoked in RNA-Pattern Sensing During Infection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV

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    Masato Nakai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects hepatocytes but not dendritic cells (DCs, but DCs effectively mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes. Using gene-disrupted mice and hydrodynamic injection strategy, we found the MAVS pathway to be crucial for induction of type III interferons (IFNs in response to HCV in mouse. Human hepatocytes barely express TLR3 under non-infectious states, but frequently express it in HCV infection. Type I and III IFNs are induced upon stimulation with polyI:C, an analog of double-stranded (dsRNA. Activation of TLR3 and the TICAM-1 pathway, followed by DC-mediated activation of cellular immunity, is augmented during exposure to viral RNA. Although type III IFNs are released from replication-competent human hepatocytes, DC-mediated CTL proliferation and NK cell activation hardly occur in response to the released type III IFNs. Yet, type I IFNs and HCV-infected hepatocytes can induce maturation of DCs in either human or mouse origin. In addition, mouse CD8+ DCs mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes unless the TLR3/TICAM-1 pathway is blocked. We found the exosomes containing HCV RNA in the supernatant of the HCV-infected hepatocytes act as a source of TLR3-mediated DC maturation. Here we summarize our view on the mechanism by which DCs mature to induce NK and CTL in a status of HCV infection.

  19. Profile of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis d virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections in hemodialysis patients of a tertiary care hospital in uttarakhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Garima; Gupta, Pratima; Thakuria, Bhaskar; Mukhiya, Gulshan K; Mittal, Manish

    2013-03-01

    Viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are important causes of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The present study was performed to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and HIV infections in hemodialysis patients of a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. All patients undergoing maintenance HD at our center were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to HCV (anti-HCV), antibody to HDV (anti-HDV) and HIV antibody by ELISA. Detailed history regarding age, sex, duration of dialysis, blood transfusions, number of dialysis centers, dialyzer reuse and laboratory data was recorded. A total of 118 patients (79 males and 39 females) were followed for 18 months with screening for the presence of HBV, HCV and HIV infections. At baseline, 12 (10.2%) patients were positive for HBsAg, 19 (16.1%) for anti-HCV and 2 (1.7%) for HIV antibody. Over 18 months, one additional patient became HBsAg positive and an additional 17 became anti-HCV-positive to give a total of 36 HCV-positive patients. Dual HBV and HCV infection was seen in 5 (4.2%) and anti-HDV antibodies were found in 1 (0.9%) patient. History of blood transfusions, duration of HD, dialyzer reuse and dialysis at multiple centers were found to be important risk factors for anti-HCV positivity. Implementation and adherence to universal work precautions by dialysis staff is imperative to prevent transmission of these infections.

  20. Increased HEV seroprevalence in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.

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    Sven Pischke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV infection takes a clinically silent, self-limited course in the far majority of cases. Chronic hepatitis E has been reported in some cohorts of immunocompromised individuals. The role of HEV infections in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is unknown. METHODS: 969 individuals were tested for anti-HEV antibodies (MP-diagnostics including 208 patients with AIH, 537 healthy controls, 114 patients with another autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and 109 patients with chronic HCV- or HBV-infection (HBV/HCV. Patients with AIH, RA and HBV/HCV were tested for HEV RNA. HEV-specific proliferative T cell responses were investigated using CFSE staining and in vitro stimulation of PBMC with overlapping HEV peptides. RESULTS: HEV-antibodies tested more frequently positive in patients with AIH (n = 16; 7.7% than in healthy controls (n = 11; 2.0%; p = 0.0002, patients with RA (n = 4; 3.5%; p = 0.13 or patients with HBV/HCV infection (n = 2; 2.8%; p = 0.03. HEV-specific T cell responses could be detected in all anti-HEV-positive AIH patients. One AIH patient receiving immunosuppression with cyclosporin and prednisolone and elevated ALT levels had acute hepatitis E but HEV viremia resolved after reducing immunosuppressive medication. None of the RA or HBV/HCV patients tested HEV RNA positive. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with autoimmune hepatitis but not RA or HBV/HCV patients are more likely to test anti-HEV positive. HEV infection should been ruled out before the diagnosis of AIH is made. Testing for HEV RNA is also recommended in AIH patients not responding to immunosuppressive therapy.

  1. Considerations on bringing warehoused HCV patients into active care following interferon-free, direct-acting antiviral drug approval.

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    Palak, Aleksandra; Livoti, Christine; Audibert, Céline

    2017-05-01

    Until recently, lack of efficacious and tolerable hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments prompted patient warehousing until better treatment options became available. We investigated whether the introduction of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir precipitated patient return to clinics, thereby changing HCV clinic dynamics. Online questionnaire responses indicated the volume of HCV patients followed, the proportion of warehoused patients and those who were proactively offered new options, methods for identifying and contacting patients, and insurance authorization/reimbursement-related information. Of 168 practices surveyed, 19% indicated no patient warehousing in the previous 3 years; 81% had warehoused 40% of patients; 92% were able to handle their patient load; and 82% had not changed practices to accommodate more HCV patients in the previous 12 months. Of the 35% of patients who were ledipasvir/sofosbuvir-eligible, 50% already completed/are completing therapy, 21% were not treated due to insurance denial, and 19% were awaiting responses from insurance companies. Launch of a new treatment did not overburden HCV practices. Patients eligible to receive new treatments were being treated, but pre-authorization processes and reimbursement denials reduced the numbers of treated patients.

  2. Seropositivity of HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV in preoperative patients

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    Berrin Karaayak Uzun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV viruses pose a serious occupational risk for the healthcare workers especially those in emergency services, laboratories and surgery wards. Vaccination and establishment of the strict biosafety procedures are the main principles to prevent blood-borne infections in healthcare workers. Additionally, serological screening of the preoperative patients could decrease the risk for exposure. In this study, we aimed to determine the seroprevalence of HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1/2 in preoperative patients. Methods: Hospital automation records were evaluated retrospectively for 4.367 patients who were scheduled for surgery and scanned for anti-HIV 1/2, HBsAg and anti-HCV as preoperative procedures in the preparation period of operation between January 2012 and December 2012. Results: HBsAg positivity rate was found in 7.7% (n=336, anti-HCV positivity rate was found in 2.3% (n=101. A two (0.05% of five patients were positive for anti-HIV 1/2 was found positive verification test and the other three samples were accepted as false positive test results. Conclusion: All healthcare workers must be trained about occupational diseases and vaccinated against Hepatitis B. Universal precautions must be strictly followed particularly in the operating room. In addition, all patients should be considered as potential carriers regarded as a carrier of the potential for infection. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 449-452

  3. Cancer risk in patients with hepatitis C virus infection: a?population?based study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiangdong; Chen, Yanqing; Wang, Youxin; Dong, Xiaohua; Wang, Junming; Tang, Jianhua; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Ji, Jianguang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Increased risks of certain cancers have been observed in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, data on other cancer sites/types are lacking. We analyzed systematically the risk of developing 35 common cancers in patients with HCV infection using a nationwide Swedish database. Patients with HCV infection were identified from the Swedish Hospital Inpatient and Outpatient Register and Primary Health Care Database, and followed until the diagnosis of cancer. Standardi...

  4. Microbial translocation is correlated with HIV evolution in HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

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    Jean-Jacques Tudesq

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT is characterized by bacterial products passing into the blood through the gut barrier and is a key phenomenon in the pathophysiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. MT is also associated with liver damage in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV patients. The aim of the study was to assess MT in plasma of HIV-HCV co-infected patients. 16S rDNA (16 S Ribosomal DNA subunit marker and other markers of MT such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-binding protein (LBP, soluble CD14 (sCD14, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP were used. Clinical, biological and immunological characteristics of the population were studied in order to correlate them with the intensity of the MT. We demonstrate that indirect markers of MT, LBP and CD14s, and a marker of intestinal permeability (I-FABP are significantly higher in HIV-HCV co-infected patients than in healthy controls (17.0 vs 2.6 μg/mL, p < 0.001; 1901.7 vs 1255.0 ng/mL, p = 0.018; 478.3 vs 248.1 pg/mL, p < 0.001, respectively, while a direct marker of MT (16S rDNA copies is not different between these two populations. However, plasma 16S rDNA was significantly higher in co-infected patients with long-standing HIV infections (RGM = 1.47 per 10 years, CI95% = [1.04:2.06], p = 0.03. Our findings show that in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, plasma 16S rDNA levels, directly reflecting MT, seem to be linked to the duration of HIV infection, while elevated levels of LBP and sCD14 reflect only a persistence of immune activation. The levels of these markers were not correlated with HCV evolution.

  5. Risk Factors and Seroprevalence of Hepatitis C among Patients Hospitalized at Mulago Hospital, Uganda

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    J. I. O'Reilly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of hepatitis C virus (HCV and its associated sequelae in Africa is a cause for significant concern. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients are at an increased risk of contracting HCV infection due to similar risk factors and modes of transmission. We investigated the seroprevalence of hepatitis C in hospitalized HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in Mulago Hospital, an academic hospital in Uganda. Blood samples were first tested for HCV antibodies, and positive tests were confirmed with HCV RNA PCR. We enrolled five hundred patients, half HIV-positive and half HIV negative. Overall, 13/500 patients (2.6% tested positive for HCV antibodies. There was no difference in HCV antibody detection among HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Out of all risk factors examined, only an age greater than 50 years was associated with HCV infection. Traditional risk factors for concurrent HIV and HCV transmission, such as intravenous drug use, were exceedingly rare in Uganda. Only 3 of 13 patients with detectable HCV antibodies were confirmed by HCV RNA detection. This result concurs with recent studies noting poor performance of HCV antibody testing when using African sera. These tests should be validated in the local population before implementation.

  6. Study of Various HCV Genotypes in Patients Managing by Referral Clinic in Yazd Province

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    M Pedarzadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Determining virus genotype is a major factor for initiation of treatment because various kinds of genotypes need different antiviral drugs. Distribution of hepatitis C genotype in the word is variable in each country or even in each province. So we need to determine distribution pattern of hepatitis C genotype in our region. This study was performed in referral clinic of Yazd province. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted between 2007 and 2010 on patients who were observed by Yazd referral clinic (the clinic for evaluating and management of patients with high risk behaviors. Ninety two patients who had positive RIBA test for hepatitis C infection were randomly selected and entered the study. Genotyping was performed using RT-PCR method. The primer was "universal primer HCV". Prevalence of various genotypes was analyzed according to gender, addiction and co- existence of HCV-HIV infection. Personal information and laboratory results were analyzed using SPSS. Results: The most common genotype in our study was genotype 3a (65% of cases, followed by 1a (35%. Globally 83% of patients were IV drug addict. Genotype distribution in these patients was similar to others. Fifteen patients had co-infection of HCV-HIV, and 47% of them were contaminated by genotype 1a and 53% with 3a. We could not find any patient contaminated with genotypes 2 or 4. No other genotypes except 1 & 3 or mixed genotype infection could be determined in our patients. Twenty three percent of patients had negative PCR despite positive RIBA test. This indicates that self improvement from acute hepatitis C infection in IV drug addict patients is similar to other people. Conclusion: According to the results of our study, about 2/3 of patients were infected by genotype 3a. This kind of chronic hepatitis C shows a better response to treatment comparing genotype 1a (or 1b with shorter duration and lower cost drugs. But despite higher incidence of genotype 3a, we

  7. Interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4 gene polymorphism is associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV in HIV-1 positive patients

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    Camila Fernanda da Silveira Alves

    Full Text Available Abstract Approximately one-third of the individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. Co-infected patients have an increased risk for developing end-stage liver diseases. Variants upstream of the IFNL3 gene have been associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of HCV infection. Recently, a novel polymorphism was discovered, denoted IFNL4 ΔG > TT (rs368234815, which seems to be a better predictor of spontaneous clearance than the IFNL4 rs12979860 polymorphism. We aimed to determine the prevalence of the IFNL4 ΔG > TT variants and to evaluate the association with spontaneous clearance of HCV infection in Brazilian HIV-1 patients. The IFNL4 ΔG > TT genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction digestion in 138 HIV-1 positive patients who had an anti-HCV positive result. Spontaneous clearance of HCV was observed in 34 individuals (24.6%. IFNL4 genotype distribution was significantly different between individuals who had spontaneous clearance and chronic HCV patients (p=0.002. The probability of spontaneous clearance of HCV infection for patients with the IFNL4 TT/TT genotype was 3.6 times higher than for patients carrying the IFNL4 ΔG allele (OR=3.63, 95% CI:1.51-8.89, p=0.001. The IFNL4 ΔG > TT polymorphism seems to be better than IFNL4 rs12979860 to predict spontaneous clearance of the HCV in Brazilian HIV-1 positive patients.

  8. The Combination of Grazoprevir, a Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, and Elbasvir, an HCV NS5A Inhibitor, Demonstrates a High Genetic Barrier to Resistance in HCV Genotype 1a Replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahser, Frederick C; Bystol, Karin; Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Xia, Ellen; Ingravallo, Paul; Chase, Robert; Liu, Rong; Black, Todd; Hazuda, Daria; Howe, Anita Y M; Asante-Appiah, Ernest

    2016-05-01

    The selection of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) against single agents administered to patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) necessitates that direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) targeting multiple viral proteins be developed to overcome failure resulting from emergence of resistance. The combination of grazoprevir (formerly MK-5172), an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and elbasvir (formerly MK-8742), an NS5A inhibitor, was therefore studied in genotype 1a (GT1a) replicon cells. Both compounds were independently highly potent in GT1a wild-type replicon cells, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 0.9 nM and 0.006 nM for grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. No cross-resistance was observed when clinically relevant NS5A and NS3 RAVs were profiled against grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. Kinetic analyses of HCV RNA reduction over 14 days showed that grazoprevir and elbasvir inhibited prototypic NS5A Y93H and NS3 R155K RAVs, respectively, with kinetics comparable to those for the wild-type GT1a replicon. In combination, grazoprevir and elbasvir interacted additively in GT1a replicon cells. Colony formation assays with a 10-fold multiple of the EC90 values of the grazoprevir-elbasvir inhibitor combination suppressed emergence of resistant colonies, compared to a 100-fold multiple for the independent agents. The selected resistant colonies with the combination harbored RAVs that required two or more nucleotide changes in the codons. Mutations in the cognate gene caused greater potency losses for elbasvir than for grazoprevir. Replicons bearing RAVs identified from resistant colonies showed reduced fitness for several cell lines and may contribute to the activity of the combination. These studies demonstrate that the combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir exerts a potent effect on HCV RNA replication and presents a high genetic barrier to resistance. The combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir is currently approved for

  9. Histological and histochemical alterations in liver of chronic hepatitis C patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Sakr, Saber A; Badrah, Gamal A; Sheir, Rania A

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C is an infectious disease affecting the liver. Chronic infection can progress fibrosis and cirrhosis, liver failure or liver cancer. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral bacterium infects the stomach of more than 50% of the human population worldwide. H. pylori DNA has been identified in human livers and has been implicated in chronic liver disease and liver cancer. The present work was aimed to study the histological and histochemical alterations in liver of HCV patients with or without H. pylori infection. Immunohistochemical detection of H. pylori showed positive reactivity in 62 biopsies out of 100 biopsies (38% HCV patients and 62% HCV patients coinfected with H. pylori). Histological examination of liver of HCV patients showed microvesicular and macrovesicular steatosis, lymphocytic infiltrations, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Cirrhotic nodules and impairment of hepatic parenchyma were common in HCV patients coinfected with H. pylori. HCV patients coinfected with H. pylori recorded higher NIC score and pronounced fibrosis stages than HCV patients. Glycogen and total proteins decreased in hepatocytes and cirrhotic nodules in HCV patients. Such decrease was marked in liver of HCV patients coinfected with H. pylori. So it is recommended to perform a complete analysis for H. pylori in HCV patients suggesting that it will help in therapy of this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatitis C as a prognostic indicator among noncirrhotic patients hospitalized with alcoholic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuluvath, Paul J; Ahn, Eric; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2013-11-01

    A nationwide analysis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH) admissions was conducted to determine the impact of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on short-term survival and hospital resource utilization. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, noncirrhotic patients admitted with AH throughout the United States between 1998 and 2006 were identified with diagnostic codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. The in-hospital mortality rate (primary end point) of AH patients with and without co-existent HCV infection was determined. Hospital resource utilization was assessed as a secondary end point through linear regression analysis. From 1998 to 2006, there were 112,351 admissions for AH. In-hospital mortality was higher among patients with coexistent HCV infection (41.1% versus 3.2%; P=0.07). The adjusted odds of in-hospital mortality in the presence of HCV was 1.48 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.98). Noncirrhotic patients with AH and HCV also had longer length of stay (5.8 days versus 5.3 days; P<0.007) as well as greater hospital charges (US$25,990 versus US$21,030; P=0.0002). Among noncirrhotic patients admitted with AH, HCV infection was associated with higher in-hospital mortality and resource utilization.

  11. Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis Delta (HDV) Viruses in the Colombian Population—How Is the Epidemiological Situation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Gutierrez Fernandez, María Fernanda; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Soares; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem worldwide. In Colombia, data from 1980s described that HBV and HDV infection are important causes of hepatitis, but little is known about HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the currently frequency of HBV, HCV and HDV in four different Colombian regions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in 697 habitants from 4 Colombian departments: Amazonas, Chocó, Magdalena and San Andres Islands. Epidemiological data were obtained from an interview applied to each individual aiming to evaluate risk factors related to HBV, HCV or HDV infections. All samples were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV markers. Samples that were positive to HBsAg and/or anti-HBc were tested to anti-HDV. Concerning the geographical origin of the samples, the three HBV markers showed a statistically significant difference: HBsAg (p = 0.033) and anti-HBc (pMagdalena departments. Isolated anti-HBs (a marker of previous vaccination) frequencies were: Chocó (53.26%), Amazonas (32.88%), Magdalena (17.0%) and San Andrés (15.33%) - pMagdalena department. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, HBV, HCV and HDV infections are detected throughout Colombia in frequency levels that would place some areas as hyperendemic for HBV, especially those found in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the rural population and to strengthen HCV surveillance are reinforced by these results. PMID:21559488

  12. Hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and hepatitis delta (HDV) viruses in the Colombian population--how is the epidemiological situation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Fernandez, María Fernanda Gutierrez; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Soares; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2011-04-29

    Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem worldwide. In Colombia, data from 1980s described that HBV and HDV infection are important causes of hepatitis, but little is known about HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the currently frequency of HBV, HCV and HDV in four different Colombian regions. This study was conducted in 697 habitants from 4 Colombian departments: Amazonas, Chocó, Magdalena and San Andres Islands. Epidemiological data were obtained from an interview applied to each individual aiming to evaluate risk factors related to HBV, HCV or HDV infections. All samples were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV markers. Samples that were positive to HBsAg and/or anti-HBc were tested to anti-HDV. Concerning the geographical origin of the samples, the three HBV markers showed a statistically significant difference: HBsAg (p = 0.033) and anti-HBc (pMagdalena departments. Isolated anti-HBs (a marker of previous vaccination) frequencies were: Chocó (53.26%), Amazonas (32.88%), Magdalena (17.0%) and San Andrés (15.33%)--pMagdalena department. In conclusion, HBV, HCV and HDV infections are detected throughout Colombia in frequency levels that would place some areas as hyperendemic for HBV, especially those found in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the rural population and to strengthen HCV surveillance are reinforced by these results.

  13. The influence of HCV coinfection on clinical, immunological and virological responses to HAART in HIV-patients

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    Ricardo A. Carmo

    Full Text Available The potential impact of the hepatitis C virus (HCV on clinical, immunological and virological responses to initial highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is important to evaluate due to the high prevalence of HIV-HCV coinfection. A historical cohort study was conducted among 824 HIV-infected patients starting HAART at a public referral service in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, to assess the impact of HCV seropositivity on appearance of a new AIDS-defining opportunistic illness, AIDS-related death, suppression of viral load, and an increase in CD4-cell count. A total of 76 patients (9.2% had a positive HCV test, 26 of whom (34.2% had a history of intravenous drug use. In multivariate analysis, HCV seropositivity was associated with a smaller CD4-cell recovery (RH=0.68; 95% CI [0.49-0.92], but not with progression to a new AIDS-defining opportunistic illness or to AIDS-related death (RH=1.08; 95% CI [0.66-1.77], nor to suppression of HIV-1 viral load (RH=0.81; 95% CI [0.56-1.17] after starting HAART. These results indicate that although associated with a blunted CD4-cell recovery, HCV coinfection did not affect the morbidity or mortality related to AIDS or the virological response to initial HAART.

  14. HCV and HBV infections in Nigerian Patients with Liver Cirrhosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is aimed at determining the incidence of HCV and HBV infections in Nigerian patients with Liver Cirrhosis (LC) and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of HBV and antibodies to HVC was determined by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assey (ELISA) in 24 Nigerians with histologically ...

  15. Anti-ENA antibody profile in hepatitis C patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchoun, Raymond G; Al-Najdawi, Malek A; Al-Taamary, Sameh

    2011-07-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasing all over the world, especially among hemodialysis patients. HCV is one of the major autoantibody inducing viruses, where anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), anti-liver kidney microsome antibodies (LKM-1), and rheumatoid factor (RF) have been related to HCV. Few studies have investigated the presence of anti-extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) antibodies in chronic liver diseases, especially in chronic hepatitis C cases, but none investigated its immunostimulation role in hemodialysis units. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of HCV among chronic kidney disease- Stage 5 (CKD5) patients undergoing hemodialysis and the prevalence of ENA antibodies among them. Sera of 134 patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis, were screened for HCV antibodies and ENA antibodies profile, using ELISA and Immunoblot technique. 41 HCV-positive blood bank donors were used as controls. Sixty-four (47.7%) of 134 patients undergoing hemodialysis were infected with HCV. Thirty-three (51.6%) of 64 patients with HCV infection undergoing hemodialysis had anti-ENA antibodies: 9 (27.3%) showed anti-SSA antibodies and 22 (66.7%) had anti-SSB antibodies. The prevalence of anti-ENA antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with HCV infection, undergoing hemodialysis, compared with both control groups (hepatitis C-positive blood bank donors and hepatitis C-negative patients undergoing hemodialysis). Seventeen of 33 HCV antibodies-positive males undergoing hemodialysis had anti-ENA antibodies, compared with 16 of 31 females, indicating no sex related difference. This study emphasizes the high prevalence of HCV infection in our hemodialysis patients, comparable to that of other Middle Eastern countries, but higher than Western ones. A strong association was observed between anti-HCV positivity and hemodialysis duration, as well as anti-ENA antibody profile. However, these

  16. Anti-ENA antibody profile in hepatitis C patients undergoing hemodialysis

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    Raymond G Batchoun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is increasing all over the world, especially among hemodialysis patients. HCV is one of the major autoantibody inducing viruses, where anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA, anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA, anti-liver kidney microsome antibodies (LKM-1, and rheumatoid factor (RF have been related to HCV. Few studies have investigated the presence of anti-extractable nuclear antigens (ENA antibodies in chronic liver diseases, especially in chronic hepatitis C cases, but none investigated its immunostimulation role in hemodialysis units. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of HCV among chronic kidney disease- Stage 5 (CKD5 patients undergoing hemodialysis and the prevalence of ENA antibodies among them. Sera of 134 patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis, were screened for HCV antibodies and ENA antibodies profile, using ELISA and Immunoblot technique. 41 HCV-positive blood bank donors were used as controls. Sixty-four (47.7% of 134 patients undergoing hemodialysis were infected with HCV. Thirty-three (51.6% of 64 patients with HCV infection undergoing hemodialysis had anti-ENA antibodies: 9 (27.3% showed anti-SSA antibodies and 22 (66.7% had anti-SSB antibodies. The prevalence of anti-ENA antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with HCV infection, undergoing hemodialysis, compared with both control groups (hepatitis C-positive blood bank donors and hepatitis C-negative patients undergoing hemodialysis. Seventeen of 33 HCV antibodies-positive males undergoing hemodialysis had anti-ENA antibodies, compared with 16 of 31 females, indicating no sex related difference. This study emphasizes the high prevalence of HCV infection in our hemodialysis patients, comparable to that of other Middle Eastern countries, but higher than Western ones. A strong association was observed between anti-HCV positivity and hemodialysis duration, as well as anti-ENA antibody profile. However

  17. Maintenance of Th1 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific responses in individuals with acute HCV who achieve sustained virological clearance after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Dore, Gregory J; Hellard, Margaret; Yeung, Barbara; Rawlinson, William D; White, Peter A; Kaldor, John M; Lloyd, Andrew R; Ffrench, Rosemary A

    2013-11-01

    T-cell responses against hepatitis C are believed to be critical in achieving both natural and treatment-induced clearance. However, rapid clearance of antigen with early treatment of primary infection may result in reduced or poorly sustained cellular immunity. This study longitudinally examined Th1 and Th2 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific cytokine production and T-cell effector function from subjects enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C comparing three groups: treatment-induced clearance (sustained virological response [SVR]), treatment non-response, and untreated spontaneous clearance. HCV-specific T-cell responses were characterized by HCV peptide ELISpot, in vitro cytokine production, and T-cell flow cytometry assays. Treated subjects with a sustained virological response (SVR) displayed a better maintenance of HCV-specific Th1 responses compared to treatment non-responders (higher interferon [IFN]-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 magnitude at week 24, broader IFN-γ responses at weeks 24 and 48, P < 0.05) and significantly increased IFN-γ responses between screening and week 48 (magnitude P = 0.026, breadth P = 0.009). Treatment-induced viral clearance was also associated with a trend toward decreased IL-10 responses (screening to week 48, P = 0.070), higher expression of CD45RO (P = 0.042) and CD38 (P = 0.088) on CD4+ T cells, and higher IFN-γR expression (CD56+ IFN-γR+ P = 0.033) compared to treatment non-responders. Untreated subjects with viral clearance also displayed high magnitude and broad HCV-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 responses early in infection; however, IFN-γ responses were not as well maintained compared to treated subjects with a SVR (week 48 magnitude, breadth P = 0.064). Treatment-induced viral clearance of recent HCV infection is associated with maintenance of HCV-specific Th1 responses. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Variety of genotypes of a HCV virus and outcomes of chronic hepatitis C: results 5 summer supervision in the territory of the Kirov region

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    S. V. Baramzina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the epidemiological situation in respect of chronic hepatitis C in the Russian Federation and the Kirov region for the period 1998–2012 yy. The data on the characteristics and frequency of outcomes of chronic hepatitis C, according to the 5-year observation of patients Kirov branch of viral hepatitis infectious diseases hospital. The results of genotyping HCV-virus in 730 patients with chronic hepatitis C in the dynamics from 2006–2010, and in comparison with other regions of Russia. Dominant in the region are the genotypes 1b and 3a, minor – 2 and 1a. During the analyzed period, there was a trend to a decrease in the proportion of genotypes 1b and 1a, and increase the proportion of subtype 3a and 2.

  19. The effect of HIV infection and HCV viremia on inflammatory mediators and hepatic injury-The Women's Interagency HIV Study.

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    Sheila M Keating

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection induces inflammation and while it is believed that HIV co-infection enhances this response, HIV control may reduce inflammation and liver fibrosis in resolved or viremic HCV infection. Measurement of systemic biomarkers in co-infection could help define the mechanism of inflammation on fibrosis and determine if HIV control reduces liver pathology. A nested case-control study was performed to explore the relationship of systemic biomarkers of inflammation with liver fibrosis in HCV viremic and/or seropositive women with and without HIV infection. Serum cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and cell adhesion molecules were measured in HIV uninfected (HIV-, n = 18, ART-treated HIV-controlled (ARTc, n = 20, uncontrolled on anti-retroviral therapy (ARTuc, n = 21 and elite HIV controllers (Elite, n = 20. All were HCV seroreactive and had either resolved (HCV RNA-; <50IU/mL or had chronic HCV infection (HCV RNA+. In HCV and HIV groups, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio (APRI was measured and compared to serum cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and cell adhesion molecules. APRI correlated with sVCAM, sICAM, IL-10, and IP-10 levels and inversely correlated with EGF, IL-17, TGF-α and MMP-9 levels. Collectively, all HCV RNA+ subjects had higher sVCAM, sICAM and IP-10 compared to HCV RNA-. In the ART-treated HCV RNA+ groups, TNF-α, GRO, IP-10, MCP-1 and MDC were higher than HIV-, Elite or both. In ARTuc, FGF-2, MPO, soluble E-selectin, MMP-9, IL-17, GM-CSF and TGF-α are lower than HIV-, Elite or both. Differential expression of soluble markers may reveal mechanisms of pathogenesis or possibly reduction of fibrosis in HCV/HIV co-infection.

  20. The influence of hepatitis B virus on antiviral treatment with interferon and ribavirin in Asian patients with hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus coinfection: a meta-analysis

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    Liu Jun-Ying

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical and laboratory studies have indicated that coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV can suppress one another, eliciting a dominant disease phenotype. To assess whether HBV can influence the antiviral effect of treatment on HCV, we performed a meta-analysis to comparatively analyze the response to interferon plus ribavirin treatment in patients with HBV/HCV coinfection and HCV mono-infection. Methods Published studies in the English-language medical literature that involved cohorts of HBV/HCV coinfection and HCV mono-infection were obtained by searching Medline, Cochrane and Embase databases. Studies that compared the efficacy of treatment with interferon plus ribavirin in HBV/HCV coinfection and HCV mono-infection were assessed. End-of-treatment virological response (ETVR, sustained virological response (SVR, HCV relapse rate, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT normalization rate were compared between HBV/HCV coinfection and HCV mono-infection patients. Results Five trials involving 705 patients were analyzed. At the end of follow-up serum ALT normalization rates in patients with HCV mono-infection were significantly higher than in patients with HBV/HCV coinfection (odds ratio (OR = 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.40–0.80, P = 0.001. The ETVR and SVR achieved in HBV/HCV coinfection patients were comparable to those in HCV mono-infection patients (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.37–2.82, P = 0.96 and OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.62–1.21, P = 0.38, respectively. The rate of relapse for HCV or HCV genotype 1 was not significantly different between HBV/HCV coinfection patients and HCV mono-infection patients (OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 0.98–2.47, P = 0.06; HCV genotype 1: OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.17–4.91, P = 0.19. Conclusions Treatment with interferon and ribavirin achieves similar ETVR and SVR in HBV/HCV coinfection and HCV mono-infection. HBV/HCV coinfection patients had

  1. Differential Effect of Viral Hepatitis Infection on Mortality among Korean Maintenance Dialysis Patients: A Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study.

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    Eugene Kwon

    Full Text Available The role of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in terms of survival among dialysis patients remains incompletely understood. In the present multicenter prospective cohort study, we investigated the prevalences of HBV and HCV infection among 3,321 patients receiving maintenance dialysis in Korea, and assessed the impacts of these infections on survival. All included patients underwent hepatitis B antigen (HBsAg and HCV antibody (Ab testing, which revealed that 236 patients (7.1% were HBsAg-positive, and 123 patients (3.7% were HCV Ab-positive. HBsAg-positive and HCV Ab-positive patients were matched to hepatitis virus-negative patients using a propensity score at a ratio of 1:2. The prevalences of HBV and HCV infection did not significantly differ according to dialysis modality. Linear-by-linear association analysis revealed that hepatitis B prevalence significantly increased with increasing dialysis vintage (p = 0.001, and hepatitis C prevalence tended to be higher with increasing dialysis vintage (p = 0.074. We compared the survival of HBsAg-positive and HCV Ab-positive patients to that of hepatitis virus-negative patients. After propensity score matching, cumulative survival did not differ between HBsAg-positive and HBsAg-negative patients (p = 0.37, while HCV Ab-positive patients showed significantly lower survival than HCV Ab-negative patients (p = 0.03. The main conclusions of the present study are that HBV infection prevalence increased with longer dialysis vintage, and that both HBV and HCV infections were most prevalent among patients with the longest dialysis vintage. Additionally, HCV infection among maintenance dialysis patients is associated with an increased risk of mortality.

  2. Hepatitis G virus co-infection may affect the elimination of hepatitis C virus RNA from the peripheral blood of hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, D; Wysocki, J; Rembowska, J; Lewandowski, K; Nowak, T; Pernak, M; Nowak, J

    2001-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients are at risk for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis G virus (HGV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of HGV co-infection on HCV RNA elimination from the peripheral blood of hemodialysis patients. The study involved 144 persons, all with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA. Among 144 patients 24 (16.7%) were positive for HGV RNA. After 2.5 years of observation 80 patients (55.6%) were still HCV RNA-positive. In the latter group 18 patients were co-infected with HGV and 62 were HGV RNA-negative. During 2.5 years of the follow-up study 64 patients eliminated HCV RNA from the serum. In this group only 6 patients were HGV co-infected. None of the HGV-positive patients eliminated HGV RNA from the serum. The higher incidence of HGV co-infection in the group of patients who remained HCV RNA-positive (18/80, 22.5%), in comparison to the group of HCV antibodies-positive patients who lost HCV in the blood (6/64, 9.4%, P < 0.0001) suggests, that the co-infection with HGV may delay the spontaneous elimination of HCV RNA from the blood.

  3. Hepatitis C pada Anak

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    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakInfeksi virus hepatitis C saat ini masih merupakan persoalan yang serius. Penularan infeksi HCV pada anak yang utama adalah melalui transfusi darah atau produk darah yang saat ini bertanggung jawab menyebabkan kasus hepatitis C kronis. Selain itu infeksi HCV pada anak dapat disebabkan oleh transmisi perinatal (vertikal. Infeksi HCV akut dapat berakhir dengan sirosis dan karsinoma hepatoselular setelah dekade ketiga (sekitar 20%, karena progresivitas infeksi HCV lebih lambat dari infeksi hepatitis B virus. Pada umumnya infeksi HCV bersifat asimptomatik termasuk pada anak. Karena tidak ada gejala yang jelas pada infeksi HCV tersebut maka diagnosis infeksi HCV hanya dapat ditegakkan dengan pemeriksaan awal laboratorium dan uji serologi, dan bila perlu dengan uji molekuler pada pasien dengan risiko tinggi. Kebijakan kuratif khusus terhadap HCV adalah terapi antivirus berupa interferon dan ribavirin yang diberikan bila diagnosis HCV sudah ditegakkanKata kunci: Hepatitis C, diagnosis and management problem, childrenAbstractHepatitis C virus infection is still a serious problem. Transmission of HCV infection in children is a major blood transfusion or blood products that are currently responsible for causing chronic hepatitis C cases. Additionally HCV infection in children can be caused by perinatal transmission (vertical. Acute HCV infection may end up with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma after the third decade (around 20%, due to a slower progression of HCV infection of hepatitis B virus infection. In most cases of HCV infection are asymptomatic, including in children. Since there are no obvious symptoms in the diagnosis of HCV infection HCV infection can only be confirmed by laboratory examinations and serologic testing early, and if necessary with molecular testing in patients at high risk. Curative policy is specific to HCV antiviral therapy such as interferon and ribavirin are given when the diagnosis of HCV has been establishedKeywords:Hepatitis

  4. Expression of Biliverdin Reductase A in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with treatment response in HCV-infected patients.

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    Iva Subhanova

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is associated with systemic oxidative stress. Since the heme catabolic pathway plays an important role in antioxidant protection, we attempted to assess the gene expression of key enzymes of heme catabolism, heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1, heme oxygenase 2 (HMOX2, and biliverdin reductase A (BLVRA in the liver and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL of patients chronically infected with HCV.Gene expressions (HMOX1, HMOX2, BLVRA and HCV RNA were analyzed in PBL of HCV treatment naïve patients (n = 58 and controls (n = 55, with a subset of HCV patients having data on hepatic gene expression (n = 35. Based upon the therapeutic outcome, HCV patients were classified as either responders (n = 38 or treatment-failure patients (n = 20. Blood samples in HCV patients were collected at day 0, and week 12, 24, 36, and 48 after the initiation of standard antiviral therapy.Compared to the controls, substantially increased BLVRA expression was detected in PBL (p<0.001 of therapeutically naïve HCV patients. mRNA levels of BLVRA in PBL closely correlated with those in liver tissue (r2 = 0.347,p = 0.03. A marked difference in BLVRA expression in PBL between the sustained responders and patients with treatment failure was detected at week 0 and during the follow-up (p<0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that BLVRA basal expression in PBL was an independent predictor for sustained virological response (OR 15; 95% CI 1.05-214.2; P = 0.046. HMOX1/2 expression did not have any effect on the treatment outcome.Our results suggest that patients with chronic HCV infection significantly upregulate BLVRA expression in PBL. The lack of BLVRA overexpression is associated with non-responsiveness to standard antiviral therapy; whereas, HMOX1/2 does not seem to have any predictive potential.

  5. Increased incidence of cancer observed in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients versus HIV-monoinfected, 1993-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Héctor; Pértega, Sonia; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Baliñas, Josefa; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Mena, Álvaro; Poveda, Eva

    2017-03-21

    Cancer is a growing problem in persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection could play an additional role in carcinogenesis. Herein, all cancers in an HIV-mono and HIV/HCV-coinfected cohort were evaluated and compared to identify any differences between these two populations. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including all cancers in PLWH between 1993 and 2014. Cancers were classified in two groups, AIDS-defining cancer (ADC) and non AIDS-defining cancer (NADC). Cancer incidence rates were calculated and compared with that observed in the Spanish general population (GLOBOCAN, 2012), computing the standardized incidence ratios (SIR). A competing risk approach was used to estimate the probability of cancer after HIV diagnosis. Cumulative incidence in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected was also compared using multivariable analysis. A total of 185 patients (117 HIV-monoinfected and 68 HIV/HCV) developed cancer in the 26,580 patient-years cohort; with an incidence rate of 696 cancers per 100,000 person-years, higher than in the general population (SIR = 3.8). The incidence rate of NADC in HIV/HCV-coinfected was 415.0 (SIR = 3.4), significantly higher than in monoinfected (377.3; SIR = 1.8). After adjustments, HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had a higher cumulative incidence of NADC than HIV-monoinfected (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.80), even when excluding hepatocellular carcinomas (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.26). PLWH have a higher incidence of NADC than the general population and HCV-coinfection is associated with a higher incidence of NADC. This data justifies the need for prevention strategies in these two populations and the importance of eradicating HCV.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Test in Monitoring of Dialysis Patients

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    Gioacchino Li Cavoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection is a persistent worldwide public health concern. The prevalence of HCV infection is much higher in patients on chronic haemodialysis (HD than in the general population. HCV infection can detrimentally affect patients throughout the spectrum of chronic kidney disease. Despite the control of blood products, hepatitis C virus transmission is still being observed among patients undergoing dialysis. Detection systems for serum HCV antibodies are insensitive in the acute phase because of the long serological window. Direct detection of HCV depends on PCR test but this test is not suitable for routine screening. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of HCV core antigen detection as an alternative to PCR. Few studies exist about the efficacy of HCV core antigen test in dialysis population. We studied the utility of HCV core antigen test in routine monitoring of virological status of dialysis patients. We screened 92 patients on long-term dialysis both by PCR HCV-RNA and HCV core antigen test. The sensitivity of HCVcAg test was 90%, the specificity 100%, the positive predictive power 100%, the negative predictive power 97%, and the accuracy 97%. We think serological detection of HCV core antigen may be an alternative to NAT techniques for routine monitoring of patients on chronic dialysis.

  7. Thyroid Dysfunction in Non-Interferon Treated Hepatitis C Patients Residing in Hepatitis Endemic Area

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    Nayab Batool

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Association of thyroid dysfunction (TD with interferon treatment of HCV is well known to clinicians. However, a few studies have highlighted the role of hepatitis C virus per se in the development of TD. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence of TD in non-interferon treated HCV infected patients referred for thyroid function testing. Patients and Methods. Among 557 ELISA-positive HCV patients 446 (341 females, 105 males were selected for this study. Serums FT4, FT3, and TSH were determined by radioimmunoassay method. Results. TD was detected in 15.2% of patients: 9.0% hypothyroidism and 6.3% hyperthyroidism. In increasing order subclinical hypothyroidism, overt hypothyroidism, overt hyperthyroidism, and subclinical hyperthyroidism were found in 4.7%, 4.3%, 3.6%, and 2.7% patients, respectively. Overall TD was more common in female than in male HCV patients but the difference was not significant (16.1% versus 12.4%; p=0.648. Hyperthyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism were slightly more common in female and overall hypothyroidism and overt hypothyroidism in male patients but the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. The incidence of TD was relatively high in patients above 36 years (median age but the difference was not statistically significant either collectively or in gender base groups (p>0.05. Conclusion. Prior to interferon treatment, HCV infection itself causes biochemical thyroid dysfunction in 15.2% of local HCV patients.

  8. Adherence to treatment for recently acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebely, Jason; Matthews, Gail V; Hellard, Margaret; Shaw, David; van Beek, Ingrid; Petoumenos, Kathy; Alavi, Maryam; Yeung, Barbara; Haber, Paul S; Lloyd, Andrew R; Kaldor, John M; Dore, Gregory J

    2011-07-01

    Adherence to HCV therapy impacts sustained virological response (SVR) but there are limited data on adherence, particularly among injecting drug users (IDUs). We assessed 80/80 adherence (≥80% of PEG-IFN doses, ≥80% treatment), on-treatment adherence, and treatment completion in a study of treatment of recent HCV infection (ATAHC). Participants with HCV received pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa-2a (180μg/week, n=74) and those with HCV/HIV received PEG-IFN alfa-2a with ribavirin (n=35), for a planned 24 weeks. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of PEG-IFN 80/80 adherence. A total of 109 out of 163 patients received treatment (HCV, n=74; HCV/HIV, n=35), with 75% ever reporting IDU. The proportion with 80/80 PEG-IFN adherence was 82% (n=89). During treatment, 14% missed ≥1 dose (on-treatment adherence=99%). Completion of 0-4, 5-19, 20-23, and all 24 weeks of PEG-IFN therapy occurred in 10% (n=11), 14% (n=15), 6% (n=7) and 70% (n=76) of cases, respectively. Participants with no tertiary education were less likely to have 80/80 PEG-IFN adherence (AOR 0.29, p=0.045). IDU prior to or during treatment did not impact 80/80 PEG-IFN adherence. SVR was higher among those patients with ≥80/80 PEG-IFN adherence (67% vs. 35%, p=0.007), but similar among those with and without missed doses during therapy (73% vs. 60%, p=0.309). SVR in those patients discontinuing therapy between 0-4, 5-19, 20-23, and 24 weeks was 9%, 33%, 43%, and 76%, respectively (p<0.001). High adherence to treatment for recent HCV was observed, irrespective of IDU prior to, or during, therapy. Sub-optimal PEG-IFN exposure was mainly driven by early treatment discontinuation rather than missed doses during therapy. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nutritional status and food intake of HCV/HIV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Giselle Souza; Zanolla, Anelise Fernanda; Tovo, Cristiane Valle; Gottschall, Catarina Bertaso Andreatta; Buss, Caroline

    2016-10-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection may cause nutrient deficiency and affect the nutritional status.Objetive: To assess nutritional status, and energy and macronutrient intake in HCV/HIV coinfected patients. Cross-sectional study on HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated in a public hospital. Nutritional status was assessed by measurements of weight, height, waist circumference (WC), arm circumference (AC), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), non-dominant hand gripltrength (NDHGS), body mass index (BMI) and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). Dietary intake was assessed by 24-hour recall. Fifty-seven patients (59.6% women) with mean age of 46 ± 11.2 years were studied. According to BMI, more than half of patients were overweight or obese, and 41% of men and 68% of women had increased or substantially increased WC. The prevalence of malnutrition varied between the methods -10.5% (BMI), 29.8% (AC), 56.2% (TST), 17.6% (MUAC), and 12.3% (NDHGS). We found a high percentage of patients with inadequate intake of protein, fat and energy. The percentage of total energy intake (%TEI) from carbohydrates inversely correlated with WC and AC. A positive correlation was observed between %TEI from protein and NDHGS, and between %TEI from fat and BMI, WC and AC. We found a high prevalence of increased body weight and WC, and inadequate dietary intake in HCV/HIV coinfected patients. We observed a positive association between protein intake and muscle function, and between fat intake and obesity.

  10. Management and Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus in Patients with HIV and Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection: A Practical Guide for Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Côté

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV is a common yet complex coinfection. The present document is a practical guide for treating HCV infection in people coinfected with HIV. Effective antiretroviral therapies have prolonged survival rates for HIV-infected people over the past decade, which have made latent complications of HCV major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Advances in the treatment of HCV (eg, combined pegylated interferon and ribavirin offer the possibility of eradicating HCV infection in coinfected persons. The treatment of HCV must be considered in all cases. Intensive management of the adverse effects of HCV treatment is one of the factors for the success of these therapies. HCV eradication is predicted to decrease the mortality associated with coinfection and reduce the toxicity of HIV treatment.

  11. Label Free Inhibitor Screening of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV NS5B Viral Protein Using RNA Oligonucleotide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Eun Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, over 170 million people (ca. 3% of the World’s population are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, which can cause serious liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, evolving into subsequent health problems. Driven by the need to detect the presence of HCV, as an essential factor in diagnostic medicine, the monitoring of viral protein has been of great interest in developing simple and reliable HCV detection methods. Despite considerable advances in viral protein detection as an HCV disease marker, the current enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA based detection methods using antibody treatment have several drawbacks. To overcome this bottleneck, an RNA aptamer become to be emerged as an antibody substitute in the application of biosensor for detection of viral protein. In this study, we demonstrated a streptavidin-biotin conjugation method, namely, the RNA aptamer sensor system that can quantify viral protein with detection level of 700 pg mL−1 using a biotinylated RNA oligonucleotide on an Octet optical biosensor. Also, we showed this method can be used to screen inhibitors of viral protein rapidly and simply on a biotinylated RNA oligonucleotide biosensor. Among the inhibitors screened, (−-Epigallocatechin gallate showed high binding inhibition effect on HCV NS5B viral protein. The proposed method can be considered a real-time monitoring method for inhibitor screening of HCV viral protein and is expected to be applicable to other types of diseases.

  12. The effect of HIV infection and HCV viremia on inflammatory mediators and hepatic injury-The Women's Interagency HIV Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Sheila M; Dodge, Jennifer L; Norris, Philip J; Heitman, John; Gange, Stephen J; French, Audrey L; Glesby, Marshall J; Edlin, Brian R; Latham, Patricia S; Villacres, Maria C; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Peters, Marion G

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection induces inflammation and while it is believed that HIV co-infection enhances this response, HIV control may reduce inflammation and liver fibrosis in resolved or viremic HCV infection. Measurement of systemic biomarkers in co-infection could help define the mechanism of inflammation on fibrosis and determine if HIV control reduces liver pathology. A nested case-control study was performed to explore the relationship of systemic biomarkers of inflammation with liver fibrosis in HCV viremic and/or seropositive women with and without HIV infection. Serum cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and cell adhesion molecules were measured in HIV uninfected (HIV-, n = 18), ART-treated HIV-controlled (ARTc, n = 20), uncontrolled on anti-retroviral therapy (ARTuc, n = 21) and elite HIV controllers (Elite, n = 20). All were HCV seroreactive and had either resolved (HCV RNA-; infection (HCV RNA+). In HCV and HIV groups, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio (APRI) was measured and compared to serum cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and cell adhesion molecules. APRI correlated with sVCAM, sICAM, IL-10, and IP-10 levels and inversely correlated with EGF, IL-17, TGF-α and MMP-9 levels. Collectively, all HCV RNA+ subjects had higher sVCAM, sICAM and IP-10 compared to HCV RNA-. In the ART-treated HCV RNA+ groups, TNF-α, GRO, IP-10, MCP-1 and MDC were higher than HIV-, Elite or both. In ARTuc, FGF-2, MPO, soluble E-selectin, MMP-9, IL-17, GM-CSF and TGF-α are lower than HIV-, Elite or both. Differential expression of soluble markers may reveal mechanisms of pathogenesis or possibly reduction of fibrosis in HCV/HIV co-infection.

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C virus in euthyroid patients | Xu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of hepatic infections, viz, hepatitis B (HBV) virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV), in the euthyroid population of Southern Punjab Province of Pakistan. Methods: A total of 120 euthyroid patients (36 male and 84 female) with a mean age of 30.7 ± 0.09 years) were included in this study.

  14. Challenging hepatitis C-infected liver transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Madeleine Oliver,1 Christopher Chiodo Ortiz,2 Jorge Ortiz31University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, 2Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 3Department of Transplant Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Caring for liver transplant patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a challenging task for transplant surgeons and primary physicians alike. HCV is the leading cause of liver transplantation in the USA and comes with a myriad of complications that increase morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on patient follow-up, spanning from before the liver transplant occurs to the patient's long-term health. Pretransplant, both donor and recipient variables, must be carefully chosen to ensure optimal surgical success. Risk factors must be identified and HCV viral load must be reduced to a minimum. In addition to standard transplant complications, HCV patients suffer from additional problems, such as fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis and widespread viremia. Physicians must focus on the balance of immunosuppressive and antiviral medications, while considering possible side effects from these potent drugs. Over the years following surgery, physicians must identify any signs of failing liver health, as HCV-positive patients have an increased risk for cirrhosis and certain life-threatening malignancies. Keywords: liver transplant, hepatitis C virus, postoperative, cirrhosis, donor and recipient variables, viremia

  15. [Present status of community-based HCV screening in Osaka City and evaluation of the utility of follow-up programs on hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Mineko; Tamori, Akihiro; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2008-02-01

    The present status of community-based HCV screening in Osaka City and the utility of follow-up programs on hepatitis were examined. During a period of three years, from 2003-2005, 83, 458 persons who underwent HCV testing in a community-based HCV screening program in Osaka City were targeted. These persons were 40 years of age or older who opted to receive testing for HCV antibodies. To assist patients testing positive for HCV, hepatitis follow up programs were carried out. For cases where consent was given, the performance or nonperformance of a thorough examination could be ascertained with regard to whether or not a thorough examination results notification was sent from the medical institution. For patients who did not receive a notification, a health nurse checked whether a thorough examination was received, by telephone or visit, usually two times (after 3 months and after 6 months) on average. If an examination had not been received, the nurse suggested having one. Furthermore, the contents of the thorough examination and other details like procedure plans for all patients were obtained through the thorough examination results notification. From continuous diagnostic reports from the medical institutions, an assessment was given and the information was provided to each medical institution. For cases where consent was not given for the follow up programs, only the results of the thorough examination were available. The percentage of patients testing positive for HCV antibodies showed a yearly decline, with 3.9% in 2003, 3.8% in 2004, and 3.0% in 2005. The percentages of patients consenting to hepatitis follow up programs were 52.2% in 2003, 56.2% in 2004, and 59.1% in 2005. When comparing the percentage of patients receiving a thorough examination between those consenting to these programs and those not consenting, the consenting group was 82.6% and the non-consenting group was 37.5% in 2003, 77.1% and 37.7% in 2004, 78.0% and 34.3% in 2005, respectively

  16. Anti-ENA antibody profile in hepatitis C patients undergoing hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond G Batchoun; Malek A Al-Najdawi; Sameh Al-Taamary

    2011-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasing all over the world, especially among hemodialysis patients. HCV is one of the major autoantibody inducing viruses, where anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), anti-liver kidney microsome antibodies (LKM-1), and rheumatoid factor (RF) have been related to HCV. Few studies have investigated the presence of anti-extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) antibodies in chronic liver diseases, especially in chronic hepatit...

  17. Prevalence of Hepatitis C among Multi-transfused Thalassaemic Patients in Oman: Single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Naamani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Regular blood transfusions are essential for patients with thalassaemia major. However, infections with hepatotropic viruses remain a major concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of hepatitis C viral (HCV infection among patients with homozygous beta thalassaemia in a single centre in Oman. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 200 patients treated at the Thalassemia Unit of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman, between August 1991 and December 2011 was performed. Relevant demographic and clinical characteristics were collected, including age, gender, HCV status and the presence of endocrinopathies. Results: A total of 81 patients (41% were found to be anti-HCV-antibody (anti-HCV-positive. HCV ribonucleic acid tests were performed on 65 anti-HCV-positive patients and were positive among 33 (51%; the remaining 16 patients died before these tests were available. Anti-HCV-positive patients were significantly older than anti-HCV-negative patients (P <0.001 and were more likely to be diabetic than anti-HCV-negative patients (27% versus 8%; P <0.001. A total of 100 patients had been transfused before they were transferred to SQUH in 1991; of these, 70 (70% were anti-HCV-positive. Only 11 (11.5% of the 96 patients who were seronegative in 1991, or who were transfused later, became seropositive. Conclusion: It is likely that the high prevalence of HCV among multi-transfused thalassaemic patients in Oman is due to blood transfusions dating from before the implementation of HCV screening in 1991 as the risk of HCVassociated transfusions has significantly reduced since then. Additionally, results showed that anti-HCV-positive patients were more likely to be diabetic than anti-HCV-negative patients.

  18. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for HCV infection in patients coinfected with HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gane, Edward J; Hyland, Robert H; An, Di; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S; Brainard, Diana; McHutchison, John G

    2016-01-01

    Currently there are no all-oral treatment regimens for HCV in patients coinfected with HBV. In this pilot study, we evaluated whether ledipasvir and sofosbuvir therapy can suppress HCV infection in patients coinfected with HBV. Patients with HBV and genotype-1 HCV received 90 mg ledipasvir and 400 mg sofosbuvir daily for 12 weeks. The efficacy end point was sustained virological response (HCV RNA ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was a safe and effective treatment for genotype-1 HCV infection in patients coinfected with HBV. Larger studies with longer follow-up are warranted.

  19. Hepatitis B (HBV, hepatitis C (HCV and hepatitis delta (HDV viruses in the Colombian population--how is the epidemiological situation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Viviana Alvarado-Mora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viral hepatitis B, C and delta still remain a serious problem worldwide. In Colombia, data from 1980s described that HBV and HDV infection are important causes of hepatitis, but little is known about HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the currently frequency of HBV, HCV and HDV in four different Colombian regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study was conducted in 697 habitants from 4 Colombian departments: Amazonas, Chocó, Magdalena and San Andres Islands. Epidemiological data were obtained from an interview applied to each individual aiming to evaluate risk factors related to HBV, HCV or HDV infections. All samples were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs and anti-HCV markers. Samples that were positive to HBsAg and/or anti-HBc were tested to anti-HDV. Concerning the geographical origin of the samples, the three HBV markers showed a statistically significant difference: HBsAg (p = 0.033 and anti-HBc (p<0.001 were more frequent in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Isolated anti-HBs (a marker of previous vaccination frequencies were: Chocó (53.26%, Amazonas (32.88%, Magdalena (17.0% and San Andrés (15.33%--p<0.001. Prevalence of anti-HBc increased with age; HBsAg varied from 1.97 to 8.39% (p = 0.033. Amazonas department showed the highest frequency for anti-HCV marker (5.68%, while the lowest frequency was found in San Andrés Island (0.66%. Anti-HDV was found in 9 (5.20% out of 173 anti-HBc and/or HBsAg positive samples, 8 of them from the Amazonas region and 1 from them Magdalena department. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, HBV, HCV and HDV infections are detected throughout Colombia in frequency levels that would place some areas as hyperendemic for HBV, especially those found in Amazonas and Magdalena departments. Novel strategies to increase HBV immunization in the rural population and to strengthen HCV surveillance are reinforced by these results.

  20. Plasma protein biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma in HCV-infected alcoholic patients with cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ferrín

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common and lethal cancers in the world, with limited options for treatment unless timely diagnosed. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and persistent heavy alcohol consumption are independent risk factors for HCC development, which may induce a specific protein expression pattern different from those caused separately. The aim of the study was to identify protein biomarkers for the detection of HCC in HCV-infected alcoholic patients with cirrhosis in order to improve survival. We compared protein expression profiles of plasma samples from 52 HCV-infected alcoholic patients with and without HCC, using 2-D DIGE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The 2-D DIGE results were analyzed statistically using Decyder software, and verified by western-blot and ELISA. In plasma samples from HCV-infected alcoholic patients, we found significantly differential expression profiles of carboxypeptidase-N, ceruloplasmin (CP, complement component 4a (C4a, fibrinogen-alpha (FGA, immunoglobulin mu chain C region, serum albumin, and serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1. Deregulation of plasma/serum levels of the identified proteins was associated to HCV, ethanol consumption, and/or HCC progression. In the validation through ELISA, C4a serum concentration was increased in HCC patients (2.4±1 ng/mg vs 1.8±0.6 ng/mg; p = 0.029, being the only independent predictor of HCC in the multivariate analysis (OR = 2.15; p = 0.015, with an AUROC = 0.70. The combination of C4a, FGA, CP and PON1 improved slightly the predictive ability of C4a alone (AUROC 0.81. In conclusion, we identified proteins related to acute-phase response, oxidative stress, or immune response, whose differential expression in plasma may be attributed to the presence of HCC. Among them, C4a, and its combination with CP, FGA and PON1, could be considered as potentially reliable biomarkers for the detection of HCC in HCV-infected alcoholic

  1. Screening of adult dental patients visiting Khyber College of Dentistry, Peshawar for HBV and HCV infections and identifying the associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Jamila; Lufullah, Ghosia; Nazli, Rubina; Akhtar, Tasleem; Shah, Asma

    2017-01-01

    To screen out adult patients for HBV and HCV infections visiting Khyber College of Dentistry Peshawar (KCD) for different dental treatments and to identify the associated risk factors. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Khyber College of Dentistry, Peshawar in the year 2013. A total of 1540 patients >15 years, visiting KCD for seeking different dental treatments were screened for hepatitis B & C. Informed consent was taken before blood collection and filling of a structured questionnaire. Blood samples were tested against HBsAg and anti HCV by using ICT that were further confirmed by ELISA. The data was analyzed using Epi info version 6. A total of 1540 patients were screened during the study. Among these 36.4%(561) were males and 63.6%(979) were females. Overall prevalence of HBV and HCV was 5.12%(79). On screening, 2.14%(33) were found to be HBs Ag positive of which 2.5%(14) were males and 1.9%(19) were females. HCV was found positive in 2.98%(46) individuals having male to female ratio of 1.6% and 3.8%. Frequency of HBsAg was high in age group 56-65 year and HCV in 36-45 year group. Previous history of IV/IM injections, spouse patient of hepatitis, blood transfusion, surgical operation were found significant risk factors in the transmission of both hepatitis B and C, while previous history of dental treatment and sharing of clippers were significant risk factor in spreading hepatitis C infection only. Overall prevalence of HCV was higher than HBV. Previous history of injections, spouse patient of hepatitis, blood transfusion, surgical operation were found significant risk factors in the transmission of both hepatitis B and C.

  2. Central nervous system involvement in patients with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia: review and a case report

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    B. Canesi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few well-documented cases of central nervous system involvement in patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia and/or HCV infection have been reported. We can distinguish between acute or subacute diffuse and focal lesions (transient ischemic attack-like syndromes and cerebrovascular accidents. Methods: A search of two electronic databases (Medline and EMBASE was conducted from the year of their inception (1966 for Medline and 1988 for EMBASE to September 2000. The search strategy employed entailed combining these terms: Cryoglobulinemia, Central Nervous System, Hepatitis C, chronic hepatitis. Cryoglobulinemia and Central Nervous System were also used as free test words. We analysed articles with case reports and the most frequent articles on the references list. Pathogenesis: The main pathophysiologic mechanism of cerebral involvement is ischemia (or rarely hemorrhage due to diffuse or segmental vasculitis of the small cerebral vessels. In these cases a brain MRI usually shows single or multiple increased T2 signals. Furthermore an occasional occlusive vasculopathy without vasculitis was documented histologically. In these patients ischemia could be started or enhanced by the engorgement of the microvasculature by clumps of red cells and by aggregates of cryoglobulins. In the same patients vasculitis and hemoreological abnormalities can affect the clinical picture of the cerebral involvement in mixed cryoglobulinemia. Finally, the detection of HCV in the lesions induces a hypothesis that, in some cases, CNS involvement could be directly related to chronic HCV infection, even in the absence of cryoglobulin production. Case report: We describe a 63 year-old woman with acute severe encephalopathy. Laboratory evaluation revealed a high positive test result for rheumatoid factor (3390 U/ml and hypocomplementemia (C4 less than 1.67 mg/dl. Protein immunofixation electrophoresis demonstrated 5% monoclonal proteins (IgM/k and IgG/k, 3

  3. Expression of HCV Alternative Reading Frame Protein (Core+1/F) in Baculovirus Expression System and its Evaluation for Assessment of Specific Anti-core+1 Antibody in Iranian HCV Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Fard, Farideh Sadat Sajadian; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Chahouki, Fatemeh Fotouhi; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Bolhassani, Azam; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Mohajel, Nasir; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Amiran, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome contains an overlapping reading frame which results in alternative core protein (ARFP). Baculovirus expression system was used as a powerful eukaryotic vector system to express core+1/F protein for the first time. This recombinant core+1/F protein was used to assess the anti-core+1 antibody in anti-HCV drug resistant and sustained virologic response (SVR) patients. The core+1 coding sequence from HCV genotype 1 was designed and synthesized in pUC57 vector. It was subcloned into baculovirus donor plasmid pFastBacTM HTA and transposed into baculovirus shuttle vector (bacmid) to transfect Sf9 cells. Recombinant core+1 protein was purified using Ni-NTA agarose under native condition and verified using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Western blotting. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using this purified protein to assess anti-core+1 antibody in 28 anti-HCV drug resistant patients and in 34 patients with sustained virologic response (SVR) in comparison with 31 healthy volunteers used as the negative control. Expression of HCV core+1 protein in Sf9 cells was confirmed by using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Antibody titer against core+1 protein in anti-HCV drug resistant patients was significantly higher than that in both the healthy volunteers and SVR patients (p < 0.0001). HCV core+1 protein was expressed successfully in a baculovirus expression system in high yield in order to develop an ELISA to assess the anti-core+1 antibody. Further studies are needed to reveal the potential application of core+1 protein in anti-HCV treatment prognosis.

  4. GB Virus C infection in Patients With HIV/Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection: Improvement of the Liver Function in Chronic Hepatitis C

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Yue; Liu, Li; Feng, Yue-Mei; Zhao, Wenhua; Li, Zheng; Zhang, A-Mei; Song, Yuzhu; Xia, Xueshan

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV coinfection have shown that the presence of GBV-C is associated with significantly less compensated and decompensated cirrhosis, and an improvement in cirrhosis-free survival...

  5. [Prevalence of positive markers for hepatitis B (HBV Ags) and hepatitis C (Anti-HCV) in health personnel at the Social Security Institute of Mexico State and Municipalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Huezo, M S; Sánchez-Hernández, E; Camacho, M C; Mejia-López, M D; Rebollo-Vargas, J

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of serum markers of viral hepatitis in health-care workers seems to be similar to that described in the general population, even though this group would appear at increased risk because exposure to potentially infectious material. There is scarce information available in Mexico in this regard. To define the prevalence of serum markers for hepatitis C (anti-HCV antibodies) and hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen, HBsAg) in health-care workers at the Instituto de Seguridad Social del Estado de Mexico y Municipios (ISSEMYM) and to establish the presence of viremia in subjects with positive serum markers. Health-care workers from ISSEMyM with unknown hepatitis serologic status participated voluntarily in this trial. They completed a written questionnaire detailing potential risk factors for viral hepatitis and provided a blood sample. A total of 374 health-care workers were included. Seven subjects (1.8%) were positive, 5 for anti-HCV antibodies (1.3%) and 2 for HBsAg (0.5%). None of these subjects had detectable serum HCV RNA or HBV DNA on further testing. The frequency of positive serum markers for viral hepatitis in this group of healthcare workers is similar to the estimated prevalence among the general population in Mexico. No case of active infection defined by positive viremia was encountered in this group of subjects.

  6. HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been found to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), using them as a reservoir, which might contribute to the development of resistance to treatment. Objectives: To study hepatitis virus C (HCV) RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with ...

  7. Insights on treatment of a Portuguese cohort of HCV/HIV coinfected patients

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    C Silva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: This study intends to characterize a Portuguese patient population with chronic HCV and HIV coinfection, followed at our Research Unit, underline the importance of early treatment and incorporate the importance of DDA for retreatment of HCV infection. Methods: Retrospective, observational analysis of medical records of 348 HCV/HIV coinfected patients from 2001 to 2011. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data and virologic response were collected. Summary of results: Review of 348 HCV/HIV coinfected patients, 121 of those (34.7% under treatment, predominantly male (77.0% and Caucasians (94.8% with a median age of 44 yrs old (min 25; max 77 yrs. Intravenous drug use was the main route of HCV infection, in 71.3% of patients, and 8.3% were related with MSM. Frequent morbidities were alcohol abuse (46.8%, illicit drug use (70.1%, methadone (25.6% and mental disturbances (12.3% of patients. Regarding HIV infection, six were HIV-2 and 342 HIV-1; 36.1% were stage A and 29.6% were stage C (CDC Atlanta, 94.8% on antiretroviral treatment and only 21.9% of them with more than 350 TCD4 cell count. Genotype 1 was the most prevalent (58.1%–117 genotype 1a, 26 genotype 1b; 1.6% were genotype 2, 22.8% genotype 3 and 17.5% genotype 4. Previous to treatment initiation, HCV ARN was above 600.000 IU/mL in 56.9% patients. Fibrosis was evaluated by fibroelastography in 41.1% and hepatic biopsy in 26.3% of patients; in those, 44.0% had a score above F2 (METAVIR and ALT was elevated 2 times the limit in 38.0%, with an average value of 94 UI/L. IL 28B testing was performed in only 35 patients at the time, with 45.7% CC and 17.1% CT genotype. Treatment was started in 34.8% of patients, with 1.7 treatments per individual, and regimen was based on peguilated interferon with ribavirin in 93.6% of cases (72.1% with peginterferon alfa 2a. The SVR rate was 51.2%, with 28.9% non responders, 3 relapsers and 9 treatment interruptions due

  8. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Klein, Marina B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review will give an update on the prevalence of HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, and describe recent trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality. The focus is mainly on patients followed in clinics in high-income countries and their heterogeneity in terms...

  9. Evolving strategy for HCV testing in an Italian tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora; Ferraglia, Francesca; Pinardi, Federica; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Bernasconi, Daniela; Galli, Claudio; Calderaro, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic tests for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection should be adapted according to the clinical status of the patient. We exploited the application of different HCV diagnostic algorithms in a tertiary care hospital practice. The laboratory clinical reports to the medical orders for HCV testing during three years were clustered by different combinations of assays for anti-HCV antibodies (HCV Ab) (screening and confirmatory), HCV nucleic acid (HCV-RNA), HCV core antigen (HCV Ag). The latter was the first-line assay in acute HCV infections requiring a rapid assessment of the infectious state. The majority (91.9%) of the 2726 subjects whose samples were analyzed were inpatients. Most of the patients/subjects were tested for clinical suspicion of viral hepatitis (49.2%), or occupational accident to health care professionals (20.0%). On 66% of samples HCV Ag test alone was performed and resulted positive in 116 cases (6%), while it was detected in 50.3% of anti-HCV positive samples. The agreement between HCV Ag and HCV-RNA was very high (k=0.97); HCV Ag positivity rates increased according to the signal of the HCV Ab screening test. The use of different testing strategies according to the patients' history and clinical status allowed a significant reduction of the number of tests performed and the time needed to provide a diagnostic response useful for patients' management without compromising the overall diagnostic accuracy for HCV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of a Cholesterol-conjugated Aptamer Against the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS5B Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Lee, Soo-Han; Kim, Ji Hyun; Noh, Yook-Hwan; Noh, Gyu-Jeong; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major cause of progressive liver disease such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Previously, we reported that a 29 nucleotide-long 2'-F pyrimidine modified RNA aptamer against the HCV nonstructural protein 5B efficiently inhibited HCV replication and suppressed HCV infectious virus particle formation in a cell culture system. In this study, we modified this aptamer through conjugation of cholesterol for in vivo availability. This cholesterol-conjugated aptamer (chol-aptamer) efficiently entered the cell and inhibited HCV RNA replication, without any alteration in gene expression profiling including innate immune response-related genes. Moreover, systemic administration of the chol-aptamer was well tolerated without any abnormalities in mice. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the chol-aptamer in vivo, dose proportionality, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated by noncompartmental analyses in normal BALB/c mice. Population analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. Moreover, the pharmacokinetics of two different routes (intravenous, IV, versus intraperitoneal, IP) were compared. Cholesterol conjugation showed dose proportionality, extended the time that the aptamer was in the plasma, and enhanced aptamer exposure to the body. Noticeably, the IV route was more suitable than the IP route due to the chol-aptamer remaining in the plasma for a longer period of time. PMID:26440598

  11. Assessment of factors associated with the quality of life of patients living with HIV/HCV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marco; Fialho, Renata

    2016-10-01

    This study compared the quality of life (QoL) of HIV-infected patients with and without hepatitis C and examined the sociodemographic, HIV-related and psychological symptoms associated with the QoL domains in patients with HIV/HCV co-infection. The sample consisted of 248 HIV/HCV co-infected patients (18-74 years, 81.5 % male) and 482 patients only with HIV (24-78 years, 62.7 % male). Participants completed the WHOQOL-HIV-Bref questionnaire and the Brief Symptom Inventory. The HIV/HCV co-infected patients reported significantly lower QoL in all domains, as well as significantly lower scores in 10 of the 17 specific facets. Overall, among the co-infected patients, male gender, employment, combination antiretroviral therapy use and fewer depressive and anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with higher QoL. Symptoms of psychological distress accounted for significant variability in the QoL scores of co-infected patients. These data reinforce the need for tailored interventions to improve the overall well-being of HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

  12. Serological and molecular expression of Hepatitis B infection in patients with chronic Hepatitis C from Tunisia, North Africa

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    Azaiez Ons

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study reports the prevalence and the viral aspects of HBV infection in HCV-positive patients from Tunisia, a country with intermediate and low endemicity for hepatitis B and C, respectively. Results HBV infection was assessed in the serum samples of 361 HCV-positive patients and compared to a group of HCV negative individuals. Serological markers were determined by ELISA tests and HBV DNA by real-time PCR. HBV serological markers were found in 43% and 44% of patients and controls, respectively. However, the serological and molecular expression of HBV infection differed in the two groups: The group of patients included more individuals with ongoing HBV infection, as defined by the presence of detectable HBsAg and or HBV DNA (17% and 12%, respectively. Furthermore, while most of the controls with ongoing HBV infection expressed HBsAg, the majority of HCV and HBV positive patients were HBsAg negative and HBV DNA positive. Genotyping of HCV isolates showed large predominance of subtype 1b as previously reported in Tunisia. Comparison of the replicative status of the two viruses found low HBV viral load in all co-infected patients as compared to patients with single HBV infection. In contrast, high levels of HCV viremia levels were observed in most of cases with no difference between the group of co-infected patients and the group with single HCV infection. Conclusions This study adds to the knowledge on the prevalence and the virological presentation of HCV/HBV dual infection, providing data from the North African region. It shows that, given the local epidemiology of the two viruses, co-infected patients are likely to have low replication levels of HBV suggesting a suppressive effect of HCV on HBV. In contrast, high replication levels for HCV were fond in most cases which indicate that the presence of circulating HBV-DNA does not necessarily influence HCV replication.

  13. HBV vaccination of HCV-infected patients with occult HBV infection and anti-HBc-positive blood donors

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    J.S.F. Pereira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-HBc positivity is a frequent cause of donation rejection at blood banks. Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection may also occur in HBsAg-negative patients, a situation denoted occult infection. Similarly, very low levels of HBV-DNA have also been found in the sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, even in the absence of serum HBsAg. Initially we searched for HBV-DNA in serum of 100 blood donors and 50 HCV-infected patients who were HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive by nested-PCR and by an HBV monitor commercial test for HBV-DNA. Anti-HBs seroconversion rates were measured in 100 blood donors and in 22 patients with chronic HCV infection after HBV vaccination to determine if the HBV vaccination could eliminate an occult HBV infection in these individuals. Occult HBV infection was detected in proportionally fewer blood donors (6/100 = 6% than chronic hepatitis C patients (12/50 = 24% (P 0.05. All subjects who were HBV-DNA(+ before the first dose of HBV vaccine (D1, became HBV-DNA(- after D1, D2, and D3. Among 22 HCV-positive patients, 10 HBV-DNA(+ and 12 HBV-DNA(-, seroconversion was observed in 9/10 (90% HBV-DNA(+ and in 9/12 (75% HBV-DNA(- subjects (P > 0.05. The disappearance of HBV-DNA in the majority of vaccinated patients suggests that residual HBV can be eliminated in patients with occult infection.

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection and spontaneous clearance in HTLV-1 and HIV co-infected patients in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

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    Chloe Le Marchand

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Our study found that patients coinfected with HIV and HTLV-1 were more likely to spontaneously clear hepatitis C virus than patients with HIV/HCV or HCV alone. The effects of HTLV coinfection on the immune response of such patients may be associated with these findings.

  15. CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS В AND C IN CHILDREN BORN FROM MOTHERS INFECTED WITH НВV AND HCV

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    T. I. Raba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There were 164 children with chronic hepatitis B (CHB and chronic hepatitis C (CHC at the age of 1—18 years of age, 78 of which (48% had a perinatal route of infection  (CHB — 46; CHC  — 32. Observed for 5 years. Chronic hepatitis B and C was characterized by subclinical  signs, with minimal fibrosis, in the immu- noactive phase of HBV (69% and high viremia HCV (56%. Etiopathogenetic therapy (alpha-2b interferon (VIFERON, PegIntron, lamivudine  (Zeffix, ribavirin (Rebetol promoted the development of clinico-virologic remission in 83% of children with CHB and 63% in CHC.

  16. [Immunity against hepatitis A virus in patients with chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Redondo, María Pilar; Almaraz, Ana; Jiménez Rodríguez-Vila, Manuel; Santamaría, Ana; de Castro, Julián; Torrego, Juan Carlos; Caro-Patón, Agustín

    2008-10-25

    Because of high fatality rate associated with acute infection by hepatitis A virus (HAV) in chronic hepatitis C patients, it is of interest to know the prevalence of immunization against HAV in these patients. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) IgG HAV antibodies (IgG anti-HAV) were determined in 313 hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV) positive patients and in 313 anti-HCV negative subjects (control group). Several epidemiological factors were recorded (age, sex, rural vs urban precedence, tattoos, parenteral drugs use, alcohol consumption and surgery). The prevalence of IgG anti-HAV was identical in both groups: 81.2%. However, in those younger than 41 years, this prevalence was greater in those anti-HCV positive than in the control group. Parenteral drugs use and tattoos were more frequent in the first group. The presence of IgG anti-HAV was associated with age and the rural origin in both groups. The prevalence of IgG anti-HAV increases with age, and is more frequent in individuals with rural origin. It was also greater in young anti-HCV positive patients, when compared with controls of the same age. This finding can be due to the poor standards of hygiene probably associated with some practices more common in this population, such as parenteral drugs use, tattoos and others.

  17. Social determinants and risk behaviors associated with prevalent Hepatitis C and HIV/HCV co-infection among male injection drug users in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakchapati, Sampurna; Maharjan, Manju; Rawal, Bir Bahadhur; Dixit, Sameer Mani

    2017-01-01

    Nepal is facing double burden of injecting drug use and HIV, yet the problem of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) has not been so well addressed, where there is large population known to be at risk for HCV. This study assessed the prevalence of HCV infection and HIV/HCV co-infection among male injection drug users (IDUs) in Nepal and identified factors associated with infection. Cross-sectional surveys in 2015 aimed to sample 1045 male IDUs in the Kathmandu valley, Pokhara Valley and Eastern Terai districts of Nepal. Information about socio demographic characteristics, injecting and sexual risk behaviours were obtained, and biological specimens tested for HCV and HIV. The logistic regression model was used to identify the determinants associated with HCV and HIV/HCV co-infection. HCV prevalence was 28.8% and HIV/HCV co-infection was 4%. Among the 6% of HIV positive male IDUs, 65% were found to be co-infected. The multivariate logistic analysis revealed that HCV prevalence was higher in Eastern Terai districts, longer duration of drug use and injecting drugs and presence of HIV. Similarly, HIV/HCV co-infection was associated with Eastern highway districts, older age and longer duration of injecting drugs. The factors strongly contributing to HCV and HIV/HCV co-infection was longer duration of injecting drugs. Highest HCV and HIV/HCV co-infection was found in Eastern Terai districts. Target health interventions need to be focused in Eastern Terai districts and IDUs with longer duration of injecting drugs for the prevention of HCV and HIV/HCV transmission.

  18. Helicobacter pylori and Hepatitis C virus coinfection in Egyptian patients

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    El-Masry Samir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide. It has been shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori plays an important role in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies, and its eradication has been advocated. The association between H. pylori infection and liver cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C virus has been documented in different parts of the world; nevertheless, no conclusive data is available in Egypt. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the status of H. pylori infection was sought in 90 patients with chronic HCV infection and in 66 HCV-free healthy controls. Results: The study showed that the H. pylori positivity was increased significantly (P = 0.03 in the HCV-infected patients when compared to that in healthy controls, where H. pylori infection was found in 50 (55.6% out of 90 of the HCV-infected patients versus 26 (39.4% out of 66 of the healthy controls. In HCV-infected patients, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was increased significantly (P = 0.04 from chronic active hepatitis to cirrhosis. H. pylori infection was present in 6/18 (33.3%, 10/21 (47.6%, 16/27 (59.3%, 18/24 (75.0% patients with chronic active hepatitis, Child-Pugh score A, Child-Pugh score B and Child-Pugh score C, respectively. More importantly, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in HCV-infected patients was increased very significantly (P = 0.003 with increasing Meld (model for end-stage liver disease score. The prevalence of H. pylori was documented in 9/28 (32.1% patients with Meld score ≤10 and in 41/62 (66.1% patients with Meld score> 10. Conclusion: It may be stated that our results collectively reflect a remarkable increase in H. pylori prevalence with advancing hepatic lesions, and the eradication treatment may prove beneficial in those patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  19. Liver fibrosis progression in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfected patients with normal aminotransferases levels

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    Fábio Heleno de Lima Pace

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Approximately 30% of hepatitis C virus (HCV monoinfected patients present persistently normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels. Most of these patients have a slow progression of liver fibrosis. Studies have demonstrated the rate of liver fibrosis progression in hepatitis C virus-human immunodeficiency virus (HCV-HIV coinfected patients is faster than in patients infected only by HCV. Few studies have evaluated the histological features of chronic hepatitis C in HIV-infected patients with normal ALT levels. METHODS: HCV-HIV coinfected patients (HCV-RNA and anti-HIV positive with known time of HCV infection (intravenous drugs users were selected. Patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg positive or hepatitis C treatment before liver biopsy were excluded. Patients were considered to have a normal ALT levels if they had at least 3 normal determinations in the previous 6 months prior to liver biopsy. All patients were submitted to liver biopsy and METAVIR scale was used. RESULTS: Of 50 studied patients 40 (80% were males. All patients were treated with antiretroviral therapy. The ALT levels were normal in 13 (26% patients. HCV-HIV co-infected patients with normal ALT levels had presented means of the liver fibrosis stages (0.77±0.44 versus 1.86±1.38; p<0.001 periportal inflammatory activity (0.62±0.77 versus 2.24±1.35; p<0.001 and liver fibrosis progression rate (0.058±0.043 fibrosis unit/year versus 0.118±0.102 fibrosis unit/year significantly lower as compared to those with elevated ALT. CONCLUSIONS: HCV-HIV coinfected patients with persistently normal ALTs showed slower progression of liver fibrosis. In these patients the development of liver cirrhosis is improbable.

  20. HCV - Estimation of the number of diagnosed patients eligible to the new anti-HCV therapies in Italy.

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    Gardini, I; Bartoli, M; Conforti, M; Mennini, F S; Marcellusi, A; Lanati, E

    2016-12-01

    The present research wants to take a picture of the current epidemiological scenario regarding HCV infection in Italy. Studies used to estimate HCV burden of illness in Italy were so far local and performed a number of years ago, not mirroring the state of the art. EpaC wanted to provide a real number of diagnosed patients, eligible to new anti-HCV therapies. EpaC is the most important Italian NGO for hepatopathic patients. A number of sources were cross-checked. Starting from all regional data regarding HCV-related exemptions, a correction/integration was performed with online questionnaire to associated patients (from which we derived patients cured and also other/no exemptions); survey to all prescribing centers in Italy (from which we derived the percentage of ineligible patients); prevalence of particular subpopulations was also collected (prisoners and HIV/HCV coinfected); calculations of new diagnosed, dead and cured patients in 2015. Excluded patients were illegal immigrants and active drug addicts (subpopulations currently rarely cured). A total of 221,549 patients were derived from regional exemptions databases and the mean national prevalence was 0.364%. Adding patients without exemptions/other exemptions, total was 308,624. We deducted the yearly deaths, cured and not eligible patients and, last, integrated with coinfected and prisoner special groups. Prevalence was also estimated at regional level, highlighting a reduction of the typical North-to-South prevalence gradient. Applying the above-mentioned corrections/integrations, total diagnosed and eligible HCV patients in Italy who can be immediately cured are supposed to range 163,148-187,756. This is a research aimed at filling an informative gap able to provide useful actual information in terms of HCV patients real-life management and future resource allocation. These data may be considered the basis for policy- and decision-makers to plan and manage patients ready to be cured. The research does not

  1. Bim-mediated apoptosis and PD-1/PD-L1 pathway impair reactivity of PD1(+)/CD127(-) HCV-specific CD8(+) cells targeting the virus in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrubia, Juan R; Benito-Martínez, Selma; Miquel, Joaquín; Calvino, Miryam; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo; González-Praetorius, Alejandro; Albertos, Sonia; García-Garzón, Silvia; Lokhande, Megha; Parra-Cid, Trinidad

    2011-01-01

    PD-1 molecule promotes anergy and IL-7 receptor (CD127) induces an anti-apoptotic effect on T cells. Correlation between PD-1/CD127 phenotype and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) cell reactivity in resolved infection (RI) after treatment and persistent HCV-infection (PI) was analysed. Directly ex vivo, PD-1 and CD127 expression on HCV-specific CD8(+) cells displayed a positive and negative correlation, respectively with viraemia. Proliferation after stimulation on PD-1(-)/CD127(+) cells from RI cases was preserved, while it was impaired on PD-1(+)/CD127(-) cells from PI patients. PD1(+)/CD127(+) population was observed in PI, and these maintained expansion ability but they did not target the virus. Frequency of PI cases with HCV-specific CD8(+) cell proliferation increased after anti-PD-L1 and anti-apoptotic treatment. Bim expression on HCV-specific CD8(+) cells from PI patients was enhanced. In conclusion, during chronic HCV infection non-reactive HCV-specific CD8(+) cells targeting the virus are PD-1(+)/CD127(-)/Bim(+) and, blocking apoptosis and PD-1/PD-L1 pathway on them enhances in vitro reactivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of PNPLA3 rs738409 SNP on Liver Fibrosis Progression, Portal Hypertension and Hepatic Steatosis in HIV/HCV Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Bernhard; Mandorfer, Mattias; Schwabl, Philipp; Payer, Berit Anna; Bucsics, Theresa; Bota, Simona; Aichelburg, Maximilian C.; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Stättermayer, Albert; Ferenci, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Reiberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Faster fibrosis progression and hepatic steatosis are hallmarks of HIV/HCV coinfection. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the PNPLA3-gene is associated with development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and a worse outcome in alcoholic liver disease. However, the role of PNPLA3 rs738409 SNP on liver fibrosis and steatosis, portal hypertension, and virological response in HIV/HCV coinfection remains unclear. Methods In this cross-sectional study PNPLA3 (rs738409) and IL28B (rs12979860) SNPs were determined in 177 HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Liver fibrosis and steatosis—staged by liver biopsy and transient elastography using the Controlled Attenuation Parameter (CAP)–and portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient, HVPG) were compared across PNPLA3 genotypes. Results 75 (42.4%) patients tested positive for a PNPLA3 minor/major risk allele (G/C:66; G/G:9) showed comparable fibrosis stages (median F2 vs. F2; p = 0.292) and similar amounts of hepatic steatosis (CAP: 203.5±41.9 vs. 215.5±59.7dB/m; p = 0.563) as compared to patients without a PNPLA3 risk allele. Advanced liver fibrosis was neither associated with PNPLA3 (p = 0.253) nor IL28B-genotype (p = 0.628), but with HCV-GT3 (p = 0.003), higher BMI (p = 0.008) and higher age (p = 0.007). Fibrosis progression rate (0.27±0.41 vs. 0.20±0.26 units/year; p = 0.984) and HVPG (3.9±2.6 vs. 4.4±3.0 mmHg; p = 0.472) were similar in patients with and without PNPLA3 risk alleles. SVR rates to PEGIFN/RBV therapy were similar across PNPLA3 genotypes. Conclusions The presence of a PNPLA3 risk allele had no independent impact on liver disease or virological response rates to PEGIFN/RBV therapy in our cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. PMID:26599080

  3. The Impact of PNPLA3 rs738409 SNP on Liver Fibrosis Progression, Portal Hypertension and Hepatic Steatosis in HIV/HCV Coinfection.

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    Bernhard Scheiner

    Full Text Available Faster fibrosis progression and hepatic steatosis are hallmarks of HIV/HCV coinfection. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of the PNPLA3-gene is associated with development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and a worse outcome in alcoholic liver disease. However, the role of PNPLA3 rs738409 SNP on liver fibrosis and steatosis, portal hypertension, and virological response in HIV/HCV coinfection remains unclear.In this cross-sectional study PNPLA3 (rs738409 and IL28B (rs12979860 SNPs were determined in 177 HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Liver fibrosis and steatosis-staged by liver biopsy and transient elastography using the Controlled Attenuation Parameter (CAP-and portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient, HVPG were compared across PNPLA3 genotypes.75 (42.4% patients tested positive for a PNPLA3 minor/major risk allele (G/C:66; G/G:9 showed comparable fibrosis stages (median F2 vs. F2; p = 0.292 and similar amounts of hepatic steatosis (CAP: 203.5 ± 41.9 vs. 215.5 ± 59.7 dB/m; p = 0.563 as compared to patients without a PNPLA3 risk allele. Advanced liver fibrosis was neither associated with PNPLA3 (p = 0.253 nor IL28B-genotype (p = 0.628, but with HCV-GT3 (p = 0.003, higher BMI (p = 0.008 and higher age (p = 0.007. Fibrosis progression rate (0.27 ± 0.41 vs. 0.20 ± 0.26 units/year; p = 0.984 and HVPG (3.9 ± 2.6 vs. 4.4 ± 3.0 mmHg; p = 0.472 were similar in patients with and without PNPLA3 risk alleles. SVR rates to PEGIFN/RBV therapy were similar across PNPLA3 genotypes.The presence of a PNPLA3 risk allele had no independent impact on liver disease or virological response rates to PEGIFN/RBV therapy in our cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients.

  4. Risk factors for Hepatitis C virus antibody seropositivity among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C is an infectious disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) resulting to a chronic hepatitis. Chronic HCV infection constitutes a serious public health challenge in Nigeria where donor blood is not routinely screened for HCV. Patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) are considered a ...

  5. Differences between quantification of genotype 3 hepatitis C virus RNA by Versions 1.0 and 2.0 of the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Test.

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    Pierce, Virginia M; Eversley, Jacqueline S; Tran, Thuy K; Rosenberg, Eric S

    2017-06-27

    Differences between the designs of hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load assays can result in genotype-related variability in RNA quantification. We tested paired aliquots of plasma specimens from HCV-infected individuals using two versions (v1.0 and v2.0) of the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HCV Test (CAP/CTM HCV) and noted variability between results for a subset of specimens; we then sought to determine whether discrepant results were more prevalent among specific HCV genotypes. Archived and prospectively-collected plasma samples from 114 unique patients were tested using CAP/CTM HCV v1.0 and v2.0. The HCV genotype result for each patient was determined by retrospectively reviewing laboratory records. All (46/46) specimens with quantifiable viral loads from patients with genotype 1 or 2 infection had CAP/CTM HCV v1.0 and v2.0 results that were within 0.5 log10 IU/mL; in contrast, only 3/11 (27.3%) from patients with HCV genotype 3 (mean difference, 0.56 log10 IU/mL higher with v2.0) and 0/3 (0%) from patients with HCV genotype 4 (mean difference, 0.91 log10 IU/mL higher with v2.0) had results within 0.5 log10 IU/mL. Among specimens with detectable HCV RNA below the lower limit of quantification with v1.0, greater proportions of genotype 3 (4/7, 57.1%) and genotype 4 (3/4, 75.0%) specimens than genotype 1 or 2 specimens (6/30, 20.0%) had v2.0 results within the quantifiable range. In patients infected with HCV genotype 3, sequential CAP/CTM HCV viral load results should be compared with caution and interpreted in the context of the specific assay version used.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Syphilis Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Victims of HIV infection may suffer a co-infection with hepatitis B and C viruses that share similar mode of transmission. Syphilis, a major cause of Sexually Transmitted Infections, is known to predispose to the transmission of these infections. Aim: The objective of this study is to determine the seroprevalence of ...

  7. Seropositivity and Coinfection of Hepatitis B and C among Patients Seeking Hospital Care in Islamabad, Pakistan

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    Jafar Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The undertaken study was conducted to find out the seroprevalence and coinfection of HBV and HCV infection among patients seeking hospital care. A total of 845 samples were received at tertiary care hospital of Islamabad and were screened for hepatitis B and C. The ELISA was used to detect antigen for HBV and antibodies for HCV in patient serum. Among 845 collected samples, 255 (30.1% were seropositive for HBV and HCV. Out of 255 seropositive samples, 45 (5.3% were positive for HBsAg while 199 (23.5% were positive for anti-HCV. Among 255, 11 (1.3% were seropositive for both HBsAg and anti-HCV (coinfection. Among the seropositive male, HBV was more prevalent (23.8% while female patients had a high incidence of HCV (52.2%. Among the age group variable, HBV, HCV, and coinfection were found to be more common in the age groups of 21–30 (29% and 30–40 (24% years. The seropositivity for HBsAg was higher in unmarried individuals (31.2% while anti-HCV was more prevalent in married individuals (84%. The present study provides the preliminary information about high HCV and HBV prevalence. Findings from the current study will be helpful for the better management and control of viral hepatitis among patients seeking hospital care.

  8. microRNA-122 abundance in hepatocellular carcinoma and non-tumor liver tissue from Japanese patients with persistent HCV versus HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniel, Carolyn; Honda, Masao; Selitsky, Sara R; Yamane, Daisuke; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Lanford, Robert E; Lemon, Stanley M

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of hepatic carcinogenesis in chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C are incompletely defined but often assumed to be similar and related to immune-mediated inflammation. Despite this, several studies hint at differences in expression of miR-122, a liver-specific microRNA with tumor suppressor properties, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) versus hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Differences in the expression of miR-122 in these cancers would be of interest, as miR-122 is an essential host factor for HCV but not HBV replication. To determine whether the abundance of miR-122 in cancer tissue is influenced by the nature of the underlying virus infection, we measured miR-122 by qRT-PCR in paired tumor and non-tumor tissues from cohorts of HBV- and HCV-infected Japanese patients. miR-122 abundance was significantly reduced from normal in HBV-associated HCC, but not in liver cancer associated with HCV infection. This difference was independent of the degree of differentiation of the liver cancer. Surprisingly, we also found significant differences in miR-122 expression in non-tumor tissue, with miR-122 abundance reduced from normal in HCV- but not HBV-infected liver. Similar differences were observed in HCV- vs. HBV-infected chimpanzees. Among HCV-infected Japanese subjects, reductions in miR-122 abundance in non-tumor tissue were associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL28B gene that predicts poor response to interferon-based therapy (TG vs. TT genotype at rs8099917), and correlated negatively with the abundance of multiple interferon-stimulated gene transcripts. Reduced levels of miR-122 in chronic hepatitis C thus appear to be associated with endogenous interferon responses to the virus, while differences in miR-122 expression in HCV- versus HBV-associated HCC likely reflect virus-specific mechanisms contributing to carcinogenesis. The continued expression of miR-122 in HCV-associated HCC may signify

  9. microRNA-122 abundance in hepatocellular carcinoma and non-tumor liver tissue from Japanese patients with persistent HCV versus HBV infection.

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    Carolyn Spaniel

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of hepatic carcinogenesis in chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C are incompletely defined but often assumed to be similar and related to immune-mediated inflammation. Despite this, several studies hint at differences in expression of miR-122, a liver-specific microRNA with tumor suppressor properties, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV versus hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Differences in the expression of miR-122 in these cancers would be of interest, as miR-122 is an essential host factor for HCV but not HBV replication. To determine whether the abundance of miR-122 in cancer tissue is influenced by the nature of the underlying virus infection, we measured miR-122 by qRT-PCR in paired tumor and non-tumor tissues from cohorts of HBV- and HCV-infected Japanese patients. miR-122 abundance was significantly reduced from normal in HBV-associated HCC, but not in liver cancer associated with HCV infection. This difference was independent of the degree of differentiation of the liver cancer. Surprisingly, we also found significant differences in miR-122 expression in non-tumor tissue, with miR-122 abundance reduced from normal in HCV- but not HBV-infected liver. Similar differences were observed in HCV- vs. HBV-infected chimpanzees. Among HCV-infected Japanese subjects, reductions in miR-122 abundance in non-tumor tissue were associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL28B gene that predicts poor response to interferon-based therapy (TG vs. TT genotype at rs8099917, and correlated negatively with the abundance of multiple interferon-stimulated gene transcripts. Reduced levels of miR-122 in chronic hepatitis C thus appear to be associated with endogenous interferon responses to the virus, while differences in miR-122 expression in HCV- versus HBV-associated HCC likely reflect virus-specific mechanisms contributing to carcinogenesis. The continued expression of miR-122 in HCV

  10. Detection of high biliary and fecal viral loads in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrroy, Hugo; Angulo, Jenniffer; Pino, Karla; Labbé, Pilar; Miquel, Juan Francisco; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Soza, Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is closely associated with lipid metabolism. Recently, NPC1L1 (a cholesterol transporter) has been reported to function as an HCV receptor. This receptor is expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and in the intestine; serving as a key transporter for the cholesterol enterohepatic cycle. We hypothesized that HCV might have a similar cycle, so we aimed to study the presence of HCV in bile and stools of infected patients. Blood, feces, and duodenal bile samples were collected from patients infected with HCV. The biliary viral load was normalized to the bile salt concentration of each sample and the presence of HCV core protein was also evaluated. A total of 12 patients were recruited. HCV RNA was detected in the bile from ten patients. The mean viral load was 2.5log10IU/60mg bile salt. In the stool samples, HCV RNA was detected in ten patients (mean concentration 2.7log10IU/g of feces). HCV RNA is readily detectable and is present at relatively high concentrations in the bile and stool samples of infected patients. This may be relevant as a source of infection in men who have sex with men. Biliary HCV secretion may perhaps play a role in the persistence of viral infection via an enterohepatic cycle of the virus or intrahepatic spread. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. [Detection of serum anti-F antibody in hepatitis C virus infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao-zhao; Jiang, Churn-mei; Xu, Ke; Wang, Zhong-can; Ding, Wei-liang; Yu, Rong-bin; Wang, Jie; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Yun

    2007-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of serum anti-F in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the distribution of anti-F. The recombinant protein (HCV-F/GST) was coated onto micro titer plates as antigen. Sera of 120 patients with hepatitis C virus infection, 15 patients with hepatitis B, 3 patients with hepatitis E and 10 normal sera were tested by indirect ELISA for detecting anti-F. 82 samples out of the 120 (68%) HCV infected patients exhibited a positive anti-F reaction, showing significant difference from the controls with no HCV infection (P F was higher in patients over 50 year olds (OR = 6.675, 95% CI: 2.407-19.071). Patients of midrange, severe phase and hepatic cirrhosis had higher rate than the others (OR = 2.749, 95% CI: 1.470-5.141). Prevalence and distribution of anti-F in Yixing hepatitis C patients was reported and which might be related to the progression of HCV infection.

  12. Evaluation of life quality of patients with chronic hepatitis C

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    Schevchenko-Makarenko O.P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the adap­tation data of the quality of life questionnaire (QOL in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C (CVHC. Ball score of QOL of patients with CVHC was 5.09±1.04, 2nd group (with co-infection with HIV / HCV - 4.60±1.13, control group - 5.92±0.52 (p<0.05. The results of the analysis show that co-infection HIV / HCV is a serious problem for patients and significantly affects QOL. The use of the QOL questionnaire for chronic liver disease is a sensitive tool for measuring QOL in patients with CVHC and co-infection HIV / HCV. This informative and economical method can be implemented to assess the patient's health both at the group and individual levels in patients with chronic liver disease in the population of Ukraine.

  13. Virologic response following combined ledipasvir and sofosbuvir administration in patients with HCV genotype 1 and HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinusi, Anu; Townsend, Kerry; Kohli, Anita; Nelson, Amy; Seamon, Cassie; Meissner, Eric G; Bon, Dimitra; Silk, Rachel; Gross, Chloe; Price, Angie; Sajadi, Mohammad; Sidharthan, Sreetha; Sims, Zayani; Herrmann, Eva; Hogan, John; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Talwani, Rohit; Proschan, Michael; Jenkins, Veronica; Kleiner, David E; Wood, Brad J; Subramanian, G Mani; Pang, Phillip S; McHutchison, John G; Polis, Michael A; Fauci, Anthony S; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam

    There is an unmet need for interferon- and ribavirin-free treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To evaluate the rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and adverse events in previously untreated patients with HCV genotype 1 and HIV co-infection following a 12-week treatment of the fixed-dose combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir. Open-label, single-center, phase 2b pilot study of previously untreated, noncirrhotic patients with HCV genotype 1 and HIV co-infection conducted at the Clinical Research Center of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, from June 2013 to September 2014. Patients included those receiving antiretroviral therapy with HIV RNA values of 50 copies/mL or fewer and a CD4 T-lymphocyte count of 100 cells/mL or greater or patients with untreated HIV infection with a CD4 T-lymphocyte count of 500 cells/mL or greater. Serial measurements of safety parameters, virologic and host immune correlates, and adherence were performed. Fifty patients with HCV genotype 1 never before treated for HCV were prescribed a fixed-dose combination of ledipasvir (90 mg) and sofosbuvir (400 mg) once daily for 12 weeks. The primary study outcome was the proportion of patients with sustained viral response (plasma HCV RNA level ledipasvir. The most common adverse events were nasal congestion (16% of patients) and myalgia (14%). There were no discontinuations or serious adverse events attributable to study drug. In this open-label, uncontrolled, pilot study enrolling patients co-infected with HCV genotype 1 and HIV, administration of an oral combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks was associated with high rates of SVR after treatment completion. Larger studies that also include patients with cirrhosis and lower CD4 T-cell counts are required to understand if the results of this study generalize to all patients co-infected with HCV and HIV. clinicaltrials

  14. Influence of Genetic Polymorphisms of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin 10 Genes on the Risk of Liver Cirrhosis in HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients.

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    Sara Corchado

    Full Text Available Analysis of the contribution of genetic (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP at position -238 and -308 of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and -592 of the interleukin-10 (IL-10 promotor genes and of classical factors (age, alcohol, immunodepression, antirretroviral therapy on the risk of liver cirrhosis in human immunodeficiency (HIV-hepatitis C (HCV virus coinfected patients.Ninety one HIV-HCV coinfected patients (50 of them with chronic hepatitis and 41 with liver cirrhosis and 55 healthy controls were studied. Demographic, risk factors for the HIV-HCV infection, HIV-related (CD4+ T cell count, antiretroviral therapy, HIV viral load and HCV-related (serum ALT concentration, HCV viral load, HCV genotype characteristics and polymorphisms at position -238 and -308 of the tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF- α and -592 of the interleukin-10 (IL-10 promotor genes were studied.Evolution time of the infection was 21 years in both patients' groups (chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. The group of patients with liver cirrhosis shows a lower CD4+ T cell count at the inclusion in the study (but not at diagnosis of HIV infection, a higher percentage of individuals with previous alcohol abuse, and a higher proportion of patients with the genotype GG at position -238 of the TNF-α promotor gene; polymorphism at -592 of the IL-10 promotor gene approaches to statistical significance. Serum concentrations of profibrogenic transforming growth factor beta1 were significantly higher in healthy controls with genotype GG at -238 TNF-α promotor gene. The linear regression analysis demonstrates that the genotype GG at -238 TNF-α promotor gene was the independent factor associated to liver cirrhosis.It is stressed the importance of immunogenetic factors (TNF-α polymorphism at -238 position, above other factors previously accepted (age, gender, alcohol, immunodepression, on the evolution to liver cirrhosis among HIV-infected patients with established chronic

  15. Real-World Experiences with the Combination Treatment of Ledipasvir plus Sofosbuvir for 12 Weeks in HCV Genotype 1-Infected Japanese Patients: Achievement of a Sustained Virological Response in Previous Users of Peginterferon plus Ribavirin with HCV NS3/4A Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Arai, Makoto; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Saito, Tomoko; Haga, Yuki; Takahashi, Koji; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Tawada, Akinobu; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Imazeki, Fumio; Kato, Naoya; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-04-25

    The aim of this study was to characterize the treatment response and serious adverse events of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir therapies in Japanese patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 (GT1). This retrospective study analyzed 240 Japanese HCV GT1 patients treated for 12 weeks with 90 mg of ledipasvir plus 400 mg of sofosbuvir daily. Sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) was achieved in 236 of 240 (98.3%) patients. Among treatment-naïve patients, SVR12 was achieved in 136 of 138 (98.6%) patients, and among treatment-experienced patients, SVR12 was achieved in 100 of 102 (98.0%) patients. In patients previously treated with peginterferon plus ribavirin with various HCV NS3/4A inhibitors, 100% SVR rates (25/25) were achieved. Two relapsers had HCV NS5A resistance-associated variants (RAVs), but no HCV NS5B-S282 was observed after they relapsed. We experienced two patients with cardiac events during treatment. In conclusion, combination of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir for 12 weeks is a potential therapy for HCV GT1 patients. Caution is needed for HCV NS5A RAVs, which were selected by HCV NS5A inhibitors and cardiac adverse events.

  16. NS3 Resistance-Associated Variants (RAVs in Patients Infected with HCV Genotype 1a in Spain.

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    María Ángeles Jimenez-Sousa

    Full Text Available Resistance-associated variants have been related to treatment failure of hepatitis C virus (HCV therapy with direct-acting antiviral drugs. The aim of our study was to analyze the prevalence of clinically relevant resistance-associated variants within NS3 in patients infected with HCV genotype 1a (GT1a in Spain.We performed a cross-sectional study on 2568 patients from 115 hospitals throughout Spain (2014-2015. The viral NS3 protease gene was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by Sanger sequencing using an ABI PRISM 377 DNA sequencer. Additionally, clade information for genotype 1a was obtained by using the software geno2pheno (http://hcv.geno2pheno.org/.In total, 875 out of 2568 samples were from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Q80K was the main RAV found in our patients (11.1% and the rest of the resistance-associated variants had a lower frequency, including S122G (6.23%, T54S (3.47%, V55A (2.61%, and V55I (2.15%, which were among the most frequent after Q80K. Overall, 286 samples had the Q80K polymorphism (11.1% and 614 (23.9% were GT1a clade I. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had a higher frequency of Q80K and GT1a clade I than HCV-monoinfected patients (12.9% vs. 9.6% [p = 0.012] and 28.5% vs. 21.4% [p<0.001], respectively. Both the prevalence of Q80K and GT1a clade I were not uniform throughout the country (p<0.001, which ranged from 7.3%-22.2% and 15.7%-42.5%, respectively. The frequency of the Q80K polymorphism was far higher in patients infected with GT1a clade I than in patients infected with GT1a clade II (41.5% vs. 1.6%; p<0.001.The prevalence of most resistance-associated variants in NS3 was low in patients infected with HCV GT1a in Spain, except for Q80K (11.1%, which was also notably higher in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. The vast majority of Q80K polymorphisms were detected in GT1a clade I.

  17. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents [version 3; referees: 2 approved

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    Sara Sobhy Kishta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs. However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs (e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness.

  18. Protective effect of coffee consumption on all-cause mortality of French HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Protopopescu, Camelia; Marcellin, Fabienne; Rosellini, Silvia; Wittkop, Linda; Esterle, Laure; Zucman, David; Raffi, François; Rosenthal, Eric; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Salmon-Ceron, Dominique; Dabis, François; Spire, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Coffee has anti-inflammatory and hepato-protective properties. In the general population, drinking ≥3cups of coffee/day has been associated with a 14% reduction in the risk of all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of all-cause mortality in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH is an ongoing French nationwide prospective cohort of patients co-infected with HIV-HCV collecting both medical and psychosocial/behavioural data (annual self-administered questionnaires). We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the effect of elevated coffee consumption (≥3cups/day) at baseline on all-cause mortality during the cohort's five-year follow-up. Over a median [interquartile range] follow-up of 5.0 [3.9-5.9] years, 77 deaths occurred among 1,028 eligible patients (mortality rate 1.64/100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-2.05). Leading causes of death were HCV-related diseases (n=33, 43%), cancers unrelated to AIDS/HCV (n=9, 12%), and AIDS (n=8, 10%). At the first available visit, 26.6% of patients reported elevated coffee consumption. Elevated coffee consumption at baseline was associated with a 50% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.5; CI 0.3-0.9; p=0.032), after adjustment for gender and psychosocial, behavioral and clinical time-varying factors. Drinking three or more cups of coffee per day halves all-cause mortality risk in patients co-infected with HIV-HCV. The benefits of coffee extracts and supplementing dietary intake with other anti-inflammatory compounds need to be evaluated in this population. Coffee has anti-inflammatory and hepato-protective properties but its effect on mortality risk has never been investigated in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study shows that elevated coffee consumption (≥3cups

  19. Clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV

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    Braga Eduardo Lorens

    Full Text Available Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is increasingly common and affects the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has improved the life expectancy of HIV infected patients, but, by extending survival, it permits the development of HCV cirrhosis. This study tried to evaluate clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV. We evaluated 134 HCV-infected patients: i group A - 65 co-infected HCV/HIV patients, ii group B - 69 mono-infected HCV patients. The impact of HIV infection on HCV liver disease was analyzed using Child's score, ultrasound findings and liver histology. Patients were subjected to HCV genotyping and anti-HBs dosage. Patients mean age was 42.4 years (±9.1 and 97 (72.4% were males. Injected drug use and homo/bisexual practice were more frequently encountered in the co-infected group: 68.3% and 78.0%, respectively. Antibodies against hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs were found in only 38.1% of the patients (66.7% group A x 33.3% group B. Ten out of 14 individuals (71.4% who had liver disease (Child B or C and 25 out of 34 (73.5% who showed ultrasound evidence of chronic liver disease were in the co-infection group. HCV genotype-2/3 was more frequently encountered in co-infected patients (36.9% group A vs. 21.8% group B. Conclusions: a HIV infection seems to adversely affect the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C, b injected drug use, bi/homosexual practice and genotype-2/3 were more frequently encountered in co-infected patients, c immunization against HBV should be encouraged in these patients.

  20. Rapid reversal of innate immune dysregulation in blood of patients and livers of humanized mice with HCV following DAA therapy

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    Burchill, Matthew A.; Roby, Justin A.; Crochet, Nanette; Wind-Rotolo, Megan; Stone, Amy E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Dran, Rachael J.; Kriss, Michael S.; Gale, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in sustained immune activation in both the periphery and hepatic tissue. HCV infection induces innate immune signaling that is responsible for recognition of dsRNA, leading to activation of transcription factors and production of Type I and III IFNs, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Continued activation of host-immune mediated inflammation is thought to contribute to pathologic changes that result in progressive hepatic fibrosis. The current standard treatment for chronic HCV infection is directly-acting antivirals (DAAs), which have provided the unique opportunity to determine whether successful, rapid treatment-induced eradication of viral RNA normalizes the dysregulated antiviral innate immune response in patients chronically infected with HCV. Results First, in patients receiving two different combinations of DAAs, we found that DAAs induced not only rapid viral clearance, but also a re-setting of antiviral immune responses in the peripheral blood. Specifically, we see a rapid decline in the expression of genes associated with chronic IFN stimulation (IFIT3, USP18, IFIT1) as well as a rapid decline in genes associated with inflammation (IL1β, CXCL10, CXCL11) in the peripheral blood that precedes the complete removal of virus from the blood. Interestingly, this rapid reversal of innate immune activation was not seen in patients who successfully clear chronic HCV infection using IFN-based therapy. Next, using a novel humanized mouse model (Fah-/-RAG2-/-IL2rgnull—FRG), we assessed the changes that occur in the hepatic tissue following DAA treatment. DAA-mediated rapid HCV clearance resulted in blunting of the expression of proinflammatory responses while functionally restoring the RIG-I/MAVS axis in the liver of humanized mice. Conclusions Collectively, our data demonstrate that the rapid viral clearance following treatment with DAAs results in the rebalancing of innate antiviral response in

  1. Prevalence of hepatic steatosis and associated factors in Iranian patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortahmasebi, Vahdat; Emami Aleagha, Mohammad Sajad; Amiri, Mehdi; Qorbani, Mostafa; Farahmand, Mohammad; Asayesh, Hamid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatic steatosis is commonly observed in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Many studies indicate a relationship between steatosis and fibrosis progression. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of hepatic steatosis and related factors in Iranian CHC patients. Methods: One hundred and fifteen consecutive patients with CHC were enrolled which were treatment- naïve. The patients were divided into groups with and without steatosis according to the result of liver biopsy (58.3% and 41.7%, respectively). Demographic, histological, biochemical and virological factors were examined and compared in all patients. Results: In terms of host factors, body mass index (BMI), triglyceride, fasting blood glucose (FBG), necroinflammatory activity and severity in fibrosis of CHC patients with steatosis was significantly higher than the patients without steatosis. Of viral factors, HCV viral load was not significantly altered in patients with steatosis. Moreover, HCV genotypes did not meet such association. Using multivariate regression analysis, parameters of BMI values, FBG level and stage of fibrosis were independently associated with steatosis. Conclusion: Our data indicate that CHC patients are more susceptible to development of hepatic steatosis. Based on our results, grade of steatosis appears to be associated with hepatic fibrosis progression rate in CHC patients. PMID:27390692

  2. [Analyses of anti-hCV detected by ELISA and HCV RNA detected by RT-nPCR in chronic hepatitis C virus infectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiuju; Liu, Dianwu; Zhang, Shiyong; Tong, Lixin

    2007-01-01

    In order to provide the basis for the clinical test and the blood station screening the health donator, the results of anti-HCV tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked-immuno-absorbed assay ) and HCV RNA tested by RT-nPCR (reverse-transcript-nested-polymerase-chain-reaction) were compared in the chronic hepatitis C virus infectors. Venous blood samples of 133 chronic hepatitis C virus infectors, 52 health controls were collected in May 2005. These infectors were infected with HCV nearly in 1990 through plasma donator and diagnosed in 1993 in a rural area of Zhao County in Hebei Province, which remained the same diagnosis as HCV infectors in 2002 Hebei Province. The anti-HCV was tested by ELISA and HCV RNA was tested by RT-nPCR. (1) In 185 cases, the positive rates of both anti-HCV and HCV RNA were 49.73% (92/185). The rate of anti-HCV negative but HCV RNA positive was 9.73% (18/185). The rate of anti-HCV positive but HCV RNA negative was 11.89% (22/185). The negative rate of both anti-HCV and HCV RNA tested was 28.65% (53/185). The result-agreement rate of ELISA and RT-nPCR methods were 78.38% [(92 + 53)/185]. The disagreement rate between ELISA and RT-nPCR methods was not obviously different (paired chi2 = 0.40, P > 0.05). (2) In the chronic HCV infectors, the sensitivity of anti-HCV tested by ELISA was 82.71%, the specificity was 92.31%, and the omitting rate was 17.29%. The sensitivity of HCV RNA tested by RT-nPCR was 81.20%, the specificity was 96.15%, and the omitting rate was 18.80%. The sensitivity between ELISA and RT-nPCR was not obviously different (chi2 = 0.102, P > 0.05). (3) The sensitivity tested by ELISA combined with RT-nPCR was 96.75%, which was evidently higher than that of single ELISA (82.71%) (chi2 = 9.62, P < 0.01). The false negative rate was nearly 17% when anti-HCV was tested with single ELISA in HCV infectors. The positive testing rate of HCV infection was increased remarkably when ELISA and RT-nPCR were tested simultaneously.

  3. Efficacy of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, for 12 weeks in patients with HCV genotype 3 or 6 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gane, Edward J; Hyland, Robert H; An, Di; Svarovskaia, Evguenia; Pang, Phillip S; Brainard, Diana; Stedman, Catherine A

    2015-11-01

    We performed a phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 or 6. We performed an open-label study of 126 patients with HCV genotype 3 or 6 infections at 2 centers in New Zealand from April 2013 through October 2014. Subjects were assigned 1 of 4 groups that received 12 weeks of treatment. Previously untreated patients with HCV genotype 3 were randomly assigned to groups given fixed-dose combination tablet of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (n = 25) or ledipasvir and sofosbuvir along with ribavirin (n = 26). Treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotype 3 (n = 50) received ledipasvir and sofosbuvir and ribavirin. Treatment-naïve or treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotype 6 (n = 25) received ledipasvir and sofosbuvir. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with HCV RNA ≤15 IU/mL 12 weeks after stopping therapy (sustained virologic response at 12 weeks [SVR12]). Among treatment-naïve genotype 3 patients, 16 of 25 (64%) receiving ledipasvir and sofosbuvir alone achieved SVR12 compared with all 26 patients (100%) receiving ledipasvir and sofosbuvir and ribavirin. Among treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotype 3, forty-one of fifty achieved an SVR12 (82%). Among patients with HCV genotype 6, the rate of SVR12 was 96% (24 of 25 patients). The most common adverse events were headache, upper respiratory infection, and fatigue. One patient with HCV genotype 3 discontinued ledipasvir and sofosbuvir because of an adverse event (diverticular perforation), which was not considered treatment related. In an uncontrolled, open-label trial, high rates of SVR12 were achieved by patients with HCV genotype 3 infection who received 12 weeks of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir plus ribavirin, and by patients with HCV genotype 6 infection who received 12 weeks of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir without ribavirin. Current guidelines do

  4. Acute portal vein thrombosis precipitated by indomethacin in a HCV-positive elderly patient

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    Mantarro Stefania

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increased risk of venous thromboembolism has been reported in patients treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. We describe a case of acute portal vein thrombosis (PVT in a hepatitis C virus (HCV-positive elderly patient following administration of indomethacin. Case presentation A 79-year-old HCV-positive man was hospitalized for severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, 15 days after starting indomethacin for back pain. Clinical signs and imaging evaluations disclosed a picture of PVT. Indomethacin was discontinued, and the patient was started on fondaparinux and antithrombin. He was discharged 15 days later due to improvement of his clinical conditions. Thirty days later, a follow-up ultrasound did not show appreciable signs of PVT. The time elapsing between the start of analgesic therapy and PVT onset suggests a role of indomethacin as the triggering agent. Indomethacin could have precipitated PVT by a combination of at least two detrimental mechanisms: 1 direct action on liver vascular endothelium by inhibition of prostacyclin biosynthesis; 2 damage to the intestinal mucosa, followed by inflammatory and pro-coagulant activation of portal endothelium upon exposure to bacterial endotoxins. Conclusions This case can be of interest to physicians, who should exert caution when prescribing NSAIDs for inflammatory pain in patients with background inflammatory dysfunctions of the portal vein endothelium.

  5. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in healthy adults and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of HCV infection in Abuja, FCT, Nigeria was determined among healthy adults and HIV infected persons. A total of n=520 apparently healthy HIV negative persons and n=1,200 infected persons were tested for antibodies against HCV by rapid chromatographic immunoassay HCV kit (Acon, ACON ...

  6. Present situation of antiviral therapies for HCV-related cirrhosis

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    LI Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV-related cirrhosis are at a higher risk for the development of hepatic failure and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC compared with non-cirrhotic patients. Antiviral therapies for HCV-related cirrhosis may reduce the incidence of HCC and hepatic failure. This article introduces current antiviral therapies for HCV-related cirrhosis: P/R, DAA+P/R, and IFN-free regimens, and summarizes the present situation of antiviral therapies for HCV-related cirrhosis. It is thought that the advent of direct-acting antivirals has improved the rate of sustained virologic response and reduced the incidence of adverse events during the treatment of HCV-related cirrhosis. Interferon-free regimens have great advantage and potential in antiviral therapies for HCV-related cirrhosis.

  7. Buprenorphine for human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients: does it serve as a bridge to hepatitis C virus therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynn E; Maynard, Michaela A; Friedmann, Peter D; Macleod, Cynthia J; Rich, Josiah D; Flanigan, Timothy P; Sylvestre, Diana L

    2012-09-01

    Buprenorphine is associated with enhanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment outcomes including increased antiretroviral therapy initiation rates, adherence, and CD4 cell counts among HIV-infected opioid-dependent individuals. Buprenorphine facilitates hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment in opioid-dependent patients with HCV monoinfection. Less is known about buprenorphine's role in HIV/HCV coinfection. We conducted a retrospective chart review to evaluate HCV care for HIV-infected buprenorphine patients in the first 4 years of buprenorphine's integration into a Rhode Island HIV clinic. Sixty-one patients initiated buprenorphine. All had HCV antibody testing; 57 (93%) were antibody-positive. All antibody-positive patients underwent HCV RNA testing; 48 (84%) were RNA-positive. Of these, 15 (31%) were not referred to HCV care. Among chronically infected patients, 3 received HCV treatment after buprenorphine; all had cirrhosis and none achieved viral eradication. At buprenorphine induction, most patients had inadequately controlled HIV infection, with detectable HIV RNA (59%) or CD4 cell count less than or equal to 350/μL (38%). Buprenorphine has shown limited success to date as a bridge to HCV treatment within an HIV clinic. Buprenorphine's stabilization of opioid dependence and HIV disease may permit the use of HCV therapy over time.

  8. Neuropsychiatric and psychosocial issues of patients with hepatitis C infection: a selective literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the evidence on the association of hepatitis C (HCV) infection with several aspects of mental and psychosocial health. Medline was searched with appropriate keywords. The primary sources were the systematic reviews. If systematic reviews were not available for a subject, then the most relevant and methodologically sound original studies were selected. HCV infection is associated with poorer health-related quality of life, and physical, mental, and social health. A part of impaired health of these patients is related to cirrhosis, intravenous drug use, co morbid psychiatric disorders, stigmatization, poor social support, alcohol abuse, and interferon treatment. However, HCV itself is also associated with poorer health status particularly in the physical and cognitive domains, which might be related to brain alterations induced by the virus. Interferon treatment is an important cause of depression in HCV patients and sometimes is associated with irritability, manic episode, or acute confusional state. Social health of HCV patients is significantly impaired by stigmatization, poor social support, psychiatric comorbidties, and impaired coping. Psychosocial impairment of HCV patients significantly impairs their treatment adherence. A supportive and nonjudgmental multidisciplinary team is required for optimal management of these patients. Patients with HCV infection had complex neuropsychiatric and psychosocial problems. These problems are challenges for management of HCV infection, affect the patient's care significantly, and might alter the course of the disease. A multidisciplinary approach, a supportive environment, and a nonjudgmental healthcare team are required for optimal medical and psychosocial management of patients with HCV.

  9. Efficacy of 8 Weeks of Sofosbuvir, Velpatasvir, and Voxilaprevir in Patients With Chronic HCV Infection: 2 Phase 3 Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ira M; Lawitz, Eric; Gane, Edward J; Willems, Bernard E; Ruane, Peter J; Nahass, Ronald G; Borgia, Sergio M; Shafran, Stephen D; Workowski, Kimberly A; Pearlman, Brian; Hyland, Robert H; Stamm, Luisa M; Svarovskaia, Evguenia; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Zhu, Yanni; Subramanian, G Mani; Brainard, Diana M; McHutchison, John G; Bräu, Norbert; Berg, Thomas; Agarwal, Kosh; Bhandari, Bal Raj; Davis, Mitchell; Feld, Jordan J; Dore, Gregory J; Stedman, Catherine A M; Thompson, Alexander J; Asselah, Tarik; Roberts, Stuart K; Foster, Graham R

    2017-07-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) after 12 weeks of treatment with the nucleotide polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir combined with the NS5A inhibitor velpatasvir. We assessed the efficacy of 8 weeks of treatment with sofosbuvir and velpatasvir plus the pangenotypic NS3/4A protease inhibitor voxilaprevir (sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir). In 2 phase 3, open-label trials, patients with HCV infection who had not been treated previously with a direct-acting antiviral agent were assigned randomly to groups given sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir for 8 weeks or sofosbuvir-velpatasvir for 12 weeks. POLARIS-2, which enrolled patients infected with all HCV genotypes with or without cirrhosis, except patients with genotype 3 and cirrhosis, was designed to test the noninferiority of 8 weeks of sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir to 12 weeks of sofosbuvir-velpatasvir using a noninferiority margin of 5%. POLARIS-3, which enrolled patients infected with HCV genotype 3 who had cirrhosis, compared rates of SVR in both groups with a performance goal of 83%. In POLARIS-2, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93%-97%) of patients had an SVR to 8 weeks of sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir; this did not meet the criterion to establish noninferiority to 12 weeks of sofosbuvir-velpatasvir, which produced an SVR in 98% of patients (95% CI, 96%-99%; difference in the stratum-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel proportions of -3.2%; 95% CI, -6.0% to -0.4%). The difference in the efficacy was owing primarily to a lower rate of SVR (92%) among patients with HCV genotype 1a infection receiving 8 weeks of sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir. In POLARIS-3, 96% of patients (95% CI, 91%-99%) achieved an SVR in both treatment groups, which was significantly superior to the performance goal. Overall, the most common adverse events were headache, fatigue, diarrhea, and nausea; diarrhea and nausea were reported more frequently by

  10. DNA vaccine expressing the non-structural proteins of hepatitis C virus diminishes the expression of HCV proteins in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeshi; Kohara, Michinori; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-05

    Most of the people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) develop chronic hepatitis, which in some cases progresses to cirrhosis and ultimately to hepatocellular carcinoma. Although various immunotherapies against the progressive disease status of HCV infection have been studied, a preventive or therapeutic vaccine against this pathogen is still not available. In this study, we constructed a DNA vaccine expressing an HCV structural protein (CN2), non-structural protein (N25) or the empty plasmid DNA as a control and evaluated their efficacy as a candidate HCV vaccine in C57BL/6 and novel genetically modified HCV infection model (HCV-Tg) mice. Strong cellular immune responses to several HCV structural and non-structural proteins, characterized by cytotoxicity and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production, were observed in CN2 or N25 DNA vaccine-immunized C57BL/6 mice but not in empty plasmid DNA-administered mice. The therapeutic effects of these DNA vaccines were also examined in HCV-Tg mice that conditionally express HCV proteins in their liver. Though a reduction in cellular immune responses was observed in HCV-Tg mice, there was a significant decrease in the expression of HCV protein in mice administered the N25 DNA vaccine but not in mice administered the empty plasmid DNA. Moreover, both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were required for the decrease of HCV protein in the liver. We found that the N25 DNA vaccine improved pathological changes in the liver compared to the empty plasmid DNA. Thus, these DNA vaccines, especially that expressing the non-structural protein gene, may be an alternative approach for treatment of individuals chronically infected with HCV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Baseline MELD Score Predicts Hepatic Decompensation during Antiviral Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C and Advanced Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dultz, Georg; Seelhof, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Welker, Martin-Walter; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Teuber, Gerlinde; Kronenberger, Bernd; von Wagner, Michael; Vermehren, Johannes; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Hofmann, Wolf Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In patients with advanced liver cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection antiviral therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin is feasible in selected cases only due to potentially life-threatening side effects. However, predictive factors associated with hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy are poorly defined. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, 68 patients with HCV-associated liver cirrhosis (mean MELD score 9.18±2.72) were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Clinical events indicating hepatic decompensation (onset of ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hospitalization) as well as laboratory data were recorded at baseline and during a follow up period of 72 weeks after initiation of antiviral therapy. To monitor long term sequelae of end stage liver disease an extended follow up for HCC development, transplantation and death was applied (240weeks, ±SD 136weeks). Results Eighteen patients (26.5%) achieved a sustained virologic response. During the observational period a hepatic decompensation was observed in 36.8%. Patients with hepatic decompensation had higher MELD scores (10.84 vs. 8.23, p14, respectively. Baseline MELD score was significantly associated with the risk for transplantation/death (p<0.001). Conclusions Our data suggest that the baseline MELD score predicts the risk of hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy and thus contributes to decision making when antiviral therapy is discussed in HCV patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. PMID:23936497

  12. Baseline MELD score predicts hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Dultz

    Full Text Available In patients with advanced liver cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection antiviral therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin is feasible in selected cases only due to potentially life-threatening side effects. However, predictive factors associated with hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy are poorly defined.In a retrospective cohort study, 68 patients with HCV-associated liver cirrhosis (mean MELD score 9.18 ± 2.72 were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Clinical events indicating hepatic decompensation (onset of ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hospitalization as well as laboratory data were recorded at baseline and during a follow up period of 72 weeks after initiation of antiviral therapy. To monitor long term sequelae of end stage liver disease an extended follow up for HCC development, transplantation and death was applied (240 weeks, ± SD 136 weeks.Eighteen patients (26.5% achieved a sustained virologic response. During the observational period a hepatic decompensation was observed in 36.8%. Patients with hepatic decompensation had higher MELD scores (10.84 vs. 8.23, p14, respectively. Baseline MELD score was significantly associated with the risk for transplantation/death (p<0.001.Our data suggest that the baseline MELD score predicts the risk of hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy and thus contributes to decision making when antiviral therapy is discussed in HCV patients with advanced liver cirrhosis.

  13. Evaluation of bacterial translocation in patients with chronic HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Daniela; Negru, Anca; Radulescu, Mihaela; Mihailescu, Raluca; Arama, St S; Arama, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The factors involved in the progression of liver disease towards decompensated cirrhosis are not completely elucidated. It seems that bacterial translocation (BT) from the gut to the systemic blood flow has an important role in the disease progression, but literature data are controversial. Our objectives were to evaluate the presence of BT in patients with chronic HCV infection and to assess the correlation between BT and liver fibrosis stages and inflammatory state. We conducted a cross-sectional study on patients with chronic HCV infection in a tertiary care hospital between January and July 2013. Blood samples were collected for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, platelets, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis-alpha (TNFα). Plasma LPS were measured by ELISA (Kamiya Biomedical Company Seattle, SUA) and TNFα by DIAsource ImmunoAssay (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) kits. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by means of FibroMax (BioPredictive, Paris, France) in all patients. We enrolled 116 patients with CHC, with a sex ratio M/F of 0.55 and a median age of 54 (45-61) years. Most of the patients (32) had compensated cirrhosis (F4). LPS levels were higher in patients with mild fibrosis--median value of 60.34 (32-91.7) ng/mL, than in cirrhotic patients--median value 40.39 (20.2-74.4) ng/mL (p = 0.051). We found no statistical correlation between LPS levels and fibrosis (p = 0.068) or TNFα levels (p = 0.097) CONCLUSIONS: There was BT in patients with CHC but it was not correlated with liver fibrosis stages or systemic inflammation. This may suggest that LPS evaluation may not be the best technique to assess baterial translocation, but further studies are needed.

  14. HBV, HCV and HIV among patients with Hemophilia in Khartoum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The main objective is to determine the screening, vaccination, seroconversion of hepatitis B, C and HIV among Sudanese hemophilic patients registered in Hemophilia Center Khartoum Teaching Hospital. Methods: During the period from July to November 2008, sixty two hemophilic male patients were randomly ...

  15. Reactivation of occult HBV infection in an HIV/HCV Co-infected patient successfully treated with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Gabriele; Mastrorosa, Ilaria; Vergori, Alessandra; Mazzotta, Valentina; Pinnetti, Carmela; Grisetti, Susanna; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Ammassari, Adriana; Antinori, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Reactivation of occult or inactive Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection during immunosuppressant treatments is well known and widely described in literature. The same observation has been made in Hepatitis C (HCV)-infected patients previously exposed to HBV and treated with interferon-free DAA treatments. Because of common transmission routes, persons may have been exposed to HCV, HBV and HIV, but few cases have been reported in this scenario to date. Frequency of HBV reactivation in HIV/HCV co-infected patients previously exposed to HBV and treated with DAA remains unclear. Herein, we report an episode of HBV reactivation in an HIV/HCV co-infected patient prescribed with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir for HCV. The patient is a Caucasian 54-years old female, with HIV/HCV co-infection (genotype 4), and a previous exposure to HBV, documented by negativity of HBsAg and positivity of HBsAb and HBcAb. Her medical history included: myocardial infarct, chronic kidney disease stage 3, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and mild pulmonary hypertension. HCV had not been treated with interferon (IFN)-based regimens and liver stiffness was 10.5 KPa (Metavir stage F3) at hepatic elastography. Because of CKD, she was prescribed with a nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI)-sparing regimen including darunavir/ritonavir plus etravirine, and thereafter with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir for 12 weeks. Four weeks after DAA termination, the patient was hospitalized with symptoms of acute hepatitis. Blood tests showed HCV RNA <12 IU/ml, but positivity of HBAg, HBeAg, and of anti-core antibodies (IgM and IgG), while anti-HBs and anti-HBe antibodies were negative. HBV DNA was 6.06 Log 10 IU/ml. Entecavir was started obtaining resolution of symptoms, normalization of liver enzymes, as well as reduction of HBV DNA and of quantitative HBV surface antigen. This case-report highlights the risk of HBV reactivation with interferon-free DAA treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients previously exposed to HBV

  16. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens D; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Soriano, Vincent; Reiss, Peter; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Sambatakou, Helen; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2012-09-24

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined. Patients with at least three serum creatinine measurements after 1 January 2004 and known HCV antibody status were included. Baseline was defined as the first eligible estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (Cockcroft-Gault equation), and CKD was either a confirmed (>3 months apart) eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less for patients with a baseline eGFR more than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or a confirmed 25% decline in eGFR for patients with a baseline eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less. Incidence rates of CKD were compared between HCV groups (anti-HCV-negative, anti-HCV-positive with or without viremia) using Poisson regression. Of 8235 patients with known anti-HCV status, 2052 (24.9%) were anti-HCV-positive of whom 983 (47.9%) were HCV-RNA-positive, 193 (9.4%) HCV-RNA-negative and 876 (42.7%) had unknown HCV-RNA. At baseline, the median eGFR was 97.6 (interquartile range 83.8-113.0) ml/min per 1.73 m. During 36123 person-years of follow-up (PYFU), 495 patients progressed to CKD (6.0%) with an incidence rate of 14.5 per 1000 PYFU (95% confidence interval 12.5-14.9). In a multivariate Poisson model, patients who were anti-HCV-positive with HCV viremia had a higher incidence rate of CKD, whereas patients with cleared HCV infection had a similar incidence rate of CKD compared with anti-HCV-negative patients. There was no association between CKD and HCV genotype. Compared with HIV-monoinfected patients, HIV-positive patients with chronic rather than cleared HCV infection were at increased risk of developing CKD, suggesting a contribution from active HCV infection toward the pathogenesis of CKD.

  17. Are specific antiretrovirals associated with an increased risk of discontinuation due to toxicities or patient/physician choice in patients with hepatitis C virus coinfection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Rockstroh, J; Soriano, V

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver damage associated with hepatitis C (HCV) may influence the likelihood of experiencing discontinuation due to toxicities or patient/physician choice (TOXPC) in patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Little information to address this concern is available from...... of HCV should influence the choice between antiretrovirals used as part of a cART regimen....

  18. Preliminary results of ozone therapy as a possible treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, Saad; Kamel, Sherif Ebrahiem; Hassan, Magda Shahata; Sallam, Nadia Abdel; Shahata, Mohamad Ahmad; Helal, Shaaban Redwan; Mahmoud, Heba

    2011-03-01

    Medical ozone is more bactericidal, fungicidal, and virucidal than any other natural substance. Some studies proved that ozone infused into donated blood samples can kill viruses 100% of the time. Ozone, because of its special biologic properties, has theoretical and practical attributes to make it a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) inactivator, which suggests an important role in the therapy for hepatitis C. The study aim is to evaluate the role of ozone therapy in decreasing HCV ribonucleic acid (HCV RNA) load and its effect on the liver enzymes among patients with chronic hepatitis C. This study included 52 patients with chronic hepatitis C (positive polymerase chain reaction [PCR] for HCV RNA and raised serum alanine transaminase [ALT] for more than 6 months). All patients were subjected to meticulous history taking and clinical examination. Complete blood count, liver function tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were requested for all patients. The ozone group included 40 patients who received major autohemotherapy, minor autohemotherapy, and rectal ozone insufflation. The other 12 patients (conventional group) received silymarin and/or multivitamins. There were significant improvements of most of the presenting symptoms of the patients in the ozone group in comparison to the conventional group. ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels normalized in 57.5% and 60% in the ozone group, respectively, in comparison to 16.7% and 8% in the conventional group, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HCV RNA was negative among 25% and 44.4% after 30 and 60 sessions of ozone therapy, respectively, in comparison to 8% among the conventional group. Ozone therapy significantly improves the clinical symptoms associated with chronic hepatitis C and is associated with normalized ALT and AST levels among a significant number of patients. Ozone therapy is associated with disappearance of HCV RNA from the serum (-ve PCR for HCV RNA) in 25%-45% of patients with

  19. Frequency of HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV in pregnant women and/or patients with gynecologic diseases in a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Özlü

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are viruses that can be transmitted to the health care workers by infected body fluids and from mother to the baby before, during or after delivery. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg, hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV, and HIV antibodies (anti-HIV in pregnant women and/or patients with gynecologic diseases that admit to a university hospital in Bolu.Methods: HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV results of the pregnant women and/or patients with gynecologic diseases that admitted to the obstetrics and gynecology clinics between January 2006 and June 2012 were retrospectively investigated. All markers were tested in the microbiology laboratory of our hospital by using macro ELISA method (Axsyme and Architect i2000SR systems, Abbott Diagnostics, Chicago, IL, USA.Results: The frequency of HBsAg, anti-HCV, and antiHIV positivity were 1.8%, 0.5%, and 0% in pregnant women and 1.9%, 1.1%, and 0% in patients with gynecologic diseases, respectively.Conclusion: The frequencies detected in our hospital are at low levels as seen in developed countries. Since there is no effective method of prevention especially from HCV, awareness of this serologic result before high risk procedures will enable the doctors and the health care workers to take extensive measures to prevent the transmission of the disease. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (2: 166-170Key words: anti-HCV, anti-HIV, HBsAg, pregnant women, gynecology

  20. Anti-viral therapy in haemodialysed HCV patients: efficacy, tolerance and treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltenre, P; Moreno, C; Tran, A; Ollivier, I; Provôt, F; Stanke, F; Lazrek, M; Castel, H; Canva, V; Louvet, A; Colin, M; Glowacki, F; Dharancy, S; Henrion, J; Hazzan, M; Noel, C; Mathurin, P

    2011-08-01

    In end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, hepatitis C virus (HCV) eradication improves patient and graft survival. To determine optimal use of erythropoietin (EPO) and ribavirin, to compare ribavirin concentrations with those of HCV patients having normal renal function and to evaluate sustained virological response (SVR) in a prospective observatory of ESRD candidates for renal transplantation. Thirty-two naïve patients were treated with Peg-IFN-α2a and ribavirin. Two different schedules of ribavirin and EPO administration were used: starting ribavirin at 600mg per week and adapting EPO when haemoglobin (Hb) fell below 10g/dL (adaptive strategy) or starting ribavirin at 1000mg per week while increasing EPO from the start of treatment (preventive strategy). Patients treated with the adaptive strategy had lower median Hb levels (9.6 vs. 10.9g/dL, P=0.02) and more frequent median Hb levels below 10g/dL (58 vs. 5%, P=0.0007) despite lower median ribavirin doses (105 vs. 142mg/day, P<0.0001) than patients treated with the preventive strategy. There was a trend for more frequent transfusion in patients treated with the adaptive strategy than in patients treated with preventive strategy (50 vs. 20%, P=0.08). Compared to patients with normal renal function, ESRD patients had lower ribavirin concentrations during the first month (0.81 vs. 1.7mg/L, P=0.007) and similar concentrations thereafter. SVR was reached in 50%. Pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and an adapted schedule of ribavirin are effective in ESRD patients. Increasing EPO from the start of treatment provides better haematological tolerance. The optimal dosage of ribavirin remains unresolved, in light of frequent side effects. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Algerian patients with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhia, Samir; Malek, Rachid; Bounecer, Hocine; Dekaken, Aoulia; Bendali Amor, Fouzia; Sadelaoud, Mourad; Benouar, Abderrahmene

    2010-07-21

    To investigate the prevalence of, and risk factors for, diabetes mellitus (DM) in Algerian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and in a control group. A cross-sectional study was undertaken. A total of 416 consecutive patients with viral chronic hepatitis attending the Internal Medicine Department of the University Hospital Center Touhami Benflis in Batna [290 HCV-infected and 126 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients] were prospectively recruited. The prevalence of DM was higher in HCV-infected patients in comparison with HBV-infected patients (39.1% vs 5%, P < 0.0001). Among patients without cirrhosis, diabetes was more prevalent in HCV-infected patients than in HBV-infected patients (33.5% vs 4.3%, P < 0.0001). Among patients with cirrhosis, diabetes was more prevalent in HCV-infected patients, but the difference was not significant (67.4% vs 20%, P = 0.058). The logistic regression analysis showed that HCV infection [odds ratio (OR) 4.73, 95% CI: 1.7-13.2], metabolic syndrome (OR 12.35, 95% CI: 6.18-24.67), family history of diabetes (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.67-6.13) and increased hepatic enzymes (OR 2.22, 95% CI: 1.1-4.5) were independently related to DM in these patients. The high prevalence of diabetes in HCV-infected patients, and its occurrence at early stages of hepatic disease, suggest that screening for glucose abnormalities should be indicated in these patients.

  2. Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles induced by hepatitis C virus F protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ming; Deng, Xiaozhao; Zhai, Xiangjun; Xu, Ke; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Jinhai; Zhou, Zhenxian; Yu, Xiaojie; Xu, Xiaodong; Liu, Yunxi; Zhu, Danyan; Zhang, Yun

    2013-05-01

    Th1 and Th2 cytokine response has been confirmed to be correlated with the pathogenesis of HCV infection. The aim of the study is to investigate the Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles induced by HCV alternate reading frame protein (F protein) in chronic hepatitis C patients. We assessed the immune responses specific to HCV F protein in 55 chronic HCV patients. IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) post F protein stimulation were compared among HCV patients and healthy donors. Finally, the associations between HCV F protein and HLA class II alleles were explored. We found that the seroprevalence of anti-F antibodies in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients was significantly higher than that of patients without HCC, but such a significant difference in humoral immune responses to F protein was not observed in HCV 1b-infected- and non-HCV 1b-infected-patients. Additionally, the PBMC proliferation of HCC patients was significantly lower than that of patients without HCC. Furthermore, F protein stimulation of PBMCs from F-seropositive patients resulted in Th2 biased cytokine responses (significantly decreased IFN-γ and/or IL-2 and significantly increased IL-4 and/or IL-5 levels) that reportedly may contribute to HCC progression and pathogenesis. However, no significant difference in the association between HCV F protein and HLA-DRB1*0201, 0301, 0405, 1001 and HLA-DQB1*0201, 0401, 0502, 0602 was observed in this study. These findings suggest that F protein may contribute to the HCV-associated bias in Th1/Th2 responses of chronic hepatitis C patients including the progress of HCC pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Shift in Emphasis From Risk-Based to Age-Based Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Testing in the US Tends to Remove Injection Drug Use From Discourse on HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Ashly E; Perlman, David C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is hyperendemic among people who inject drugs; nonsterile drug injection is the principle risk for HCV acquisition. Due to gaps in the HCV care continuum, there have been recommendations in the United States emphasizing age-rather than risk-based testing strategies. The central research focus of this project is to explore the meanings and implications of the shift in emphasis from risk-based to age-based HCV testing with regard to people who use drugs. Content analysis and critical discourse analysis, informed by eco-social theory, were used to examine relevant documents. Fifteen documents were assessed for eligibility; 6 documents comprised the final set reviewed. In content analysis, age-based testing was both mentioned more frequently and was supported more strongly than risk-based testing. Risk-based testing was frequently mentioned in terms minimizing its use and drug use was often mentioned only euphemistically. The reframed emphasis largely removed discussion of injection drug use from discussion of HCV risks. Shifting the emphasis of HCV testing from testing based on specific routes of transmission and risk to testing based on age removes injection drug use from HCV discourse. This has the potential to either facilitate HCV care for drug users or to further stigmatize and marginalize drug use and people who use drugs. The potential implications of this shift in testing emphasis for public health merit further investigation.

  4. Fracture risk in hepatitis C virus infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection and fracture risk is not well characterized. We compared fracture risk between HCV-seropositive (HCV-exposed) patients and the general population and between patients with cleared and chronic HCV-infection. METHODS...

  5. Hepatitis C virus reactivation in cancer patients in the era of targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ozan; Sendur, Mehmet Ali Nahit; Aksoy, Sercan

    2014-06-14

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence of hepatitis C reactivation in cancer patients in the era of targeted therapies. Targeted therapies are novel therapeutics frequently used in cancer patients. During treatment with targeted therapies, viral replication is one of the major problems that can occur. The PubMed database, ASCO, and ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium abstracts were searched up until September 15, 2013 using the following search keywords: "targeted therapies, rituximab, alemtuzumab, brentuximab, hepatitis, hepatitis C reactivation, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, everolimus, anti-HER therapies, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, lapatinib, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapies, cetuximab, panitumumab, and ipilimumab". Papers considered relevant for the aim of this review were selected by the authors. The data about rituximab-induced hepatic flare in hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive patients is controversial. However, there is the possibility of life-threatening hepatic flare that can develop after HCV ribonucleic acid (HCV-RNA) viral load increases. Routine follow-up of liver function tests should be advised. Especially in high-risk patients, such as those with baseline chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis, and where there are plans to administer rituximab concomitantly with corticosteroids, it is advised to have close follow-up of HCV viral load. The data is insufficient to make accurate statements about the association of alemtuzumab therapy and HCV reactivation. However, alemtuzumab may cause deep immunosuppression. Due to this, it is better to follow up with liver function tests and HCV RNA levels during alemtuzumab therapy. Brentuximab has effects on antibody dependent cellular toxicity and may decrease humoral immunity. Thus, we believe that during brentuximab treatment of HCV infected patients, clinicians may encounter hepatitis C reactivation. There have been no

  6. The hepatitis C cascade of care among HIV infected patients: a call to address ongoing barriers to care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R Cachay

    Full Text Available The aims were to investigate the hepatitis C (HCV cascade of care among HIV-infected patients and to identify reasons for not referring for and not initiating HCV therapy after completion of HCV treatment staging.Retrospective cohort analysis of HIV-infected patients under care at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD. We identified patients screened for and diagnosed with active HCV infection. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with lack of referral for HCV therapy. Electronic medical records were reviewed to ascertain reasons for not initiating HCV therapy.Between 2008 and 2012, 4725 HIV-infected patients received care at the UCSD Owen clinic. Most patients [4534 (96%] were screened for HCV, 748 (16% patients had reactive serum HCV antibodies but only 542 patients had active HCV infection. Lack of engagement in care was the most important predictor of non-referral for HCV therapy [odds ratio (OR: 5.08, 95% confidence interval 3.24-6.97, p<0.00001]. Other significant predictors included unstable housing (OR: 2.26, AIDS (OR: 1.83, having a detectable HIV viral load (OR: 1.98 and being non-white (OR: 1.67. The most common reason (40% for not initiating or deferring HCV therapy was the presence of ongoing barriers to care.Screening for HCV in HIV-infected patients linked to care is high but almost half of patients diagnosed with HCV are not referred for HCV therapy. Despite improvements in HCV therapy the benefits will not be realized unless effective measures for dealing with barriers to care are implemented.

  7. Prevalence of anti HCV infection in patients with beta-thalassemia in Isfahan-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Ataei

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings revealed that blood transfusion was the main risk factors for HCV infection among beta-thalassemic patients. Therefore, more blood donor screening programs and effective screening techniques are needed to prevent transmission of HCV infection among beta-thalassemic patients.

  8. Prevalence of Hepatitis B and C among Patients Looking for Hospital Care; Five Years' Study in Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Atefeh; Yousefzadeh, Hadis; Tahaghoghi, Sahar; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out the prevalence, viral load and co-infection of HBV and HCV infection among patients seeking to hospital care in Mashhad, Iran. A total of 402 samples (349 samples for HBV and 53 for HCV) were received and were screened for hepatitis B and C during 2004 to 2014. Viral loads of HBV DNA and HCV RNA were quantified by real-time PCR. Among 349 collected samples, 229 (65.61%) were positive for HBV DNA and 36 (67.92%) for HCV RNA. Among the ones positive for HBV DNA and HCV RNA, HCV was more prevalent (86.11% Vs 58%) ,in male patients, a higher incidence was attributed to HBV than HCV (34.42 Vs 13.88%%). The incidence of co-infection of HBV and HCV was in 5 (1.88%) patients. Association of age and load of HBV, HCV showed that higher marginal viral loads found to be more common in the age groups of upper 30 years old (P=0.064, P=0.079, respectively). The present study provides the preliminary information about high HCV and HBV prevalence. Findings from the current study will be helpful for the better management and control of viral hepatitis among patients looking for hospital care.

  9. Hepatitis C virus coinfection independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montero, J V; Barreiro, P; de Mendoza, C; Labarga, P; Soriano, V

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with HIV are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease despite successful antiretroviral therapy. Likewise, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with extrahepatic complications, including cardiovascular disease. However the risk of cardiovascular disease has not been formally examined in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. A retrospective study was carried out to assess the influence of HCV coinfection on the risk of cardiovascular events in a large cohort of HIV-infected patients recruited since year 2004. A composite event of cardiovascular disease was used as an endpoint, including myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke or death due to any of them. A total of 1136 patients (567 HIV-monoinfected, 70 HCV-monoinfected and 499 HIV/HCV-coinfected) were analysed. Mean age was 42.7 years, 79% were males, and 46% were former injection drug users. Over a mean follow-up of 79.4 ± 21 months, 3 patients died due to cardiovascular disease, whereas 29 suffered a first episode of coronary ischaemia or stroke. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had a greater incidence of cardiovascular disease events and/or death than HIV-monoinfected individuals (4% vs 1.2%, P = 0.004) and HCV-monoinfected persons (4% vs 1.4%, P = 0.5). After adjusting for demographics, virological parameters and classical cardiovascular disease risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, high LDL cholesterol), both HIV/HCV coinfection (HR 2.91; CI 95%: 1.19-7.12; P = 0.02) and hypertension (HR 3.65; CI 95%: 1.34-9.94; P = 0.01) were independently associated with cardiovascular disease events and/or death in HIV-infected patients. Chronic hepatitis C and hypertension are independently associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk in HIV-infected patients. Therefore, treatment of chronic hepatitis C should be prioritized in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients regardless of any liver fibrosis staging. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The French national prospective cohort of patients co-infected with HIV and HCV (ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH: Early findings, 2006-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouges François

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In France, it is estimated that 24% of HIV-infected patients are also infected with HCV. Longitudinal studies addressing clinical and public health questions related to HIV-HCV co-infection (HIV-HCV clinical progression and its determinants including genetic dimension, patients' experience with these two diseases and their treatments are limited. The ANRS CO 13 HEPAVIH cohort was set up to explore these critical questions. To describe the cohort aims and organization, monitoring and data collection procedures, baseline characteristics, as well as follow-up findings to date. Methods Inclusion criteria in the cohort were: age > 18 years, HIV-1 infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection or sustained response to HCV treatment. A standardized medical questionnaire collecting socio-demographic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, histological, ultrasound and endoscopic data is administered at enrolment, then every six months for cirrhotic patients or yearly for non-cirrhotic patients. Also, a self-administered questionnaire documenting socio-behavioral data and adherence to HIV and/or HCV treatments is administered at enrolment and yearly thereafter. Results A total of 1,175 patients were included from January 2006 to December 2008. Their median age at enrolment was 45 years and 70.2% were male. The median CD4 cell count was 442 (IQR: 304-633 cells/μl and HIV RNA plasma viral load was undetectable in 68.8%. Most participants (71.6% were on HAART. Among the 1,048 HIV-HCV chronically co-infected patients, HCV genotype 1 was predominant (56% and cirrhosis was present in 25%. As of January, 2010, after a median follow-up of 16.7 months (IQR: 11.3-25.3, 13 new cases of decompensated cirrhosis, nine hepatocellular carcinomas and 20 HCV-related deaths were reported, resulting in a cumulative HCV-related severe event rate of 1.9/100 person-years (95% CI: 1.3-2.5. The rate of HCV-related severe events was higher in cirrhotic

  11. The French national prospective cohort of patients co-infected with HIV and HCV (ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH): early findings, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loko, Marc-Arthur; Salmon, Dominique; Carrieri, Patrizia; Winnock, Maria; Mora, Marion; Merchadou, Laurence; Gillet, Stéphanie; Pambrun, Elodie; Delaune, Jean; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Neau, Didier; Bonnard, Philippe; Rosenthal, Eric; Barange, Karl; Morlat, Philippe; Lacombe, Karine; Gervais, Anne; Rouges, François; See, Alain Bicart; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Vittecoq, Daniel; Goujard, Cécile; Duvivier, Claudine; Spire, Bruno; Izopet, Jacques; Sogni, Philippe; Serfaty, Lawrence; Benhamou, Yves; Bani-Sadr, Firouzé; Dabis, François

    2010-10-22

    In France, it is estimated that 24% of HIV-infected patients are also infected with HCV. Longitudinal studies addressing clinical and public health questions related to HIV-HCV co-infection (HIV-HCV clinical progression and its determinants including genetic dimension, patients' experience with these two diseases and their treatments) are limited. The ANRS CO 13 HEPAVIH cohort was set up to explore these critical questions.To describe the cohort aims and organization, monitoring and data collection procedures, baseline characteristics, as well as follow-up findings to date. Inclusion criteria in the cohort were: age > 18 years, HIV-1 infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection or sustained response to HCV treatment. A standardized medical questionnaire collecting socio-demographic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, histological, ultrasound and endoscopic data is administered at enrollment, then every six months for cirrhotic patients or yearly for non-cirrhotic patients. Also, a self-administered questionnaire documenting socio-behavioral data and adherence to HIV and/or HCV treatments is administered at enrollment and yearly thereafter. A total of 1,175 patients were included from January 2006 to December 2008. Their median age at enrollment was 45 years and 70.2% were male. The median CD4 cell count was 442 (IQR: 304-633) cells/μl and HIV RNA plasma viral load was undetectable in 68.8%. Most participants (71.6%) were on HAART. Among the 1,048 HIV-HCV chronically co-infected patients, HCV genotype 1 was predominant (56%) and cirrhosis was present in 25%. As of January, 2010, after a median follow-up of 16.7 months (IQR: 11.3-25.3), 13 new cases of decompensated cirrhosis, nine hepatocellular carcinomas and 20 HCV-related deaths were reported, resulting in a cumulative HCV-related severe event rate of 1.9/100 person-years (95% CI: 1.3-2.5). The rate of HCV-related severe events was higher in cirrhotic patients and those with a low CD4 cells count, but

  12. Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Dialysis Patients: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Weclawiak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a blood-borne infection and its prevalence used to be elevated in hemodialysis (HD patients. Its main mode of contamination relies on nosocomial transmission. HCV infection is frequently associated in HD patients with normal liver enzymes whereas liver histology can display some degree of HCV-related lesions. The assessment of HCV-related lesions, even in HD dialysis patients, can be done via noninvasive tests. After kidney transplantation, HCV-related lesions can worsen; however, in this setting antiviral treatment harbors the risk of acute rejection. Therefore, it is recommended to implement antiviral treatment while the patient is receiving dialysis therapy. In this setting, the rate of viral clearance is usually high. In case of sustained virological response, no relapse occurs after kidney transplantation, despite heavy immunosuppression.

  13. The negative impact of HBV/HCV coinfection on cirrhosis and its consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, S; Haour, G; Fontaine, H; Dorival, C; Petrov-Sanchez, V; Bourliere, M; Capeau, J; Carrieri, P; Larrey, D; Larsen, C; Marcellin, P; Pawlostky, J-M; Nahon, P; Zoulim, F; Cacoub, P; de Ledinghen, V; Mathurin, P; Negro, F; Pageaux, G-P; Yazdanpanah, Y; Wittkop, L; Zarski, J-P; Carrat, F

    2017-10-09

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) confection has been rarely studied in nonasian series. To compare the characteristics of HBV/HCV coinfected patients to those of HBV- or HCV-monoinfected patients in the ANRS CO22 HEPATHER cohort study. Of the 20 936 included patients, 95 had HBV/HCV coinfection (hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV antibody and HCV RNA positive) and were matched with 375 HBV- and 380 HCV-monoinfected patients on age, gender and time since HBV or HCV diagnosis. F3-F4 fibrosis was more frequent in coinfected patients (58%) than in HBV- (32%, P HBV- (2%, P = .0002) or HCV- (4%, P = .0275) monoinfected patients. Past excessive alcohol use was more frequent in coinfected patients (26%) than in HBV (12%, P = .0011), but similar in HCV monoinfected patients (32%, P = .2868). Coinfected patients had a higher proportion with arterial hypertension (42%) than HBV- (26%) or HCV-monoinfected patients (25%) (P HBV-infected patients (OR = 3.84, 95% CI 1.99-7.43) and the association between decompensated cirrhosis and coinfection in HBV infected (OR = 5.58, 95% CI 1.42-22.0) or HCV infected patients (OR = 3.02, 95% CI 1.22-7.44). HCV coinfection harmfully affects liver fibrosis in HBV patients, while decompensated cirrhosis is increased in coinfected patients compared with HBV- or HCV-monoinfected patients. HCV treatment is as safe and effective in coinfected as monoinfected patients and should be considered following the same rules as HCV monoinfected patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The success of HCV cure: every rose has its thorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon-Ceron, Dominique; Mondelli, Mario U; Maticic, Mojca; Arends, Joop E

    2017-11-07

    This review aimed to examine mid-term liver complications and extra-hepatic clinical syndromes in addition to quality of life benefits associated with achieving HCV cure. Also to review the few safety issues that have been associated with the use of oral direct acting antivirals (DAAs) and discuss the potential benefits of the reduction of the burden of HCV infection at the population level. HCV cure is possible with DAAs in more than 95% of the patients treated. The blockage of liver inflammation and halting of fibrosis progression translates in both hepatic and extra-hepatic beneficial improvements and in reduction in the need for liver transplantation secondary to HCV. In addition, a reduction in the frequency of extra-hepatic manifestations like mixed cryoglobulinemia and vasculitis and improvements in quality of life and fatigue have been described. Curing HCV infection also provides a high potential to reduce the burden of HCV infection at the population level. Several modelling studies suggest that dramatic reductions in HCV prevalence and incidence are possible with large scaling-up of HCV treatment. However, obtaining these benefits needs early treatment of HCV-infected individuals preceded by voluntary national policies to improve the screening of HCV and the access to care, particularly in high-risk populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viral infections in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in north India

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    Parnita Harsh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD often require immunosuppressive therapy and blood transfusions and therefore are at a high risk of contracting infections due to hepatitis B (HBV and hepatitis C (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of these infections in patients with IBD.Methods: This retrospective study included 908 consecutive patients with IBD (ulcerative colitis [UC], n=581; Crohn's disease [CD], n=327 who were receiving care at a tertiary care center. Ninety-five patients with intestinal tuberculosis (ITB were recruited as disease controls. Prospectively maintained patient databases were reviewed for the prevalence of HBV surface antigen, anti-HCV antibodies, and HIV (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. HCV RNA was examined in patients who tested positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Prevalence data of the study were compared with that of the general Indian population (HBV, 3.7%; HCV, 1%; HIV, 0.3%.Results: The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV was 2.4%, 1.4%, and 0.1%, respectively, in the 908 patients with IBD. Among the 581 patients with UC, 2.2% (12/541 had HBV, 1.7% (9/517 had HCV, and 0.2% (1/499 had HIV. Among the 327 patients with CD, 2.8% (8/288 had HBV, 0.7% (2/273 had HCV, and 0% (0/277 had HIV. One patient with CD had HBV and HCV coinfection. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV in patients with ITB was 5.9% (4/67, 1.8% (1/57, and 1.2% (1/84, respectively.Conclusions: The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV in north Indian patients with IBD is similar to the prevalence of these viruses in the general community. Nonetheless, the high risk of flare after immunosuppressive therapy mandates routine screening of patients with IBD for viral markers.

  16. Hepatitis C virus coinfection does not influence the CD4 cell recovery in HIV-1-infected patients with maximum virologic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects the CD4 cell recovery in patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of HCV coinfection on the CD4 recovery in patients with maximum virologic suppression within the Euro...... for HCV treatment and HCV-RNA VL did not change the findings. CONCLUSIONS: HCV serostatus did not influence the CD4 recovery in patients with HIV with maximum virologic suppression after starting combination antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, no difference in CD4 gain was found when comparing distinct...

  17. Diffuse Hepatic Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma Developed in a Patient with Hepatitis C Cirrhosis

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    Pedro W. Baron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE is an infrequent vascular tumor of endothelial origin that primarily occurs in women in the mid-fifth decade of life without underlying chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Liver transplant should be the first-line of therapy in patients with large or diffuse unresectable tumors even in the presence of metastatic disease due to the favorable long-term outcome. We report the case of a 48-year-old female who complained of abdominal pain and weight loss. She has a history of cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis C (HCV and was treated with interferon and ribavirin with sustained virological response. Her work-up revealed multiple confluent infiltrating bilobar liver masses diagnosed as HEHE. She underwent a successful liver transplant without evidence of recurrent HCV infection. She developed cervical spine (C4-C6 HEHE metastases 4 years after transplant. She underwent surgical resection and local radiotherapy after resection with good clinical response. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HEHE that developed in a patient with HCV cirrhosis successfully treated with antiviral therapy before transplant and liver transplant with good allograft function without evidence of recurrent liver tumor or HCV infection but developed metastases to the cervical spine 4 years after transplant.

  18. Management of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in patients with end-stage renal disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Valadez J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan Aguirre Valadez,1 Ignacio García Juárez,1 Rodolfo Rincón Pedrero,2 Aldo Torre11Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Nephrology, National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients, mainly in those on hemodialysis (HD. The seroprevalence of HCV in developing countries ranges between 7% and 40%. Risk factors for this infection in the CKD population include the number of blood transfusions, duration of end-stage renal disease (ESRD, and prevalence of HCV in HD. Chronic HCV infection in patients with ESRD is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality in the pre and post kidney transplant periods. The increase in mortality is directly associated with liver complications and an elevated cardiovascular risk in HCV-infected patients on hemodialysis. Antiviral treatment may improve the prognosis of patients with HCV, and standard interferon remains the cornerstone of treatment. Treatment of HCV in patients with CKD is complex, but achieving a sustained viral response may decrease the frequency of complications after transplantation. It appears that HCV-infected patients who remain on maintenance dialysis are at increased risk of death compared with HCV patients undergoing renal transplantation.Keywords: hepatitis C virus, chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis, interferon

  19. Clinical experiences with interferon as monotherapy or in combination with ribavirin in patients co-infected with HIV and HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puoti, Massimo; Zanini, Barbara; Bruno, Raffaele; Airoldi, Monica; Rossi, Stefania; Quiros Roldan, Eugenia; El Hamad, Issa; Moretti, Francesca; Castelli, Francesco; Sacchi, Paolo; Filice, Gaetano; Carosi, Giampiero

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection accelerates progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) toward cirrhosis. Thus, with the increase of life expectancy observed after introduction of combination antiretroviral treatment, liver disease is becoming an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. In addition, HCV co-infection blunts CD4 restoration induced by HAART and increases HAART hepatotoxicity. For all these reasons, anti-HCV treatment is mandatory in HIV seropositives. The perfect treatment of hepatitis C should not only be safe and effective, but it should not have any adverse impact on HIV diseases and concurrent anti-HIV therapy. Two drugs are currently licensed for treatment of HCV: interferon alfa (IFNalpha) and ribavirin. Three hundred and thirty-eight patients have been included in pilot studies on the efficacy and tolerability of IFNalpha monotherapy: 16% showed sustained response and 10% dropped out. No significant adverse impact of IFNalpha monotherapy on HIV diseases or antiretroviral treatment has been observed. IFNalpha and ribavirin in combination have been introduced more recently: only 88 patients were included in pilot studies published as full papers with a 25% sustained response and an 11% rate of drop outs. Anemia and cumulative toxicity with didanosine were the most important side effects of combination treatment, but it did not affect HIV disease progression. Higher rates of sustained response (33%) without increase of side effects have been observed in preliminary experiences with the new long-acting pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. The search for the perfect treatment continues.

  20. Tiny staining spots in liver cirrhosis associated with HCV infection observed by computed tomographic hepatic arteriography. Follow-up study

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    Tsuchiyama, Tomoya; Terasaki, Shuichi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kaji, Kyosuke; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Matsui, Osamu [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-10-01

    It is important to distinguish small lesions with increased arterial perfusion observed by computed tomographic arteriography (CT-A) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the clinical characteristics and prognosis of such lesions have not been clarified. We retrospectively examined 200 patients with cirrhosis related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who had undergone both CT-A and CT arterioportography between 1995 and 1998, and found 80 tiny staining spots (TSS)s, with a diameter of 5-10 mm, by CT-A (35 patients). The mean TSS observation period was 29.0 months. If the major axis was larger than 10 mm and showed a 1.5-fold or more increase, the lesion was regarded as tumor growth (TG). The TSS lesions were divided into two groups according to whether the patient had or did not have HCC. The prognosis of TSS was classified into three groups; HCC-suspected group, nontumor group, and unclassified group, in which TG was negative although transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) had been performed. Of the 40 TSSs in 14 patients without HCC, 2 (5%) were suspected as HCC. Of the 40 TSSs in 21 patients with HCC, 13 (32.5%) were suspected as HCC. There were no significant differences in the size, position, and morphology of TSSs among the three prognostic groups. Of the 7 TSSs with a high signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images, 5 were in the HCC-suspected group. We recommend early treatment of TSSs accompanying HCC or showing features of malignancy at the imaging workup. (author)

  1. USE OF HEMATOPOIETIC GROWTH FACTOR IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEMATOLOGICAL SIDE EFFECTS ASSOCIATED TO ANTIVIRAL TREATMENT FOR HCV HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mancino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Haematological abnormalities are common during combination antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C. Although dose reduction or discontinuation can easily treat these side effects, they can adversely affect the efficacy of combination antiviral therapy reducing the likelihood of a sustained viral response (SVR. To avoid potentially diminishing a patient’s chance of response, many physicians have begun using growth factors off-label to manage anaemia and neutropenia in hepatitis C. Haematopoietic growth factors are generally well tolerated and they may be useful for managing haematological side effects of anti-HCV therapy improving patients’ quality of life. To date, the role and benefit of these agents during anti-HCV therapy and their positive impact on SVR have not conclusively determined in the published studies. However, the possibility of a benefit to individual outpatients remains, and an individualized approach is recommended. This review explores the incidence, clinical significance, and management of anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia associated with combination therapy for HCV infection.

  2. PRO-C3-levels in patients with HIV/HCV-Co-infection reflect fibrosis stage and degree of portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Christian; Leeming, Diana J; Mandorfer, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver-related deaths represent the leading cause of mortality among patients with HIV/HCV-co-infection, and are mainly related to complications of fibrosis and portal hypertension. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the structural changes by the assessment of extracellular matrix (ECM......4M and C5M levels were higher in patients with portal hypertension (HVPG>5 mmHg). CONCLUSION: PRO-C3 levels reflect liver injury, stage of liver fibrosis and degree of portal hypertension in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Furthermore, C4M and C5M were associated with increased portal pressure....... Circulating markers of hepatic ECM remodeling might be helpful in the diagnosis and management of liver disease and portal hypertension in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection....

  3. Interferon Stimulated Gene Expression in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients Treated with Nitazoxanide/Peginterferon-Alfa-2a and Ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Tess; Lee, Yu-Jin; Osinusi, Anu; Amorosa, Valerianna K; Wang, Crystal; Kang, Minhee; Matining, Roy; Zhang, Xiao; Dou, Diana; Umbleja, Triin; Kottilil, Shyam; Peters, Marion G

    2016-07-01

    A combination of nitazoxanide (NTZ), peginterferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin (RBV) may result in higher sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfected patients. This study evaluated the effect of NTZ on interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in vitro and in vivo among HIV/HCV genotype-1 (GT-1) treatment-naive patients. The ability of NTZ to enhance host response to interferon (IFN) signaling using the HCV cell culture system was initially evaluated. Second, ISG expression in 53 patients with treatment outcomes [21 SVR and 32 nonresponders (NR)] in the ACTG A5269 trial, a phase-II study (4-week lead in of NTZ 500 mg daily followed by 48 weeks of NTZ, PegIFN, and weight-based RBV), was assessed. The relative expression of 48 ISGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured at baseline, week 4, and week 8 of treatment in a blinded manner. In vitro NTZ produced a direct and additive antiviral effect with IFN-alfa, with pretreatment of NTZ resulting in maximal HCV suppression. NTZ augmented IFN-mediated ISG induction in PBMCs from relapsers and SVRs (p < 0.05), but not NR. In ACTG A5269, baseline expression of most ISGs was similar between NR and SVR. NTZ minimally induced 17 genes in NR and 13 genes in SVR after 4 weeks of therapy. However, after initiation of PegIFN and RBV, ISG induction was predominantly observed in the SVR group and not NR group. NTZ treatment facilitates IFN-induced suppression of HCV replication. Inability to achieve SVR with IFN-based therapy in this clinical trial is associated with diminished ISG response to therapy that is refractory to NTZ.

  4. Recent advances in managing chronic HCV infection: Focus on therapy in patients with severe liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Maan (Raoel); A.J.P. van der Meer (Adriaan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractChronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection still represents a major public health problem, as it is thought to be responsible for more than 350,000 deaths around the globe on a yearly basis. Fortunately, successful eradication of the virus has been associated with improved clinical

  5. Urgency to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jia-Horng; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Chien, Rong-Nan; Cho, Mong; Chuang, Wan-Long; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Liu, Chen-Hua; Paik, Seung-Woon

    2017-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection poses a global healthcare burden, being associated with serious complications if untreated. The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highest in areas of Central, South, and East Asia; over 50% of HCV patients worldwide live in the region, where HCV genotypes 1b, 2, 3, and 6 are the most prevalent. Treatment outcomes for chronic hepatitis C vary by ethnicity, and Asian patients achieve higher sustained virologic response rates following interferon (IFN)-based therapy than non-Asians. However, low efficacy, poor safety profile, and subcutaneous administration limit the use of IFN-based therapies. Superior virologic outcomes have been observed with different classes of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) alone or in combination, and several all-oral DAA regimens are available in Asia. These regimens have shown excellent efficacy and favorable tolerability in clinical trials, yet there is a need for further studies of DAAs in a real world context, particularly in Asia. Furthermore, IFN-free treatment may not be accessible for many patients in the region, and IFN-based regimens remain an option in some countries. There is a need to improve current clinical practices for HCV management in Asia, including effective screening, disease awareness, and prevention programs, and to further understand the cost-effectiveness of IFN-free regimens. The evolution of potent treatments makes HCV eradication a possibility that should be available to all patients. However, access to these therapies in Asian countries has been slow, primarily because of economic barriers that continue to present a hurdle to optimal treatment. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Barriers to care of chronic hepatitis patients in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna

    2007-08-01

    Delay in diagnosis of chronic hepatitis due to HCV or HBV is mainly caused by lack of information about these prevalent and life-threatening disorders. Diagnostic tests are either not easily available or not requested by primary care physicians. When cases positive for hepatitis-B markers or anti-HCV are found, misleading guidance may be given to patients. Absence of symptoms associated with lack of information is another barrier to the care of chronic hepatitis patients. Management of these diseases is not simple, and treatment options and schedules are in rapid and continuous evolution. Surveillance of patients with chronic hepatitis before, during and after antiviral therapy is mandatory. For patients with no indication for therapy, identification of optimal follow-up frequency constitutes a problem, as does determination of the correct amount and type of diagnostic tests to be used. Another important barrier to care of patients with chronic hepatitis is the absence of an ideal drug, namely, one that is inexpensive, does not have collateral effects, and has very high percentages of cure or resolution. Access to therapy is uncertain, and the side effects of interferon frighten some patients and physicians. Lack of adherence to the medication, early interruption, and the need for other supportive therapies are frequent barriers to successful treatment.

  7. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among patients undergoing haemodialysis in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C infection is a worldwide problem. The global prevalence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) averages 3%. Moreover, its prevalence among patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) varies worldwide, ranging from as low as 1% to up to 70%. There are few data on its prevalence in developing countries, and even less information is available on HD patients. A literature review revealed that the prevalence of HCV infection among patients undergoing HD in Latin America ranges from 4.2 to 83.9%, with most data stemming from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Venezuela and Cuba. The most common genotype was genotype 1, and subtype 1b was the most frequent. The risk factors associated with this condition were the duration of the HD treatment and blood transfusion before hepatitis C screening. In addition, HCV RNA detection by polymerase chain reaction is crucial for the diagnosis of HCV infection in HD patients. Trials using combinations of new oral antiviral drugs, such as sofosbuvir and combo (ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir and dasabuvir), should be the next step in the improvement of care among HD patients with HCV, because these therapeutic agents apparently do not require dose adjustment according to renal function. Finally, information on this subgroup of patients remains unavailable in some countries; therefore, additional studies are needed to determine the prevalence trend of HCV infection in these populations.

  8. Critical issues in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in methadone maintenance patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, David M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2008-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common chronic complication of injection drug use. Methadone maintenance programs contain large numbers of patients infected with HCV. This paper reviews HCV infection with emphasis on the medical care of HCV-infected, or HCV and human immunodeficiency virus co-infected, patients on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance. Literature searches using PubMed, PsycINFO and SocINDEX were used to identify papers from 1990-present on antiviral therapy for HCV in methadone maintenance patients and on liver transplantation in methadone maintenance patients. Injection drug use is the most significant risk factor for HCV infection in most western countries. The prevalence of HCV antibody is high in injection drug users (53-96%) and in patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs (67-96%). Studies of antiviral therapy for HCV in methadone maintenance patients show rates of sustained virological response (SVR), defined as negative HCV-RNA 24 weeks after the end of treatment, of 28-94%. In studies with contrast groups, no significant differences in SVR between methadone and contrast groups were found. Excellent completion rates of antiviral therapy (72-100%) were found in five of six studies. There are many barriers to methadone maintenance patients' receiving antiviral therapy, and research on overcoming barriers is discussed. Liver transplantation has been successful in methadone maintenance patients but has not been utilized widely. High quality medical care for all aspects of HCV infection can be provided to methadone maintenance patients. The literature supports the effectiveness of such services, but the reality is that most patients do not receive them.

  9. The preliminary efficacy of interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination treatment of chronic hepatitis C in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-huang; Zhang, Chun-ying; He, Yan; Zhou, Hua-ying; Zou, Wen; Ding, Pei-pei; Huang, Li; Li, Hui

    2005-07-20

    It is internationally accepted that in drug-naïve individuals with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection, chronic hepatitis C should be treated first if the CD4 cell count does not require the initiation of anti-retroviral therapy. Present paper evaluated the clinical effect and side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy for Chinese patients with HCV-HIV co-infection, and compared with them for HIV infection alone. Ten patients with HCV-HIV and 17 patients with HCV received 5 million unit IFNalpha-2b every other day intramuscularly, and 300 mg RBV triple daily by oral. Dynamic observations were made for HCV RNA and HIV RNA loads, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts, liver function and blood cell measurement, and the medicine side-effects. After 12-week and 24-week treatments of IFN-alpha and RBV combination therapy, mean HCV RNA levels reduced 1.14 logs and 1.56 logs from the baseline at week 0 in HCV-HIV co-infection, and reduced 1.48 logs and 1.75 logs in HCV infection, respectively. The HIV RNA levels decreased 1.22 logs and 1.32 logs from the base line; however, there were no obvious different changes at T lymphocyte counts of HCV-HIV and HCV patients through 24-week treatments. Whole 27 patients showed satisfactory biochemical response to therapy. There were some mild or mediate influence-like symptoms, intestinal uncomfortable and depressed blood cell counts in early stage of the treatments. No neuropsychiatric and auto-immune disorders were found. IFN-alpha and RBV combination therapy had similar anti-HCV effects during 24-week treatment for HCV-HIV and HCV infected Chinese patients, and some anti-HIV effect. There were no obvious different biochemical responses and side-effects between two groups above.

  10. Biochemical non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis cannot replace biopsy in HIV-HCV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliemann, Dimas A; Wolff, Fernando H; Tovo, Cristiane V; Alencastro, Paulo R; Ikeda, Maria L R; Brandão, Ajácio B M; Barcellos, Nêmora; Fuchs, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    The liver biopsy has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and quantification of fibrosis. However, this method presents limitations. In addition, the non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis is a challenge. The aim of this study was to validate the fibrosis cirrhosis index (FCI) index in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients, and compare to AST/ALT ratio (AAR), AST to platelet ratio index (APRI) and FIB-4 scores, as a tool for the assessment of liver fibrosis in coinfected patients. Retrospective cross sectional study including 92 HIV-HCV coinfected patients evaluated in two reference centers for HIV treatment in the Public Health System in Southern Brazil. Patients who underwent liver biopsy for any indication and had concomitant laboratory data in the 3 months prior to liver biopsy, to allow the calculation of studied noninvasive markers (AAR, APRI, FIB-4 and FCI) were included. APRI 1.5 presents the best negative predictive value and FCI > 1.25 the best specificity to detect significant fibrosis. The values of noninvasive markers for each Metavir fibrosis stage showed statistically significant differences only for APRI. In conclusion, until better noninvasive markers for liver fibrosis are developed and validated for HIV-HCV coinfected patients, noninvasive serum markers should be used carefully in this population.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Antibodies in Dialysis Patients in Tunisia: A Single Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassi F

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-eight patients on maintenance hemodialysis in a dialysis unit at Tunis, Tunisia were tested for anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV antibodies by second generation ELISA test, and for HCV-RNA by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of 5′ non-coding region. Specificity of the antibodies was confirmed by immunoblot test. HCV genotype was defined using INNO-LIPA test. Twenty-seven out of 58 patients (46.5% were reactive by ELISA. Transaminase levels were assessed over a six-month period and showed normal average values. Fourteen of the 27 anti-HCV positive patients (51% were positive by RT-PCR. Type 1b HCV genotype was the most prevalent, seen in all the dialysis patients and one patient in addition, was co-infected with genotype 4. There was a significant correlation between the duration on dialysis (over five years and the prevalence of anti-HCV-positive patients (P< 0.005 while no correlation existed between the number of blood transfusions and the presence of anti-HCV antibodies. The present study illustrates the high prevalence of HCV infection among Tunisian dialysis patients (51% and indicates that the spread may be nosocomial rather than transfusion-related.

  12. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Nogueira Cordeiro Moraes Jardim

    Full Text Available Occult hepatitis B infection is characterized by hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA in the serum in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg. We assessed occult HBV infection prevalence in two groups of immunocompromised patients (maintenance hemodialysis patients and HIV-positive patients presenting HBsAg-negative and anti-HBc positive serological patterns, co-infected or not by HCV. Thirty-four hemodialysis anti-HIV negative patients, 159 HIV-positive patients and 150 blood donors who were anti-HBc positive (control group were selected. HBV-DNA was detected by nested-PCR. Occult hepatitis B infection was not observed in the hemodialysis patients group but was found in 5% of the HIV-patients and in 4% of the blood donors. Immunosuppression in HIV positive patients was not a determining factor for occult HBV infection. In addition, no significant relationship between HBV-DNA and HCV co-infection in the HIV-positive patient group was found. A lack of significant associations was also observed between positivity for HBV-DNA and CD4 count, viral load and previous lamivudine treatment in these HIV-positive patients.

  13. Impact of resistance-associated variant dominancy on treatment in patients with HCV genotype 1b receiving daclatasvir/asunaprevir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Okuse, Chiaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Toshiya; Yamada, Norie; Shigefuku, Ryuta; Hattori, Nobuhiro; Matsunaga, Kotaro; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Minoru; Yasuda, Kiyomi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Izumi, Namiki; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Michihiro; Itoh, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Sustained virological responses (SVR) by daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) therapy for genotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients has been significantly affected by pre-existence of Y93 H resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) region. The aim of this study was to elucidate the dominancy of naturally occurring RAVs in viral quasispecies on treatment outcomes in patients with HCV. In total, 138 patients were prospectively selected from 152 patients treated with DCV and ASV, where evaluation of treatment outcomes at 12 weeks post-treatment was possible. Pre-treatment RAVs in the non-structural protein 3 and NS5A regions were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader assays, and the ratio of Y93H RAVs in viral quasispecies was measured by quantitative PCR-Invader assay. Among 25 patients detected the Y93H RAV, the Y93H ratio was 1-25% in 5 patients, 26-75% in 7 patients, and ≥76% in 13 patients. Overall, SVR at 12 weeks after the completion of treatment (SVR12) was 91% (125/138), and those with Y93H ratios of <1%, 1-25%, 26-75%, and ≥76% were 99%, 100%, 71%, and 23%, respectively. Thus, the SVR12 decreased as the HCV Y93H ratio increased (P < 0.0001). The dominancy of pre-treatment RAVs of DCV and ASV affected its treatment outcomes, suggesting that evaluating the dominancy of HCV RAVs could be required for every other direct-acting antiviral agent treatments. J. Med. Virol. 89:99-105, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of silybum marianum on patients with chronic hepatitis C

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    Hamid Kalantari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silymarin derived from silybum marianum (milk thistle, a flowering member of the daisy family, may benefit liver function in people infected with the hepatitis C virus. The aims of this pilot study were to assess the efficacy and safety of silymarin on serum hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA, serum aminotransferases (ALT, AST levels, liver fibrosis and well-being in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Methods: This prospective self-controlled trial study was conducted from March to September 2006 at Department of Gastroenterology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. 55 patients with HCV (10 female and 45 male with a mean age of 31.8 ± 6.4 years (10-67 years were participated in the study. Patients received 24 weeks of silymarin (630 mg/day. Baseline virological biochemical, liver fibrosis (by a serum fibrosis markers, including YKL-40 and Hyaluronic acid, and SF-36 questionnaire were performed with biochemical tests repeated at the end of the treatment period. Results: There was statistically difference in mean of ALT (108.7 ± 86.6 vs 70.3 ± 57.7 before and after the treatment (p < 0.001. The means of AST were 99.4 ± 139.7 and 59.7 ± 64.32 before and after the treatment with statistically differences (p = 0.004. After the treatment, nine patients were found with negative HCV-RNA (p = 0.004 and statistically significant improvement in results of liver fibrosis markers were found only in fibrosis group (p = 0.015. Quality of life was improved significantly (p < 0.001. Conclusions: This study indicated that in patients with CHC performing silymarin (650 mg/day for 6 months, improved serum HCV-RNA titer, serum aminotransferases (ALT, AST, hepatic fibrosis and patient′s quality of life. More future studies are warranted.

  15. Persistent cryoglobulinemic vasculitis following successful treatment of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, James W; Gota, Carmen; Fessler, Barri J; Calabrese, Leonard H; Cooper, Sheldon M

    2005-06-01

    There is a well established link between type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and HCV is believed to be the cause of cryoprotein formation and tissue deposition. Successful treatment of HCV infection has resulted in resolution of cryoglobulinemia and vasculitis. We describe 4 patients who had persistent MC and vasculitis despite successful eradication of HCV with antiviral therapy.

  16. Characteristics and TB treatment outcomes in TB patients with viral hepatitis, New York City, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, G; Stennis, N L; Drobnik, A M; Proops, D C; Ahuja, S D; Bornschlegel, K; Fuld, J

    2015-07-01

    Literature surrounding the burden of and factors associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons with tuberculosis (TB) disease remains limited and focused on populations outside the USA. Cross-matched New York City (NYC) TB and viral hepatitis surveillance data were used to estimate the proportion of NYC adults diagnosed with TB from 2000 to 2010 with a report of viral hepatitis infection and to describe the impact of viral hepatitis infection on TB treatment completion and death. For 9512 TB patients, HCV infection was reported in 4.2% and HBV infection in 3.7%; TB patients had both HCV and HBV infection. The proportion of TB patients with HCV infection to die before TB treatment completion was larger than in TB patients without a viral hepatitis report (21% vs. 9%); this association remained when stratified by HIV status. There was no significant difference in death before treatment completion for TB patients with HBV infection compared to TB patients without a viral hepatitis report when stratified by HIV status. These findings reinforce the importance of hepatitis testing and providing additional support to TB patients with viral hepatitis infection.

  17. Øget forekomst af depression hos patienter med hepatitis C-infektion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is increased in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Several aetiological mechanisms are thought to be involved, e.g. premorbid psychiatric disease, genetic disposition to affective disorders, socio-economic factors, stigmatization and possibly HCV...... neuroinfection. Evidence to support that former intravenous drug abuse increases the risk of depression is lacking. It is particularly important to diagnose and treat depression in HCV patients as it constitutes a relative contraindication to antiviral treatment and may jeopardize therapeutic outcome....

  18. Extrahepatic Manifestations and Autoantibodies in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection frequently have many extrahepatic manifestations, as persistent HCV infection often triggers lymphoproliferative disorders and metabolic abnormalities. These manifestations primarily include autoimmune disorders such as cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune thyroid disorders. It has been well established that chronic HCV infection plays important roles in the production of non-organ-specific autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and organ-specific autoantibodies such as thyroid autoantibodies. However, the clinical significance of autoantibodies associated with the extrahepatic manifestations caused by HCV infection has not been fully recognized. In this paper, we mainly focus on the relationship between extrahepatic manifestations and the emergence of autoantibodies in patients with HCV infection and discuss the clinical relevance of the autoantibodies in the extrahepatic disorders.

  19. PD-1 Blockade in Advanced Melanoma in Patients with Hepatitis C and/or HIV

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    Diwakar Davar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of remarkable antitumor activity, programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1 inhibitors pembrolizumab and nivolumab were approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma in the second-line setting following progression on either CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab or BRAF/MEK inhibitors (for BRAF mutated melanoma. Given hypothesized risk of triggering exacerbations of autoimmune diseases and/or chronic viral infections, clinical trials (including regulatory studies evaluating checkpoint blocking antibodies PD-1 and CTLA-4 have excluded patients with autoimmune diseases, chronic hepatitis B/C virus (HBV/HCV, and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections. Herein, we describe two patients with advanced melanoma and concomitant HCV/HIV infections treated with PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab. Patient 2 with HIV/HCV coinfection progressed after 2 doses of pembrolizumab. Patient 1 who had HCV alone was treated with pembrolizumab with initial partial response. HCV viral load remained stable after 9 cycles of pembrolizumab following which 12-week course of HCV-directed therapy was commenced, resulting in prompt reduction of HCV viral load below detectable levels. Response is ongoing and HCV viral load remains undetectable. In both patients, no significant toxicities were observed when pembrolizumab was initiated. We argue for the further investigation of checkpoint inhibition in cancer patients with underlying chronic viral infections in the context of carefully designed clinical trials.

  20. Loss to follow-up in anti-HCV-positive patients in a Brazilian regional outpatient clinic

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    L.C. Mendes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss to follow-up (LF, which refers to patients who started care but voluntary stopped it, is a problem for patients with chronic disease. We aimed to estimate the rate of LF among patients seropositive for hepatitis C virus (HCV and identify possible demographic and lifestyle risk factors associated with LF. From January 2009 through December 2012, 1010 anti-HCV-positive patients were included in the study. Among participants, 223 (22.1% met the case definition for LF (more than 1-year elapsed since the last clinical appointment. Among 787 patients who remained in follow-up, 372 (47.2% were discharged after undetectable HCV RNA, 88 (11.1% were transferred (and remained on regular follow-up at the destination, and 25 (3.1% died. According to univariate analysis, male gender, absence of a life partner, black race, psychiatric illness, previous alcohol abuse, previous or current recreational drug use, and previous or current smoking were significantly associated with LF. In multivariate analysis, absence of a life partner (adjusted odds ratio (AOR=1.44; 95% confidence interval (95%CI=1.03–2.02, black race (AOR=1.81, 95%CI=1.12–2.89, psychiatric illness (AOR=1.77, 95%CI=1.14–2.73, and the presence of at least one lifestyle risk factor (pertaining to substance abuse (AOR=1.95, 95%CI=1.29–2.94 were independently associated with LF. Our study provides an estimate of the incidence of LF among anti-HCV-positive patients and identifies risk factors associated with this outcome. In addition, these results can help clinicians recognize patients at risk for LF, who require additional support for the continuity of care.

  1. [Prevalence of TT virus in patients with hepatitis B,C and hepatitis of unknown etiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liweń, Izabela; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Rembowska, Jolanta; Pernak, Monika; Nowicka-Kujawska, Karina; Nowak, Jerzy

    2002-01-01

    Discovery of TT virus in 1997 gave raise to intensive subsequent studies to learn about its structure, features and, what is the most important, about its role in pathogenesis of liver disease. The aim of the work was to analyze prevalence of TTV DNA in patients with diagnosed hepatitis B, C, that of unknown etiology and in healthy blood donors as well. Additionally the divergence of TTV sequence was estimated in selected cases. TTV DNA was detected by PCR technique using specific oligonucleotide primers for coding regions. TT virus has been detected in 25.6% (32/125) HBsAg positive patients and in 23.9% (51/213) HCV infected patients. In healthy blood donors the frequency of TTV was 24.3% (34/140) similarly to that found in HCV and HBV infected patients. The frequency of TTV DNA among patients with hepatitis of unknown etiology was 9.1%. This result was statistically significant lower than in the other groups. When detected sequences have been compared to these from NCBI base the homology result was 71% to 95%, and among different patients and groups of patients identity was 46% to 73%. On the basis of the obtained results it can be concluded that it is very unlikely that TTV coinfection plays any significant role in HCV or HBV infection. The hypothetical role of TTV infection in the etiopathogenesis of cryptogenic chronic hepatitis has not been confirmed. The results obtained in the small group of patients with hepatitis of unknown etiology are not conclusive and should be taken with some precaution. The final conclusion is the TTV coinfection does not contribute to the liver pathology. The divergence of TTV sequences may explain the various frequency of TTV viremia reported by other authors.

  2. Characteristics of co-infections by HCV and HBV among Brazilian patients infected by HIV-1 and/or HTLV-1

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    Marcia Moreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1 share the routes of infection with hepatitis viruses B and C. Co-infection by these agents are a common event, but we have scarce knowledge on co-infection by two or more of these agents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics and risk factors for co-infections by HBV and HCV in patients infected by HIV-1 or/and HTLV-1, in Salvador, Brazil. METHODS: In a case-control study we evaluated patients followed in the AIDS and HTLV clinics of Federal University of Bahia Hospital. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were reviewed, and patients were tested for the presence of serological markers of HBV and HCV infections. HCV-infected patients were tested by PCR to evaluate the presence of viremia. RESULTS: A total of 200 HIV-1, 213 HTLV-1-infected, and 38 HIV-HTLV-co-infected individuals were included. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have had more sexual partners in the lifetime than other patients' groups. HIV-HTLV-co-infected subjects were predominantly male. Patients infected by HTLV or co-infected had a significantly higher frequency of previous syphilis or gonorrhea, while HIV infection was mainly associated with HPV infection. Co-infection was significantly associated to intravenous drug use (IVDU. HBV and/or HCV markers were more frequently found among co-infected patients. HBV markers were more frequently detected among HIV-infected patients, while HCV was clearly associated with IVDU across all groups. AgHBs was strongly associated with co-infection by HIV-HTLV (OR = 22.03, 95% CI: 2.69-469.7, as well as confirmed HCV infection (p = 0.001. Concomitant HCV and HBV infection was also associated with retroviral co-infection. Patients infected by HTLV-1 had a lower chance of detectable HCV viremia (OR = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.002-0.85. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by HCV and/or HBV is frequent among patients presenting retroviral infection, but risk factors and prevalence for each

  3. Can Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment as Prevention Reverse the HCV Epidemic Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in the United Kingdom? Epidemiological and Modeling Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Natasha K.; Thornton, Alicia; Hickman, Matthew; Sabin, Caroline; Nelson, Mark; Cooke, Graham S.; Martin, Thomas C. S.; Delpech, Valerie; Ruf, Murad; Price, Huw; Azad, Yusef; Thomson, Emma C.; Vickerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. We report on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United Kingdom and model its trajectory with or without scaled-up HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods. A dynamic HCV transmission model among HIV–diagnosed MSM in the United Kingdom was calibrated to HCV prevalence (antibody [Ab] or RNA positive), incidence, and treatment from 2004 to 2011 among HIV-diagnosed MSM in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC). The epidemic was projected with current or scaled-up HCV treatment, with or without a 20% behavioral risk reduction. Results. HCV prevalence among HIV-positive MSM in UK CHIC increased from 7.3% in 2004 to 9.9% in 2011, whereas primary incidence was flat (1.02–1.38 per 100 person-years). Over the next decade, modeling suggests 94% of infections are attributable to high-risk individuals, comprising 7% of the population. Without treatment, HCV chronic prevalence could have been 38% higher in 2015 (11.9% vs 8.6%). With current treatment and sustained virological response rates (status quo), chronic prevalence is likely to increase to 11% by 2025, but stabilize with DAA introduction in 2015. With DAA scale-up to 80% within 1 year of diagnosis (regardless of disease stage), and 20% per year thereafter, chronic prevalence could decline by 71% (to 3.2%) compared to status quo in 2025. With additional behavioral interventions, chronic prevalence could decline further to <2.5% by 2025. Conclusions. Epidemiological data and modeling suggest a continuing HCV epidemic among HIV-diagnosed MSM in the United Kingdom driven by high-risk individuals, despite high treatment rates. Substantial reductions in HCV transmission could be achieved through scale-up of DAAs and moderately effective behavioral interventions. PMID:26908813

  4. Current treatment status and barriers for patients with chronic HCV infection in mainland China: A national multicenter cross-sectional survey in 56 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Hai-Yang; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Mei; Duan, Carol; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ting; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhao; Zheng, Su-Jun; Duan, Zhong-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious public health problem worldwide. China, as the country with the largest number of HCV infections in the world, plays a significant role in eliminating hepatitis C. Due to different financial situations and education background, hepatitis C patients take different actions for their disease treatment and management. Therefore, antiviral treatment status should be attached great importance to learn the medical demand of patients. A nationwide, multicenter survey was conducted from July 2015 to June 2016. Of 1798 inpatients and outpatients with chronic HCV from 56 hospitals participated in the survey. Each patient completed the questionnaire with questions about his/her antiviral therapy status, perception of treatment barriers, and expectations for future treatment. In total 1622 patients, including 1241 with chronic hepatitis C, 344 with cirrhosis, and 37 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, fulfilled data collection requirements and finally were included in analysis. Overall, up to 30.7% of the patients had not or currently does not intend to receive antiviral therapy. The main reason was expecting more potent and well-tolerance medication (31.5%), followed by the fear of interferon related side effects (27.5%). Multiple regression analysis showed that the patient's annual income, the severity of HCV, and comorbidity were independent predictors of not receiving antiviral therapy. The whole patients were expecting more potent and well tolerance medication available soon. In summary, Peg-IFN/RBV treatment regimen cannot meet the need of patients well, and safe and efficient direct-acting antivirals are urgently needed in mainland China.

  5. Hepatitis C and blood transfusion among children attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 90% of post-transfusion hepatitis. In Uganda, there has been limited research of prevalence of HCV among sickle cell anaemia (SS) patients, a group at risk for multiple transfusions. Objectives: To establish prevalence of HCV infection and determine whether blood ...

  6. Ongoing risk behavior and the presence of HCV-RNA affect the hepatitis C virus (HCV)-Specific CD4(+) T cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Charlotte H S B; Nanlohy, Nening M; van de Laar, Thijs J W; Prins, Maria; van Baarle, Debbie

    The largest population of people at risk for HCV-infection is injecting drug users (DU). We hypothesize that recurrent exposure to HCV, by continuing risk behavior, influences the development of an HCV-specific T-cell response. Therefore, we studied the association between repeated exposure to and

  7. Autonomic evaluation of hepatitis C virus infected patients

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    Bruno Mattos Coutinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies reporting the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and disautonomia. We have evaluated the autonomic cardiovascular function in 12 patients with sensory small-fiber polyneuropathy infected by HCV. The mean age was 49±13 years old. The mean infection time was 9.6 years in six (50% patients. Thermal and pinprick hypoesthesia was observed in distal legs in all patients. Autonomic symptoms were referred by eight (66.7% patients. Among patients with abnormal autonomic cardiovascular test, five (41.7% showed abnormal results in two or more tests. Valsalva maneuver was abnormal in seven (58.3% patients. We can consider that there is an association of both parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent cardiovascular dysfunction in this group of patients.

  8. Role of transferrin receptor 2 in hepatic accumulation of iron in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifuji, Rumi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Ma, Ning; Qiang, Qin Li; Urawa, Naohito; Horiike, Shinichiro; Iwasa, Motoh; Kaito, Masahiko; Malavasi, Fabio; Adachi, Yukihiko

    2006-01-01

    Iron deposition in the liver is a common finding in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CH-C). The mechanism of this hepatic accumulation of iron is not completely understood. This study assessed if the protein expression of transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) is upregulated in the liver of patients with CH-C and if TfR2 protein mediates iron accumulation during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Liver specimens from patients with CH-C that underwent interferon (IFN) therapy (n=23) and from patients with CH-B (n=18) were evaluated. Hepatic expression of TfR2 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Total hepatic iron score (THIS) was evaluated by Prussian blue staining. TfR2 protein was expressed in the cell membrane and cytosol of hepatocytes. Cytosol TfR2 protein was found to co-localize with Tf. THIS (P=0.0198) and hepatic TfR2 (P=0.0047) expression were significantly higher in CH-C than in CH-B. The change in THIS values (rho=0.580, P=0.0079) and the grade of histological activity (rho=0.444, P=0.0373) were significantly correlated with changes in TfR2 expression after IFN therapy. The protein expression of TfR2 is significantly associated with iron deposition in the liver in patients with CH-C. HCV infection may affect the hepatic expression of TfR2, leading to iron accumulation in the liver.

  9. Relation of HCV induced insulin resitance and Hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It could be concluded from this work that HCV-related metabolic complications as hepatic steatosis and IR may be associated with increased risk of HCC development. c.335T>C and c.3073A>C SNPs of MDR1 gene could be considered as a possible molecular candidates for the HCC development in chronic HCV patients.

  10. Correlation between alanine aminotransferase level, HCV-RNA titer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reham Al Swaff

    2012-04-04

    Apr 4, 2012 ... Abstract The relationship of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level and viral replication to liver damage in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the stage of fibrosis correlates with HCV-. RNA titer and/or serum ALT level in ...

  11. Long-term outcome of liver transplantation in HCV/HIV coinfected haemophilia patients. A single centre study of 10 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, G; Zeitler, H; Marquardt, N; Horneff, S; Balta, Z; Strassburg, C P; Oldenburg, J

    2015-01-01

    The outcome and clinical features during long term follow-up of 10 haemophilia patients (haemophilia A n = 9, haemophilia B n = 1), who underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) due to hepatitis associated liver disease, are summarised. Eight patients were HIV/HCV co-infected. Despite severe postoperative complications, which were not bleeding-associated, all patients survived OLT. Long-term survival was 70% after in mean 8 years follow-up. Twelve years after OLT one patient developed a cyclosporine-induced nephropathy requiring haemodialysis. HIV-HAART was initiated in all patients after OLT, and allowed a successful HCV treatment in 6 patients. Factor VIII production was sufficient in mean 72 h after OLT and remained stable at subnormal to normal FVIII levels of in median 30% (range 14-96%) also during long-term follow-up. Post-OLT spontaneous bleeding events were rare compared to pre-OLT, therefore, the performance status improved in all patients. OLT substitutes the hepatic FVIII but has no effect on the extra-hepatic endothelial FVIII production, suggesting that in case of severe tissue injury enhanced bleeding might occur. Additionally, after OLT there is no acute phase reaction of the FVIII protein. Therefore, our OLT patients received in case of a reduced FVIII activity a peri-interventional prophylactic short-term FVIII substitution in surgical and diagnostic interventions with high bleeding risk. Bleeding and wound healing disturbances were not seen.

  12. Ribavirin Concentrations Do Not Predict Sustained Virological Response in HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients Treated with Ribavirin and Pegylated Interferon in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kovari

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is an essential component of most current hepatitis C (HCV treatment regimens and still standard of care in the combination with pegylated interferon (pegIFN to treat chronic HCV in resource limited settings. Study results in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are contradicting as to whether RBV concentration correlates with sustained virological response (SVR.We included 262 HCV treatment naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS participants treated with RBV and pegIFN between 01.01.2001-01.01.2010, 134 with HCV genotype (GT 1/4, and 128 with GT 2/3 infections. RBV levels were measured retrospectively in stored plasma samples obtained between HCV treatment week 4 and end of therapy. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between RBV concentration and SVR in GT 1/4 and GT 2/3 infections. The analyses were repeated stratified by treatment phase (week 4-12, 13-24, >24 and IL28B genotype (CC versus CT/TT.SVR rates were 35.1% in GT 1/4 and 70.3% in GT 2/3 infections. Overall, median RBV concentration was 2.0 mg/L in GT 1/4, and 1.9 mg/L in GT 2/3, and did not change significantly across treatment phases. Patients with SVR had similar RBV concentrations compared to patients without SVR in both HCV genotype groups. SVR was not associated with RBV levels ≥2.0 mg/L (GT 1/4, OR 1.19 [0.5-2.86]; GT 2/3, 1.94 [0.78-4.80] and ≥2.5 mg/L (GT 1/4, 1.56 [0.64-3.84]; GT 2/3 2.72 [0.85-8.73], regardless of treatment phase, and IL28B genotype.In HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegIFN/RBV, therapeutic drug monitoring of RBV concentrations does not enhance the chance of HCV cure, regardless of HCV genotype, treatment phase and IL28B genotype.

  13. Pharmacogenetics of efficacy and safety of HCV treatment in HCV-HIV coinfected patients: significant associations with IL28B and SOCS3 gene variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Vidal

    Full Text Available This was a safety and efficacy pharmacogenetic study of a previously performed randomized trial which compared the effectiveness of treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with pegylated interferon alpha (pegIFNα 2a vs. 2b, both with ribavirin, for 48 weeks, in HCV-HIV coinfected patients.The study groups were made of 99 patients (efficacy pharmacogenetic substudy and of 114 patients (safety pharmacogenetic substudy. Polymorphisms in the following candidate genes IL28B, IL6, IL10, TNFα, IFNγ, CCL5, MxA, OAS1, SOCS3, CTLA4 and ITPA were assessed. Genotyping was carried out using Sequenom iPLEX-Gold, a single-base extension polymerase chain reaction. Efficacy end-points assessed were: rapid, early and sustained virological response (RVR, EVR and SVR, respectively. Safety end-points assessed were: anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, flu-like syndrome, gastrointestinal disturbances and depression. Chi square test, Student's T test, Mann-Whitney U test and logistic regression were used for statistic analyses.As efficacy is concerned, IL28B and CTLA4 gene polymorphisms were associated with RVR (p<0.05 for both comparisons. Nevertheless, only polymorphism in the IL28B gene was associated with SVR (p = 0.004. In the multivariate analysis, the only gene independently associated with SVR was IL28B (OR 2.61, 95%CI 1.2-5.6, p = 0.01. With respect to safety, there were no significant associations between flu-like syndrome or depression and the genetic variants studied. Gastrointestinal disturbances were associated with ITPA gene polymorphism (p = 0.04. Anemia was associated with OAS1 and CTLA4 gene polymorphisms (p = 0.049 and p = 0.045, respectively, neutropenia and thromobocytopenia were associated with SOCS3 gene polymorphism (p = 0.02 and p = 0.002, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, the associations of the SOCS3 gene polymorphism with neutropenia (OR 0.26, 95%CI 0.09-0.75, p = 0.01 and thrombocytopenia (OR

  14. Management of chronic hepatitis C in patients co-infected with HIV: focus on safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Miriam; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; García-Samaniego, Javier; Soriano, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a significant public health problem and one of the most important causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. Co-infection with HCV and HIV occurs frequently, mainly because both viruses share the same transmission routes. In recent years, the life expectancy of patients with HIV disease has been increased due to the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Furthermore, several studies have established that HIV infection is associated with a major progression of the HCV-related liver disease. Thus, end-stage liver disease has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population, emphasising the importance of treatment of chronic hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons. The biological and histological benefit of interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) therapy in patients co-infected with HCV/HIV is not significantly different from that noted in similar patients without HIV when the HIV infection is adequately controlled. However, patients with low CD4+ cell counts tend to respond poorly to anti-HCV therapy.Given the relatively low sustained virological response rate to IFN alone, the use of IFNalpha monotherapy has been largely abandoned in favour of combination therapy with ribavirin. In the last 2 years, IFN plus ribavirin combination therapy has been the standard care for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Although information on the safety and efficacy of this dual therapy in HCV/HIV co-infected patients is scarce, recent trials have reported that the combination of IFN plus ribavirin is well tolerated and feasible in patients co-infected with HCV/HIV. However, the rates of sustained virological response seem to be worse than those observed in patients without HIV infection. New IFN formulations (e.g. pegylated interferon) plus ribavirin appear to be way of the future for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients both with and without HIV co-infection.

  15. Mortality in siblings of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a poor prognostic factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. We examined whether the increased mortality in these patients is partly explained by a familial excess risk of death. METHODS: Danish HIV-infected patients who...

  16. Serum oxidative-anti-oxidative stress balance is dysregulated in patients with hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Mamoru; Takaki, Akinobu; Tamaki, Naofumi; Maruyama, Takayuki; Onishi, Hideki; Kobayashi, Sayo; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Koike, Kazuko; Hagihara, Hiroaki; Kuwaki, Kenji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ikeda, Fusao; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-10-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). This association is best established in chronic hepatitis C. However, the anti-oxidative state is not well characterized. The objective of the present study was to investigate the balance of oxidative and anti-oxidative stress in CLD patients. We recruited a study population of 208 patients, including healthy volunteers (HV; n = 15), patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related CLD without or with hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-non-HCC, n = 25, and HBV-HCC, n = 50, respectively), and patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related CLD without or with HCC (HCV-non-HCC, n = 49, and HCV-HCC, n = 69, respectively). Serum levels of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) and anti-oxidative markers (OXY-adsorbent test; OXY) were determined, and the balance of these values was used as the oxidative index. Correlations among ROM, OXY, oxidative index and clinical characteristics were investigated. Patients with CLD exhibited elevated ROM and oxidative index compared to HV. Among patients with CLD, HCV positive status correlated with increased ROM. In CLD, HCV-HCC patients exhibited the highest ROM levels. Among HCV-related CLD patients, lower OXY correlated with HCC positive status, but was recovered by eradication of HCC. In HCV-HCC, lower OXY correlated with high PT-INR. HCV positive CLD patients displayed higher oxidative stress and HCV-HCC patients displayed lower anti-oxidative state. Anti-oxidative state depression was associated with liver reservoir-related data in HCV-HCC and could be reversed with HCC eradication. © 2012 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  17. IP-10 can be measured in dried plasma spots in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection.

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    Morten Ruhwald

    Full Text Available The chemokine IP-10 (CXCL10 is a candidate marker for hepatitis C virus (HCV fibrosis monitoring. The aim of this proof-of-concept study is to assess if IP-10 measurements from dried plasma spots (DPS are accurate in HCV-infected patients with either minimal or significant fibrosis. We measured IP-10 levels in plasma and DPS of 21 HCV-infected patients with cirrhosis and 19 patients with no/little fibrosis (determined with FibroScan. Cirrhotic patients had significantly higher levels of IP-10 compared to patients with minimal fibrosis. DPS and plasma measurements of IP-10 are comparable and the correlation was excellent (r(2 = 0.97, p<0.0001. The DPS based method for IP-10 detection performs well in HCV-infected patients with either minimal or significant fibrosis.

  18. PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION IN NON INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETIC PATIENTS (NIDDM

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    Sreedhara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM : The present study was done to evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in non - insulin dependent diabetic patients (NIDDM and to investigate influence of HCV seropositivity on several factors such as age of onset of diabetes, complicat ions and mode of treatment. METHODS: The study is prospective, hospital based case - control study done over a period of 3 years. A total of 428 diabetic patients were compared with 1800 voluntary blood donors for the presence of HCV infection. Serological testing for anti HCV was done by using commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Data about various variables were collected from diabetic patients using a structured questionnaire after taking informed consent. RESULTS: Higher prevalence of H CV (7.71% infection rate observed in NIDDM patients in comparison with blood donors (1.1%. In our study, HCV seropositivity is highest (11.81% in 40 - 50 years age group followed by (8.57% 30 - 40 years age and least (2.43% in age > 61 years. Mean age of onset of diabetes mellitus (DM is 39 years in HCV +ve patients in comparison with 46 years in non - reactors. Proportion of seropositive cases among male and female diabetic cases did not show significant difference. Out of 33 HCV seropositive cases, 63.64% managed with insulin and 48.49% oral hypoglycemic drugs with insulin supplement. Ten out of 33 (30.30% HCV seropositive cases presented with one or more late diabetic complications compared to 78 out of 395 (19.75% seronegative cases, with diabetic neph ropathy being commonest one. CONCLUSION: Although, HCV infection is more common among adults with type 2 diabetes, it is uncertain whether HCV infection precedes the development of diabetes. Hence, there is a need to perform a prospective analysis to inves tigate, in persons who acquire type 2 diabetes whether they are more likely to have had antecedent HCV infection

  19. Discrimination of Patients With Different Serological Evolution of HIV and Co-Infection with HCV Using Metabolic Fingerprinting Based on FT-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Consuelo; Esteban-Díez, Isabel; Arenzana-Rámila, Irene; González-Sáiz, José María

    2017-09-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that weakens the immune system and permits opportunistic diseases such as Hepatitis C (HCV) to enter the body. These diseases induce metabolic disorders in the patients and it is therefore logical to approach them from a holistic, functional perspective, studying the metabolome comprehensively to identify metabolic signatures associated with certain disease states. The metabolomics strategy here proposed involves metabolic fingerprinting using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometric tools on 72 plasma samples (subdivided into 63 training and 9 test samples) to differentiate between healthy subjects and patients with different disease stages. Several options, relating to the variable selection method used in linear discriminant analysis and the number of categories being considered, were explored to optimize discrimination ability. 18 bands enabled differentiation between control subjects, HIV patients and the group that encompassed patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), AIDS/HCV and HIV/HCV, providing overall classification and internal prediction rates of 97.67 and 93.65%, respectively. Only 9 bands were required to further discriminate between AIDS, AIDS/HCV and HIV/HCV, with 99.20% (training) and 89.66% (cross-validation) correct classifications. The simplicity and effectiveness of the classification methodology proposed was reinforced by the satisfactory results obtained in external prediction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatitis C virus coinfection does not influence the CD4 cell recovery in HIV-1-infected patients with maximum virologic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects the CD4 cell recovery in patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of HCV coinfection on the CD4 recovery in patients with maximum virologic suppression within the Euro...

  1. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 protein regions that specifically bind to HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier Eduardo; Puentes, Alvaro; Súarez, Jorge; López, Ramses; Vera, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Luis Eduardo; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Guzman, Fanny; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-02-01

    Identify hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences in E1 and E2 protein binding to HepG2. Synthetic 20-mer long, ten-residue overlapped peptides, from E1 and E2 proteins, were tested in HepG2 or Raji cell-binding assays. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay for high activity binding peptides (HABPs). Receptors for HepG2 cell were determined by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. Twelve HABPs were found in HCV genotype 1a, allowing six hepatocyte-binding sequences (HBSs) to be defined: two peptide-binding regions in E1 HABPs 4913 (YQVRNSTGLYHVTNDCPNSS) and 4918 (MTPTVATRDGKLPATQLRRHY). Four hepatocyte-binding regions were defined in E2: region-I, peptide 4931 (ETHVTGGSAGHTVSGFVSLLY); region-II, 4937-4939 (HHKFNSSGCPERLASCRPLTDFDQGWGPISYANGSGPDQR); region-III, 4943-4945 (PVYCFTPSPVVVGTTDRSGAPTYSWGENDTDVFVLNNTR) and region-IV, 4949-4952 (CGAPPCVIGGAGNNTLHCPTDCFRKHPDATYSRCGSGPWITPRCLVDYPY). The underlined sequences are most relevant in the binding process. HABPs 4913 and 4938 also bind to CD81 positive Raji cells. Region-II 4938 HABPs bind to 50 and 60kDa HepG2 cell membrane surface proteins. Six HVRs to the HepG2 were identified. Some HABPs have been previously found to be antigenic and immunogenic. HABPs, 4918 (from E1), 4938, 4949, 4950, 4951 and 4952 (from E2) have not been previously recognised. These HABPs could be relevant to HCV invasion of hepatocytes.

  2. Polyclonal immunoglobulins from a chronic hepatitis C virus patient protect human liver-chimeric mice from infection with a homologous hepatitis C virus strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Bukh, Jens; Meuleman, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The role of the humoral immune response in the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is widely debated. Most chronically infected patients have immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies capable of neutralizing HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) in vitro. It is, however, not clear whether these Ig...... were loaded with chronic phase polyclonal IgG and challenged 3 days later with a 100% infectious dose of the acute phase H77C virus, both originating from patient H. Passive immunization induced sterilizing immunity in five of eight challenged animals. In the three nonprotected animals, the HCV...

  3. Acute hepatitis C virus infection assessment among chronic hemodialysis patients in the Southwest Parana State, Brazil

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    Ono-Nita Suzane K

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hemodialysis patients are at higher risk for acquiring hepatitis C virus (HCV. The prevalence varies among different countries and hemodialysis centers. Although guidelines for a comprehensive infection control program exist, the nosocomial transmission still accounts for the new cases of infection. The aim of this study was analyze the follow up of newly acquired acute hepatitis C cases, during the period from January 2002 to May 2005, in the Hemodialysis Center, located in the Southwest region of Parana State, Brazil and to analyze the effectiveness of the measures to restrain the appearance of new cases of acute hepatitis C. Methods Patients were analyzed monthly with anti-HCV tests and ALT measurements. Patients with ALT elevations were monitored for possible acute hepatitis C. Results During this period, 32 new cases were identified with acute hepatitis C virus infection. Blood screening showed variable ALT levels preceding the anti-HCV seroconversion. HCV RNA viremia by PCR analysis was intermittently and even negative in some cases. Ten out of 32 patients received 1 mcg/kg dose of pegylated interferon alfa-2b treatment for 24 weeks. All dialysis personnel were re-trained to strictly follow the regulations and recommendations regarding infection control, proper methods to clean and disinfect equipment were reviewed and HCV-positive patients were isolated. Conclusion Laboratory tests results showed variable ALT preceding anti-HCV seroconversion and intermittent viremia. The applied recommendations contributed importantly to restrain the appearance of new cases of acute hepatitis C in this center and the last case was diagnosed in May 2004.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B, C and D viruses in Turkish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdayi, A M; Aslan, N; Bozdayi, G; Türkyilmaz, A R; Sengezer, T; Wend, U; Erkan, O; Aydemir, F; Zakirhodjaev, S; Orucov, S; Bozkaya, H; Gerlich, W; Karayalçin, S; Yurdaydin, C; Uzunalimoğlu, O

    2004-11-01

    Different genotypes of the hepatitis viruses may influence the clinical outcome of the disease. The distribution of genotypes may vary according to geographical regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) genotypes in Turkish patients with chronic hepatitis in a large cohort of patients. Genotyping was performed in 41, 59 and 365 patients with chronic hepatitis B, D and C, respectively, and 36 hemodialysis patients with chronic hepatitis C. Genotypes were determined by direct sequencing in hepatitis B and by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in hepatitis C and D patients. In addition, HBV subtyping by multiplex PCR and subtype specific ELISA were performed in 83 and 71 HBsAg (+) blood donors, respectively. All hepatitis B (100%) and hepatitis D (100%) patients had genotype D and type I, respectively. HBsAg subtyping by two methods yielded that 99% of the patients were subtype ayw. S gene amino acid sequence in the 41 patients included for HBV genotyping revealed the ayw2 subtype. Genotype distribution of 365 patients with chronic C hepatitis were as follows: 306 (84%) patients genotype 1b, 43 (11%) patients genotype 1a, 10 (3%) patients genotype 2, 3 (1%) patients genotype 3, 3 (1%) patients genotype 4. Among 36 patients receiving hemodialysis, 28 (78%) patients had genotype 1b and 8 (22%) patients had genotype 1a. The study indicates that Turkish patients with chronic viral hepatitis show very little genotypic heterogeneity. Subtype ayw and the genotype D of HBV DNA, and the type I of HDV RNA represent almost 100% of related infections. The genotype 1b of HCV RNA was found to be significantly dominant in Turkish patients.

  5. Lack of evidence of hepatitis in patients with oral lichen planus in China: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangyuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Ji, Xiaoli; Su, Sha; Liu, Xiaodan; Xu, Si; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    China has been one of the countries with high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) liver disease. And lichen planus is an extrahepatic manifestation of patients with chronic HCV infection. This case-control study was conducted to investigate the relationship between oral lichen planus (OLP) and HBV/HCV infection in China. A total of 776 patients, including 150 patients with OLP (Group OLP), 429 inpatients from the Trauma Ward of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department (Group A), 110 patients with other oral mucosal diseases, but without a reported association with HCV infection (Group B) and 87 patients with oral lichenoid lesion (Group OLL), were compared with their seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody (HCVAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and the parameters of liver functions. Moreover, the clinical characteristics of OLP were also observed, such as gender, age, chief complaint, course of the disease, clinical type, sites involved and so on. The positive rates of HCVAb and HBsAg in OLP patients were 0.7% and 4%, respectively. Neither HCVAb nor HBsAg was associated with OLP as demonstrated by both the univariate and the multivariate analyses. The clinical features and liver functions of OLP patients with negative or positive HBsAg were nearly the same. Our findings verify that there is no association between OLP and hepatitis and there is no need to run a screening test for HCV or HBV in OLP patients in China.

  6. Hepatitis C in Haematological Patients

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    Y. Y. Hwang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus guideline concerning the management of chronic hepatitis C patients during chemotherapy, and immunosuppression. However, there are some suggestions in literature that hepatitis C viral load increases during chemotherapy and there is a risk of rebound immunity against hepatitis C after discontinuation of immunosuppression with a consequent liver injury. A close monitoring of liver function of these patients is prudent during treatment of haematological malignancy. Antiviral treatment is deferred after the completion of chemotherapy and recovery of patients' immunity to minimize the toxicity of treatment. A combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin is the standard therapy in hepatitis C infected haematological patients.

  7. The acute hepatic flare in a patient with chronic hepatitis C infection receiving pegylated interferon alpha 2b and ribavirin

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    Hayati Demiraslan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin treatment is well established therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection.During the treatment alanine aminotransferase (ALT flare may be observed rarely.A 51-year-old female receiving pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for HCV infection, complained nausea, vomitingin seventh week of the therapy, and her ALT level was detected over 20 times above the normal level. Hepatitis B surfaceantigen, anti-nuclear antibody, anti-mitochondrial antibody, anti-double stranded DNA antibody and anti-hepatitisA virus IgM antibody were negative, and thyroid stimulating hormone was normal. HCV RNA level was 424 IU/ml. PEGIFN and ribavirin therapy was interrupted for three weeks, after liver enzyme level was detected less than 100U/L, thetreatment was resumed. The patient was followed up for 2 months, ALT flare was not observed.In conclusion, we present a rare case with ALT flare, while receiving pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy forchronic HCV infection. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(3: 121-123Key words: Pegylated interferon, ribavirin, ALT flare, hepatitis C virus

  8. Antimitochondrial antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbert, S; Johanet, C; Bendjaballah, F; Homberg, J C; Poupon, R; Beaugrand, M

    1996-06-01

    Although autoantibodies have been found in the serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) there has been no convincing evidence of the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies, until now. Sera from 460 untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C were tested for antimitochondrial antibodies, using an indirect immunofluorescence technique; and if they tested positive for the antibodies (titer more than 1:50), they also were treated by Western blot analysis. Seven (1.5%) sera were positive. None of the patients had biological or histological evidence of primary biliary cirrhosis. Antimitochondrial antibodies recognized one of the oxo-dehydrogenase multienzyme complexe's epitopes by Western blot assay in three patients only. All seven patients were then treated by interferon alpha for six months. None showed exacerbation of liver disease during treatment. HCV-RNA disappeared from the serum in one patient who became negative for anti-M2 antibodies. The four patients who did not respond to interferon-alpha therapy, and the two who relapsed after treatment withdrawal, had sustained positive antimitochondrial antibodies. These data suggest that: 1) antimitochondrial antibodies present in patients with chronic hepatitis C do not always recognize the same epitopes as in primary biliary cirrhosis; 2) these antibodies may disappear after eradication of HCV, suggesting that the production of antimitochondrial antibodies is linked to the presence of the virus and 3) the clinical and biological course of chronic hepatitis C, and the response to interferon-alpha therapy, does not seem to be different in patients who are positive for antimitochondrial antibodies.

  9. Temporal changes and regional differences in treatment uptake of hepatitis C therapy in EuroSIDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Peters, L; Schwarze-Zander, C

    2013-01-01

    All HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients with chronic HCV infection and ≥ F2 fibrosis should be considered for HCV therapy. This study aimed to determine the rate of HCV treatment uptake among coinfected patients in Europe....

  10. Immunological changes in different patient populations with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereday, Laszlo; Meggyes, Matyas; Halasz, Melinda; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Par, Alajos; Par, Gabriella

    2016-05-28

    To investigate killer inhibitory and activating receptor expression by natural killer (NK), natural killer T-like (NKT-like) and CD8+ T lymphocytes in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with elevated and with persistently normal alanine aminotransferase (PNALT). The percentage of peripheral blood Treg cells, KIR2DL3, ILT-2, KIR3DL1, CD160, NKG2D, NKG2C expressing NK, T and NKT-like cells, cytokine production and NK cytotoxicity were determined by flow cytometry. Twenty-one patients with chronic HCV infection with elevated alanine aminotransferase, 11 HCV carriers with persistently normal alanine aminotransferase and 15 healthy volunteers were enrolled. No significant differences were observed in the percentage of total T, NK or NKT-like cells between study groups. Comparing the activating and inhibitory receptor expression by NK cells obtained from HCV carriers with PNALT and chronic HCV hepatitis patients with elevated alanine aminotransferase, NKG2D activating receptor expression was the only receptor showing a significant difference. NKG2D expression of NK cells was significantly lower in patients with elevated alanine aminotransferase. The expression of CD160, NKG2D and NKG2C activating receptor by CD8+ T cells were significantly lower in patients with chronic HCV hepatitis than in healthy controls and in HCV carriers with PNALT. Plasma TGF-β1 levels inversely correlated with NKG2D expression by NK cells. In vitroTGF-β1 treatment inhibited NK cells cytotoxic activity and downregulated NKG2D expression. CD8+ T cells from HCV carriers with PNALT showed significantly elevated expression of CD160, NKG2D and NKG2C activating receptors compared to chronic HCV patients with elevated alanine aminotransferase. Enhanced expression of inhibitory KIR2DL3 receptor, and decreased ILT-2 expression on NK cells were also found in chronic hepatitis C patients compared to healthy controls. Our study demonstrated a complex dysregulation of activating and

  11. Increased frequency of micronuclei in the lymphocytes of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus

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    Samantha Therezinha Almeida Pereira Leite

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analysed the frequency of micronuclei (MN, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs and nuclear buds (NBUDs and evaluated mutagen-induced sensitivity in the lymphocytes of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV. In total, 49 patients with chronic viral hepatitis (28 HBV-infected and 21 HCV-infected patients and 33 healthy, non-infected blood donor controls were investigated. The frequencies (‰ of MN, NPBs and NBUDs in the controls were 4.41 ± 2.15, 1.15 ± 0.97 and 2.98 ± 1.31, respectively. The frequencies of MN and NPBs were significantly increased (p < 0.0001 in the patient group (7.01 ± 3.23 and 2.76 ± 2.08, respectively compared with the control group. When considered separately, the HBV-infected patients (7.18 ± 3.57 and HCV-infected patients (3.27 ± 2.40 each had greater numbers of MN than did the controls (p < 0.0001. The HCV-infected patients displayed high numbers of NPBs (2.09 ± 1.33 and NBUDs (4.38 ± 3.28, but only the HBV-infected patients exhibited a significant difference (NPBs = 3.27 ± 2.40, p < 0.0001 and NBUDs = 4.71 ± 2.79, p = 0.03 in comparison with the controls. Similar results were obtained for males, but not for females, when all patients or the HBV-infected group was compared with the controls. The lymphocytes of the infected patients did not exhibit sensitivity to mutagen in comparison with the lymphocytes of the controls (p = 0.06. These results showed that the lymphocytes of patients who were chronically infected with HBV or HCV presented greater chromosomal instability.

  12. Effect of Dialysis Modality on Survival of Hepatitis C-Infected ESRF Patients

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    Bose, Bhadran; McDonald, Stephen P.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Brown, Fiona G.; Badve, Sunil V.; Wiggins, Kathryn J.; Bannister, Kym M.; Boudville, Neil; Clayton, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in end-stage renal failure (ESRF) patients. Despite a lower incidence and risk of transmission of HCV infection with peritoneal dialysis (PD), the optimal dialysis modality for HCV-infected ESRF patients is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of dialysis modality on the survival of HCV-infected ESRF patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The study included all adult incident ESRF patients in Australia and New Zealand who commenced dialysis between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2008, and were HCV antibody-positive at the time of dialysis commencement. Time to all-cause mortality was compared between hemodialysis (HD) and PD according to modality assignment at day 90, using Cox proportional hazards model analysis. Results A total of 424 HCV-infected ESRF patients commenced dialysis during the study period and survived for at least 90 days (PD n = 134; HD n = 290). Mortality rates were comparable between PD and HD in the first year (10.7 versus 13.8 deaths per 100 patient-years, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.65, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.26) and thereafter (20 versus 15.9 deaths per 100 patient-years, respectively; HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.88). Conclusions The survival of HCV-infected ESRF patients is comparable between PD and HD. PMID:21903989

  13. Detection of HCV core antigen and its diagnostic significance

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    YANG Jie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo compare the abilities of the hepatitis C virus (HCV core antigen (cAg test and the HCV RNA assay for confirming anti-HCV presence in order to determine the clinical utility of the HCV-cAg as an alternative or confirmatory diagnostic tool. MethodsSerum samples collected from 158 patients diagnosed with HCV infection were subjected to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based HCV-cAg test. The optical density (OD measured values were used to calculate the ratio of specimen absorbance to the cutoff value (S/CO. Simultaneously, the serum samples were subjected to PCR-based nucleic acid amplification quantitative fluorescence detection of HCV RNA. ResultsNone of the serum samples had a S/CO value <1 for the HCV-cAg test (100% negative, but all of the samples had a S/CO value >5 (100% positive. The HCV-cAg test sensitivity was 87.05%, specificity was 76.67%, positive predictive value was 9653%, and negative predictive value was 44.23%. As the S/CO value gradually increased, the significantly higher positive coincident rate of the HCV RNA test decreased. The HCV RNA negative coincident rate was significantly higher than that of the HCV-cAg test. HCV-cAg S/CO values between 1 and 2 corresponded to an HCV RNA values between 1.0×103 copies/ml and 1.0×104 copies/ml. The highest S/CO value obtained was 1.992. ConclusionThe HCV-cAg test is comparable to the HCV RNA assay for diagnosing HCV infection.

  14. Hepatitis C virus to hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Jahan Shah; Ashfaq Usman A; Qasim Muhammad; Khaliq Saba; Saleem Muhammad; Afzal Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis C virus causes acute and chronic hepatitis and can lead to permanent liver damage and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a significant number of patients via oxidative stress, insulin resistance (IR), fibrosis, liver cirrhosis and HCV induced steatosis. HCV induced steatosis and oxidative stress causes steato-hepatitis and these pathways lead to liver injury or HCC in chronic HCV infection. Steatosis and oxidative stress crosstalk play an important role in liver damage in HC...

  15. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam

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    Bùi Vũ Huy; Kanxay Vernavong; Nguyễn Văn Kính

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724), of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients) with HBV, HCV, ...

  16. Hepatitis C seroconversions in HIV infection across Europe: which regions and patient groups are affected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesecke, Christoph; Grint, Daniel; Soriano, Vincent; Lundgren, Jens D; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Mitsura, Victor M; Chentsova, Nelly; Hadziosmanovic, Vesnadarjan; Kirk, Ole; Mocroft, Amanda; Peters, Lars; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, several outbreaks of sexually acquired acute hepatitis C (HCV) infection have been described in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). The aims of this study were to determine whether there has been an increase in the number of acute HCV infections in different parts of Europe. HCV seroconversion was defined as an HCV-antibody test change from negative to positive within the observation period in EuroSIDA. Binomial regression was performed to determine factors associated with being tested for HCV and HCV seroconversion. A total of 223 HCV seroconversions were observed from 16,188 tests [1.38% (95%CI 1.20-1.56)] among 5736 patients between 2002 and 2013. Overall the odds of acquiring HCV infection increased by 4% per year (OR 1.04 [95%CI 0.99-1.09]; P = 0.10). Overall 63.2% (141/223) of all seroconversions were seen among MSM. Similar patterns were observed across all European regions (P = 0.69, test for interaction) and HIV transmission risks groups (P = 0.69, test for interaction). In multivariate analysis, North, South and East Europe had higher odds of HCV seroconversion compared with Western Europe [OR 1.90 (1.28-2.81), 1.55 (0.99-2.45) and 1.86 (1.21-2.84); P = 0.0014, P = 0.058 and P = 0.0044 respectively]. Within EuroSIDA a significant increase in HCV seroconversions can be observed after accounting for increased levels of testing for HCV in recent years. This highlights the need for increased HCV prevention efforts among HIV-positive persons in Europe. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Soluble Adhesion Molecules in Patients Coinfected with HIV and HCV: A Predictor of Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Aldámiz-Echevarría

    Full Text Available Higher serum levels of adhesion molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 are associated with advanced liver fibrosis in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus. We assessed the relationship between serum levels of adhesion molecules and liver-related events (LRE or death, in coinfected patients.We studied clinical characteristics and outcomes of 182 coinfected patients with a baseline liver biopsy (58 with advanced fibrosis and simultaneous plasma samples who were followed for median of 9 years. We used receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves to calculate optimized cutoff values (OCV of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, defined as the values with the highest combination of sensitivity and specificity for LRE. We used multivariate regression analysis to test the association between OCVs of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 and outcomes. The variables for adjustment were age, HIV transmission category, liver fibrosis, baseline CD4+ T-cell counts, antiretroviral therapy, and sustained virologic response (SVR.During the study period 51 patients had SVR, 19 had LRE, and 16 died. The OCVs for LRE were 5.68 Log pg/mL for sICAM-1 and 6.25 Log pg/mL for sVCAM-1, respectively. The adjusted subhazard ratio (aSHR (95% confidence interval [CI] of death or LRE, whichever occurred first, for sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 > OCV were 3.98 ([1.14; 13.89], P = 0.030 and 2.81 ([1.10; 7.19], respectively (P = 0.030.Serum levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 can serve as markers of outcome in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Therapies targeting necroinflammatory damage and fibrogenesis may have a role in the management chronic hepatitis C.

  18. Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir for untreated HCV genotype 1 infection in end stage renal disease patients: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, Mandarapu; Raju, Sree Bhushan; Sridhar, Nimmagadda; Vijay Kiran, Bangillapati; Rajesh, Goli; Anvesh, Golla; Raju, Nallagasu

    2017-10-03

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in end stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with increased mortality. Recently, numerous directly acting antiviral agents have been approved for the management of HCV. Ledipasvir along with Sofosbuvir has been approved for management of genotype 1 infection in patients with eGFR ≥30 mL/min. However, there is paucity of data regarding its role in the management of patients on dialysis. This is a single center prospective open label observational study to assess the safety and efficacy of Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir in hemodialysis (HD) patients who were diagnosed with HCV genotype 1 infection. Eligibility criteria were treatment naive HD patients with normal liver histology. We administered Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir combination tablet on alternate days for a period of 12 weeks. Primary efficacy end point was the assessment of sustained virological response (SVR12), and the safety end point was the discontinuation of therapy secondary to adverse drug effects. A total of 21 patients were treated with this regimen. Two patients expired during the study period and are not related to the therapy. SVR12 was achieved in all the 19 patients. None of the patients in our study discontinued the therapy or had severe adverse drug effects. One patient had head ache and another patient had giddiness which were managed symptomatically. Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir combination therapy on alternate days, is effective even in ESRD patients, with excellent SVR12 rates, and it is as safe as in other population groups, without any major adverse reactions. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  19. Hepatitis C in Haematological Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Y. Y.; Liang, R.H.S.

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus guideline concerning the management of chronic hepatitis C patients during chemotherapy, and immunosuppression. However, there are some suggestions in literature that hepatitis C viral load increases during chemotherapy and there is a risk of rebound immunity against hepatitis C after discontinuation of immunosuppression with a consequent liver injury. A close monitoring of liver function of these patients is prudent during treatment of haematological malignancy. Antivir...

  20. HCV and HCC molecular epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor H. Pujol

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    iHepatitis C virus (HCV is a member of the family Flaviviridae, responsible for the majority of the non-A non-B post-transfusion hepatitis before 1990. Around 170 millions persons in the world are thought to be infected with this virus. A high number of HCV-infected people develop cirrhosis and from these, a significant proportion progresses to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Six HCV genotypes and a large number of subtypes in each genotype have been described. Infections with HCV genotype 1 are associated with the lowest therapeutic success. HCV genotypes 1, 2, and 3 have a worldwide distribution. HCV subtypes 1a and 1b are the most common genotypes in the United States and are also are predominant in Europe, while in Japan, subtype 1b is predominant. Although HCV subtypes 2a and 2b are relatively common in America, Europe, and Japan, subtype 2c is found commonly in northern Italy. HCV genotype 3a is frequent in intravenous drug abusers in Europe and the United States. HCV genotype 4 appears to be prevalent in Africa and the Middle East, and genotypes 5 and 6 seem to be confined to South Africa and Asia, respectively. HCC accounts for approximately 6% of all human cancers. Around 500,000 to 1 million cases occur annually worldwide, with HCC being the fifth common malignancy in men and the ninth in women. HCC is frequently a consequence of infection by HBV and HCV. The first line of evidences comes from epidemiologic studies. While HBV is the most frequent cause of HCC in many countries of Asia and South America, both HBV and HCV are found at similar frequencies, and eventually HCV at a higher frequency than HBV, among HCC patients in Europe, North America, and Japan. The cumulative appearance rate of HCC might be higher for HCV

  1. Senior health sciences students' perception of occupational risk of viral hepatitis and attitudes toward patients diagnosed with viral hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Raed; Almutairi, Muneer; Alsugair, Ali; Alseraikh, Moayad; Almutairi, Huda

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Medical, applied medical science, and dental students constitute a high-risk group for HBV and HCV infections during their training or at the beginning of their careers. This study aimed to explore senior health science students' knowledge of and attitudes toward these infections. Between December 2014 and December 2015, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among senior health science at the College of Medicine, the College of Dentistry, and the Laboratory Section of Applied Medical Sciences in Qassim University, Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia. A validated questionnaire was randomly distributed to male and female senior students to test students' knowledge of the general information on hepatitis B and C as well as their attitudes toward hepatitis B and hepatitis C patients and the disease in general. A total of 205 respondents were invited, but only 180 participated in this survey. Higher knowledge was positively correlated with a higher belief in providing equitable care to hepatitis B/C patients and general anxiety about handling such patients (P < 0.004). Higher beliefs in equity and anxiety predicted higher knowledge when everything else was held constant. We found a positive relationship between knowledge levels and attitudes toward HBV and HCV patients. We therefore encourage health science colleges to offer more lectures on HBV and HCV to improve students' knowledge and thereby improve their attitudes.

  2. Interrelationship of hepatitis C virus genotypes with patient characteristics in Bahrain

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    Abdulla MA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Maheeba A Abdulla,1 Eman A Murad,1 Hend A Aljenaidi,1 Duha R Aljowder,1 Omar IK Aljeeran,1 Eman Farid,2 Jehad R Al Qamish3 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Salmaniya Medical Complex, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Ibn Al Nafees Hospital, Manama, Bahrain Aim: Hepatitis C virus (HCV shows genotype-based variation in prevalence across geographical regions. This study was conducted to understand the clinical interrelationship of HCV genotypes with patient characteristics. Methods: Medical records of 122 patients positive for HCV RNA test collected during 2013 and 2014 were included for analysis. Only adults were included in the study. HCV RNA extraction and genotyping was done as part of the routine diagnostic requirements. The association of continuous and categorical variables with genotypes was analyzed through analysis of variance and chi-square tests, respectively. Results: Of the 122 patients selected, 103 were Bahrainis, 18 non-Bahrainis, and 1 was unregistered. Genotype 1 was the predominant (53% one, followed by types 3 (23% and 4 (20%. Classical symptoms, clinical signs, liver function test, and ultrasonographic results were recorded. Cirrhosis and ascites showed significant variation across genotypes. Although alanine transaminase, total bilirubin, and albumin levels were increased, gamma-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal. About 12% of the subjects were alcohol users, 4% were positive for HIV infection and 2.4% were positive for hepatitis B virus infection. The circulating HCV RNA load was at medium-level in the study cohort and showed significant association with the HCV genotypes and subtypes. Patients with genotype 1a had 6 times more load than patients with type 4 (P<0.05. Conclusion: This study reconfirmed the incidence and distribution of different genotypes in Bahrain population, and delineated the relationship of HCV RNA viral load with the severity of liver disease in

  3. Clearance of low levels of HCV viremia in the absence of a strong adaptive immune response

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    Manns Michael P

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV has frequently been associated with the presence of HCV-specific cellular immunity. However, there had been also reports in chimpanzees demonstrating clearance of HCV-viremia in the absence of significant levels of detectable HCV-specific cellular immune responses. We here report seven asymptomatic acute hepatitis C cases with peak HCV-RNA levels between 300 and 100.000 copies/ml who all cleared HCV-RNA spontaneously. Patients were identified by a systematic screening of 1176 consecutive new incoming offenders in a German young offender institution. Four of the seven patients never developed anti-HCV antibodies and had normal ALT levels throughout follow-up. Transient weak HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detectable in five individuals which did not differ in strength and breadth from age- and sex-matched patients with chronic hepatitis C and long-term recovered patients. In contrast, HCV-specific MHC-class-I-tetramer-positive cells were found in 3 of 4 HLA-A2-positive patients. Thus, these cases highlight that clearance of low levels of HCV viremia is possible in the absence of a strong adaptive immune response which might explain the low seroconversion rate after occupational exposure to HCV.

  4. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus in a group of patients newly diagnosed with active tuberculosis in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costi, Cintia; Grandi, Tarciana; Halon, Maria Laura; Silva, Márcia Susana Nunes; Silva, Cláudia Maria Dornelles da; Gregianini, Tatiana Schäffer; Possuelo, Lia Gonçalves; Jarczewski, Carla Adriane; Niel, Christian; Rossetti, Maria Lucia Rosa

    2017-04-01

    Porto Alegre is the Brazilian state capital with second highest incidence of tuberculosis (TB) and the highest proportion of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among patients with TB. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increases the risk of anti-TB drug-induced hepatotoxicity, which may result in discontinuation of the therapy. The aim of this study was (i) to estimate prevalence of HCV and HIV in a group of patients newly diagnosed with active TB in a public reference hospital in Porto Alegre and (ii) to compare demographic, behavioural, and clinical characteristics of patients in relation to their HCV infection status. One hundred and thirty-eight patients with TB were tested for anti-HCV antibody, HCV RNA, and anti-HIV1/2 antibody markers. HCV RNA from real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive samples was submitted to reverse transcription and PCR amplification. The 5' non-coding region of the HCV genome was sequenced, and genotypes of HCV isolates were determined. Anti-HCV antibody, HCV RNA, and anti-HIV antibodies were detected in 27 [20%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 13-26%], 17 (12%; 95% CI, 7-18%), and 34 (25%; 95% CI, 17-32%) patients, respectively. HCV isolates belonged to genotypes 1 (n = 12) and 3 (n = 4). Some characteristics were significantly more frequent in patients infected with HCV. Among them, non-white individuals, alcoholics, users of illicit drugs, imprisoned individuals, and those with history of previous TB episode were more commonly infected with HCV (p < 0.05). HCV screening, including detection of anti-HCV antibody and HCV RNA, will be important to improving the management of co-infected patients, given their increased risk of developing TB treatment-related hepatotoxicity.

  5. Safety and efficacy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir on hepatitis C eradication in hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoping; Hopkins, Lynne; Everett, George; Carter, Willie M; SchroppDyce, Cynthia; Abusaada, Khalid; Hsu, Vincent

    2017-10-28

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir on hepatitis C eradication in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in an urban HIV clinic. A retrospective cohort study of 40 subjects co-infected with HIV-1 and HCV treated with the fixed-dose combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 wk from 2014 to 2016. All patients included were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with HIV RNA values of 100 copies/mL or fewer regardless of baseline HCV RNA level. The primary end point was a sustained virologic response of HCV at 12 wk (SVR12) after the end of therapy. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 55% were black, 22.5% had been previously treated for HCV, and 25% had cirrhosis. The patients were on a wide range of ART. Overall, 39 patients (97.5%) had a SVR 12 after the end of therapy, including rates of 97.1% in patients with HCV genotype 1a and 100% in those with HCV genotype 1b. One patient with HCV genotype 3a was included and achieved SVR12. Rates of SVR12 were similar regardless of previous treatment or the presence of compensated cirrhosis. Only 1 patient experienced relapse at week 12 following treatment and deep sequencing didn't reveal any resistance associated mutation in the NS5A or NS5B region. Interestingly, 7 (17.5%) patients who were adherent to ART experienced HIV viral breakthrough which resolved after continuing the same ART regimen. Two (5%) patients experienced HIV-1 virologic rebound due to noncompliance with HIV therapy, which resolved after resuming the same ART regimen. No severe adverse events were observed and no patient discontinued treatment because of adverse events. The most common adverse events included headache (12.5%), fatigue (10%), and diarrhea (2.5%). This retrospective study demonstrated the high rates of SVR12 of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir on HCV eradication in patients co-infected with HCV and HIV, regardless of HCV baseline levels, HCV treatment history or cirrhosis

  6. Cognitive dysfunction and hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Solinas, Antonio; Piras, Maria Rita; Deplano, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a distinct form of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). In fact, the majority of HCV-positive patients, irrespective of the grading of liver fibrosis, display alterations of verbal learning, attention, executive function, and memory when they are evaluated by suitable neuropsychological tests. Similarities between the cognitive dysfunction of HCV patients and MHE of patients with different etiologies are uncl...

  7. Sofosbuvir plus simeprevir for the treatment of HCV genotype 4 patients with advanced fibrosis or compensated cirrhosis is highly efficacious in real life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, S B; Baak, L C; Kuiken, S D; van der Sluys Veer, A; Lettinga, K D; van der Meer, J T M; Depla, A C T M; Tuynman, H; van Nieuwkerk, C M J; Schinkel, C J; Kwa, D; Reesink, H W; van der Valk, M

    2016-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and liver-related death. Recently, multiple regimens of different direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have been registered. Although treatment with sofosbuvir (SOF) and simeprevir (SMV) is registered for the treatment of genotype 4 patients in some countries, data on efficacy of this combination are lacking. We aimed to assess the efficacy of SOF and SMV with or without RBV during 12 weeks in a real-life cohort of genotype 4 HCV patients. A retrospective multicentre observational study was conducted in 4 hospitals in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, including patients with advanced liver fibrosis or liver cirrhosis treated with SOF plus SMV with or without RBV during 12 weeks for a genotype 4 chronic HCV infection from 1 January 2015 to 1 August 2015. Sustained viral response (SVR) was established at week 12 after end of treatment. A total of 53 patients with genotype 4 HCV infection, treatment naïve and experienced, were included. SVR was achieved in 49 of 53 patients (92%). The four failures all had a virological relapse and did not receive ribavirin. Three were nonresponder to earlier interferon-based treatment, and one was treatment naive. In this real-life cohort of patients with HCV genotype 4 infection and advanced liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, we show that treatment with SOF and SMV is effective. The addition of RBV could be considered in treatment-experienced patients as recommended in guidelines. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Viral Hepatitis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. PRO-C3-levels in patients with HIV/HCV-Co-infection reflect fibrosis stage and degree of portal hypertension.

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    Christian Jansen

    Full Text Available Liver-related deaths represent the leading cause of mortality among patients with HIV/HCV-co-infection, and are mainly related to complications of fibrosis and portal hypertension. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the structural changes by the assessment of extracellular matrix (ECM derived degradation fragments in peripheral blood as biomarkers for fibrosis and portal hypertension in patients with HIV/HCV co-infection.Fifty-eight patients (67% male, mean age: 36.5 years with HIV/HCV-co-infection were included in the study. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG was measured in forty-three patients. The fibrosis stage was determined using FIB4 -Score. ECM degraded products in peripheral blood were measured using specific ELISAs (C4M, MMP-2/9 degraded type IV collagen; C5M, MMP-2/9 degraded type V collagen; PRO-C3, MMP degraded n-terminal propeptide of type III collagen.As expected, HVPG showed strong and significant correlations with FIB4-index (rs = 0.628; p = 7*10-7. Interestingly, PRO-C3 significantly correlated with HVPG (rs = 0.354; p = 0.02, alanine aminotransferase (rs = 0.30; p = 0.038, as well as with FIB4-index (rs = 0.3230; p = 0.035. C4M and C5M levels were higher in patients with portal hypertension (HVPG>5 mmHg.PRO-C3 levels reflect liver injury, stage of liver fibrosis and degree of portal hypertension in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Furthermore, C4M and C5M were associated with increased portal pressure. Circulating markers of hepatic ECM remodeling might be helpful in the diagnosis and management of liver disease and portal hypertension in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection.

  9. Interferon-free therapy with direct acting antivirals for HCV/HIV-1 co-infected Japanese patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

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    Haruka Uemura

    Full Text Available Almost 30 years ago, about 30% of Japanese hemophiliacs became infected with HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV after receiving contaminated blood products. While several studies have reported the high efficacy and safety of direct acting antivirals (DAA in HIV-1 co-infected patients, such data are limited in hemophiliacs.We conducted a single-center, open-label study involving 27 Japanese patients (median age; 45 years with inherited bleeding disorders who were co-infected with HCV/HIV-1. Patients with HCV genotype 1 (GT1 and GT4 received ledipasvir (90 mg plus sofosbuvir (400 mg, those with HCV GT2 received sofosbuvir plus weight-based ribavirin, and those with HCV GT3 received daclatasvir (60 mg plus sofosbuvir. Treatment was continued for 12 weeks in all patients. The primary endpoints were rate of sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after end of therapy (SVR12 and occurrence of adverse events during DAA therapy.Eighteen (67% patients had had received interferon-based therapy, and 11 (41% had compensated cirrhosis. HCV genotypes were GT1a 4 (15%, GT1b 16 (59%, GT1 undetermined 2 (7%, GT2a 1 (4%, GT3a 3 (11% and GT4a 1 (4%. All patients were on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART and had undetectable HIV-1 viral load (2.0 cutoff index and FS scores (>15.0 kPa were still high in 6 patients at week 36.DAA therapy is effective in all patients. However, adverse events and efficacy of cART should be monitored closely.

  10. Apolipoprotein-AII concentrations are associated with liver steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jean Michel; Jooste, Valerie; Duvillard, Laurence; Minello, Anne; Texier, Véronique; Galland, Françoise; Gambert, Philippe; Verges, Bruno; Hillon, Patrick

    2007-12-01

    It has been shown that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein reduces the activity of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and could lead to steatosis in HCV-infected patients. Experimentally, apolipoprotein-AII (apoAII), which restores triglyceride secretion altered by the HCV core protein, could be protective against HCV steatosis. On the other hand, increasing plasma concentrations of mouse apoAII in transgenic mice produced several aspects of insulin-resistance syndrome, which also is implicated in the pathogenesis of HCV steatosis. This study was designed to investigate the role of apoAII in HCV-related steatosis in humans. Sixty-five hospitalized patients with chronic HCV were included in this study to assess the effects of apoAII, body mass index (BMI), age, insulin sensibility (HOMA), and leptin level on steatosis. Steatosis was observed in 55.3% of patients. Apo-AII was significantly associated with HOMA and with leptin concentrations. In univariate analyses, age, BMI, increased leptin level, increased HOMA, and increased apoAII concentration were associated with steatosis. In multivariate analysis, steatosis was associated with apoAII concentration, age, gender, and BMI. Contrary to previous hypotheses, apoAII is not a protective factor against HCV steatosis but is significantly associated with the development of liver steatosis. The fact that the plasma levels of apoAII correlate with HOMA and leptin levels in HCV-infected patients suggests that apoAII may contribute to hepatic steatosis progression in relationship to visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

  11. Viral Outcome in Patients with Occult HBV Infection or HCV-Ab Positivity Treated for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Maria; Picardi, Marco; Vitello, Anna; Pugliese, Novella; Rea, Matilde; Cossiga, Valentina; Pane, Fabrizio; Caporaso, Nicola; Morisco, Filomena

    2017-01-01

    HBV and HCV reactivation has been widely reported in patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy for oncohaematological diseases. We aimed to evaluate the HBV and HCV reactivation events in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) underwent cytotoxic chemotherapy containing or not rituximab. This is a retrospective observational study, including all patients with NHL and HL attending an Italian tertiary referral hospital, the University of Naples "Federico II". A total of 322 patients were enrolled. We evaluated serum HBV and HCV markers. A total of 47 (38%) patients with occult HBV infection were enrolled. Seven/47 were treated with therapeutic cytotoxic schedule containing rituximab. Of them, 6/7 received prophylaxis with lamivudine. HBV reactivation was observed in two patients treated with rituximab. A reactivation was observed in the only patient (HBcAb+/HBsAb+) not receiving lamivudine prophylaxis, and the other one was observed in 1 patient with isolated HBcAb positivity during lamivudine prophylaxis. Moreover, 8 patients with HCV-Ab positivity were enrolled. No viral reactivation was observed in these patients. In conclusion, patients with occult HBV infection receiving chemotherapy containing rituximab for lymphoma without antiviral prophylaxis are at risk of viral reactivation. On the contrary, there is no risk of reactivation in patients undergoing rituximab-free schedule. Our findings suggest that there is also very low risk of HCV reactivation. This preliminary report underlines the concept that HBV reactivationis strongly related to the type of immunosuppressive therapy administered and that antiviral prophylaxis needs to be tailored.

  12. Hepatitis C prevalence and risk factors in hemodialysis patients in Central Brazil: a survey by polymerase chain reaction and serological methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro Megmar AS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An hemodialysis population in Central Brazil was screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and serological methods to assess the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and to investigate associated risk factors. All hemodialysis patients (n=428 were interviewed in eight dialysis units in Goiânia city. Blood samples were collected and serum samples screened for anti-HCV antibodies by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Positive samples were retested for confirmation with a line immunoassay (LIA. All samples were also tested for HCV RNA by the PCR. An overall prevalence of 46.7% (CI 95%: 42-51.5 was found, ranging from 20.7% (CI 95%: 8.8-38.1 to 90.4% (CI 95%: 79.9-96.4 depending on the dialysis unit. Of the 428 patients, 185 were found to be seropositive by ELISA, and 167 were confirmed positive by LIA, resulting in an anti-HCV prevalence of 39%. A total of 131 patients were HCV RNA-positive. HCV viremia was present in 63.5% of the anti-HCV-positive patients and in 10.3% of the anti-HCV-negative patients. Univariate analysis of risk factors showed that the number of previous blood transfusions, transfusion of blood before mandatory screening for anti-HCV, length of time on hemodialysis, and treatment in multiple units were associated with HCV positivity. However, multivariate analysis revealed that blood transfusion before screening for anti-HCV and length of time on hemodialysis were significantly associated with HCV infection in this population. These data suggest that nosocomial transmission may play a role in the spread of HCV in the dialysis units studied. In addition to anti-HCV screening, HCV RNA detection is necessary for the diagnosis of HCV infection in hemodialysis patients.

  13. Chronic Hepatitis B and C Virus Infection and Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in HIV-Infected Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qing; De Luca, Andrea; Smith, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-defining condition in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Whether chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promote NHL in HIV-infected patients is unclear. Objective: To investigate whether chronic HBV...

  14. Hepatitis C and cutaneous alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Rita Fachinelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While most of those infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV are asymptomatic or only develop liver manifestations, a significant percentage evolves with autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders, resulting in a clinical condition called HCV syndrome. This work involving case studies of six patients with hepatitis C and varied skin manifestation aimed to report skin lesions occurring with HCV infection and its treatment. Skin manifestations in hepatitis C have been based on epidemiological studies. This justifies the need for studies that correlate HCV infection and its treatment with skin manifestations.

  15. "Waiting for DAAs": A retrospective chart review of patients with untreated hepatitis C in Rwanda.

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    Neil Gupta

    Full Text Available Access to treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV in sub-Saharan Africa is extremely limited. With the advent of direct acting antivirals (DAAs, highly effective and easy-to-deliver oral regimens are now available on the global market. This study was conducted to understand the background and characteristics of a national cohort of patients with HCV infection enrolled in care and awaiting therapy with DAAs.We conducted a retrospective chart review of all adult patients with confirmed HCV infection who were currently enrolled in care and treatment at the four existing hepatitis referral centers in Rwanda. Patient charts at these centers were reviewed, and routinely collected data were recorded and analyzed. Overall, 253 patients were identified; median age was 56 years (IQR: 43, 65, and 149 (58.9% were female. Median viral load was 688,736 IU/ml and 96.7% were HCV genotype 4. As classified by FIB-4 score, 64.8% of the patients had moderate to severe fibrosis. Fibrosis stage was associated with age (OR 1.12, CI 1.09-1.17, but not with time since diagnosis, gender, treatment center, or type of insurance. There was a low frequency of documented co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, HIV, and hepatitis B virus.Compared to an estimated 55,000 patients eligible for HCV treatment in Rwanda, this study identified only 253 patients currently diagnosed and engaged in care, highlighting an immense treatment gap in HCV, likely due to the lack of accessible and affordable screening, diagnostic, and treatment modalities. The patients that were enrolled in care had a disproportionately advanced fibrosis stage, possibly indicating late presentation to care or lack of treatment options. In the context of newly available and effective treatment options, this study supports the overall need to accelerate access to HCV screening, diagnostics, and care and treatment services in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Natural Polymorphisms Conferring Resistance to HCV Protease and Polymerase Inhibitors in Treatment-Naïve HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients in China.

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    Kali Zhou

    Full Text Available The advent of direct-acting agents (DAAs has improved treatment of HCV in HIV co-infection, but may be limited by primary drug resistance. This study reports the prevalence of natural polymorphisms conferring resistance to NS3/4A protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected individuals in China.Population based NS3/4A sequencing was completed for 778 treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected patients from twelve provinces. NS3 sequences were amplified by nested PCR using in-house primers for genotypes 1-6. NS5B sequencing was completed for genotyping in 350 sequences. Resistance-associated variants (RAVs were identified in positions associated with HCV resistance.Overall, 72.8% (566/778 of all HCV sequences had at least one RAV associated with HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor resistance. Variants were found in 3.6% (7/193 of genotype 1, 100% (23/23 of genotype 2, 100% (237/237 of genotype 3 and 92% (299/325 of genotype 6 sequences. The Q80K variant was present in 98.4% of genotype 6a sequences. High-level RAVs were rare, occurring in only 0.8% of patients. 93% (64/69 patients with genotype 1b also carried the C316N variant associated with NS5B low-level resistance.The low frequency of high-level RAVs associated with primary HCV DAA resistance among all genotypes in HIV/HCV co-infected patients is encouraging. Further phenotypic studies and clinical research are needed.

  17. Potential risk of HBV reactivation in patients with resolved HBV infection undergoing direct-acting antiviral treatment for HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Furusyo, Norihiro; Murata, Masayuki; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Takeo; Ura, Kazuya

    2017-06-15

    Despite a known risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-HBV coinfection, it remains unclear whether patients with past HBV infection are at risk for reactivation. This study evaluated the risk of HBV reactivation during treatment with sofosbuvir (SOF)-based regimens, focusing on patients with resolved HBV infection. This study analyzes the data of 183 consecutive patients treated with SOF-based regimens. From these patients, 63 with resolved HBV infection (negative for hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] and undetectable HBV DNA but positive for hepatitis B core antibody) were eligible for this study. HBV reactivation was defined as a quantifiable HBV DNA level >20 IU/mL. Among the patients antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) positive (10-500 mIU/mL) (n = 30), the titre of anti-HBs was significantly decreased with time, as shown by the results of repeated-measures analysis of variance (P = .0029). Overall, four patients (6.3%) with resolved HBV infection came to have detectable HBV DNA during treatment, including one who had HBV reactivation at week 4 (HBV DNA 80 IU/mL). However, none developed hepatic failure. Among four patients who had detectable HBV DNA during treatment, all were negative or had very low-titre (HBV infection and negative or very low-titre anti-HBs at baseline are at risk for having detectable HBV DNA transiently during treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Is sustained virological response a marker of treatment efficacy in patients with chronic hepatitis C viral infection with no response or relapse to previous antiviral intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Wilson, Edward; Koretz, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of antiviral interventions in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection use sustained virological response (SVR) as the main outcome. There is sparse information on long-term mortality from RCTs.......Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of antiviral interventions in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection use sustained virological response (SVR) as the main outcome. There is sparse information on long-term mortality from RCTs....

  19. Portal vein thrombosis in a patient with HCV cirrhosis and combined hemophilia A and thrombophilia V Leiden

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    Nikos Eleftheriadis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nikos Eleftheriadis, Pantelis MakrisHemostatic Unit of The First Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotles University of Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: The relation of hemophilia A with thrombophilia V Leiden is extremely rare in the literature. Furthermore, hemophiliac patients have an increased risk of severe life-threatening hemorrhage, blood transfusions, and therefore hepatitis transmission, mainly hepatitis C (HCV.Aims and methods: We present a 54-year-old male with a 5-year history of decompensated liver cirrhosis on the grounds of HCV hepatitis, hemophilia A, and thrombophilia V Leiden. He was admitted to our department because of severe abdominal distension, resembling ‘tense ascites’ despite the use of diuretics. Clinical examination showed shifting dullness and a protuberant abdomen, while hematological and blood chemistry results revealed thrombopenia (platelets: 77000/mL and hypoalbuminemia. Repeated abdominal paracentesis (under factor VIII administration failed to remove ascitic fluid, while abdominal echosonography and computed tomography revealed severe edema of mesenterium and intraabdominal viscus and the absence of free ascitic fluid, atrophic cirrhotic liver, and splenomegaly. Moreover, abdominal doppler echosonography revealed signs of portal hypertension, previous portal vein thrombosis, and revascularization of the portal vein. Gastroscopy showed esophageal varices grade II, without signs of bleeding. A-FP and all other laboratory examinations were normal.Results: Our patient was intravenously treated with albumine and diuretics (furosemide with mild improvement of his abdominal distension. During his hospitalization he presented an episode of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatic encephalopathy, which were successfully treated with lactulose clysmas and ciprofloxacine. He was discharged in a good general condition.Conclusion: According to our case we consider the false clinical

  20. Differences in HCV viral decline between low and standard-dose pegylated-interferon-alpha-2a with ribavirin in HIV/HCV genotype 3 patients.

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    Antonio Rivero-Juárez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to analyze the different impact of standard and low-dose Peg-IFN-α2a/RBV therapies on HCV viral decline in HIV/HCV genotype 3 co-infected patients during the first weeks of treatment. METHODS: Plasma HCV viral decline was analyzed between baseline and weeks 1, 2 and 4 in two groups of treatment-naïve HCV genotype 3 patients with HIV co-infection. The Standard Dose Group (SDG included patients who received Peg-IFN at 180 µg/per week with a weight-adjusted dose of ribavirin; Low-Dose Group (LDG patients received Peg-IFN at 135 µg/per week with 800 mg/day ribavirin. The effect of IL28B genotype on HCV viral decline was evaluated in both groups. HCV viral decline was analyzed using a multivariate linear regression model. RESULTS: One hundred and six patients were included: 48 patients in the SDG and 58 in the LDG. HCV viral decline for patients in the LDG was less than for those in the SDG (week 1:1.72±0.74 log(10 IU/mL versus 1.78±0.67 log(10 IU/mL, p = 0.827; week 2:2.3±0.89 log(10 IU/mL versus 3.01±1.02 log(10 IU/mL, p = 0.013; week 4:3.52±1.2 log(10 IU/mL versus 4.09±1.1 log(10 IU/mL, p = 0.005. The linear regression model identified the Peg-IFN/RBV dose as an independent factor for HCV viral decline at week 4. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that HCV viral decline was less for patients in the low-dose group compared to those receiving the standard dose. Until a randomized clinical trial is conducted, clinicians should be cautious about using lower doses of Peg-IFN/RBV in HIV/HCV genotype 3 co-infected patients.