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Sample records for hcn hnc dcn

  1. The HNC/HCN ratio in star-forming regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graninger, Dawn M.; Öberg, Karin I.; Herbst, Eric; Vasyunin, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    HNC and HCN, typically used as dense gas tracers in molecular clouds, are a pair of isomers that have great potential as a temperature probe because of temperature dependent, isomer-specific formation and destruction pathways. Previous observations of the HNC/HCN abundance ratio show that the ratio decreases with increasing temperature, something that standard astrochemical models cannot reproduce. We have undertaken a detailed parameter study on which environmental characteristics and chemical reactions affect the HNC/HCN ratio and can thus contribute to the observed dependence. Using existing gas and gas-grain models updated with new reactions and reaction barriers, we find that in static models the H + HNC gas-phase reaction regulates the HNC/HCN ratio under all conditions, except for very early times. We quantitatively constrain the combinations of H abundance and H + HNC reaction barrier that can explain the observed HNC/HCN temperature dependence and discuss the implications in light of new quantum chemical calculations. In warm-up models, gas-grain chemistry contributes significantly to the predicted HNC/HCN ratio and understanding the dynamics of star formation is therefore key to model the HNC/HCN system.

  2. The Photodissociation of HCN and HNC: Effects on the HNC/HCN Abundance Ratio in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Alfredo [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada (UAM), Unidad Asociada a IFF-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias Módulo 14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Roncero, Octavio; Zanchet, Alexandre [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco E-28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-20

    The impact of the photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers is analyzed in different astrophysical environments. For this purpose, the individual photodissociation cross sections of HCN and HNC isomers have been calculated in the 7–13.6 eV photon energy range for a temperature of 10 K. These calculations are based on the ab initio calculation of three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 21 lower electronic states. The cross sections are then obtained using a quantum wave packet calculation of the rotational transitions needed to simulate a rotational temperature of 10 K. The cross section calculated for HCN shows significant differences with respect to the experimental one, and this is attributed to the need to consider non-adiabatic transitions. Ratios between the photodissociation rates of HCN and HNC under different ultraviolet radiation fields have been computed by renormalizing the rates to the experimental value. It is found that HNC is photodissociated faster than HCN by a factor of 2.2 for the local interstellar radiation field and 9.2 for the solar radiation field, at 1 au. We conclude that to properly describe the HNC/HCN abundance ratio in astronomical environments illuminated by an intense ultraviolet radiation field, it is necessary to use different photodissociation rates for each of the two isomers, which are obtained by integrating the product of the photodissociation cross sections and ultraviolet radiation field over the relevant wavelength range.

  3. THE HCN/HNC ABUNDANCE RATIO TOWARD DIFFERENT EVOLUTIONARY PHASES OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kee-Tae, E-mail: mihwajin.sf@gmail.com, E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ktkim@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-20

    Using the H{sup 13}CN and HN{sup 13}C J = 1–0 line observations, the abundance ratio of HCN/HNC has been estimated for different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and ultracompact H ii regions (UCH iis). IRDCs were divided into “quiescent IRDC cores (qIRDCc)” and “active IRDC cores (aIRDCc),” depending on star formation activity. The HCN/HNC ratio is known to be higher at active and high temperature regions related to ongoing star formation, compared to cold and quiescent regions. Our observations toward 8 qIRDCc, 16 aIRDCc, 23 HMPOs, and 31 UCH iis show consistent results; the ratio is 0.97 (±0.10), 2.65 (±0.88), 4.17 (±1.03), and 8.96 (±3.32) in these respective evolutionary stages, increasing from qIRDCc to UCH iis. The change of the HCN/HNC abundance ratio, therefore, seems directly associated with the evolutionary stages of star formation, which have different temperatures. One suggested explanation for this trend is the conversion of HNC to HCN, which occurs effectively at higher temperatures. To test the explanation, we performed a simple chemical model calculation. In order to fit the observed results, the energy barrier of the conversion must be much lower than the value provided by theoretical calculations.

  4. Photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers in the 7-10 eV energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenel, Aurelie; Roncero, Octavio, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Alfredo [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada (UAM), Unidad Asociada a IFF-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias Módulo 14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain)

    2016-04-14

    The ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of the HCN and HNC isomers have been simulated in the 7-10 eV photon energy range. For this purpose, the three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 7 lowest electronic states, and the corresponding transition dipole moments, have been calculated, at multireference configuration interaction level. The spectra are calculated with a quantum wave packet method on these adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The spectra for the 3 lower excited states, the dissociative electronic states, correspond essentially to predissociation peaks, most of them through tunneling on the same adiabatic state. The 3 higher electronic states are bound, hereafter electronic bound states, and their spectra consist of delta lines, in the adiabatic approximation. The radiative lifetime towards the ground electronic states of these bound states has been calculated, being longer than 10 ns in all cases, much longer that the characteristic predissociation lifetimes. The spectra of HCN is compared with the available experimental and previous theoretical simulations, while in the case of HNC there are no previous studies to our knowledge. The spectrum for HNC is considerably more intense than that of HCN in the 7-10 eV photon energy range, which points to a higher photodissociation rate for HNC, compared to HCN, in astrophysical environments illuminated by ultraviolet radiation.

  5. Synthesis of HCN and HNC in Ion-Irradiated N2-Rich Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L.; Ferrante, R. F.

    2002-11-01

    Near-IR observations reveal that nitrogen-rich ice containing small amounts of methane, CH4, and carbon monoxide, CO, is abundant on the surfaces of Triton, a moon of Neptune, and Pluto (Cruikshank et al.. 1993; Owen et al., 1993). N2-rich apolar ices are also possible in some interstellar environments (Ehrenfreund et al., 1998). To investigate the radiation chemical behavior of N2-dominated ices we performed a systematic IR study of ion-irradiated N2-rich ices containing CH4 and CO. Experiments at 18 K, showed that HCN, HNC, and the reactive molecule diazomethane, CH2N2, formed along with several radicals. NH3 was also identified in irradiated N2 + CH4. Comparing results from similarly photolyzed ices (Bohn et al., 1994) shows that the significant difference between radiolysis and photolysis of these N2-dominated ices is that photolyzed ices do not form detectable HCN and HNC. Our experiments examined different N2/CH4 ratios, the half-life of CH4, possible HCN and HNC formation routes, and competing pathways in the presence of CO. Intrinsic band strengths (A(HCN) and A(HNC)) were measured and used to calculate nearly equal values of HCN and HNC yields in N2+CH4 irradiated ices. Low temperature results apply to interstellar ices. Reaction products that appear at 30-35 K are also expected to form and survive on the surfaces of Triton and Pluto and interstellar grains. We examined the evolution of ice features as species undergo acid-base (acids such as HCN, HNC, HNCO and a base NH3) reactions triggered by warming from 18 K to 30-35 K. We identified anions (OCN-, CN- and N3-) attributed to relatively stable salts in ices where NH4+ is the likely cation. These results also have an astrobiology implication since many of these products (HCN, HNC, HNCO, NH3, NH4OCN, and NH4CN) are reactants used in synthesis studies of bio- molecules such as amino acids and peptides.

  6. DFT coupled with NEGF study of ultra-sensitive HCN and HNC gases detection and distinct I-V response based on phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jiu; Yang, Qun; Ma, Xiaosong; Wang, Liming; Tan, Chunjian; Xiong, Daxi; Ye, Huaiyu; Chen, Xianping

    2017-11-22

    The sensing performances of pristine and X-doped phosphorene substrates (X = Al, Si, and S atoms) toward the adsorption of the toxic gases HCN and HNC were systematically investigated by first-principles simulations. The numerical results show that the pristine phosphorene is sensitive to HCN and HNC molecules with moderate adsorption energy, excellent charge transfer, high sensitivity and selectivity, implying its potential applications as excellent HCN and HNC sensors. In addition, the Al-doped phosphorene exhibits extremely high reactive activity toward HCN and HNC gases; thus, it has potential for use as a metal-free catalyst for activating or catalyzing HCN or HNC adsorbates. Moreover, the transport properties, i.e., current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, were calculated by the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). The obtained results reveal that the adsorbed HCN or HNC gas molecules have a remarkable impact on the electronic conductivity of phosphorene, and the zigzag direction of phosphorene is more sensitive to gas molecules than the armchair direction. The combination of the high sensitivity, superior selectivity, and moderate adsorption energy of pristine phosphorene toward HCN or HNC gas molecules adsorption, makes phosphorene an excellent candidate for HCN and HNC sensors.

  7. Retrieving molecular structural information and tracking HNC/HCN isomerization process with high harmonic generation by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ngoc Ty; Le Van Hoang; Vu Ngoc Tuoc; Le Anh Thu

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of applying the iterative method, suggested in our previous work, for HCN molecule and its HNC isomer. We found that the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectra are quite insensitive to the change of H-C (or H-N) bond length so that only the inter-nuclear C-N distance can be retrieved from the high-order harmonic spectra using ultrashort intense lasers. Furthermore, by analyzing the HHG spectra emitted by HCN during the chemical reaction path of isomerization we identify the intensity peaks nearby the stable, metastable and transition states. this finding can be useful for tracking the HNC/HNC isomerization process. (author)

  8. ALMA INVESTIGATION OF VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC EMISSION LINES IN THE AGN-HOSTING ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IRAS 20551−4250

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Izumi, Takuma, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 20551−4250 at HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 3–2 lines at both vibrational ground ( v = 0) and vibrationally excited ( v {sub 2} = 1) levels. This galaxy contains a luminous buried active galactic nucleus (AGN), in addition to starburst activity, and our ALMA Cycle 0 data revealed a tentatively detected vibrationally excited HCN v {sub 2} = 1f J = 4–3 emission line. In our ALMA Cycle 2 data, the HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 3–2 emission lines at v = 0 are clearly detected. The HCN and HNC v {sub 2} = 1f J = 3–2 emission lines are also detected, but the HCO{sup +} v {sub 2} = 1f J = 3–2 emission line is not. Given the high energy level of v {sub 2} = 1 and the resulting difficulty of collisional excitation, we compared these results with those of the calculation of infrared radiative pumping, using the available infrared 5–35 μ m spectrum. We found that all of the observational results were reproduced if the HCN abundance was significantly higher than that of HCO{sup +} and HNC. The flux ratio and excitation temperature between v {sub 2} = 1f and v = 0, after correction for possible line opacity, suggests that infrared radiative pumping affects rotational ( J -level) excitation at v = 0 at least for HCN and HNC. The HCN-to-HCO{sup +} v = 0 flux ratio is higher than those of starburst-dominated regions, and will increase even more when the derived high HCN opacity is corrected. The enhanced HCN-to-HCO{sup +} flux ratio in this AGN-hosting galaxy can be explained by the high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} abundance ratio and sufficient HCN excitation at up to J = 4, rather than the significantly higher efficiency of infrared radiative pumping for HCN than HCO{sup +}.

  9. Ab initio calculation of a global potential, vibrational energies, and wave functions for HCN/HNC, and a simulation of the (A-tilde)-(X-tilde) emission spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Joel M.; Gazdy, Bela; Bentley, Joseph A.; Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    1993-01-01

    A potential energy surface for the HCN/HNC system which is a fit to extensive, high-quality ab initio, coupled-cluster calculations is presented. All HCN and HNC states with energies below the energy of the first delocalized state are reported and characterized. Vibrational transition energies are compared with all available experimental data on HCN and HNC, including high CH-overtone states up to 23,063/cm. A simulation of the (A-tilde)-(X-tilde) stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectrum is also reported, and the results are compared to experiment. Franck-Condon factors are reported for odd bending states of HCN, with one quantum of vibrational angular momentum, in order to compare with the recent assignment by Jonas et al. (1992), on the basis of axis-switching arguments of a number of previously unassigned states in the SEP spectrum.

  10. Is Photolytic Production a Viable Source of HCN and HNC in Astrophysical Environments? A Laboratory-based Feasibility Study of Methyl Cyanoformate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Martínez-Núñez, Emilio; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Vázquez, Saulo A.; Smith, Jonathan M.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the possibility that cyano-containing hydrocarbons may act as photolytic sources for HCN and HNC in astrophysical environments, we conducted a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the 193 nm photolysis of the cyano-ester, methyl cyanoformate (MCF). Experimentally, nanosecond time-resolved infrared emission spectroscopy was used to detect the emission from nascent products generated in the photolysis reaction. The time-resolved spectra were analyzed using a recently developed spectral reconstruction analysis, which revealed spectral bands assignable to HCN and HNC. Fitting of the emission band shape and intensity allowed determination of the photolysis quantum yields of HCN, HNC, and {CN}({A}2{{{\\Pi }}}1) and an HNC/HCN ratio of ˜0.076 ± 0.059. Additionally, multiconfiguration self-consistent field calculations were used to characterize photoexcitation-induced reactions in the ground and four lowest singlet excited states of MCF. At 193 nm excitation, dissociation is predicted to occur predominantly on the repulsive S 2 state, with minor pathways via internal conversion from S 2 to highly excited ground state. An automated transition-state search algorithm was employed to identify the corresponding ground-state dissociation channels, and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the associated branching ratios. The proposed mechanisms were validated using the experimentally measured and quasi-classical trajectory-deduced nascent internal energy distributions of HCN and HNC. This work, along with previous studies, illustrates the propensity for cyano-containing hydrocarbons to act as photolytic sources for astrophysical HCN and HNC and may help explain the observed overabundance of HNC in astrophysical environments.

  11. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling

  12. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kastner, Joel, E-mail: dgraninger@cfa.harvard.edu [Center for Imaging Science, School of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  13. IRRADIATION OF ETHYLENE DILUTED IN SOLID NITROGEN WITH VACUUM ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT AND ELECTRONS: ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION OF HCN AND HNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui-Fen [Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Liu, Meng-Chen; Chen, Sian-Cong; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Wu, Yu-Jong, E-mail: yjwu@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, No. 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-01

    Chemical reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} dispersed in solid nitrogen at 10 K that occur upon irradiation with Lyα light at a wavelength of 121.6 nm and 500 eV electrons were investigated by measuring the infrared absorption spectra. Photolysis of the matrix samples with 121.6 nm light yielded products, including C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CN, and isomers of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, as well as a pair of HCN and HNC. In contrast, electron bombardment of similar matrix samples mainly resulted in the generation of N{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}N{sup −}. Mechanisms of the reactions that occur during the photolysis and electron-radiation of the matrix samples are discussed. The results of the study provide insights into the formation of HNC and HCN, as well as nitriles, in N{sub 2}-rich ice samples containing a small proportion of C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  14. FORMATION OF N{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}, HCN, AND HNC FROM THE FAR-UV PHOTOLYSIS OF CH{sub 4} IN NITROGEN ICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Jen-Iu; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Peng, Yu-Chain; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Bing-Ming, E-mail: bmcheng@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, No. 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-15

    The irradiation of pure solid N{sub 2} at 3 K with far-ultraviolet light from a synchrotron produced infrared absorption lines at 1657.7, 1655.6, and 1652.4 cm{sup −1} and an ultraviolet absorption line at 272.0 nm, which are characteristic of the product N{sub 3}. The threshold wavelength at which N{sub 3} was generated was 145.6 ± 2.9 nm, corresponding to an energy of 8.52 ± 0.17 eV. The photolysis of isotopically labeled {sup 15}N{sub 2} at 3 K consistently led to the formation of {sup 15}N{sub 3} with the same threshold wavelength of 145.6 ± 2.9 nm for its formation. The photolysis of CH{sub 4} in nitrogen ice in low concentrations also led to the formation of N{sub 3}, together with CH{sub 3}, HCN, and HNC, with the same threshold wavelength of 145.6 ± 2.9 nm. These results indicate that N{sub 3} radicals may play an important role in the photochemistry of nitrogen ices in astronomical environments.

  15. Fossil DCN in Orion-KL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangum, J.G.; Plambeck, R.L.; Wootten, A.

    1991-01-01

    The J = 1 - 0 transition of DCN was mapped toward Orion-KL with the BIMA array. With a synthesized beam width of 7.6 arcsec, emission from the hot core, compact ridge, and northern cloud regions was identified. Over half of the integrated DCN emission detected originates from the hot core component, with progressively smaller contributions from the compact ridge and northern cloud. The DCN fractional abundance is 10 to the -9th in the hot core, 4 x 10 to the -10th in the compact ridge, and 2 x 10 to the -10th in the northern cloud; it is estimated that the corresponding DCN/HCN ratios are about 0.005, 0.02, and 0.02. Chemical models suggest that such high DCN/HCN abundance ratios are produced only in clouds colder than about 20 K. Since the present temperatures near Orion-KL are 50-275 K, it is evident that most of the DCN formed before this region was heated by massive star formation. Much of the fossil DCN which is now observed may have sublimated from icy grain mantles. 32 refs

  16. Formation of doubly and triply bonded unsaturated compounds HCN, HNC, and CH2NH via N + CH4 low-temperature solid state reaction: from molecular clouds to solar system objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencos, Alejandro; Krim, Lahouari

    2018-06-01

    We show in the current study carried out in solid phase at cryogenic temperatures that methane (CH4) ice exposed to nitrogen atoms is a source of two acids HCN, HNC, and their corresponding hydrogenated unsaturated species CH2NH, in addition to CH3, C2H6, CN-, and three nitrogen hydrides NH, NH2, and NH3. The solid state N + CH4 reaction taken in the ground state seems to be strongly temperature dependent. While at temperatures lower than 10 K only CH3, NH, NH2, and NH3 species formation is promoted due to CH bond dissociation and NH bond formation, stable compounds with CN bonds are formed at temperatures ranged between 10 and 40 K. Many of these reaction products, resulting from CH4 + N reaction, have already been observed in N2-rich regions such as the atmospheres of Titan, Kuiper belt objects, and molecular clouds of the interstellar medium. Our results show the power of the solid state N-atom chemistry in the transformation of simple astrochemical relevant species, such as CH4 molecules and N atoms into complex organic molecules which are also potentially prebiotic species.

  17. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF HCN AND ITS ISOTOPOLOGUES ON TITAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molter, Edward M.; Nixon, C. A.; Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Lindberg, J. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Serigano, J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Teanby, N. A., E-mail: edward.m.molter@nasa.gov [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    We present sub-millimeter spectra of HCN isotopologues on Titan, derived from publicly available ALMA flux calibration observations of Titan taken in early 2014. We report the detection of a new HCN isotopologue on Titan, H{sup 13}C{sup 15}N, and confirm an earlier report of detection of DCN. We model high signal-to-noise observations of HCN, H{sup 13}CN, HC{sup 15}N, DCN, and H{sup 13}C{sup 15}N to derive abundances and infer the following isotopic ratios: {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 89.8 ± 2.8, {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N = 72.3 ± 2.2, D/H = (2.5 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −4}, and HCN/H{sup 13}C{sup 15}N = 5800 ± 270 (1 σ errors). The carbon and nitrogen ratios are consistent with and improve on the precision of previous results, confirming a factor of ∼2.3 elevation in {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N in HCN compared to N{sub 2} and a lack of fractionation in {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C from the protosolar value. This is the first published measurement of D/H in a nitrile species on Titan, and we find evidence for a factor of ∼2 deuterium enrichment in hydrogen cyanide compared to methane. The isotopic ratios we derive may be used as constraints for future models to better understand the fractionation processes occurring in Titan’s atmosphere.

  18. An ALMA Survey of DCN/H{sup 13}CN and DCO{sup +}/H{sup 13}CO{sup +} in Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jane; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Loomis, Ryan A.; Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Aikawa, Yuri; Furuya, Kenji [Center for Computational Sciences, The University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F., E-mail: jane.huang@cfa.harvard.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-02-01

    The deuterium enrichment of molecules is sensitive to their formation environment. Constraining patterns of deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks is therefore useful for probing how material is inherited or reprocessed throughout the stages of star and planet formation. We present ALMA observations at ∼0.″6 resolution of DCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CO{sup +}, DCN, and H{sup 13}CN in the full disks around T Tauri stars AS 209 and IM Lup, in the transition disks around T Tauri stars V4046 Sgr and LkCa 15, and in the full disks around Herbig Ae stars MWC 480 and HD 163296. We also present ALMA observations of HCN in the IM Lup disk. DCN, DCO{sup +}, and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} are detected in all disks, and H{sup 13}CN in all but the IM Lup disk. We find efficient deuterium fractionation for the sample, with estimates of disk-averaged DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} and DCN/HCN abundance ratios ranging from ∼0.02–0.06 and ∼0.005–0.08, respectively, which is comparable to values reported for other interstellar environments. The relative distributions of DCN and DCO{sup +} vary between disks, suggesting that multiple formation pathways may be needed to explain the diverse emission morphologies. In addition, gaps and rings observed in both H{sup 13}CO{sup +} and DCO{sup +} emission provide new evidence that DCO{sup +} bears a complex relationship with the location of the midplane CO snowline.

  19. HNC variational calculations of boson matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantto, L.J.; Jackson, A.D.; Siemens, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple and reliable numerical technique is given for determining the two-body distribution function which minimizes the HNC energy of boson matter. Numerical results are presented for the neutron matter homework problem and the 4 He Lennard-Jones potential. The resulting distribution function is found to have proper asymptotic behaviour and yields reasonable binding energies. (Auth.)

  20. Biomolecules from HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Ryan, T. J.; Lobo, A. P.; Donner, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    It has been suggested by Sanchez et al. (1967) that HCN might have been one of the more important precursors of biological molecules on the primitive earth. Studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms involved in HCN oligomerizations in dilute aqueous solutions and to identify the compounds which are produced in these oligomerization mixtures. Indirect evidence for the formation of cyanate was obtained along with direct evidence for the formation of citrulline, aspartic acid, and orotic acid.

  1. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  2. An Ab Initio MP2 Study of HCN-HX Hydrogen Bonded Complexes

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    Araújo Regiane C.M.U.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An ab initio MP2/6-311++G** study has been performed to obtain geometries, binding energies and vibrational properties of HCN-HX H-bonded complexes with X = F, Cl, NC, CN and CCH. These MP2/6-311++G** results have revealed that: (i the calculated H-bond lengths are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; (ii the H-bond strength is associated with the intermolecular charge transfer and follows the order: HCN-HNC ~ HCN-HF > HCN-HCl ~ HCN-HCN > HCN-HCCH; (iii BSSE correction introduces an average reduction of 2.4 kJ/mol on the MP2/6-311++G** binding energies, i.e. 11% of the uncorrected binding energy; (iv the calculated zero-point energies reduce the stability of these complexes and show a good agreement with the available experimental values; (v the H-X stretching frequency is shifted downward upon H-bond formation. This displacement is associated with the H-bond length; (vi The more pronounced effect on the infrared intensities occurs with the H-X stretching intensity. It is much enhanced after complexation due to the charge-flux term; (vii the calculated intermolecular stretching frequencies are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; and, finally, (viii the results obtained for the HCN-HX complexes follow the same profile as those found for the acetylene-HX series but, in the latter case, the effects on the properties of the free molecules due to complexation are less pronounced than those in HCN-HX.

  3. ALMA DETECTION OF THE VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN J = 4-3 EMISSION LINE IN THE AGN-HOSTING LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IRAS 20551–4250

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii, 96720 (United States); Nakanishi, Kouichiro, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura 763-0355, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2013-10-01

    We present results from our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, at the frequencies around the HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 transition lines, of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 20551–4250 at z = 0.043, which is known to host an energetically important obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). In addition to the targeted HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 emission lines, two additional strong emission lines are seen, which we attribute to H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 3}CN(+CCH). The HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio (∼0.7) is higher than in the other starburst-dominated galaxy (∼0.2) observed in our ALMA Cycle 0 program. We tentatively (∼5σ) detected the vibrationally excited (v {sub 2} = 1) HCN J = 4-3 (l = 1f) emission line, which is important for testing an infrared radiative pumping scenario for HCN. This is the second detection of this molecular transition in external galaxies. The most likely reason for this detection is not only the high flux of this emission line, but also the small molecular line widths observed in this galaxy, suggesting that vibrational excitation of HCN may be relatively common in AGN-hosting galaxies.

  4. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo C. DiFrancesco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4 in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic and

  5. Hyperfine anomalies of HCN in cold dark clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walmsley, C.M.; Churchwell, E.; Nash, A.; Fitzpatrick, E.; and Physics Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

    1982-01-01

    We report observations of the J = 1→0 line of HCN measured toward six positions in nearby low-temperature dark clouds. The measured relative intensities of the hyperfine components of the J = 1→0 line are anomalous in that the F = 0→1 transition is stronger than would be expected if all three components (F = 2→1, F = 1→1, F = 0→1) had equal excitation temperatures. Differences of approximately 20% in the populations per sublevel of J = 1 could account for the observations. The results are in contrast to the situation observed in warmer molecular clouds associated with H II regions where the F = 1→1 line is anomalously weak. The apparent overpopulation of J = 1, F = 0 in dark clouds may be related to the phenomenon observed in the J = 1→0 transitions of HCO + and HNC in the same objects where 13 C substituted version of these species is found to be stronger than the 12 C species

  6. Flavonoid Regulation of HCN2 Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Anne E.; Rosenbaum, Joel C.; Brelidze, Tinatin I.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are pacemaker channels whose currents contribute to rhythmic activity in the heart and brain. HCN channels open in response to hyperpolarizing voltages, and the binding of cAMP to their cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) facilitates channel opening. Here, we report that, like cAMP, the flavonoid fisetin potentiates HCN2 channel gating. Fisetin sped HCN2 activation and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarizing potentials with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 1.8 μm. When applied together, fisetin and cAMP regulated HCN2 gating in a nonadditive fashion. Fisetin did not potentiate HCN2 channels lacking their CNBD, and two independent fluorescence-based binding assays reported that fisetin bound to the purified CNBD. These data suggest that the CNBD mediates the fisetin potentiation of HCN2 channels. Moreover, binding assays suggest that fisetin and cAMP partially compete for binding to the CNBD. NMR experiments demonstrated that fisetin binds within the cAMP-binding pocket, interacting with some of the same residues as cAMP. Together, these data indicate that fisetin is a partial agonist for HCN2 channels. PMID:24085296

  7. EXTENDED HCN AND HCO{sup +} EMISSION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicua Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kepley, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, and HC{sub 3}N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO{sup +} emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO{sup +} observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO{sup +} J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 21 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, or ≳ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is ≥0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which would lower the starburst lifetime by ≥5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 10{sup 52} erg.

  8. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  9. Connections from the rat dorsal column nuclei (DCN) to the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaresi, Paolo; Mensà, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal columns (DCs; spinal cord stimulation; SCS) has been proposed to treat chronic neuropathic pain. SCS may activate a dual mechanism that would affect both the spinal cord and supraspinal levels. Stimulation of DCs or DC nuclei (DCN) in animals where neuropathic pain has been induced causes activation of brainstem centers including the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which is involved in the endogenous pain suppression system. Biotinylated dextran-amine (BDA) was iontophoretically injected into the DCN to analyze the ascending projection directed to the PAG. Separate injections into the gracile nucleus (GrN) and the cuneate nucleus (CunN) showed BDA-positive fibers terminating in different regions of the contralateral PAG. GrN-PAG afferents terminated in the caudal and middle portions of PAG-l, whereas CunN-PAG fibers terminated in the middle and rostral portions of PAG-l. Based on the DCN somatotopic map, the GrN sends information to the PAG from the contralateral hindlimb and the tail and the CunN from the contralateral forelimb, shoulder, neck and ear. This somatotopic organization is consistent with earlier electrophysiological and PAG stimulation studies. These fibers could form part of the DCs-brainstem-spinal cord loop, which may be involved in the inhibitory effects of SCS on neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. CO and HCN observations of carbon stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F; deJong, T; Loup, C

    We present CO and HCN observations of carbon stars. They consist of partly new detections in the (CO)-C-12 J = (1-0), (2-1) and HCN(1-0) lines obtained with the SEST and the IRAM telescope, and of (CO)-C-12 and (CO)-C-13 J = (1-0), (2-1) and (3-2) observations with IRAM and the JCMT of some of the

  11. HCN Channels Modulators: The Need for Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Maria Novella; Sartiani, Laura; Masi, Alessio; Mannaioni, Guido; Manetti, Dina; Mugelli, Alessandro; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated current (If/Ih), are membrane proteins which play an important role in several physiological processes and various pathological conditions. In the Sino Atrial Node (SAN) HCN4 is the target of ivabradine, a bradycardic agent that is, at the moment, the only drug which specifically blocks If. Nevertheless, several other pharmacological agents have been shown to modulate HCN channels, a property that may contribute to their therapeutic activity and/or to their side effects. HCN channels are considered potential targets for developing drugs to treat several important pathologies, but a major issue in this field is the discovery of isoform-selective compounds, owing to the wide distribution of these proteins into the central and peripheral nervous systems, heart and other peripheral tissues. This survey is focused on the compounds that have been shown, or have been designed, to interact with HCN channels and on their binding sites, with the aim to summarize current knowledge and possibly to unveil useful information to design new potent and selective modulators. PMID:26975509

  12. Gabapentin Modulates HCN4 Channel Voltage-Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Shen Tae

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin (GBP is widely used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain. There is evidence that GBP can act on hyperpolarization-activated cation (HCN channel-mediated Ih in brain slice experiments. However, evidence showing that GBP directly modulates HCN channels is lacking. The effect of GBP was tested using two-electrode voltage clamp recordings from human HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Whole-cell recordings were also made from mouse spinal cord slices targeting either parvalbumin positive (PV+ or calretinin positive (CR+ inhibitory neurons. The effect of GBP on Ih was measured in each inhibitory neuron population. HCN4 expression was assessed in the spinal cord using immunohistochemistry. When applied to HCN4 channels, GBP (100 μM caused a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage of half activation (V1/2 thereby reducing the currents. Gabapentin had no impact on the V1/2 of HCN1 or HCN2 channels. There was a robust increase in the time to half activation for HCN4 channels with only a small increase noted for HCN1 channels. Gabapentin also caused a hyperpolarizing shift in the V1/2 of Ih measured from HCN4-expressing PV+ inhibitory neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Gabapentin had minimal effect on Ih recorded from CR+ neurons. Consistent with this, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the majority of CR+ inhibitory neurons do not express somatic HCN4 channels. In conclusion, GBP reduces HCN4 channel-mediated currents through a hyperpolarized shift in the V1/2. The HCN channel subtype selectivity of GBP provides a unique tool for investigating HCN4 channel function in the central nervous system. The HCN4 channel is a candidate molecular target for the acute analgesic and anticonvulsant actions of GBP.

  13. Detection of interstellar vibrationally excited HCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Turner, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrationally excited HCN has been observed for the first time in the interstellar medium. The J = 3-2 rotational transitions of the l-doubled (0,1/sup 1d/,1c, 0) bending mode of HCN have been detected toward Orion-KL and IRC +10216. In Orion, the overall column density in the (0,1,0) mode, which exclusively samples the ''hot core,'' is 1.7-10 16 cm -2 and can be understood in terms of the ''doughnut'' model for Orion. The ground-state HCN column density implied by the excited-state observations is 2.3 x 10 18 cm -2 in the hot core, at least one order of magnitude greater than the column densities derived for HCN in its spike and plateau/doughnut components. Radiative excitation by 14 μm flux from IRc2 accounts for the (0,1,0) population provided the hot core is approx.6-7 x 10 16 cm distant from IRc2, in agreement with the ''cavity'' model for KL. Toward IRC +10216 we have detected J = 3-2 transitions of both (0,1/sup 1c/,/sup 1d/,0) and (0,2 0 ,0) excited states. The spectral profiles have been modeled to yield abundances and excitation conditions throughout the expanding envelope

  14. Presence of activating KRAS mutations correlates significantly with expression of tumour suppressor genes DCN and TPM1 in colorectal cancer

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    Rems Miran

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite identification of the major genes and pathways involved in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC, it has become obvious that several steps in these pathways might be bypassed by other as yet unknown genetic events that lead towards CRC. Therefore we wanted to improve our understanding of the genetic mechanisms of CRC development. Methods We used microarrays to identify novel genes involved in the development of CRC. Real time PCR was used for mRNA expression as well as to search for chromosomal abnormalities within candidate genes. The correlation between the expression obtained by real time PCR and the presence of the KRAS mutation was investigated. Results We detected significant previously undescribed underexpression in CRC for genes SLC26A3, TPM1 and DCN, with a suggested tumour suppressor role. We also describe the correlation between TPM1 and DCN expression and the presence of KRAS mutations in CRC. When searching for chromosomal abnormalities, we found deletion of the TPM1 gene in one case of CRC, but no deletions of DCN and SLC26A3 were found. Conclusion Our study provides further evidence of decreased mRNA expression of three important tumour suppressor genes in cases of CRC, thus implicating them in the development of this type of cancer. Moreover, we found underexpression of the TPM1 gene in a case of CRCs without KRAS mutations, showing that TPM1 might serve as an alternative path of development of CRC. This downregulation could in some cases be mediated by deletion of the TPM1 gene. On the other hand, the correlation of DCN underexpression with the presence of KRAS mutations suggests that DCN expression is affected by the presence of activating KRAS mutations, lowering the amount of the important tumour suppressor protein decorin.

  15. THE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF METEORITIC HCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzarello, Sandra, E-mail: pizzar@asu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85018-1604 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    HCN is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial environments and is central to current theories on the origin of early solar system organic compounds such as amino acids. These compounds, observed in carbonaceous meteorites, were likely important in the origin and/or evolution of early life. As part of our attempts to understand the origin(s) of meteoritic CN{sup –}, we have analyzed the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic composition of HCN gas released from water extracts of the Murchison meteorite and found its value to be near those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The findings, when evaluated viz-a-viz molecular abundances and isotopic data of meteoritic organic compounds, suggest that HCN formation could have occurred during the protracted water alteration processes known to have affected the mineralogy of many asteroidal bodies during their solar residence. This was an active synthetic stage, which likely involved simple gasses, organic molecules, their presolar precursors, as well as mineral catalysts and would have lead to the formation of molecules of differing isotopic composition, including some with solar values.

  16. Novel insights into the distribution of cardiac HCN channels: an expression study in the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Stefan; Layh, Beate; Ludwig, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    HCN pacemaker channels (I(f) channels) are believed to contribute to important functions in the heart; thus these channels became an attractive target for generating transgenic mouse mutants to elucidate their role in physiological and pathophysiological cardiac conditions. A full understanding of cardiac I(f) and the interpretation of studies using HCN mouse mutants require detailed information about the expression profile of the individual HCN subunits. Here we investigate the cardiac expression pattern of the HCN isoforms at the mRNA as well as at the protein level. The specificity of antibodies used was strictly confirmed by the use of HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 knockout animals. We find a low, but highly differential HCN expression profile outside the cardiac conduction pathway including left and right atria and ventricles. Additionally HCN distribution was investigated in tissue slices of the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, the bundle of His and the bundle branches. The conduction system was marked by acetylcholine esterase staining. HCN4 was confirmed as the predominant isoform of the primary pacemaker followed by a distinct expression of HCN1. In contrast HCN2 shows only a confined expression to individual pacemaker cells. Immunolabeling of the AV-node reveals also a pronounced specificity for HCN1 and HCN4. Compared to the SN and AVN we found a low but selective expression of HCN4 as the only isoform in the atrioventricular bundle. However in the bundle branches HCN1, HCN4 and also HCN2 show a prominent and selective expression pattern. Our results display a characteristic distribution of individual HCN isoforms in several cardiac compartments and reveal that beside HCN4, HCN1 represents the isoform which is selectively expressed in most parts of the conduction system suggesting a substantial contribution of HCN1 to pacemaking. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sick sinus syndrome in HCN1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Stefanie; Krause, Stefanie C; Hassan, Sami I H; Becirovic, Elvir; Auer, Franziska; Bernard, Rebekka; Kupatt, Christian; Lange, Philipp; Ziegler, Tilman; Wotjak, Carsten T; Zhang, Henggui; Hammelmann, Verena; Paparizos, Christos; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2013-12-17

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is a major clinically relevant disease that is associated with sudden cardiac death and requires surgical implantation of electric pacemaker devices. Frequently, SND occurs in heart failure and hypertension, conditions that lead to electric instability of the heart. Although the pathologies of acquired SND have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms that cause congenital SND. Here, we show that the HCN1 protein is highly expressed in the sinoatrial node and is colocalized with HCN4, the main sinoatrial pacemaker channel isoform. To characterize the cardiac phenotype of HCN1-deficient mice, a detailed functional characterization of pacemaker mechanisms in single isolated sinoatrial node cells, explanted beating sinoatrial node preparation, telemetric in vivo electrocardiography, echocardiography, and in vivo electrophysiology was performed. On the basis of these experiments we demonstrate that mice lacking the pacemaker channel HCN1 display congenital SND characterized by bradycardia, sinus dysrhythmia, prolonged sinoatrial node recovery time, increased sinoatrial conduction time, and recurrent sinus pauses. As a consequence of SND, HCN1-deficient mice display a severely reduced cardiac output. We propose that HCN1 stabilizes the leading pacemaker region within the sinoatrial node and hence is crucial for stable heart rate and regular beat-to-beat variation. Furthermore, we suggest that HCN1-deficient mice may be a valuable genetic disease model for human SND.

  18. Simple Organics and Biomonomers Identified in HCN Polymers: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Osuna-Esteban

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide (HCN is a ubiquitous molecule in the Universe. It is a compound that is easily produced in significant yields in prebiotic simulation experiments using a reducing atmosphere. HCN can spontaneously polymerise under a wide set of experimental conditions. It has even been proposed that HCN polymers could be present in objects such as asteroids, moons, planets and, in particular, comets. Moreover, it has been suggested that these polymers could play an important role in the origin of life. In this review, the simple organics and biomonomers that have been detected in HCN polymers, the analytical techniques and procedures that have been used to detect and characterise these molecules and an exhaustive classification of the experimental/environmental conditions that favour the formation of HCN polymers are summarised. Nucleobases, amino acids, carboxylic acids, cofactor derivatives and other compounds have been identified in HCN polymers. The great molecular diversity found in HCN polymers encourages their placement at the central core of a plausible protobiological system.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of sticky electrolytes in the HNC/MS approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.N.; Blum, L.

    1991-01-01

    We study an approximation for a model which combines the sticky potential of Baxter and charged spheres. In the hypernetted chain (HNC)/mean spherical approximation (MSA), simple expressions for the thermodynamic functions are obtained. There equations should be useful in representing the properties of real electrolytes. Approximate expressions that are similar to those of the primitive model are obtained, for low densities (concentrations) of the electrolyte (Author)

  20. CN and HCN in the infrared spectrum of IRC + 10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, G. R.; Deming, D.; Jennings, D. E.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Keady, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The abundance of HCN in the inner circumstellar shell of IRC + 10216 has been remeasured using the 12-micron nu2 band. The 12-micron lines are less saturated than HCN 3-micron lines previously detected in the spectrum of IRC + 10216. The observed 12-micron HCN line is formed in the circumstellar shell from about 4 to 12 R sub * in accord with a photospheric origin for HCN. The derived HCN abundance in the 4 to 12 R sub* region is 4 x 10 exp-5 and the column density is 7 x 10 exp 18/sq cm. The 5-micron CN vibration-rotation fundamental band was detected for the first time in an astronomical source. Using four CN lines, the CN column density was determined to be 2.6 x 10 exp 15/sq cm and the rotational temperature to be 8 +/-2 K. The peal radial abundance is 1 x 10 exp -5. The values for the temperature and abundance are in good agreement with microwave results and with the formation of CN from the photolysis of HCN.

  1. HCN Channels—Modulators of Cardiac and Neuronal Excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Herrmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels comprise a family of cation channels activated by hyperpolarized membrane potentials and stimulated by intracellular cyclic nucleotides. The four members of this family, HCN1–4, show distinct biophysical properties which are most evident in the kinetics of activation and deactivation, the sensitivity towards cyclic nucleotides and the modulation by tyrosine phosphorylation. The four isoforms are differentially expressed in various excitable tissues. This review will mainly focus on recent insights into the functional role of the channels apart from their classic role as pacemakers. The importance of HCN channels in the cardiac ventricle and ventricular hypertrophy will be discussed. In addition, their functional significance in the peripheral nervous system and nociception will be examined. The data, which are mainly derived from studies using transgenic mice, suggest that HCN channels contribute significantly to cellular excitability in these tissues. Remarkably, the impact of the channels is clearly more pronounced in pathophysiological states including ventricular hypertrophy as well as neural inflammation and neuropathy suggesting that HCN channels may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these conditions. This perspective as well as the current therapeutic use of HCN blockers will also be addressed.

  2. HCN channels are not required for mechanotransduction in sensory hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Horwitz

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of the hair cell transduction channel has not been identified. Here we explore the novel hypothesis that hair cell transduction channels include HCN subunits. The HCN family of ion channels includes four members, HCN1-4. They were originally identified as the molecular correlates of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels that carry currents known as If, IQ or Ih. However, based on recent evidence it has been suggested that HCN subunits may also be components of the elusive hair cell transduction channel. To investigate this hypothesis we examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction current were assayed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells of wildtype mice exposed to HCN channel blockers or a dominant-negative form of HCN2 that contained a pore mutation and in mutant mice that lacked HCN1, HCN2 or both. We found robust expression of HCNs 1, 2 and 4 but little evidence that localized HCN subunits in hair bundles, the site of mechanotransduction. Although high concentrations of the HCN antagonist, ZD7288, blocked 50-70% of the transduction current, we found no reduction of transduction current in either cochlear or vestibular hair cells of HCN1- or HCN2- deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice that lacked both HCN1 and HCN2 also had normal transduction currents. Lastly, we found that mice exposed to the dominant-negative mutant form of HCN2 had normal transduction currents as well. Taken together, the evidence suggests that HCN subunits are not required for mechanotransduction in hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: L1157-B1 DCN (2-1) and H13CN (2-1) datacubes (Busquet+,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, G.; Fontani, F.; Viti, S.; Codella, C.; Lefloch, B.; Benedettini, M.; Ceccarellli, C.

    2017-06-01

    IRAM NOEMA observations of DCN(2-1) and H13CN(2-1) towa brightest bow-shock B1 of the L1157 molecular outflow. All data cubes are provided in fits format smoothed to a velocity resolution of 0.5km/s. (2 data files).

  4. Electric discharge synthesis of HCN in simulated Jovian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribling, Roscoe; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Corona discharge is presently considered as a possible source of the HCN detected in the Jovian atmosphere at 2.2 x 10 to the -7th moles/sq cm column density, for the cases of gas mixtures containing H2, CH4, and NH3, with H2/CH4 ratios from 4.4 to 1585. A 3:1 ratio of corona discharge to lightning energy similar to that of the earth is applied to Jupiter. Depending on the lightning energy available on Jupiter and the eddy diffusion coefficients in the synthesis region, HCN column densities generated by corona discharge could account for about 10 percent of the HCN observed.

  5. New CO and HCN sources associated with IRAS carbon stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGUYEN-Q-RIEU; Epchtein, N.; TRUONG-BACH; Cohen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Emission of CO and HCN was detected in 22 out of a sample of 53 IRAS sources classified as unidentified carbon-rich objects. The sample was selected according to the presence of the silicon carbide feature as revealed by low-resolution spectra. The molecular line widths indicate that the CO and HCN emission arises from the circumstellar envelopes of very highly evolved stars undergoing mass loss. The visible stars tend to be deficient in CO as compared with unidentified sources. Most the detected CO and HCN IRAS stars are distinct and thick-shelled objects, but their infrared and CO luminosities are similar to those of IRC + 102156 AFGL and IRC-CO evolved stars. The 12 micron flux seems to be a good indicator of the distance, hence a guide for molecular searches.

  6. De novo mutations in HCN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nava, Caroline; Dalle, Carine; Rastetter, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels contribute to cationic Ih current in neurons and regulate the excitability of neuronal networks. Studies in rat models have shown that the Hcn1 gene has a key role in epilepsy, but clinical evidence implicating HCN1 mutations in ...

  7. Catalytic and Gas-Solid Reactions Involving HCN over Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Johnsson, Jan Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    In coal-fired combustion systems solid calcium species may be present as ash components or limestone added to the combustion chamber. In this study heterogeneous reactions involving HCN over seven different limestones were investigated in a laboratory fixed-bed quartz reactor at 873-1,173 K...

  8. HCN Polymers: Toward Structure Comprehension Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Thissen, Roland; Frisari, Ma; Vuitton, Veronique; Quirico, Eric; Le Roy, Léna; Fray, Nicolas; Cottin, Hervé; Horst, Sarah; Yelle, Roger

    A lot of solar system materials, including cometary ices and Titan aerosols, contain dark matter that can be interpreted as complex nitrogen bearing organic matter [1]. In laboratory experi-ments, HCN polymers are thus analogs of great interest. In fact they may be present in Titan atmosphere and in comet nuclei and then reprocessed as a CN distributed source [2], when ices began to sublimate and ejects from the nucleus organic matter grains [3]. The presence of HCN polymers is suggested because HCN molecule has been directly observed in 1P/Halley comet [4] and others. HCN polymers are also of prebiotic interest [5] as it can form amino acid under hydrolysis conditions. Even if they have been studied during the last decades, their chemical composition and structure are still poorly understood, and a great analytical effort has to be continued. In this way we present a high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and a high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/HRMS) analysis of HCN polymers. It was shown [6] that this is a suitable technique to elucidate composition and structure of the soluble part of tholins analogs of Titan's atmosphere aerosols. HCN polymers have never been studied by HRMS, thus we used a LTQ-Orbitrap XL high resolution mass spectrometer to analyse the HCN polymers. These are produced at LISA by direct polymerisation of pure liquid HCN, catalyzed by ammonia. HCN polymers have been completely dissolved in methanol and then injected in the mass spectrometer by ElectroSpray Ionization (ESI). This atmospheric pressure ionization process produces protonated or deprotonated ions, but it does not fragment molecules. Thus HRMS, allows a direct access to the stoechiometry of all the ionizable molecules present in the samples. Fragmentation analyses (MS/MS) of selected ions have also been performed. Thess analysis provide information about the different chemical fonctionnalities present in HCN poly-mers and also about their structure. Thus we are able to

  9. Gain-of-function HCN2 variants in genetic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Melody; Maljevic, Snezana; Phillips, A Marie; Petrovski, Slave; Hildebrand, Michael S; Burgess, Rosemary; Mount, Therese; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Schubert, Julian; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Wong, Michael; Weisenberg, Judith L; Thio, Liu Lin; Lerche, Holger; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Reid, Christopher A

    2018-02-01

    Genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE) is a common epilepsy syndrome that encompasses seizure disorders characterized by spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs). Pacemaker hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) are considered integral to SWD genesis, making them an ideal gene candidate for GGE. We identified HCN2 missense variants from a large cohort of 585 GGE patients, recruited by the Epilepsy Phenome-Genome Project (EPGP), and performed functional analysis using two-electrode voltage clamp recordings from Xenopus oocytes. The p.S632W variant was identified in a patient with idiopathic photosensitive occipital epilepsy and segregated in the family. This variant was also independently identified in an unrelated patient with childhood absence seizures from a European cohort of 238 familial GGE cases. The p.V246M variant was identified in a patient with photo-sensitive GGE and his father diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Functional studies revealed that both p.S632W and p.V246M had an identical functional impact including a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation that is consistent with a gain-of-function. In contrast, no biophysical changes resulted from the introduction of common population variants, p.E280K and p.A705T, and the p.R756C variant from EPGP that did not segregate with disease. Our data suggest that HCN2 variants can confer susceptibility to GGE via a gain-of-function mechanism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Response of Si- and Al-doped graphenes toward HCN: A computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastegar, Somayeh F.; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Hadipour, Nasser L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sensitivity of Si- and Al-doped graphene (SiG and AlG) toward HCN is investigated. ► The electronic properties of AlG are significantly changed in the presence of HCN. ► It is established that AlG can be a good sensor for HCN molecule. - Abstract: Sensitivity of Si- and Al-doped graphenes (SiG and AlG) toward toxic HCN has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in terms of energetic, geometric and electronic properties. Optimized configurations corresponding to physisorption and, subsequently, chemisorption of HCN on each surface have been identified. It is found that HCN molecule can be adsorbed on impurity atoms with adsorption energies about −27.20 and −38.75 kcal/mol on the SiG and the AlG, respectively. By comparing to HCN adsorption on SiG, it can be inferred that molecular HCN adsorbed on AlG can induce significant change in AlG conductivity. On the basis of calculated changes in the HOMO/LUMO energy gap it is found that electronic properties of AlG are sensitive toward adsorption of HCN and the reverse is correct for SiG, suggesting that the AlG may be a promising sensor for HCN.

  11. Hypoosmotic cell swelling as a novel mechanism for modulation of cloned HCN2 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Elmedyb, Pernille; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2005-01-01

    This work demonstrates cell swelling as a new regulatory mechanism for the cloned hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2). HCN2 channels were coexpressed with aquaporin1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and currents were monitored using a two-electrode voltage-clamp. HCN2...... channels were activated by hyperpolarization to -100 mV and the currents were measured before and during hypoosmotic cell swelling. Cell swelling increased HCN2 currents by 30% without changing the kinetics of the currents. Injection of 50 nl intracellular solution resulted in a current increase of 20......%, indicating that an increase in cell volume also under isoosmotic conditions may lead to activation of HCN2. In the absence of aquaporin1 only negligible changes in oocyte cell volume occur during exposure to hypoosmotic media and no significant change in HCN2 channel activity was observed during perfusion...

  12. Characterization of solvated electrons in hydrogen cyanide clusters: (HCN)n- (n=3, 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Li, Ying; Li, Zhuo; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the solvated electrons (HCN)n- (n =3, 4) reveal a variety of electron trapping possibilities in the (HCN)n (n =3, 4) clusters. Two isomers for (HCN)3- and four isomers for (HCN)4- are obtained at the MP2/aug -cc-pVDZ+dBF (diffusive bond functions) level of theory. In view of vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) at the CCSD(T) level, the excess electron always "prefers" locating in the center of the system, i.e., the isomer with higher coordination number shows larger VDE value. However, the most stable isomers of the solvated electron state (HCN)3- and (HCN)4- are found to be the linear C∞ν and D∞h structures, respectively, but not the fullyl symmetric structures which have the largest VDE values.

  13. HCN Producing Bacteria Enable Sensing Of Non-Bioavailable Hg Species by the Whole Cell Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, M.; Rijavec, T.; Koron, N.; Lapanje, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria play an important role in Hg transformation reactions. The production of cyanide (HCN) and other secondary metabolites seems to be key elements involved in these transformations. Current hypotheses link the role of HCN production to growth inhibition of nonHCN producing competitor organisms (role of an antimicrobial agent). Our past investigations showed that HCN production did not correlate with antimicrobial activity and since pK value of HCN is very high (pK = 9,21), it can be expected that most of the produced HCN is removed from the microenvironment. This way, the expected inhibitory concentrations can hardly be reached. Accordingly, we proposed a new concept, where the ability of complexation of transient metals by HCN served as a regulation process for the accessibility of micro-elements. In our study, we focused on the presence of HCN producing bacteria and carried it out in the Hg contaminated environment connected to the Idrija Mercury Mine, Slovenia. We characterised the isolates according to the presence of Hg resistance (HgR), level of HCN production and genetic similarities. In laboratory setups, using our merR whole cell based biosensor, we determined the transformation of low bioavailable Hg0 and HgS forms into bioavailable Hg by these HCN producing bacteria. We observed that HgR strains producing HCN had the highest impact on increased Hg bioavailability. In the proposed ecological strategy HgR HCN producing bacteria increase their competitive edge over non-HgR competitors through the increase of Hg toxicity. Due to their activity, Hg is made available to other organisms as well and thus enters into the ecosystem. Finally, using some of the characteristics of bacteria (e.g. Hg resistance genetic elements), we developed a fully automated sensing approach, combining biosensorics and mechatronics, to measure the bioavailability of Hg in situ.

  14. Photochemistry of methane and the formation of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) in the earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to analyze the photochemistries of CH4 and HCN in the primitive terrestrial atmosphere. CH4, N2, and HCN photolysis are examined. The background atmosphere and boundary conditions applied in the analysis are described. The formation of HCN as a by-product of N2 and CH4 photolysis is investigated; the effects of photodissociation and rainfall on HCN is discussed. The low and high CH4 mixing ratios and radical densities are studied.

  15. Plasma density calculation based on the HCN waveform data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liaoyuan; Pan Li; Luo Cuiwen; Zhou Yan; Deng Zhongchao

    2004-01-01

    A method to improve the plasma density calculation is introduced using the base voltage and the phase zero points obtained from the HCN interference waveform data. The method includes making the signal quality higher by putting the signal control device and the analog-to-digit converters in the same location and charging them by the same power, and excluding the noise's effect according to the possible changing rate of the signal's phase, and to make the base voltage more accurate by dynamical data processing. (authors)

  16. Disturbed Processing of Contextual Information in HCN3 Channel Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Marc S.; Fenske, Stefanie; Hammelmann, Verena; Becirovic, Elvir; Schöttle, Verena; Delorme, James E.; Schöll-Weidinger, Martha; Mader, Robert; Deussing, Jan; Wolfer, David P.; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Albrecht, Urs; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wahl-Schott, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs) in the nervous system are implicated in a variety of neuronal functions including learning and memory, regulation of vigilance states and pain. Dysfunctions or genetic loss of these channels have been shown to cause human diseases such as epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The physiological functions of HCN1 and HCN2 channels in the nervous system have been analyzed using genetic knockout mouse models. By contrast, there are no such genetic studies for HCN3 channels so far. Here, we use a HCN3-deficient (HCN3−/−) mouse line, which has been previously generated in our group to examine the expression and function of this channel in the CNS. Specifically, we investigate the role of HCN3 channels for the regulation of circadian rhythm and for the determination of behavior. Contrary to previous suggestions we find that HCN3−/− mice show normal visual, photic, and non-photic circadian function. In addition, HCN3−/− mice are impaired in processing contextual information, which is characterized by attenuated long-term extinction of contextual fear and increased fear to a neutral context upon repeated exposure. PMID:29375299

  17. Disturbed Processing of Contextual Information in HCN3 Channel Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc S. Stieglitz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs in the nervous system are implicated in a variety of neuronal functions including learning and memory, regulation of vigilance states and pain. Dysfunctions or genetic loss of these channels have been shown to cause human diseases such as epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The physiological functions of HCN1 and HCN2 channels in the nervous system have been analyzed using genetic knockout mouse models. By contrast, there are no such genetic studies for HCN3 channels so far. Here, we use a HCN3-deficient (HCN3−/− mouse line, which has been previously generated in our group to examine the expression and function of this channel in the CNS. Specifically, we investigate the role of HCN3 channels for the regulation of circadian rhythm and for the determination of behavior. Contrary to previous suggestions we find that HCN3−/− mice show normal visual, photic, and non-photic circadian function. In addition, HCN3−/− mice are impaired in processing contextual information, which is characterized by attenuated long-term extinction of contextual fear and increased fear to a neutral context upon repeated exposure.

  18. Widespread HCN maser emission in carbon-rich evolved stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Keller, D.; Kamiński, T.

    2018-05-01

    Context. HCN is a major constituent of the circumstellar envelopes of carbon-rich evolved stars, and rotational lines from within its vibrationally excited states probe parts of these regions closest to the stellar surface. A number of such lines are known to show maser action. Historically, in one of them, the 177 GHz J = 2 → 1 line in the l-doubled bending mode has been found to show relatively strong maser action, with results only published for a single object, the archetypical high-mass loss asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRC+10216. Aims: To examine how common 177 GHz HCN maser emission is, we conducted an exploratory survey for this line toward a select sample of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars that are observable from the southern hemisphere. Methods: We used the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment 12 meter submillimeter Telescope (APEX) equipped with a new receiver to simultaneously observe three J = 2 → 1 HCN rotational transitions, the (0, 11c, 0) and (0, 11d, 0) l-doublet components, and the line from the (0,0,0) ground state. Results: The (0, 11c, 0) maser line is detected toward 11 of 13 observed sources, which all show emission in the (0,0,0) transition. In most of the sources, the peak intensity of the (0, 11c, 0) line rivals that of the (0,0,0) line; in two sources, it is even stronger. Except for the object with the highest mass-loss rate, IRC+10216, the (0, 11c, 0) line covers a smaller velocity range than the (0,0,0) line. The (0, 11d, 0) line, which is detected in four of the sources, is much weaker than the other two lines and covers a velocity range that is smaller yet, again except for IRC+10216. Compared to its first detection in 1989, the profile of the (0, 11c, 0) line observed toward IRC+10216 looks very different, and we also appear to see variability in the (0,0,0) line profile (at a much lower degree). Our limited information on temporal variabilitydisfavors a strong correlation of maser and stellar continuum flux

  19. A TENTATIVE IDENTIFICATION OF HCN ICE ON TRITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdorf, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Sekiguchi, T.; Nakamura, R.; Orton, G.; Quirico, E.; Schmitt, B.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra of Triton between 1.8 and 5.5 μm, obtained in 2007 May and 2009 November, have been analyzed to determine the global surface composition. The spectra were acquired with the grism and the prism of the Infrared Camera on board AKARI with spectral resolutions of 135 and 22, respectively. The data from 4 to 5 μm are shown in this Letter and compared to the spectra of N 2 , CO, and CO 2 , i.e., all the known ices on this moon that have distinct bands in this previously unexplored wavelength range. We report the detection of a 4σ absorption band at 4.76 μm (2101 cm -1 ), which we attribute tentatively to the presence of solid HCN. This is the sixth ice to be identified on Triton and an expected component of its surface because it is a precipitating photochemical product of Triton's thin N 2 and CH 4 atmosphere. It is also formed directly by irradiation of mixtures of N 2 and CH 4 ices. Here we consider only pure HCN, although it might be dissolved in N 2 on the surface of Triton because of the evaporation and recondensation of N 2 over its seasonal cycle. The AKARI spectrum of Triton also covers the wavelengths of the fundamental (1-0) band of β-phase N 2 ice (4.296 μm, 2328 cm -1 ), which has never been detected in an astronomical body before, and whose presence is consistent with the overtone (2-0) band previously reported. Fundamental bands of CO and CO 2 ices are also present.

  20. SPATIALLY RESOLVED HCN ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 1052

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada-Satoh, Satoko [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-12 Hoshigaoka-cho, Mizusawa-ku, Oshu, Iwate 023-0861 (Japan); Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Hwang, Ju-Yeon [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Kameno, Seiji, E-mail: satoko.ss@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: sss@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107 Vitacura, Santiago 763 0355 (Chile)

    2016-10-10

    We present the first VLBI detection of HCN molecular absorption in the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 1052. Utilizing the 1 mas resolution achieved by the Korean VLBI Network, we have spatially resolved the HCN absorption against a double-sided nuclear jet structure. Two velocity features of HCN absorption are detected significantly at the radial velocity of 1656 and 1719 km s{sup −1}, redshifted by 149 and 212 km s{sup −1} with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The column density of the HCN molecule is estimated to be 10{sup 15}–10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}, assuming an excitation temperature of 100–230 K. The absorption features show high optical depth localized on the receding jet side, where the free–free absorption occurred due to the circumnuclear torus. The size of the foreground absorbing molecular gas is estimated to be on approximately one-parsec scales, which agrees well with the approximate size of the circumnuclear torus. HCN absorbing gas is likely to be several clumps smaller than 0.1 pc inside the circumnuclear torus. The redshifted velocities of the HCN absorption features imply that HCN absorbing gas traces ongoing infall motion inside the circumnuclear torus onto the central engine.

  1. Targeted deletion of Kcne2 impairs HCN channel function in mouse thalamocortical circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Wang Ying

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels generate the pacemaking current, I(h, which regulates neuronal excitability, burst firing activity, rhythmogenesis, and synaptic integration. The physiological consequence of HCN activation depends on regulation of channel gating by endogenous modulators and stabilization of the channel complex formed by principal and ancillary subunits. KCNE2 is a voltage-gated potassium channel ancillary subunit that also regulates heterologously expressed HCN channels; whether KCNE2 regulates neuronal HCN channel function is unknown.We investigated the effects of Kcne2 gene deletion on I(h properties and excitability in ventrobasal (VB and cortical layer 6 pyramidal neurons using brain slices prepared from Kcne2(+/+ and Kcne2(-/- mice. Kcne2 deletion shifted the voltage-dependence of I(h activation to more hyperpolarized potentials, slowed gating kinetics, and decreased I(h density. Kcne2 deletion was associated with a reduction in whole-brain expression of both HCN1 and HCN2 (but not HCN4, although co-immunoprecipitation from whole-brain lysates failed to detect interaction of KCNE2 with HCN1 or 2. Kcne2 deletion also increased input resistance and temporal summation of subthreshold voltage responses; this increased intrinsic excitability enhanced burst firing in response to 4-aminopyridine. Burst duration increased in corticothalamic, but not thalamocortical, neurons, suggesting enhanced cortical excitatory input to the thalamus; such augmented excitability did not result from changes in glutamate release machinery since miniature EPSC frequency was unaltered in Kcne2(-/- neurons.Loss of KCNE2 leads to downregulation of HCN channel function associated with increased excitability in neurons in the cortico-thalamo-cortical loop. Such findings further our understanding of the normal physiology of brain circuitry critically involved in cognition and have implications for our understanding of

  2. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen cyanide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The...

  3. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen cyanide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The...

  4. A 1D coordination polymer of UF{sub 5} with HCN as a ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, Benjamin; Rudel, Stefan S.; Buchner, Magnus R.; Kraus, Florian [Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Karttunen, Antti J. [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University (Finland)

    2017-01-05

    β-Uranium(V) fluoride was reacted with liquid anhydrous hydrogen cyanide to obtain a 1D coordination polymer with the composition {sup 1}{sub ∞}[UF{sub 5}(HCN){sub 2}], {sup 1}{sub ∞}[UF{sub 4/1}F{sub 2/2}-(HCN){sub 2/1}], revealed by single-crystal X-ray structure determination. The reaction system was furthermore studied by means of vibrational and NMR spectroscopy, as well as by quantum chemical calculations. The compound presents the first described polymeric HCN Lewis adduct and the first HCN adduct of a uranium fluoride. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Distribution and function of HCN channels in the apical dendritic tuft of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Mark T; Magee, Jeffrey C; Williams, Stephen R

    2015-01-21

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351024-14$15.00/0.

  6. De novo mutations in HCN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Caroline; Dalle, Carine; Rastetter, Agnès; Striano, Pasquale; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Nabbout, Rima; Cancès, Claude; Ville, Dorothée; Brilstra, Eva H; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Raffo, Emmanuel; Bouteiller, Delphine; Marie, Yannick; Trouillard, Oriane; Robbiano, Angela; Keren, Boris; Agher, Dahbia; Roze, Emmanuel; Lesage, Suzanne; Nicolas, Aude; Brice, Alexis; Baulac, Michel; Vogt, Cornelia; El Hajj, Nady; Schneider, Eberhard; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Gormley, Padhraig; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Baulac, Stéphanie; Zara, Federico; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Haaf, Thomas; LeGuern, Eric; Depienne, Christel

    2014-06-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels contribute to cationic Ih current in neurons and regulate the excitability of neuronal networks. Studies in rat models have shown that the Hcn1 gene has a key role in epilepsy, but clinical evidence implicating HCN1 mutations in human epilepsy is lacking. We carried out exome sequencing for parent-offspring trios with fever-sensitive, intractable epileptic encephalopathy, leading to the discovery of two de novo missense HCN1 mutations. Screening of follow-up cohorts comprising 157 cases in total identified 4 additional amino acid substitutions. Patch-clamp recordings of Ih currents in cells expressing wild-type or mutant human HCN1 channels showed that the mutations had striking but divergent effects on homomeric channels. Individuals with mutations had clinical features resembling those of Dravet syndrome with progression toward atypical absences, intellectual disability and autistic traits. These findings provide clear evidence that de novo HCN1 point mutations cause a recognizable early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in humans.

  7. Inferior Olive HCN1 Channels Coordinate Synaptic Integration and Complex Spike Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek L.F. Garden

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar climbing-fiber-mediated complex spikes originate from neurons in the inferior olive (IO, are critical for motor coordination, and are central to theories of cerebellar learning. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN channels expressed by IO neurons have been considered as pacemaker currents important for oscillatory and resonant dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that in vitro, network actions of HCN1 channels enable bidirectional glutamatergic synaptic responses, while local actions of HCN1 channels determine the timing and waveform of synaptically driven action potentials. These roles are distinct from, and may complement, proposed pacemaker functions of HCN channels. We find that in behaving animals HCN1 channels reduce variability in the timing of cerebellar complex spikes, which serve as a readout of IO spiking. Our results suggest that spatially distributed actions of HCN1 channels enable the IO to implement network-wide rules for synaptic integration that modulate the timing of cerebellar climbing fiber signals.

  8. WARM HCN IN THE PLANET FORMATION ZONE OF GV TAU N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, Asuncion [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (OAN,IGN), Apdo 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Cernicharo, Jose; Agundez, Marcelino, E-mail: a.fuente@oan.es [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Laboratory of Molecular Astrophysics, Ctra. Ajalvir km. 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz (Spain)

    2012-07-20

    The Plateau de Bure Interferometer has been used to map the continuum emission at 3.4 mm and 1.1 mm together with the J = 1{yields}0 and J = 3{yields}2 lines of HCN and HCO{sup +} toward the binary star GV Tau. The 3.4 mm observations did not resolve the binary components, and the HCN J = 1{yields}0 and HCO{sup +} J 1{yields}0 line emissions trace the circumbinary disk and the flattened envelope. However, the 1.1 mm observations resolved the individual disks of GV Tau N and GV Tau S and allowed us to study their chemistry. We detected the HCN 3{yields}2 line only toward the individual disk of GV Tau N, and the emission of the HCO{sup +} 3{yields}2 line toward GV Tau S. Simple calculations indicate that the 3{yields}2 line of HCN is formed in the inner R < 12 AU of the disk around GV Tau N where the HCN/HCO{sup +} abundance ratio is >300. On the contrary, this ratio is <1.6 in the disk around GV Tau S. The high HCN abundance measured in GV Tau N is well explained by photochemical processes in the warm (>400 K) and dense (n > 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}) disk surface.

  9. Genetic variation in Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and its relationship with neuroticism, cognition and risk of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Mcintosh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are encoded by four genes (HCN1-4 and, through activation by cyclic AMP (cAMP, represent a point of convergence for several psychosis risk genes. On the basis of positive preliminary data, we sought to test whether genetic variation in HCN1-4 conferred risk of depression or cognitive impairment in the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study. HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 were genotyped for 43 haplotype-tagging SNPs and tested for association with DSM-IV depression, neuroticism and a battery of cognitive tests assessing cognitive ability, memory, verbal fluency and psychomotor performance. No association was found between any HCN channel gene SNP and risk of depression, neuroticism or on any cognitive measure. The current study does not support a genetic role for HCN channels in conferring risk of depression or cognitive impairment in human subjects within the Scottish population.

  10. Contribution of presynaptic HCN channels to excitatory inputs of spinal substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S-C; Wu, J; Zhang, D-Y; Jiang, C-Y; Xie, C-N; Liu, T

    2017-09-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pathological pain-associated voltage-gated ion channels. They are widely expressed in central nervous system including spinal lamina II (also named the substantia gelatinosa, SG). Here, we examined the distribution of HCN channels in glutamatergic synaptic terminals as well as their role in the modulation of synaptic transmission in SG neurons from SD rats and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67)-GFP mice. We found that the expression of the HCN channel isoforms was varied in SG. The HCN4 isoform showed the highest level of co-localization with VGLUT2 (23±3%). In 53% (n=21/40 neurons) of the SG neurons examined in SD rats, application of HCN channel blocker, ZD7288 (10μM), decreased the frequency of spontaneous (s) and miniature (m) excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by 37±4% and 33±4%, respectively. Consistently, forskolin (FSK) (an activator of adenylate cyclase) significantly increased the frequency of mEPSCs by 225±34%, which could be partially inhibited by ZD7288. Interestingly, the effects of ZD7288 and FSK on sEPSC frequency were replicated in non-GFP-expressing neurons, but not in GFP-expressing GABAergic SG neurons, in GAD67-GFP transgenic C57/BL6 mice. In summary, our results represent a previously unknown cellular mechanism by which presynaptic HCN channels, especially HCN4, regulate the glutamate release from presynaptic terminals that target excitatory, but not inhibitory SG interneurons. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rotational excitation of HCN by para- and ortho-H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, Mario Hernández, E-mail: marhvera@gmail.com [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76 063 Le Havre cedex (France); InSTEC, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza, La Habana 10600 (Cuba); Kalugina, Yulia [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76 063 Le Havre cedex (France); Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin av., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel [Université de Bordeaux, ISM, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Matanzas, Matanzas 40100 (Cuba); Stoecklin, Thierry [Université de Bordeaux, ISM, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Lique, François, E-mail: francois.lique@univ-lehavre.fr [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76 063 Le Havre cedex (France)

    2014-06-14

    Rotational excitation of the hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecule by collisions with para-H{sub 2}( j = 0, 2) and ortho-H{sub 2}( j = 1) is investigated at low temperatures using a quantum time independent approach. Both molecules are treated as rigid rotors. The scattering calculations are based on a highly correlated ab initio 4-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface recently published. Rotationally inelastic cross sections among the 13 first rotational levels of HCN were obtained using a pure quantum close coupling approach for total energies up to 1200 cm{sup −1}. The corresponding thermal rate coefficients were computed for temperatures ranging from 5 to 100 K. The HCN rate coefficients are strongly dependent on the rotational level of the H{sub 2} molecule. In particular, the rate coefficients for collisions with para-H{sub 2}( j = 0) are significantly lower than those for collisions with ortho-H{sub 2}( j = 1) and para-H{sub 2}( j = 2). Propensity rules in favor of even Δj transitions were found for HCN in collisions with para-H{sub 2}( j = 0) whereas propensity rules in favor of odd Δj transitions were found for HCN in collisions with H{sub 2}( j ⩾ 1). The new rate coefficients were compared with previously published HCN-para-H{sub 2}( j = 0) rate coefficients. Significant differences were found due the inclusion of the H{sub 2} rotational structure in the scattering calculations. These new rate coefficients will be crucial to improve the estimation of the HCN abundance in the interstellar medium.

  12. Development of a high power HCN waveguide laser for plasma diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongchao; Zhou Yan; Tang Yiwu; Yi Jiang; Gao Bingyi; Tian Chongli

    2007-06-01

    Both design and development of a high power cw HCN waveguide laser is described for multichannel FIR laser interferometer on the HL-2A divertor tokamak. The geometry parameters of stracture of the HCN laser are calculated according to scaling laws for cw 337 μm HCN waveguide laser offered by P. Belland et al. The designed value of output power of the laser that is more than 400 mW with discharge length of 5.6 m and 6.3 cm inner diameter of tube have been chosen in case of external loss of the cavity of 2%. At the same time, in order to get a laser system of stable output both of configuration and operating condition is discussed. In developed laser a hot LaB 6 cathode is employed to en- sure a stable discharge, the cavity mirrors are spaced using four invar rod of φ25 mm in diameter and an structure of adjusting machine for axially movable flat mirror in cavity has been also designed, and that it can be taken down many times without badly destroying alignment of the cavity etc.. A suit of pipes sys- tem of cw HCN laser is schemed out so that some experiments of operating parameter optimization can be done. The results of primary test of operating waveguide HCN laser are briefly showed. (authors)

  13. Restricted primitive model for electrical double layers: modified HNC theory of density profiles and Monte Carlo study of differential capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1986-02-01

    Interfacial properties of an ionic fluid next to a uniformly charged planar wall are studied in the restricted primitive model by both theoretical and Monte Carlo methods. The system is a 1:1 fluid of equisized charged hard spheres in a state appropriate to 1M aqueous electrolyte solutions. The interfacial density profiles of counterions and coions are evaluated by extending the hypernetted chain approximation (HNC) to include the leading bridge diagrams for the wall-ion correlations. The theoretical results compare well with those of grand canonical Monte Carlo computations of Torrie and Valleau over the whole range of surface charge density considered by these authors, thus resolving the earlier disagreement between statistical mechanical theories and simulation data at large charge densities. In view of the importance of the model as a testing ground for theories of the diffuse layer, the Monte Carlo calculations are tested by considering alternative choices for the basic simulation cell and are extended so as to allow an evaluation of the differential capacitance of the model interface by two independent methods. These involve numerical differentiation of the mean potential drop as a function of the surface charge density or alternatively an appropriate use of a fluctuation theory formula for the capacitance. The results of these two Monte Carlo approaches consistently indicate an initially smooth increase of the diffuse layer capacitance followed by structure at large charge densities, this behaviour being connected with layering of counterions as already revealed in the density profiles reported by Torrie and Valleau. (author)

  14. ORIGINS OF SCATTER IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HCN 1-0 AND DENSE GAS MASS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Elisabeth A. C. [San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Battersby, Cara, E-mail: elisabeth.mills@sjsu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We investigate the correlation of HCN 1-0 with gas mass in the central 300 pc of the Galaxy. We find that on the ∼10 pc size scale of individual cloud cores, HCN 1-0 is well correlated with dense gas mass when plotted as a log–log relationship. There is ∼0.75 dex of scatter in this relationship from clouds like Sgr B2, which has an integrated HCN 1-0 intensity of a cloud less than half its mass, and others that have HCN 1-0 enhanced by a factor of 2–3 relative to clouds of comparable mass. We identify the two primary sources of scatter to be self-absorption and variations in HCN abundance. We also find that the extended HCN 1-0 emission is more intense per unit mass than in individual cloud cores. In fact the majority (80%) of HCN 1-0 emission comes from extended gas with column densities below 7 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −2}, accounting for 68% of the total mass. We find variations in the brightness of HCN 1-0 would only yield a ∼10% error in the dense gas mass inferred from this line in the Galactic center. However, the observed order of magnitude HCN abundance variations, and the systematic nature of these variations, warn of potential biases in the use of HCN as dense gas mass tracer in more extreme environments such as an active galactic nucleus and shock-dominated regions. We also investigate other 3 mm tracers, finding that HNCO is better correlated with mass than HCN, and might be a better tracer of cloud mass in this environment.

  15. Ab initio study of low-energy electrons interacting with HCN molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.; Norcross, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Our earlier study of low-energy electron scattering with HCN molecules is further improved by treating exchange exactly (in a separable exchange approximation 2 ) in Σ, π and Δ symmetries: the 3.8 eV π resonance is shifted towards lower energy (2.56 eV, the experimental position is around 2.26 eV 3 ), while in Σ and the Δ symmetries the difference is within 15%. We also study possible negative ion states of HCN by calculating potential energy curves with respect to C-H and C-N stretches. For example, there is evidence of an avoiding crossing between a 1Σ + and a 2Σ + state (C-H stretch) of HCN -

  16. HCN Production via Impact Ejecta Reentry During the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkos, Devon; Pikus, Aaron; Alexeenko, Alina; Melosh, H. Jay

    2018-04-01

    Major impact events have shaped the Earth as we know it. The Late Heavy Bombardment is of particular interest because it immediately precedes the first evidence of life. The reentry of impact ejecta creates numerous chemical by-products, including biotic precursors such as HCN. This work examines the production of HCN during the Late Heavy Bombardment in more detail. We stochastically simulate the range of impacts on the early Earth and use models developed from existing studies to predict the corresponding ejecta properties. Using multiphase flow methods and finite-rate equilibrium chemistry, we then find the HCN production due to the resulting atmospheric heating. We use Direct Simulation Monte Carlo to develop a correction factor to account for increased yields due to thermochemical nonequilibrium. We then model 1-D atmospheric turbulent diffusion to find the time accurate transport of HCN to lower altitudes and ultimately surface water. Existing works estimate the necessary HCN molarity threshold to promote polymerization that is 0.01 M. For a mixing depth of 100 m, we find that the Late Heavy Bombardment will produce at least one impact event above this threshold with probability 24.1% for an oxidized atmosphere and 56.3% for a partially reduced atmosphere. For a mixing depth of 10 m, the probability is 79.5% for an oxidized atmosphere and 96.9% for a partially reduced atmosphere. Therefore, Late Heavy Bombardment impact ejecta is likely an HCN source sufficient for polymerization in shallow bodies of water, particularly if the atmosphere were in a partially reduced state.

  17. Experimental conditions affecting the kinetics of aqueous HCN polymerization as revealed by UV-vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Yaseli, Margarita R; Moreno, Miguel; de la Fuente, José L; Briones, Carlos; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta

    2018-02-15

    HCN polymerization is one of the most important and fascinating reactions in prebiotic chemistry, and interest in HCN polymers in the field of materials science is growing. However, little is known about the kinetics of the HCN polymerization process. In the present study, a first approach to the kinetics of two sets of aqueous HCN polymerizations, from NH 4 CN and NaCN, at middle temperatures between 4 and 38°C, has been carried out. For each series, the presence of air and salts in the reaction medium has been systematically explored. A previous kinetic analysis was conducted during the conversion of the insoluble black HCN polymers obtained as gel fractions in these precipitation polymerizations for a reaction of one month, where a limit conversion was achieved at the highest polymerization temperature. The kinetic description of the gravimetric data for this complex system shows a clear change in the linear dependence with the polymerization temperature for the reaction from NH 4 CN, besides a relevant catalytic effect of ammonium, in comparison with those data obtained from the NaCN series. These results also demonstrated the notable influence of air, oxygen, and the saline medium in HCN polymer formation. Similar conclusions were reached when the sol fractions were monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy, and a Hill type correlation was used to describe the polymerization profiles obtained. This technique was chosen because it provides an easy, prompt and fast method to follow the evolution of the liquid or continuous phase of the process under study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optical emissions from the dissociative recombination of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, HOC{sup +}, and HNC{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, R [Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Golde, M F [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Rosati, R E [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St. MS-50 Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Pappas, D [Army Research Laboratory, 4600 Deer Creek Loop, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Skrzypkowski, M P, E-mail: rj@pitt.ed [Prometheus Energy Company, 3311 S. 120th Place Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98168 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    We present recent flowing-afterglow measurements of branching fractions for electronically and vibrationally excited products arising from the dissociative recombination of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, HOC{sup +}, and HNC{sup +} ions with thermal electrons. State-specific yields were derived by fitting the observed, spatially resolved emission band intensities to models that simulate all ion-chemical processes, recombination, diffusion, and gas mixing.

  19. The excitation of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the galactic center circumnuclear disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf Dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Morris, M. R., E-mail: millsb@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We present new observations of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the circumnuclear disk (CND) of the Galaxy, which we obtained with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. We mapped emission in rotational lines of HCN J = 3-2, 4-3, and 8-7, as well as of HCO{sup +} J = 3-2, 4-3, and 9-8. We also present spectra of H{sup 13}CN J = 3-2 and 4-3 as well as H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 3-2 and 4-3 toward four positions in the CND. Using the intensities of all of these lines, we present an excitation analysis for each molecule using the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADEX. The HCN line intensities toward the northern emission peak of the CND yield log densities (cm{sup –3}) of 5.6{sub −0.6}{sup +0.6}, consistent with those measured with HCO{sup +} as well as with densities recently reported for this region from an excitation analysis of highly excited lines of CO. These densities are too low for the gas to be tidally stable. The HCN line intensities toward the CND's southern emission peak yield log densities of 6.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.5}, higher than densities determined for this part of the CND with CO (although the densities measured with HCO{sup +}, log [n] = 5.6{sub −0.2}{sup +0.2}, are more consistent with the CO-derived densities). We investigate whether the higher densities we infer from HCN are affected by midinfrared radiative excitation of this molecule through its 14 μm rovibrational transitions. We find that radiative excitation is important for at least one clump in the CND, where we additionally detect the J = 4-3, v {sub 2} = 1 vibrationally excited transition of HCN, which is excited by dust temperatures of ≳125-150 K. If this hot dust is present elsewhere in the CND, it could lower our inferred densities, potentially bringing the HCN-derived densities for the southern part of the CND into agreement with those measured using HCO{sup +} and CO. Additional sensitive, high-resolution submillimeter observations, as well as midinfrared observations, would be

  20. Long-lasting spatial learning and memory impairments caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion associate with a dynamic change of HCN1/HCN2 expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pan; Lu, Yun; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes learning and memory impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the mechanisms underlying the disease process remained unclear particularly in a temporal manner. We performed permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. To determine whether hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are altered at different stages of cognitive impairment caused by CCH, adult male SD rats were randomly distributed into sham-operated 4, 8 and 12weeks group, 2VO 4, 8 and 12weeks group. Learning and memory performance were evaluated with Morris water maze (MWM) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Expression of NeuN, HCN1 and HCN2 in hippocampal CA1, DG and CA3 areas was quantified by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Our data showed that CCH induced a remarkable spatial learning and memory deficits in rats of 2VO 4, 8, and 12weeks group although neuronal loss only occurred after 4weeks of 2VO surgery in CA1. In addition, a significant reduction of HCN1 surface expression in CA1 was observed in the group that suffered 4weeks ischemia but neither 8 nor 12weeks. However, HCN2 surface expression in CA1 increased throughout the ischemia time-scales (4, 8 and 12w). Our findings indicate spatial learning and memory deficits in the CCH model are associated with disturbed HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression in hippocampal CA1. The altered patterns of both HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression may be implicated in the early stage (4w) of spatial learning and memory impairments; and the stable and long-lasting impairments of spatial learning and memory may partially attribute to the up-regulated HCN2 surface expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An N-Terminal ER Export Signal Facilitates the Plasma Membrane Targeting of HCN1 Channels in Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan; Laird, Joseph G; Yamaguchi, David M; Baker, Sheila A

    2015-06-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 1 (HCN1) channels are widely expressed in the retina. In photoreceptors, the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) carried by HCN1 is important for shaping the light response. It has been shown in multiple systems that trafficking HCN1 channels to specific compartments is key to their function. The localization of HCN1 in photoreceptors is concentrated in the plasma membrane of the inner segment (IS). The mechanisms controlling this localization are not understood. We previously identified a di-arginine endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif that negatively regulates the surface targeting of HCN1. In this study, we sought to identify a forward trafficking signal that could counter the function of the ER retention signal. We studied trafficking of HCN1 and several mutants by imaging their subcellular localization in transgenic X. laevis photoreceptors. Velocity sedimentation was used to assay the assembly state of HCN1 channels. We found the HCN1 N-terminus can redirect a membrane reporter from outer segments (OS) to the plasma membrane of the IS. The sequence necessary for this behavior was mapped to a 20 amino acid region containing a leucine-based ER export motif. The ER export signal is necessary for forward trafficking but not channel oligomerization. Moreover, this ER export signal alone counteracted the di-arginine ER retention signal. We identified an ER export signal in HCN1 that functions with the ER retention signal to maintain equilibrium of HCN1 between the endomembrane system and the plasma membrane.

  2. First-principles insights into interaction of CO, NO, and HCN with Ag{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torbatian, Zahra; Hashemifar, S. Javad, E-mail: hashemifar@cc.iut.ac.ir; Akbarzadeh, Hadi [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-28

    We use static as well as time-dependent first-principles computations to study interaction of the CO, NO, and HCN molecules with the Ag{sub 8} nanocluster. The many-body based GW correction is applied for accurate description of the highest occupied (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied (LUMO) molecular orbital levels. It is argued that the adsorption of these molecules changes the stable structure of Ag{sub 8} from Td to the more chemically active D{sub 2d} symmetry. We discuss that the CO, NO, and HCN molecules prefer to adsorb on the atom of the cluster with significant contribution to both HOMO and LUMO, for the accomplishment of the required charge transfers in the systems. The charge back donation is found to leave an excess energy of about 110 meV on the NO molecular bond, evidencing potential application of silver clusters for NO reduction. It is argued that CO and specially NO exhibit strong physical interaction with the silver cluster and hence significantly modify the electronic and optical properties of the system, while HCN makes very week physical bonds with the cluster. The optical absorption spectra of the Ag{sub 8} cluster before and after molecule adsorption are computed and a nontrivial red shift is observed in the NO and HCN adsorbed clusters.

  3. The HCN-Water Ratio in the Planet Formation Region of Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najita, J.; Carr, J.; Pontoppidan, K.; Salyk, C.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Blake, G.

    2013-01-01

    We find a trend between the mid-infrared HCN/H$_{2}$O flux ratio and submillimeter disk mass among T Tauri stars in Taurus. While it may seem puzzling that the molecular emission properties of the inner disk ({lt}few AU) are related to the properties of the outer disk (beyond ~{}20 AU) probed by the

  4. WARM HCN IN THE PLANET FORMATION ZONE OF GV TAU N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, Asunción; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    The Plateau de Bure Interferometer has been used to map the continuum emission at 3.4 mm and 1.1 mm together with the J = 1→0 and J = 3→2 lines of HCN and HCO + toward the binary star GV Tau. The 3.4 mm observations did not resolve the binary components, and the HCN J = 1→0 and HCO + J 1→0 line emissions trace the circumbinary disk and the flattened envelope. However, the 1.1 mm observations resolved the individual disks of GV Tau N and GV Tau S and allowed us to study their chemistry. We detected the HCN 3→2 line only toward the individual disk of GV Tau N, and the emission of the HCO + 3→2 line toward GV Tau S. Simple calculations indicate that the 3→2 line of HCN is formed in the inner R + abundance ratio is >300. On the contrary, this ratio is 400 K) and dense (n > 10 7 cm –3 ) disk surface.

  5. Modulation of thalamocortical oscillations by TRIP8b, an auxiliary subunit for HCN channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeiri, M.; Chaudhary, R.; Datunashvili, M.; Heuermann, R.J.; Lüttjohann, A.; Narayanan, V.; Balfanz, S.; Meuth, P.; Chetkovich, D.M.; Pape, H.C.; Baumann, A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budde, T.

    2018-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels have important functions in controlling neuronal excitability and generating rhythmic oscillatory activity. The role of tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) in regulation of

  6. Millimeterwave spectroscopy of active laser plasmas; the excited vibrational states of HCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lucia, F.C.; Helminger, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter microwave techniques have been used for the spectroscopic study of an HCN laser plasma. Forty-seven rotational transitions in 12 excited vibrational states have been observed. Numerous rotational, vibrational, and perturbation parameters have been calculated from these data. A discussion of experimental techniques is included

  7. Probing highly obscured, self-absorbed galaxy nuclei with vibrationally excited HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, S.; Martín, S.; Costagliola, F.; González-Alfonso, E.; Muller, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Fuller, G. A.; García-Burillo, S.; van der Werf, P.; Neri, R.; Spaans, M.; Combes, F.; Viti, S.; Mühle, S.; Armus, L.; Evans, A.; Sturm, E.; Cernicharo, J.; Henkel, C.; Greve, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution (0.̋4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS 17208-0014, Arp220, IC 860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited (ν2 = 1) J = 3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r 5 × 1013 L⊙ kpc-2. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, ν2 = 1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 μm mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses, and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H2 column densities exceed 1024 cm-2. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, we show strong evidence that the ground vibrational state (ν = 0), J = 3-2and 4-3 rotational lines of HCN and HCO+ fail to probe the highly enshrouded, compact nuclear regions owing to strong self- and continuum absorption. The HCN and HCO+ line profiles are double-peaked because of the absorption and show evidence of non-circular motions - possibly in the form of in- or outflows. Detections of vibrationally excited HCN in external galaxies are so far limited to ULIRGs and early-type spiral LIRGs, and we discuss possible causes for this. We tentatively suggest that the peak of vibrationally excited HCN emission is connected to a rapid stage of nuclear growth, before the phase of strong feedback. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure and ALMA Interferometers. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA

  8. Structural Insight into the Gene Expression Profiling of the hcn Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nilkanta; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen. It generally attacks immunosuppressed patients like AIDS, cancer, cystic fibrosis, etc. The virulence of P. aeruginosa is mediated by various virulence factors. One of such potential virulence factors is HCN synthesized by HCN synthase enzyme, which is encoded by the hcnABC operon. The expressions of the genes of this operon are regulated by three transcriptional regulators, viz., LasR, ANR, and RhlR. In our previous work, we analyzed the molecular details of the functionalities of LasR. In this work, we focused on ANR. ANR is a regulatory protein which belongs to the FNR family and works in anaerobic condition. ANR binds to the promoter DNA, named ANR box, as a dimer. The dimerization of this ANR protein is regulated by Fe 4 S 4 , an iron-sulfur cluster. This dimer of ANR (ANR-Fe 4 S 4 /ANR-Fe 4 S 4 ) recognizes and binds the promoter DNA sequence and regulates the transcription of this hcnABC operon. Till date, the biomolecular details of the interactions of ANR dimer with the promoter DNA are not fully understood. Thus, we built the molecular model of ANR-Fe 4 S 4 /ANR-Fe 4 S 4 . We docked the complex with the corresponding promoter DNA region. We analyzed the mode of interactions with the promoter DNA under different conditions. Thus, we tried to analyze the functionality of the ANR protein during the expressions of the genes of the hcnABC operon. So far, this is the first report to detail the molecular mechanism of the gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

  9. SU-E-T-198: Hippocampal-Sparing Radiotherapy (HSRT) for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, A; Welsh, L; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Bhide, S; Newbold, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that decline in cognitive function following brain radiotherapy (RT) is related to the radiation dose delivered to the hippocampi. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using IMRT to generate HSRT plans in HNC. Methods: A planning study was undertaken for ten representative patients with HNC previously treated with radical (chemo)-RT using standard IMRT techniques. The hippocampi were delineated according to the RTOG hippocampal contouring atlas, on a T1w- MRI scan that was registered with the RT planning CT. LINAC-based, clinically acceptable, HSRT plans were generated and assessed using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. Results: Using a VMAT technique, a reduction in hippocampal dose was achievable in six cases. For these cases, the EQD2-D40% of the bilateral hippocampi was significantly reduced by HSRT (p = 0.006) from a median of 18.8Gy (range 14.4–34.6) to 6.5 Gy (4.2–9.5) for the delivered and HSRT plans respectively. Plans were also generated using a fixed-field IMRT technique with non-coplanar beams that were designed to avoid the bilateral hippocampi, resulting in a median EQD2-D40% of 11.2Gy (8.0–14.5). Both HSRT techniques also resulted in lower doses to the whole brain, brain stem, and cerebellum. The HSRT plans resulted in higher doses to some regions of non-contoured normaltissue, but the magnitude of these dose differences is unlikely to be of clinical significance in terms of acute and late toxicity. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible, in many cases, to adapt treatment plans for HNC to significantly reduce dose to the hippocampi. This reduction in dose would be predicted to Resultin a significant reduction in the probability of subsequent decline in cognitive function following RT. Our results point towards the need for the collection of prospective data on cognitive outcomes for the HNC patient population treated with radical (chemo)-RT

  10. SU-E-T-198: Hippocampal-Sparing Radiotherapy (HSRT) for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, A; Welsh, L; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Bhide, S; Newbold, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that decline in cognitive function following brain radiotherapy (RT) is related to the radiation dose delivered to the hippocampi. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using IMRT to generate HSRT plans in HNC. Methods: A planning study was undertaken for ten representative patients with HNC previously treated with radical (chemo)-RT using standard IMRT techniques. The hippocampi were delineated according to the RTOG hippocampal contouring atlas, on a T1w- MRI scan that was registered with the RT planning CT. LINAC-based, clinically acceptable, HSRT plans were generated and assessed using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. Results: Using a VMAT technique, a reduction in hippocampal dose was achievable in six cases. For these cases, the EQD2-D40% of the bilateral hippocampi was significantly reduced by HSRT (p = 0.006) from a median of 18.8Gy (range 14.4–34.6) to 6.5 Gy (4.2–9.5) for the delivered and HSRT plans respectively. Plans were also generated using a fixed-field IMRT technique with non-coplanar beams that were designed to avoid the bilateral hippocampi, resulting in a median EQD2-D40% of 11.2Gy (8.0–14.5). Both HSRT techniques also resulted in lower doses to the whole brain, brain stem, and cerebellum. The HSRT plans resulted in higher doses to some regions of non-contoured normaltissue, but the magnitude of these dose differences is unlikely to be of clinical significance in terms of acute and late toxicity. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible, in many cases, to adapt treatment plans for HNC to significantly reduce dose to the hippocampi. This reduction in dose would be predicted to Resultin a significant reduction in the probability of subsequent decline in cognitive function following RT. Our results point towards the need for the collection of prospective data on cognitive outcomes for the HNC patient population treated with radical (chemo)-RT.

  11. HCN(1-0) enhancement in the bar of NGC 2903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, S.; Jeyakumar, S.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Lee, S. W.; Ocaña Flaquer, B.

    2008-12-01

    We have mapped the HCN(1-0) emission from two spiral galaxies, NGC 2903 and NGC 3504 to study the gas properties in the bars. The HCN(1-0) emission is detected in the center and along the bar of NGC 2903. The line ratio HCN(1-0)/ 12CO(1-0) ranges from 0.07 to 0.12 with the lowest value in the center. The enhancement of HCN(1-0) emission along the bar indicates a higher fraction of dense molecular gas in the bar than at the center. The mass of dense molecular gas in the center (2.2 × 107 M⊙) is about 6 times lower than that in the bar (1.2 × 108 M⊙). The total star formation rate (SFR) is estimated to be 1.4 M⊙ yr-1, where the SFR at the center is 1.9 times higher than that in the bar. The time scale of consumption of the dense molecular gas in the center is about ~ 3 × 107 yr which is much shorter than that in the bar of about 2 to 10 × 108 yr. The dynamical time scale of inflow of the gas from the bar to the center is shorter than the consumption time scale in the bar, which suggests that the star formation (SF) activity at the center is not deprived of fuel. In the bar, the fraction of dense molecular gas mass relative to the total molecular gas mass is twice as high along the leading edge than along the central axis of the bar. The HCN(1-0) emission has a large velocity dispersion in the bar, which can be attributed partially to the streaming motions indicative of shocks along the bar. In NGC 3504, the HCN(1-0) emission is detected only at the center. The fraction of dense molecular gas mass in the center is about 15%. Comparison of the SFR with the predictions from numerical simulations suggest that NGC 2903 harbors a young type B bar with a strong inflow of gas toward the center whereas NGC 3504 has an older bar and has already passed the phase of inflow of gas toward the center.

  12. A search for the millimetre lines of HCN in Comets Wilson 1987 VII and Machholz 1988 XV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouvisier, J.; Despois, D.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Gerard, E.; Paubert, G.; Johansson, L. E. B.; Ekelund, L.; Winnberg, A.; Ge, W.; Irvine, W. M.; Kinzel, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1990-08-01

    The J(1-0) lines of HCN at 89 GHz were searched for in Comet Wilson 1987 VII, with the FCRAO, the SEST and the IRAM radio telescopes between February and June 1987. There was no firm detection, but significant upper limits were obtained, which put severe constraints on the HCN production rate in that comet. A direct comparison with the observations of P/Halley suggests that the HCN abundance relative to water might be smaller in Comet Wilson by at least a factor of two. The J(1-0) and J(3-2) lines of HCN at 89 and 266 GHz were searched for in Comet Machholz 1988 XV when it was close to perihelion at 0.17 AU from the sun. There was no detection. At that moment, the comet was probably no longer active.

  13. Effect of Non-specific HCN1 Blocker CsCl on Spatial Learning and Memory in Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xin; GUO Lianjun; YIN Guangfu; ZONG Xiangang; AI Yongxun

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that HCN1 is primarily expressed in hippocampus, however little is known about its effects on spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we investigated the effects of non-specific HCN1 blocker CsCl on spatial learning and memory by using Morris water maze and in situ hybridization in mice. The results showed CsCl 160 mg/kg ip for 4 days, and the mean escape latency was 34 s longer than that of normal control (P<0.01). In hippocampal tissues, staining for the HCN1 mRNA was stronger in the DG and CA1 region of the hippocampus (P <0.05, P<0.05, when CsCl-administration group was compared with normal group). Our results suggested that CsCl could significantly affect the spatial learning and memory in mice, and HCN channel is involved in the process of learning and memory.

  14. Substitutional HCN- molecular ions in KCN crystal: a paramagnetic probe in a ferroelastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weid, J.P. von der; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Ribeiro, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The HCN - molecular ion was produced in single crystals of KCN: 10 -2 OH - irradiated by UV light at 77 K. The spin Hamiltonian parameters were measured at 60 K and the temperature dependence of the spectrum was investigated between 60 K and 170 K. This temperature dependence is explained by the rapid motion of the molecule with the increasing temperature and the elastic interaction of the molecule with the surrounding ions. Using the similarity between the paramagnetic HCN - molecule and the CN - ions of the host lattice a qualitative picture of the local phenomena occuring in the ferroelastic phase of KCN could be made and the energy of the elastic interaction between CN - was estimated of the order of 7 meV [pt

  15. Detection of HCN and C2H2 in ISO Spectra of Oxygen-Rich AGB Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Chiar, Jean; Goorvitch, David; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cool oxygen-rich AGB stars were not expected to have organic molecules like HCN in either their photospheres or circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). The discovery of HCN and CS microwave emission from the shallowest CSE layers of these stars was a considerable surprise and much theoretical effort has been expended in explaining the presence of such organics. To further explore this problem, we have undertaken a systematic search of oxygen-rich AGB stellar spectra in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data archive. Our purposes are to find evidence regarding critical molecular species that could be of value in choosing among the proposed theoretical models, to locate spectral features which might give clues to conditions deeper in the CSEs, and to lay the groundwork for future SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) observations. Using carefully reduced observations, we have detected weak absorption features arising from HCN and possibly C2H2 in a small number of oxygen-rich AGB stars. The most compelling case is NML Cyg which shows both HCN (14 microns) and CO2 (15 microns). VY CMa, a similar star, shows evidence for HCN, but not CO2. Two S-type stars show evidence for the C-H bending transitions: W Aql at 14 microns (HCN) and both W Aql and S Cas at 13.7 microns (C2H2). Both W Aql and S Cas as well as S Lyr, a SC-type star, show 3 micron absorption which may arise from the C-H stretch of HCN and C2H2. In the case of NML Cyg, we show that the HCN and CO2 spectral features are formed in the CSE at temperatures well above those of the outermost CSE layers and derive approximate column densities. In the case of the S-stars, we discuss the evidence for the organic features and their photospheric origin.

  16. Chemical evolution. XXI - The amino acids released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Major amino acids released by hydrolysis of acidic and basic HCN oligomers are identified by chromatography as Gly, Asp, and diaminosuccinic acid. Smaller amounts of Ala, Ile and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid are also detected. The amino acids released did not change appreciably when the hydrolysis medium was changed from neutral to acidic or basic. The presence of both meso and d, l-diaminosuccinic acids was established by paper chromatography and on an amino acid analyzer.

  17. Investigating the Spatial Structure of HCN Emission in Comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Shawn; Burkhardt, Andrew; Corby, Joanna; Dollhopf, Niklaus; Rawlings, Mark; Remijan, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Comets are of particular interest in the field of Astrochemistry as they can be used as a direct probe of formation chemistry of the Solar System. Originating in the Oort Cloud reservoir, these long period objects experience relatively limited solar influence. The majority of cometary material (water, methane and ammonia ices) has remained in the same state as when it formed. These ices are precursors to more complex molecules which have been shown to form amino acids that are crucial for the development of life. HCN, or hydrogen cyanide, is of particular interest because it can form the nucleobase adenine (C5H5N5). The goals of this project are to map the HCN distribution of Comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and to show the simultaneous observation capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), which allows the extraction of 7-m array, 12-m array and single dish observation data. On UT 2013 May 11, Comet Lemmon was observed using ALMA. The Cycle 1 configuration was used with the Band 6 receivers, with a 1.5 GHz range centered on the HCN transition at 265.86 GHz, which gave a spectral resolution of 0.07 km/s. We show that Comet Lemmon has both a compact HCN region (found with the 12-m array) and also an extended component, forming a tail-like structure in the anti-motion direction (found with the 7-m array). We were also able to extract the autocorrelation data (single dish) and show that it is viable. This project was supported and funded by NRAO in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF), with special thanks to the Astronomy Department at University of Virginia.

  18. Lamellar γ-AlOOH architectures: Synthesis and application for the removal of HCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Hongwei; Zhu You; Tang Gangling; Hu Qingyuan

    2012-01-01

    Using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a structure-directing agent and precipitator, the complete synthesis of lamellar γ-AlOOH architectures was successfully accomplished via a hydrothermal route. Different product structures were obtained by varying the molar ratio of aluminum nitrate and CTAB. Several techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry thermal analysis, were used to characterize the products. The effects of CTAB concentration, reaction temperature and time, and the molar ratio of Al 3+ /CTAB on the product morphologies were investigated. The nitrogen adsorption and desorption measurements indicated that the γ-AlOOH architectures possess a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area of approximately 75.02 m 2 /g. It was also demonstrated that 10 mg γ-AlOOH architectures can remove 45.3% of the HCN (1.68 μg/mL) from model wastewater. When 0.03 mg/cig γ-AlOOH architectures were combined with cigarette paper, 8.12% of the present HCN was adsorbed. These results indicate that lamellar γ-AlOOH architectures may be a potential adsorbent for removing HCN from highly toxic pollutant solutions and harmful cigarette smoke. Highlights: ► Hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a structure-directing agent and precipitator. ► Hydrothermal treatment enables growth of lamellar γ-AlOOH architectures. ► Lamellar γ-AlOOH architectures were demonstrated to exhibit high BET surface area and excellent adsorptive capacity. ► HCN in contaminated water and cigarette smoke can be effectively removed by the prepared lamellar γ-AlOOH superstructures.

  19. Adsorption of HCN molecules on Ni, Pd and Pt-doped (7, 0) boron nitride nanotube: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz; Basharnavaz, Hadi

    2018-05-01

    We studied affinity of pure and Ni, Pd and Pt-doped (7, 0) boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to toxic HCN molecules using density functional theory calculations. The results indicated that the pure (7, 0) BNNTs can weakly adsorb HCN molecules with adsorption energy of -0.2474 eV. Upon adsorption of HCN molecules on this nanotube, the band gap energy was decreased from 3.320 to 2.960 eV. The more negative adsorption energy between these transition metal-doped (7, 0) BNNTs and HCN molecules indicated that doping of (7, 0) BNNTs with Ni, Pd and Pt elements can significantly improve the affinity of BNNTs toward this gas. Additionally, it was found that the interaction energy between HCN molecules and Pt-doped BNNTs is more negative than those of the Ni and Pd-doped BNNTs. These observations suggested that the Pt-doped (7, 0) BNNTs are strongly sensitive to HCN molecules and therefore it may be used in gas sensor devices for detecting this toxic gas.

  20. United States Historical Climatology Network (US HCN) monthly temperature and precipitation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Boden, T.A. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Easterling, D.R.; Karl, T.R.; Mason, E.H.; Hughes, P.Y.; Bowman, D.P. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)

    1996-01-11

    This document describes a database containing monthly temperature and precipitation data for 1221 stations in the contiguous United States. This network of stations, known as the United States Historical Climatology Network (US HCN), and the resulting database were compiled by the National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina. These data represent the best available data from the United States for analyzing long-term climate trends on a regional scale. The data for most stations extend through December 31, 1994, and a majority of the station records are serially complete for at least 80 years. Unlike many data sets that have been used in past climate studies, these data have been adjusted to remove biases introduced by station moves, instrument changes, time-of-observation differences, and urbanization effects. These monthly data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP includes this document and 27 machine-readable data files consisting of supporting data files, a descriptive file, and computer access codes. This document describes how the stations in the US HCN were selected and how the data were processed, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, describes the format and contents of the magnetic media, and provides reprints of literature that discuss the editing and adjustment techniques used in the US HCN.

  1. Importance of the Hydrogen Isocyanide Isomer in Modeling Hydrogen Cyanide Oxidation in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) has been proposed as an important intermediate in oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in combustion, but details of its chemistry are still in discussion. At higher temperatures, HCN and HNC equilibrate rapidly, and being more reactive than HCN, HNC offers a fast alterna...... HNCO is the major consumption path for HCN. Under lean conditions, HNC is shown to be less important than indicated by the early work by Lin and co-workers, but it acts to accelerate HCN oxidation and promotes the formation of HNCO.......Hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) has been proposed as an important intermediate in oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in combustion, but details of its chemistry are still in discussion. At higher temperatures, HCN and HNC equilibrate rapidly, and being more reactive than HCN, HNC offers a fast...

  2. THE VARIABILITY OF HCN IN TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE AS IMPLIED BY THE CASSINI ION-NEUTRAL MASS SPECTROMETER MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J.; Cao, Y.-T. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Lavvas, P. P. [Groupe de Spectroscopie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, Universite de Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, CNRS UMR F-7331 (France); Koskinen, T. T. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    HCN is an important constituent in Titan’s upper atmosphere, serving as the main coolant in the local energy budget. In this study, we derive the HCN abundance at the altitude range of 960–1400 km, combining the Ion-Neutral Mass Spectrometer data acquired during a large number of Cassini flybys with Titan. Typically, the HCN abundance declines modestly with increasing altitude and flattens to a near constant level above 1200 km. The data reveal a tendency for dayside depletion of HCN, which is clearly visible below 1000 km but weakens with increasing altitude. Despite the absence of convincing anti-correlation between HCN volume mixing ratio and neutral temperature, we argue that the variability in HCN abundance makes an important contribution to the large temperature variability observed in Titan’s upper atmosphere.

  3. Characterization of a right atrial subsidiary pacemaker and acceleration of the pacing rate by HCN over-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gwilym M; D'Souza, Alicia; Dobrzynski, Halina; Lei, Ming; Choudhury, Moinuddin; Billeter, Rudi; Kryukova, Yelena; Robinson, Richard B; Kingston, Paul A; Boyett, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    Although the right atrium (RA contains subsidiary atrial pacemaker (SAP) tissue that can take over from the sinoatrial node (SAN) in sick sinus syndrome (SSS), SAP tissue is bradycardic. Little is known about SAP tissue and one aim of the study was to characterize ion channel expression to obtain insight into SAP pacemaker mechanisms. A second aim was to determine whether HCN over-expression (a 'biopacemaker'-like strategy) can accelerate the pacemaker rate producing a pacemaker that is similar in nature to the SAN. SAP tissue was isolated from the rat and the leading pacemaker site was characterized. Cell size at the leading pacemaker site in the SAP was smaller than in the RA and comparable to that in the SAN. mRNA levels showed the SAP to be similar to, but distinct from, the SAN. For example, in the SAN and SAP, expression of Tbx3 and HCN1 was higher and Nav1.5 and Cx43 lower than in the RA. Organ-cultured SAP tissue beat spontaneously, but at a slower rate than the SAN. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of HCN2 and the chimeric protein HCN212 significantly increased the pacemaker rate of the SAP close to that of the native SAN, but HCN4 was ineffective. SAP tissue near the inferior vena cava is bradycardic, but shares characteristics with the SAN. Pacing can be accelerated by the over-expression of HCN2 or HCN212. This provides proof of concept for the use of SAP tissue as a substrate for biopacemaking in the treatment of SSS.

  4. HCN channels segregate stimulation‐evoked movement responses in neocortex and allow for coordinated forelimb movements in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Jordan S.; Palmer, Laura A.; Singleton, Anna C.; Pittman, Quentin J.; Teskey, G. Campbell

    2016-01-01

    Key points The present study tested whether HCN channels contribute to the organization of motor cortex and to skilled motor behaviour during a forelimb reaching task.Experimental reductions in HCN channel signalling increase the representation of complex multiple forelimb movements in motor cortex as assessed by intracortical microstimulation.Global HCN1KO mice exhibit reduced reaching accuracy and atypical movements during a single‐pellet reaching task relative to wild‐type controls.Acute pharmacological inhibition of HCN channels in forelimb motor cortex decreases reaching accuracy and increases atypical movements during forelimb reaching. Abstract The mechanisms by which distinct movements of a forelimb are generated from the same area of motor cortex have remained elusive. Here we examined a role for HCN channels, given their ability to alter synaptic integration, in the expression of forelimb movement responses during intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and movements of the forelimb on a skilled reaching task. We used short‐duration high‐resolution ICMS to evoke forelimb movements following pharmacological (ZD7288), experimental (electrically induced cortical seizures) or genetic approaches that we confirmed with whole‐cell patch clamp to substantially reduce I h current. We observed significant increases in the number of multiple movement responses evoked at single sites in motor maps to all three experimental manipulations in rats or mice. Global HCN1 knockout mice were less successful and exhibited atypical movements on a skilled‐motor learning task relative to wild‐type controls. Furthermore, in reaching‐proficient rats, reaching accuracy was reduced and forelimb movements were altered during infusion of ZD7288 within motor cortex. Thus, HCN channels play a critical role in the separation of overlapping movement responses and allow for successful reaching behaviours. These data provide a novel mechanism for the encoding of multiple

  5. In situ measurements of HCN and CH3CN over the Pacific Ocean: Sources, sinks, and budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Kolyer, R.; Czech, E.; Viezee, W.; Li, Q.; Jacob, D. J.; Blake, D.; Sachse, G.; Harward, C. N.; Fuelberg, H.; Kiley, C. M.; Zhao, Y.; Kondo, Y.

    2003-10-01

    We report the first in situ measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and methyl cyanide (CH3CN, acetonitrile) from the Pacific troposphere (0-12 km) obtained during the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) airborne mission (February-April 2001). Mean HCN and CH3CN mixing ratios of 243 ± 118 (median 218) ppt and 149 ± 56 (median 138) ppt, respectively, were measured. These in situ observations correspond to a mean tropospheric HCN column of 4.2 × 1015 molecules cm-2 and a CH3CN column of 2.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2. This is in good agreement with the 0-12 km HCN column of 4.4 (±0.6) × 1015 molecules cm-2 derived from infrared solar spectroscopic observations over Japan. Mixing ratios of HCN and CH3CN were greatly enhanced in pollution outflow from Asia and were well correlated with each other as well as with known tracers of biomass combustion (e.g., CH3Cl, CO). Volumetric enhancement (or emission) ratios (ERs) relative to CO in free tropospheric plumes, likely originating from fires, were 0.34% for HCN and 0.17% for CH3CN. ERs with respect to CH3Cl and CO in selected biomass burning (BB) plumes in the free troposphere and in boundary layer pollution episodes are used to estimate a global BB source of 0.8 ± 0.4 Tg (N) yr-1 for HCN and 0.4 ± 0.1 Tg (N) yr-1 for CH3CN. In comparison, emissions from industry and fossil fuel combustion are quite small (atmospheric residence time of 5.0 months for HCN and 6.6 months for CH3CN is calculated. A global budget analysis shows that the sources and sinks of HCN and CH3CN are roughly in balance but large uncertainties remain in part due to a lack of observational data from the atmosphere and the oceans. Pathways leading to the oceanic (and soil) degradation of these cyanides are poorly known but are expected to be biological in nature.

  6. The correlation between HCN/H2O flux ratios and disk mass: evidence for protoplanet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Caitlin; Salyk, Colette

    2017-01-01

    We analyze hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and water vapor flux ratios in protoplanetary disks as a way to trace planet formation. Analyzing only disks in the Taurus molecular cloud, Najita et al. (2013) found a tentative correlation between protoplanetary disk mass and the HCN/H2O line flux ratio in Spitzer-IRS emission spectra. They interpret this correlation to be a consequence of more massive disks forming planetesimals more efficiently than smaller disks, as the formation of large planetesimals may lock up water ice in the cool outer disk region and prevent it from migrating, drying out the inner disk. The sequestering of water (and therefore oxygen) in the outer disk may also increase the carbon-to- oxygen ratio in the inner disk, leading to enhanced organic molecule (e.g. HCN) emission. To confirm this trend, we expand the Najita et al. sample by calculating HCN/H2O line flux ratios for 8 more sources with known disk masses from clusters besides Taurus. We find agreement with the Najita et al. trend, suggesting that this is a widespread phenomenon. In addition, we find HCN/H2O line flux ratios for 17 more sources that await disk mass measurements, which should become commonplace in the ALMA era. Finally, we investigate linear fits and outliers to this trend, and discuss possible causes.

  7. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes-A model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanani, S. [Institut Genomique Fonctionelle, 141 Rue de la Cardonille, 34396 Montpellier (France); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pumir, A. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Laboratoire J.A. Dieudonne, CNRS and Universite de Nice, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)], E-mail: alain.pumir@unice.fr; Krinsky, V. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2008-01-07

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler-Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo-Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin-Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I{sub K1} channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I{sub K1} channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I{sub K1} channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I{sub K1} channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler-Reuter and in the dynamic Luo-Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below {approx}1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I{sub K1} has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  8. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  9. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  10. Small functional If current in sinoatrial pacemaker cells of the brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) heart despite strong expression of HCN channel transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, Minna; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2017-12-01

    Funny current ( I f ), formed by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN channels), is supposed to be crucial for the membrane clock regulating the cardiac pacemaker mechanism. We examined the presence and activity of HCN channels in the brown trout ( Salmo trutta fario ) sinoatrial (SA) pacemaker cells and their putative role in heart rate ( f H ) regulation. Six HCN transcripts (HCN1, HCN2a, HCN2ba, HCN2bb, HCN3, and HCN4) were expressed in the brown trout heart. The total HCN transcript abundance was 4.0 and 4.9 times higher in SA pacemaker tissue than in atrium and ventricle, respectively. In the SA pacemaker, HCN3 and HCN4 were the main isoforms representing 35.8 ± 2.7 and 25.0 ± 1.5%, respectively, of the total HCN transcripts. Only a small I f with a mean current density of -1.2 ± 0.37 pA/pF at -140 mV was found in 4 pacemaker cells out of 16 spontaneously beating cells examined, despite the optimization of recording conditions for I f activity. I f was not found in any of the 24 atrial myocytes and 21 ventricular myocytes examined. HCN4 coexpressed with the MinK-related peptide 1 (MiRP1) β-subunit in CHO cells generated large I f currents. In contrast, HCN3 (+MiRP1) failed to produce I f in the same expression system. Cs + (2 mM), which blocked 84 ± 12% of the native I f , reversibly reduced f H 19.2 ± 3.6% of the excised multicellular pacemaker tissue from 53 ± 5 to 44 ± 5 beats/min ( P brown trout heart is largely independent on I f . Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A widely tunable, near-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) detection in exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M.; Mandon, J.; Neerincx, A. H.; Liu, Z.; Mink, J.; Merkus, P. J. F. M.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2017-11-01

    A compact, cost-effective sensor is developed for detection of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in exhaled breath within seconds. For this, an off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy setup is combined with a widely tunable compact near-infrared laser (tunability 1527-1564 nm). For HCN a detection sensitivity has been obtained of 8 ppbv in nitrogen (within 1 s), equal to a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.9 × 10-9 cm-1 Hz-1/2. With this sensor we demonstrated the presence of HCN in exhaled breath; its detection could be a good indicator for bacterial lung infection. Due to its compact, cost-effective and user-friendly design, this laser-based sensor has the potential to be implemented in future clinical applications.

  12. Ground-based multiwavelength observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Cordiner, M. A.; Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.; Remijan, A. J.; Coulson, I. M.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Kuan, Y.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here, we report detections of HCN, H 2 CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN toward 103P using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m telescope (ARO 12 m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, Q H 2 O = (0.67-1.07) × 10 28 s –1 , was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H 2 CO relative to water (0.13 ± 0.03% and 0.14 ± 0.03%, respectively), we conclude that H 2 CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data, we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho-H 2 CO and para-H 2 CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT) allowed us to derive an ortho:para ratio (OPR) of ≈2.12 ± 0.59 (1σ), corresponding to T spin > 8 K (2σ).

  13. Ground-based multiwavelength observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gicquel, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Cordiner, M. A. [Catholic University of America, Physics Department, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC (United States); Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Remijan, A. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Coulson, I. M. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North A' ohoku Place University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Chuang, Y.-L.; Kuan, Y.-J., E-mail: adeline.gicquel@nasa.gov, E-mail: stefanie.n.milam@nasa.gov, E-mail: geronimo.l.villanueva@nasa.gov, E-mail: steven.b.charnley@nasa.gov, E-mail: martin.a.cordiner@nasa.gov, E-mail: aremijan@nrao.edu, E-mail: i.coulson@jach.hawaii.edu, E-mail: ylchuang@std.ntnu.edu.tz, E-mail: kuan@ntnu.edu.tw [National Taiwan Normal University, 88 Sec. 4 Ting-Chou Road, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here, we report detections of HCN, H{sub 2}CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN toward 103P using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m telescope (ARO 12 m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, Q{sub H{sub 2O}} = (0.67-1.07) × 10{sup 28} s{sup –1}, was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H{sub 2}CO relative to water (0.13 ± 0.03% and 0.14 ± 0.03%, respectively), we conclude that H{sub 2}CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data, we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho-H{sub 2}CO and para-H{sub 2}CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT) allowed us to derive an ortho:para ratio (OPR) of ≈2.12 ± 0.59 (1σ), corresponding to T {sub spin} > 8 K (2σ).

  14. Signal detection circuit design of HCN measurement system based on TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chungui; Zhang, Yujun; Chen, Chen; Lu, Yibing; Liu, Guohua; Gao, Yanwei; You, Kun; He, Ying; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen cyanide gas leakage may exist in the petrochemical industry, smelting plant, and other industrial processes, causing serious harm to the environment, and even threatening the safety of personnel. So the continuous detection of HCN gas plays an important role in the prevention of risk in production process and storage environment that existing hydrogen cyanide gas. The Tunable Diode Laser Technology (TDLAS) has advantages of non-contact, high sensitivity, high selectivity, and fast response time, etc., which is one of the ideal method of gas detection technologies and can be used to measure the hydrogen cyanide concentration. This paper studies the HCN detection system based on TDLAS technology, selects the absorption lines of hydrogen cyanide in 6539.12cm-1, and utilizes the center wavelength of 1.529μm distributed feedback (DFB) laser as a light source. It is discussed in detail on technical requirements of a high frequency modulated laser signal detection circuit, including noise level, gain, and bandwidth. Based on the above theory, the high frequency modulation preamplifier circuit and main amplifier circuit are designed for InGaAs photoelectric detector. The designed circuits are calculation analyzed with corresponding formula and simulation analyzed based on the Multisim software.

  15. Modulation of thalamocortical oscillations by TRIP8b, an auxiliary subunit for HCN channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobeiri, Mehrnoush; Chaudhary, Rahul; Datunashvili, Maia; Heuermann, Robert J; Lüttjohann, Annika; Narayanan, Venu; Balfanz, Sabine; Meuth, Patrick; Chetkovich, Dane M; Pape, Hans-Christian; Baumann, Arnd; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Budde, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels have important functions in controlling neuronal excitability and generating rhythmic oscillatory activity. The role of tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) in regulation of hyperpolarization-activated inward current, I h , in the thalamocortical system and its functional relevance for the physiological thalamocortical oscillations were investigated. A significant decrease in I h current density, in both thalamocortical relay (TC) and cortical pyramidal neurons was found in TRIP8b-deficient mice (TRIP8b -/- ). In addition basal cAMP levels in the brain were found to be decreased while the availability of the fast transient A-type K + current, I A , in TC neurons was increased. These changes were associated with alterations in intrinsic properties and firing patterns of TC neurons, as well as intrathalamic and thalamocortical network oscillations, revealing a significant increase in slow oscillations in the delta frequency range (0.5-4 Hz) during episodes of active-wakefulness. In addition, absence of TRIP8b suppresses the normal desynchronization response of the EEG during the switch from slow-wave sleep to wakefulness. It is concluded that TRIP8b is necessary for the modulation of physiological thalamocortical oscillations due to its direct effect on HCN channel expression in thalamus and cortex and that mechanisms related to reduced cAMP signaling may contribute to the present findings.

  16. ALMA HCN AND HCO{sup +} J  = 3 − 2 OBSERVATIONS OF OPTICAL SEYFERT AND LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: CONFIRMATION OF ELEVATED HCN-TO-HCO{sup +} FLUX RATIOS IN AGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Izumi, Takuma, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of our ALMA observations of three active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated nuclei in optical Seyfert 1 galaxies (NGC 7469, I Zw 1, and IC 4329 A) and eleven luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with various levels of infrared estimated energetic contributions by AGNs at the HCN and HCO{sup +} J  = 3 − 2 emission lines. The HCN and HCO{sup +} J  = 3 − 2 emission lines are clearly detected at the main nuclei of all sources, except for IC 4329 A. The vibrationally excited ( v {sub 2} = 1f) HCN J  = 3 − 2 and HCO{sup +} J  = 3 − 2 emission lines are simultaneously covered, and HCN v {sub 2} = 1f J  = 3 − 2 emission line signatures are seen in the main nuclei of two LIRGs, IRAS 12112+0305 and IRAS 22491–1808, neither of which shows clear buried AGN signatures in the infrared. If the vibrational excitation is dominated by infrared radiative pumping, through the absorption of infrared 14 μ m photons, primarily originating from AGN-heated hot dust emission, then these two LIRGs may contain infrared-elusive, but (sub)millimeter-detectable, extremely deeply buried AGNs. These vibrationally excited emission lines are not detected in the three AGN-dominated optical Seyfert 1 nuclei. However, the observed HCN v {sub 2} = 1f to v  = 0 flux ratios in these optical Seyferts are still consistent with the intrinsic flux ratios in LIRGs with detectable HCN v {sub 2} = 1f emission lines. The observed HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J  = 3 − 2 flux ratios tend to be higher in galactic nuclei with luminous AGN signatures compared with starburst-dominated regions, as previously seen at J  = 1 − 0 and J  = 4 − 3.

  17. Targeting miR-423-5p Reverses Exercise Training-Induced HCN4 Channel Remodeling and Sinus Bradycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Souza, Alicia; Pearman, Charles M.; Wang, Yanwen

    2017-01-01

    -generation sequencing and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed remodeling of miRs in the sinus node of swim-trained mice. Computational predictions highlighted a prominent role for miR-423-5p. Interaction between miR-423-5p and HCN4 was confirmed by a dose-dependent reduction...

  18. Coupling catalytic hydrolysis and oxidation on Mn/TiO2-Al2O3 for HCN removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Langlang; Wang, Xueqian; Cheng, Jinhuan; Ning, Ping; Lin, Yilong

    2018-05-01

    The manganese-modified titania-alumina (Mn/TiO2-Al2O3) catalyst synthesized by sol-gol method was used to remove hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from simulated flue gas. Further, effects of the mass ratios of Ti/Al, Mn loading, calcination temperature, and relative humidity on HCN conversion efficiency and catalytic activity were systematically investigated. The results indicated that the Mn/TiO2-Al2O3 catalyst exhibited significantly enhanced HCN removal efficiency, and the maximum yield of N2 increased to 68.02% without the participation of water vapor. When water vapor was added into the flue gas, the yield of N2 decreased and the formation of NOx was also inhibited. The XRD and XPS results indicated that Mn was mainly present in the form of Mn2+, Mn3+, and Mn4+ on the surface of catalyst and chemisorbed oxygen played a major role in the HCN catalytic oxidation process. The results of DSC-TGA analysis and H2-TPR indicated that the catalyst also exhibited a good thermal and chemical stability. NH3-TPD and CO2-TPD indicated that the surface of the catalyst mainly contained acidic sites. During the reaction, part of NH3 was adsorbed by Brönsted and Lewis acid sites. NH3 adsorbed on Lewis acid sites participated in NH3-SCR, which reduced the amount of NOx produced and resulted in a high N2 yield.

  19. Electron density profile reconstruction by maximum entropy method with multichannel HCN laser interferometer system on SPAC VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S.; Narihara, K.; Tomita, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Tsuzuki, T.; Mohri, A.

    1988-01-01

    A multichannel HCN laser interferometer system has been developed to investigate the plasma electron confinement properties in SPAC VII device. Maximum entropy method is applied to reconstruct the electron density profile from measured line integrated data. Particle diffusion coefficient in the peripheral region of the REB ring core spherator was obtained from the evolution of the density profile. (author)

  20. Enhancement of Spontaneous Activity by HCN4 Overexpression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes - A Possible Biological Pacemaker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Saito

    Full Text Available Establishment of a biological pacemaker is expected to solve the persisting problems of a mechanical pacemaker including the problems of battery life and electromagnetic interference. Enhancement of the funny current (If flowing through hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and attenuation of the inward rectifier K+ current (IK1 flowing through inward rectifier potassium (Kir channels are essential for generation of a biological pacemaker. Therefore, we generated HCN4-overexpressing mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs and induced cardiomyocytes that originally show poor IK1 currents, and we investigated whether the HCN4-overexpressing mESC-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs function as a biological pacemaker in vitro.The rabbit Hcn4 gene was transfected into mESCs, and stable clones were selected. mESC-CMs were generated via embryoid bodies and purified under serum/glucose-free and lactate-supplemented conditions. Approximately 90% of the purified cells were troponin I-positive by immunostaining. In mESC-CMs, expression level of the Kcnj2 gene encoding Kir2.1, which is essential for generation of IK1 currents that are responsible for stabilizing the resting membrane potential, was lower than that in an adult mouse ventricle. HCN4-overexpressing mESC-CMs expressed about a 3-times higher level of the Hcn4 gene than did non-overexpressing mESC-CMs. Expression of the Cacna1h gene, which encodes T-type calcium channel and generates diastolic depolarization in the sinoatrial node, was also confirmed. Additionally, genes required for impulse conduction including Connexin40, Connexin43, and Connexin45 genes, which encode connexins forming gap junctions, and the Scn5a gene, which encodes sodium channels, are expressed in the cells. HCN4-overexpressing mESC-CMs showed significantly larger If currents and more rapid spontaneous beating than did non-overexpressing mESC-CMs. The beating rate of HCN4-overexpressing mESC-CMs responded

  1. A size upper limit and position for the HCN maser in CIT 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, J.E.; Welch, W.J.; Goldsmith, P.F.; Lis, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A size upper limit and position for the HCN maser in CIT 6 were determined from interferometric observations with the Hat Creek millimeter array. The maser is located at alpha(1950) = 10 h 13 m 10.942 + or - 0.012 s and delta(1950) = + 30 deg 49 arcmin 16.75 arcsec + or - 0.15, coincident with the optical image taken from the Palomar plates, within the 3 arcsec uncertainty of the latter. The size of the maser emission region is less than 0.45 arcsec, approximately 180 AU at the distance estimated for CIT 6. The small size and strong emission (40 Jy) set a lower limit to the brightness temperature of 44,000 K, further strengthening the maser interpretation. 14 refs

  2. Diagnostics of a stationary MPD-type plasma jet with a HCN laser interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graser, W.; Hoffmann, P.

    1975-01-01

    A HCN laser interferometer of the Ashby-Jephcott type operating at a wavelength of 337 μm was used to measure spatially resolved electron densities in a stationary MPD-type plasma jet with non-LTE behavior. Experiments were performed with and without superimposed magnetic fields up to 0.1 T at the exit of the plasma accelerator. Electron densities were obtained within the limits of 5times10 12 and 10 15 cm -3 with an accuracy better than 10%. Within the axially symmetric expanding plasma of about 15-cm average diameter and 50-cm length the radial resolving power came to less than 1 cm. So this technique has proved to be suitable to fill a gap in the diagnostics of stationary magnetized plasmas in the mean range of electron densities. (auth)

  3. PENGARUH LAMA PERENDAMAN KORO BENGU (Mucuna pruriens DALAM AIR KAPUR (Ca(OH2 TERHADAP KADAR ASAM SIANIDA (HCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Nurmawan Toro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Masyarakat Indonesia masih menitikberatkan pada komoditas kacang kedelai sebagai sumber utama protein, sedangkan pemanfaatan komoditas lain seperti koro benguk masih sangat minim. Minimnya pemanfaatan koro benguk ini karena di dalamnya terkandung senyawa alami berupa glokusida sianogenik yang dapat mengalami hidrolisis enzimatis menjadi asam sianida (HCN yang bersifat racun. Karena asam sianida bersifat asam yang sangat mudah larut dalam air, maka dilakukan perendaman menggunakan air kapur (Ca(OH2 bersifat basa yang dirasa cukup efektif menetralkan HCN dalam koro benguk.   Tujuan Penelitian: Mengetahui pengaruh lama perendaman koro benguk dalam air kapur terhadap kadar asam sianida dan mengetahui apakah air kapur lebih efektif dibandingkan air biasa dalam menetralkan HCN koro benguk.   Metode Penelitian: Penelitian dengan desain post test with control group. Obyek penelitian ini adalah koro benguk varietas benguk putih berumur 4-6 bulan yang diperoleh di Dusun Nogosari, Desa Purwosari, Kecamatan Girimulyo, Kabupaten Kulon Progo, DIY yang dilakukan perendaman dalam air sebagai kelompok kontrol dan air kapur 100 mg/L sebagai kelompok perlakuan selama 12, 24 dan 36 jam kemudian dilakukan destilasi. Destilat direaksikan dengan asam pikrat 1% kemudia diukur kadar HCN secara spektrofotometri.   Hasil: Kadar HCN  koro benguk pada perendaman dalam air selama 12 jam adalah 20,736 mg/kg, selama 24 jam adalah 19,348 mg/kg dan selama 36 jam adalah 16,786 mg/kg. Sedangkan kadar HCN pada perendaman air kapur 100 mg/L selama 12 jam adalah 19,020 mg/kg, selama 24 jam adalah 1,635 mg/kg dan selama 36 jam adalah 9,307 mg/kg. Hasil Uji ANOVA satu jalan pada kelompok perlakuan didapatkan nilai signifikansi 0.000 (p< 0.05.   Kesimpulan: Ada pengaruh bermakna lama perendaman koro benguk dalam air kapur terhadap kadar asam sianida. Perendaman dalam air kapur terbukti lebih efektif menetralkan asam sianida koro benguk dibandingkan perendaman dalam

  4. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. SUBMILLIMETER-HCN DIAGRAM FOR ENERGY DIAGNOSTICS IN THE CENTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aalto, Susanne [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Observatory, SE-439 94 Onsala (Sweden); Espada, Daniel; Martín, Sergio; Nakanishi, Kouichiro [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova, 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile); Fathi, Kambiz [Stockholm Observatory, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Harada, Nanase; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Matsushita, Satoki [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hatsukade, Bunyo; Imanishi, Masatoshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Krips, Melanie [Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, F-38406 St. Martin d’Hères (France); Meier, David S. [Department of Physics, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Place, Soccoro, NM 87801 (United States); Nakai, Naomasa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-nodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, Heidelberg D-69117 (Germany); Sheth, Kartik [NASA, 300 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20546 (United States); Terashima, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Turner, Jean L., E-mail: takumaizumi@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Compiling data from literature and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array archive, we show enhanced HCN(4–3)/HCO{sup +}(4–3) and/or HCN(4–3)/CS(7–6) integrated intensity ratios in circumnuclear molecular gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared to those in starburst (SB) galaxies (submillimeter HCN enhancement). The number of sample galaxies is significantly increased from our previous work. We expect that this feature could potentially be an extinction-free energy diagnostic tool of nuclear regions of galaxies. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelings of the above molecular emission lines involving both collisional and radiative excitation, as well as a photon trapping effect, were conducted to investigate the cause of the high line ratios in AGNs. As a result, we found that enhanced abundance ratios of HCN to HCO{sup +} and HCN to CS in AGNs as compared to SB galaxies by a factor of a few to even ≳10 are a plausible explanation for the submillimeter HCN enhancement. However, a counterargument of a systematically higher gas density in AGNs than in SB galaxies can also be a plausible scenario. Although we cannot fully distinguish these two scenarios at this moment owing to an insufficient amount of multi-transition, multi-species data, the former scenario is indicative of abnormal chemical composition in AGNs. Regarding the actual mechanism to realize the composition, we suggest that it is difficult with conventional gas-phase X-ray-dominated region ionization models to reproduce the observed high line ratios. We might have to take into account other mechanisms such as neutral–neutral reactions that are efficiently activated in high-temperature environments and/or mechanically heated regions to further understand the high line ratios in AGNs.

  6. ALMA IMAGING OF HCN, CS, AND DUST IN ARP 220 AND NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoville, Nick; Manohar, Swarnima; Murchikova, Lena [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Zschaechner, Laura [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Yun, Min [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Koda, Jin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Sanders, David; Barnes, Joshua [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, HI 96822 (United States); Thompson, Todd [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Robertson, Brant; Tacconi, Linda; Narayanan, Desika [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Genzel, Reinhard; Davies, Richard [Max-Planck-Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brown, Robert [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [TAPIR 350-17, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kartaltepe, Jeyhan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We report ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz) imaging at 0.''4-0.''6 resolution and Band 9 (696 GHz) at ∼0.''25 resolution of the luminous IR galaxies Arp 220 and NGC 6240. The long wavelength dust continuum is used to estimate interstellar medium masses for Arp 220 east and west and NGC 6240 of 1.9, 4.2, and 1.6 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}within radii of 69, 65, and 190 pc. The HCN emission was modeled to derive the emissivity distribution as a function of radius and the kinematics of each nuclear disk, yielding dynamical masses consistent with the masses and sizes derived from the dust emission. In Arp 220, the major dust and gas concentrations are at radii less than 50 pc in both counter-rotating nuclear disks. The thickness of the disks in Arp 220 estimated from the velocity dispersion and rotation velocities are 10-20 pc and the mean gas densities are n{sub H{sub 2}}∼10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} at R <50 pc. We develop an analytic treatment for the molecular excitation (including photon trapping), yielding volume densities for both the HCN and CS emission with n {sub H2} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}. The agreement of the mean density from the total mass and size with that required for excitation suggests that the volume is essentially filled with dense gas, i.e., it is not cloudy or like swiss cheese.

  7. ALMA IMAGING OF HCN, CS, AND DUST IN ARP 220 AND NGC 6240

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoville, Nick; Manohar, Swarnima; Murchikova, Lena; Sheth, Kartik; Walter, Fabian; Zschaechner, Laura; Yun, Min; Koda, Jin; Sanders, David; Barnes, Joshua; Thompson, Todd; Robertson, Brant; Tacconi, Linda; Narayanan, Desika; Genzel, Reinhard; Davies, Richard; Hernquist, Lars; Brown, Robert; Hayward, Christopher C.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2015-01-01

    We report ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz) imaging at 0.''4-0.''6 resolution and Band 9 (696 GHz) at ∼0.''25 resolution of the luminous IR galaxies Arp 220 and NGC 6240. The long wavelength dust continuum is used to estimate interstellar medium masses for Arp 220 east and west and NGC 6240 of 1.9, 4.2, and 1.6 × 10 9 M ☉ within radii of 69, 65, and 190 pc. The HCN emission was modeled to derive the emissivity distribution as a function of radius and the kinematics of each nuclear disk, yielding dynamical masses consistent with the masses and sizes derived from the dust emission. In Arp 220, the major dust and gas concentrations are at radii less than 50 pc in both counter-rotating nuclear disks. The thickness of the disks in Arp 220 estimated from the velocity dispersion and rotation velocities are 10-20 pc and the mean gas densities are n H 2 ∼10 5  cm –3 at R <50 pc. We develop an analytic treatment for the molecular excitation (including photon trapping), yielding volume densities for both the HCN and CS emission with n H2 ∼ 2 × 10 5  cm –3 . The agreement of the mean density from the total mass and size with that required for excitation suggests that the volume is essentially filled with dense gas, i.e., it is not cloudy or like swiss cheese

  8. Large-scale upper tropospheric pollution observed by MIPAS HCN and C2H6 global distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, N.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G. P.; Funke, B.; Koukouli, M. E.; Fischer, H.; Grabowski, U.; Höpfner, M.; Kellmann, S.; Linden, A.

    2009-12-01

    We present global upper tropospheric HCN and C2H6 amounts derived from MIPAS/ENVISAT limb emission spectra. HCN and C2H6 are retrieved in the spectral regions 715.5-782.7 cm-1 and 811.5-835.7 cm-1, respectively. The datasets consist of 54 days between September 2003 and March 2004. This period covers the peak and decline of the southern hemispheric biomass burning period and some months thereafter. HCN is a nearly unambiguous tracer of biomass burning with an assumed tropospheric lifetime of several months. Indeed, the most significant feature in the MIPAS HCN dataset is an upper tropospheric plume of enhanced values caused by southern hemispheric biomass burning, which in September and October 2003 extended from tropical South America over Africa, Australia to the Southern Pacific. The spatial extent of this plume agrees well with the MOPITT CO distribution of September 2003. Further there is good agreement with the shapes and mixing ratios of the southern hemispheric HCN and C2H6 fields measured by the ACE experiment between September and November 2005. The MIPAS HCN plume extended from the lowermost observation height of 8 km up to about 16 km altitude, with maximum values of 500-600 pptv in October 2003. It was still clearly visible in December 2003, but had strongly decreased by March 2004, confirming the assumed tropospheric lifetime. The main sources of C2H6 are production and transmission of fossil fuels, followed by biofuel use and biomass burning. The C2H6 distribution also clearly reflected the southern hemispheric biomass burning plume and its seasonal variation, with maximum amounts of 600-700 pptv. Generally there was good spatial overlap between the southern hemispheric distributions of both pollution tracers, except for the region between Peru and the mid-Pacific. Here C2H6was considerably enhanced, whereas the HCN amounts were low. Backward trajectory calculations suggested that industrial pollution was responsible for the elevated C2H6

  9. Large-scale upper tropospheric pollution observed by MIPAS HCN and C2H6 global distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Linden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present global upper tropospheric HCN and C2H6 amounts derived from MIPAS/ENVISAT limb emission spectra. HCN and C2H6 are retrieved in the spectral regions 715.5–782.7 cm−1 and 811.5–835.7 cm−1, respectively. The datasets consist of 54 days between September 2003 and March 2004. This period covers the peak and decline of the southern hemispheric biomass burning period and some months thereafter. HCN is a nearly unambiguous tracer of biomass burning with an assumed tropospheric lifetime of several months. Indeed, the most significant feature in the MIPAS HCN dataset is an upper tropospheric plume of enhanced values caused by southern hemispheric biomass burning, which in September and October 2003 extended from tropical South America over Africa, Australia to the Southern Pacific. The spatial extent of this plume agrees well with the MOPITT CO distribution of September 2003. Further there is good agreement with the shapes and mixing ratios of the southern hemispheric HCN and C2H6 fields measured by the ACE experiment between September and November 2005. The MIPAS HCN plume extended from the lowermost observation height of 8 km up to about 16 km altitude, with maximum values of 500–600 pptv in October 2003. It was still clearly visible in December 2003, but had strongly decreased by March 2004, confirming the assumed tropospheric lifetime. The main sources of C2H6 are production and transmission of fossil fuels, followed by biofuel use and biomass burning. The C2H6 distribution also clearly reflected the southern hemispheric biomass burning plume and its seasonal variation, with maximum amounts of 600–700 pptv. Generally there was good spatial overlap between the southern hemispheric distributions of both pollution tracers, except for the region between Peru and the mid-Pacific. Here C2H6was considerably enhanced, whereas the HCN amounts were low. Backward trajectory calculations suggested that industrial pollution was responsible

  10. Airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN in boreal biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Sebastian J.; Bauguitte, Stephane; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Le Breton, Michael; Archibald, Alex; Gallagher, Martin W.; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl J.

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning plays an important role in the budgets of a variety of atmospheric trace gases and particles. For example, fires in boreal Russia have been linked with large growths in the global concentrations of trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and CO (Langenfelds et al., 2002; Simpson et al., 2006). High resolution airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN were made over Eastern Canada onboard the UK Atmospheric Research Aircraft FAAM BAe-146 from 12 July to 4 August 2011. These observations were made as part of the BORTAS project (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites). Flights were aimed at transecting and sampling the outflow from the commonly occurring North American boreal forest fires during the summer months and to investigate and identify the chemical composition and evolution of these plumes. CO2 and CH4 dry air mole fractions were determined using an adapted system based on a Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Model RMT-200) from Los Gatos Research Inc, which uses the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy technique. In-flight calibrations revealed a mean accuracy of 0.57 ppmv and 2.31 ppbv for 1 Hz observations of CO2 and CH4, respectively, during the BORTAS project. During these flights a number of fresh and photochemically-aged plumes were identified using simultaneous HCN measurements. HCN is a distinctive and useful marker for forest fire emissions and it was detected using chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS). In the freshest plumes, strong relationships were found between CH4, CO2 and other tracers for biomass burning. From this we were able to estimate that 8.5 ± 0.9 g of CH4 and 1512 ± 185 g of CO2 were released into the atmosphere per kg of dry matter burnt. These emission factors are in good agreement with estimates from previous studies and can be used to calculate budgets for the region. However for aged plumes the correlations between CH4 and other

  11. HCN4 ion channel function is required for early events that regulate anatomical left-right patterning in a nodal and lefty asymmetric gene expression-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vaibhav P; Willocq, Valerie; Pitcairn, Emily J; Lemire, Joan M; Paré, Jean-François; Shi, Nian-Qing; McLaughlin, Kelly A; Levin, Michael

    2017-10-15

    Laterality is a basic characteristic of all life forms, from single cell organisms to complex plants and animals. For many metazoans, consistent left-right asymmetric patterning is essential for the correct anatomy of internal organs, such as the heart, gut, and brain; disruption of left-right asymmetry patterning leads to an important class of birth defects in human patients. Laterality functions across multiple scales, where early embryonic, subcellular and chiral cytoskeletal events are coupled with asymmetric amplification mechanisms and gene regulatory networks leading to asymmetric physical forces that ultimately result in distinct left and right anatomical organ patterning. Recent studies have suggested the existence of multiple parallel pathways regulating organ asymmetry. Here, we show that an isoform of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) family of ion channels (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4, HCN4) is important for correct left-right patterning. HCN4 channels are present very early in Xenopus embryos. Blocking HCN channels ( I h currents) with pharmacological inhibitors leads to errors in organ situs. This effect is only seen when HCN4 channels are blocked early (pre-stage 10) and not by a later block (post-stage 10). Injections of HCN4-DN (dominant-negative) mRNA induce left-right defects only when injected in both blastomeres no later than the 2-cell stage. Analysis of key asymmetric genes' expression showed that the sidedness of Nodal , Lefty , and Pitx2 expression is largely unchanged by HCN4 blockade, despite the randomization of subsequent organ situs, although the area of Pitx2 expression was significantly reduced. Together these data identify a novel, developmental role for HCN4 channels and reveal a new Nodal-Lefty-Pitx2 asymmetric gene expression-independent mechanism upstream of organ positioning during embryonic left-right patterning. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. First-principle study of structural, electronic, vibrational and magnetic properties of HCN adsorbed graphene doped with Cr, Mn and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Li Bin; Wang, Yong Ping; Dong, Hai Kuan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cr, Mn and Fe doped graphene is more active to adsorb HCN molecule than pristine graphene. • The conductivity of Fe and Mn doped graphene hardly changes after adsorption HCN molecule. • The conductivity of Cr doped graphene can be affected significantly due to HCN adsorption. • The Cr, Mn and Fe may destroy the long range order in graphene. • Phonon density of states suggests that Cr doped graphene is stable. - Abstract: The adsorption energy, electronic structure, lattice vibration and magnetic properties of Cr, Mn and Fe doped graphene with and without HCN adsorption are investigated by the first principles based on density functional theory. The physisorption and chemisorption have been identified. In the paper, Cr-NG, Mn-NG and Fe-NG denote HCN adsorption on Cr, Mn and Fe doped graphene with N atom toward the adsorption site. It is found that the adsorption energy is −1.36 eV for Fe-NG, −0.60 eV for Mn-NG and −0.86 eV for Cr-NG. The Cr-NG will convert from half-metallic behavior to semiconductor after adsorbing HCN molecule, which indicates that the conductivity changes significantly. Phonon density of states (PDOS) shows that the long range order in graphene can be destroyed by doping Fe, Mn and Cr. The imaginary frequency mode in PDOS suggests that Fe and Mn doped graphene is unstable, while Cr doped graphene is stable. The electronic properties are sensitive toward adsorbing HCN, indicating that Cr doped graphene is a promising sensor for detecting HCN molecule. This study provides a useful basis for understanding of a wide variety of physical properties on graphene

  13. CO, CS, and HCN in a clustering of reflection nebulae in Monoceros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutner, M.L.; Tucker, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Carbon monoxide line emission at lambda=2.6 mm has been observed over an area of approx.3 1/2degreetimes3 1/2degree in L1646, a diffuse dust cloud containing a grouping of reflection nebulae. The H 2 mass is estimated from the CO observations to be >3.2times10 4 M/sub sun/. Five CO emission peaks are observed, each apparently associated with at least one reflection nebula, with the strongest peak at α (1950) =6)05)20), delta (1950) =-6degree22'30''. Around this position, extended (10'times10') emission is observed from HCN and CS, suggesting a core with H 2 density approximately-less-than8times10 4 cm -3 . This core appears to be rotating with Ωgreater than or equal to7.4times10 -14 s -1 . There is also evidence for self-absorption in the CO line in this direction, suggestive of a collapsing cloud. (auth)

  14. RESOLVING THE BRIGHT HCN(1–0) EMISSION TOWARD THE SEYFERT 2 NUCLEUS OF M51: SHOCK ENHANCEMENT BY RADIO JETS AND WEAK MASING BY INFRARED PUMPING?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Trung, Dinh-V-; Boone, Frédéric; Krips, Melanie; Lim, Jeremy; Muller, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    We present high angular resolution observations of the HCN(1-0) emission (at ∼1'' or ∼34 pc), together with CO J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 observations, toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 (NGC 5194). The overall HCN(1-0) distribution and kinematics are very similar to that of the CO lines, which have been indicated as the jet-entrained molecular gas in our past observations. In addition, high HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio of about unity is observed along the jets, similar to that observed at the shocked molecular gas in our Galaxy. These results strongly indicate that both diffuse and dense gases are entrained by the jets and outflowing from the active galactic nucleus. The channel map of HCN(1-0) at the systemic velocity shows a strong emission right at the nucleus, where no obvious emission has been detected in the CO lines. The HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio at this region reaches >2, a value that cannot be explained considering standard physical/chemical conditions. Based on our calculations, we suggest infrared pumping and possibly weak HCN masing, but still requiring an enhanced HCN abundance for the cause of this high ratio. This suggests the presence of a compact dense obscuring molecular gas in front of the nucleus of M51, which remains unresolved at our ∼1'' (∼34 pc) resolution, and consistent with the Seyfert 2 classification picture

  15. RESOLVING THE BRIGHT HCN(1–0) EMISSION TOWARD THE SEYFERT 2 NUCLEUS OF M51: SHOCK ENHANCEMENT BY RADIO JETS AND WEAK MASING BY INFRARED PUMPING?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Satoki [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Trung, Dinh-V- [Institute of Physics, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, 10, Daotan, BaDinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Boone, Frédéric [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Krips, Melanie [Institute de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Lim, Jeremy [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Muller, Sebastien [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden)

    2015-01-20

    We present high angular resolution observations of the HCN(1-0) emission (at ∼1'' or ∼34 pc), together with CO J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 observations, toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 (NGC 5194). The overall HCN(1-0) distribution and kinematics are very similar to that of the CO lines, which have been indicated as the jet-entrained molecular gas in our past observations. In addition, high HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio of about unity is observed along the jets, similar to that observed at the shocked molecular gas in our Galaxy. These results strongly indicate that both diffuse and dense gases are entrained by the jets and outflowing from the active galactic nucleus. The channel map of HCN(1-0) at the systemic velocity shows a strong emission right at the nucleus, where no obvious emission has been detected in the CO lines. The HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio at this region reaches >2, a value that cannot be explained considering standard physical/chemical conditions. Based on our calculations, we suggest infrared pumping and possibly weak HCN masing, but still requiring an enhanced HCN abundance for the cause of this high ratio. This suggests the presence of a compact dense obscuring molecular gas in front of the nucleus of M51, which remains unresolved at our ∼1'' (∼34 pc) resolution, and consistent with the Seyfert 2 classification picture.

  16. Data processing with PC-9801 micro-computer for HCN laser scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Okajima, S.; Kawahata, K.; Tetsuka, T.; Fujita, J.

    1986-09-01

    In order to process the data of HCN laser scattering experiments, a micro-computer software has been developed and applied to the measurements of density fluctuations in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak plasma. The data processing system consists of a spectrum analyzer, SM-2100A Signal Analyzer (IWATSU ELECTRIC CO., LTD.), PC-9801m3 micro-computer, a CRT-display and a dot-printer. The output signals from the spectrum analyzer are A/D converted, and stored on a mini-floppy-disk equipped to the signal analyzer. The software to process the data is composed of system-programs and several user-programs. The real time data processing is carried out for every shot of plasma at 4 minutes interval by the micro-computer connected with the signal analyzer through a GP-IB interface. The time evolutions of the frequency spectrum of the density fluctuations are displayed on the CRT attached to the micro-computer and printed out on a printer-sheet. In the case of the data processing after experiments, the data stored on the floppy-disk of the signal analyzer are read out by using a floppy-disk unit attached to the micro-computer. After computation with the user-programs, the results, such as monitored signal, frequency spectra, wave number spectra and the time evolutions of the spectrum, are displayed and printed out. In this technical report, the system, the software and the directions for use are described. (author)

  17. I h and HCN channels in murine spiral ganglion neurons: tonotopic variation, local heterogeneity, and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Manis, Paul B; Davis, Robin L

    2014-08-01

    One of the major contributors to the response profile of neurons in the auditory pathways is the I h current. Its properties such as magnitude, activation, and kinetics not only vary among different types of neurons (Banks et al., J Neurophysiol 70:1420-1432, 1993; Fu et al., J Neurophysiol 78:2235-2245, 1997; Bal and Oertel, J Neurophysiol 84:806-817, 2000; Cao and Oertel, J Neurophysiol 94:821-832, 2005; Rodrigues and Oertel, J Neurophysiol 95:76-87, 2006; Yi et al., J Neurophysiol 103:2532-2543, 2010), but they also display notable diversity in a single population of spiral ganglion neurons (Mo and Davis, J Neurophysiol 78:3019-3027, 1997), the first neural element in the auditory periphery. In this study, we found from somatic recordings that part of the heterogeneity can be attributed to variation along the tonotopic axis because I h in the apical neurons have more positive half-activation voltage levels than basal neurons. Even within a single cochlear region, however, I h current properties are not uniform. To account for this heterogeneity, we provide immunocytochemical evidence for variance in the intracellular density of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel α-subunit 1 (HCN1), which mediates I h current. We also observed different combinations of HCN1 and HCN4 α-subunits from cell to cell. Lastly, based on the physiological data, we performed kinetic analysis for the I h current and generated a mathematical model to better understand varied I h on spiral ganglion function. Regardless of whether I h currents are recorded at the nerve terminals (Yi et al., J Neurophysiol 103:2532-2543, 2010) or at the somata of spiral ganglion neurons, they have comparable mean half-activation voltage and induce similar resting membrane potential changes, and thus our model may also provide insights into the impact of I h on synaptic physiology.

  18. Increased expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in reactive astrocytes following ischemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honsa, Pavel; Pivoňková, Helena; Harantová, Lenka; Butenko, Olena; Kriška, Ján; Džamba, Dávid; Rusňáková, Vendula; Valihrach, Lukáš; Kubista, Mikael; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 12 (2014), s. 2004-2021 ISSN 0894-1491 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-02154S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0045 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : Astrocytes * focal and global cerebral ischemia * HCN channels Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 6.031, year: 2014

  19. The Hi-Ring DCN Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galili, Michael; Kamchevska, Valerija; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    We will review recent work on the proposed hierarchical ring-based architecture (HiRing) proposed for data center networks. We will discuss the architecture and initial demonstrations of optical switching performance and time-domain synchronization......We will review recent work on the proposed hierarchical ring-based architecture (HiRing) proposed for data center networks. We will discuss the architecture and initial demonstrations of optical switching performance and time-domain synchronization...

  20. The Structural Phase Transition in Solid DCN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O. W.; Mackenzie, Gordon A.; Pawley, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron scattering measurements on deuterated hydrogen cyanide have shown that the structural phase change from a tetragonal to an orthorhombic form at 160K is a first-order transition. A transverse acoustic phonon mode, which has the symmetry of the phase change, was observed at very low energies...

  1. NEUTRON-SCATTERING STUDY OF DCN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, Gordon A.; Pawley, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Phonons in deuterium cyanide have been measured by neutron coherent inelastic scattering. The main subject of study was the transverse acoustic mode in the (110) direction polarised along (110) which is associated with the first-order structural phase transition at 160K. Measurements have shown...

  2. A neutron scattering study of DCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, G.A.; Pawley, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    Phonons in deuterium cyanide have been measured by neutron coherent inelastic scattering. The main subject of study was the transverse acoustic mode in the (110) direction polarised along (110) which is associated with the first-order structural phase transition at 160 K. Measurements have shown that the frequency decreases by about 25% between about 225 and 160 K as the transition temperature is approached. The other acoustic modes observable in the a*b* scattering plane have been measured and show no anomalous temperature dependence. Optic modes were unobservable because of the small size of the single-crystal sample which gave insufficient scattered intensity. Apart from the 'soft' mode, the measured frequencies are in good agreement with lattice dynamics calculations. (author)

  3. MEG3, HCN3 and linc01105 influence the proliferation and apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells via the HIF-1α and p53 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weitao; Dong, Kuiran; Li, Kai; Dong, Rui; Zheng, Shan

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differential expression and functional roles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in neuroblastoma tissue. LncRNA microarrays were used to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs between tumor and para-tumor tissues. In total, in tumor tissues, 3,098 and 1,704 lncRNAs were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. HCN3 and linc01105 exhibited the higher expression (P INSS) stage were -0.48, -0.58 and -0.55, respectively. In conclusion, we have identified lncRNAs that are differentially expressed in neuroblastoma tissues. The lncRNAs HCN3, linc01105, and MEG3 may be important in biological behaviors of neuroblastoma through mechanisms involving p53 pathway members such as HIF-1α, Noxa, and Bid. The expressions of MEG3, HCN3 and linc01105 are all negatively correlated with the INSS stage.

  4. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Nils G; Neubeck, Anna

    2009-10-22

    Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur.

  5. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubeck Anna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur.

  6. Noise-induced plasticity of KCNQ2/3 and HCN channels underlies vulnerability and resilience to tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Kalappa, Bopanna I; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    Vulnerability to noise-induced tinnitus is associated with increased spontaneous firing rate in dorsal cochlear nucleus principal neurons, fusiform cells. This hyperactivity is caused, at least in part, by decreased Kv7.2/3 (KCNQ2/3) potassium currents. However, the biophysical mechanisms underlying resilience to tinnitus, which is observed in noise-exposed mice that do not develop tinnitus (non-tinnitus mice), remain unknown. Our results show that noise exposure induces, on average, a reduction in KCNQ2/3 channel activity in fusiform cells in noise-exposed mice by 4 days after exposure. Tinnitus is developed in mice that do not compensate for this reduction within the next 3 days. Resilience to tinnitus is developed in mice that show a re-emergence of KCNQ2/3 channel activity and a reduction in HCN channel activity. Our results highlight KCNQ2/3 and HCN channels as potential targets for designing novel therapeutics that may promote resilience to tinnitus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07242.001 PMID:26312501

  7. Molecular Line Emission as a Tool for Galaxy Observations (LEGO). I. HCN as a tracer of moderate gas densities in molecular clouds and galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Jens; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Guzman, Andres; Menten, Karl M.

    2017-09-01

    Trends observed in galaxies, such as the Gao & Solomon relation, suggest a linear relationship between the star formation rate and the mass of dense gas available for star formation. Validation of such trends requires the establishment of reliable methods to trace the dense gas in galaxies. One frequent assumption is that the HCN (J = 1-0) transition is unambiguously associated with gas at H2 densities ≫ 104 cm-3. If so, the mass of gas at densities ≫ 104 cm-3 could be inferred from the luminosity of this emission line, LHCN (1-0). Here we use observations of the Orion A molecular cloud to show that the HCN (J = 1-0) line traces much lower densities 103 cm-3 in cold sections of this molecular cloud, corresponding to visual extinctions AV ≈ 6 mag. We also find that cold and dense gas in a cloud like Orion produces too little HCN emission to explain LHCN (1-0) in star forming galaxies, suggesting that galaxies might contain a hitherto unknown source of HCN emission. In our sample of molecules observed at frequencies near 100 GHz (also including 12CO, 13CO, C18O, CN, and CCH), N2H+ is the only species clearly associated with relatively dense gas.

  8. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to

  9. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to

  10. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  11. Inhibition of GluR Current in Microvilli of Sensory Neurons via Na+-Microdomain Coupling Among GluR, HCN Channel, and Na+/K+ Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Kawasaki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutamatergic dendritic EPSPs evoked in cortical pyramidal neurons are depressed by activation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels expressed in dendritic spines. This depression has been attributed to shunting effects of HCN current (Ih on input resistance or Ih deactivation. Primary sensory neurons in the rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (MTN have the somata covered by spine-like microvilli that express HCN channels. In rat MTN neurons, we demonstrated that Ih enhancement apparently diminished the glutamate receptor (GluR current (IGluR evoked by puff application of glutamate/AMPA and enhanced a transient outward current following IGluR (OT-IGluR. This suggests that some outward current opposes inward IGluR. The IGluR inhibition displayed a U-shaped voltage-dependence with a minimal inhibition around the resting membrane potential, suggesting that simple shunting effects or deactivation of Ih cannot explain the U-shaped voltage-dependence. Confocal imaging of Na+ revealed that GluR activation caused an accumulation of Na+ in the microvilli, which can cause a negative shift of the reversal potential for Ih (Eh. Taken together, it was suggested that IGluR evoked in MTN neurons is opposed by a transient decrease or increase in standing inward or outward Ih, respectively, both of which can be caused by negative shifts of Eh, as consistent with the U-shaped voltage-dependence of the IGluR inhibition and the OT-IGluR generation. An electron-microscopic immunohistochemical study revealed the colocalization of HCN channels and glutamatergic synapses in microvilli of MTN neurons, which would provide a morphological basis for the functional interaction between HCN and GluR channels. Mathematical modeling eliminated the possibilities of the involvements of Ih deactivation and/or shunting effect and supported the negative shift of Eh which causes the U-shaped voltage-dependent inhibition of IGluR.

  12. Searching for Faint Traces of CO(2-1) and HCN(4-3) Gas In Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford Lambros, Zachary; Hughes, A. Meredith

    2018-01-01

    The surprising presence of molecular gas in the debris disks around main sequence stars provides an opportunity to study the dissipation of primordial gas and, potentially, the composition of gas in other solar systems. Molecular gas is not expected to survive beyond the pre-main sequence phase, and it is not yet clear whether the gas is a remnant of the primordial protoplanetary material or whether the gas, like the dust, is second-generation material produced by collisional or photodesorption from planetesimals, exocomets, or the icy mantles of dust grains. Here we present two related efforts to characterize the prevalence and properties of gas in debris disks. First, we place the lowest limits to date on the CO emission from an M star debris disk, using 0.3" resolution observations of CO(2-1) emission from the AU Mic system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We place a 3-sigma upper limit on the integrated flux of 0.39 Jy km/s, corresponding to a maximum CO mass of 5e10-6 (Earth Masses) if the gas is in LTE. We also present the results of an ALMA search for HCN(4-3) emission from the prototypical gas-rich debris disk around 49 Ceti at a spatial resolution of 0.3". Despite hosting one of the brightest CO-rich debris disks yet discovered, our observations of 49 Ceti also yield a low upper limit of 0.057 Jy km/s in the HCN line, leaving CO as the only molecule clearly detected in emission from a debris disk. We employ several methods of detecting faint line emission from debris disks, including a model based on Keplerian kinematics as well as a spectral shifting method previously used to detect faint CO emission from the Fomalhaut debris disk, and compare our results.

  13. Submillimeter Monitoring of the HCN Molecule in Fragment C of the Split Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahus, Michal; Kueppers, M.; Jarchow, C.; Paganini, L.; Hartogh, P.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2007-10-01

    Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 is a member of the Jupiter family which broke up into several fragments in 1995. After the unfavourable return in 2000/2001, the comet passed very close to the Earth in 2006, with the perigee distance below 0.1 AU. Simultaneously, it was well situated on the sky, which resulted in several observing campaigns. We observed this comet using the SMT facility at the Mt. Graham International Observatory in Arizona. In particular, on 5 nights between 10 and 22 May 2006 the HCN molecule in fragment C was spectroscopically monitored, through the J(3-2) and J(4-3) transitions. Using a simplified model, we found the expansion velocity of the HCN coma to be equal to 0.8 ± 0.1 km/s, what is a typical value for a comet at heliocentric distance r = 1 AU. We also reconstructed the production rates Q of this molecule, finding Q(r=1AU) = 2.7 ± 0.1 × 1025 molec/s. Our result is consistent with most of the other estimates, including the CN production rate. Furthermore, taking advantage of the fairly small beam sizes during our campaign (ranging from 600 km to 1200 km in radius), we detected short-term variability of the production rate, presumably stimulated by the nucleus rotation. Although our analysis did not yield a unique rotation period, we found a limited number of possible solutions. We will discuss them in detail along with a comparison with other period claims, and propose a possible scenario that links most of the periodicities reported so far for this comet. The SMT is operated by the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO), Steward Observatory, University of Arizona.

  14. Lewis acid-base interactions in weakly bound formaldehyde complexes with CO2, HCN, and FCN: considerations on the cooperative H-bonding effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivelino, Roberto

    2008-01-17

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations reveal that HCN and mainly FCN can form Lewis acid-base complexes with formaldehyde associated with cooperative H bonds, as first noticed by Wallen et al. (Blatchford, M. A.; Raveendran, P.; Wallen, S. L. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 14818-14819) for CO2-philic materials under supercritical conditions. The present results, obtained with MP2(Full)/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations, show that the degeneracy of the nu(2) mode in free HCN or FCN is removed upon complexation in the same fashion as that of CO2. The splitting of these bands along with the electron structure analysis provides substantial evidence of the interaction of electron lone pairs of the carbonyl oxygen with the electron-deficient carbon atom of the cyanides. Also, this work investigates the role of H bonds acting as additional stabilizing interactions in the complexes by performing the energetic and geometric characterization.

  15. Hydrogen constituents of the mesosphere inferred from positive ions - H2O, CH4, H2CO, H2O2, and HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, E.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations in the mesosphere of H2O, CH4, H2CO, H2O2, and HCN were inferred from data on positive ion compositions, obtained from one mid-latitude and four high-latitude rocket flights. The inferred concentrations were found to agree only partially with the ground-based microwave measurements and/or model prediction by Garcia and Solomon (1985). The CH4 concentration was found to vary between 70 and 4 ppb in daytime and 900 and 100 ppbv at night, respectively. Unexpectedly high H2CO concentrations were obtained, with H2CO/H2O ratios between 0.0006 and 0.1, and a mean HCN volume mixing ratio of 6 x 10 to the -10th was inferred.

  16. Rate Coefficients for Reactions of Ethynyl Radical (C2H) With HCN and CH3CN: Implications for the Formation of Comples Nitriles on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoobler, Ray J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of C2H + HCN yields products and C2H + CH3CN yields products have been measured over the temperature range 262-360 K. These experiments represent an ongoing effort to accurately measure reaction rate coefficients of the ethynyl radical, C2H, relevant to planetary atmospheres such as those of Jupiter and Saturn and its satellite Titan. Laser photolysis of C2H2 is used to produce C2H, and transient infrared laser absorption is employed to measure the decay of C2H to obtain the subsequent reaction rates in a transverse flow cell. Rate constants for the reaction C2H + HCN yields products are found to increase significantly with increasing temperature and are measured to be (3.9-6.2) x 10(exp 13) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 297-360 K. The rate constants for the reaction C2H + CH3CN yields products are also found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and are measured to be (1.0-2.1) x 10(exp -12) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 262-360 K. For the reaction C2H + HCN yields products, ab initio calculations of transition state structures are used to infer that the major products form via an addition/elimination pathway. The measured rate constants for the reaction of C2H + HCN yields products are significantly smaller than values currently employed in photochemical models of Titan, which will affect the HC3N distribution.

  17. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  18. Sugar-to-base correlation in nucleic acids with a 5D APSY-HCNCH or two 3D APSY-HCN experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraehenbuehl, Barbara; Hofmann, Daniela; Maris, Christophe; Wider, Gerhard, E-mail: gsw@mol.biol.ethz.ch [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    A five-dimensional (5D) APSY (automated projection spectroscopy) HCNCH experiment is presented, which allows unambiguous correlation of sugar to base nuclei in nucleic acids. The pulse sequence uses multiple quantum (MQ) evolution which enables long constant-time evolution periods in all dimensions, an improvement that can also benefit non-APSY applications. Applied with an RNA with 23 nucleotides the 5D APSY-HCNCH experiment produced a complete and highly precise 5D chemical shift list within 1.5 h. Alternatively, and for molecules where the out-and-stay 5D experiment sensitivity is not sufficient, a set of out-and-back 3D APSY-HCN experiments is proposed: an intra-base (3D APSY-b-HCN) experiment in an MQ or in a TROSY version, and an MQ sugar-to-base (3D APSY-s-HCN) experiment. The two 3D peak lists require subsequent matching via the N1/9 chemical shift values to one 5D peak list. Optimization of the 3D APSY experiments for maximal precision in the N1/9 dimension allowed matching of all {sup 15}N chemical shift values contained in both 3D peak lists. The precise 5D chemical shift correlation lists resulting from the 5D experiment or a pair of 3D experiments also provide a valuable basis for subsequent connection to chemical shifts derived with other experiments.

  19. Sugar-to-base correlation in nucleic acids with a 5D APSY-HCNCH or two 3D APSY-HCN experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krähenbühl, Barbara; Hofmann, Daniela; Maris, Christophe; Wider, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    A five-dimensional (5D) APSY (automated projection spectroscopy) HCNCH experiment is presented, which allows unambiguous correlation of sugar to base nuclei in nucleic acids. The pulse sequence uses multiple quantum (MQ) evolution which enables long constant-time evolution periods in all dimensions, an improvement that can also benefit non-APSY applications. Applied with an RNA with 23 nucleotides the 5D APSY-HCNCH experiment produced a complete and highly precise 5D chemical shift list within 1.5 h. Alternatively, and for molecules where the out-and-stay 5D experiment sensitivity is not sufficient, a set of out-and-back 3D APSY-HCN experiments is proposed: an intra-base (3D APSY-b-HCN) experiment in an MQ or in a TROSY version, and an MQ sugar-to-base (3D APSY-s-HCN) experiment. The two 3D peak lists require subsequent matching via the N1/9 chemical shift values to one 5D peak list. Optimization of the 3D APSY experiments for maximal precision in the N1/9 dimension allowed matching of all 15 N chemical shift values contained in both 3D peak lists. The precise 5D chemical shift correlation lists resulting from the 5D experiment or a pair of 3D experiments also provide a valuable basis for subsequent connection to chemical shifts derived with other experiments.

  20. Chemical content of the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star R Doradus. Non-LTE abundance analysis of CO, SiO, and HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Sande, M.; Decin, L.; Lombaert, R.; Khouri, T.; de Koter, A.; Wyrowski, F.; De Nutte, R.; Homan, W.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The stellar outflows of low- to intermediate-mass stars are characterised by a rich chemistry. Condensation of molecular gas species into dust grains is a key component in a chain of physical processes that leads to the onset of a stellar wind. In order to improve our understanding of the coupling between the micro-scale chemistry and macro-scale dynamics, we need to retrieve the abundance of molecules throughout the outflow. Aims: Our aim is to determine the radial abundance profile of SiO and HCN throughout the stellar outflow of R Dor, an oxygen-rich AGB star with a low mass-loss rate. SiO is thought to play an essential role in the dust-formation process of oxygen-rich AGB stars. The presence of HCN in an oxygen-rich environment is thought to be due to non-equilibrium chemistry in the inner wind. Methods: We analysed molecular transitions of CO, SiO, and HCN measured with the APEX telescope and all three instruments on the Herschel Space Observatory, together with data available in the literature. Photometric data and the infrared spectrum measured by ISO-SWS were used to constrain the dust component of the outflow. Using both continuum and line radiative transfer methods, a physical envelope model of both gas and dust was established. We performed an analysis of the SiO and HCN molecular transitions in order to calculate their abundances. Results: We have obtained an envelope model that describes the dust and the gas in the outflow, and determined the abundance of SiO and HCN throughout the region of the stellar outflow probed by our molecular data. For SiO, we find that the initial abundance lies between 5.5 × 10-5 and 6.0 × 10-5 with respect to H2. The abundance profile is constant up to 60 ± 10 R∗, after which it declines following a Gaussian profile with an e-folding radius of 3.5 ± 0.5 × 1013 cm or 1.4 ± 0.2 R∗. For HCN, we find an initial abundance of 5.0 × 10-7 with respect to H2. The Gaussian profile that describes the decline

  1. Development of selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) for NH{sub 3} and HCN removal from gasification gas; Selektiivisen katalyyttisen hapetusprosessin (SCO) kehittaeminen kaasutuskaasun NH{sub 3}:n ja HCN:n poistoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T.; Heiskanen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In gasification, reactive nitrogen compounds (mainly NH{sub 3} and HCN) are formed from fuel nitrogen. If the gas containing NH{sub 3} is burned, a high NO{sub x} emission may be formed. The content of nitrogen compounds of the hot gasification gas could be reduced in Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) process. In this process small amounts of reactive oxidisers are injected into the gas in order to convert NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2}. The utilization of SCO process together with low NO{sub x} burners in advanced gasification power stations might offer an alternative for flue gas treatment technologies like SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction). In the earlier research, conditions were found, where oxidizers reacted selectively with ammonia in the gasification gas. Highest ammonia reduction took place in the aluminium oxide bed in the presence of NO and O{sub 2}. The aim of this study is to examine the reaction mechanism in order to be able to further evaluate the development possibilities of this kind process. The effect of composition and the amount of added oxidizer, the content of combustible gas components, space velocity, pressure and temperature will be studied. The experiments are carried out with the laboratory scale high pressure flow reactor of VTT Energy. Kinetic modelling of the experimental results is carried out in co-operation with the combustion chemistry group of Aabo Akademi. The aim of the modelling work is to bring insight to the gas-phase reactions that are important for the SCO-process. (orig.)

  2. Adsorption behavior of Co anchored on graphene sheets toward NO, SO2, NH3, CO and HCN molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yanan; Chen, Weiguang; Li, Chenggang; Pan, Lijun; Dai, Xianqi; Ma, Dongwei

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In contrast to the pristine graphene, a vacancy defect in graphene strongly stabilizes the Co atom. • The positively charged of Co atom on graphene can regulate the stability of gas molecules. • Different gas molecules can modulate the electronic structure of Co–graphene systems. • The adsorbed NO on Co–graphene can effectively regulate the magnetic properties of systems. - Abstract: Based on the first-principles of density-functional theory (DFT), the effects of gas adsorption on the change in geometric stability, electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene with anchored Co (Co–graphene) systems were investigated. A single Co adatom interacts much weaker with pristine graphene (Co/pri–graphene) than with the graphene containing a single vacancy (Co/SV–graphene). The Co dopant provides more electrons to the dangling bonds of carbon atom at defective site and exhibits more positive charges, which makes Co/SV–graphene less prone to be adsorbed by gas molecules in comparison to Co/pri–graphene. It is found that the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Co–graphene systems can be modulated by adsorbing gas molecules. Except the NH 3 molecule, the adsorbed NO, SO 2 , CO or HCN as electron acceptors on the Co/pri–graphene can exhibit semiconducting properties. Among the gas molecules, the strong adsorption of NO molecule can effectively regulate the magnetic properties of Co–graphene systems. Moreover, the stable configuration of Co/SV–graphene is more likely to be the gas sensor for detecting NO and SO 2 . The results validate that the reactivity of atomic-scale catalyst is supported on graphene sheets, which is expected to be potentially efficient in the gas sensors and electronic device

  3. The influence of zinc hydroxystannate on reducing toxic gases (CO, NO{sub x} and HCN) generation and fire hazards of thermoplastic polyurethane composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bibo; Sheng, Haibo [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Yongqian [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Jiangsu, Suzhou 215123 (China); Song, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Yan [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Jiangsu, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hu, Yuan, E-mail: yuanhu@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Jiangsu, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hu, Weizhao, E-mail: hwz1988@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The ZnHS could significantly enhance the mechanical properties of the TPU composites. • ZnHS has excellent smoke suppression and reduction the HRR for TPU composites. • ZnHS shows significant decrease in CO, HCN, NO{sub x} for TPU composites. • These improvements are due to charring and catalytic degradation the toxic gases. - Abstract: A uniform zinc hydroxystannate (ZnHS) microcube was synthesized to reduce toxicity and fire hazards of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites using ammonium polyphosphate as a flame retardant agent. The structure, morphology and thermal properties of ZnHS were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. Smoke suppression properties and synergistic flame retardant effect of ZnHS on flame retardant TPU composites were intensively investigated by smoke density test, cone calorimeter test, and thermalgravimetric analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry and tube furnace were employed to evaluate the toxic gases (CO, NO{sub x} and HCN) of TPU composites. The incorporation of ZnHS into TPU matrix effectively improved the fire safety and restrained the smoke density, which is attributed to that the char residue catalyzed by ZnHS enhanced barrier effect that reduced peak heat release rate, total heat release, smoke particles and organic volatiles during combustion. Furthermore, the ZnHS synergist demonstrated high efficiency in catalytic degradation of the toxic gases, which obviously decreased total volatiled product and toxic volatiles evolved, such as the CO, HCN and NO{sub x}, indicating suppressed toxicity of the TPU composites.

  4. Fluoxetine ameliorates cognitive impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via down-regulation of HCN2 surface expression in the hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Lu, Yun; Chen, Cheng; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Shen, Guanxin; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes cognitive impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), could play a neuroprotective role against chronic cerebral hypoperfusion injury and to clarify underlying mechanisms of its efficacy. Rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO). Two weeks later, rats were treated with 30 mg/kg fluoxetine (intragastric injection, i.g.) for 6 weeks. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) and novel objects recognition (NOR) test. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Western blotting was used to quantify the protein levels. Our results showed that fluoxetine treatment significantly improved the cognitive impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced inhibitory of LTP. Furthermore, 2VO caused an up-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2) surface expressions in the hippocampal CA1 area and fluoxetine also effectively recovered the disorder of HCN2 surface expressions, which may be a possible mechanism that fluoxetine treatment ameliorates cognitive impairments in rats with CCH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A new ab initio potential energy surface for the collisional excitation of HCN by para- and ortho-H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel, E-mail: otonieldenisalpizar@gmail.com [Université de Bordeaux, ISM, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Matanzas, Matanzas 40100 (Cuba); Kalugina, Yulia [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 540, 76058, Le Havre (France); Department of Optics and Spectroscopy, Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin av., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Stoecklin, Thierry [Université de Bordeaux, ISM, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Vera, Mario Hernández [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 540, 76058, Le Havre (France); Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza, La Habana 10600 (Cuba); Lique, François, E-mail: francois.lique@univ-lehavre.fr [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Matanzas, Matanzas 40100 (Cuba)

    2013-12-14

    We present a new four-dimensional potential energy surface for the collisional excitation of HCN by H{sub 2}. Ab initio calculations of the HCN–H{sub 2} van der Waals complex, considering both molecules as rigid rotors, were carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12a] level of theory using an augmented correlation-consistent triple zeta (aVTZ) basis set. The equilibrium structure is linear HCN–H{sub 2} with the nitrogen pointing towards H{sub 2} at an intermolecular separation of 7.20 a{sub 0}. The corresponding well depth is −195.20 cm{sup −1}. A secondary minimum of −183.59 cm{sup −1} was found for a T-shape configuration with the H of HCN pointing to the center of mass of H{sub 2}. We also determine the rovibrational energy levels of the HCN–para-H{sub 2} and HCN–ortho-H{sub 2} complexes. The calculated dissociation energies for the para and ortho complexes are 37.79 cm{sup −1} and 60.26 cm{sup −1}, respectively. The calculated ro-vibrational transitions in the HCN–H{sub 2} complex are found to agree by more than 0.5% with the available experimental data, confirming the accuracy of the potential energy surface.

  6. Synthesis IR spectra and crystal structure of N-(4-bromophenyl)-1,1,1-trifluoroacetyl-acetonimine HN(C6H4Br)xC(Me)xCHxC(CF3)xO(HL) and its molecular complex with tungstene(4) oxotetrachloride WOCl4xHL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergienko, V.S.; Ilyukhin, A.B.; Abramenko, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    Synthesis, IR spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction studies of compound HN(C 6 H 4 Br)xC(Me)xCHxC(CF 3 )xO(HL) (1) and of molecular complex WOCl 4 xHL(2) have been conducted. In 1 and 2 HL molecule exists in ketoamine tautomeric form (acid proton is localized at nitrogen atom). The results of 1 and 2 study are compared with literature data on structures of HL type molecules and Mo(6) molecular complexes with β-enaminevinylketone, as well as with the structure of chelate compound WOCl 3 L 1 , where L 1 - anion of N-phenylacetylacetonimine

  7. Transportation system requirements document. Revision 1 DCN01. Supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The original Transportation System Requirements Document described the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of that document was to define the system-level requirements. These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presented an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. This revision of the document contains only the pages that have been modified

  8. Infrared Solar Spectroscopic Measurements of Free Tropospheric CO, C2H6, and HCN above Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Seasonal Variations and Evidence for Enhanced Emissions from the Southeast Asian Tropical Fires of 1997-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Stephen, T. M.; Pougatchev, N. S.; Fishman, J.; David, S. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Novelli, P. C.; Jones, N. B.

    1999-01-01

    High spectral resolution (0.003 per cm) infrared solar absorption measurements of CO, C2H6, and HCN have been recorded at the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change station on Mauna Loa, Hawaii, (19.5N, 155.6W, altitude 3.4 km). The observations were obtained on over 250 days between August 1995 and February 1998. Column measurements are reported for the 3.4-16 km altitude region, which corresponds approximately to the free troposphere above the station. Average CO mixing ratios computed for this layer have been compared with flask sampling CO measurements obtained in situ at the station during the same time period. Both show asymmetrical seasonal cycles superimposed on significant variability. The first 2 years of observations exhibit a broad January-April maximum and a sharper CO minimum during late summer. The C2H6 and CO 3.4-16 km columns were highly correlated throughout the observing period with the C2H6/CO slope intermediate between higher and lower values derived from similar infrared spectroscopic measurements at 32'N and 45'S latitude, respectively. Variable enhancements in CO, C2H6, and particularly HCN were observed beginning in about September 1997. The maximum HCN free tropospheric monthly mean column observed in November 1997 corresponds to an average 3.4-16 km mixing ratio of 0.7 ppbv (1 ppbv = 10(exp -9) per unit volume), more than a factor of 3 above the background level. The HCN enhancements continued through the end of the observational series. Back-trajectory calculations suggest that the emissions originated at low northern latitudes in southeast Asia. Surface CO mixing ratios and the C2H6 tropospheric columns measured during the same time also showed anomalous autumn 1997 maxima. The intense and widespread tropical wild fires that burned during the strong El Nino warm phase of 1997- 1998 are the likely source of the elevated emission products.

  9. Qualification of a Multi-Channel Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Monitoring CO, HCl, HCN, HF, and CO2 Aboard Manned Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.; Meyer, Marit E.; Kulis, Michael J.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of specific combustion products can provide early-warning detection of accidental fires aboard manned spacecraft and also identify the source and severity of combustion events. Furthermore, quantitative in situ measurements are important for gauging levels of exposure to hazardous gases, particularly on long-duration missions where analysis of returned samples becomes impractical. Absorption spectroscopy using tunable laser sources in the 2 to 5 micrometer wavelength range enables accurate, unambiguous detection of CO, HCl, HCN, HF, and CO2, which are produced in varying amounts through the heating of electrical components and packaging materials commonly used aboard spacecraft. Here, we report on calibration and testing of a five-channel laser absorption spectrometer designed to accurately monitor ambient gas-phase concentrations of these five compounds, with low-level detection limits based on the Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations. The instrument employs a two-pass absorption cell with a total optical pathlength of 50 cm and a dedicated infrared semiconductor laser source for each target gas. We present results from testing the five-channel sensor in the presence of trace concentrations of the target compounds that were introduced using both gas sources and oxidative pyrolysis (non-flaming combustion) of solid material mixtures.

  10. Ammonothermal synthesis of alkali-alkaline earth metal and alkali-rare earth metal carbodiimides. K{sub 5-x}M{sub x}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2+x}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 1-x} (M = Sr, Eu) and Na{sub 4.32}Sr{sub 0.68}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2.68}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 0.32}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallmann, Mathias; Haeusler, Jonas; Cordes, Niklas; Schnick, Wolfgang [Department of Chemistry, University of Munich (LMU) (Germany)

    2017-12-13

    Alkali-alkaline earth metal and alkali-rare earth metal carbodiimides, namely K{sub 5-x}M{sub x}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2+x}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 1-x} (x = 0 - 1) (M = Sr, Eu) and Na{sub 4.32}Sr{sub 0.68}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2.68}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 0.32}, were synthesized under ammonothermal conditions in high-pressure autoclaves. The structures of the three compounds can be derived from homeotypic K{sub 5}H(CN{sub 2}){sub 3} and Na{sub 5}H(CN{sub 2}){sub 3} by partial substitution of K{sup +} or Na{sup +}by Sr{sup 2+} or Eu{sup 2+}. The reactions were carried out in two step syntheses (T{sub 1} = 673 K, T{sub 2} = 823 K) starting from sodium or potassium azide, dicyandiamide and strontium or Eu(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}, respectively. The crystal structures were solved and refined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data [K{sub 4.16}Sr{sub 0.84}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2.84}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 0.16}: space group Im3m (no. 229), a = 7.8304(5) Aa, Z = 2, R{sub 1} = 0.024, wR{sub 2} = 0.052; K{sub 4.40}Eu{sub 0.60}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2.60}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 0.40}: space group Im anti 3m (no. 229), a = 7.8502(6) Aa, Z = 2, R{sub 1} = 0.022, wR{sub 2} = 0.049]. In contrast to the potassium carbodiimides, the sodium-strontium carbodiimide was only synthesized as microcrystalline powder. The crystal structure was determined by powder X-ray diffraction and refined by the Rietveld method [Na{sub 4.32}Sr{sub 0.68}(CN{sub 2}){sub 2.68}(HCN{sub 2}){sub 0.32}: space group Im3m (no. 229), a = 7.2412(1) Aa, Z = 2, R{sub wp} = 0.050]. The presence of hydrogencyanamide units ([HNCN]{sup -}) next to carbodiimide units ([CN{sub 2}]{sup 2-}) in all compounds was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Rates and equilibrium constants of the ligand-induced conformational transition of an HCN ion channel protein domain determined by DEER spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collauto, Alberto; DeBerg, Hannah A; Kaufmann, Royi; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2017-06-14

    Ligand binding can induce significant conformational changes in proteins. The mechanism of this process couples equilibria associated with the ligand binding event and the conformational change. Here we show that by combining the application of W-band double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy with microfluidic rapid freeze quench (μRFQ) it is possible to resolve these processes and obtain both equilibrium constants and reaction rates. We studied the conformational transition of the nitroxide labeled, isolated carboxy-terminal cyclic-nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HCN2 ion channel upon binding of the ligand 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Using model-based global analysis, the time-resolved data of the μRFQ DEER experiments directly provide fractional populations of the open and closed conformations as a function of time. We modeled the ligand-induced conformational change in the protein using a four-state model: apo/open (AO), apo/closed (AC), bound/open (BO), bound/closed (BC). These species interconvert according to AC + L ⇌ AO + L ⇌ BO ⇌ BC. By analyzing the concentration dependence of the relative contributions of the closed and open conformations at equilibrium, we estimated the equilibrium constants for the two conformational equilibria and the open-state ligand dissociation constant. Analysis of the time-resolved μRFQ DEER data gave estimates for the intrinsic rates of ligand binding and unbinding as well as the rates of the conformational change. This demonstrates that DEER can quantitatively resolve both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of ligand binding and the associated conformational change.

  12. Structural Changes and Lack of HCN1 Channels in the Binaural Auditory Brainstem of the Naked Mole-Rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessele, Nikodemus; Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Omerbašić, Damir; Park, Thomas J; Koch, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber) live in large eu-social, underground colonies in narrow burrows and are exposed to a large repertoire of communication signals but negligible binaural sound localization cues, such as interaural time and intensity differences. We therefore asked whether monaural and binaural auditory brainstem nuclei in the naked mole-rat are differentially adjusted to this acoustic environment. Using antibody stainings against excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic structures, namely the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT1 and the glycine transporter GlyT2 we identified all major auditory brainstem nuclei except the superior paraolivary nucleus in these animals. Naked mole-rats possess a well structured medial superior olive, with a similar synaptic arrangement to interaural-time-difference encoding animals. The neighboring lateral superior olive, which analyzes interaural intensity differences, is large and elongated, whereas the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, which provides the contralateral inhibitory input to these binaural nuclei, is reduced in size. In contrast, the cochlear nucleus, the nuclei of the lateral lemniscus and the inferior colliculus are not considerably different when compared to other rodent species. Most interestingly, binaural auditory brainstem nuclei lack the membrane-bound hyperpolarization-activated channel HCN1, a voltage-gated ion channel that greatly contributes to the fast integration times in binaural nuclei of the superior olivary complex in other species. This suggests substantially lengthened membrane time constants and thus prolonged temporal integration of inputs in binaural auditory brainstem neurons and might be linked to the severely degenerated sound localization abilities in these animals.

  13. Experimental investigation of aminoacetonitrile formation through the Strecker synthesis in astrophysical-like conditions: reactivity of methanimine (CH2NH), ammonia (NH3), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danger, G.; Borget, F.; Chomat, M.; Duvernay, F.; Theulé, P.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Le Sergeant D'Hendecourt, L.; Chiavassa, T.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Studing chemical reactivity in astrophysical environments is an important means for improving our understanding of the origin of the organic matter in molecular clouds, in protoplanetary disks, and possibly, as a final destination, in our solar system. Laboratory simulations of the reactivity of ice analogs provide important insight into the reactivity in these environments. Here, we use these experimental simulations to investigate the Strecker synthesis leading to the formation of aminoacetonitrile in astrophysical-like conditions. The aminoacetonitrile is an interesting compound because it was detected in SgrB2, hence could be a precursor of the smallest amino acid molecule, glycine, in astrophysical environments. Aims: We present the first experimental investigation of the formation of aminoacetonitrile NH2CH2CN from the thermal processing of ices including methanimine (CH2NH), ammonia (NH3), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in interstellar-like conditions without VUV photons or particules. Methods: We use Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to monitor the ice evolution during its warming. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are then used to identify the aminoacetonitrile formation. Results: We demonstrate that methanimine can react with -CN during the warming of ice analogs containing at 20 K methanimine, ammonia, and [NH4+ -CN] salt. During the ice warming, this reaction leads to the formation of poly(methylene-imine) polymers. The polymer length depend on the initial ratio of mass contained in methanimine to that in the [NH4+ -CN] salt. In a methanimine excess, long polymers are formed. As the methanimine is progressively diluted in the [NH4+ -CN] salt, the polymer length decreases until the aminoacetonitrile formation at 135 K. Therefore, these results demonstrate that aminoacetonitrile can be formed through the second step of the Strecker synthesis in astrophysical-like conditions.

  14. Structural Changes and Lack of HCN1 Channels in the Binaural Auditory Brainstem of the Naked Mole-Rat (Heterocephalus glaber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikodemus Gessele

    Full Text Available Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber live in large eu-social, underground colonies in narrow burrows and are exposed to a large repertoire of communication signals but negligible binaural sound localization cues, such as interaural time and intensity differences. We therefore asked whether monaural and binaural auditory brainstem nuclei in the naked mole-rat are differentially adjusted to this acoustic environment. Using antibody stainings against excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic structures, namely the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT1 and the glycine transporter GlyT2 we identified all major auditory brainstem nuclei except the superior paraolivary nucleus in these animals. Naked mole-rats possess a well structured medial superior olive, with a similar synaptic arrangement to interaural-time-difference encoding animals. The neighboring lateral superior olive, which analyzes interaural intensity differences, is large and elongated, whereas the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, which provides the contralateral inhibitory input to these binaural nuclei, is reduced in size. In contrast, the cochlear nucleus, the nuclei of the lateral lemniscus and the inferior colliculus are not considerably different when compared to other rodent species. Most interestingly, binaural auditory brainstem nuclei lack the membrane-bound hyperpolarization-activated channel HCN1, a voltage-gated ion channel that greatly contributes to the fast integration times in binaural nuclei of the superior olivary complex in other species. This suggests substantially lengthened membrane time constants and thus prolonged temporal integration of inputs in binaural auditory brainstem neurons and might be linked to the severely degenerated sound localization abilities in these animals.

  15. Adsorption behavior of Co anchored on graphene sheets toward NO, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CO and HCN molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanan, E-mail: yntang2010@hotmail.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Quantum Materials Research Center, Zhengzhou Normal University, Henan 450044 (China); Chen, Weiguang; Li, Chenggang; Pan, Lijun [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Quantum Materials Research Center, Zhengzhou Normal University, Henan 450044 (China); Dai, Xianqi, E-mail: xqdai@henannu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Quantum Materials Research Center, Zhengzhou Normal University, Henan 450044 (China); Ma, Dongwei [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In contrast to the pristine graphene, a vacancy defect in graphene strongly stabilizes the Co atom. • The positively charged of Co atom on graphene can regulate the stability of gas molecules. • Different gas molecules can modulate the electronic structure of Co–graphene systems. • The adsorbed NO on Co–graphene can effectively regulate the magnetic properties of systems. - Abstract: Based on the first-principles of density-functional theory (DFT), the effects of gas adsorption on the change in geometric stability, electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene with anchored Co (Co–graphene) systems were investigated. A single Co adatom interacts much weaker with pristine graphene (Co/pri–graphene) than with the graphene containing a single vacancy (Co/SV–graphene). The Co dopant provides more electrons to the dangling bonds of carbon atom at defective site and exhibits more positive charges, which makes Co/SV–graphene less prone to be adsorbed by gas molecules in comparison to Co/pri–graphene. It is found that the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Co–graphene systems can be modulated by adsorbing gas molecules. Except the NH{sub 3} molecule, the adsorbed NO, SO{sub 2}, CO or HCN as electron acceptors on the Co/pri–graphene can exhibit semiconducting properties. Among the gas molecules, the strong adsorption of NO molecule can effectively regulate the magnetic properties of Co–graphene systems. Moreover, the stable configuration of Co/SV–graphene is more likely to be the gas sensor for detecting NO and SO{sub 2}. The results validate that the reactivity of atomic-scale catalyst is supported on graphene sheets, which is expected to be potentially efficient in the gas sensors and electronic device.

  16. FTIR time-series of biomass burning products (HCN, C2H6, C2H2, CH3OH, and HCOOH at Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E and comparisons with model data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. A. Jones

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E, situated in the Indian Ocean at about 800 km east of Madagascar, is appropriately located to monitor the outflow of biomass burning pollution from Southern Africa and Madagascar, in the case of short-lived compounds, and from other Southern Hemispheric landmasses such as South America, in the case of longer-lived species. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR solar absorption observations are sensitive to a large number of biomass burning products. We present in this work the FTIR retrieval strategies, suitable for very humid sites such as Reunion Island, for hydrogen cyanide (HCN, ethane (C2H6, acetylene (C2H2, methanol (CH3OH, and formic acid (HCOOH. We provide their total columns time-series obtained from the measurements during August–October 2004, May–October 2007, and May 2009–December 2010. We show that biomass burning explains a large part of the observed seasonal and interannual variability of the chemical species. The correlations between the daily mean total columns of each of the species and those of CO, also measured with our FTIR spectrometer at Reunion Island, are very good from August to November (R ≥ 0.86. This allows us to derive, for that period, the following enhancement ratios with respect to CO: 0.0047, 0.0078, 0.0020, 0.012, and 0.0046 for HCN, C2H6, C2H2, CH3OH, and HCOOH, respectively. The HCN ground-based data are compared to the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, while the data for the other species are compared to the IMAGESv2 model. We show that using the HCN/CO ratio derived from our measurements (0.0047 in GEOS-Chem reduces the underestimation of the modeled HCN columns compared with the FTIR measurements. The comparisons between IMAGESv2 and the long-lived species C2H6 and C2H2 indicate that the biomass burning emissions used in the model (from the GFED3 inventory are probably underestimated in the late September–October period for all years of measurements, and

  17. Quantum dynamics study on the binding of a positron to vibrationally excited states of hydrogen cyanide molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Kento; Yoshida, Takahiko; Kita, Yukiumi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2017-05-01

    We present computational results of vibrationally enhanced positron annihilation in the e+ + HCN/DCN collisions within a local complex potential model. Vibrationally elastic and inelastic cross sections and effective annihilation rates were calculated by solving a time-dependent complex-potential Schrödinger equation under the ab initio potential energy surface for the positron attached HCN molecule, [HCN; e+], with multi-component configuration interaction level (Kita and Tachikawa, 2014). We discuss the effect of vibrational excitation on the positron affinities from the obtained vibrational resonance features.

  18. Ex situ generation of stoichiometric HCN and its application in the Pd-catalysed cyanation of aryl bromides: evidence for a transmetallation step between two oxidative addition Pd-complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Steffan K; Eikeland, Espen Z; Taarning, Esben; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2017-12-01

    A protocol for the Pd-catalysed cyanation of aryl bromides using near stoichiometric and gaseous hydrogen cyanide is reported for the first time. A two-chamber reactor was adopted for the safe liberation of ex situ generated HCN in a closed environment, which proved highly efficient in the Ni-catalysed hydrocyanation as the test reaction. Subsequently, this setup was exploited for converting a range of aryl and heteroaryl bromides (28 examples) directly into the corresponding benzonitriles in high yields, without the need for cyanide salts. Cyanation was achieved employing the Pd(0) precatalyst, P( t Bu) 3 -Pd-G3 and a weak base, potassium acetate, in a dioxane-water solvent mixture. The methodology was also suitable for the synthesis of 13 C-labelled benzonitriles with ex situ generated 13 C-hydrogen cyanide. Stoichiometric studies with the metal complexes were undertaken to delineate the mechanism for this catalytic transformation. Treatment of Pd(P( t Bu) 3 ) 2 with H 13 CN in THF provided two Pd-hydride complexes, (P( t Bu) 3 ) 2 Pd(H)( 13 CN), and [(P( t Bu) 3 )Pd(H)] 2 Pd( 13 CN) 4 , both of which were isolated and characterised by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis. When the same reaction was performed in a THF : water mixture in the presence of KOAc, only (P( t Bu) 3 ) 2 Pd(H)( 13 CN) was formed. Subjection of this cyano hydride metal complex with the oxidative addition complex (P( t Bu) 3 )Pd(Ph)(Br) in a 1 : 1 ratio in THF led to a transmetallation step with the formation of (P( t Bu) 3 ) 2 Pd(H)(Br) and 13 C-benzonitrile from a reductive elimination step. These experiments suggest the possibility of a catalytic cycle involving initially the formation of two Pd(ii)-species from the oxidative addition of L n Pd(0) into HCN and an aryl bromide followed by a transmetallation step to L n Pd(Ar)(CN) and L n Pd(H)(Br), which both reductively eliminate, the latter in the presence of KOAc, to generate the benzonitrile and L n Pd(0).

  19. Observations of nitrogen isotope fractionation in deeply embedded protostars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wampfler, Susanne Franziska; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N...... HCN and HNC with respect to the solar composition. Solar composition cannot be excluded for the third source, OMC-3 MMS6. Furthermore, there are indications of a trend toward increasing 14N/15N ratios with increasing outer envelope temperature. The enhanced 15N abundances in HCN and HNC found in two...

  20. Diagnostics for mechanical heating in star-forming galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazandjian, Mher V.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis the molecular emission of species such as CO, HCN and HNC and HCO+ are used to probe and quantify mechanical heating in star-forming galaxies. In the first part of the thesis photo-dissociation models are used to find a diagnostic of mechanical heating at the level of molecular

  1. A survey of HC3N in extragalactic sources - is HC3N a tracer of activity in ULIRGs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Aalto, S.; Costagliola, F.

    2011-01-01

    , and to compare HC3N with other molecular tracers (HCN, HNC), as well as other properties (silicate absorption strength, IR flux density ratios, C II flux, and megamaser activity). Methods. We present mm IRAM 30 m, OSO 20 m, and SEST observations of HC3N rotational lines (mainly the J = 10-9 transition...

  2. Chemistry of Carbon Rich Star IRAS 15194–5115 A. Ali

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have constructed two gas-phase models to study the chem- ... 1. Introduction. IRAS 15194–5115 is the third brightest carbon star at 12 µm and the brightest one ..... The main formation routes of CN, HCN and HNC in the inner part are.

  3. Broadening of spectral lines of CO2, N2O , H2CO, HCN, and H2S by pressure of gases dominant in planetary atmospheres (H2, He and CO2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Shanelle; Gordon, Iouli; Tan, Yan

    2018-01-01

    HITRAN1,2 is a compilation of spectroscopic parameters that a variety of computer codes use to predict and simulate the transmission and emission of light in planetary atmospheres. The goal of this project is to add to the potential of the HITRAN database towards the exploration of the planetary atmospheres by including parameters describing broadening of spectral lines by H2, CO2, and He. These spectroscopic data are very important for the study of the hydrogen and helium-rich atmospheres of gas giants as well as rocky planets with volcanic activities, including Venus and Mars, since their atmospheres are dominated by CO2. First step in this direction was accomplished by Wilzewski et al.3 where this was done for SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2. The molecules investigated in this work were CO2, N2O, H2CO, HCN and H2S. Line-broadening coefficients, line shifts and temperature-dependence exponents for transitions of these molecules perturbed by H2, CO2 and He have been assembled from available peer-reviewed experimental and theoretical sources. The data was evaluated and the database was populated with these data and their extrapolations/interpolations using semi-empirical models that were developed to this end.Acknowledgements: Financial support from NASA PDART grant NNX16AG51G and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Latino Initiative Program from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center is gratefully acknowledged.References: 1. HITRAN online http://hitran.org/2. Gordon, I.E., Rothman, L.S., Hill, C., Kochanov, R.V., Tan, Y., et al., 2017. The HITRAN2016 Molecular Spectroscopic Database. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2017.06.0383. Wilzewski, J.S., Gordon, I.E., Kochanov, R. V., Hill, C., Rothman, L.S., 2016. H2, He, and CO2 line-broadening coefficients, pressure shifts and temperature-dependence exponents for the HITRAN database. Part 1: SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat

  4. Genetic Perturbations Suggest a Role of the Resting Potential in Regulating the Expression of the Ion Channels of the KCNA and HCN families in Octopus Cells of the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Jie; Oertel, Donata

    2017-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated K+ (gKL) and hyperpolarization-activated mixed cation conductances (gh) mediate currents, IKL and Ih, through channels of the Kv1 (KCNA) and HCN families respectively and give auditory neurons the temporal precision required for signaling information about the onset, fine structure, and time of arrival of sounds. Being partially activated at rest, gKL and gh contribute to the resting potential and shape responses to even small subthreshold synaptic currents. Resting gKL and gh also affect the coupling of somatic depolarization with the generation of action potentials. To learn how these important conductances are regulated we have investigated how genetic perturbations affect their expression in octopus cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). We report five new findings: First, the magnitude of gh and gKL varied over more than two-fold between wild type strains of mice. Second, average resting potentials are not different in different strains of mice even in the face of large differences in average gKL and gh. Third, IKL has two components, one being α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX)-sensitive and partially inactivating and the other being α-DTX-insensitive, tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive, and non-inactivating. Fourth, the loss of Kv1.1 results in diminution of the α-DTX-sensitive IKL, and compensatory increased expression of an α-DTX-insensitive, tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive IKL. Fifth, Ih and IKL are balanced at the resting potential in all wild type and mutant octopus cells even when resting potentials vary in individual cells over nearly 10 mV, indicating that the resting potential influences the expression of gh and gKL. The independence of resting potentials on gKL and gh shows that gKL and gh do not, over days or weeks, determine the resting potential but rather that the resting potential plays a role in regulating the magnitude of either or both gKL and gh. PMID:28065805

  5. Animal Model Selection for Inhalational HCN Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    effects. Following acute inhalation exposure in humans and animals, cyanide is found in the lung, heart, blood , kidneys, and brain (Ballantyne, 1983...Pritchard, 2007). Other direct or secondary effects associated with CN are reacting with the ferric and carbonyl group of enzymes (e.g. catalase...mechanisms occurs before myocardial depression. Clinically, an initial period of bradycardia and hypertension may occur, followed by hypotension with reflex

  6. Alma observations of nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various agn energetic contributions using dense gas tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Nakanishi, Kouichiro, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, using HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 lines, of six nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various energetic contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from previous infrared spectroscopy. These lines are very effective for probing the physical properties of high-density molecular gas around the hidden energy sources in the nuclear regions of these galaxies. We find that HCN to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratios tend to be higher in AGN-important galaxies than in starburst-dominated regions, as was seen at the J = 1-0 transition, while there is no clear difference in the HCN-to-HNC J = 4-3 flux ratios among observed sources. A galaxy with a starburst-type infrared spectral shape and very large molecular line widths shows a high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio, which could be due to turbulence-induced heating. We propose that enhanced HCN J = 4-3 emission relative to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 could be used to detect more energetic activity than normal starbursts, including deeply buried AGNs, in dusty galaxy populations.

  7. Optical Depth Estimates and Effective Critical Densities of Dense Gas Tracers in the Inner Parts of Nearby Galaxy Discs

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-Donaire, M. J.; Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Cormier, D.; Gallagher, M.; Usero, A.; Bolatto, A.; Colombo, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Hughes, A.; Kramer, C.; Krumholz, M. R.; Meier, D. S.; Murphy, E.; Pety, J.

    2016-01-01

    High critical density molecular lines like HCN(1-0) or HCO+(1-0) represent our best tool to study currently star-forming, dense molecular gas at extragalactic distances. The optical depth of these lines is a key ingredient to estimate the effective density required to excite emission. However, constraints on this quantity are even scarcer in the literature than measurements of the high density tracers themselves. Here, we combine new observations of HCN, HCO+ and HNC(1-0) and their optically ...

  8. WE-F-304-02: Recurrent HNC Treated with SBRT: TCP-Based Outcome Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clump, D. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model in explaining the results of hypofractionated RT Describe the dose/volume metrics that are considered safe in SBRT treatment of tumors near the optic structures. Discuss the efficacy of hypofractionation and dosing schedules used in treating vestibular schwannomas Identify some difficulties in modeling TCP and NTCP for cranial tumors treated with hypofractionation. One moderator, Dr. Grimm, designed and holds intellectual property rights to the DVH Evaluator software tool which is an FDA-cleared product in commercial use, and can analyze some of this data. No others have relevant conflicts of interest.

  9. Recent Advances in HNC’s Context Vector Information Retrieval Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    infectados 14 20 0.360 portadoras 5 5 0.358 deficiencia 8 10 0.351 vih 10 18 0.343 adquirida 26 28 0.340 infection 12 22 0.337 aids "patients 12...0.607 portadores 16 31 0.528 immunodeficiency 6 6 0.514 infectadas 18 21 0.504 hiv 18 49 0.496 vih 10 18 0.489 aids 86 578 0.481 infectados 14...34 Table 2 shows the stem tree for the tie-word "AIDS". In Spanish, AIDS has the acronym " SIDA " which stands for sindrome inmuno deficiencia

  10. WE-F-304-02: Recurrent HNC Treated with SBRT: TCP-Based Outcome Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clump, D.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model in explaining the results of hypofractionated RT Describe the dose/volume metrics that are considered safe in SBRT treatment of tumors near the optic structures. Discuss the efficacy of hypofractionation and dosing schedules used in treating vestibular schwannomas Identify some difficulties in modeling TCP and NTCP for cranial tumors treated with hypofractionation. One moderator, Dr. Grimm, designed and holds intellectual property rights to the DVH Evaluator software tool which is an FDA-cleared product in commercial use, and can analyze some of this data. No others have relevant conflicts of interest

  11. Rekombinace a reakce iontů v plazmatu

    OpenAIRE

    Varju, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    One of the most interesting questions in contemporary interstellar chemistry is the HCN/HNC abundance ratio observed in dense interstellar clouds. The observed ratios vary from 80:1 to 1:5 depending on the object under observation. These ratios represent a striking deviation from thermochemical equilibrium. Dissociative recombination of HCNH+ has been invoked to explain these observations. It is suggested to study details of this recombination using FALP apparatus equipped with NIR Cavity Rin...

  12. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona DCN:2051-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altic, Nick A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  13. "CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DCN 5158-SR-02-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-03-25

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys include gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  14. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively Driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse

    Planetary nebulae contain shells of cold gas and dust whose heating and chemistry is likely driven by UV and X-ray emission from their central stars and from wind-collision-generated shocks. We present the results of a survey of molecular line emissions in the 88 - 235 GHz range from nine nearby (Radioastronomie Millimetrique. Rotational transitions of nine molecules, including the well-studied CO isotopologues and chemically important trace species, were observed and the results compared with and augmented by previous studies of molecular gas in PNe. Lines of the molecules HCO+, HNC, HCN, and CN, which were detected in most objects, represent new detections for five planetary nebulae in our study. Flux ratios were analyzed to identify correlations between the central star and/or nebular ultraviolet/X-ray luminosities and the molecular chemistries of the nebulae. Analysis reveals the apparent dependence of the HNC/HCN line ratio on PN central star UV luminosity. There exists no such clear correlation between PN X-rays and various diagnostics of PN molecular chemistry. The correlation between HNC/HCN ratio and central star UV luminosity hints at the potential of molecular emission line studies of PNe for improving our understanding of the role that high-energy radiation plays in the heating and chemistry of photodissociation regions.

  15. A Treasure Trove of Molecules: Uncovering the Molecular Content of Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Deborah Rose; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    We have undertaken a systematic study of the molecular content of planetary nebulae (PNe) using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). A search for HCN and HCO+ in seventeen PNe in which CO had previously been detected has been carried out. The J=1→0 and J=3→2 transitions of both molecules were searched for using the ARO 12-M Telescope and ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope respectively. At least one transition of either molecule was detected in thirteen sources. Assuming a kinetic temperature of 20 K, the abundances of these two molecule, relative to H2, were determined to be f(HCN) ~ 0.1 - 9.1 × 10-7 and f(HCO+) ~ 0.04 - 7.4 × 10-7. The abundances of both species were found to remain relatively constant with nebular age, in contrast to predictions of chemical models. A subset of eleven of these PNe were subsequently searched for the J=1→0 and J=3→2 transitions of CCH and HNC. HNC was detected in ten sources, resulting in HCN/HNC ratios of ~2-6, while CCH has been detected in eight. The most current results for the abundances of both molecules will be reported. The correlation of CCH and C60 will also be presented. Establishing molecular abundances in PNe is vital to our understanding of their environments as well as the nature of their ejecta, which populate the interstellar medium (ISM).

  16. Characterization of the HCNCO complex and its radiation-induced transformation to HNCCO in cold media: an experimental and theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, Svetlana V; Tyurin, Daniil A; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2017-09-13

    The HCNCO complex and its X-ray induced transformation to HNCCO in solid noble gas (Ng) matrices (Ng = Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) was first characterized by matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopy at 5 K. The HCNCO complex was obtained by deposition of HCN/CO/Ng gaseous mixtures. The assignment was based on extensive quantum chemical calculations at the CCSD(T) level of theory. The calculations predicted two computationally stable structures for HCNCO and three stable structures for HNCCO. However, only the most energetically favorable linear structures corresponding to the co-ordination between the H atom of HCN (HNC) and the C atom of CO have been found experimentally. The HCNCO complex demonstrates a considerable red shift of the H-C stretching vibrations (-24 to -38 cm -1 , depending on the matrix) and a blue shift of the HCN bending vibrations (+29 to +32 cm -1 ) with respect to that of the HCN monomer, while the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching mode is blue-shifted by 15 to 20 cm -1 as compared to the CO monomer. The HNCCO complex reveals a strong red shift of the H-N bending (-77 to -118 cm -1 ) and a strong blue shift of the HNC bending mode (ca. +100 cm -1 ) as compared to the HNC monomer, whereas the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching is blue-shifted by 24 to 29 cm -1 with respect to that of the CO monomer. The interaction energies were determined to be 1.01 and 1.87 kcal mol -1 for HCNCO and HNCCO, respectively. It was found that the formation of complexes with CO had a remarkable effect on the radiation-induced transformations of HCN. While the dissociation of HCN to H and CN is suppressed in complexes, the isomerization of HCN to HNC is strongly catalyzed by the complexation with CO. The astrochemical implications of the results are discussed.

  17. UNVEILING THE DUST NUCLEATION ZONE OF IRC+10216 WITH ALMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Guélin, M.; Agundez, M.; Marcelino, N.; Joblin, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection in IRC+10216 of lines of HNC J = 3 – 2 pertaining to nine excited vibrational states with energies up to ∼5300 K. The spectrum, observed with ALMA, also shows a surprising large number of narrow, unidentified lines that arise in the vicinity of the star. The HNC data are interpreted through a 1D-spherical non-local radiative transfer model, coupled to a chemical model that includes chemistry at thermochemical equilibrium for the innermost regions and reaction kinetics for the external envelope. Although unresolved by the current early ALMA data, the radius inferred for the emitting region is ∼0.''06 (i.e., ≅ 3 stellar radii), similar to the size of the dusty clumps reported by IR studies of the innermost region (r < 0.''3). The derived abundance of HNC relative to H 2 is 10 –8 < χ(HNC) <10 –6 , and drops quickly where the gas density decreases and the gas chemistry is dominated by reaction kinetics. Merging HNC data with that of molecular species present throughout the inner envelope, such as vibrationally excited HCN, SiS, CS, or SiO, should allow us to characterize the physical and chemical conditions in the dust formation zone

  18. UNVEILING THE DUST NUCLEATION ZONE OF IRC+10216 WITH ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; Goicoechea, J. R. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología, CSIC-INTA, Ctra. de Torrejón a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Castro-Carrizo, A.; Guélin, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406, Saint Martin dHères (France); Agundez, M. [Univ. Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270, Floirac (France); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Joblin, C. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)

    2013-12-01

    We report the detection in IRC+10216 of lines of HNC J = 3 – 2 pertaining to nine excited vibrational states with energies up to ∼5300 K. The spectrum, observed with ALMA, also shows a surprising large number of narrow, unidentified lines that arise in the vicinity of the star. The HNC data are interpreted through a 1D-spherical non-local radiative transfer model, coupled to a chemical model that includes chemistry at thermochemical equilibrium for the innermost regions and reaction kinetics for the external envelope. Although unresolved by the current early ALMA data, the radius inferred for the emitting region is ∼0.''06 (i.e., ≅ 3 stellar radii), similar to the size of the dusty clumps reported by IR studies of the innermost region (r < 0.''3). The derived abundance of HNC relative to H{sub 2} is 10{sup –8} < χ(HNC) <10{sup –6}, and drops quickly where the gas density decreases and the gas chemistry is dominated by reaction kinetics. Merging HNC data with that of molecular species present throughout the inner envelope, such as vibrationally excited HCN, SiS, CS, or SiO, should allow us to characterize the physical and chemical conditions in the dust formation zone.

  19. Theoretical studies of the reactions of HCN with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, R.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been made of the energetics of the important pathways involved in the reaction of hydrogen atoms with hydrogen cyanide. For each reaction ab initio GVB-CI calculations were carried out to determine the structures and vibrational frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products; then POL-CI calculations were carried out to more accurately estimate the electronic contribution to the energetics of the reactions. The hydrogen abstraction reaction is calculated to be endoergic by 24 kcal/mol [expt. ΔH (0 K) = 16--19 kcal/mol] with a barrier of 31 kcal/mol in the forward direction and 6 kcal/mol in the reverse direction. For the hydrogen addition reactions, addition to the carbon atom is calculated to be exoergic by 19 kcal/mol with a barrier of 11 kcal/mol, while addition to the nitrogen center is essentially thermoneutral with a barrier of 17 kcal/mol. Calculations were also carried out on the isomerization reactions of the addition products. The cis→trans isomerization of HCNH has a barrier of only 10 kcal/mol with the trans isomer being more stable by 5 kcal/mol. The (1,2)-hydrogen migration reaction, converting H 2 CN to trans-HCNH, is endoergic by only 14 kcal/mol, but the calculated barrier for the transfer is 52 kcal/mol. The energy of the migration pathway thus lies above that of the dissociation--recombination pathway

  20. MAPPING THE RELEASE OF VOLATILES IN THE INNER COMAE OF COMETS C/2012 F6 (LEMMON) AND C/2012 S1 (ISON) USING THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Milam, S. N.; Mumma, M. J.; Charnley, S. B.; Paganini, L.; Villanueva, G. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Remijan, A. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Boissier, J. [IRAM, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Crovisier, J. [LEISA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Kuan, Y.-J.; Chuang, Y.-L. [National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Lis, D. C. [Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112, LERMA, F-75014 Paris (France); Minniti, D. [Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Coulson, I. M., E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.gov [Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Results are presented from the first cometary observations using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), including measurements of the spatially resolved distributions of HCN, HNC, H{sub 2}CO, and dust within the comae of two comets: C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2012 S1 (ISON), observed at heliocentric distances of 1.5 AU and 0.54 AU, respectively. These observations (with angular resolution ≈0.''5), reveal an unprecedented level of detail in the distributions of these fundamental cometary molecules, and demonstrate the power of ALMA for quantitative measurements of the distributions of molecules and dust in the inner comae of typical bright comets. In both comets, HCN is found to originate from (or within a few hundred kilometers of) the nucleus, with a spatial distribution largely consistent with spherically symmetric, uniform outflow. By contrast, the HNC distributions are clumpy and asymmetrical, with peaks at cometocentric radii ∼500-1000 km, consistent with release of HNC in collimated outflow(s). Compared to HCN, the H{sub 2}CO distribution in comet Lemmon is very extended. The interferometric visibility amplitudes are consistent with coma production of H{sub 2}CO and HNC from unidentified precursor material(s) in both comets. Adopting a Haser model, the H{sub 2}CO parent scale length is found to be a few thousand kilometers in Lemmon and only a few hundred kilometers in ISON, consistent with the destruction of the precursor by photolysis or thermal degradation at a rate that scales in proportion to the solar radiation flux.

  1. What Lurks in ULIRGs?—Probing the Chemistry and Excitation of Molecular Gas in the Nuclei of Arp 220 and NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, Nick [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 in the 3 mm band transitions of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, and CS at 0.″5–0.″8 resolution using CARMA. Our data set images all these lines at similar resolutions and high sensitivity, and can be used to derive line ratios of faint high excitation lines. In both the nuclei of Arp 220, the HCN/HNC ratios suggest chemistry of X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs)—a likely signature of an active galactic nucleus. In NGC 6240, there is no evidence of XDR type chemistry, but there the bulk of the molecular gas is concentrated between the nuclei rather than on them. We calculated molecular H{sub 2} densities from excitation analysis of each of the molecular species. It appears that the abundances of HNC and HCO{sup +} in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies may be significantly different from those in galactic molecular clouds. The derived H{sub 2} volume densities are ∼5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} in the Arp 220 nuclei and ∼10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} in NGC 6240.

  2. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF KUIPER BELT SURFACE ICES: TERNARY N2-CH4-CO MIXTURES AS A CASE STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2012-01-01

    The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH 4 ) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N 2 ) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N 2 -CH 4 and CO-CH 4 systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH 2 N 2 ), and its radical fragment (HCN 2 ); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH 3 CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H 2 CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH 3 ) and ethane (C 2 H 6 ) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and the azide radical (N 3 ). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

  3. THE DISK IMAGING SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY WITH SMA. I. TAURUS PROTOPLANETARY DISK DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Espaillat, Catherine; Van Kempen, Tim A.; Wilner, David J.; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry plays an important role in the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks, with implications for the composition of comets and planets. This is the first of a series of papers based on data from DISCS, a Submillimeter Array survey of the chemical composition of protoplanetary disks. The six Taurus sources in the program (DM Tau, AA Tau, LkCa 15, GM Aur, CQ Tau, and MWC 480) range in stellar spectral type from M1 to A4 and offer an opportunity to test the effects of stellar luminosity on the disk chemistry. The disks were observed in 10 different lines at ∼3'' resolution and an rms of ∼100 mJy beam -1 at ∼0.5 km s -1 . The four brightest lines are CO 2-1, HCO + 3-2, CN 2 33/4/2 - 1 22/3/1 , and HCN 3-2, and these are detected toward all sources (except for HCN toward CQ Tau). The weaker lines of CN 2 22 -1 11 , DCO + 3-2, N 2 H + 3-2, H 2 CO 3 03 -2 02 , and 4 14 -3 13 are detected toward two to three disks each, and DCN 3-2 only toward LkCa 15. CH 3 OH 4 21 -3 1 2 and c-C 3 H 2 are not detected. There is no obvious difference between the T Tauri and Herbig Ae sources with regard to CN and HCN intensities. In contrast, DCO + , DCN, N 2 H + , and H 2 CO are detected only toward the T Tauri stars, suggesting that the disks around Herbig Ae stars lack cold regions for long enough timescales to allow for efficient deuterium chemistry, CO freeze-out, and grain chemistry.

  4. Chemistry and structure of giant molecular clouds in energetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Crystal Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Throughout the years many studies on Galactic star formation have been conducted. This resulted in the idea that giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are hierarchical in nature with substructures spanning a large range of sizes. The physical processes that determine how molecular clouds fragment, form clumps/cores and then stars depends strongly on both recent radiative and mechanical feed- back from massive stars and, on longer term, from enhanced cooling due to the buildup of metals. Radiative and mechanical energy input from stellar populations can alter subsequent star formation over a large part of a galaxy and hence is relevant to the evolution of galaxies. Much of our knowledge of star formation on galaxy wide scales is based on scaling laws and other parametric descriptions. But to understand the overall evolution of star formation in galaxies we need to watch the feedback processes at work on giant molecular cloud (GMC) scales. By doing this we can begin to answer how strong feedback environments change the properties of the substructure in GMCs. Tests of Galactic star formation theory to other galaxies has been a challenging process due to the lack of resolution with current instruments. Thus, only the nearest galaxies allow us to resolve GMCs and their substructures. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is one of the closest low metallicity dwarf galaxies (D˜ 50 kpc) and is close enough that current instruments can resolve the sub- structure of its GMCs to molecular gas tracers (e.g. HCO+, HCN, HNC, CS, C2H, N2H+) detected in the LMC at 1.5-40 pc scales and in NGC 5253 at 40 pc scales. I then compare the molecular gas detections to the Central Molecular Zone in our Galaxy. Dense molecular gas was detected in all of the sources. For the regions in the LMC, molecular lines of CS, N2H+, C 2H, HNC, HCO+ and HCN were all detected in N159W and N113 while only HCN, HCO+, HNC, and C2H were detected in 30Dor-10. Toward NGC 5253 only HCO+, HCN, C2H and CS were detected. I

  5. Is N-protonated hydrogen isocyanide, H2NC+, an observable interstellar species?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFrees, D.J.; Binkley, J.S.; Frisch, M.J.; McLean, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory is used to examine the singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces for the CH 2 N + system. The results confirm those of earlier studies which suggested that the singlet H 2 NC + isomer could be formed via the corresponding triplet isomer. Also, it is shown that the reaction HCN + +H 2 might lead to this metastable isomer without invoking the triplet species. The best test of the hypothesis that this molecule can be formed by gas phase, ion molecule reactions and may be an important precursor in the interstellar synthesis of HCN and HNC is to search for it in space. To this end, theoretical predictions are made of its rotational frequencies and its vibrational frequencies and intensities to serve as a guide to laboratory spectroscopists and radioastronomers

  6. Analysis of mRNA expression of CNN3, DCN, FBN2, POSTN, SPARC and YWHAQ genes in porcine foetal and adult skeletal muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bílek, K.; Knoll, Aleš; Stratil, Antonín; Svobodová, K.; Horák, Pavel; Bechyňová, Renata; Van Poucke, M.; Peelman, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2008), s. 181-186 ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD523/03/H076; GA ČR(CZ) GA523/06/1302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : mRNA * fetus * gene expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.735, year: 2008

  7. Mapping of the porcine FBN2, YWHAQ, CNN3, DCN, POSTN, SPARC, RBM39 and GNAS genes, expressed in foetal skeletal muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stratil, Antonín; Knoll, Aleš; Horák, Pavel; Bílek, K.; Bechyňová, Renata; Bartenschlager, H.; Van Poucke, M.; Peelman, L. J.; Svobodová, K.; Geldermann, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2008), s. 204-205 ISSN 0268-9146 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/03/0858; GA ČR(CZ) GA523/06/1302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : porcine genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.459, year: 2008

  8. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York DCN: 5098-SR-06-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpeneau, Evan

    2011-01-01

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  9. CARBON CHEMISTRY IN THE ENVELOPE OF VY CANIS MAJORIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OXYGEN-RICH EVOLVED STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Tenenbaum, E. D.; Pulliam, R. L.; Woolf, N. J.; Milam, S. N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the carbon-bearing molecules CO, HCN, CS, HNC, CN, and HCO + have been conducted toward the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich red supergiant star, VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). CO and HCN were also observed toward the O-rich shells of NML Cyg, TX Cam, IK Tau, and W Hya. Rotational transitions of these species at 1 mm, 0.8 mm, and 0.4 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, including the J = 6 → 5 line of CO at 691 GHz toward TX Cam and W Hya. The ARO 12 m was used for 2 mm and 3 mm observations. Four transitions were observed for HCO + in VY CMa, the first definitive identification of this ion in a circumstellar envelope. Molecular line profiles from VY CMa are complex, indicating three separate outflows: a roughly spherical flow and separate red- and blueshifted winds, as suggested by earlier observations. Spectra from the other sources appear to trace a single outflow component. The line data were modeled with a radiative transfer code to establish molecular abundances relative to H 2 and source distributions. Abundances for CO derived for these objects vary over an order of magnitude, f ∼ 0.4-5 x 10 -4 , with the lower values corresponding to the supergiants. For HCN, a similar range in abundance is found (f ∼ 0.9-9 x 10 -6 ), with no obvious dependence on the mass-loss rate. In VY CMa, HCO + is present in all three outflows with f ∼ 0.4-1.6 x 10 -8 and a spatial extent similar to that of CO. HNC is found only in the red- and blueshifted components with [HCN]/[HNC] ∼ 150-190, while [CN]/[HCN] ∼ 0.01 in the spherical flow. All three velocity components are traced in CS, which has a confined spatial distribution and f ∼ 2-6 x 10 -7 . These observations suggest that carbon-bearing molecules in O-rich shells are produced by a combination of photospheric shocks and photochemistry. Shocks may play a more prominent role in the supergiants because of their macroturbulent

  10. Carbon Chemistry in the Envelope of VY Canis Majoris: Implications for Oxygen-Rich Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Tenenbaum, E. D.; Pulliam, R. L.; Woolf, N. J.; Milam, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    Observations of the carbon-bearing molecules CO, HCN, CS, HNC, CN, and HCO+ have been conducted toward the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich red supergiant star, VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). CO and HCN were also observed toward the O-rich shells of NML Cyg, TX Cam, IK Tau, and W Hya. Rotational transitions of these species at 1 mm, 0.8 mm, and 0.4 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, including the J = 6 → 5 line of CO at 691 GHz toward TX Cam and W Hya. The ARO 12 m was used for 2 mm and 3 mm observations. Four transitions were observed for HCO+ in VY CMa, the first definitive identification of this ion in a circumstellar envelope. Molecular line profiles from VY CMa are complex, indicating three separate outflows: a roughly spherical flow and separate red- and blueshifted winds, as suggested by earlier observations. Spectra from the other sources appear to trace a single outflow component. The line data were modeled with a radiative transfer code to establish molecular abundances relative to H2 and source distributions. Abundances for CO derived for these objects vary over an order of magnitude, f ~ 0.4-5 × 10-4, with the lower values corresponding to the supergiants. For HCN, a similar range in abundance is found (f ~ 0.9-9 × 10-6), with no obvious dependence on the mass-loss rate. In VY CMa, HCO+ is present in all three outflows with f ~ 0.4-1.6 × 10-8 and a spatial extent similar to that of CO. HNC is found only in the red- and blueshifted components with [HCN]/[HNC] ~ 150-190, while [CN]/[HCN] ~ 0.01 in the spherical flow. All three velocity components are traced in CS, which has a confined spatial distribution and f ~ 2-6 × 10-7. These observations suggest that carbon-bearing molecules in O-rich shells are produced by a combination of photospheric shocks and photochemistry. Shocks may play a more prominent role in the supergiants because of their macroturbulent velocities.

  11. Product channels in the 193-nm photodissociation of HCNO (fulminic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Wenhui; Hershberger, John F., E-mail: john.hershberger@ndsu.edu

    2016-06-15

    IR diode laser spectroscopy was used to detect the products of HCNO (fulminic acid) photolysis at 193 nm. Six product channels are energetically possible at this photolysis wavelength: O + HCN, H + NCO/CNO, CN + OH, CO + NH, NO + CH and HNCO. In some experiments, isotopically labeled {sup 15}N{sup 18}O, C{sub 2}D{sub 6} or C{sub 6}H{sub 12} reagents were included into the photolysis mixture in order to suppress and/or redirect possible secondary reactions. HCN, OC{sup 18}O, {sup 15}N{sup 15}NO, CO, DCN and HNCO molecules were detected upon laser photolysis of HCNO/reagents/buffer gas mixtures. Analysis of the yields of product molecules leads to the following photolysis quantum yields: ϕ{sub 1a} (O + HCN) = 0.38 ± 0.04, ϕ{sub 1b} (H + (NCO)) = 0.07 ± 0.02, ϕ{sub 1c} (CN + OH) = 0.24 ± 0.03, ϕ{sub 1d} (CO + NH(a{sup 1}Δ)) < 0.22 ± 0.1, ϕ{sub 1e} (HNCO) = 0.02 ± 0.01 and ϕ{sub 1f} (CH + NO) = 0.21 ± 0.1, respectively.

  12. Spatially resolved chemistry in nearby galaxies. III. Dense molecular gas in the inner disk of the LIRG IRAS 04296+2923

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David S. [Department of Physics, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Turner, Jean L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Beck, Sara C., E-mail: dmeier@nmt.edu, E-mail: turner@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: sara@wise.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Ramat Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-10

    We present a survey of 3 mm molecular lines in IRAS 04296+2923, one of the brightest known molecular-line emitting galaxies, and one of the closest luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). Data are from the Owens Valley and CARMA millimeter interferometers. Species detected at ≲ 4'' resolution include C{sup 18}O, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CN, CH{sub 3}OH, and, tentatively, HNCO. Along with existing CO, {sup 13}CO, and radio continuum data, these lines constrain the chemical properties of the inner disk. Dense molecular gas in the nucleus fuels a star formation rate ≳10 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and is traced by lines of HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, and CN. A correlation between HCN and star formation rate is observed on sub-kiloparsec scales, consistent with global relations. Toward the nucleus, CN abundances are similar to those of HCN, indicating emission comes from a collection (∼40-50) of moderate visual extinction, photon-dominated-region clouds. The CO isotopic line ratios are unusual: CO(1-0)/{sup 13}CO(1-0) and CO(1-0)/C{sup 18}O(1-0) line ratios are large toward the starburst, as is commonly observed in LIRGs, but farther out in the disk these ratios are remarkably low (≲ 3). {sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O abundance ratios are lower than in Galactic clouds, possibly because the C{sup 18}O is enriched by massive star ejecta from the starburst. {sup 13}CO is underabundant relative to CO. Extended emission from CH{sub 3}OH indicates that dynamical shocks pervade both the nucleus and the inner disk. The unusual CO isotopologue ratios, the CO/HCN intensity ratio versus L {sub IR}, the HCN/CN abundance ratio, and the gas consumption time versus inflow rate all indicate that the starburst in IRAS 04296+2923 is in an early stage of development.

  13. Chemical complexity in the winds of the oxygen-rich supergiant star VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Milam, S. N.; Apponi, A. J.; Woolf, N. J.

    2007-06-01

    The interstellar medium is enriched primarily by matter ejected from old, evolved stars. The outflows from these stars create spherical envelopes, which foster gas-phase chemistry. The chemical complexity in circumstellar shells was originally thought to be dominated by the elemental carbon to oxygen ratio. Observations have suggested that envelopes with more carbon than oxygen have a significantly greater abundance of molecules than their oxygen-rich analogues. Here we report observations of molecules in the oxygen-rich shell of the red supergiant star VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). A variety of unexpected chemical compounds have been identified, including NaCl, PN, HNC and HCO+. From the spectral line profiles, the molecules can be distinguished as arising from three distinct kinematic regions: a spherical outflow, a tightly collimated, blue-shifted expansion, and a directed, red-shifted flow. Certain species (SiO, PN and NaCl) exclusively trace the spherical flow, whereas HNC and sulphur-bearing molecules (amongst others) are selectively created in the two expansions, perhaps arising from shock waves. CO, HCN, CS and HCO+ exist in all three components. Despite the oxygen-rich environment, HCN seems to be as abundant as CO. These results suggest that oxygen-rich shells may be as chemically diverse as their carbon counterparts.

  14. DETECTION OF N{sub 2}D{sup +} IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jane; Öberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Observations of deuterium fractionation in the solar system, and in interstellar and circumstellar material, are commonly used to constrain the formation environment of volatiles. Toward protoplanetary disks, this approach has been limited by the small number of detected deuterated molecules, i.e., DCO{sup +} and DCN. Based on ALMA Cycle 2 observations toward the disk around the T Tauri star AS 209, we report the first detection of N{sub 2}D{sup +} (J = 3–2) in a protoplanetary disk. These data are used together with previous Submillimeter Array observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 3–2) to estimate a disk-averaged D/H ratio of 0.3–0.5, an order of magnitude higher than disk-averaged ratios previously derived for DCN/HCN and DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} around other young stars. The high fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +} is consistent with model predictions. The presence of abundant N{sub 2}D{sup +} toward AS 209 also suggests that N{sub 2}D{sup +} and the N{sub 2}D{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} ratio can be developed into effective probes of deuterium chemistry, kinematics, and ionization processes outside the CO snow line of disks.

  15. Submillimetric Spectroscopic Observations of Volatiles in Comet C-2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVal-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Villanueva, G. L.; Kueppers, M.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.

    2012-01-01

    Submillimeter spectroscopic observations of comets provide an important tool for understanding their chemical composition and enable a taxonomic classification. Aims. We aim to determine the production rates of several parent- and product volatiles and the C-12/C-13 isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. Methods. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) at the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Results. We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H(sup 13)CN, HNC, H2CO, CO, and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. We calculated the synthetic profiles using a radiative transfer code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons, and the effects of radiative pumping of the fundamental vibrational levels by solar infrared radiation. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 7-6 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 +/- 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/HC-13N/HCN= 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. Conclusions. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of approx 3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the

  16. The rate constant of the reaction NCN + H2 and its role in NCN and NO modeling in low pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faßheber, Nancy; Lamoureux, Nathalie; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-06-28

    Bimolecular reactions of the NCN radical play a key role in modeling prompt-NO formation in hydrocarbon flames. The rate constant of the so-far neglected reaction NCN + H2 has been experimentally determined behind shock waves under pseudo-first order conditions with H2 as the excess component. NCN3 thermal decomposition has been used as a quantitative high temperature source of NCN radicals, which have been sensitively detected by difference UV laser absorption spectroscopy at [small nu, Greek, tilde] = 30383.11 cm(-1). The experiments were performed at two different total densities of ρ≈ 4.1 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) and ρ≈ 7.4 × 10(-6) mol cm(-3) (corresponding to pressures between p = 324 mbar and p = 1665 mbar) and revealed a pressure independent reaction. In the temperature range 1057 K rate constant can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 4.1 × 10(13) exp(-101 kJ mol(-1)/RT) (Δlog k = ±0.11). The pressure independent reaction as well as the measured activation energy is consistent with a dominating H abstracting reaction channel yielding the products HNCN + H. The reaction NCN + H2 has been implemented together with a set of reactions for subsequent HNCN and HNC chemistry into the detailed GDFkin3.0_NCN mechanism for NOx flame modeling. Two fuel-rich low-pressure CH4/O2/N2-flames served as examples to quantify the impact of the additional chemical pathways. Although the overall NCN consumption by H2 remains small, significant differences have been observed for NO yields with the updated mechanism. A detailed flux analysis revealed that HNC, mainly arising from HCN/HNC isomerization, plays a decisive role and enhances NO formation through a new HNC → HNCO → NH2→ NH → NO pathway.

  17. The conceptual design of high temporal resolution HCN interferometry for atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. B.; Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.

    2018-01-01

    A heterodyne interferometer operating at the frequency f = 890 GHz has been designed for measuring the electron density of atmospheric pressure air plasmas, it's density range is from 1015 to 3×1019 m-3 and the pressure range is from 1 Pa to 20 kPa. The system is configured as a Mach\

  18. Phase space conduits for reaction in multidimensional systems : HCN isomerization in three dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens, Holger; Burbanks, Andrew; Wiggins, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional hydrogen cyanide/isocyanide isomerization problem is taken as an example to present a general theory for computing the phase space structures which govern classical reaction dynamics in systems with an arbitrary (finite) number of degrees of freedom. The theory, which is

  19. Oxygen, nitrogen and air broadening of HCN spectral lines at terahertz frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chun; Buldyreva, Jeanna; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rohart, Francois; Cuisset, Arnaud; Mouret, Gael; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis

    2008-01-01

    The room-temperature nitrogen- and oxygen-broadening coefficients of hydrogen cyanide spectral lines have been measured in the 0.5-3 THz (17-100 cm -1 ) frequency range (purely rotational transitions with 5≤J≤36) by a continuous-wave terahertz spectrometer based on a photomixing source. An improved version of the Robert and Bonamy semiclassical formalism has been used to calculate the oxygen-broadening coefficients and resulted in a good agreement with these measurements. The nitrogen and oxygen data are combined to provide the air-broadening coefficients as used by the HITRAN database. A significant difference is observed between the measured and tabulated values for transitions with high values of the rotational quantum number. A new polynomial representation is suggested for inclusion in HITRAN. A similar polynomial expression has been derived for the nitrogen broadening to aid the studies of Titan's atmosphere

  20. Oxygen, nitrogen and air broadening of HCN spectral lines at terahertz frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chun [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere, UMR CNRS 8101, Universite du Littoral Cote d' Opale, 189A Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Buldyreva, Jeanna [Institut UTINAM, UMR CNRS 6213, Universite de Franche-Comte, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Gordon, Iouli E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138-1516 (United States); Rohart, Francois [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, UMR CNRS 8523, Batiment P5-135, Universite de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Cuisset, Arnaud; Mouret, Gael; Bocquet, Robin [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere, UMR CNRS 8101, Universite du Littoral Cote d' Opale, 189A Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Hindle, Francis [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere, UMR CNRS 8101, Universite du Littoral Cote d' Opale, 189A Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France)], E-mail: francis.hindle@univ-littoral.fr

    2008-11-15

    The room-temperature nitrogen- and oxygen-broadening coefficients of hydrogen cyanide spectral lines have been measured in the 0.5-3 THz (17-100 cm{sup -1}) frequency range (purely rotational transitions with 5{<=}J{<=}36) by a continuous-wave terahertz spectrometer based on a photomixing source. An improved version of the Robert and Bonamy semiclassical formalism has been used to calculate the oxygen-broadening coefficients and resulted in a good agreement with these measurements. The nitrogen and oxygen data are combined to provide the air-broadening coefficients as used by the HITRAN database. A significant difference is observed between the measured and tabulated values for transitions with high values of the rotational quantum number. A new polynomial representation is suggested for inclusion in HITRAN. A similar polynomial expression has been derived for the nitrogen broadening to aid the studies of Titan's atmosphere.

  1. Modulation of rod photoreceptor output by HCN1 channels is essential for regular mesopic cone vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeliger, Mathias W; Brombas, Arne; Weiler, Reto; Humphries, Peter; Knop, Gabriel; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Müller, Frank

    2011-11-08

    Retinal photoreceptors permit visual perception over a wide range of lighting conditions. Rods work best in dim, and cones in bright environments, with considerable functional overlap at intermediate (mesopic) light levels. At many sites in the outer and inner retina where rod and cone signals interact, gap junctions, particularly those containing Connexin36, have been identified. However, little is known about the dynamic processes associated with the convergence of rod and cone system signals into ON- and OFF-pathways. Here we show that proper cone vision under mesopic conditions requires rapid adaptational feedback modulation of rod output via hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels 1. When these channels are absent, sustained rod responses following bright light exposure saturate the retinal network, resulting in a loss of downstream cone signalling. By specific genetic and pharmacological ablation of key signal processing components, regular cone signalling can be restored, thereby identifying the sites involved in functional rod-cone interactions.

  2. Elevation in Type I Interferons Inhibits HCN1 and Slows Cortical Neuronal Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadler, Konstantin; Bierwirth, Claudia; Stoenica, Luminita; Battefeld, Arne; Reetz, Olivia; Mix, Eilhard; Schuchmann, Sebastian; Velmans, Tanja; Rosenberger, Karen; Bräuer, Anja U.; Lehnardt, Seija; Nitsch, Robert; Budt, Matthias; Wolff, Thorsten; Kole, Maarten H. P.; Strauss, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) inflammation involves the generation of inducible cytokines such as interferons (IFNs) and alterations in brain activity, yet the interplay of both is not well understood. Here, we show that in vivo elevation of IFNs by viral brain infection reduced

  3. Global bending quantum number and the absence of monodromy in the HCN-CNH molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K; Joyeux, M; Sadovskií, D. A.

    We introduce and analyze a model system based on a deformation of a spherical pendulum that can be used to reproduce large amplitude bending vibrations of flexible triatomic molecules with two stable linear equilibria. On the basis of our model and the recent vibrational potential [ J. Chem. Phys.

  4. High Energy Radical Chemistry Formation of HCN- rich Atmospheres on early Earth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Knížek, Antonín; Pastorek, Adam; Sutherland, J.D.; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 6275. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-05076S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015083; GA MŠk LG15013 Grant - others:Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401521 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : high-power laser * transform emission-spectroscopy * induced dielectric-breakdown * prebiotic organic-synthesis * nucleobase formation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  5. DENSE GAS FRACTION AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY VARIATIONS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigiel, F. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Street, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blitz, L. [Department of Astronomy, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Da Cunha, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, E. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandstrom, K. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Usero, A., E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Alfonso XII 3, E-28014, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-20

    We use the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) millimeter interferometer to map the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/39), tracing the bulk of the molecular gas via the {sup 12}CO(1–0) line and denser molecular gas via the high density transitions HCN(1–0), HCO{sup +}(1–0), CS(2–1), and HNC(1–0). We detect bright emission from all tracers in both the two nuclei and three locales in the overlap region between the two nuclei. These three overlap region peaks correspond to previously identified “supergiant molecular clouds.” We combine the CARMA data with Herschel infrared (IR) data to compare observational indicators of the star formation efficiency (star formation rate/H{sub 2} ∝ IR/CO), dense gas fraction (HCN/CO), and dense gas star formation efficiency (IR/HCN). Regions within the Antennae show ratios consistent with those seen for entire galaxies, but these ratios vary by up to a factor of six within the galaxy. The five detected regions vary strongly in both their integrated intensities and these ratios. The northern nucleus is the brightest region in millimeter-wave line emission, while the overlap region is the brightest part of the system in the IR. We combine the CARMA and Herschel data with ALMA CO data to report line ratio patterns for each bright point. CO shows a declining spectral line energy distribution, consistent with previous studies. HCO{sup +} (1–0) emission is stronger than HCN (1–0) emission, perhaps indicating either more gas at moderate densities or higher optical depth than is commonly seen in more advanced mergers.

  6. The rotational spectra of HCNH/+/ and COH/+/ from quantum mechanical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, D. J.; Loew, G. H.; Mclean, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A description is provided of ab initio molecular orbital calculations designed to provide accurate predictions for the J = 1 to 0 rotational line of the candidate interstellar molecules HCNH(+) and COH(+). The former is believed to be important in the formation of both HCN and HNC in the interstellar medium. The latter, a metastable isomer of HCO(+), was first proposed as an interstellar molecule by Herbst et al. (1976). Attention is given to thermochemical arguments that this molecule can be formed in the same reactions which are proposed to form HCO(+), taking into account theoretical data which establish its stability to intramolecular rearrangement. Rotational constants are derived by applying an empirical correction to the ab initio rotational constants.

  7. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  8. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively-driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse; Kastner, Joel H.; Santander-García, Miguel; Montez, Rodolfo; Alcolea, Javier; Balick, Bruce; Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of a survey of mm-wave molecular line emission from nine nearby (Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Our sample comprises molecule-rich PNe spanning a wide range of central star UV luminosities as well as central star and nebular X-ray emission properties. Nine molecular line frequencies were chosen to investigate the molecular chemistry of these nebulae. New detections of one or more of five molecules -- the molecular mass tracer 13CO and the chemically important trace species HCO+, CN, HCN, and HNC -- were made in at least one PN. We present analysis of emission line flux ratios that are potential diagnostics of the influence that ultraviolet and X-ray radiation have on the chemistry of residual molecular gas in PNe.

  9. Final Report-Confirmatory Survey Results for the ABB Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut; Revision 1 (DCN 5158-SR-02-1) (Docket No. 030-03754; RFTA No. 12-003)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-01-28

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys included gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  10. Final-Independent Confirmatory Survey Report For The Reactor Building, Hot Laboratory, Primary Pump House, And Land Areas At The Plum Brook Reactor Facility, Sandusky, Ohio DCN:2036-SR-01-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Erika N.

    2011-01-01

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities

  11. Revised Final - Report No. 2: Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary And Results For The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1, Newport, Michigan (Docket No. 50 16; RFTA 10-004) DCN 2018-SR-02-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Erika

    2011-01-01

    The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1 (Fermi 1) was a fast breeder reactor design that was cooled by sodium and operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. On May 10, 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) granted an operating license, DPR-9, to the Power Reactor Development Company (PRDC), a consortium specifically formed to own and operate a nuclear reactor at the Fermi 1 site. The reactor was designed for a maximum capability of 430 megawatts (MW); however, the maximum reactor power with the first core loading (Core A) was 200 MW. The primary system was filled with sodium in December 1960 and criticality was achieved in August 1963. The reactor was tested at low power during the first couple years of operation. Power ascension testing above 1 MW commenced in December 1965 immediately following the receipt of a high-power operating license. In October 1966 during power ascension, zirconium plates at the bottom of the reactor vessel became loose and blocked sodium coolant flow to some fuel subassemblies. Two subassemblies started to melt and the reactor was manually shut down. No abnormal releases to the environment occurred. Forty-two months later after the cause had been determined, cleanup completed, and the fuel replaced, Fermi 1 was restarted. However, in November 1972, PRDC made the decision to decommission Fermi 1 as the core was approaching its burn-up limit. The fuel and blanket subassemblies were shipped off-site in 1973. Following that, the secondary sodium system was drained and sent off-site. The radioactive primary sodium was stored on-site in storage tanks and 55 gallon (gal) drums until it was shipped off-site in 1984. The initial decommissioning of Fermi 1 was completed in 1975. Effective January 23, 1976, DPR-9 was transferred to the Detroit Edison Company (DTE) as a 'possession only' license (DTE 2010a). This report details the confirmatory activities performed during the second Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) site visit to Fermi 1 in November 2010. The survey was strategically planned during a Unit 2 (Fermi 2) outage to take advantage of decreased radiation levels that were observed and attributed to Fermi 2 from the operating unit during the first site visit. However, during the second visit there were elevated radiation levels observed and attributed to the partially dismantled Fermi 1 reactor vessel and a waste storage box located on the 3rd floor of the Fermi 1 Turbine Building. Confirmatory surveys (unshielded) performed directly in the line of sight of these areas were affected. The objective of the confirmatory survey was to verify that the final radiological conditions were accurately and adequately described in Final Status Survey (FSS) documentation, relative to the established release criteria. This objective was achieved by performing document reviews, as well as independent measurements and sampling. Specifically, documentation of the planning, implementation, and results of the FSS were evaluated; side-by-side FSS measurement and source comparisons were performed; site areas were evaluated relative to appropriate FSS classification; and areas were assessed for residual, undocumented contamination.

  12. Final-Report No. 2: Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary And Results For The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1, Newport, Michigan (Docket No. 50 16; RFTA 10-004) DCN 2018-SR-02-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Erika

    2011-01-01

    The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1 (Fermi 1) was a fast breeder reactor design that was cooled by sodium and operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. On May 10, 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) granted an operating license, DPR-9, to the Power Reactor Development Company (PRDC), a consortium specifically formed to own and operate a nuclear reactor at the Fermi 1 site. The reactor was designed for a maximum capability of 430 megawatts (MW); however, the maximum reactor power with the first core loading (Core A) was 200 MW. The primary system was filled with sodium in December 1960 and criticality was achieved in August 1963.

  13. Sub-Doppler and Doppler Spectroscopy of DCN Isotopomers in the Terahertz Region: Ground and First Excited Bending States (.nu.1 .nu.2 .nu.3) =0 1ef O)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brünken, S.; Fuchs, U.; Lewen, F.; Urban, Štěpán; Giesen, T.; Winnewisser, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 2 (2004), s. 152-161 ISSN 0022-2852 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/1274; GA MŠk ME 445 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : molecular spectroscopy * sub-Doppler spectroscopy * high-resolution spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.292, year: 2004

  14. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS: RESULTS FROM THE MALT90 SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoq, Sadia; Jackson, James M.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Claysmith, Christopher [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Guzmán, Andrés [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Whitaker, J. Scott [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Rathborne, Jill M. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW (Australia); Vasyunina, Tatiana; Vasyunin, Anton, E-mail: shoq@bu.edu, E-mail: jackson@bu.edu, E-mail: patricio@bu.edu, E-mail: claysmit@bu.edu, E-mail: jonathan.b.foster@yale.edu, E-mail: aguzmanf@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: scott@bu.edu, E-mail: rathborne@csiro.au, E-mail: tv3h@virginia.edu, E-mail: aiv3f@virginia.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The chemical changes of high-mass star-forming regions provide a potential method for classifying their evolutionary stages and, ultimately, ages. In this study, we search for correlations between molecular abundances and the evolutionary stages of dense molecular clumps associated with high-mass star formation. We use the molecular line maps from Year 1 of the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) Survey. The survey mapped several hundred individual star-forming clumps chosen from the ATLASGAL survey to span the complete range of evolution, from prestellar to protostellar to H II regions. The evolutionary stage of each clump is classified using the Spitzer GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL mid-IR surveys. Where possible, we determine the dust temperatures and H{sub 2} column densities for each clump from Herschel/Hi-GAL continuum data. From MALT90 data, we measure the integrated intensities of the N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, HCN and HNC (1-0) lines, and derive the column densities and abundances of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +}. The Herschel dust temperatures increase as a function of the IR-based Spitzer evolutionary classification scheme, with the youngest clumps being the coldest, which gives confidence that this classification method provides a reliable way to assign evolutionary stages to clumps. Both N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +} abundances increase as a function of evolutionary stage, whereas the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) to HCO{sup +} (1-0) integrated intensity ratios show no discernable trend. The HCN (1-0) to HNC(1-0) integrated intensity ratios show marginal evidence of an increase as the clumps evolve.

  15. Physical-chemical processes of astrophysical interest: nitrogen chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Hickson, Kevin; Hily-Blant, Pierre; Faure, Alexandre; Vuitton, Veronique; Bacmann, A.; Maret, Sebastien; Legal, Romane; Rist, Claire; Roncero, Octavio; Larregaray, Pascal; Hochlaf, Majdi; Senent, M. L.; Capron, Michael; Biennier, Ludovic; Carles, Sophie; Bourgalais, Jeremy; Le Picard, Sebastien; Cordier, Daniel; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Trolez, Yann; Bertin, M.; Poderoso, H.A.M.; Michaut, X.; Jeseck, P.; Philippe, L.; Fillion, J.H.; Fayolle, E.C.; Linnartz, H.; Romanzin, C.; Oeberg, K.I.; Roueff, Evelyne; Pagani, Laurent; Padovani, Marco; Wakelam, Veronique; Honvault, Beatrice; Zvereva-Loete, Natalia; Ouk, Chanda-Malis; Scribano, Yohann; Hartmann, J.M.; Pineau des Forets, Guillaume; Hernandez, Mario; Lique, Francois; Kalugina, Yulia N.; Stoecklin, T.; Hochlaf, M.; Crespos, C.; Larregaray, P.; Martin-Gondre, L.; Petuya, R.; Quintas Sanchez, E.L.; Zanchet, Alexandre; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Mate, Belen

    2013-06-01

    This document contains the programme and abstracts of contributions to a workshop on nitrogen chemistry within an astrophysical perspective. These contributions have been presented in sessions: Introduction (opening lecture, experimental approaches to molecular astrophysics, theoretical approaches to astrophysics, observations in molecular astrophysics), Physical-chemical theory of the gas phase (time-dependent approach in elementary activity, statistic approach in elementary activity in the case of the N+H_2 reaction, potential energy surfaces for inelastic and reactive collisions, collision rate for N_2H"+, ortho/para selection rules in the chemistry of nitrogen hydrides, cyanides/iso-cyanides excitation in the ISM, CN excitation, radiative association with N_2H as new interstellar anion, ro-vibratory excitation of HCN) Laboratory astrophysics (measurement of reaction products in the CRESUSOL project, reactivity of the CN- anion, N_2 photo-desorption in ices, CRESU study of nitrogen chemistry, chemistry of nitrogen complex molecules), Observations and chemistry of astrophysical media (the problem of interstellar nitrogen fractioning, abundance of N_2 in proto-stellar cores, HNC in Titan atmosphere and nitrogen-related mechanisms in hot Jupiters, HCN and HNC in dark clouds or how theoretical modelling helps in interpreting observations, nitrogen chemistry in cold clouds, deuteration of nitrogen hydrides, nitrogen in interstellar ices, biochemical molecules on Titan, coupling between excitation and chemistry, radiative transfer of nitrogen hydrides, ortho/para chemistry of nitrogen hydrides), Physical-chemical theory of gas-grain interactions (nitrogen reactivity on surfaces, IR spectra of ices of NH_3 and NH_3/N_2 mixtures)

  16. Chemistry in the final stages of stellar evolution: Millimeter and submillimeter observations of supergiants and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jessica Louise

    High mass loss rates in evolved stars make them the major contributors to recycling processed material back into the interstellar medium. This mass loss creates large circumstellar shells, rich in molecular material. This dissertation presents millimeter and submillimeter studies of the end stages of low mass and high mass stars in order to probe their molecular content in more detail. In low mass stars, the molecular material is carried on into the planetary nebula (PN) stage. Observations of CS, HCO+, and CO in planetary nebulae (PNe) of various post-asymptotic giant branch ages have shown that molecular abundances in these objects do not significantly vary with age, as previously thought. More detailed observations of the slightly oxygen-rich PN NGC 6537 resulted in the detection of CN, HCN, HNC, CCH, CS, SO, H 2CO, HCO+ and N2H+, as well as numerous 13C isotopologues. Observations of the middle-aged PN M2-48 showed the presence of CN, HCN, HNC, CS, SO, SO2, SiO, HCO+, N2H+, and several 13C isotopologues. These observations represent the first detections of CS, SO, SO2, and SiO in any planetary nebula. The implications of these observations are discussed. A 1 mm spectral survey of the supergiant star NML Cygni has been carried out with the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope resulting in the observation of 102 emission features arising from 17 different molecules and 4 unidentified features. The line profiles observed in this circumstellar shell are asymmetric and vary between different molecules, akin to what has been seen in another supergiant, VY Canis Majoris. The non-LTE radiative transfer code ESCAPADE has been used to model molecular abundances in the various asymmetric outflows of VY Canis Majoris, showing just how chemically and kinematically complex these supergiant circumstellar envelopes really are.

  17. Physical and chemical characteristics of L1689-SMM16, an oscillating prestellar core in Ophiuchus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitsazzadeh, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schnee, S.; Friesen, R. K.; Shimajiri, Y.; Langston, G. I.; Bourke, T. L.; Keto, E. R.; Pineda, J. E.; Takakuwa, S.; Tatematsu, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present single-dish observations of the L1689-SMM16 core in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud in NH 3 (1, 1) and (2, 2) emission using the Green Bank Telescope, in N 2 H + (1-0) emission using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, and in NH 2 D (1 1,1 a (--)1 0,1 s ), HCN (1-0), HNC (1-0), H 13 CO + (1-0), and HCO + (1-0) emission using the Mopra telescope. The morphologies of the integrated NH 3 (1, 1) and N 2 H + (1-0) emission well match that of 250 μm continuum emission. Line widths of NH 3 (1, 1) and N 2 H + (1-0) show the presence of transonic turbulence across the core. Jeans and virial analyses made using updated measurements of core mass and size confirm that L1689-SMM16 is prestellar, i.e., gravitationally bound. It also has accumulated more mass compared to its corresponding Jeans mass in the absence of magnetic fields and therefore is a 'super-Jeans' core. The high levels of X(NH 3 )/X(N 2 H + ) and deuterium fractionation reinforce the idea that the core has not yet formed a protostar. Comparing the physical parameters of the core with those of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere reveals the advanced evolutionary stage of L1689-SMM16 and shows that it might be unstable to collapse. We do not detect any evidence of infall motions toward the core. Instead, red asymmetry in the line profiles of HCN (1-0) and HNC (1-0) indicates the expansion of the outer layers of the core at a speed of ∼0.2 km s –1 to 0.3 km s –1 . For a gravitationally bound core, expansion in the outer layers might indicate that the core is experiencing oscillations.

  18. The rest-frame submillimeter spectrum of high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aguirre, J. E. [University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Aravena, M. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001 Vitacura Santiago (Chile); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Béthermin, M. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bradford, C. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bothwell, M. S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thompson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Carlstrom, J. E.; Crawford, T. M. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); De Breuck, C.; Gullberg, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Greve, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hezaveh, Y. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Holzapfel, W. L., E-mail: jspilker@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the average rest-frame spectrum of high-redshift dusty, star-forming galaxies from 250 to 770 GHz. This spectrum was constructed by stacking Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 3 mm spectra of 22 such sources discovered by the South Pole Telescope and spanning z = 2.0-5.7. In addition to multiple bright spectral features of {sup 12}CO, [C I], and H{sub 2}O, we also detect several faint transitions of {sup 13}CO, HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and CN, and use the observed line strengths to characterize the typical properties of the interstellar medium of these high-redshift starburst galaxies. We find that the {sup 13}CO brightness in these objects is comparable to that of the only other z > 2 star-forming galaxy in which {sup 13}CO has been observed. We show that the emission from the high-critical density molecules HCN, HNC, HCO{sup +}, and CN is consistent with a warm, dense medium with T {sub kin} ∼ 55 K and n{sub H{sub 2}}≳10{sup 5.5} cm{sup –3}. High molecular hydrogen densities are required to reproduce the observed line ratios, and we demonstrate that alternatives to purely collisional excitation are unlikely to be significant for the bulk of these systems. We quantify the average emission from several species with no individually detected transitions, and find emission from the hydride CH and the linear molecule CCH for the first time at high redshift, indicating that these molecules may be powerful probes of interstellar chemistry in high-redshift systems. These observations represent the first constraints on many molecular species with rest-frame transitions from 0.4 to 1.2 mm in star-forming systems at high redshift, and will be invaluable in making effective use of ALMA in full science operations.

  19. Spectral line survey toward the spiral arm of M51 in the 3 and 2 mm bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sorai, Kazuo, E-mail: nabe@taurus.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics/Department of Cosmoscience, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan)

    2014-06-10

    We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 3 and 2 mm bands toward two positions in a spiral arm of M51 (NGC 5194) with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30 m telescope. In this survey, we have identified 13 molecular species, including CN, CCH, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HNCO, and CH{sub 3}OH. Furthermore, six isotopologues of the major species have been detected. On the other hand, SiO, HC{sub 3}N, CH{sub 3}CN, and deuterated species such as DCN and DCO{sup +} were not detected. The deuterium fractionation ratios are evaluated to be less than 0.8% and 1.2% for DCN/HCN and DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +}, respectively. By comparing the results of the two positions with different star formation activities, we have found that the observed chemical compositions do not strongly depend on star formation activities. They seem to reflect a chemical composition averaged over the 1 kpc scale region including many giant molecular clouds. Among the detected molecules CN, CCH, and CH{sub 3}OH are found to be abundant. High abundances of CN and CCH are consistent with the above picture of a widespread distribution of molecules because they can be produced by photodissociation. On the other hand, it seems likely that CH{sub 3}OH is liberated in the gas phase by shocks associated with large-scale phenomena such as cloud-cloud collisions and/or by nonthermal desorption processes such as photoevaporation due to cosmic-ray-induced UV photons. The present result demonstrates a characteristic chemical composition of a giant molecular cloud complex in the spiral arm, which can be used as a standard reference for studying chemistry in active galactic nuclei and starbursts.

  20. First Measurement of the 14N/15N Ratio in the Analog of the Sun Progenitor OMC-2 FIR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Claudine; Jaber Al-Edhari, Ali; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Fontani, Francesco; Kama, Mihkel

    2018-01-01

    We present a complete census of the 14N/15N isotopic ratio in the most abundant N-bearing molecules toward the cold envelope of the protocluster OMC-2 FIR4, the best known Sun progenitor. To this scope, we analyzed the unbiased spectral survey obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope at 3, 2, and 1 mm. We detected several lines of CN, HCN, HNC, HC3N, N2H+, and their respective 13C and 15N isotopologues. The lines’ relative fluxes are compatible with LTE conditions, and moderate line opacities have been corrected via a population diagram method or theoretical relative intensity ratios of the hyperfine structures. The five species lead to very similar 14N/15N isotopic ratios, without any systematic difference between amine- and nitrile-bearing species as previously found in other protostellar sources. The weighted average of the 14N/15N isotopic ratio is 270 ± 30. This 14N/15N value is remarkably consistent with the [250–350] range measured for the local galactic ratio but significantly differs from the ratio measured in comets (around 140). High-angular resolution observations are needed to examine whether this discrepancy is maintained at smaller scales. In addition, using the CN, HCN, and HC3N lines, we derived a 12C/13C isotopic ratio of 50 ± 5.

  1. SULFUR- AND SILICON-BEARING MOLECULES IN PLANETARY NEBULAE: THE CASE OF M2-48

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M., E-mail: lziurys@email.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210041, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Molecular-line observations of the bipolar planetary nebula (PN) M2-48 have been conducted using the Sub-Millimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory at 1, 2, and 3 mm. M2-48 is estimated to be ∼4800 yr old, midway through the PN evolutionary track. SiO and SO{sub 2} were detected in this source—the first identification of either molecule in a PN. CN, HCN, HNC, CS, SO, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and several {sup 13}C isotopologues such as {sup 13}CN, H{sup 13}CN, and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} were also observed toward this object. A radiative transfer analysis of multiple SiO transitions indicates a gas kinetic temperature of T {sub K} ∼ 55 K and a density of n(H{sub 2}) ∼ 9 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} in M2-48, in agreement with previous CS and CO modeling. After CO, CN, and SO were found to be the most prevalent molecules in this nebula, with fractional abundances, relative to H{sub 2}, of f ∼ 3.8 × 10{sup –7} and 2.4 × 10{sup –7}, respectively. SO{sub 2} and HCN are also abundant, with f ∼ 1.2 × 10{sup –7}, indicating an [SO]/[SO{sub 2}] ratio of ∼2. Relatively high ion abundances were measured in M2-48 as well, with f ∼ 10{sup –7} for both HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}. An [HCN]/[HNC] ratio of ∼2 was determined, as typically observed in other PNe, independent of age. The high abundances of SO and SO{sub 2}, along with the presence of SiO with f ∼ 2.9 × 10{sup –8}, suggest O/C > 1 in this source; furthermore, the prevalence of CN and N{sub 2}H{sup +} indicates nitrogen enrichment. The {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of ∼3 in the nebula was also established. These factors indicate hot-bottom burning occurred in the progenitor star of M2-48, suggesting an initial mass > 4 M {sub ☉}.

  2. Decorin in human oral cancer: A promising predictive biomarker of S-1 neoadjuvant chemosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasama, Hiroki; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • DCN is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. • DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. • DCN predicts the clinical responses to S-1 NAC for patients with oral cancer. - Abstract: We reported previously that decorin (DCN) is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. DCN is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that DCN affects the biology of several types of cancer by directly/indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis, however, the molecular mechanisms of DCN in chemoresistance and its clinical relevance are still unknown. Here we assumed that DCN silencing cells increase chemosusceptibility to S-1, consisted of tegafur, prodrug of 5-fluorouracil. We first established DCN knockdown transfectants derived from oral cancer cells for following experiments including chemosusceptibility assay to S-1. In addition to the in vitro data, DCN knockdown zenografting tumors in nude mice demonstrate decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis with dephosphorylation of AKT after S-1 chemotherapy. We also investigated whether DCN expression predicts the clinical responses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using S-1 (S-1 NAC) for oral cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry data in the preoperative biopsy samples was analyzed to determine the cut-off point for status of DCN expression by receiver operating curve analysis. Interestingly, low DCN expression was observed in five (83%) of six cases with complete responses to S-1 NAC, and in one (10%) case of 10 cases with stable/progressive disease, indicating that S-1 chemosensitivity is dramatically effective in oral cancer patients with low DCN expression compared with high DCN expression. Our findings suggest that DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms, and

  3. Decorin in human oral cancer: A promising predictive biomarker of S-1 neoadjuvant chemosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi, E-mail: kasamatsua@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Oral Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Department of Dentistry and Oral–Maxillofacial Surgery, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Uzawa, Katsuhiro, E-mail: uzawak@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Oral Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Department of Dentistry and Oral–Maxillofacial Surgery, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasama, Hiroki [Department of Oral Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori [Department of Dentistry and Oral–Maxillofacial Surgery, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shiiba, Masashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi [Medical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Tanzawa, Hideki [Department of Oral Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Department of Dentistry and Oral–Maxillofacial Surgery, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DCN is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. • DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. • DCN predicts the clinical responses to S-1 NAC for patients with oral cancer. - Abstract: We reported previously that decorin (DCN) is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. DCN is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that DCN affects the biology of several types of cancer by directly/indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis, however, the molecular mechanisms of DCN in chemoresistance and its clinical relevance are still unknown. Here we assumed that DCN silencing cells increase chemosusceptibility to S-1, consisted of tegafur, prodrug of 5-fluorouracil. We first established DCN knockdown transfectants derived from oral cancer cells for following experiments including chemosusceptibility assay to S-1. In addition to the in vitro data, DCN knockdown zenografting tumors in nude mice demonstrate decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis with dephosphorylation of AKT after S-1 chemotherapy. We also investigated whether DCN expression predicts the clinical responses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using S-1 (S-1 NAC) for oral cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry data in the preoperative biopsy samples was analyzed to determine the cut-off point for status of DCN expression by receiver operating curve analysis. Interestingly, low DCN expression was observed in five (83%) of six cases with complete responses to S-1 NAC, and in one (10%) case of 10 cases with stable/progressive disease, indicating that S-1 chemosensitivity is dramatically effective in oral cancer patients with low DCN expression compared with high DCN expression. Our findings suggest that DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms, and

  4. Frequency-specific corticofugal modulation of the dorsal cochlear nucleus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingzhi; Xiong, Colin; Li, Liang; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The primary auditory cortex (AI) modulates the sound information processing in the lemniscal subcortical nuclei, including the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), in a frequency-specific manner. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is a non-lemniscal subcortical nucleus but it is tonotopically organized like the AVCN. However, it remains unclear how the AI modulates the sound information processing in the DCN. This study examined the impact of focal electrical stimulation of AI on the auditory responses of the DCN neurons in mice. We found that the electrical stimulation induced significant changes in the best frequency (BF) of DCN neurons. The changes in the BFs were highly specific to the BF differences between the stimulated AI neurons and the recorded DCN neurons. The DCN BFs shifted higher when the AI BFs were higher than the DCN BFs and the DCN BFs shifted lower when the AI BFs were lower than the DCN BFs. The DCN BFs showed no change when the AI and DCN BFs were similar. Moreover, the BF shifts were linearly correlated to the BF differences. Thus, our data suggest that corticofugal modulation of the DCN is also highly specific to frequency information, similar to the corticofugal modulation of the AVCN. The frequency-specificity of corticofugal modulation does not appear limited to the lemniscal ascending pathway.

  5. Organic chemistry of NH3 and HCN induced by an atmospheric abnormal glow discharge in N2-CH4 mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The formation of the chemical products produced in an atmospheric glow discharge fed by a N2-CH4 gas mixture has been studied using Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) and Optical Emission Spectrometry (OES). The measurements were carried out in a flowing regime at ambient temperature and pressure with CH4 concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 2%. In the recorded emission spectra the lines of the second positive system CN system and the first negative s...

  6. Pengaruh Lama Perendaman Koro Bengu (Mucuna pruriens Dalam Air Kapur (Ca(OH2 Terhadap Kadar Asam Siana (HCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Nurmawan Toro

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: There was a significant effect of soaking time koro benguk in lime-water on levels of cyanide. Soaking in lime-water to neutralize the cyanide acid to be more effective than soaking in water.

  7. High-resolution synchrotron terahertz investigation of the large-amplitude hydrogen bond librational band of (HCN)2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihrin, Dmytro; Jakobsen, P. W.; Voute, A.

    2018-01-01

    experimental value for the vibrational zero-point energy of 2.50 ± 0.05 kJ mol−1 arising from the entire class of large-amplitude intermolecular modes. The spectroscopic findings are complemented by CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z (electronic energies) and CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pVQZ (force fields) electronic structure...... calculations, providing a (semi)-experimental value of 17.20 ± 0.20 kJ mol−1 for the dissociation energy D0 of this strictly linear weak intermolecular CH⋯N hydrogen bond....

  8. Energy distribution in selected fragment vibrations in dissociation processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, Y.B.; Freed, K.F.

    1977-01-01

    The full quantum theory of dissociation processes in polyatomic molecules is converted to a form enabling the isolation of a selected fragment vibration. This form enables the easy evaluation of the probability distribution for energy partitioning between this vibration and all other degrees of freedom that results from the sudden Franck--Condon rearrangement process. The resultant Franck--Condon factors involve the square of the one-dimensional overlap integral between effective oscillator wavefunctions and the wavefunctions for the selected fragment vibration, a form that resembles the simple golden rule model for polyatomic dissociation and reaction processes. The full quantum theory can, therefore, be viewed as providing both a rigorous justification for certain generic aspects of the simple golden rule model as well as providing a number of important generalizations thereof. Some of these involve dealing with initial bound state vibrational excitation, explicit molecule, fragment and energy dependence of the effective oscillator, and the incorporation of all isotopic dependence. In certain limiting situations the full quantum theory yields simple, readily usable analytic expressions for the frequency and equilibrium position of the effective oscillator. Specific applications are presented for the direct photodissociation of HCN, DCN, and CO 2 where comparisons between the full theory and the simple golden rule are presented. We also discuss the generalizations of the previous theory to enable the incorporation of effects of distortion in the normal modes as a function of the reaction coordinate on the repulsive potential energy surface

  9. A statistical study towards high-mass BGPS clumps with the MALT90 survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Lan; Xu, Jin-Long; Ning, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Tao

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we perform a statistical investigation towards 50 high-mass clumps using data from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) and Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz survey (MALT90). Eleven dense molecular lines (N2H+(1–0), HNC(1–0), HCO+(1–0), HCN(1–0), HN13C(1–0), H13CO+(1–0), C2H(1–0), HC3N(10–9), SiO(2–1), 13CS(2–1)and HNCO(44,0 ‑ 30,3)) are detected. N2H+ and HNC are shown to be good tracers for clumps in various evolutionary stages since they are detected in all the fields. The detection rates of N-bearing molecules decrease as the clumps evolve, but those of O-bearing species increase with evolution. Furthermore, the abundance ratios [N2H+]/[HCO+] and log([HC3N]/[HCO+]) decline with log([HCO+]) as two linear functions, respectively. This suggests that N2H+ and HC3N transform to HCO+ as the clumps evolve. We also find that C2H is the most abundant molecule with an order of magnitude 10‑8. In addition, three new infall candidates, G010.214–00.324, G011.121–00.128 and G012.215–00.118(a), are discovered to have large-scale infall motions and infall rates with an order of magnitude 10‑3 M ⊙ yr‑1.

  10. Physical and chemical characteristics of L1689-SMM16, an oscillating prestellar core in Ophiuchus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitsazzadeh, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Sadavoy, S. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Schnee, S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Friesen, R. K. [The Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Shimajiri, Y. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Langston, G. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Bourke, T. L.; Keto, E. R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pineda, J. E. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Takakuwa, S. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tatematsu, K., E-mail: schitsaz@uvic.ca [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We present single-dish observations of the L1689-SMM16 core in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud in NH{sub 3} (1, 1) and (2, 2) emission using the Green Bank Telescope, in N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) emission using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, and in NH{sub 2}D (1{sub 1,1}{sup a}(--)1{sub 0,1}{sup s}), HCN (1-0), HNC (1-0), H{sup 13}CO{sup +} (1-0), and HCO{sup +} (1-0) emission using the Mopra telescope. The morphologies of the integrated NH{sub 3} (1, 1) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) emission well match that of 250 μm continuum emission. Line widths of NH{sub 3} (1, 1) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) show the presence of transonic turbulence across the core. Jeans and virial analyses made using updated measurements of core mass and size confirm that L1689-SMM16 is prestellar, i.e., gravitationally bound. It also has accumulated more mass compared to its corresponding Jeans mass in the absence of magnetic fields and therefore is a 'super-Jeans' core. The high levels of X(NH{sub 3})/X(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) and deuterium fractionation reinforce the idea that the core has not yet formed a protostar. Comparing the physical parameters of the core with those of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere reveals the advanced evolutionary stage of L1689-SMM16 and shows that it might be unstable to collapse. We do not detect any evidence of infall motions toward the core. Instead, red asymmetry in the line profiles of HCN (1-0) and HNC (1-0) indicates the expansion of the outer layers of the core at a speed of ∼0.2 km s{sup –1} to 0.3 km s{sup –1}. For a gravitationally bound core, expansion in the outer layers might indicate that the core is experiencing oscillations.

  11. Altered decorin leads to disrupted endothelial cell function: a possible mechanism in the pathogenesis of fetal growth restriction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, A; Murthi, P; Gunatillake, T; Brennecke, S P; Ignjatovic, V; Monagle, P T; Whitelock, J M; Said, J M

    2014-08-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a key cause of adverse pregnancy outcome where maternal and fetal factors are identified as contributing to this condition. Idiopathic FGR is associated with altered vascular endothelial cell functions. Decorin (DCN) has important roles in the regulation of endothelial cell functions in vascular environments. DCN expression is reduced in FGR. The objectives were to determine the functional consequences of reduced DCN in a human microvascular endothelial cell line model (HMVEC), and to determine downstream targets of DCN and their expression in primary placental microvascular endothelial cells (PLECs) from control and FGR-affected placentae. Short-interference RNA was used to reduce DCN expression in HMVECs and the effect on proliferation, angiogenesis and thrombin generation was determined. A Growth Factor PCR Array was used to identify downstream targets of DCN. The expression of target genes in control and FGR PLECs was performed. DCN reduction decreased proliferation and angiogenesis but increased thrombin generation with no effect on apoptosis. The array identified three targets of DCN: FGF17, IL18 and MSTN. Validation of target genes confirmed decreased expression of VEGFA, MMP9, EGFR1, IGFR1 and PLGF in HMVECs and PLECs from control and FGR pregnancies. Reduction of DCN in vascular endothelial cells leads to disrupted cell functions. The targets of DCN include genes that play important roles in angiogenesis and cellular growth. Therefore, differential expression of these may contribute to the pathogenesis of FGR and disease states in other microvascular circulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular-cloud-scale Chemical Composition. II. Mapping Spectral Line Survey toward W3(OH) in the 3 mm Band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yuri [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harada, Nanase [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Shimonishi, Takashi [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramakiazaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Sakai, Nami [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    To study a molecular-cloud-scale chemical composition, we conducted a mapping spectral line survey toward the Galactic molecular cloud W3(OH), which is one of the most active star-forming regions in the Perseus arm. We conducted our survey through the use of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope, and observed the area of 16′ × 16′, which corresponds to 9.0 pc × 9.0 pc. The observed frequency ranges are 87–91, 96–103, and 108–112 GHz. We prepared the spectrum averaged over the observed area, in which eight molecular species (CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, SO, C{sup 18}O, and {sup 13}CO) are identified. On the other hand, the spectrum of the W3(OH) hot core observed at a 0.17 pc resolution shows the lines of various molecules such as OCS, H{sub 2}CS CH{sub 3}CCH, and CH{sub 3}CN in addition to the above species. In the spatially averaged spectrum, emission of the species concentrated just around the star-forming core, such as CH{sub 3}OH and HC{sub 3}N, is fainter than in the hot core spectrum, whereas emission of the species widely extended over the cloud such as CCH is relatively brighter. We classified the observed area into five subregions according to the integrated intensity of {sup 13}CO, and evaluated the contribution to the averaged spectrum from each subregion. The CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, and CS lines can be seen even in the spectrum of the subregion with the lowest {sup 13}CO integrated intensity range (<10 K km s{sup −1}). Thus, the contributions of the spatially extended emission is confirmed to be dominant in the spatially averaged spectrum.

  13. Chemical Complexity in Local Diffuse and Translucent Clouds: Ubiquitous Linear C3H and CH3CN, a Detection of HC3N and an Upper Limit on the Abundance of CH2CN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszt, Harvey; Gerin, Maryvonne; Beasley, Anthony; Pety, Jerome

    2018-04-01

    We present Jansky Very Large Array observations of 20–37 GHz absorption lines from nearby Galactic diffuse molecular gas seen against four cosmologically distant compact radio continuum sources. The main new observational results are that l-C3H and CH3CN are ubiqitous in the local diffuse molecular interstellar medium at {\\text{}}{A}{{V}} ≲ 1, while HC3N was seen only toward B0415 at {\\text{}}{A}{{V}} > 4 mag. The linear/cyclic ratio is much larger in C3H than in C3H2 and the ratio CH3CN/HCN is enhanced compared to TMC-1, although not as much as toward the Horsehead Nebula. More consequentially, this work completes a long-term program assessing the abundances of small hydrocarbons (CH, C2H, linear and cyclic C3H and C3 {{{H}}}2, and C4H and C4H‑) and the CN-bearing species (CN, HCN, HNC, HC3N, HC5N, and CH3CN): their systematics in diffuse molecular gas are presented in detail here. We also observed but did not strongly constrain the abundances of a few oxygen-bearing species, most prominently HNCO. We set limits on the column density of CH2CN, such that the anion CH2CN‑ is only viable as a carrier of diffuse interstellar bands if the N(CH2CN)/N(CH2CN‑) abundance ratio is much smaller in this species than in any others for which the anion has been observed. We argue that complex organic molecules (COMS) are not present in clouds meeting a reasonable definition of diffuse molecular gas, i.e., {\\text{}}{A}{{V}} ≲ 1 mag. Based on observations obtained with the NRAO Jansky Very Large Array (VLA).

  14. 15N fractionation in infrared-dark cloud cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, S.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Cosentino, G.; Viti, S.; Barnes, A. T.; Henshaw, J. D.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Hily-Blant, P.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Nitrogen is one of the most abundant elements in the Universe and its 14N/15N isotopic ratio has the potential to provide information about the initial environment in which our Sun formed. Recent findings suggest that the solar system may have formed in a massive cluster since the presence of short-lived radioisotopes in meteorites can only be explained by the influence of a supernova. Aims: We seek to determine the 14N/15N ratio towards a sample of cold and dense cores at the initial stages in their evolution. Methods: We observed the J = 1 → 0 transitions of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, HN13C, and H15NC towards a sample of 22 cores in four infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) which are believed to be the precursors of high-mass stars and star clusters. Assuming LTE and a temperature of 15 K, the column densities of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, HN13C, and H15NC are calculated and their 14N/15N ratio is determined for each core. Results: The 14N/15N ratios measured in our sample of IRDC cores range between 70 and ≥763 in HCN and between 161 and 541 in HNC. These ratios are consistent with the terrestrial atmosphere (TA) and protosolar nebula (PSN) values, and with the ratios measured in low-mass prestellar cores. However, the 14N/15N ratios measured in cores C1, C3, F1, F2, and G2 do not agree with the results from similar studies towards the same cores using nitrogen bearing molecules with nitrile functional group (-CN) and nitrogen hydrides (-NH) although the ratio spread covers a similar range. Conclusions: Relatively low 14N/15N ratios amongst the four-IRDCs were measured in IRDC G which are comparable to those measured in small cosmomaterials and protoplanetary disks. The low average gas density of this cloud suggests that the gas density, rather than the gas temperature, may be the dominant parameter influencing the initial nitrogen isotopic composition in young PSN. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  15. Molecular diagnostics of Galactic star-formation regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Spaans, Marco

    2007-10-01

    We propose a sensitive spectral survey of Galactic star-formation regions. Using the broadband correlator at two different frequencies, we expect to detect the (1-0) transition of CO, CN, HNC, HCN, HCO+, and HCO and various of their isotopes lines, as well as the (12-11) and (10-9) transitions of HC3N. The purpose of these observations is to create a consistent (public) database of molecular emission from galactic star-formation regions. The data will be interpreted using extensive physical and chemical modeling of the whole ensemble of lines, in order to get an accurate description of the molecular environment of these regions. In particular, this diagnostic approach will describe the optical depths, the densities, and the radiation fields in the medium and will allow the establishment of dominant temperature gradients. These observations are part of a program to study molecular emission on all scales, going from individual Galactic star-formation regions, through resolved nearby galaxies, to unresolved extra-galactic emission.

  16. Vibronic Spectroscopy of the Phenylcyanomethyl Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Deepali N.; Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2011-06-01

    Resonance stabilized radicals (RSRs) are thought to be key intermediates in the formation of larger molecules in planetary atmospheres. Given the nitrogen-rich atmosphere of Titan, and the prevalence of nitriles there, it is likely that nitrile and isonitrile RSRs could be especially important in pathways leading to the formation of more complex nitrogen-containing compounds and the aerosols ("tholins") that are ultimately produced. In this talk, the results of a gas phase, jet-cooled vibronic spectroscopy study of the phenylcyanomethyl radical (C_6H_5.{C}HCN), the nitrogen-containing analog of the 1-phenylpropargyl radical, will be presented. A resonant two color photon ionization spectrum over the range 21,350-22,200 Cm-1 (450.0-468.0 nm) has been recorded, and the D_0-D_1 origin band has been tentatively identified at 21,400 Cm-1. Studies identifying the ionization threshold, and characterizing the vibronic structure will also be presented. An analogous study of the phenylisocyanomethyl radical, C_6H_5.{C}HNC, is currently being pursued for comparison with that of phenylcyanomethyl radical.

  17. Solving radiative transfer with line overlaps using Gauss-Seidel algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, F.; Cernicharo, J.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The improvement in observational facilities requires refining the modelling of the geometrical structures of astrophysical objects. Nevertheless, for complex problems such as line overlap in molecules showing hyperfine structure, a detailed analysis still requires a large amount of computing time and thus, misinterpretation cannot be dismissed due to an undersampling of the whole space of parameters. Aims: We extend the discussion of the implementation of the Gauss-Seidel algorithm in spherical geometry and include the case of hyperfine line overlap. Methods: We first review the basics of the short characteristics method that is used to solve the radiative transfer equations. Details are given on the determination of the Lambda operator in spherical geometry. The Gauss-Seidel algorithm is then described and, by analogy to the plan-parallel case, we see how to introduce it in spherical geometry. Doing so requires some approximations in order to keep the algorithm competitive. Finally, line overlap effects are included. Results: The convergence speed of the algorithm is compared to the usual Jacobi iterative schemes. The gain in the number of iterations is typically factors of 2 and 4 for the two implementations made of the Gauss-Seidel algorithm. This is obtained despite the introduction of approximations in the algorithm. A comparison of results obtained with and without line overlaps for N2H^+, HCN, and HNC shows that the J=3-2 line intensities are significantly underestimated in models where line overlap is neglected.

  18. Argus+: The Future of Wide-Field, Spectral-Line Imaging at 3-mm with the Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Ronald; Frayer, David; Lockman, Felix; O'Neil, Karen; White, Steven; Argus+ Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Robert C Byrd Green Bank Telescope has met its design goal of providing high-quality observations at 115 GHz. Observers also have access to the new, 16-pixel, 3-mm Argus receiver, which is providing high-dynamic range images over wide fields for the multitude of spectral lines between 85 and 115 GHz, including CO, 13CO, C18O, SiO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, N2H+, and CS. The small number of pixels in Argus limits its ability to map many of the most interesting objects whose extent exceeds many arc-minutes. The successful performance of Argus, and its modular design, demonstrates that receivers with many more pixels could be built for the GBT. A 12 x 12 array of the Argus design would have mapping speeds about nine times faster than Argus without suffering any degradation in performance for the outer pixels in the array. We present our plans to build the next-generation Argus instrument (Argus+) with 144-pixels, a footprint 5’x5’, and 7" resolution at 110 GHz. The project will be a collaboration between the Green Bank Observatory and university groups, who will supply key components. The key science drivers for Argus+ are studies of molecular filaments in the Milky Way, studies of molecular clouds in nearby galaxies, and the observations of rapidly evolving solar system objects.

  19. Following the Interstellar History of Carbon: From the Interiors of Stars to the Surfaces of Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziurys, L M; Halfen, D T; Geppert, W; Aikawa, Y

    2016-12-01

    The chemical history of carbon is traced from its origin in stellar nucleosynthesis to its delivery to planet surfaces. The molecular carriers of this element are examined at each stage in the cycling of interstellar organic material and their eventual incorporation into solar system bodies. The connection between the various interstellar carbon reservoirs is also examined. Carbon has two stellar sources: supernova explosions and mass loss from evolved stars. In the latter case, the carbon is dredged up from the interior and then ejected into a circumstellar envelope, where a rich and unusual C-based chemistry occurs. This molecular material is eventually released into the general interstellar medium through planetary nebulae. It is first incorporated into diffuse clouds, where carbon is found in polyatomic molecules such as H 2 CO, HCN, HNC, c-C 3 H 2 , and even C 60 + . These objects then collapse into dense clouds, the sites of star and planet formation. Such clouds foster an active organic chemistry, producing compounds with a wide range of functional groups with both gas-phase and surface mechanisms. As stars and planets form, the chemical composition is altered by increasing stellar radiation, as well as possibly by reactions in the presolar nebula. Some molecular, carbon-rich material remains pristine, however, encapsulated in comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles, and is delivered to planet surfaces. Key Words: Carbon isotopes-Prebiotic evolution-Interstellar molecules-Comets-Meteorites. Astrobiology 16, 997-1012.

  20. Prediction of electronically nonadiabatic decomposition mechanisms of isolated gas phase nitrogen-rich energetic salt: Guanidium-triazolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Atanu, E-mail: atanub@ipc.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-01-13

    Highlights: • Decomposition mechanisms of model energetic salt, guanidium triazolate, are explored. • Decomposition pathways are electronically nonadiabatic. • CASPT2, CASMP2 and CASSCF methodologies are employed. • N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} are predicted to be the most possible initial decomposition products. - Abstract: Electronically nonadiabatic decomposition pathways of guanidium triazolate are explored theoretically. Nonadiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces are explored at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory. For better estimation of energies complete active space second order perturbation theories (CASPT2 and CASMP2) are also employed. Density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and MP2 level of theory are used to explore subsequent ground state decomposition pathways. In comparison with all possible stable decomposition products (such as, N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HNC, HCN, NH{sub 2}CN and CH{sub 3}NC), only NH{sub 3} (with NH{sub 2}CN) and N{sub 2} are predicted to be energetically most accessible initial decomposition products. Furthermore, different conical intersections between the S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} surfaces, which are computed at the CASSCF(14,10)/6-31G(d) level of theory, are found to play an essential role in the excited state deactivation process of guanidium triazolate. This is the first report on the electronically nonadiabatic decomposition mechanisms of isolated guanidium triazolate salt.

  1. A NEW ASTROBIOLOGICAL MODEL OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF TITAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willacy, K. [MS 169-507, Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Allen, M. [Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Yung, Y., E-mail: Karen.Willacy@jpl.nasa.gov [Division of Geological and Planetary Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We present results of an investigation into the formation of nitrogen-bearing molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. We extend a previous model to cover the region below the tropopause, so the new model treats the atmosphere from Titan’s surface to an altitude of 1500 km. We consider the effects of condensation and sublimation using a continuous, numerically stable method. This is coupled with parameterized treatments of the sedimentation of the aerosols and their condensates, and the formation of haze particles. These processes affect the abundances of heavier species such as the nitrogen-bearing molecules, but have less effect on the abundances of lighter molecules. Removal of molecules to form aerosols also plays a role in determining the mixing ratios, particularly of HNC, HC{sub 3}N, and HCN. We find good agreement with the recently detected mixing ratios of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, with condensation playing an important role in determining the abundance of this molecule below 500 km. Of particular interest is the chemistry of acrylonitrile (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CN) which has been suggested by Stevenson et al. as a molecule that could form biological membranes in an oxygen-deficient environment. With the inclusion of haze formation, we find good agreement of our model predictions of acrylonitrile with the available observations.

  2. Dense-gas properties in Arp 220 revealed by isotopologue lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Zhang, Jiangshui; Shi, Yong; Fang, Min

    2016-02-01

    We present observations of isotopologue lines of dense-gas tracers at 3 mm and 1 mm towards the nearest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. The 3-mm and 1-mm observations were performed with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30-m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment 12-m telescope, respectively. We detected H13CN and HN13C in 1-0 and 3-2, and HC15N 1-0, among which HC15N 1-0 and HN13C 1-0 are detected in Arp 220 for the first time. The H13CO+ 1-0 and 3-2 lines are unlikely to be detected because of the confusion of SiO lines. We find that the ratio of the line brightness temperatures of HN13C 3-2/1-0 is 2.4, which is significantly higher than that of H13CN 3-2/1-0 (0.73). This indicates that HN13C and HNC molecules are in denser regions than H13CN and HCN molecules. With the line ratio of H13CN 1-0 and HC15N 1-0, the 14N/15N ratio was estimated to be 440^{+140}_{-82}, which is larger than that of the local interstellar medium.

  3. Nitrogen fractionation in high-mass star-forming cores across the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzi, L.; Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M.; Sánchez-Monge, A.; Testi, L.; Beltrán, M. T.; Caselli, P.

    2018-04-01

    The fractionation of nitrogen (N) in star-forming regions is a poorly understood process. To put more stringent observational constraints on the N-fractionation, we have observed with the IRAM-30m telescope a large sample of 66 cores in massive star-forming regions. We targeted the (1-0) rotational transition of HN13C, HC15N, H13CN and HC15N, and derived the 14N/15N ratio for both HCN and HNC. We have completed this sample with that already observed by Colzi et al. (2018), and thus analysed a total sample of 87 sources. The 14N/15N ratios are distributed around the Proto-Solar Nebula value with a lower limit near the terrestrial atmosphere value (˜272). We have also derived the 14N/15N ratio as a function of the Galactocentric distance and deduced a linear trend based on unprecedented statistics. The Galactocentric dependences that we have found are consistent, in the slope, with past works but we have found a new local 14N/15N value of ˜400, i.e. closer to the Prosolar Nebula value. A second analysis was done, and a parabolic Galactocentric trend was found. Comparison with Galactic chemical evolution models shows that the slope until 8 kpc is consistent with the linear analysis, while the flattening trend above 8 kpc is well reproduced by the parabolic analysis.

  4. Resonances in dissociative recombination: Trends and patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orel, A E; Ngassam, V; Royal, J [Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis (United States); Roos, J B; Larson, A, E-mail: aeorel@ucdavis.ed [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-11-15

    In dissociative recombination, the kinetic energy of the incident electron is transferred into excitation of the electrons of the target ion and then into kinetic energy of the fragments. In general, this proceeds via a resonance where the electron is temporarily trapped by the ion, leading to efficient energy transfer. The study of dissociative recombination is the study of these resonances, Rydberg states converging to the ground and excited states of the ion. For a number of systems, we have studied the electronic states involved in dissociative recombination, including the ground and excited states of the ion, the resonant states and the bound Rydberg states of the system, by combining electron scattering calculations with multi-reference configuration interaction quantum chemistry calculations. We will report on trends and patterns in these resonance states. We will discuss studies of dissociative recombination of the rare-gas ions, moving down the periodic table from He{sup +}{sub 2} to Ne{sup +}{sub 2} to Ar{sup +}{sub 2}, where the ground electronic state of the ion is constant, but its polarizability increases. We will also present results on isoelectronic polyatomic systems, such as HCO{sup +} and HCNH{sup +}, as well as the effects of changing the electronic structure slightly such as HCN{sup +}/HNC{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO{sup +}.

  5. Dynamic Time-Resolved Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Cyanide Photoproducts in a Room Temperature Flow Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    Chirped-pulsed (CP) Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy invented by Brooks Pate and coworkers a decade ago is an attractive tool for gas phase chemical dynamics and kinetics studies. A good reactor for such a purpose would have well-defined (and variable) temperature and pressure conditions to be amenable to accurate kinetic modeling. Furthermore, in low pressure samples with large enough number of molecular emitters, reaction dynamics can be observable directly, rather than mediated by supersonic expansion. In the present work, we are evaluating feasibility of in situ time-resolved CP spectroscopy in a room temperature flow tube reactor. Vinyl cyanide (CH_2CHCN), neat or mixed with inert gasses, flows through the reactor at pressures 1-50 μbar (0.76-38 mTorr) where it is photodissociated by a 193 nm laser. Millimeter-wave beam of the CP spectrometer co-propagates with the laser beam along the reactor tube and interacts with nascent photoproducts. Rotational transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCCCN are detected, with ≥10 μs time-steps for 500 ms following photolysis of CH_2CHCN. The post-photolysis evolution of the photoproducts' rotational line intensities is investigated for the effects of rotational and vibrational thermalization of energized photoproducts. Possible contributions from bimolecular and wall-mediated chemistry are evaluated as well.

  6. A NEW ASTROBIOLOGICAL MODEL OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF TITAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willacy, K.; Allen, M.; Yung, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present results of an investigation into the formation of nitrogen-bearing molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. We extend a previous model to cover the region below the tropopause, so the new model treats the atmosphere from Titan’s surface to an altitude of 1500 km. We consider the effects of condensation and sublimation using a continuous, numerically stable method. This is coupled with parameterized treatments of the sedimentation of the aerosols and their condensates, and the formation of haze particles. These processes affect the abundances of heavier species such as the nitrogen-bearing molecules, but have less effect on the abundances of lighter molecules. Removal of molecules to form aerosols also plays a role in determining the mixing ratios, particularly of HNC, HC 3 N, and HCN. We find good agreement with the recently detected mixing ratios of C 2 H 5 CN, with condensation playing an important role in determining the abundance of this molecule below 500 km. Of particular interest is the chemistry of acrylonitrile (C 2 H 3 CN) which has been suggested by Stevenson et al. as a molecule that could form biological membranes in an oxygen-deficient environment. With the inclusion of haze formation, we find good agreement of our model predictions of acrylonitrile with the available observations.

  7. Isotopologues of dense gas tracers in NGC 1068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junzhi; Qiu, Jianjie [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, 200030, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Zhi-Yu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Shi, Yong [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang, Jiangshui [Center For Astrophysics, GuangZhou University, 510006, GuangZhou (China); Fang, Min, E-mail: jzwang@shao.ac.cn [ESO, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munich (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    We present observations of isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward the nuclear region of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 m telescope. We detected four isotopic lines (H{sup 13}CN 1-0, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 1-0, HN{sup 13}C 1-0, and HC{sup 18}O{sup +} 1-0) at the 3 mm band with the IRAM 30 m telescope and obtained upper limits of other lines. We calculated optical depths of dense gas tracers with the detected isotopic lines of HCN 1-0, HCO{sup +} 1-0, and HNC 1-0. We find that the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N abundance ratio is greater than 420 if we adopt the upper limit of HC{sup 15}N(1-0) emission. Combining this with fluxes of 1-0 lines from IRAM 30 m observations and the upper limit of 3-2 lines from APEX 12 m observations, we also estimated the excitation condition of molecular gas in the nuclear region of NGC 1068, which is less dense than that in the extreme starburst regions of galaxies.

  8. Reversal of infall in SgrB2(M) revealed by Herschel/HIFI observations of HCN lines at THz frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolffs, R.; Schilke, P.; Comito, C.; Bergin, E. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Lis, D. C.; Qin, S.-L.; Menten, K. M.; Guesten, R.; Bell, T. A.; Blake, G.A.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Crockett, N. R.; Daniel, F.; Dubernet, M. -L.; Emprechtinger, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Gerin, M.; Giesen, T. F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gupta, H.; Herbst, E.; Joblin, C.; Johnstone, D.; Langer, W. D.; Latter, W. D.; Lord, S. D.; Maret, S.; Martin, P. G.; Melnick, G. J.; Morris, P.; Mueller, H. S. P.; Murphy, J. A.; Ossenkopf, V.; Pearson, J. C.; Perault, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Plume, R.; Schlemmer, S.; Stutzki, J.; Trappe, N.; Vastel, C.; Wang, S.; Yorke, H. W.; Yu, S.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Diez-Gonzalez, M. C.; Bachiller, R.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Baechtold, W.; Olberg, M.; Nordh, L. H.; Gill, J. J.; Chattopadhyay, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the accretion and feedback processes in massive star formation, we analyze the shapes of emission lines from hot molecular cores, whose asymmetries trace infall and expansion motions. Methods. The high-mass star forming region SgrB2(M) was observed with Herschel/HIFI (HEXOS key

  9. Heterogeneous reactions between ions NH3+and NH+andhydrocarbons adsorbed on a tungsten surface.Formation of HCN+in NH+-surface hydrocarbon collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harnisch, M.; Scheier, P.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 392, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 139-144 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ion-surface collisions * NH3+ and NH+projectiles * surface hydrocarbons Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  10. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. J. Simpson; S. K. Akagi; B. Barletta; N. J. Blake; Y. Choi; G. S. Diskin; A. Fried; H. E. Fuelberg; S. Meinardi; F. S. Rowland; S. A. Vay; A. J. Weinheimer; P. O. Wennberg; P. Wiebring; A. Wisthaler; M. Yang; R. J. Yokelson; D. R. Blake

    2011-01-01

    Boreal regions comprise about 17% of the global land area, and they both affect and are influenced by climate change. To better understand boreal forest fire emissions and plume evolution, 947 whole air samples were collected aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft in summer 2008 as part of the ARCTAS-B field mission, and analyzed for 79 non-methane volatile organic...

  11. Rings of Molecular Line Emission in the Disk Orbiting the Young, Close Binary V4046 Sgr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Vandervelde, Dorothy; Kastner, Joel H.; Qi, C.; Forveille, Thierry; Hily-Blant, Pierre; Oberg, Karin; Wilner, David; Andrews, Sean; Gorti, Uma; Rapson, Valerie; Sacco, Germano; Principe, David

    2018-01-01

    We present analysis of a suite of subarcsecond ALMA Band 6 (1.1 - 1.4 mm) molecular line images of the circumbinary, protoplanetary disk orbiting V4046 Sgr. The ~20 Myr-old V4046 Sgr system, which lies a mere ~73 pc from Earth, consists of a close (separation ~10 Rsun) pair of roughly solar-mass stars that are orbited by a gas-rich crcumbinary disk extending to ~350 AU in radius. The ALMA images reveal that the molecules CO and HCN and their isotopologues display centrally peaked surface brightness morphologies, whereas the cyanide group molecules (HC3N, CH3CN), deuterated molecules (DCN, DCO+), hydrocarbons (as traced by C2H), and potential CO ice line tracers (N2H+, and H2CO) appear as a sequence of sharp and diffuse rings of increasing radii. The characteristic sizes of these molecular emission rings, which range from ~25 to >100 AU in radius, are evident in radial emission-line surface brightness profiles extracted from the deprojected disk images. We find that emission from 13CO emission transitions from optically thin to thick within ~50 AU, whereas C18O emission remains optically thin within this radius. We summarize the insight into the physical and chemical processes within this evolved protoplanetary disk that can be obtained from comparisons of the various emission-line morphologies with each other and with that of the continuum (large-grain) emission on size scales of tens of AU.This research is supported by NASA Exoplanets program grant NNX16AB43G to RIT

  12. THE HERSCHEL AND IRAM CHESS SPECTRAL SURVEYS OF THE PROTOSTELLAR SHOCK L1157-B1: FOSSIL DEUTERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codella, C.; Fontani, F.; Vasta, M.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Kahane, C.; Taquet, V.; Wiesenfeld, L.; Busquet, G.; Caselli, P.; Lis, D.; Viti, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first study of deuteration toward the protostellar shock L1157-B1, based on spectral surveys performed with the Herschel-HIFI and IRAM 30 m telescopes. The L1157 outflow is driven by a low-mass Class 0 protostar and is considered the prototype of the so-called chemically active outflows. The young (2000 yr), bright blueshifted bow shock, B1, is an ideal laboratory for studying the gas chemically enriched by the release of dust mantles due to the passage of a shock. A total of 12 emission lines (up to E u = 63 K) of CH 2 DOH, HDCO, and DCN are detected. In addition, two lines of NH 2 D and HDO are tentatively reported. To estimate the deuteration, we also extracted from our spectral survey emission lines of non-deuterated isotopologues ( 13 CH 3 OH, H 2 13 CO, H 13 CN, H 2 13 CO, and NH 3 ). We infer higher deuteration fractions for CH 3 OH (D/H = 0.2-2 × 10 –2 ) and H 2 CO (5-8 × 10 –3 ) than for H 2 O (0.4-2 × 10 –3 ), HCN (∼10 –3 ), and ammonia (≤3 × 10 –2 ). The measurement of deuteration of water, formaldehyde, and methanol in L1157-B1 provides a fossil record of the gas before it was shocked by the jet driven by the protostar. A comparison with gas-grain models indicates that the gas passed through a low-density (≤10 3 cm –3 ) phase, during which the bulk of water ices formed, followed by a phase of increasing density, up to 3 × 10 4 cm –3 , during which formaldehyde and methanol ices formed.

  13. Multiple Paths of Deuterium Fractionation in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yuri; Furuya, Kenji; Hincelin, Ugo; Herbst, Eric

    2018-03-01

    We investigate deuterium chemistry coupled with the nuclear spin-state chemistry of H2 and {{{H}}}3+ in protoplanetary disks. Multiple paths of deuterium fractionation are found; exchange reactions with D atoms, such as HCO+ + D, are effective in addition to those with HD. In a disk model with grain sizes appropriate for dark clouds, the freeze-out of molecules is severe in the outer midplane, while the disk surface is shielded from UV radiation. Gaseous molecules, including DCO+, thus become abundant at the disk surface, which tends to make their column density distribution relatively flat. If the dust grains have grown to millimeter size, the freeze-out rate of neutral species is reduced and the abundances of gaseous molecules, including DCO+ and N2D+, are enhanced in the cold midplane. Turbulent diffusion transports D atoms and radicals at the disk surface to the midplane, and stable ice species in the midplane to the disk surface. The effects of turbulence on chemistry are thus multifold; while DCO+ and N2D+ abundances increase or decrease depending on the regions, HCN and DCN in the gas and ice are greatly reduced at the innermost radii, compared to the model without turbulence. When cosmic rays penetrate the disk, the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of H2 is found to be thermal in the disk, except in the cold (≲10 K) midplane. We also analyze the OPR of {{{H}}}3+ and H2D+, as well as the main reactions of H2D+, DCO+, and N2D+, in order to analytically derive their abundances in the cold midplane.

  14. In vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activity of extracts from Polyalthia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the three plants in the traditional treatment of malaria in Cameroon. More interestingly ... innovative antimalarial leads. ... identification numbers HNC 55313, HNC. 500594 and .... Mean ODs were plotted versus drugs concentrations and the.

  15. Evaluation of Head and Neck Cancer Awareness and Screening Status in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazzazi, Turki Y

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. Early detection is a key determinant of HNC prognosis. Hence, raising awareness of this disease may improve survival rates. The present study evaluated the level of awareness and screening status for HNC in the general population of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. An e-questionnaire was distributed during our HNC awareness campaign at the Red Sea Mall in Jeddah. The questions assessed HNC knowledge and screening status among participants. Of the 112 respondents, 68% indicated that they had no knowledge of HNC. Social media was the major source of information (39%) for respondents. The majority (40%) believed that it was the joint responsibility of dentists, dental hygienists, and general physicians to screen for HNC; 82% had never been screened. Knowledge and awareness of HNC must be increased in the general population and among dental health professionals.

  16. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of hierarchical nanoporous graphenic carbon against human gliblastoma grade IV cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Sławomir; Biniecka, Paulina; Bugajska, Zaneta

    2017-01-01

    conductivity. These unique properties and ability to transfer charge create a possibility of employing HNC as a moderator of tumor cell growth. As the charge of HNC may interfere with cell membranes by adhesion and by bonding with cell receptors, it may block the supply of nutrients. The interactions of HNC...

  17. Conjugated donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) molecule for organic nonvolatile resistor memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Guangwu; Yu, An-Dih; Bo, Zhishan; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2014-12-01

    A new donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) type of conjugated molecule, N-(4-(N',N'-diphenyl)phenylamine)-4-(4'-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)phenyl) naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic monoimide (TPA-NI-DCN), consisting of triphenylamine (TPA) donors and naphthalimide (NI)/dicyanovinylene (DCN) acceptors was synthesized and characterized. In conjunction with previously reported D-A based materials, the additional DCN moiety attached as end group in the D-A-A configuration can result in a stable charge transfer (CT) and charge-separated state to maintain the ON state current. The vacuum-deposited TPA-NI-DCN device fabricated as an active memory layer was demonstrated to exhibit write-once-read-many (WORM) switching characteristics of organic nonvolatile memory due to the strong polarity of the TPA-NI-DCN moiety. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Incidence trends of human papillomavirus-related head and neck cancer in Taiwan, 1995-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Tzer-Zen; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Tsai, Chia-Rung; Chang, Jeffrey S

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies suggested that human papillomavirus (HPV) is an emerging risk factor of head and neck cancer (HNC), particularly for oropharyngeal cancer. Studies from the West showed a rising trend of HPV-related HNC despite a decrease of the overall HNC incidence. In contrast, the overall HNC incidence in Taiwan has continued to rise. It is not clear whether the incidence trends of HPV-related HNC in Taiwan have a similar pattern to those from countries with an overall decreasing incidence of HNC. This study examined the incidence trends of HPV-related and HPV-unrelated HNC in Taiwan using data from the Taiwan Cancer Registry. Our results showed that the incidence trends of HPV-related and HPV-unrelated HNC in Taiwan both rose during 1995-2009. The incidence of HPV-related HNC (1.3 per 100,000 in 1995 to 3.3 in 2009, annual percentage change (APC) = 6.9, p Taiwan has continued to increase, the most rapid rise is in the HPV-related HNC. This suggests that similar to the Western world, HPV-related HNC is becoming an important public health issue in Taiwan. © 2014 UICC.

  19. The chemical structure of the Class 0 protostellar envelope NGC 1333 IRAS 4A⋆⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpia, E.; Semenov, D. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Caux, E.

    2017-07-01

    Context. It is not well known what drives the chemistry of a protostellar envelope, in particular the role of the stellar mass and the protostellar outflows on the chemical enrichment of such environments. Aims: We study the chemical structure of the Class 0 protostellar envelope NGC 1333 IRAS 4A in order to (I) investigate the influence of the outflows on the chemistry; (II) constrain the age of our studied object; (III) compare it with a typical high-mass protostellar envelope. Methods: In our analysis we use JCMT line mapping (360-373 GHz) and HIFI pointed spectra (626.01-721.48 GHz). To study the influence of the outflow on the degree of deuteration, we compare JCMT maps of HCO+ and DCO+ with non-LTE (RADEX) models in a region that spatially covers the outflow activity of IRAS 4A. To study the envelope chemistry, we derive empirical molecular abundance profiles for the observed species using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (RATRAN) and adopting a 1D dust density/temperature profile from the literature. We use a combination of constant abundance profiles and abundance profiles that include jumps at two radii (T 100 K or T 30 K) to fit our observations. We compare our best-fit observed abundance profiles with the predictions from the time dependent gas grain chemical code (ALCHEMIC). Results: We detect CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, HCN, HCO+, N2H+, H2CO, CH3OH, H2O, H2S, DCO+, HDCO, D2CO, SO, SO2, SiO, HNC, CN, C2H and OCS. We divide the detected lines in three groups based on their line profiles: a) broad emission (FWHM = 4-11 km s-1), b) narrow emission (FWHMtime-dependent gas-grain chemical model for the outer envelope, with the exceptions of HCN, HNC, CN. These species along with the CO abundance require an enhanced UV field which points towards an outflow cavity. The abundances with respect to H2 are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than those observed in the high mass protostellar envelope (AFGL 2591), while they are found to be similar within factors of a

  20. Revised models of interstellar nitrogen isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirström, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen-bearing molecules in cold molecular clouds exhibit a range of isotopic fractionation ratios and these molecules may be the precursors of 15N enrichments found in comets and meteorites. Chemical model calculations indicate that atom-molecular ion and ion-molecule reactions could account for most of the fractionation patterns observed. However, recent quantum-chemical computations demonstrate that several of the key processes are unlikely to occur in dense clouds. Related model calculations of dense cloud chemistry show that the revised 15N enrichments fail to match observed values. We have investigated the effects of these reaction rate modifications on the chemical model of Wirström et al. (2012) for which there are significant physical and chemical differences with respect to other models. We have included 15N fractionation of CN in neutral-neutral reactions and also updated rate coefficients for key reactions in the nitrogen chemistry. We find that the revised fractionation rates have the effect of suppressing 15N enrichment in ammonia at all times, while the depletion is even more pronounced, reaching 14N/15N ratios of >2000. Taking the updated nitrogen chemistry into account, no significant enrichment occurs in HCN or HNC, contrary to observational evidence in dark clouds and comets, although the 14N/15N ratio can still be below 100 in CN itself. However, such low CN abundances are predicted that the updated model falls short of explaining the bulk 15N enhancements observed in primitive materials. It is clear that alternative fractionating reactions are necessary to reproduce observations, so further laboratory and theoretical studies are urgently needed.

  1. On the intramolecular origin of the blue shift of A-H stretching frequencies: triatomic hydrides HAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpfen, Alfred; Kryachko, Eugene S

    2009-04-30

    A series of intermolecular complexes formed between the triatomic hydrides HAX and various interaction partners are investigated computationally aiming (1) to demonstrate that either an appearance or nonappearance of a blue shift of the A-H stretching frequency is directly related to the sign of the intramolecular coupling that exists between the two degrees of freedom, the A-H and A-X bond lengths, and (2) to offer the following conjecture: the theoretical protonation of a triatomic neutral molecule HAX at the site X is a simple and rather efficient probe of a red or blue shift that the stretching frequency nu(A-H) undergoes upon complex formation regardless of whether this bond is directly involved in hydrogen bonding or not. In other words, to predict whether this A-H bond is capable to display a blue or red shift of nu(A-H), it suffices to compare the equilibrium structures and vibrational spectra of a given molecule with its protonated counterpart. The two above goals are achieved invoking a series of 11 triatomic molecules: HNO, HSN, HPO, and HPS characterized by a negative intramolecular coupling; HON and HNS as intermediate cases; and HOF, HOCl, HCN, HNC, and HCP with a positive intramolecular coupling. For these purposes, the latter molecules are investigated at the MP2/6-311++G(2p,2d) level in the neutral and protonated HAXH(+) forms as well as their complexes with H(2)O and with the fluoromethanes H(3)CF, H(2)CF(2), and HCF(3).

  2. COMPARATIVE SPECTRA OF OXYGEN-RICH VERSUS CARBON-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELLS: VY CANIS MAJORIS AND IRC +10216 AT 215-285 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.; Milam, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive (1σ rms at 1 MHz resolution ∼3 mK) 1 mm spectral line survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IRC +10216 has been conducted to compare the chemistries of oxygen- and carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. This study was carried out using the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory with a new Atacama Large Millimeter Array type receiver. This survey is the first to chemically characterize an O-rich circumstellar shell at millimeter wavelengths. In VY CMa, 128 emission features were detected arising from 18 different molecules; and in IRC +10216, 720 lines were observed, assigned to 32 different species. The 1 mm spectrum of VY CMa is dominated by SO 2 and SiS; in IRC +10216, C 4 H and SiC 2 are the most recurrent species. Ten molecules were common to both sources: CO, SiS, SiO, CS, CN, HCN, HNC, NaCl, PN, and HCO + . Sulfur plays an important role in VY CMa, but saturated/unsaturated carbon dominates the molecular content of IRC +10216, producing CH 2 NH, for example. Although the molecular complexity of IRC +10216 is greater, VY CMa supports a unique 'inorganic' chemistry leading to the oxides PO, AlO, and AlOH. Only diatomic and triatomic compounds were observed in VY CMa, while species with four or more atoms are common in IRC +10216, reflecting carbon's ability to form multiple strong bonds, unlike oxygen. In VY CMa, a new water maser (v 2 = 2) has been found, as well as vibrationally excited NaCl. Toward IRC +10216, vibrationally excited CCH was detected for the first time.

  3. Comparative Spectra of Oxygen-rich Versus Carbon-rich Circumstellar Shells: VY Canis Majoris and IRC +10216 at 215-285 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Milam, S. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-09-01

    A sensitive (1σ rms at 1 MHz resolution ~3 mK) 1 mm spectral line survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IRC +10216 has been conducted to compare the chemistries of oxygen- and carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. This study was carried out using the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory with a new Atacama Large Millimeter Array type receiver. This survey is the first to chemically characterize an O-rich circumstellar shell at millimeter wavelengths. In VY CMa, 128 emission features were detected arising from 18 different molecules; and in IRC +10216, 720 lines were observed, assigned to 32 different species. The 1 mm spectrum of VY CMa is dominated by SO2 and SiS; in IRC +10216, C4H and SiC2 are the most recurrent species. Ten molecules were common to both sources: CO, SiS, SiO, CS, CN, HCN, HNC, NaCl, PN, and HCO+. Sulfur plays an important role in VY CMa, but saturated/unsaturated carbon dominates the molecular content of IRC +10216, producing CH2NH, for example. Although the molecular complexity of IRC +10216 is greater, VY CMa supports a unique "inorganic" chemistry leading to the oxides PO, AlO, and AlOH. Only diatomic and triatomic compounds were observed in VY CMa, while species with four or more atoms are common in IRC +10216, reflecting carbon's ability to form multiple strong bonds, unlike oxygen. In VY CMa, a new water maser (v 2 = 2) has been found, as well as vibrationally excited NaCl. Toward IRC +10216, vibrationally excited CCH was detected for the first time.

  4. Comparative Spectra of Oxygen-Rich Versus Carbon-Rich Circumstellar Shells: VY Canis Majoris and IRC(plus)10216 at 215-285 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenebaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Milam, S. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive (1sigma rms at 1 MHz resolution approx.3 mK) 1 mm spectral line survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IRC +10216 has been conducted to compare the chemistries of oxygen- and carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. This study was carried out using the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory with a new Atacama Large Millimeter Array type receiver. This survey is the first to chemically characterize an O-rich circumstellar shell at millimeter wavelengths. In VY CMa, 128 emission features were detected arising from 18 different molecules; and in IRC +10216, 720 lines were observed, assigned to 32 different species. The 1 mm spectrum of VY CMa is dominated by SO, and SiS; in IRC +10216, C4H and SiC2 are the most recurrent species. Ten molecules were common to both sources: CO, SiS, SiO, CS, CN, HCN, HNC, NaCl, PN, and HCO(+). Sulfur plays an important role in VY CMa, but saturated/ unsaturated carbon dominates the molecular content of IRC +102.16, producing CH2NH, for example. Although the molecular complexity of IRC +10216 is greater, VY CMa supports a unique "inorganic" chemistry leading to the oxides PO, AlO, and AlOH. Only diatomic and triatomic compounds were observed in VY CMa, while species with four or more atoms are common in IRC +10216, reflecting carbon's ability to form multiple strong bonds, unlike oxygen. In VY CMa, a new water maser (v2 = 2) has been found, as well as vibrationally excited NaCl. Toward IRC +10216, vibrationally excited CCH was detected for the first time.

  5. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  6. Dipole-resonance assisted isomerization in the electronic ground state using few-cycle infrared pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skocek, Oliver; Uiberacker, Christoph; Jakubetz, Werner

    2011-06-30

    A computational investigation of HCNHNC isomerization in the electronic ground state by one- and few-cycle infrared pulses is presented. Starting from a vibrationally pre-excited reagent state, isomerization yields of more than 50% are obtained using single one- to five-cycle pulses. The principal mechanism includes two steps of population transfer by dipole-resonance (DR), and hence, the success of the method is closely linked to the polarity of the system and, in particular, the stepwise change of the dipole moment from reactant to transition state and on to products. The yield drops massively if the diagonal dipole matrix elements are artificially set to zero. In detail, the mechanism includes DR-induced preparation of a delocalized vibrational wavepacket, which traverses the barrier region and is finally trapped in the product well by DR-dominated de-excitation. The excitation and de-excitation steps are triggered by pulse lobes of opposite field direction. As the number of optical cycles is increased, the leading field lobes prepare a vibrational superposition state by off-resonant ladder climbing, which is then subjected to the three steps of the principal isomerization mechanism. DR excitation is more efficient from a preformed vibrational wavepacket than from a molecular eigenstate. The entire process can be loosely described as Tannor-Kosloff-Rice type transfer mechanism on a single potential surface effected by a single pulse, individual field lobes assuming the roles of pump- and dump-pulses. Pre-excitation to a transient wavepacket can be enhanced by applying a separate, comparatively weak few-cycle prepulse, in which the prepulse prepares a vibrational wavepacket. The two-pulse setup corresponds to a double Tannor-Kosloff-Rice control scheme on a single potential surface.

  7. Molecular isomerization induced by ultrashort infrared pulses. II. Pump-dump isomerization using pairs of time-delayed half-cycle pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uiberacker, Christoph; Jakubetz, Werner

    2004-06-22

    We investigate population transfer across the barrier in a double-well potential, induced by a pair of time-delayed single-lobe half-cycle pulses. We apply this setup both to a one-dimensional (1D) quartic model potential and to a three-dimensional potential representing HCN-->HNC isomerization. Overall the results for the two systems are similar, although in the 3D system some additional features appear not seen in the 1D case. The generic mechanism of population transfer is the preparation by the pump pulse of a wave packet involving delocalized states above the barrier, followed by the essentially 1D motion of the delocalized part of wave packet across the barrier, and the eventual de-excitation by the dump pulse to localized states in the other well. The correct timing is given by the well-to-well passage time of the wave packet and its recurrence properties, and by the signs of the field lobes which determine the direction and acceleration or deceleration of the wave packet motion. In the 3D system an additional pump-pump-dump mechanism linked to wave packet motion in the reagent well can mediate isomerization. Since the transfer time and the pulse durations are of the same order of magnitude, there is also a marked dependence of the dynamics and the transfer yield on the pulse duration. Our analysis also sheds light on the pronounced carrier envelope phase dependence previously observed for isomerization and molecular dissociation with one-cycle and sub-one-cycle pulses. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  8. INFRARED DARK CLOUDS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Young; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Devine, Kathryn E.; Ott, Juergen; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Oliveira, Joana M.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Jones, Paul A.; Cunningham, Maria R.

    2009-01-01

    We have applied the unsharp-masking technique to the 24 μm image of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to search for high-extinction regions. This technique has been used to locate very dense and cold interstellar clouds in the Galaxy, particularly infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). Fifty-five candidate regions of high extinction, namely, high-contrast regions (HCRs), have been identified from the generated decremental contrast image of the SMC. Most HCRs are located in the southern bar region and mainly distributed in the outskirts of CO clouds, but most likely contain a significant amount of H 2 . HCRs have a peak contrast at 24 μm of 2%-2.5% and a size of 8-14 pc. This corresponds to the size of typical and large Galactic IRDCs, but Galactic IRDCs are 2-3 times darker at 24 μm than our HCRs. To constrain the physical properties of the HCRs, we have performed NH 3 , N 2 H + , HNC, HCO + , and HCN observations toward one of the HCRs, HCR LIRS36-east, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Mopra single-dish radio telescope. We did not detect any molecular line emission, however, our upper limits to the column densities of molecular species suggest that HCRs are most likely moderately dense with n ∼ 10 3 cm -3 . This volume density is in agreement with predictions for the cool atomic phase in low-metallicity environments. We suggest that HCRs may be tracing clouds at the transition from atomic to molecule-dominated medium, and could be a powerful way to study early stages of gas condensation in low-metallicity galaxies. Alternatively, if made up of dense molecular clumps <0.5 pc in size, HCRs could be counterparts of Galactic IRDCs, and/or regions with highly unusual abundance of very small dust grains.

  9. SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yuri; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Shimonishi, Takashi [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramakiazaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8578 (Japan); Sakai, Nami [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Center for Computational Sciences, The University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    Spectral line survey observations of seven molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been conducted in the 3 mm band with the Mopra 22 m telescope to reveal chemical compositions in low metallicity conditions. Spectral lines of fundamental species such as CS, SO, CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC are detected in addition to those of CO and {sup 13}CO, while CH{sub 3}OH is not detected in any source and N{sub 2}H{sup +} is marginally detected in two sources. The molecular-cloud scale (10 pc scale) chemical composition is found to be similar among the seven sources regardless of different star formation activities, and hence, it represents the chemical composition characteristic of the LMC without influences by star formation activities. In comparison with chemical compositions of Galactic sources, the characteristic features are (1) deficient N-bearing molecules, (2) abundant CCH, and (3) deficient CH{sub 3}OH. Feature (1) is due to a lower elemental abundance of nitrogen in the LMC, whereas features (2) and (3) seem to originate from extended photodissociation regions and warmer temperature in cloud peripheries due to a lower abundance of dust grains in the low metallicity condition. In spite of general resemblance of chemical abundances among the seven sources, the CS/HCO{sup +} and SO/HCO{sup +} ratios are found to be slightly higher in a quiescent molecular cloud. An origin of this trend is discussed in relation to possible depletion of sulfur along the molecular cloud formation.

  10. The Association of Molecular Gas and Natal Super Star Clusters in Henize 2–10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Testi, Leonardo; Wilner, David J.; Reines, Amy E.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Vanzi, Leonardo

    2018-02-01

    We present ALMA observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 in combination with previous SMA CO observations to probe the molecular environments of natal super star clusters (SSCs). These observations include the HCO+(1-0), HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and CCH(1-0) molecular lines, as well as 88 GHz continuum with a spatial resolution of 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 7× 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 6. After correcting for the contribution from free–free emission to the 88 GHz continuum flux density (∼60% of the 88 GHz emission), we derive a total gas mass for He 2–10 of {M}{gas}=4{--}6× {10}8 M ⊙, roughly 5%–20% of the dynamical mass. Based on a principle component analysis, HCO+ is found to be the best “general” tracer of molecular emission. The line widths and luminosities of the CO emission suggests that the molecular clouds could either be as small as ∼8 pc, or alternately have enhanced line widths. The CO emission and 88 GHz continuum are anti-correlated, suggesting that either the dust and molecular gas are not cospatial, which could reflect that the 88 GHz continuum is dominated by free–free emission. The CO and CCH emission are also relatively anti-correlated, which is consistent with the CCH being photo-enhanced, and/or the CO being dissociated in the regions near the natal SSCs. The molecular line ratios of regions containing the natal star clusters are different from the line ratios observed for regions elsewhere in the galaxy. In particular, the regions with thermal radio emission all have {CO}(2{--}1)/{{HCO}}+(1-0)correlated with the evolutionary stage of the clusters.

  11. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H 2 C 2 → HC 2 H, HNCHCN, and H 2 CO → H 2 + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I → Na + + I - is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features

  12. No Photon Left Behind: How Billions of Spectral Lines are Transforming Planetary Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of realistic potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment surface (DMS) descriptions, theoretically computed linelists can now synthesize accurate spectral parameters for billions of spectral lines sampling the untamed high-energy molecular domain. Being the initial driver for these databases the characterization of stellar spectra, these theoretical databases, in combination with decades of precise experimental studies (nicely compiled in community databases such as HITRAN and GEISA), are leading to unprecedented precisions in the characterization of planetary atmospheres. Cometary sciences are among the most affected by this spectroscopic revolution. Even though comets are relatively cold bodies (T˜100 K), their infrared molecular emission is mainly defined by non-LTE solar fluorescence induced by a high-energy source (Sun, T˜5600 K). In order to interpret high-resolution spectra of comets acquired with extremely powerful telescopes (e.g., Keck, VLT, NASA-IRTF), we have developed advanced non-LTE fluorescence models that integrate the high-energy dynamic range of ab-initio databases (e.g., BT2, VTT, HPT2, BYTe, TROVE) and the precision of laboratory and semi-empirical compilations (e.g., HITRAN, GEISA, CDMS, WKMC, SELP, IUPAC). These new models allow us to calculate realistic non-LTE pumps, cascades, branching-ratios, and emission rates for a broad range of excitation regimes for H2O, HDO, HCN, HNC and NH3. We have implemented elements of these compilations to the study of Mars spectra, and we are now exploring its application to modeling non-LTE emission in exoplanets. In this presentation, we present application of these advanced models to interpret highresolution spectra of comets, Mars and exoplanets.

  13. New Identifications of the CCH Radical in Planetary Nebulae: A Connection to C60?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, D. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    New detections of CCH have been made toward nine planetary nebulae (PNe), including K4-47, K3-58, K3-17, M3-28, and M4-14. Measurements of the N = 1 → 0 and N = 3 → 2 transitions of this radical near 87 and 262 GHz were carried out using the new 12 m and the Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The presence of fine and/or hyperfine structure in the spectra aided in the identification. CCH was not observed in two PNe which are sources of C60. The planetary nebulae with positive detections represent a wide range of ages and morphologies, and all had previously been observed in HCN and HNC. Column densities for CCH in the PNe, determined from radiative transfer modeling, were N tot(CCH) ˜ 0.2-3.3 × 1015 cm-2, corresponding to fractional abundances with respect to H2 of f ˜ 0.2-47 × 10-7. The abundance of CCH was found to not vary significantly with kinematic age across a time span of ˜10,000 years, in contrast to predictions of chemical models. CCH appears to be a fairly common constituent of PNe that are carbon-rich, and its distribution may anti-correlate with that of C60. These results suggest that CCH may be a product of C60 photodestruction, which is known to create C2 units. The molecule may subsequently survive the PN stage and populate diffuse clouds. The distinct, double-horned line profiles for CCH observed in K3-45 and M3-28 indicate the possible presence of a bipolar flow oriented at least partially toward the line of sight.

  14. Burst switching without guard interval in all-optical software-define star intra-data center network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Philip N.; Wang, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Optical switching has been introduced in intra-data center networks (DCNs) to increase capacity and to reduce power consumption. Recently we proposed a star MIMO OFDM-based all-optical DCN with burst switching and software-defined networking. Here, we introduce the control procedure for the star DCN in detail for the first time. The timing, signaling, and operation are described for each step to achieve efficient bandwidth resource utilization. Furthermore, the guidelines for the burst assembling period selection that allows burst switching without guard interval are discussed. The star all-optical DCN offers flexible and efficient control for next-generation data center application.

  15. Medical Imaging in Differentiating the Diabetic Charcot Foot from Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Daniel J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) poses a great challenge to diagnose in the early stages and when plain radiographs do not depict any initial signs of osseous fragmentation or dislocation in a setting of a high clinical index of suspicion. Medical imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and advanced bone scintigraphy, has its own unique clinical indications when treating the DCN with or without concomitant osteomyelitis. This article reviews different clinical case scenarios for choosing the most accurate medical imaging in differentiating DCN from osteomyelitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. THE HERSCHEL AND IRAM CHESS SPECTRAL SURVEYS OF THE PROTOSTELLAR SHOCK L1157-B1: FOSSIL DEUTERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codella, C.; Fontani, F.; Vasta, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Kahane, C.; Taquet, V.; Wiesenfeld, L. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Busquet, G. [INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133, Roma (Italy); Caselli, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Lis, D. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Viti, S., E-mail: codella@rcetri.astro.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-20

    We present the first study of deuteration toward the protostellar shock L1157-B1, based on spectral surveys performed with the Herschel-HIFI and IRAM 30 m telescopes. The L1157 outflow is driven by a low-mass Class 0 protostar and is considered the prototype of the so-called chemically active outflows. The young (2000 yr), bright blueshifted bow shock, B1, is an ideal laboratory for studying the gas chemically enriched by the release of dust mantles due to the passage of a shock. A total of 12 emission lines (up to E{sub u} = 63 K) of CH{sub 2}DOH, HDCO, and DCN are detected. In addition, two lines of NH{sub 2}D and HDO are tentatively reported. To estimate the deuteration, we also extracted from our spectral survey emission lines of non-deuterated isotopologues ({sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2} {sup 13}CO, H{sup 13}CN, H{sub 2} {sup 13}CO, and NH{sub 3}). We infer higher deuteration fractions for CH{sub 3}OH (D/H = 0.2-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}) and H{sub 2}CO (5-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}) than for H{sub 2}O (0.4-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}), HCN ({approx}10{sup -3}), and ammonia ({<=}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}). The measurement of deuteration of water, formaldehyde, and methanol in L1157-B1 provides a fossil record of the gas before it was shocked by the jet driven by the protostar. A comparison with gas-grain models indicates that the gas passed through a low-density ({<=}10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) phase, during which the bulk of water ices formed, followed by a phase of increasing density, up to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, during which formaldehyde and methanol ices formed.

  17. Predicting Fuel Ignition Quality Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multiple Linear Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Naser, Nimal; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Dooley, Stephen; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    An improved model for the prediction of ignition quality of hydrocarbon fuels has been developed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling. Cetane number (CN) and derived cetane number (DCN

  18. Effects of Azadirachta indica leaf aqeous extract on the antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Original Paper ... compared with A while C and D were decreased compared wth B. Plasma and homogenate MDA were ..... 2017), thereby maintaining the cell membrane ... DCN revised the .... Aging processes of edible vegetable oils.

  19. LightFD: A Lightweight Flow Detection Mechanism for Traffic Grooming in Optical Wireless DCNs

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ghadhban, Amer; Celik, Abdulkadir; Shihada, Basem; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    State of the art wireless technologies have recently shown a great potential for enabling re-configurable data center network (DCN) topologies by augmenting the cabling complexity and link inflexibility of traditional wired data centers (DCs

  20. Predicting Fuel Ignition Quality Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multiple Linear Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-09-14

    An improved model for the prediction of ignition quality of hydrocarbon fuels has been developed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling. Cetane number (CN) and derived cetane number (DCN) of 71 pure hydrocarbons and 54 hydrocarbon blends were utilized as a data set to study the relationship between ignition quality and molecular structure. CN and DCN are functional equivalents and collectively referred to as D/CN, herein. The effect of molecular weight and weight percent of structural parameters such as paraffinic CH3 groups, paraffinic CH2 groups, paraffinic CH groups, olefinic CH–CH2 groups, naphthenic CH–CH2 groups, and aromatic C–CH groups on D/CN was studied. A particular emphasis on the effect of branching (i.e., methyl substitution) on the D/CN was studied, and a new parameter denoted as the branching index (BI) was introduced to quantify this effect. A new formula was developed to calculate the BI of hydrocarbon fuels using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling was used to develop an empirical relationship between D/CN and the eight structural parameters. This was then used to predict the DCN of many hydrocarbon fuels. The developed model has a high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.97) and was validated with experimentally measured DCN of twenty-two real fuel mixtures (e.g., gasolines and diesels) and fifty-nine blends of known composition, and the predicted values matched well with the experimental data.

  1. Anticipated simulation of Angra-1 start-up physical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, V.B.; Perrotta, J.A.; Silva Ipojuca, T. da; Ponzoni Filho, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some results foreseen by the Department of Nuclear Fuel (DCN. O) in Furnas for the measurements that will be realized during the start-up integrated tests for Angra-1 are presented. All the forecasting is based on a DCN.O proper correlation methodology, developed from basic physical principles, using computer codes developed by the authors or public computer codes adapted to this methodology. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Allergies and risk of head and neck cancer: an original study plus meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Ou, Chun-Yen; Lo, Hung-I; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Wei-Ting; Huang, Jehn-Shyun; Chen, Ken-Chung; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Tsai, Sen-Tien; Yen, Chia-Jui; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Yang, Ming-Wei; Wu, Shang-Yin; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Lin, Chen-Lin; Wang, Fang-Ting; Wang, Yi-Hui; Weng, Ya-Ling; Yang, Han-Chien; Chang, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    Although the relationship between allergy and cancer has been investigated extensively, the role of allergy in head and neck cancer (HNC) appears less consistent. It is not clear whether allergies can independently influence the risk of HNC in the presence of known strong environmental risk factors, including consumption of alcohol, betel quid, and cigarette. THE CURRENT PAPER REPORTS RESULTS FROM: 1) an original hospital-based case-control study, which included 252 incident cases of HNC and 236 controls frequency-matched to cases on sex and age; and 2) a meta-analysis combining the results of the current case-control study and 13 previously published studies (9 cohort studies with 727,569 subjects and 550 HNC outcomes and 5 case-control studies with 4,017 HNC cases and 10,928 controls). In the original case-control study, we observed a strong inverse association between allergies and HNC [odds ratio = 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.27-0.62]. The meta-analysis also indicated a statistically significant inverse association between HNC and allergies [meta-relative risk (RR) = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.63-0.91], particularly strong for allergic rhinitis (meta-RR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.40-0.76). In addition, the inverse association between allergies and HNC was observed only among men (meta-RR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.54-0.84) but not among women (meta-RR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.81-1.18). These findings suggest that immunity plays an influential role in the risk of HNC. Future studies investigating immune biomarkers, including cytokine profiles and genetic polymorphisms, are warranted to further delineate the relationship between allergies and HNC. Understanding the relationship between allergies and HNC may help devise effective strategies to reduce and treat HNC.

  3. Technology-enhanced program for child disruptive behavior disorders: development and pilot randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Parent, Justin; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Gonzalez, Michelle; Anton, Margaret; Newey, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    Early onset disruptive behavior disorders are overrepresented in low-income families; yet these families are less likely to engage in behavioral parent training (BPT) than other groups. This project aimed to develop and pilot test a technology-enhanced version of one evidence-based BPT program, Helping the Noncompliant Child (HNC). The aim was to increase engagement of low-income families and, in turn, child behavior outcomes, with potential cost-savings associated with greater treatment efficiency. Low-income families of 3- to 8-year-old children with clinically significant disruptive behaviors were randomized to and completed standard HNC (n = 8) or Technology-Enhanced HNC (TE-HNC; n = 7). On average, caregivers were 37 years old; 87% were female, and 80% worked at least part-time. More than half (53%) of the youth were boys; the average age of the sample was 5.67 years. All families received the standard HNC program; however, TE-HNC also included the following smartphone enhancements: (a) skills video series, (b) brief daily surveys, (c) text message reminders, (d) video recording home practice, and (e) midweek video calls. TE-HNC yielded larger effect sizes than HNC for all engagement outcomes. Both groups yielded clinically significant improvements in disruptive behavior; however, findings suggest that the greater program engagement associated with TE-HNC boosted child treatment outcome. Further evidence for the boost afforded by the technology is revealed in family responses to postassessment interviews. Finally, cost analysis suggests that TE-HNC families also required fewer sessions than HNC families to complete the program, an efficiency that did not compromise family satisfaction. TE-HNC shows promise as an innovative approach to engaging low-income families in BPT with potential cost-savings and, therefore, merits further investigation on a larger scale.

  4. Critical weight loss is a major prognostic indicator for disease-specific survival in patients with head and neck cancer receiving radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Langius, J.A.E.; Bakker, S.; Rietveld, D.H.F.; Kruizenga, H.M.; Langendijk, J.A.; Weijs, P.J.M.; Leemans, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Pre-treatment weight loss (WL) is a prognostic indicator for overall survival (OS) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. This study investigates the association between WL before or during radiotherapy and disease-specific survival (DSS) in HNC patients.Methods:In 1340 newly diagnosed HNC patients, weight change was collected before and during (adjuvant) radiotherapy with curative intent. Critical WL during radiotherapy was defined as >5% WL during radiotherapy or >7.5% WL until ...

  5. A Comprehensive Analysis on the Association between Tobacco-Free Betel Quid and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer in Taiwanese Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hua Wu

    Full Text Available Although betel quid (BQ is an established risk factor of head and neck cancer (HNC, insufficiencies exist in the literature regarding the dose-response, BQ types, HNC sites, and BQ cessation. The current study was conducted to fill these insufficiencies.A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the association between BQ and HNC. In-person interview was conducted to collect data on BQ chewing. The current analysis included 487 men newly diagnosed with HNC and 617 male controls who were frequency-matched to the cases by age. The association between BQ and HNC was assessed using multivariable unconditional logistic regression.Ever BQ chewing was associated with an increased HNC risk regardless of the BQ types. A non-linear positive association between BQ and HNC was observed, with a steep rise in HNC risk for the first 5 pack-years or 200,000 minutes of BQ consumption. Every year of BQ cessation was associated with a 2.9% reduction in HNC risk; however, the risk did not reduce to the level of non-BQ chewers even after 20 years of BQ cessation. Eliminating BQ chewing may prevent 51.6% of HNCs, 62.6% of oral cancers, and 41.3% of pharyngeal cancers in Taiwan.Our results supported the positive association between BQ and HNC. BQ cessation is effective in reducing HNC risk and should be encouraged. Because BQ cessation may not reduce the HNC risk to the level of non-BQ chewers, it is important to prevent the initiation of BQ chewing.

  6. Asynchronous data change notification between database server and accelerator control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenge Fu; Seth Nemesure; Morris, J.

    2012-01-01

    Database data change notification (DCN) is a commonly used feature, it allows to be informed when the data has been changed on the server side by another client. Not all database management systems (DBMS) provide an explicit DCN mechanism. Even for those DBMS's which support DCN (such as Oracle and MS SQL server), some server side and/or client side programming may be required to make the DCN system work. This makes the setup of DCN between database server and interested clients tedious and time consuming. In accelerator control systems, there are many well established software client/server architectures (such as CDEV, EPICS, and ADO) that can be used to implement data reflection servers that transfer data asynchronously to any client using the standard SET/GET API. This paper describes a method for using such a data reflection server to set up asynchronous DCN (ADCN) between a DBMS and clients. This method works well for all DBMS systems which provide database trigger functionality. (authors)

  7. Asynchronous data change notification between database server and accelerator controls system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, W.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2011-01-01

    Database data change notification (DCN) is a commonly used feature. Not all database management systems (DBMS) provide an explicit DCN mechanism. Even for those DBMS's which support DCN (such as Oracle and MS SQL server), some server side and/or client side programming may be required to make the DCN system work. This makes the setup of DCN between database server and interested clients tedious and time consuming. In accelerator control systems, there are many well established software client/server architectures (such as CDEV, EPICS, and ADO) that can be used to implement data reflection servers that transfer data asynchronously to any client using the standard SET/GET API. This paper describes a method for using such a data reflection server to set up asynchronous DCN (ADCN) between a DBMS and clients. This method works well for all DBMS systems which provide database trigger functionality. Asynchronous data change notification (ADCN) between database server and clients can be realized by combining the use of a database trigger mechanism, which is supported by major DBMS systems, with server processes that use client/server software architectures that are familiar in the accelerator controls community (such as EPICS, CDEV or ADO). This approach makes the ADCN system easy to set up and integrate into an accelerator controls system. Several ADCN systems have been set up and used in the RHIC-AGS controls system.

  8. Trojan Horses or Local Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllner, Jakob; Klopf, Patricia; Nell, Phillip C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a multinational corporation's (MNC) decision to appoint host-country national (HCN) managers to foreign subsidiaries based on the institutional context of and familiarity with the host country. HCN managers are commonly associated with specialized knowledge, superior responsiveness...

  9. Occupational Therapy for the Head and Neck Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Priscilla; Hashmi, Mahjabeen

    2018-01-01

    Occupational therapy is a health profession concerned with promoting health and well-being through occupation. A diagnosis of head and neck cancer (HNC) often invokes fear and anxiety because of the potential negative impact of the diagnosis and/or treatment on lifestyle and well-being. Occupational therapists perform a unique and important role in addressing quality of life concerns for HNC patients through applied expertise in lifestyle management, facilitating the use of positive coping strategies and daily routine management. Occupational therapy concurrently assists HNC patients to effectively manage the debilitating stress and anxiety associated with HNC diagnosis, treatment, and recovery while facilitating a return to prior or adapted daily routines.

  10. Head and neck cancer in HIV patients and their parents: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, Frederik N; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents.......The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents....

  11. Multi-sensory integration in brainstem and auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Koehler, Seth D; Shore, Susan E

    2012-11-16

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of a physical sound stimulus. It is thought to arise from aberrant neural activity within central auditory pathways that may be influenced by multiple brain centers, including the somatosensory system. Auditory-somatosensory (bimodal) integration occurs in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), where electrical activation of somatosensory regions alters pyramidal cell spike timing and rates of sound stimuli. Moreover, in conditions of tinnitus, bimodal integration in DCN is enhanced, producing greater spontaneous and sound-driven neural activity, which are neural correlates of tinnitus. In primary auditory cortex (A1), a similar auditory-somatosensory integration has been described in the normal system (Lakatos et al., 2007), where sub-threshold multisensory modulation may be a direct reflection of subcortical multisensory responses (Tyll et al., 2011). The present work utilized simultaneous recordings from both DCN and A1 to directly compare bimodal integration across these separate brain stations of the intact auditory pathway. Four-shank, 32-channel electrodes were placed in DCN and A1 to simultaneously record tone-evoked unit activity in the presence and absence of spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) electrical activation. Bimodal stimulation led to long-lasting facilitation or suppression of single and multi-unit responses to subsequent sound in both DCN and A1. Immediate (bimodal response) and long-lasting (bimodal plasticity) effects of Sp5-tone stimulation were facilitation or suppression of tone-evoked firing rates in DCN and A1 at all Sp5-tone pairing intervals (10, 20, and 40 ms), and greater suppression at 20 ms pairing-intervals for single unit responses. Understanding the complex relationships between DCN and A1 bimodal processing in the normal animal provides the basis for studying its disruption in hearing loss and tinnitus models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tinnitus Neuroscience

  12. The dermatan sulfate proteoglycan decorin modulates α2β1 integrin and the vimentin intermediate filament system during collagen synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Jungmann

    Full Text Available Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan harboring a dermatan sulfate chain at its N-terminus, is involved in regulating matrix organization and cell signaling. Loss of the dermatan sulfate of decorin leads to an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by delayed wound healing. Decorin-null (Dcn(-/- mice display a phenotype similar to that of EDS patients. The fibrillar collagen phenotype of Dcn(-/- mice could be rescued in vitro by decorin but not with decorin lacking the glycosaminoglycan chain. We utilized a 3D cell culture model to investigate the impact of the altered extracellular matrix on Dcn(-/- fibroblasts. Using 2D gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry, we identified vimentin as one of the proteins that was differentially upregulated by the presence of decorin. We discovered that a decorin-deficient matrix leads to abnormal nuclear morphology in the Dcn(-/- fibroblasts. This phenotype could be rescued by the decorin proteoglycan but less efficiently by the decorin protein core. Decorin treatment led to a significant reduction of the α2β1 integrin at day 6 in Dcn(-/- fibroblasts, whereas the protein core had no effect on β1. Interestingly, only the decorin core induced mRNA synthesis, phosphorylation and de novo synthesis of vimentin indicating that the proteoglycan decorin in the extracellular matrix stabilizes the vimentin intermediate filament system. We could support these results in vivo, because the dermis of wild-type mice have more vimentin and less β1 integrin compared to Dcn(-/-. Furthermore, the α2β1 null fibroblasts also showed a reduced amount of vimentin compared to wild-type. These data show for the first time that decorin has an impact on the biology of α2β1 integrin and the vimentin intermediate filament system. Moreover, our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the reported defects in wound healing associated with the Dcn(-/- phenotype.

  13. Deep cerebellar nuclei play an important role in two-tone discrimination on delay eyeblink conditioning in C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN-lesioned mice develop conditioned responses (CR on delay eyeblink conditioning when a salient tone conditioned stimulus (CS is used, which suggests that the cerebellum potentially plays a role in more complicated cognitive functions. In the present study, we examined the role of DCN in tone frequency discrimination in the delay eyeblink-conditioning paradigm. In the first experiment, DCN-lesioned and sham-operated mice were subjected to standard simple eyeblink conditioning under low-frequency tone CS (LCS: 1 kHz, 80 dB or high-frequency tone CS (HCS: 10 kHz, 70 dB conditions. DCN-lesioned mice developed CR in both CS conditions as well as sham-operated mice. In the second experiment, DCN-lesioned and sham-operated mice were subjected to two-tone discrimination tasks, with LCS+ (or HCS+ paired with unconditioned stimulus (US, and HCS- (or LCS- without US. CR% in sham-operated mice increased in LCS+ (or HCS+ trials, regardless of tone frequency of CS, but not in HCS- (or LCS- trials. The results indicate that sham-operated mice can discriminate between LCS+ and HCS- (or HCS+ and LCS-. In contrast, DCN-lesioned mice showed high CR% in not only LCS+ (or HCS+ trials but also HCS- (or LCS- trials. The results indicate that DCN lesions impair the discrimination between tone frequency in eyeblink conditioning. Our results suggest that the cerebellum plays a pivotal role in the discrimination of tone frequency.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 and decorin expression in old fracture fragments and surrounding tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X G; Wang, D K; Gao, F; Liu, R H; Bi, Z G

    2015-09-21

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) can promote fracture healing. Although the complex role BMP-2 in bone formation is increasingly understood, the role of endogenous BMP-2 in nonunion remains unclear. Decorin (DCN) can promote the formation of bone matrix and calcium deposition to control bone morphogenesis. In this study, tissue composition and expression of BMP-2 and DCN were detected in different parts of old fracture zones to explore inherent anti-fibrotic ability and osteogenesis. Twenty-three patients were selected, including eight cases of delayed union and 15 cases of nonunion. Average duration of delayed union or nonunion was 15 months. Fracture fragments and surrounding tissues, including bone grafts, marrow cavity contents, and sticking scars, were categorically sampled during surgery. Through observation and histological testing, component comparisons were made between fracture fragments and surrounding tissue. The expression levels of DCN and BMP-2 in different tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of DCN and BMP- 2 in different parts of the nonunion area showed that, compared with bone graft and marrow cavity contents, sticking scars had the highest expression of BMP-2. Compared with the marrow cavity contents and sticking scars, bone grafts had the highest expression of DCN. The low antifibrotic and osteogenic activity of the nonunion area was associated with non-co-expression of BMP-2 and DCN. Therefore, the co-injection of osteogenic factor BMP and DCN into the nonunion area can improve the induction of bone formation and enhance the conversion of the old scar, thereby achieving better nonunion treatment.

  15. Consumption of vegetables and fruits and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-03-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between consumption of vegetables and fruits and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes [i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC) and laryngeal cancer (LC)]. Therefore, we investigated these associations within the Netherlands Cohort Study, in which 120,852 participants completed a 150-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 415 cases of HNC (131 OCC, 88 OHPC, three oral cavity/pharynx unspecified or overlapping and 193 LC) and 3,898 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Total vegetable and fruit consumption was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall [multivariable-adjusted rate ratios for highest vs. lowest quartile: 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.85, p trend 0.002] and all HNC subtypes, with the strongest associations for OCC. Total vegetable intake and total fruit intake were also associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall and HNC subtypes. No significant interaction was found between vegetable and fruit intake and alcohol consumption or cigarette smoking. In conclusion, in this large-scale cohort study, consumption of vegetables and fruits was associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall and all subtypes. Consumption of vegetables and fruits (or of specific groups of them) may protect against HNC and its subtypes. © 2014 UICC.

  16. Gum karaya based hydrogel nanocomposites for the effective removal of cationic dyes from aqueous solutions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mittala, H

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available after nanocomposite formation with SiC NPs. The HNC was employed for the removal of cationic dyes, i.e., malachite green (MG) and rhodamine B (RhB) from the aqueous solution. The HNC was found to remove 91% (MG) and 86% (RhB) of dyes with a polymer dose...

  17. Targeting of the Glutathione, Thioredoxin, and Nrf2 Antioxidant Systems in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Jang, Hyejin; Kim, Eun Hye; Shin, Daiha

    2017-07-10

    The glutathione (GSH), thioredoxin (Trx), and Nrf2 systems represent a major defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS), the cellular imbalance of which in cancer promotes growth and therapeutic resistance. This study investigated whether targeting the GSH, Trx, and Nrf2 antioxidant systems effectively eliminated head and neck cancer (HNC). At high concentrations, auranofin, but not buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) alone, decreased the viability of HNC, whereas even at low concentrations, auranofin plus BSO synergized to kill HNC cells. Dual silencing of the genes for GCLM and TrxR1 induced GSH depletion, Trx activity inhibition, and ROS accumulation, synergistically killing HNC cells. Inhibition of the GSH and Trx systems resulted in activation of the Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway, which may result in suboptimal GSH and Trx inhibition where HNC is resistant. Genetic inhibition of Nrf2 and/or HO-1 or trigonelline enhanced growth suppression, ROS accumulation, and cell death from GSH and Trx inhibition. The in vivo effects of GSH, Trx, and Nrf2 system inhibition were confirmed in a mouse HNC xenograft model by achieving growth inhibition >60% compared with those of control. Innovations: This study is the first to show that triple inhibition of GSH, Trx, and Nrf2 pathways could be an effective method to overcome the resistance of HNC. Inhibition of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in addition to dual inhibition of the GSH and Trx antioxidant systems can effectively eliminate resistant HNC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 106-114.

  18. Work-related experiences of head and neck cancer survivors: an exploratory and descriptive qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory and descriptive study contributes to the growing knowledge about the return-to-work (RTW) experience of head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Viewing RTW as a process, participants were asked to consider the work-related experience with HNC at different phases: (1) at

  19. Dysphagia training after head and neck cancer fails to follow legislation and national recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Sara Vinther; Høgdal, Nina; Christensen, Malene Bæk

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dysphagia is a known sequela after head and neck cancer (HNC) and causes malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia and a reduced quality of life. Due to improved survival rates, the number of patients with sequelae is increasing. Evidence on the ideal HNC-specific rehabilitation of dysphag...

  20. Emissions of hydrogen cyanide from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Samar G.; Leithead, Amy; Li, Shao-Meng; Chan, Tak W.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Stroud, Craig; Zhang, Junhua; Lee, Patrick; Lu, Gang; Brook, Jeffery R.; Hayden, Katherine; Narayan, Julie; Liggio, John

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is considered a marker for biomass burning emissions and is a component of vehicle exhaust. Despite its potential health impacts, vehicular HCN emissions estimates and their contribution to regional budgets are highly uncertain. In the current study, Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used to measure HCN emission factors from the exhaust of individual diesel, biodiesel and gasoline vehicles. Laboratory emissions data as a function of fuel type and driving mode were combined with ambient measurement data and model predictions. The results indicate that gasoline vehicles have the highest emissions of HCN (relative to diesel fuel) and that biodiesel fuel has the potential to significantly reduce HCN emissions even at realistic 5% blend levels. The data further demonstrate that gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines emit more HCN than their port fuel injection (PFI) counterparts, suggesting that the expected full transition of vehicle fleets to GDI will increase HCN emissions. Ambient measurements of HCN in a traffic dominated area of Toronto, Canada were strongly correlated to vehicle emission markers and consistent with regional air quality model predictions of ambient air HCN, indicating that vehicle emissions of HCN are the dominant source of exposure in urban areas. The results further indicate that additional work is required to quantify HCN emissions from the modern vehicle fleet, particularly in light of continuously changing engine, fuel and after-treatment technologies.

  1. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9-10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  2. A Reduced Reaction Scheme for Volatile Nitrogen Conversion in Coal Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Saaby; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    In pulverised coal flames, the most important volatile nitrogen component forming NOx is HCN. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in coal flames it is necessary to have an adequate model for HCN oxidation. The present work was concerned with developing a model for HCN/NH3/NO conversion based...... that the CO/H-2 chemistry was described adequately, the reduced HCN/NH3/NO model compared very well with the detailed model over a wide range of stoichiometries. Decoupling of the HCN chemistry from the CO/H-2 chemistry resulted in over-prediction of the HCN oxidation rate under fuel rich conditions, but had...... negligible effect on the CO/H-2 chemistry. Comparison with simplified HCN models from the literature revealed significant differences, indicating that these models should be used cautiously in modelling volatile nitrogen conversion....

  3. Risk factors for competing noncancer mortality after definitive treatment for advanced-stage head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Han; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Sung-Bae; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2018-05-27

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) can die of index tumor progression and second tumor or noncancer causes. Here, we investigated the risk factors for competing noncancer mortality (NCM) in a prospective cohort of patients with advanced-stage HNC. A prospective observational study was conducted with 604 patients who underwent definitive treatment for advanced-stage HNC between 2010 and 2015. Main outcomes were NCM and cancer mortality (CM) defined as death from noncancer causes and HNC or second cancers, respectively. Cumulative incidence and cause-specific hazard functions were used to analyze the risk factors of NCM and CM. Age, smoking, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), performance status, body mass index, rural residence, education and hemoglobin level at diagnosis, and chemotherapy were significantly associated with NCM (all Padvanced-stage HNC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Dysphagia training after head and neck cancer fails to follow legislation and national recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Sara Vinther; Høgdal, Nina; Christensen, Malene Bæk

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dysphagia is a known sequela after head and neck cancer (HNC) and causes malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia and a reduced quality of life. Due to improved survival rates, the number of patients with sequelae is increasing. Evidence on the ideal HNC-specific rehabilitation of dysphagia...... is lacking, but several studies indicate that early initiation is crucial. The aim of this study was to map the existing dysphagia rehabilitation programmes for HNC patients in Denmark. METHODS: Occupational therapists (OTs), oncologists and surgeons from five hospitals participated in a nationwide...... questionnaire-based survey, along with OTs from 39 municipal health centres. RESULTS: HNC patients rarely receive preventive occupational therapy before treatment, and hospital-based OTs mainly attend to HNC patients undergoing surgery. Far from all oncology and surgical departments complete the required...

  5. [Assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiesner, U

    2011-09-01

    The article approaches with the question how preservation of function after treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) can be defined and measured across treatment approaches. On the basis of the "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)" a series of efforts are summarized how all relevant aspects of the interdisciplinary team can be integrated into a common concept.Different efforts on the development, validation and implementation of ICF Core Sets for head and neck cancer (ICF-HNC) are discussed. The ICF-HNC covers organ-based problems with food ingestion, breathing, and speech, as well as psychosocial difficulties.Relationships between the ICF-HNC and well-established outcome measures are illustrated. This enables the user to integrate different aspects of functional outcome into a consolidated approach towards preservation/rehabilitation of functioning after HNC - applicable for a variety of treatment-approaches and health-professions. George Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Medical marijuana use in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David A; Nabavizadeh, Nima; Romer, Jeanna L; Chen, Yiyi; Holland, John M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to better understand why patients with history of head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with radiotherapy are using medical marijuana (MM). Established HNC quality of life questionnaires and our own MM quality of life questionnaire were sent to 15 HNC patients treated at our institution who reported using MM. Patients are clinically disease free and currently using MM to manage long-term side effects after curative HNC treatment. There was a 100 % response rate. Median time from treatment was 45 months (21-136 months). Most patients smoked marijuana (12 patients), while others reported ingestion (4 patients), vaporizing (3 patients), and use of homemade concentrated oil (1 patient). Six patients reported prior recreational marijuana use before diagnosis. MM provided benefit in altered sense, weight maintenance, depression, pain, appetite, dysphagia, xerostomia, muscle spasm, and sticky saliva. HNC patients report MM use to help with long-term side effects of radiotherapy.

  7. Detection of the HC3NH+ and HCNH+ ions in the L1544 pre-stellar core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quénard, D.; Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Hily-Blant, P.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2017-09-01

    The L1544 pre-stellar core was observed as part of the ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM) Large Program. We report the first detection in a pre-stellar core of the HCNH+ and HC3NH+ ions. The high spectral resolution of the observations allows us to resolve the hyperfine structure of HCNH+. Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis leads to derive a column density equal to (2.0 ± 0.2) × 1013 cm-2 for HCNH+ and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 1011 cm-2 for HC3NH+. We also present non-LTE analysis of five transitions of HC3N, three transitions of H13CN and one transition of HN13C, all of them linked to the chemistry of HCNH+ and HC3NH+. We computed for HC3N, HCN and HNC a column density of (2.0 ± 0.4) × 1013 cm-2, (3.6 ± 0.9) × 1014 cm-2 and (3.0 ± 1.0) × 1014 cm-2, respectively. We used the gas-grain chemical code nautilus to predict the abundances of all these species across the pre-stellar core. Comparison of the observations with the model predictions suggests that the emission from HCNH+ and HC3NH+ originates in the external layer where non-thermal desorption of other species was previously observed. The observed abundance of both ionic species ([HCNH+] ≃ 3 × 10-10 and [HC3NH+] ≃ [1.5 - 3.0] × 10-12, with respect to H2) cannot be reproduced at the same time by the chemical modelling within the error bars of the observations only. We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and suggest that the current chemical models are not fully accurate or complete. However, the modelled abundances are within a factor of 3, consistent with the observations, considering a late stage of the evolution of the pre-stellar core, compatible with previous observations.

  8. Physical and chemical differentiation of the luminous star-forming region W49A. Results from the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Z.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Fuller, G. A.; Plume, R.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The massive and luminous star-forming region W49A is a well-known Galactic candidate to probe the physical conditions and chemistry similar to those expected in external starburst galaxies. Aims: We aim to probe the physical and chemical structure of W49A on a spatial scale of ~0.8 pc based on the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey, which covers the frequency range between 330 and 373 GHz. Methods: The wide 2 × 2 arcmin field and the high spectral resolution of the HARP instrument on JCMT provides information on the spatial structure and kinematics of the cloud traced by the observed molecular lines. For species where multiple transitions are available, we estimate excitation temperatures and column densities using a population diagram method that takes beam dilution and optical depth corrections into account. Results: We detected 255 transitions corresponding to 63 species in the 330-373 GHz range at the center position of W49A. Excitation conditions can be probed for 14 molecules, including the complex organic molecules CH3CCH, CH3CN, and CH3OH. The chemical composition suggests the importance of shock, photon-dominated region (PDR), and hot core chemistry. Many molecular lines show a significant spatial extent across the maps including CO and its isotopologues, high density tracers (e.g., HCN, HNC, CS, HCO+), and tracers of UV irradiation (e.g., CN and C2H). The spatially extended species reveal a complex velocity-structure of W49A with possible infall and outflow motions. Large variations are seen between the subregions with mostly blue-shifted emission toward the eastern tail, mostly red-shifted emission toward the northern clump, and emission peaking around the expected source velocity toward the southwest clump. Conclusions: A comparison of column density ratios of characteristic species observed toward W49A to Galactic PDRs suggests that while the chemistry toward the W49A center is driven by a combination of UV irradiation and shocks, UV irradiation

  9. Footpoints of the giant molecular loops in the Galactic center region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, D.; Amo-Baladrón, M. A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín, S.; Burton, M.; Cunningham, M.; Jones, P. A.; Menten, K. M.; Bronfman, L.; Güsten, R.

    2018-05-01

    Aims: We aim to reveal the morphology, chemical composition, kinematics, and to establish the main processes prevalent in the gas at the footpoints of the giant molecular loops (GMLs) in the Galactic center region. Methods: Using the 22-m Mopra telescope, we mapped the M-3.8+0.9 molecular cloud, placed at the footpoints of a GML, in 3-mm range molecular lines. To derive the molecular hydrogen column density, we also observed the 13CO(2 - 1) line at 1 mm using the 12-m APEX telescope. From the 3 mm observations 12 molecular species were detected, namely HCO+, HCN, H13CN, HNC, SiO, CS, CH3OH, N2H+, SO, HNCO, OCS, and HC3N. Results: Maps revealing the morphology and kinematics of the M-3.8+0.9 molecular cloud in different molecules are presented. We identify six main molecular complexes. We derive fractional abundances in 11 selected positions of the different molecules assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium. Conclusions: Most of the fractional abundances derived for the M-3.8+0.9 molecular cloud are very similar over the whole cloud. However, the fractional abundances of some molecules show significant difference with respect to those measured in the central molecular zone (CMZ). The abundances of the shock tracer SiO are very similar between the GMLs and the CMZ. The methanol emission is the most abundant species in the GMLs. This indicates that the gas is likely affected by moderate 30 km s-1 or even high velocity (50 km s-1) shocks, consistent with the line profile observed toward one of the studied position. The origin of the shocks is likely related to the flow of the gas throughout the GMLs towards the footpoints. OPRA and APEX final data cubes (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/613/A42

  10. Physico-mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of furfuryl alcohol/2-ethylhexyl methacrylate/halloysite nanoclay wood polymer nanocomposites (WPNCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezaur Rahman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the physical, morphological, mechanical and thermal properties of furfuryl alcohol/2-ethylhexyl methacrylate/halloysite nanoclay wood polymer nanocomposites (FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNCs were investigated. FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNCs were prepared via an impregnation method and the properties of the nanocomposites were characterized through the weight percent gain, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, three-point flexural test, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis and moisture absorption test. The weight percent gain in the 50:50 FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNC was the highest compared with the raw wood (RW and other WPNCs. The FT-IR results confirmed that polymerization took place in the nanocomposites, especially 50:50 FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNC, which had a reduced amount of hydroxyl groups. The SEM results revealed that the 50:50 FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNC had the smoothest and most uniform surface among all of the nanocomposites. The 50:50 FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNC showed the highest flexural strength and modulus of elasticity. The results revealed that the storage modulus and loss modulus of the FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNCs were higher and the tan δ of FA-co-EHMA-HNC WNPCs was lower compared with the RW. The FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNCs exhibited the higher thermal stability in the TGA and DSC analysis. The 50:50 FA-co-EHMA-HNC WPNC exhibited remarkably lower moisture absorption compared with the RW. Overall, this study proved that the ratio 50:50 FA-co-EHMA ratio was the most suitable for introduction in the in the RW.

  11. Blood nickel and chromium levels in association with smoking and occupational exposure among head and neck cancer patients in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Feki-Tounsi, Molka; Chakroun, Amine; Rebai, Ahmed; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer (HNC) incidence among exposed human populations. This study represents the first biomonitoring of Cr and Ni exposure in Tunisia and focuses on a possible association with HNC risk. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of Cr and Ni in the blood of HNC patients and controls. Metals blood levels of 169 HNC patients and 351 controls were determined using a Perkin-Elmer Analyst 800 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Mean blood levels of Cr and Ni in HNC cases (52.15 and 111.60 μg/L, respectively) were significantly higher than those of controls (37.04 and 30.50 μg/L, respectively). Cases' blood levels of Cr and Ni were significantly higher than those of controls after controlling for the other risk factors of HNC, including smoking, shisha consumption, occupational exposure, and nearby environment (Pexposure presented the most significant association with HNC (odds ratio (OR)=6.54 and 7.66, respectively, P<0.001). Cr and Ni levels in blood sample of cases and controls that are smoker/occupationally exposed were higher than that of non-smoker/non-occupationally exposed (P<0.05). Smokers who are occupationally exposed present the most significant association with HNC (OR=25.08, P<0.0001). High levels of blood Cr (OR=2.09) and high levels of blood Ni (OR=8.87) were strongly associated with HNC after other potential confounders were controlled (P=0.004 and P<0.0001, respectively). This study suggested a potential role of Cr and Ni in the mechanism of HNC development.

  12. Experimental performance evaluation of software defined networking (SDN) based data communication networks for large scale flexi-grid optical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; He, Ruiying; Chen, Haoran; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Zheng, Haomian; Lin, Yi; Wang, Xinbo

    2014-04-21

    Software defined networking (SDN) has become the focus in the current information and communication technology area because of its flexibility and programmability. It has been introduced into various network scenarios, such as datacenter networks, carrier networks, and wireless networks. Optical transport network is also regarded as an important application scenario for SDN, which is adopted as the enabling technology of data communication networks (DCN) instead of general multi-protocol label switching (GMPLS). However, the practical performance of SDN based DCN for large scale optical networks, which is very important for the technology selection in the future optical network deployment, has not been evaluated up to now. In this paper we have built a large scale flexi-grid optical network testbed with 1000 virtual optical transport nodes to evaluate the performance of SDN based DCN, including network scalability, DCN bandwidth limitation, and restoration time. A series of network performance parameters including blocking probability, bandwidth utilization, average lightpath provisioning time, and failure restoration time have been demonstrated under various network environments, such as with different traffic loads and different DCN bandwidths. The demonstration in this work can be taken as a proof for the future network deployment.

  13. Power Consumption Evaluation of Distributed Computing Network Considering Traffic Locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Go; Murata, Masayuki

    When computing resources are consolidated in a few huge data centers, a massive amount of data is transferred to each data center over a wide area network (WAN). This results in increased power consumption in the WAN. A distributed computing network (DCN), such as a content delivery network, can reduce the traffic from/to the data center, thereby decreasing the power consumed in the WAN. In this paper, we focus on the energy-saving aspect of the DCN and evaluate its effectiveness, especially considering traffic locality, i.e., the amount of traffic related to the geographical vicinity. We first formulate the problem of optimizing the DCN power consumption and describe the DCN in detail. Then, numerical evaluations show that, when there is strong traffic locality and the router has ideal energy proportionality, the system's power consumption is reduced to about 50% of the power consumed in the case where a DCN is not used; moreover, this advantage becomes even larger (up to about 30%) when the data center is located farthest from the center of the network topology.

  14. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). I. Highly excited linear rotor molecules in the high-mass protostellar envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Pagani, L.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Linear rotor molecules such as CO, HCO+ and HCN are important probes of star-forming gas. For these species, temperatures of ≲ 50 K are sufficient to produce emission lines that are observable from the ground at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Molecular gas in the environment of massive protostellar objects, however, is known to reach temperatures of several hundred K. To probe this, space-based far-infrared observations are required. Aims: We aim to reveal the gas energetics in the circumstellar environment of the prototypical high-mass protostellar object AFGL 2591. Methods: Rotational spectral line signatures of CO species, HCO+, CS, HCN and HNC from a 490-1240 GHz survey with Herschel/HIFI, complemented by ground-based JCMT and IRAM 30 m spectra, cover transitions in the energy range (Eup/k) between 5 K and ~ 300 K. Selected frequency settings in the highest frequency HIFI bands (up to 1850 GHz) extend this range to 750 K for 12C16O. The resolved spectral line profiles are used to separate and study various kinematic components. Observed line intensities are compared with a numerical model that calculates excitation balance and radiative transfer based on spherical geometry. Results: The line profiles show two emission components, the widest and bluest of which is attributed to an approaching outflow and the other to the envelope. We find evidence for progressively more redshifted and wider line profiles from the envelope gas with increasing energy level. This trend is qualitatively explained by residual outflow contribution picked up in the systematically decreasing beam size. Integrated line intensities for each species decrease as Eup/k increases from ≲ 50 to ~700 K. The H2 density and temperature of the outflow gas are constrained to ~105-106 cm-3 and 60-200 K. In addition, we derive a temperature between 9 and 17 K and N(H2) ~ 3 × 1021 cm-2 for a known foreground cloud seen in absorption, and N(H2) ≲ 1019 cm-2 for a second foreground component

  15. Aderência dos Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem às Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais Adherencia de los Cursos de Pregrado en Enfermería a las Pautas Curriculares Nacionales Adherece of Nursing Graduation Courses to the National Curricular Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lopes Neto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigação teve como objetivo identificar a aderência dos Projetos Pedagógicos dos Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem (PPC/ENF às Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN para esses cursos. Trata-se de um estudo descritivo, comparativo, entre os dados presentes nos PPC/ENF e os propostos nas DCN, tendo como base os relatórios dos processos avaliativos conduzidos pelo Instituto Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa do Ministério da Educação e Cultura e disponibilizados para este estudo. A amostra foi constituída pelos relatórios para fins de reconhecimento e renovação de reconhecimento, realizados no período de 2002 a 2006, relativos a 110 cursos de graduação. Foram relacionados 60 aspectos do instrumento e destes foram selecionados 10. O estudo revelou que o índice de aderência dos cursos de enfermagem às DCN/ENF foi 72%, considerado baixo, o que aponta para a necessidade das escolas/cursos buscarem melhor vinculação entre a adoção das bases epistemológicas presentes nas DCN/ENF e as propostas nos PPC/ENF.Esta investigación tuvo como objetivo identificar la coherencia/adherencia de Proyectos Pedagógicos de los Cursos de Pregrado en Enfermería (PPC/PE con/a las Pautas Curriculares Nacionales para esos cursos (DCN/ENF. Estudio descriptivo, comparativo, entre los datos presentes en los PPC/ENF y los propuestos en las DCN/ENF, teniendo como base los informes de los procesos de evaluación conducidos por el INEP/MEC y puestos a disposición para este estudio. La muestra fue constituida por los informes de evaluación, referentes a los procesos de 110 cursos de pregrado en enfermería para reconocimiento o renovación de reconocimiento de los mismos, en el período de 2002 a 2006. Fueron relaccionados 60 aspectos del instrumento y de estos fueron seleccionados 10. El estudio mostró que el índice de adherencia de los PPC/PE a las DCN/ENF fue de 72% considerado bajo, lo que apunta para la necesidad de que las escuelas busquen

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein causes a delay in repair of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Wook; Nickel, Kwangok P.; Torres, Alexandra D.; Lee, Denis; Lambert, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with human papillomavirus related (HPV+) head and neck cancers (HNCs) demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to traditional HPV negative (HPV−) HNC patients. We have recently shown that HPV+ HNC cells are more sensitive to radiation than HPV− HNC cells. However, roles of HPV oncogenes in regulating the response of DNA damage repair remain unknown. Material and methods: Using immortalized normal oral epithelial cell lines, HPV+ HNC derived cell lines, and HPV16 E7-transgenic mice we assessed the repair of DNA damage using γ-H2AX foci, single and split dose clonogenic survival assays, and immunoblot. The ability of E7 to modulate expression of proteins associated with DNA repair pathways was assessed by immunoblot. Results: HPV16 E7 increased retention of γ-H2AX nuclear foci and significantly decreased sublethal DNA damage repair. While phospho-ATM, phospho-ATR, Ku70, and Ku80 expressions were not altered by E7, Rad51 was induced by E7. Correspondingly, HPV+ HNC cell lines showed retention of Rad51 after γ-radiation. Conclusions: Our findings provide further understanding as to how HPV16 E7 manipulates cellular DNA damage responses that may underlie its oncogenic potential and influence the altered sensitivity to radiation seen in HPV+ HNC as compared to HPV− HNC

  17. Infectious complications in head and neck cancer patients treated with cetuximab: propensity score and instrumental variable analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chih Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To compare the infection rates between cetuximab-treated patients with head and neck cancers (HNC and untreated patients. METHODOLOGY: A national cohort of 1083 HNC patients identified in 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was established. After patients were followed for one year, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis were performed to assess the association between cetuximab therapy and the infection rates. RESULTS: HNC patients receiving cetuximab (n = 158 were older, had lower SES, and resided more frequently in rural areas as compared to those without cetuximab therapy. 125 patients, 32 (20.3% in the group using cetuximab and 93 (10.1% in the group not using it presented infections. The propensity score analysis revealed a 2.3-fold (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.27; 95% CI, 1.46-3.54; P = 0.001 increased risk for infection in HNC patients treated with cetuximab. However, using IVA, the average treatment effect of cetuximab was not statistically associated with increased risk of infection (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.61-1.14. CONCLUSIONS: Cetuximab therapy was not statistically associated with infection rate in HNC patients. However, older HNC patients using cetuximab may incur up to 33% infection rate during one year. Particular attention should be given to older HNC patients treated with cetuximab.

  18. Hederagenin Induces Apoptosis in Cisplatin-Resistant Head and Neck Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Nrf2-ARE Antioxidant Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Hye; Baek, Seungho; Shin, Daiha; Lee, Jaewang; Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2017-01-01

    Acquired resistance to cisplatin is the most common reason for the failure of cisplatin chemotherapy. Hederagenin, triterpenoids extracted from ivy leaves, exhibits antitumor activity in various types of cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of hederagenin in head and neck cancer (HNC) has remained unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of hederagenin in cisplatin-resistant HNC cells and characterized its molecular mechanisms of action in this context. We evaluated the effects of hederagenin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δ Ψ m), and protein and mRNA expression in HNC cells. The antitumor effect of hederagenin in mouse tumor xenograft models was also analyzed. Hederagenin selectively induced cell death in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNC cells by promoting changes in Δ Ψ m and inducing apoptosis. Hederagenin inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway and activated p53 in HNC cells, thereby enhancing ROS production and promoting glutathione depletion. These effects were reversed by the antioxidant trolox. Hederagenin activated intrinsic apoptotic pathways via cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax. The selective inhibitory effects of hederagenin were confirmed in cisplatin-resistant HNC xenograft models. These data suggest that hederagenin induces cell death in resistant HNC cells via the Nrf2-ARE antioxidant pathway.

  19. Hederagenin Induces Apoptosis in Cisplatin-Resistant Head and Neck Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Nrf2-ARE Antioxidant Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hye Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired resistance to cisplatin is the most common reason for the failure of cisplatin chemotherapy. Hederagenin, triterpenoids extracted from ivy leaves, exhibits antitumor activity in various types of cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of hederagenin in head and neck cancer (HNC has remained unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of hederagenin in cisplatin-resistant HNC cells and characterized its molecular mechanisms of action in this context. We evaluated the effects of hederagenin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, and protein and mRNA expression in HNC cells. The antitumor effect of hederagenin in mouse tumor xenograft models was also analyzed. Hederagenin selectively induced cell death in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNC cells by promoting changes in ΔΨm and inducing apoptosis. Hederagenin inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE pathway and activated p53 in HNC cells, thereby enhancing ROS production and promoting glutathione depletion. These effects were reversed by the antioxidant trolox. Hederagenin activated intrinsic apoptotic pathways via cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax. The selective inhibitory effects of hederagenin were confirmed in cisplatin-resistant HNC xenograft models. These data suggest that hederagenin induces cell death in resistant HNC cells via the Nrf2-ARE antioxidant pathway.

  20. Dez anos de um curso de pedagogia em construção

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    Renata Maria Moschen Nascente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é explicitar e discutir a trajetória de reformulações curriculares do curso de Licenciatura em Pedagogia da Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar, no período posterior à publicação das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN específicas para os cursos de Pedagogia (BRASIL, 2006 até o momento atual, no qual está em curso a finalização de uma terceira reformulação desde a implantação dessas diretrizes. A primeira foi em 2009 e a segunda em 2012. A atual reformulação tem sido norteada pelas DCN de 2006 e pelas DCN de 2015, que se referem a todos os cursos de licenciatura em vigor no país (BRASIL, 2015.  Para tanto o trabalho encontra-se subdividido em três partes: na primeira apresentamos uma análise das DCN para o curso de Pedagogia e das DCN para os cursos de licenciatura, apontando como esse aparato legal tem norteado os cursos de Pedagogia no Brasil e sugerindo encaminhamentos que julgamos adequados na formulação de matrizes curriculares para esses cursos. Na segunda parte tematizamos o percurso do curso de Pedagogia da UFSCar entre as DCN de 2006 e as de 2015. Finalmente, na terceira parte apresentamos algumas questões e ponderações sobre esses processos.     Palavras-chave: Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais. Curso de Pedagogia. UFSCar.

  1. Intake of meat and fish and risk of head-neck cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloy, Andy; Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2017-06-01

    To date, the role of meat and fish intake in head-neck cancer (HNC) etiology is not well understood and prospective evidence is limited. This prompted us to study the association between meat, fish, and HNC subtypes, i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro- and hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), within the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). In 1986, 120,852 participants (aged 55-69 years) completed a baseline 150-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), from which daily meat and fish intake were calculated. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 430 HNC overall (134 OCC, 90 OHPC and 203 LC) cases and 4,111 subcohort members were found to be eligible for case-cohort analysis. Multivariate hazard ratios were calculated using Cox's proportional hazards model within quartiles of energy-adjusted meat and fish intake. Processed meat intake, but not red meat intake, was positively associated with HNC overall [HR(Q4 vs. Q1) = 1.46, 95% CI 1.06-2.00; ptrend = 0.03]. Among HNC subtypes, processed meat was positively associated with OCC, while no associations were found with OHPC and LC. Fish intake was not associated with HNC risk. Tests for interaction did not reveal statistically significant interaction between meat, fish, and alcohol or smoking on HNC overall risk. In this large cohort study, processed meat intake was positively associated with HNC overall and HNC subtype OCC, but not with OHPC and LC.

  2. Hyperlipidemia and statins use for the risk of new-onset anxiety/depression in patients with head and neck cancer: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-I; Lin, Li-Ching; Tien, Hung-Cheng; Que, Jenny; Ting, Wei Chen; Chen, Po-Chun; Wu, Hsin-Min; Ho, Chung-Han; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wang, Ren-Hong; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety/depression is common among patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), and can negatively affect treatment compliance and outcome. The aim of this study was to assess the association between hyperlipidemia and the risk of new-onset anxiety/depression after the diagnosis of HNC and the influence of administering statins. A matched longitudinal cohort study of 1632 subjects (408 HNC patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia and 1224 age- and sex-matched HNC patients without hyperlipidemia) was included and analyzed by using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1996 to December 2012. The incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for the development of new-onset anxiety/depression were examined between the two groups. Cox proportional hazard regression was applied to estimate the relative risks of anxiety/depressive disorders adjusted for potential confounding factors. To estimate the risks of anxiety/depression in different sub-groups, a stratified analysis was also used. HNC patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia had a higher risk for comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease (P anxiety/depression in the HNC patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia was also significantly higher than that among patients without hyperlipidemia (10.78% vs 7.27%, respectively; P = 0.03). A Cox regression model revealed that preexisting hyperlipidemia was an independent risk factor for anxiety/depression (aHR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.30-2.94). Statins use was protective against anxiety/depression among HNC patients with hyperlipidemia (aHR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.46-1.57), especially for individuals older than 65 years and for females. Preexisting hyperlipidemia was associated with increased risk of new-onset anxiety/depression in the HNC patients. Statins use for HNC patients with hyperlipidemia could decrease the risk of anxiety/depression, especially for those older than 65 years and for female patients.

  3. Evaluation of Cetane Improver Additive in Alternative Jet Fuel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    3 EVALUATION AND DATA ANALYSIS ...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Evaluation and Data Analysis Derived Cetane Number (DCN) DCN was tested IAW ASTM D6890...100 ppm CI #2 0.00 1 n/a SIP/Jet A + 500 ppm CI #2 0.00 >4 n/a Jet A 0.66 ə n/a Jet A + 100 ppm CI #1 100.23 ə 105 Jet A + 500 ppm CI #1 100.09 > 4P

  4. An Overview of Internal and External Fixation Methods for the Diabetic Charcot Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) of the foot and ankle is a challenging disease with regard to clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and prognosis. Its surgical management is equally difficult to interpret based on the wide array of options available. In the presence of an ulceration or concomitant osteomyelitis, internal fixation by means of screws, plates, or intramedullary nailing needs to be avoided when feasible. External fixation becomes a great surgical tool when managing DCN with concomitant osteomyelitis. This article describes internal and external fixation methods along with available literature to enlighten surgeons faced with treating this complex condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Co-transfection of decorin and interleukin-10 modulates pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix gene expression in human tenocyte culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbah, Sunny A.; Thomas, Dilip; Browne, Shane; O'Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix synthesis and remodelling are driven by increased activity of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In tendon tissue repair, increased activity of TGF-β1 leads to progressive fibrosis. Decorin (DCN) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) antagonise pathological collagen synthesis by exerting a neutralising effect via downregulation of TGF-β1. Herein, we report that the delivery of DCN and IL-10 transgenes from a collagen hydrogel system supresses the constitutive expression of TGF-β1 and a range of pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix genes.

  6. Diretrizes curriculares para a formação de profissionais de saúde: competências ou práxis? Curriculum guidelines for training healthcare professionals: skills or praxis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid D'avilla Freire Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa os referenciais teóricos e epistemológicos da educação que constam das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN relativas à formação profissional em saúde no Brasil. Para tanto, resgata a historicidade da relação educação, saúde e sociedade e as reformas do ensino médico; descreve o movimento de instituição das DCN para a área da saúde no país; e discute as relações entre o referencial da pedagogia das competências, que alicerça as DCN, e a concepção de direito à saúde formulada pela VIII Conferência Nacional de Saúde. Os resultados desta investigação sugerem a hipótese de que, para formar profissionais de saúde comprometidos com os princípios da VIII Conferência Nacional de Saúde e com a compreensão da saúde como direito, é necessário questionar os limites da pedagogia das competências adotada pelas DCN, bem como construir uma proposta de formação que dialogue com o pressuposto da transformação social, de modo que a sua didática possibilite aos estudantes evoluírem criticamente da práxis individual e comum para a práxis histórica.This study examines the theoretical and epistemological benchmarks of education contained in the National Curriculum Guidelines (DCN for the training of health professionals in Brazil. To achieve its goals, it rescues the historicity of the relationship among education, health, and society and the reform of medical education; it describes the movement of instituting the DCN for the health care area in Brazil, and discusses the relationship between the benchmark of the pedagogy of skills that underpins the DCN and the concept of the right to health formulated by the 8th National Health Conference. The results of this investigation suggest the hypothesis that, to train health professionals committed to the principles of the 8th National Health Conference and with the understanding of health as a right, it is necessary to question the limits of the

  7. A novel lozenge containing bupivacaine as tropical alleviation of oral mucositis pain in patients with head and neck cancer: apilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Stine; Treldal, Charlotte; Sveinsdóttir, Kolbrún

    2016-01-01

    with head and neck cancer (HNC) with oral mucositis, the location of anesthetic effect, and duration of pain relief, after a single-dose administration of a 25 mg bupivacaine lozenge. Methods: Ten patients with HNC suffering from oral mucositis pain were included. The patients assessed pain in the oral......: +4 to −23 mm; P = 0.12). No adverse events were observed. Conclusion: The results indicate that the bupivacaine lozenge has a clinically significant and long-lasting pain-relieving effect on pain because of oral mucositis in patients with HNC....

  8. A Reduced Switch Voltage Stress Class E Power Amplifier Using Harmonic Control Network

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Reza Zirak; Sobhan Roshani

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a harmonic control network (HCN) is presented to reduce the voltage stress (maximum MOSFET voltage) of the class E power amplifier (PA). Effects of the HCN on the amplifier specifications are investigated. The results show that the proposed HCN affects several specifications of the amplifier, such as drain voltage, switch current, output power capability (Cp factor), and drain impedance. The output power capability of the presented amplifier is also improved, compared with the ...

  9. Meta-path based heterogeneous combat network link prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jichao; Ge, Bingfeng; Yang, Kewei; Chen, Yingwu; Tan, Yuejin

    2017-09-01

    The combat system-of-systems in high-tech informative warfare, composed of many interconnected combat systems of different types, can be regarded as a type of complex heterogeneous network. Link prediction for heterogeneous combat networks (HCNs) is of significant military value, as it facilitates reconfiguring combat networks to represent the complex real-world network topology as appropriate with observed information. This paper proposes a novel integrated methodology framework called HCNMP (HCN link prediction based on meta-path) to predict multiple types of links simultaneously for an HCN. More specifically, the concept of HCN meta-paths is introduced, through which the HCNMP can accumulate information by extracting different features of HCN links for all the six defined types. Next, an HCN link prediction model, based on meta-path features, is built to predict all types of links of the HCN simultaneously. Then, the solution algorithm for the HCN link prediction model is proposed, in which the prediction results are obtained by iteratively updating with the newly predicted results until the results in the HCN converge or reach a certain maximum iteration number. Finally, numerical experiments on the dataset of a real HCN are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed HCNMP, in comparison with 30 baseline methods. The results show that the performance of the HCNMP is superior to those of the baseline methods.

  10. Highly preserved consensus gene modules in human papilloma virus 16 positive cervical cancer and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Cha, In-Ho; Kim, Ki-Yeol

    2017-12-26

    In this study, we investigated the consensus gene modules in head and neck cancer (HNC) and cervical cancer (CC). We used a publicly available gene expression dataset, GSE6791, which included 42 HNC, 14 normal head and neck, 20 CC and 8 normal cervical tissue samples. To exclude bias because of different human papilloma virus (HPV) types, we analyzed HPV16-positive samples only. We identified 3824 genes common to HNC and CC samples. Among these, 977 genes showed high connectivity and were used to construct consensus modules. We demonstrated eight consensus gene modules for HNC and CC using the dissimilarity measure and average linkage hierarchical clustering methods. These consensus modules included genes with significant biological functions, including ATP binding and extracellular exosome. Eigengen network analysis revealed the consensus modules were highly preserved with high connectivity. These findings demonstrate that HPV16-positive head and neck and cervical cancers share highly preserved consensus gene modules with common potentially therapeutic targets.

  11. Radiation-induced cancer after radiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the head and neck: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Keiji

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background survivors of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL are well known to be at an increased risk of second malignancies. In this study, we evaluated the incidence and clinical features of head and neck cancer (HNC occurring after radiotherapy (RT for NHL. Materials and methods We investigated the clinical records of 322 patients who had received RT for early-stage NHL of the head and neck at our institute between 1952 and 2000. Results There were 4 patients with a second HNC developing in the irradiated field, consisting of 2 patients with gum cancer, 1 case with tongue cancer and 1 case with maxillary sinus cancer. The pathological diagnosis in all the 4 patients was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Two of the patients (one with gum cancer and one with maxillary sinus cancer died of the second HNC, while the remaining 2 patients are still living at the time of writing after therapy for the second HNC, with neither recurrence of the second tumor nor relapse of the primary tumor. The ratio of the observed to the expected number (O/E ratio of a second HNC was calculated to be 12.7 (95%CI, 4.07–35.0, and the absolute excess risk (AER per 10,000 person-years was 13.3. The median interval between the RT and the diagnosis of the second HNC was 17.0 years (range, 8.7 to 22.7 years. Conlusion The risk of HNC significantly increased after RT for early-stage NHL. These results suggest that second HNC can be regarded as one of the late complications of RT for NHL of the head and neck.

  12. A Framework to Assess Where and How Children Connect to Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Matteo; Svane, Ulrika; Raymond, Christopher M.; Beery, Thomas H.

    2018-01-01

    The design of the green infrastructure in urban areas largely ignores how people's relation to nature, or human-nature connection (HNC), can be nurtured. One practical reason for this is the lack of a framework to guide the assessment of where people, and more importantly children, experience significant nature situations and establish nature routines. This paper develops such a framework. We employed a mixed-method approach to understand what qualities of nature situations connect children to nature (RQ1), what constitutes children's HNC (RQ2), and how significant nature situations and children's HNC relate to each other over time (RQ3). We first interviewed professionals in the field of connecting children to nature (N = 26), performed inductive thematic analysis of these interviews, and then further examined the inductive findings by surveying specialists (N = 275). We identified 16 qualities of significant nature situations (e.g., “awe,” “engagement of senses,” “involvement of mentors”) and 10 abilities that constitute children's HNC (e.g., “feeling comfortable in natural spaces,” “feeling attached to natural spaces,” “taking care of nature”). We elaborated three principles to answer our research questions: (1) significant nature situations are various and with differing consequences for children's HNC; (2) children's HNC is a complex embodied ability; (3) children's HNC progresses over time through diverse nature routines. Together, these findings form the Assessment framework for Children's Human Nature Situations (ACHUNAS). ACHUNAS is a comprehensive framework that outlines what to quantify or qualify when assessing “child-nature connecting” environments. It guides the assessment of where and how children connect to nature, stimulating both the design of nature-connecting human habitats as well as pedagogical approaches to HNC. PMID:29354088

  13. A Framework to Assess Where and How Children Connect to Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giusti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the green infrastructure in urban areas largely ignores how people's relation to nature, or human-nature connection (HNC, can be nurtured. One practical reason for this is the lack of a framework to guide the assessment of where people, and more importantly children, experience significant nature situations and establish nature routines. This paper develops such a framework. We employed a mixed-method approach to understand what qualities of nature situations connect children to nature (RQ1, what constitutes children's HNC (RQ2, and how significant nature situations and children's HNC relate to each other over time (RQ3. We first interviewed professionals in the field of connecting children to nature (N = 26, performed inductive thematic analysis of these interviews, and then further examined the inductive findings by surveying specialists (N = 275. We identified 16 qualities of significant nature situations (e.g., “awe,” “engagement of senses,” “involvement of mentors” and 10 abilities that constitute children's HNC (e.g., “feeling comfortable in natural spaces,” “feeling attached to natural spaces,” “taking care of nature”. We elaborated three principles to answer our research questions: (1 significant nature situations are various and with differing consequences for children's HNC; (2 children's HNC is a complex embodied ability; (3 children's HNC progresses over time through diverse nature routines. Together, these findings form the Assessment framework for Children's Human Nature Situations (ACHUNAS. ACHUNAS is a comprehensive framework that outlines what to quantify or qualify when assessing “child-nature connecting” environments. It guides the assessment of where and how children connect to nature, stimulating both the design of nature-connecting human habitats as well as pedagogical approaches to HNC.

  14. フェライト型球状黒鉛鋳鉄の低サイクル疲労寿命に及ぼす黒鉛粒数の影響

    OpenAIRE

    原田, 昭治; 秋庭, 義明; 植田, 隆浩; 矢野, 満

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of nodule count on the low-cycle fatigue life of ferritic ductile cast iron. Stress amplitude-controlled fatigue tests are conducted on ferritic ductile cast iron with different nodule count, i. e. high nodule count (HNC), and low nodule count (LNC) with same chemical composition and heat treatment. The difference of nodule count yields difference of fatigue mechanism in HNC and LNC. The fatigue life of both materials satisfies the Manson-Coffin relationship a...

  15. Peripheral hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels contribute to inflammation-induced hypersensitivity of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R J; Jennings, E A; Ivanusic, J J

    2013-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels conduct an inward cation current (Ih ) that contributes to the maintenance of neuronal membrane potential and have been implicated in a number of animal models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In the current study, we investigated HCN channel involvement in inflammatory pain of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The contribution of HCN channels to inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant; CFA)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of the rat TMJ was tested with injections of the HCN channel blocker ZD7288. Retrograde labelling and immunohistochemistry was used to explore HCN channel expression in sensory neurons that innervate the TMJ. Injection of CFA into the TMJ (n = 7) resulted in a significantly increased mechanical sensitivity relative to vehicle injection (n = 7) (p blocked by co-injection of ZD7288 with the CFA (n = 7). Retrograde labelling and immunohistochemistry experiments revealed expression predominantly of HCN1 and HCN2 channel subunits in trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervate the TMJ (n = 3). No change in the proportion or intensity of HCN channel expression was found in inflamed (n = 6) versus control (n = 5) animals at the time point tested. Our findings suggest a role for peripheral HCN channels in inflammation-induced pain of the TMJ. Peripheral application of a HCN channel blocker could provide therapeutic benefit for inflammatory TMJ pain and avoid side effects associated with activation of HCN channels in the central nervous system. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  16. A novel SDN enabled hybrid oiptical packet/circuit switched data centre network - The LIGHTNESS approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, S.; Simeonidou, D.; Zervas, G.; Nejabati, R.; Yan, Y; Shu, Yi; Spadaro, S.; Perelló, J.; Agraz, F.; Careglio, D.; Dorren, H.J.S.; Miao, W.; Calabretta, N.; Bernini, G.; Ciulli, N.; Sancho, J.C.; Iordache, S.; Becerra, Y.; Farreras, M.; Biancani, M.; Predieri, A.; Proietti, R.; Cao, Z.; Liu, L.; Yoo, S.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Current over-provisioned and multi-tier data centre networks (DCN) deploy rigid control and management platforms, which are not able to accommodate the ever-growing workload driven by the increasing demand of high-performance data centre (DC) and cloud applications. In response to this, the EC FP7

  17. Lightness : a function-virtualizable software defined data center network with all-optical circuit/packet switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saridis, G.; Peng, S.; Yan, Y.; Aguado, A.; Guo, B.; Arslan, M.; Jackson, C.; Miao, W.; Calabretta, N.; Agraz, F.; Spadaro, S.; Bernini, G.; Ciulli, N.; Zervas, G.; Nejabati, R.; Simeonidou, D.

    2016-01-01

    Modern high-performance Data Centers are responsible for delivering a huge variety of cloud applications to the end-users, which are increasingly pushing the limits of currently deployed computing and network infrastructure. All-optical dynamic data center network (DCN) architectures are strong

  18. Study of UO2 radioinduced densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stora, J.P.; Bruet, M.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of radioinduced densification were performed on UO 2 DCN (intergranular fine porosity) and UO 2 DCI (interaggregate coarse porosity) in the Anemone device. The densification kinetics was followed by measuring the shrinkage of the oxide column on neutron radiographic plates. UO 2 DCI was found stable in regard to densification. At power near 450Wcm -1 , densification is hitten by restructuring phenomena [fr

  19. Contribution of Somatic and Dendritic SK Channels in the Firing Rate of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei: Implication in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Abbasi

    2016-01-01

    Discussion: Therefore, inhibition of SK channel in DCN can cause cerebellar ataxia, and SK channel openers can have a therapeutic effect on cerebellar ataxia. In addition, the location of SK channels could be important in therapeutic goals. Dendritic SK channels can be a more effective target compared to somatic SK channels

  20. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among...

  1. The Oxidation and Ignition of Jet Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    2.5 example, due to the arrival of rarefaction waves from the driver, the signal detector intensity recovers slightly due to the decreased density of...its choice does not affect the shape of the DCN fall off curve and we found values for − from 0 to 15 do not

  2. A novel scalable and low latency hybrid data center network architecture based on flow controlled fast optical switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Fulong; Guelbenzu, Gonzalo; Calabretta, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    We present a novel hybrid DCN based on flow-controlled fast optical switches. Results show packet loss < 1.4E-5 and latency < 2.4μs for 100,000 servers (0.3 load). Costs and power consumptions are also compared with current technologies.

  3. All-optical packet/circuit switching-based data center network for enhanced scalability, latency and throughput

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perelló, J.; Spadaro, S.; Ricciardi, S.; Careglio, D.; Peng, S.; Nejabati, R.; Zervas, G.; Simeonidou, D.; Predieri, A.; Biancani, M.; Dorren, H.J.S.; Di Lucente, S.; Luo, J.; Calabretta, N.; Bernini, G.; Ciulli, N.; Sancho, J.C.; Iordache, S.; Farreras, M.; Becerra, Y.; Liou, C.; Hussain, I.; Yin, Y.; Liu, L.; Proietti, R.

    2013-01-01

    Applications running inside data centers are enabled through the cooperation of thousands of servers arranged in racks and interconnected together through the data center network. Current DCN architectures based on electronic devices are neither scalable to face the massive growth of DCs, nor

  4. Decorin-transforming growth factor- interaction regulates matrix organization and mechanical characteristics of three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Wei, Victoria Mariko; Iozzo, Renato; Höök, Magnus; Grande-Allen, Kathryn Jane

    2007-12-07

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin has been demonstrated to be a key regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis; decorin deficiencies lead to irregularly shaped collagen fibrils and weakened material behavior in postnatal murine connective tissues. In an in vitro investigation of the contributions of decorin to tissue organization and material behavior, model tissues were engineered by seeding embryonic fibroblasts, harvested from 12.5-13.5 days gestational aged decorin null (Dcn(-/-)) or wild-type mice, within type I collagen gels. The resulting three-dimensional collagen matrices were cultured for 4 weeks under static tension. The collagen matrices seeded with Dcn(-/-) cells exhibited greater contraction, cell density, ultimate tensile strength, and elastic modulus than those seeded with wild-type cells. Ultrastructurally, the matrices seeded with Dcn(-/-) cells contained a greater density of collagen. The decorin-null tissues contained more biglycan than control tissues, suggesting that this related proteoglycan compensated for the absence of decorin. The effect of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), which is normally sequestered by decorin, was also investigated in this study. The addition of TGF-beta1 to the matrices seeded with wild-type cells improved their contraction and mechanical strength, whereas blocking TGF-beta1 in the Dcn(-/-) cell-seeded matrices significantly reduced the collagen gel contraction. These results indicate that the inhibitory interaction between decorin and TGF-beta1 significantly influenced the matrix organization and material behavior of these in vitro model tissues.

  5. Expression of immediate-early genes in the dorsal cochlear nucleus in salicylate-induced tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shou-Sen; Mei, Ling; Chen, Jian-Yong; Huang, Zhi-Wu; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous neuronal activity in dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) may be involved in the physiological processes underlying salicylate-induced tinnitus. As a neuronal activity marker, immediate-early gene (IEG) expression, especially activity-dependent cytoskeletal protein (Arc/Arg3.1) and the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1), appears to be highly correlated with sensory-evoked neuronal activity. However, their relationships with tinnitus induced by salicylate have rarely been reported in the DCN. In this study, we assessed the effect of acute and chronic salicylate treatment on the expression of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), Arg3.1, and Egr-1. We also observed ultrastructural alterations in the DCN synapses in an animal model of tinnitus. Levels of mRNA and protein expression of NR2B and Arg3.1 were increased in rats that were chronically administered salicylate (200 mg/kg, twice daily for 3, 7, or 14 days). These levels returned to baseline 14 days after cessation of treatment. However, no significant changes were observed in Egr-1 gene expression in any groups. Furthermore, rats subjected to long-term salicylate administration showed more presynaptic vesicles, thicker and longer postsynaptic densities, and increased synaptic interface curvature. Alterations of Arg3.1 and NR2B may be responsible for the changes in the synaptic ultrastructure. These changes confirm that salicylate can cause neural plasticity changes at the DCN level.

  6. Information and Communication Technologies for Reconstruction and Development: Afghanistan Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    market advantages and provide business and employment opportunities. Businesses can use cell phones to gain access to information about their domains...and UNDP, New York, 2001. District Communications Network (DCN) Franchisee Business Case Preliminary Recommendation for the MCIT, Alan Chelko, USAID

  7. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is a radiosensitizing target for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Emma; Yue, Shijun; Moriyama, Eduardo H; Hui, Angela B; Kim, Inki; Shi, Wei; Alajez, Nehad M; Bhogal, Nirmal; Li, Guohua; Datti, Alessandro; Schimmer, Aaron D; Wilson, Brian C; Liu, Peter P; Durocher, Daniel; Neel, Benjamin G; O'Sullivan, Brian; Cummings, Bernard; Bristow, Rob; Wrana, Jeff; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2011-01-26

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the eighth most common malignancy worldwide, comprising a diverse group of cancers affecting the head and neck region. Despite advances in therapeutic options over the last few decades, treatment toxicities and overall clinical outcomes have remained disappointing, thereby underscoring a need to develop novel therapeutic approaches in HNC treatment. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), a key regulator of heme biosynthesis, was identified from an RNA interference-based high-throughput screen as a tumor-selective radiosensitizing target for HNC. UROD knockdown plus radiation induced caspase-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HNC cells in vitro and suppressed the in vivo tumor-forming capacity of HNC cells, as well as delayed the growth of established tumor xenografts in mice. This radiosensitization appeared to be mediated by alterations in iron homeostasis and increased production of reactive oxygen species, resulting in enhanced tumor oxidative stress. Moreover, UROD was significantly overexpressed in HNC patient biopsies. Lower preradiation UROD mRNA expression correlated with improved disease-free survival, suggesting that UROD could potentially be used to predict radiation response. UROD down-regulation also radiosensitized several different models of human cancer, as well as sensitized tumors to chemotherapeutic agents, including 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and paclitaxel. Thus, our study has revealed UROD as a potent tumor-selective sensitizer for both radiation and chemotherapy, with potential relevance to many human malignancies.

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote head and neck cancer progression through Periostin-mediated phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanxia; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Baixiang; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Chaowei; Yu, Mengfei; Cao, Guifen; Wang, Huiming

    2018-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) have been shown to be recruited to the tumor microenvironment and exert a tumor-promoting effect in a variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms related to the tumor-promoting effect of BMMSC on head and neck cancer (HNC) are not clear. In this study, we investigated Periostin (POSTN) and its roles in the tumor-promoting effect of BMMSC on HNC. In vitro analysis of HNC cells cultured in BMMSC-conditioned media (MSC-CM) showed that MSC-CM significantly promoted cancer progression by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), and altering expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and inhibition of apoptosis. Moreover, MSC-CM promoted the expression of POSTN and POSTN promoted HNC progression through the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. In a murine model of HNC, we found that BMMSC promoted tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and enhanced the expression of POSTN and EMT in tumor tissues. Clinical sample analysis further confirmed that the expression of POSTN and N-cadherin were correlated with pathological grade and lymph node metastasis of HNC. In conclusion, this study indicated that BMMSC promoted proliferation, invasion, survival, tumorigenicity and migration of head and neck cancer through POSTN-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Impaired swallowing mechanics of post radiation therapy head and neck cancer patients: A retrospective videofluoroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William G; Davidoff, Alisa A; Smith, Zachary M; Adams, Dorothy E; Langmore, Susan E

    2016-02-28

    To determine swallowing outcomes and hyolaryngeal mechanics associated with post radiation therapy head and neck cancer (rtHNC) patients using videofluoroscopic swallow studies. In this retrospective cohort study, videofluoroscopic images of rtHNC patients (n = 21) were compared with age and gender matched controls (n = 21). Penetration-aspiration of the bolus and bolus residue were measured as swallowing outcome variables. Timing and displacement measurements of the anterior and posterior muscular slings elevating the hyolaryngeal complex were acquired. Coordinate data of anatomical landmarks mapping the action of the anterior muscles (suprahyoid muscles) and posterior muscles (long pharyngeal muscles) were used to calculate the distance measurements, and slice numbers were used to calculate time intervals. Canonical variate analysis with post-hoc discriminant function analysis was performed on coordinate data to determine multivariate mechanics of swallowing associated with treatment. Pharyngeal constriction ratio (PCR) was also measured to determine if weak pharyngeal constriction is associated with post radiation therapy. The rtHNC group was characterized by poor swallowing outcomes compared to the control group in regards to: Penetration-aspiration scale (P time of displacement was abbreviated (P = 0.002) and distance of excursion was reduced (P = 0.02) in the rtHNC group. A canonical variate analysis shows a significant reduction in pharyngeal mechanics in the rtHNC group (P clearance. Using videofluoroscopy, this study shows rtHNC patients have worse swallowing outcomes associated with reduced hyolaryngeal mechanics and pharyngeal constriction compared with controls.

  10. Relationship of inflammatory markers and pain in patients with head and neck cancer prior to anticancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, K.G.; Zeidler, S.V. von; Lamas, A.Z.; Podestá, J.R.V. de; Sena, A.; Souza, E.D.; Lenzi, J.; Lemos, E.M.; Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with cancer, including those with head and neck cancer (HNC). While studies suggest an association between chronic inflammation and pain, levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), have not been correlated with pain in HNC patients who are not currently undergoing anticancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between these inflammatory markers and perceived pain in HNC patients prior to anticancer therapy. The study group consisted of 127 HNC patients and 9 healthy controls. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and serum levels of CRP and TNF-α were determined using the particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and ELISA techniques, respectively. Patients experiencing pain had significantly higher levels of CRP (P<0.01) and TNF-α (P<0.05) compared with controls and with patients reporting no pain. There were significantly positive associations between pain, CRP level, and tumor stage. This is the first study to report a positive association between perceived pain and CRP in HNC patients at the time of diagnosis. The current findings suggest important associations between pain and inflammatory processes in HNC patients, with potential implications for future treatment strategies

  11. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population.

  12. Internal and external environmental factors affecting the performance of hospital-based home nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J-W; Kwon, Y-D; Yoon, S-J; Hwang, J-I

    2011-06-01

    Numerous studies on HNC services have been carried out by signifying their needs, efficiency and effectiveness. However, no study has ever been performed to determine the critical factors associated with HNC's positive results despite the deluge of positive studies on the service. This study included all of the 89 training hospitals that were practising HNC service in Korea as of November 2006. The input factors affecting the performance were classified as either internal or external environmental factors. This analysis was conducted to understand the impact that the corresponding factors had on performance. Data were analysed by using multiple linear regressions. The internal and external environment variables affected the performance of HNC based on univariate analysis. The meaningful variables were internal environmental factors. Specifically, managerial resource (the number of operating beds and the outpatient/inpatient ratio) were meaningful when the multiple linear regression analysis was performed. Indeed, the importance of organizational culture (the passion of HNC nurses) was significant. This study, considering the limited market size of Korea, illustrates that the critical factor for the development of hospital-led HNC lies with internal environmental factors rather than external ones. Among the internal environmental factors, the hospitals' managerial resource-related factors (specifically, the passion of nurses) were the most important contributing element. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  13. Relationship of inflammatory markers and pain in patients with head and neck cancer prior to anticancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, K.G. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Zeidler, S.V. von [Departamento de Patologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Lamas, A.Z. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Podestá, J.R.V. de; Sena, A.; Souza, E.D.; Lenzi, J. [Divisão de Cabeça e Pescoço, Hospital Santa Rita de Cássia, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Lemos, E.M. [Centro de Doenças Infecciosas, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with cancer, including those with head and neck cancer (HNC). While studies suggest an association between chronic inflammation and pain, levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), have not been correlated with pain in HNC patients who are not currently undergoing anticancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between these inflammatory markers and perceived pain in HNC patients prior to anticancer therapy. The study group consisted of 127 HNC patients and 9 healthy controls. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and serum levels of CRP and TNF-α were determined using the particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and ELISA techniques, respectively. Patients experiencing pain had significantly higher levels of CRP (P<0.01) and TNF-α (P<0.05) compared with controls and with patients reporting no pain. There were significantly positive associations between pain, CRP level, and tumor stage. This is the first study to report a positive association between perceived pain and CRP in HNC patients at the time of diagnosis. The current findings suggest important associations between pain and inflammatory processes in HNC patients, with potential implications for future treatment strategies.

  14. An Estimation of Radiobiological Parameters for Head-and-Neck Cancer Cells and the Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Yang, Qiuhui; Lee, Steve P.; Li, X. Allen; Wang, Dian

    2012-01-01

    In vitro survival measurements using two human head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cell lines were performed. The specially designed split-dose surviving fraction was obtained and fitted to the linear-quadratic formalism. The repair halftime (Tr), the potential doubling time (T d ), α/β and radiosensitivity α, were estimated. Other radiobiological models: EUD, BED, TCP, etc., were used to examine the potential treatment effectiveness of different IMRT techniques. Our data indicated the repair halftime of ~17 min based on two HNC cell lines. The combined α/β, α and T d are α/β = 8.1 ± 4.1 Gy, α = 0.22 ± 0.08 Gy −1 , T d = 4.0 ± 1.8 day, respectively. The prolonged IMRT dose delivery for entire HNC treatment course could possibly result in the loss of biological effectiveness, i.e., the target EUDs decreased by 11% with fraction dose delivery time varying from 5 to 30 min. We determined the sublethal damage repair halftime and other radiobiological parameters for HNC cells, and to evaluate treatment effectiveness of the prolonged dose delivery times associated with different IMRT techniques. The estimated repair halftime for HNC is relatively short and may be comparable to the step-and-shoot IMRT fraction dose delivery time. The effectiveness of IMRT treatment may be improved by reducing the fraction delivery time for HNC treatment

  15. Prognostic value of stromal decorin expression in patients with breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang-Jiang; Chen, Da-Li; Zhang, Wen-Biao; Shen, Cheng; Che, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Numbers of studies have investigated the biological functions of decorin (DCN) in oncogenesis, tumor progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. Although many of them aim to highlight the prognostic value of stromal DCN expression in breast cancer, some controversial results still exist and a consensus has not been reached until now. Therefore, our meta-analysis aims to determine the prognostic significance of stromal DCN expression in breast cancer patients. PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched for full-text literatures met out inclusion criteria. We applied the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) as the appropriate summarized statistics. Q-test and I(2) statistic were employed to estimate the level of heterogeneity across the included studies. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to further identify the possible origins of heterogeneity. The publication bias was detected by Begg's test and Egger's test. There were three English literatures (involving 6 studies) included into our meta-analysis. On the one hand, both the summarized outcomes based on univariate analysis (HR: 0.513; 95% CI: 0.406-0.648; Panalysis (HR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.388-0.763; Panalysis (HR: 0.504; 95% CI: 0.389-0.651; Panalysis (HR: 0.568; 95% CI: 0.400-0.806; P=0.002) also indicated that stromal DCN expression was positively associated with high disease-free survival (DFS) of breast cancer patients. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed within this meta-analysis. The present evidences indicate that high stromal DCN expression can significantly predict the good prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The discoveries from our meta-analysis have better be confirmed in the updated review pooling more relevant investigations in the future.

  16. Biological pacemakers in canines exhibit positive chronotropic response to emotional arousal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Nearing, Bruce D.; Lau, David H.; Boink, Gerard J. J.; Danilo, Peter; Kryukova, Yelena; Robinson, Richard B.; Cohen, Ira S.; Rosen, Michael R.; Verrier, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological pacemakers based on the HCN2 channel isoform respond to beta-adrenergic and muscarinic stimulation, suggesting a capacity to respond to autonomic input. The purpose of this study was to investigate autonomic response to emotional arousal in canines implanted with murine HCN2-based

  17. Search after new agents for hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels; Suche nach neuen Wirkstoffen fuer Hyperpolarisationsaktivierte und zyklisch Nukleotid-gesteuerte Ionenkanaele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struenker, T.

    2005-12-01

    Rhythmic activity of single cells or cellular networks is a common feature of most organisms. Cellular rhythms govern the beating of the heart, cycles of sleep and wakefulness, breathing, and the release of hormones. The endogenous rhythmic activity of many neurons and cardiac relies on a complex interplay between several distinct ion channels. In particular, one type of ion channel plays a prominent role in the control of rhythmic electrical activity because it determines the frequency of the oscillations. The activity of the channels is thus setting the ''pace'' of the activity; therefore, these channels are often referred to as ''pacemaker'' channels. Despite their obvious physiological importance it hasn't been until a few years ago that the genes encoding pacemaker channels have been identified. Because both hyperpolarization and cyclic nucleotides are key elements that control their activity, pacemaker channels have now been designated hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. From a scientific as well as medical point of view, HCN channels are interesting drug targets. Only a few substances are known that specifically affect HCN channels. In the present study, a microtiter plate-based high throughput screening assay for HCN1 and HCN4 channels was developed. With this assay, known drugs for HCN channels were characterized. Subsequently, venoms of snails, spiders, scorpions, and snakes were screened for toxins affecting HCN channel activity. A few venoms were identified that possibly contain drugs that act on HCN channels. (orig.)

  18. Summer 2012 Testing and Analysis of the Chemical Mixture Methodology -- Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, Clifford S.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Coggin, Rebekah L.; Ponder, Lashaundra A.; Booth, Alexander E.; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Horn, Sarah M.; Yao, Juan

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the key findings made by the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) project team during the first stage of their summer 2012 testing and analysis of the CMM. The study focused on answering the following questions: o What is the percentage of the chemicals in the CMM Rev 27 database associated with each Health Code Number (HCN)? How does this result influence the relative importance of acute HCNs and chronic HCNs in the CMM data set? o What is the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? Which Modes of Action and Target Organ Effects tend to be important in determining the HCN-based Hazard Index (HI) for a chemical mixture? o What are some of the potential issues associated with the current HCN-based approach? What are the opportunities for improving the performance and/or technical defensibility of the HCN-based approach? How would those improvements increase the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? o What is the Target Organ System Effect approach and how can it be used to improve upon the current HCN-based approach? How does the benefits users would derive from using the Target Organ System Approach compare to the benefits available from the current HCN-based approach?

  19. Trojan Horses or Local Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllner, Jakob; Klopf, Patricia; Nell, Phillip Christopher

    We investigate an MNC’s decision to appoint host-country national (HCN) managers to foreign subsidiaries based on the institutional context of and familiarity with the host country. HCN managers are commonly associated with specialized knowledge, superior responsiveness, and higher legitimacy. On...

  20. The oxidation of hydrogen cyanide and related chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagaut, Philippe; Glarborg, Peter; Alzueta, Maria U.

    2008-01-01

    For modeling the formation of nitrogen oxides in combustion via both the prompt-NO and the fuel-NO mechanisms, as well as for modeling the reduction of nitrogen oxides via reburning, a good knowledge of the kinetics of oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is required. The formation routes to HCN a...

  1. Het cyanophore karakter van witte klaver (Trifolium repens L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, de D.

    1942-01-01

    The positive correlation found in New Zealand between quality of white clover and its hydrocyanic acid content, could not be confirmed for Dutch white clover in the Netherlands. HCN occurred bound to an incompletely identified glucoside. As Weevers and Treub et al. found the glucoside and HCN

  2. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; El-Shall, M. Samy, E-mail: mselshal@vcu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-07

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} clusters, respectively, with n = 1–4. For comparison, the binding of 1–4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}(HCN){sub n} has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH{sup +}⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH{sup +}⋯NCH··NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11–12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CH{sup δ+} centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  3. Storage and release of hydrogen cyanide in a chelicerate (Oribatula tibialis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Adrian; Raspotnig, Günther; Wehner, Katja; Meusinger, Reinhard; Norton, Roy A.; Heethoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cyanogenesis denotes a chemical defensive strategy where hydrogen cyanide (HCN, hydrocyanic or prussic acid) is produced, stored, and released toward an attacking enemy. The high toxicity and volatility of HCN requires both chemical stabilization for storage and prevention of accidental self-poisoning. The few known cyanogenic animals are exclusively mandibulate arthropods (certain myriapods and insects) that store HCN as cyanogenic glycosides, lipids, or cyanohydrins. Here, we show that cyanogenesis has also evolved in the speciose Chelicerata. The oribatid mite Oribatula tibialis uses the cyanogenic aromatic ester mandelonitrile hexanoate (MNH) for HCN storage, which degrades via two different pathways, both of which release HCN. MNH is emitted from exocrine opisthonotal oil glands, which are potent organs for chemical defense in most oribatid mites. PMID:28289203

  4. Radiation-induced polymerization of hydrogen cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P.S.; Kichigina, G.A.; Kiryukhin, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    The chain reaction of HCN polymerization in a γ-radiation field does not occur at 77 K. When irradiated HCN is warmed up to ambient temperature, a polymer is formed. The heat of polymerization of HCN is 44.0±6.0 kJ/mol and the polymer yield reaches 2.5% for a dose of 725 kGy. Amorphous polymer products (with yields increasing up to 33.5%) and needle crystals (presumably HCN tetramer) are formed upon storage of irradiated HCN at room temperature. The polymer is stable below 700 K, has a conductivity of 3x10 -5 Ω -1 cm -f1 , and displays an EPR spectrum typical of polyconjugated systems. A radical mechanism of the formation of conjugated chain -C=N-C=N- is suggested. The tetramer is produced by a combination of aminocyanocarbene biradicals

  5. MLS measurements of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide during the 2015-2016 El Niño event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Glatthor, Norbert; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Christopher D.; Hannigan, James W.; Ortega, Ivan; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Read, William G.

    2018-01-01

    It is known from ground-based measurements made during the 1982-1983 and 1997-1998 El Niño events that atmospheric hydrogen cyanide (HCN) tends to be higher during such years than at other times. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite has been measuring HCN mixing ratios since launch in 2004; the measurements are ongoing at the time of writing. The winter of 2015-2016 saw the largest El Niño event since 1997-1998. We present MLS measurements of HCN in the lower stratosphere for the Aura mission to date, comparing the 2015-2016 El Niño period to the rest of the mission. HCN in 2015-2016 is higher than at any other time during the mission, but ground-based measurements suggest that it may have been even more elevated in 1997-1998. As the MLS HCN data are essentially unvalidated, we show them alongside data from the MIPAS and ACE-FTS instruments; the three instruments agree reasonably well in the tropical lower stratosphere. Global HCN emissions calculated from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED v4.1) database are much greater during large El Niño events and are greater in 1997-1998 than in 2015-2016, thereby showing good qualitative agreement with the measurements. Correlation between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) indices, measured HCN, and GFED HCN emissions is less clear if the 2015-2016 event is excluded. In particular, the 2009-2010 winter had fairly strong El Niño conditions and fairly large GFED HCN emissions, but very little effect is observed in the MLS HCN.

  6. CYANIDE PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND NITROGEN FRACTIONATION IN THE MWC 480 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Loomis, R.; Qi, C., E-mail: vguzman@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    HCN is a commonly observed molecule in Solar System bodies and in interstellar environments. Its abundance with respect to CN is a proposed tracer of UV exposure. HCN is also frequently used to probe the thermal history of objects, by measuring its degree of nitrogen fractionation. To address the utility of HCN as a probe of disks, we present Atacama Large (sub-) Millimeter Array observations of CN, HCN, H{sup 13}CN, and HC{sup 15}N toward the protoplanetary disk around Herbig Ae star MWC 480, and of CN and HCN toward the disk around T Tauri star DM Tau. Emission from all molecules is clearly detected and spatially resolved, including the first detection of HC{sup 15}N in a disk. Toward MWC 480, CN emission extends radially more than 1″ exterior to the observed cut-off of HCN emission. Quantitative modeling further reveals very different radial abundance profiles for CN and HCN, with best-fit outer cut-off radii of >300 AU and 110 ± 10 AU, respectively. This result is in agreement with model predictions of efficient HCN photodissociation into CN in the outer-part of the disk where the vertical gas and dust column densities are low. No such difference in CN and HCN emission profiles are observed toward DM Tau, suggestive of different photochemical structures in Herbig Ae and T Tauri disks. We use the HCN isotopologue data toward the MWC 480 disk to provide the first measurement of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in a disk. We find a low disk averaged {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio of 200 ± 100, comparable to what is observed in cloud cores and comets, demonstrating interstellar inheritance and/or efficient nitrogen fractionation in this disk.

  7. Marijuana smoking and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthiller, Julien; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Boffetta, Paolo; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Greenland, Sander; Morgenstern, Hal; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; Chen, Chu; Schwartz, Stephen M; Eluf Neto, José; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Koifman, Sergio; Curado, Maria Paula; Matos, Elena; Fernandez, Leticia; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Hashibe, Mia

    2009-05-01

    Marijuana contains carcinogens similar to tobacco smoke and has been suggested by relatively small studies to increase the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). Because tobacco is a major risk factor for HNC, large studies with substantial numbers of never tobacco users could help to clarify whether marijuana smoking is independently associated with HNC risk. We pooled self-reported interview data on marijuana smoking and known HNC risk factors on 4,029 HNC cases and 5,015 controls from five case-control studies within the INHANCE Consortium. Subanalyses were conducted among never tobacco users (493 cases and 1,813 controls) and among individuals who did not consume alcohol or smoke tobacco (237 cases and 887 controls). The risk of HNC was not elevated by ever marijuana smoking [odds ratio (OR), 0.88; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), 0.67-1.16], and there was no increasing risk associated with increasing frequency, duration, or cumulative consumption of marijuana smoking. An increased risk of HNC associated with marijuana use was not detected among never tobacco users (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.63-1.37; three studies) nor among individuals who did not drink alcohol and smoke tobacco (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.47-2.38; two studies). Our results are consistent with the notion that infrequent marijuana smoking does not confer a risk of these malignancies. Nonetheless, because the prevalence of frequent marijuana smoking was low in most of the contributing studies, we could not rule out a moderately increased risk, particularly among subgroups without exposure to tobacco and alcohol.

  8. The interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene, ALDH2 and ADH1B in the risk of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sen-Tien; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Ou, Chun-Yen; Fang, Sheen-Yie; Chen, Ken-Chung; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Wei-Ting; Lo, Hung-I; Huang, Jehn-Shyun; Wu, Jiunn-Liang; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Yang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Forn-Chia; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Shang-Yin; Liao, Hsiao-Chen; Lin, Chen-Lin; Wang, Yi-Hui; Weng, Ya-Ling; Yang, Han-Chien; Chang, Jeffrey S

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). The major carcinogen from alcohol is acetaldehyde, which may be produced by humans or by oral microorganisms through the metabolism of ethanol. To account for the different sources of acetaldehyde production, the current study examined the interplay between alcohol consumption, oral hygiene (as a proxy measure for the growth of oral microorganisms), and alcohol-metabolizing genes (ADH1B and ALDH2) in the risk of HNC. We found that both the fast (*2/*2) and the slow (*1/*1+ *1/*2) ADH1B genotypes increased the risk of HNC due to alcohol consumption, and this association differed according to the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes (*1/*2+ *2/*2) or poor oral hygiene. In persons with the fast ADH1B genotype, the HNC risk associated with alcohol drinking was increased for those with the slow/non-functional ALDH2 genotypes. For those with the slow ADH1B genotypes, oral hygiene appeared to play an important role; the highest magnitude of an increased HNC risk in alcohol drinkers occurred among those with the worst oral hygiene. This is the first study to show that the association between alcohol drinking and HNC risk may be modified by the interplay between genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B and ALDH2 and oral hygiene. Although it is important to promote abstinence from or reduction of alcohol drinking to decrease the occurrence of HNC, improving oral hygiene practices may provide additional benefit. © 2014 UICC.

  9. Suppression of Lymphocyte Functions by Plasma Exosomes Correlates with Disease Activity in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Sonja; Floros, Theofanis; Theodoraki, Marie-Nicole; Hong, Chang-Sook; Jackson, Edwin K; Lang, Stephan; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2017-08-15

    Purpose: Head and neck cancers (HNCs) often induce profound immunosuppression, which contributes to disease progression and interferes with immune-based therapies. Body fluids of patients with HNC are enriched in exosomes potentially engaged in negative regulation of antitumor immune responses. The presence and content of exosomes derived from plasma of patients with HNC are evaluated for the ability to induce immune dysfunction and influence disease activity. Experimental Design: Exosomes were isolated by size-exclusion chromatography from plasma of 38 patients with HNC and 14 healthy donors. Morphology, size, numbers, and protein and molecular contents of the recovered exosomes were determined. Coculture assays were performed to measure exosome-mediated effects on functions of normal human lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cells. The results were correlated with disease stage and activity. Results: The presence, quantity, and molecular content of isolated, plasma-derived exosomes discriminated patients with HNC with active disease (AD) from those with no evident disease (NED) after oncologic therapies. Exosomes of patients with AD were significantly more effective than exosomes of patients with NED in inducing apoptosis of CD8 + T cells, suppression of CD4 + T-cell proliferation, and upregulation of regulatory T-cell (Treg) suppressor functions (all at P Exosomes of patients with AD also downregulated NKG2D expression levels in NK cells. Conclusions: Exosomes in plasma of patients with HNC carry immunosuppressive molecules and interfere with functions of immune cells. Exosome-induced immune suppression correlates with disease activity in HNC, suggesting that plasma exosomes could be useful as biomarkers of HNC progression. Clin Cancer Res; 23(16); 4843-54. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. The impact of introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy into routine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, Elizabeth A.; Clark, Catharine H.; Urbano, M. Teresa Guerrero; Bidmead, Margaret; Dearnaley, David P.; Harrington, Kevin J.; A'Hern, Roger; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at Royal Marsden Hospital London was introduced in July 2001. Treatment delivery was dynamic using a single-phase technique. Concerns were raised regarding increased clinical workload due to introduction of new technology. The potential increased use of resources was assessed. Patients and methods: IMRT patient selection was within guidelines of clinical trials and included patients undergoing prostate plus pelvic lymph node (PPN) irradiation and head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment. Patient planning, quality assurance and treatment times were collected for an initial IMRT patient group. A comparative group of patients with advanced HNC undergoing two- or three-phase conventional radiotherapy, requiring matched photon and electron fields, were also timed. Results: The median overall total planning time for IMRT was greater for HNC patients compared to the PPN cohort. For HNC the overall IMRT planning time was significantly longer than for conventional. The median treatment time for conventional two- or three-phase HNC treatments, encompassing similar volumes to those treated with IMRT, was greater than that for the IMRT HNC patient cohort. A reduction in radiographer man hours per patient of 4.8 h was recorded whereas physics time was increased by 4.9 h per patient. Conclusions: IMRT currently increases overall planning time. Additional clinician input is required for target volume localisation. Physics time is increased, a significant component of this being patient specific QA. Radiographer time is decreased. For HNC a single phase IMRT treatment has proven to be more efficient than a multiple phase conventional treatment. IMRT has been integrated smoothly and efficiently into the existing treatment working day. This preliminary study suggests that IMRT could be a routine treatment with efficient use of current radiotherapy resources

  11. The impact of introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy into routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Elizabeth A; Clark, Catharine H; Urbano, M Teresa Guerrero; Bidmead, Margaret; Dearnaley, David P; Harrington, Kevin J; A'Hern, Roger; Nutting, Christopher M

    2005-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at the Royal Marsden Hospital London was introduced in July 2001. Treatment delivery was dynamic using a single-phase technique. Concerns were raised regarding increased clinical workload due to introduction of new technology. The potential increased use of resources was assessed. IMRT patient selection was within guidelines of clinical trials and included patients undergoing prostate plus pelvic lymph node (PPN) irradiation and head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment. Patient planning, quality assurance and treatment times were collected for an initial IMRT patient group. A comparative group of patients with advanced HNC undergoing two- or three-phase conventional radiotherapy, requiring matched photon and electron fields, were also timed. The median overall total planning time for IMRT was greater for HNC patients compared to the PPN cohort. For HNC the overall IMRT planning time was significantly longer than for conventional. The median treatment time for conventional two- or three-phase HNC treatments, encompassing similar volumes to those treated with IMRT, was greater than that for the IMRT HNC patient cohort. A reduction in radiographer man hours per patient of 4.8h was recorded whereas physics time was increased by 4.9h per patient. IMRT currently increases overall planning time. Additional clinician input is required for target volume localisation. Physics time is increased, a significant component of this being patient specific QA. Radiographer time is decreased. For HNC a single phase IMRT treatment has proven to be more efficient than a multiple phase conventional treatment. IMRT has been integrated smoothly and efficiently into the existing treatment working day. This preliminary study suggests that IMRT could be a routine treatment with efficient use of current radiotherapy resources.

  12. Demographics of Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanova, Martina; Dzhenkov, Deyan L; Ghenev, Peter; Sapundzhiev, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Head and neck cancer (HNC) comprises a diverse group of oncological entities, originating from various tissue types and organ localizations, situated in the topographical regions of the head and neck (H&N). This single institution retrospective study was aimed at establishing the HNC patient demographics and categorizing the individual incidence of H&N malignancies, regarding their organ of origin and main histopathological type. Materials and methods All histologically verified cases of HNC from a single tertiary referral center were reviewed in a descriptive retrospective manner. Data sampling period was 47 months. Results Male to female ratio of the registered HNC cases was 3.24:1. The mean age of diagnosis was 63.84 ± 12.65 years, median 65 years. The most common HNC locations include the larynx 30.37% (n = 188), lips and oral cavity 29.08% (n = 180), pharynx 20.03% (n = 124) and salivary glands 10.94% (n = 68), with other locations such as the external nose, nasal cavity and sinuses and auricle and external ear canal harboring a minority of the cases. The main histopathological groups include squamous cell carcinoma 76.74% (n = 475) and adenocarcinoma 6.14% (n = 38), with other malignant entries such as other epithelial malignancies, primary tonsillar, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue or parenchymal lymphomas, connective tissue neoplasias, neuroendocrine and vascular malignancies diagnosed in a minority of cases. Conclusion Considered to be relatively rare, HNC represents a diverse group of oncological entities with individual and specific demographic characteristics. The reported single institution results appear representative of the national incidence and characteristics of HNC. PMID:28875091

  13. Phase I Trial Using the Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib and Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubicek, Gregory J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Axelrod, Rita S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ahn, Peter H.; Anne, Pramila R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fogh, Shannon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cognetti, David [Department of Otolaryngology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Myers, Thomas J. [EMD Serono, Rockland, MA (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dicker, Adam P., E-mail: Adam.dicker@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC) remains a difficult disease to cure. Proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib have the potential to improve survival over chemoradiotherapy alone. This Phase I dose-escalation study examined the potential of bortezomib in combination with cisplatin chemotherapy and concurrent radiation in the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent HNC. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received cisplatin once weekly at 30 mg/m{sup 2} per week and bortezomib along with concurrent radiation. Bortezomib was given on Days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 3 weeks, with an initial starting dose of 0.7 mg/m{sup 2} and escalation levels of 1.0 and 1.3 mg/m{sup 2}. Dose escalation was performed only after assessment to rule out any dose-limiting toxicity. Results: We enrolled 27 patients with HNC, including 17 patients with recurrent disease who had received prior irradiation. Patients received bortezomib dose levels of 0.7 mg/m{sup 2} (7 patients), 1.0 mg/m{sup 2} (10 patients), and 1.3 mg/m{sup 2} (10 patients). No Grade 5 toxicities, 3 Grade 4 toxicities (all hematologic and considered dose-limiting toxicities), and 39 Grade 3 toxicities (in 20 patients) were observed. With a median follow-up of 7.4 months, the overall median survival was 24.7 months (48.4 months for advanced HNC patients and 15.4 months for recurrent HNC patients). Conclusion: Bortezomib in combination with radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy is safe in the treatment of HNC with a bortezomib maximum tolerated dose of 1.0 mg/m{sup 2} in patients previously treated for HNC and 1.3 mg/m{sup 2} in radiation-naive patients.

  14. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). III. Chemical structure of the protostellar envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak-Barthel, M.; Semenov, D. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Chavarría, L.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to understand the richness of chemical species observed in the isolated high-mass envelope of AFGL 2591, a prototypical object for studying massive star formation. Methods: Based on HIFI and JCMT data, the molecular abundances of species found in the protostellar envelope of AFGL 2591 were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (Ratran), assuming a mixture of constant and 1D stepwise radial profiles for abundance distributions. The reconstructed 1D abundances were compared with the results of the time-dependent gas-grain chemical modeling, using the best-fit 1D power-law density structure. The chemical simulations were performed considering ages of 1-5 × 104 years, cosmic ray ionization rates of 5-500 × 10-17 s-1, uniformly-sized 0.1-1 μm dust grains, a dust/gas ratio of 1%, and several sets of initial molecular abundances with C/O 1. The most important model parameters varied one by one in the simulations are age, cosmic ray ionization rate, external UV intensity, and grain size. Results: Constant abundance models give good fits to the data for CO, CN, CS, HCO+, H2CO, N2H+, CCH, NO, OCS, OH, H2CS, O, C, C+, and CH. Models with an abundance jump at 100 K give good fits to the data for NH3, SO, SO2, H2S, H2O, HCl, and CH3OH. For HCN and HNC, the best models have an abundance jump at 230 K. The time-dependent chemical model can accurately explain abundance profiles of 15 out of these 24 species. The jump-like radial profiles for key species like HCO+, NH3, and H2O are consistent with the outcome of the time-dependent chemical modeling. The best-fit model has a chemical age of ~10-50 kyr, a solar C/O ratio of 0.44, and a cosmic-ray ionization rate of ~5 × 10-17 s-1. The grain properties and the intensity of the external UV field do not strongly affect the chemical structure of the AFGL 2591 envelope, whereas its chemical age, the cosmic-ray ionization rate, and the initial abundances play an important role. Conclusions: We

  15. Aderência dos cursos de Fisioterapia da região Norte às Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato da Costa Teixeira

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Após a aprovação das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais para os cursos de Fisioterapia (DCN/Fisio, houve um expressivo aumento no número de cursos de graduação em Fisioterapia. A região Norte apresentou a maior taxa de crescimento desses cursos, entre 1999 e 2004, existindo atualmente 27 cursos nessa região. A DCN/FISIO trouxe uma mudança no paradigma de formação desse profissional, passando-se a buscar um perfil de egresso generalista, humanista, crítico e reflexivo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Com a finalidade de analisarmos a aderência dos cursos de fisioterapia da região Norte às DCN/Fisio, realizamos uma análise crítica dos projetos pedagógicos (PPC de dez cursos de Fisioterapia da região, com base na mesma metodologia utilizada pelo Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisas Educacionais Anísio Teixeira (Inep em 2006, em estudo semelhante com os cursos de Enfermagem, Medicina e Odontologia. RESULTADOS: A aderência média dos PPC às DCN/Fisio foi de 74%. Encontramos como pontos fortes: a construção coletiva dos projetos pedagógicos, matriz curricular interdisciplinar ou a utilização de metodologias que propiciam essa prática, a integração entre teoria e prática, a presença de mecanismos de controle do Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso, maior abrangência das áreas de atuação profissional durante o estágio supervisionado, o incentivo à produção científica, o equilíbrio entre as cargas horárias dos conteúdos essenciais e a presença de regulamento das atividades complementares. Por sua vez, encontramos como fragilidades: o projeto pedagógico construído por grupos restritos, a transcrição literal de elementos das DCN/Fisio no PPC, metodologias de ensino não condizentes com a perspectiva de formação das DCN/Fisio.

  16. Dual-Lumen Chest Port Infection Rates in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bos, Aaron, E-mail: abos1210@gmail.com; Ahmed, Osman [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States); Jilani, Danial [Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine (United States); Giger, Maryellen; Funaki, Brian S.; Zangan, Steven M. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate dual-lumen chest port infection rates in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) compared to those with other malignancies (non-HNC).Materials and MethodsAn IRB-approved retrospective study was performed on 1,094 consecutive chest ports placed over a 2-year period. Patients with poor follow-up (n = 53), no oncologic history (n = 13), or single-lumen ports (n = 183) were excluded yielding a study population of 845 patients. The electronic medical records were queried for demographic information, data regarding ports and infections, and imaging review.ResultsHNC patients experienced more infections (42 vs. 30), an increased infection rate per 1,000 catheter days (0.68 vs. 0.21), and more early infections within 30 days compared to non-HNC patients (10 vs. 6) (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.02, respectively). An existing tracheostomy at the time of port placement was associated with infection in the HNC group (p = 0.02) but was not an independent risk factor for infection in the study population overall (p = 0.06). There was a significant difference in age, male gender, and right-sided ports between the HNC and non-HNC groups (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, and p = 0.01), although these were not found to be independent risk factors for infection (p = 0.32, p = 0.76, p = 0.16).ConclusionHNC patients are at increased risk for infection of dual-lumen chest ports placed via a jugular approach compared to patients with other malignancies. Tracheostomy is associated with infection in HNC patients but is not an independent risk factor for infection in the oncologic population as a whole.

  17. Dual-Lumen Chest Port Infection Rates in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Aaron; Ahmed, Osman; Jilani, Danial; Giger, Maryellen; Funaki, Brian S.; Zangan, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate dual-lumen chest port infection rates in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) compared to those with other malignancies (non-HNC).Materials and MethodsAn IRB-approved retrospective study was performed on 1,094 consecutive chest ports placed over a 2-year period. Patients with poor follow-up (n = 53), no oncologic history (n = 13), or single-lumen ports (n = 183) were excluded yielding a study population of 845 patients. The electronic medical records were queried for demographic information, data regarding ports and infections, and imaging review.ResultsHNC patients experienced more infections (42 vs. 30), an increased infection rate per 1,000 catheter days (0.68 vs. 0.21), and more early infections within 30 days compared to non-HNC patients (10 vs. 6) (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.02, respectively). An existing tracheostomy at the time of port placement was associated with infection in the HNC group (p = 0.02) but was not an independent risk factor for infection in the study population overall (p = 0.06). There was a significant difference in age, male gender, and right-sided ports between the HNC and non-HNC groups (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, and p = 0.01), although these were not found to be independent risk factors for infection (p = 0.32, p = 0.76, p = 0.16).ConclusionHNC patients are at increased risk for infection of dual-lumen chest ports placed via a jugular approach compared to patients with other malignancies. Tracheostomy is associated with infection in HNC patients but is not an independent risk factor for infection in the oncologic population as a whole

  18. RITA plus 3-MA overcomes chemoresistance of head and neck cancer cells via dual inhibition of autophagy and antioxidant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Daiha; Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Jaewang; Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2017-10-01

    Reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA) is a small molecule that blocks p53-MDM2 interaction, thereby reactivating p53 in tumors. RITA can induce exclusive apoptosis in cancer cells independently of the p53 pathway; however, the resistance of cancer cells remains a major drawback. Here, we found a novel resistance mechanism of RITA treatment and an effective combined treatment to overcome RITA resistance in head and neck cancer (HNC) cells. The effects of RITA and 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were tested in different HNC cell lines, including cisplatin-resistant and acquired RITA-resistant HNC cells. The effects of each drug alone and in combination were assessed by measuring cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle, glutathione, reactive oxygen species, protein expression, genetic inhibition of p62 and Nrf2, and a mouse xenograft model of cisplatin-resistant HNC. RITA induced apoptosis of HNC cells at different levels without significantly inhibiting normal cell viability. Following RITA treatment, RITA-resistant HNC cells exhibited a sustained expression of other autophagy-related proteins, overexpressed p62, and displayed activation of the Keap1-Nrf2 antioxidant pathway. The autophagy inhibitor 3-MA sensitized resistant HNC cells to RITA treatment via the dual inhibition of molecules related to the autophagy and antioxidant systems. Silencing of the p62 gene augmented the combined effects. The effective antitumor activity of RITA plus 3-MA was also confirmed in vivo in mouse xenograft models transplanted with resistant HNC cells, showing increased oxidative stress and DNA damage. The results indicate that RITA plus 3-MA can help overcome RITA resistance in HNC cells. This study revealed a novel RITA resistant mechanism associated with the sustained induction of autophagy, p62 overexpression, and Keap1-Nrf2 antioxidant system activation. The combined treatment of RITA with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine overcomes RITA resistance via dual

  19. Application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to people with dysphagia following non-surgical head and neck cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Ward, Elizabeth C; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is an internationally recognized framework which allows its user to describe the consequences of a health condition on an individual in the context of their environment. With growing recognition that dysphagia can have broad ranging physical and psychosocial impacts, the aim of this paper was to identify the ICF domains and categories that describe the full functional impact of dysphagia following non-surgical head and neck cancer (HNC) management, from the perspective of the person with dysphagia. A secondary analysis was conducted on previously published qualitative study data which explored the lived experiences of dysphagia of 24 individuals with self-reported swallowing difficulties following HNC management. Categories and sub-categories identified by the qualitative analysis were subsequently mapped to the ICF using the established linking rules to develop a set of ICF codes relevant to the impact of dysphagia following HNC management. The 69 categories and sub-categories that had emerged from the qualitative analysis were successfully linked to 52 ICF codes. The distribution of these codes across the ICF framework revealed that the components of Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were almost equally represented. The findings confirm that the ICF is a valuable framework for representing the complexity and multifaceted impact of dysphagia following HNC. This list of ICF codes, which reflect the diverse impact of dysphagia associated with HNC on the individual, can be used to guide more holistic assessment and management for this population.

  20. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jie, E-mail: jie.deng@vanderbilt.edu [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Ridner, Sheila H. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Dietrich, Mary S. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A. [Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  1. Usage of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J. Kyaw; Byass, O.R.; Cast, J.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess outcomes and usage rate of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Materials and methods: Outcome data of all HNC patients who underwent prophylactic RIG over a 22-month period (November 2007 to September 2009) in a tertiary referral centre were collected retrospectively. Thirty-day mortality, major and minor complication rates, and subsequent usage of the RIG were analysed. Results: Fifty-one HNC patients underwent prophylactic RIG. Three minor and no major immediate complications were identified. Sixteen minor and three major complications at 30-days were identified. Three (5.9%) major complications were identified. There was one death due to disease progression and not RIG insertion. The RIG was not used in 17.7% of patients post-procedure. Conclusion: Prophylactic RIG in HNC patients has a comparable mortality rate to RIG insertion in HNC patients with mixed indications. However, the number of cases where the gastrostomy is not used raises important concerns and warrants further investigation.

  2. Malnutrition and refeeding syndrome prevention in head and neck cancer patients: from theory to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderbay, Akil; Atallah, Ihab; Fontaine, Eric; Chobert-Bakouline, Marine; Schmitt, Stephanie; Mitariu, Philipp; Righini, Christian Adrien

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this review is to raise awareness about refeeding syndrome (RFS) and to give a comprehensive presentation of recent guidelines and latest scientific data about nutritional management among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients while focusing on RFS prevention. A review of literature for nutritional assessment and RFS management was conducted. Electronic searches of Medline, Cochrane, PubMed and Embase databases for articles published in peer-reviewed journals were conducted from February to September 2017 using the keywords: "nutrition assessment", "head and neck cancer", "refeeding syndrome" and "guidelines". Articles, reviews, book references as well as national and international guidelines in English and French were included. The prevalence of malnutrition is high in HNC patients and a large number of them will need artificial nutritional support or refeeding intervention. RFS is characterized by fluid and electrolyte imbalance associated with clinical manifestations induced by rapid refeeding after a period of malnutrition or starvation. Regarding risk factors for malnutrition and RFS, HNC patients are particularly vulnerable. However, RFS remains unrecognized among head and neck surgeons and medical teams. Practical data are summarized to help organizing nutritional assessment and refeeding interventions. It also summarizes preventive measures to reduce RFS incidence and morbidity in HNC population. Nutritional assessment and early refeeding interventions are crucial for HNC patients care. As prevention is the key for RFS management, early identification of patients with high risks is crucial and successful nutritional management requires a multidisciplinary approach.

  3. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A.; Harris, Stephen L.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers

  4. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A. [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harris, Stephen L. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Manchester, New Hampshire (United States); Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  5. Low frequency of cigarette smoking and the risk of head and neck cancer in the INHANCE consortium pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthiller, Julien; Straif, Kurt; Agudo, Antonio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Bezerra Dos Santos, Alexandre; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Canova, Cristina; Castellsague, Xavier; Chen, Chu; Conway, David; Curado, Maria Paula; Dal Maso, Luigino; Daudt, Alexander W; Fabianova, Eleonora; Fernandez, Leticia; Franceschi, Silvia; Fukuyama, Erica E; Hayes, Richard B; Healy, Claire; Herrero, Rolando; Holcatova, Ivana; Kelsey, Karl; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Koifman, Sergio; Lagiou, Pagona; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lazarus, Philip; Levi, Fabio; Lissowska, Jolanta; Macfarlane, Tatiana; Mates, Dana; McClean, Michael; Menezes, Ana; Merletti, Franco; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew F; Purdue, Mark; Ramroth, Heribert; Rudnai, Peter; Schwartz, Stephen M; Serraino, Diego; Shangina, Oxana; Smith, Elaine; Sturgis, Erich M; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Thomson, Peter; Vaughan, Thomas L; Vilensky, Marta; Wei, Qingyi; Winn, Deborah M; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Znaor, Ariana; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). To our knowledge, low cigarette smoking (frequency of cigarette consumption was categorized as follows: never cigarette users, >0-3, >3-5, >5-10 cigarettes per day. Smoking >0-3 cigarettes per day was associated with a 50% increased risk of HNC in the study population [odds ratio (OR) = 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.21, 1.90). Smoking >3-5 cigarettes per day was associated in each subgroup from OR = 2.01 (95% CI: 1.22, 3.31) among never alcohol drinkers to OR = 2.74 (95% CI: 2.01, 3.74) among women and in each cancer site, particularly laryngeal cancer (OR = 3.48, 95% CI: 2.40, 5.05). However, the observed increased risk of HNC for low smoking frequency was not found among smokers with smoking duration shorter than 20 years. Our results suggest a public health message that low frequency of cigarette consumption contributes to the development of HNC. However, smoking duration seems to play at least an equal or a stronger role in the development of HNC. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  6. The role of oral hygiene in head and neck cancer: results from International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, D; Sartori, S; Brennan, P; Curado, M P; Wünsch-Filho, V; Divaris, K; Olshan, A F; Zevallos, J P; Winn, D M; Franceschi, S; Castellsagué, X; Lissowska, J; Rudnai, P; Matsuo, K; Morgenstern, H; Chen, C; Vaughan, T L; Hofmann, J N; D'Souza, G; Haddad, R I; Wu, H; Lee, Y-C; Hashibe, M; Vecchia, C La; Boffetta, P

    2016-08-01

    Poor oral hygiene has been proposed to contribute to head and neck cancer (HNC) risk, although causality and independency of some indicators are uncertain. This study investigates the relationship of five oral hygiene indicators with incident HNCs. In a pooled analysis of 8925 HNC cases and 12 527 controls from 13 studies participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium, comparable data on good oral hygiene indicators were harmonized. These included: no denture wear, no gum disease (or bleeding), oral hygiene indicator and cumulative score on HNC risk, adjusting for tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Inverse associations with any HNC, in the hypothesized direction, were observed for cancer sites, especially for tooth brushing and dentist visits. The population attributable fraction for ≤ 2 out of 5 good oral hygiene indicators was 8.9% (95% CI 3.3%, 14%) for oral cavity cancer. Good oral hygiene, as characterized by few missing teeth, annual dentist visits, and daily tooth brushing, may modestly reduce the risk of HNC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [Human papilloma viruses: other risk factor of head and neck carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woto-Gaye, G; M'Farrej, M K; Doh, K; Thiam, I; Touré, S; Diop, R; Dial, C

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck carcinoma (HNC) occupy the sixth place as the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. Next to alcohol and tobacco intoxication, other risk factors (RF) are suspected, including the human papilloma viruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of HPVs and histo-epidemiological characteristics of HNC HPV+ in Senegal. This is a prospective, multicenter preliminary study of 18 months (January 1, 2012-June 30, 2014). The cases of HNC histologically confirmed in Senegal were then sent to the bio-pathology department of the Curie Institute in Paris to search HPVs. In the 90 included cases, the PCR technique was successful in 54 cases (60%). HPVs were found in seven cases, that is, a prevalence of 13%. HPVs were associated with 5 cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma and 2 cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity. Patients with HNC HPV+ had a median age of 42 years against 49 years for HPV-patients. Three patients (42.8%) with HPV+ carcinomas were smokers. Of the 47 HPV-patients, 40 patients (87.1%) had alcohol intoxication and/or smoking. The concept of oral sex was refuted by all our patients. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only histological type found. HPV+ cell carcinoma showed no specific histological appearance. HPVs are another certain RF of HNC in Senegal. The major therapeutic and prognostic impact of HPVinduced cancers requires the systematic search of the viruses by the PCR technique.

  8. Controversies surrounding human papilloma virus infection, head & neck vs oral cancer, implications for prophylaxis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Giuseppina; Giovannelli, Lucia

    2009-03-30

    Head & Neck Cancer (HNC) represents the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and it is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors, i.e., tobacco smoking and/or the alcohol consumption. Recently, substantial evidence has been mounting that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is playing an increasing important role in oral cancer. Because of the attention and clamor surrounding oral HPV infection and related cancers, as well as the use of HPV prophylactic vaccines, in this invited perspective the authors raise some questions and review some controversial issues on HPV infection and its role in HNC, with a particular focus on oral squamous cell carcinoma. The problematic definition and classification of HNC will be discussed, together with the characteristics of oral infection with oncogenic HPV types, the frequency of HPV DNA detection in HNC, the location of HPV-related tumours, the severity and prognosis of HPV-positive HNC, the diagnosis of oral HPV infection, common routes of oral infection and the likelihood of oro-genital HPV transmission, the prevention of HPV infection and novel therapeutic approaches.

  9. A low percentage of autologous serum can replace bovine serum to engineer human nasal cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For the generation of cell-based therapeutic products, it would be preferable to avoid the use of animal-derived components. Our study thus aimed at investigating the possibility to replace foetal bovine serum (FBS with autologous serum (AS for the engineering of cartilage grafts using expanded human nasal chondrocytes (HNC. HNC isolated from 7 donors were expanded in medium containing 10% FBS or AS at different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10% and cultured in pellets using serum-free medium or in Hyaff®-11 meshes using medium containing FBS or AS. Tissue forming capacity was assessed histologically (Safranin O, immunohistochemically (type II collagen and biochemically (glycosaminoglycans -GAG- and DNA. Differences among experimental groups were assessed by Mann Whitney tests. HNC expanded under the different serum conditions proliferated at comparable rates and generated cartilaginous pellets with similar histological appearance and amounts of GAG. Tissues generated by HNC from different donors cultured in Hyaff®-11 had variable quality, but the accumulated GAG amounts were comparable among the different serum conditions. Staining intensity for collagen type II was consistent with GAG deposition. Among the different serum conditions tested, the use of 2% AS resulted in the lowest variability in the GAG contents of generated tissues. In conclusion, a low percentage of AS can replace FBS both during the expansion and differentiation of HNC and reduce the variability in the quality of the resulting engineered cartilage tissues.

  10. Studies on some important secondary metabolites from marine organisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvatkar, R.R.

    -(2,4- dibromo-5-methoxyphenyl)ethanamine (15) from this species suggest that amathamides and amathaspiramides are biosynthesized from phenylalanine by a series of aromatic substitution reactions and a decarboxylation giving the amines of the type 15, which... an aldehyde with HCN. HCN is generated in situ from cyanide salt such as NaCN, KCN, etc by treatment with a mineral acid. It is not safe to use HCN or its salts owing to its toxic effects that are fatal. Moreover, the yields of these reactions are poor...

  11. The discrete cones methods for two-dimensional neutral particle transport problems with voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Maynard, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    One of the most widely applied deterministic methods for time-independent, two-dimensional neutron transport calculations is the discrete ordinates method (DSN). The DSN solution, however, fails to be accurate in a void due to the ray effect. In order to circumvent this drawback, the authors have been developing a novel approximation: the discrete cones method (DCN), where a group of particles in a cone are simultaneously traced instead of particles in discrete directions for the DSN method. Programs, which apply to the DSN method in a non-vacuum region and the DCN method in a void, have been written for transport calculations in X-Y coordinates. The solutions for test problems demonstrate mitigation of the ray effect in voids without loosing the computational efficiency of the DSN method

  12. Energy efficiency benefits of introducing optical switching in Data Center Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilimon, Artur; Zeimpeki, Alexandra; Fagertun, Anna Manolova

    2017-01-01

    layers of the network topology. The analysis is based on network-level simulations using a transport network planning tool applied to small-scale setups of the considered DCNs. The obtained results show that introducing all-optical switching within the DCN leads to reduced power consumption in all......In this paper we analyze the impact of WDM-enhanced optical circuit switching on the power consumption of multiple Data Center Network (DCN) architectures. Traditional three-tier Tree, Fat-Tree and a ring-based structure are evaluated and optical switching is selectively introduced on different...... an optically switched core benefits most the ring-based network. For the latter, the core ring nodes need fewer long-reach transponders at the trunk interfaces and benefit from more efficient traffic grooming in the access part....

  13. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  14. Precision of Discrete and Rhythmic Forelimb Movements Requires a Distinct Neuronal Subpopulation in the Interposed Anterior Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Y.T. Low

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN represent output channels of the cerebellum, and they transmit integrated sensorimotor signals to modulate limb movements. But the functional relevance of identifiable neuronal subpopulations within the DCN remains unclear. Here, we examine a genetically tractable population of neurons in the mouse interposed anterior nucleus (IntA. We show that these neurons represent a subset of glutamatergic neurons in the IntA and constitute a specific element of an internal feedback circuit within the cerebellar cortex and cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway associated with limb control. Ablation and optogenetic stimulation of these neurons disrupt efficacy of skilled reach and locomotor movement and reveal that they control positioning and timing of the forelimb and hindlimb. Together, our findings uncover the function of a distinct neuronal subpopulation in the deep cerebellum and delineate the anatomical substrates and kinematic parameters through which it modulates precision of discrete and rhythmic limb movements.

  15. Do we reach the patients with the most problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Trille; Johansen, Christoffer; Andersen, Elo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study seeks to assess the differences in disease and socioeconomic characteristics, late effects and long-term quality of life (QoL) after head-and-neck cancer (HNC) among participants and non-participants. METHODS: Five hundred sixty recurrence-free survivors treated for HNC at least...... likely to cohabit, less likely to smoke, used less alcohol and were more likely to have HPV than those who declined but did not differ by gender, cancer site, stage or time since diagnosis. Participants reported significantly better QoL and functioning and less severe symptoms than those who declined...... participation other than filling in the baseline questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: Late symptoms are common in HNC survivors. A wide diversity of self-reported late effects was found in this trial with participants significantly less affected than non-participants. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Generalizable...

  16. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabretta, Nicola; Miao, Wang; Dorren, Harm

    2016-03-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and applications. Virtualization mechanisms and technologies can leverage statistical multiplexing and fast switch reconfiguration to further extend the DC efficiency and agility. We present a novel high performance flat DCN employing bufferless and distributed fast (sub-microsecond) optical switches with wavelength, space, and time switching operation. The fast optical switches can enhance the performance of the DCNs by providing large-capacity switching capability and efficiently sharing the data plane resources by exploiting statistical multiplexing. Benefiting from the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control of the optical switches, virtual DCNs can be flexibly created and reconfigured by the DCN provider. Numerical and experimental investigations of the DCN based on the fast optical switches show the successful setup of virtual network slices for intra-data center interconnections. Experimental results to assess the DCN performance in terms of latency and packet loss show less than 10^-5 packet loss and 640ns end-to-end latency with 0.4 load and 16- packet size buffer. Numerical investigation on the performance of the systems when the port number of the optical switch is scaled to 32x32 system indicate that more than 1000 ToRs each with Terabit/s interface can be interconnected providing a Petabit/s capacity. The roadmap to photonic integration of large port optical switches will be also presented.

  17. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements adaptable gain control in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Garrido Alcazar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptable gain regulation is at the core of the forward controller operation performed by the cerebro-cerebellar loops and it allows the intensity of motor acts to be finely tuned in a predictive manner. In order to learn and store information about body-object dynamics and to generate an internal model of movement, the cerebellum is thought to employ long-term synaptic plasticity. LTD at the PF-PC synapse has classically been assumed to subserve this function (Marr, 1969. However, this plasticity alone cannot account for the broad dynamic ranges and time scales of cerebellar adaptation. We therefore tested the role of plasticity distributed over multiple synaptic sites (Gao et al., 2012; Hansel et al., 2001 by generating an analog cerebellar model embedded into a control loop connected to a robotic simulator. The robot used a three-joint arm and performed repetitive fast manipulations with different masses along an 8-shape trajectory. In accordance with biological evidence, the cerebellum model was endowed with both LTD and LTP at the PF-PC, MF-DCN and PC-DCN synapses. This resulted in a network scheme whose effectiveness was extended considerably compared to one including just PF-PC synaptic plasticity. Indeed, the system including distributed plasticity reliably self-adapted to manipulate different masses and to learn the arm-object dynamics over a time course that included fast learning and consolidation, along the lines of what has been observed in behavioral tests. In particular, PF-PC plasticity operated as a time correlator between the actual input state and the system error, while MF-DCN and PC-DCN plasticity played a key role in generating the gain controller. This model suggests that distributed synaptic plasticity allows generation of the complex learning properties of the cerebellum. The incorporation of further plasticity mechanisms and of spiking signal processing will allow this concept to be extended in a more realistic

  18. Bimodal stimulus timing-dependent plasticity in primary auditory cortex is altered after noise exposure with and without tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Koehler, Seth D; Shore, Susan E

    2015-12-01

    Central auditory circuits are influenced by the somatosensory system, a relationship that may underlie tinnitus generation. In the guinea pig dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), pairing spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) stimulation with tones at specific intervals and orders facilitated or suppressed subsequent tone-evoked neural responses, reflecting spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Furthermore, after noise-induced tinnitus, bimodal responses in DCN were shifted from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian timing rules with less discrete temporal windows, suggesting a role for bimodal plasticity in tinnitus. Here, we aimed to determine if multisensory STDP principles like those in DCN also exist in primary auditory cortex (A1), and whether they change following noise-induced tinnitus. Tone-evoked and spontaneous neural responses were recorded before and 15 min after bimodal stimulation in which the intervals and orders of auditory-somatosensory stimuli were randomized. Tone-evoked and spontaneous firing rates were influenced by the interval and order of the bimodal stimuli, and in sham-controls Hebbian-like timing rules predominated as was seen in DCN. In noise-exposed animals with and without tinnitus, timing rules shifted away from those found in sham-controls to more anti-Hebbian rules. Only those animals with evidence of tinnitus showed increased spontaneous firing rates, a purported neurophysiological correlate of tinnitus in A1. Together, these findings suggest that bimodal plasticity is also evident in A1 following noise damage and may have implications for tinnitus generation and therapeutic intervention across the central auditory circuit. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Some Topics in A and M Data Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Dr Ralchenko reported on the recent developments in XSAMS (XML Schema for Atoms, Molecular and Solids). The XSAMS was proposed at the DCN meeting in 2003 and was developed by a team of DCN participants and external participants. Since its start in 2009 the VAMDC group played an important role in the XSAMS development. The development group (steering committee) meets typically twice a year, most recently at NIFS and at IAEA. The next meeting will be at NIST in October 2011. The XSAMS source files are available at the IAEA official XSAMS webpage (http://www-amdis.iaea.org/xml/) as well as Sourceforge.net (http://sourceforge.net/projects/xsams/) where also sub-versions can be stored for development. Currently, there are two branches other than the official version: the nist-branch and the vamdc-branch. XSAMS contains descriptors of physical objects (atoms, molecules, solids and particles), physical processes (radiative, collisional and non-radiative), environment and other items (data production methods, data sources, etc.). The original idea was to provide a complete classification of atomic and molecular processes and this was largely achieved for atomic processes. However, the molecular part is so complex that more practical approach has been proposed and adopted by VAMDC. The vamdc-branch has a significant separate development in the molecular part (where a case-by-case approach is developed, coordinated by Christian Hill of UK) and in the solid parts. The implementation is under way in almost all VAMDC member institutes. The spectroscopic databases are in a better shape than the collisional databases in terms of XSAMS implementation. Currently only a couple of DCN members have adopted the XSAMS output in their databases and the DCN members should be encouraged to adopt it in the future.

  20. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest K Amankwah

    Full Text Available Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN and lumican (LUM show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC. We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among Caucasians were estimated with odds ratios (OR among 397 cases and 920 controls in two U.S.-based studies (discovery set, 436 cases and 1,098 controls in Australia (replication set 1 and a consortium of 15 studies comprising 1,668 cases and 4,249 controls (replication set 2. The discovery set and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity≥0.48 decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P(trend = 0.001 to 0.03. Results from replication set 2 were statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity≥0.13 and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P(trend≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity≤0.03, which precluded combining. In post-hoc analyses, interactions were observed between each variant and recruitment period (P(interaction≤0.003, age at diagnosis (P(interaction = 0.04, and year of diagnosis (P(interaction = 0.05 in the five studies with available information (1,044 cases, 2,469 controls. We conclude that variants in DCN and LUM are not directly associated with sEOC, and that confirmation of possible effect modification of the variants by non-genetic factors is required.

  1. Uncertain Photometric Redshifts with Deep Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Isanto, A.

    2017-06-01

    The need for accurate photometric redshifts estimation is a topic that has fundamental importance in Astronomy, due to the necessity of efficiently obtaining redshift information without the need of spectroscopic analysis. We propose a method for determining accurate multi-modal photo-z probability density functions (PDFs) using Mixture Density Networks (MDN) and Deep Convolutional Networks (DCN). A comparison with a Random Forest (RF) is performed.

  2. Diretrizes curriculares para a formação de profissionais de saúde: competências ou práxis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid D'avilla Freire Pereira

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa os referenciais teóricos e epistemológicos da educação que constam das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN relativas à formação profissional em saúde no Brasil. Para tanto, resgata a historicidade da relação educação, saúde e sociedade e as reformas do ensino médico; descreve o movimento de instituição das DCN para a área da saúde no país; e discute as relações entre o referencial da pedagogia das competências, que alicerça as DCN, e a concepção de direito à saúde formulada pela VIII Conferência Nacional de Saúde. Os resultados desta investigação sugerem a hipótese de que, para formar profissionais de saúde comprometidos com os princípios da VIII Conferência Nacional de Saúde e com a compreensão da saúde como direito, é necessário questionar os limites da pedagogia das competências adotada pelas DCN, bem como construir uma proposta de formação que dialogue com o pressuposto da transformação social, de modo que a sua didática possibilite aos estudantes evoluírem criticamente da práxis individual e comum para a práxis histórica.

  3. Second meeting of the Atomic and Molecular Data Centre network. Fontenay aux Roses, 23-24 May 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1980-11-01

    Summary report of the Second A+M Data Centre Network (DCN) meeting convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section at the CEA Laboratory at Fontenay-aux-Roses, France, 23-24 May 1980. The meeting was attended by 20 representatives from centres and groups from six Member States concerned with the coordinated international management of atomic and molecular data pertinent to controlled fusion research and technology

  4. The role of Dermcidin isoform-2 in the occurrence and severity of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Khan, Md Mobidullah; Ghosh, Chandradipa; Bank, Sarbashri; Maiti, Smarajit

    2017-08-15

    Diabetes is now epidemic worldwide. Several hundred-million peoples are presently suffering from this disease with other secondary-disorders. Stress, hypertension, sedentary life-style, carbohydrate/lipid metabolic-disorders due to genetic or environmental factors attributes to type-1 and/or type-2 diabetes. Present investigation demonstrates that stress-induced protein dermcidin isoform-2 (DCN-2) which appears in the serum of diabetic-patients play a key-role in this disease pathogenesis/severity. DCN-2 suppresses insulin production-release from liver/pancreas. It also increases the insulin-resistance. Stress-induction at the onset/progression of this disease is noticed as the high-level of lipid peroxides/low-level of free-thiols in association with increase of inflammatory-markers c-reactive protein and TNF-α. DCN-2 induced decrease in the synthesis of glucose-activated nitric oxide synthase (GANOS) and lower production of NO in liver has been shown here where NO is demonstrated to lower the expression of glucose trabsporter-4 (GLUT-4) and its translocation on liver membrane surface. This finally impairs glucose transport to organs from the extracellular fluid. Low level of glucose uptake further decreases glucose-induced insulin synthesis. The central role of DCN-2 has been demonstrated in type-1/type-2 diabetic individuals, in rodent hepatocytes and pancreatic-cell, tissue-slices, in-vitro and in-vivo experimental model. It can be concluded that stress-induced decrease in insulin synthesis/function, glucose transport is an interactive consequence of oxidative threats and inflammatory events.

  5. Transfer Learning for Video Recognition with Scarce Training Data for Deep Convolutional Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yu-Chuan; Chiu, Tzu-Hsuan; Yeh, Chun-Yen; Huang, Hsin-Fu; Hsu, Winston H.

    2014-01-01

    Unconstrained video recognition and Deep Convolution Network (DCN) are two active topics in computer vision recently. In this work, we apply DCNs as frame-based recognizers for video recognition. Our preliminary studies, however, show that video corpora with complete ground truth are usually not large and diverse enough to learn a robust model. The networks trained directly on the video data set suffer from significant overfitting and have poor recognition rate on the test set. The same lack-...

  6. Comparison of ASTM D613 and ASTM D6890

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    cetane values outside of the routine range of traditional CN testing by ASTM D613, this is an important advantage in fuel blending and disposition...Number testing. Particular emphasis was placed on evaluating fuels, and blends thereof, having cetane values outside of the normal range of the...interest covers both petroleum-based and synthetic-based, as well as blends thereof in order to improve the confidence in using DCN as a replacement

  7. Nonlinear development of the populations of neurons expressing c-Fos under sustained electrical intracochlear stimulation in the rat auditory brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosskothen-Kuhl, Nicole; Illing, Robert-Benjamin

    2010-08-06

    The immediate-early-gene c-fos is among the first genes to be expressed following sensory-invoked neuronal activity. Its gene product c-Fos forms the limiting monomer of the heterodimeric activator protein-1 transcription factor that triggers various genes involved in neuroplastic remodeling. This study investigated the pattern of c-Fos expression in anteroventral (AVCN) and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and central inferior colliculus (CIC) after 45 min, 73 min, 2 h, 3:15 h and 5 h of unilateral electrical intracochlear stimulation (EIS) at 50 Hz in anaesthetized rats. Following EIS, tonotopic c-Fos expression was observed for each stimulation time in ipsilateral AVCN, DCN bilaterally, and contralateral CIC. By counting c-Fos positive nuclei, we discovered temporal non-linearities in the size of the respective population of c-Fos expressing neurons. In all regions investigated, the populations significantly increased from 73 min to 2 h but decreased towards 3:15 h. In AVCN, the number rose again by 5 h of EIS. Remarkably, the same was noted for neurons with large nuclei in deep DCN. In both regions, the population of responsive neurons shifted spatially: In central AVCN, the density of c-Fos positive cells increased significantly from 2 to 5h with medial and lateral regions remaining unchanged. In DCN, the density of large c-Fos positive nuclei fell in the upper and rose in the deep layers from 45 min to 5h of EIS. In conclusion, spatiotemporally varying recruitments of neuronal subpopulations into cellular networks responding to specific patterns of sensory activity take place in the auditory brainstem. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Major International R and D Ranges and Test Facilities. Summary of Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Fabrications De Telecommunications (SEFT) 51 Centre D’Etudes De Gramat (CEG) 53 Direction Des Constructions Navales (DCN) 56 Centre D’Essais Et D’Evaluations...MAS (DAT)ICAEPE (DIEN) * MA (OCA*) 0 GRAMAT CEO (DRET) CAZAUX CEB (DCA&) BISCARROSSEO CELDEN TUOSE ITE AABE E(DAT)CA TARES CAP (DA) ATS (DAT) CEAT (DC...at Arcucil, Cazaux. and Gramat . The five Hydrodynamic Testing centers are: Le Centre D’Analyse de Defense (CAD) at (CMCM) at Arcueil. Conducts

  9. French participation to PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.

    1994-06-01

    The PISC III programme was set up in 1986 after the conclusions of the PISC II programme. The main objective was assessment of ISI procedures on few particular components or materials. France with IPSN, CEA/DTA, DCN INDRET, EDF, FRAMATOME and INTERCONTROLE decided to have an important participation in several of the eight actions. This paper describes shortly the key points of this participation and the consequences in France. (authors). 10 figs., 1 tab

  10. Pretreatment neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in determining the prognosis of head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yalian; Wang, Hongbo; Yan, Aihui; Wang, Hailong; Li, Xinyao; Liu, Jiangtao; Li, Wei

    2018-04-04

    Recent studies have reported a relationship between prognosis and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). As the results are still controversial, we conducted a meta-analysis of pretreatment NLR in peripheral blood and prognosis in HNC patients. We retrieved articles from PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, Embase and Web of Science. A comparative analysis was conducted for the effect of pretreatment NLR in peripheral blood on overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), disease-specific survival, metastasis-free survival, and recurrence-free survival of HNC patients. The analysis applied the criteria for systematic reviews described in the Cochrane Handbook and was conducted using hazard ratios (HRs) to estimate effect size, and calculated by Stata/SE version 13.0. The meta-analysis included eligible cohort studies (5475 cases). The OS data indicated increased mortality risk in HNC patients with a high NLR (HR = 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53-2.23; P Analysis of subgroups stratified by NLR cutoff values revealed increased mortality risk and significantly shorter DFS in patients with high NLR compared to those with low NLR (HR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.46-3.24; P analysis results were stable, as shown by sensitivity analysis. No publication bias was detected by the Egger test (P = 0.135). HNC patients with elevated pretreatment NLR in peripheral blood have poor prognosis and are prone to local invasion and distant metastasis. NLR values are easily obtained from routinely collected blood samples and could assist clinicians to determine prognosis of HNC patients.

  11. Absorption of Bupivacaine after Administration of a Lozenge as Topical Treatment for Pain from Oral Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Stine; Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Sveinsdóttir, Kolbrún; Treldal, Charlotte; Jensen, Kenneth; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Kristensen, Claus Andrup; Jacobsen, Jette; Kreilgaard, Mads; Petersen, Janne; Andersen, Ove

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate systemic exposure after administration of a novel bupivacaine lozenge in healthy individuals with normal mucosa and in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients with oral mucositis. A lozenge containing 5, 10, 25 and 50 mg bupivacaine, respectively, was administered as single dose to 10 healthy individuals, and a lozenge containing 25 mg bupivacaine was administered as single dose to 10 HNC patients with oral mucositis and as multiple doses to five patients with HNC. Blood samples were collected for 6 hr from the healthy individuals and 3 hr from the patients with HNC, respectively, after administration. The plasma concentration-time profiles of bupivacaine were fitted to pharmacokinetic models using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, evaluating demographics and health status as covariates. The population pharmacokinetics (PK) of bupivacaine lozenge was best described by a two-compartment distribution model with absorption transit compartments. All the observed plasma concentrations were well below the bupivacaine concentrations (2000-2250 ng/ml) which have caused toxic symptoms. The PK model suggested that relative bioavailability was two times higher in HNC patients with oral mucositis grade 1-2 and three times higher in HNC patients with oral mucositis grade 3-4 than in the healthy individuals. Simulations showed that the plasma concentrations would be below the toxic limit after repeated dosing every second hour with 25 mg bupivacaine for five days. The 25-mg bupivacaine lozenges were safe without systemic toxic levels of bupivacaine or risk of side effects. Based on PK simulations of repeated doses of 25 mg every two hours for 16 hr a day, the lozenges can be administered with minimum risk of exceeding the toxic limit. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  12. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs--data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønden, Louise B; Eriksen, Thomas; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2009-12-18

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR) from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown) were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128). Of these, 64 (50%) were malignant and 44 (34%) benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant), OMM (13; 20% of malignant), soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant) and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant). The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign), polyps (6; 14% of benign) and fibroma (5; 11% of benign). In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans.Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and could be a clinical model for OMM in humans.

  13. Preliminary study on the differentiation between parapelvic cyst and hydronephrosis with non-calculous using only pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Ma, Guangming; Wei, Lequn; Ren, Chenglong; Zhou, Jieli; Shen, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of using the quantitative parameters from only the pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT imaging for distinguishing between parapelvic cyst and hydronephrosis with non-calculous (HNC). Methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. 28 patients with parapelvic cyst and 24 patients with HNC who underwent standard pre-contrast and multiphase contrast-enhanced dual-energy spectral CT imaging were retrospectively identified. The parapelvic cyst and HNC were identified using the contrast-enhanced scans, and their CT number in the 70-keV monochromatic images, effective atomic number (Zeff), iodine concentration (IC) and water concentration in the pre-contrast images were measured. The slope of the spectral curve (λ) was calculated. The difference in the measurements between parapelvic cyst and HNC was statistically analyzed using SPSS® v. 19.0 (IBM Corp., New York, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) statistical software. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: The CT numbers in the 70-keV images, Zeff and IC values were statistically different between parapelvic cyst and HNC (all p  0.05). Conclusion: The quantitative parameters obtained in the pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT imaging may be used to differentiate between parapelvic cyst and HNC. Advances in knowledge: The pre-contrast dual-energy spectral CT scans may be used to screen parapelvic cysts for patients who are asymptomatic, thereby avoiding contrast-enhanced CT or CT urography examination for these patients to reduce ionizing radiation dose and contrast dose. PMID:28281789

  14. Detection of active human papilloma virus-16 in head and neck cancers of Asian North Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannigrahi, M K; Singh, V; Sharma, R; Panda, N K; Radotra, B D; Khullar, M

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are one of the most common cancers in India. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an emerging risk factor for HNC. The present study was carried out to determine the active form of HPV-16 using a combination of PCR, viral load determination, HPV-16 E7 mRNA expression, p16, p53, and pRB immuno-histochemistry (IHC). A total of 226 HNC patients were enrolled in the present study. Sixty-seven (29.7%) of HNC cases were found to be HPV DNA positive. Thirty-two (14%) cases were HPV-16 DNA positive and 20 (9%) cases expressed HPV-16 E7 mRNA. HPV-16 mRNA/p16 positive cases had significantly increased viral load and integrated HPV-16 DNA. In summary, of total HNC patients, 6% cases were positive for both HPV-16 DNA and p16, and 5% were positive for both E7 mRNA and p16 IHC. We observed similar HPV-16 DNA/E7mRNA prevalence in oropharynx and oral cavity sites, however, oropharynx SCC had significantly higher viral load. Our results show low prevalence of active HPV-16 in North Indian HNC patients. HPV-16 E7 mRNA expression correlated with p16 nuclear positivity and increased viral load. Therefore, E7 mRNA expression may be used as a good surrogate indicator for active form of HPV-16 infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among...... and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)≥0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P(trend) = 0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically...... homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)≥0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P(trend)≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity)≤0.03), which precluded combining. In post...

  16. A comprehensive adsorption study and modeling of antibiotics as a pharmaceutical waste by graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Rahele; Behnejad, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of tetracycline (TCN), doxycycline (DCN) as the most common antibiotics in veterinary and ciprofloxacin (CPN) onto graphene oxide nanosheets (GOS) in aqueous solution was evaluated. The four factors influencing the adsorption of antibiotics (initial concentration, pH, temperature and contact time) were studied. The results showed that initial pH ∼ 6 to 7 and contact time ∼ 100 - 200min are optimum for each drug. The monolayer adsorption capacity was reduced with the increasing temperature from 25°C to 45°C. Non-linear regressions were carried out in order to define the best fit model for every system. To do this, eight error functions were applied to predict the optimum model. Among various models, Hill and Toth isotherm models represented the equilibrium adsorption data of antibiotics while the kinetic data were well fitted by pseudo second-order (PSO) kinetic model (DCN and TCN) and Elovich (CPN) models. The maximum adsorption capacity (q max ) is found to be in the following order: CPN > DCN > TCN, obtained from sips equation at the same temperature. The GOS shows highest adsorption capacity towards CPN up to 173.4mgg -1 . The study showed that GOS can be removed more efficiently from water solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions.

  18. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... Malaysia confirmed that there is 18.6 mg of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) per ... titration of the sodium thiosulphate is continued with vigorous ... Density test was conducted using density cup stainless steel model Elcometer 1800.

  19. Comparative Study of Different Processing Methods for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-06-07

    Jun 7, 2014 ... production of food energy, year-round availability and tolerance to stress condition (Hahn and Keyser,. 1985). Cassava is a major source of ... compounds releases hydrocyanic acid (HCN) which is of great concern for human ...

  20. Combustion products from various kinds of fibers: toxicological hazards from smoke exposure. [Guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betol, E.; Mari, F.; Orzalesi, G.; Volpato, I.

    1983-08-15

    The smoke exposure hazards during combustion of carbon and nitrogen-containing fibers were evaluated in guinea pigs intoxicated by gradual exposure to HCN and CO neo-formed from foam rubber, wool and PAN (Polyacrylonitrile). The most prominent result of our study was that the neo-formation of HCN from 1 g of PAN was 1500 ppm, much higher than from foam rubber and wool because of the presence of many -CN groups in the polymer chemical structure. This concentration of HCN is estimated to be lethal. Extrapolating this data, a lethal concentration of HCN could be obtained by burning 2 kg of PAN in an average sized living room. The above-mentioned 1 g of PAN was burned in a 15.6-liter combustion chamber.

  1. Benzoin condensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ART

    Box 1. Toxicity and Detoxification of Cyanide. Cyanide's Murderous Course: The cyanide inhaled as HCN or .... The nitrile can be transformed into a variety of other ..... D L Nelson amd M M Cox, Lehninger: Principles of Biochemistry, IV.

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanide Salts, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS As...

  3. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Toxicity of carbon monoxide hydrogen cyanide gas mixtures : exposure concentration, time to incapacitation, carboxyhemoglobin and blood cyanide parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    During aircraft interior fires, carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are produced in sufficient amounts to cause incapacitation and death. Time-to-incapacitation (ti) is a practical parameter for estimating escape time in fire environments...

  5. Formation of 1,2-diaminomaleodinitrile crystals in radiolyzed solid hydrocyanic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P.S.; Kichigina, G.A.; Aliev, Z.G.; Kiryukhin, D.P.; Atovmyan, L.O.; Barkalov, I.M.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrocyanic molecules, HCN, are widely found in various extraterrestrial objects and have come to be regarded as the building blocks of chemical evolution, because they convert directly to more complex organic compounds, such as amino acids, nucleotides, and proteins. While observing the low-temperature conversion of radiolyzed solid HCN, the authors noted the formation of an amorphous polymer and the nucleation and growth of needle shaped crystals. The crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction methods and believed to be formed by 1,2-diaminomaleodinitrile, a tetramer of HCN, arising by recombination of aminocyanocarbene diradicals. Cobalt 60 was used as the radiation source, preirradiating with a 800 kGy dose a solid HCN sample at 77K

  6. Swallowing therapy and progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajdú, Sara F; Wessel, Irene; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are often challenged by treatment induced dysphagia and trismus. Traditionally, rehabilitation is initiated when loss of function has already occurred. There is increasing evidence that it is of benefit to patients to initiate an early rehabilitation...... process before and during treatment. HNC patients have a unique set of functional challenges such as pre- and post-treatment dysphagia, pain and weight loss. The aim of the trial is to investigate the effects of swallowing and mouth-opening exercises combined with progressive resistance training (PRT...

  7. Prophylactic Swallowing Exercises in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H R; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, K

    2015-01-01

    Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience reduced quality of life due to radiotherapy (RT)-related dysphagia. The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to evaluate the impact of prophylactic swallowing exercises on swallowing-related outcomes in HNC patients treated with curative...... of the dysphagia outcomes during and after treatment. Adherence to exercises was poor and dropouts due to especially fatigue were very frequent in both groups. Systematic swallowing exercises had no impact on swallowing outcomes within the first year after RT. Despite repeated supervised sessions, adherence...

  8. Prevalence and management of pulmonary comorbidity in patients with lung and head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Magnus; Marsaa, Kristoffer; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The simultaneous presence of cancer and other medical conditions (comorbidity) is frequent. Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for as well head and neck cancer (HNC) and lung cancer (LC) as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is the most common comorbidity in LC...... guidelines. Secondary outcome was feasibility, i.e. the proportion of eligible patients that accepted follow-up in the pulmonary clinic for 24 weeks in addition to oncological treatment. The design of the randomized trail is described in detail. RESULTS: In total 130 patients of whom 65% had LC and 35% HNC...

  9. Prediction of radiotherapy induced normal tissue adverse reactions: the role of double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S. Satish; Mumbrekar, K.D.; Goutham, H.V.; Donald, J.F.; Vadhiraja, M.B.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the predictive potential of DSB repair kinetics (using γH2AX foci assay) in lymphocytes and analysed the genetic variants in the selected radioresponsive candidate genes like XRCC3, LIG4, NBN, CD44, RAD9A, LIG3, SH3GL1, BAXS, XRCC1, MAD2L2 on the individual susceptibility to radiotherapy (RT) induced acute skin reactions among the head and neck cancer (HNC), and breast cancer (BC) patients. All the 183 HNC and 132 BC patients were treated by a 3-dimensional conformal RT technique

  10. Detection of interstellar DNC - Difficulties of chemical equilibrium hypothesis for enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, P. D.; Brown, R. D.; Gunn, H. I.; Blackman, G. L.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1977-01-01

    The J = 1-0 transition of DNC at 76.3058 GHz has been observed in emission in NGC 2264. Comparison with previous observations of HN(C-13) indicates that deuterium is enriched in DNC similarly to the enrichment reported for DCO(+) in this source. The DNC/HNC ratio is estimated to be about 1/24. The results cannot readily be interpreted in terms of chemical equilibria relating to the formation of DNC. It is suggested that the explanation must be sought in isotope effects on rates of formation of interstellar molecules.

  11. Dense gas and star formation in individual Giant Molecular Clouds in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, S.; Forbrich, J.; Fritz, J.

    2018-04-01

    Studies both of entire galaxies and of local Galactic star formation indicate a dependency of a molecular cloud's star formation rate (SFR) on its dense gas mass. In external galaxies, such measurements are derived from HCN(1-0) observations, usually encompassing many Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) at once. The Andromeda galaxy (M31) is a unique laboratory to study the relation of the SFR and HCN emission down to GMC scales at solar-like metallicities. In this work, we correlate our composite SFR determinations with archival HCN, HCO+, and CO observations, resulting in a sample of nine reasonably representative GMCs. We find that, at the scale of individual clouds, it is important to take into account both obscured and unobscured star formation to determine the SFR. When correlated against the dense-gas mass from HCN, we find that the SFR is low, in spite of these refinements. We nevertheless retrieve an SFR-dense-gas mass correlation, confirming that these SFR tracers are still meaningful on GMC scales. The correlation improves markedly when we consider the HCN/CO ratio instead of HCN by itself. This nominally indicates a dependency of the SFR on the dense-gas fraction, in contradiction to local studies. However, we hypothesize that this partly reflects the limited dynamic range in dense-gas mass, and partly that the ratio of single-pointing HCN and CO measurements may be less prone to systematics like sidelobes. In this case, the HCN/CO ratio would importantly be a better empirical measure of the dense-gas content itself.

  12. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on whole blood cyanide concentrations in carbon monoxide intoxicated patients from fire accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hilsted, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) may be important components of smoke from fire accidents. Accordingly, patients admitted to hospital from fire accidents may have been exposed to both HCN and CO. Cyanide (CN) intoxication results in cytotoxic hypoxia leading to organ dysfunction...... and animal experiments have shown that in rats exposed to CN intoxication, HBO can increase the concentration of CN in whole blood....

  13. Hydrogen Cyanide In Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ashley L.; Oberg, Karin; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore

    2018-01-01

    The chemistry behind star and planet formation is extremely complex and important in the formation of habitable planets. Life requires molecules containing carbon, oxygen, and importantly, nitrogen. Hydrogen cyanide, or HCN, one of the main interstellar nitrogen carriers, is extremely dangerous here on Earth. However, it could be used as a vital tool for tracking the chemistry of potentially habitable planets. As we get closer to identifying other habitable planets, we must understand the beginnings of how those planets are formed in the early protoplanetary disk. This project investigates HCN chemistry in different locations in the disk, and what this might mean for forming planets at different distances from the star. HCN is a chemically diverse molecule. It is connected to the formation for other more complex molecules and is commonly used as a nitrogen tracer. Using computational chemical models we look at how the HCN abundance changes at different locations. We use realistic and physically motivated conditions for the gas in the protoplanetary disk: temperature, density, and radiation (UV flux). We analyze the reaction network, formation, and destruction of HCN molecules in the disk environment. The disk environment informs us about stability of habitable planets that are created based on HCN molecules. We reviewed and compared the difference in the molecules with a variety of locations in the disk and ultimately giving us a better understanding on how we view protoplanetary disks.

  14. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP(-/-) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L; Gandini, Maria A; Black, Stefanie A; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrP(C) profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrP(C). The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (I h), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, I h peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrP(C). These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability.

  15. [Development and Application of a Performance Prediction Model for Home Care Nursing Based on a Balanced Scorecard using the Bayesian Belief Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Wonjung; Seomun, Gyeongae

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop key performance indicators (KPIs) for home care nursing (HCN) based on a balanced scorecard, and to construct a performance prediction model of strategic objectives using the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN). This methodological study included four steps: establishment of KPIs, performance prediction modeling, development of a performance prediction model using BBN, and simulation of a suggested nursing management strategy. An HCN expert group and a staff group participated. The content validity index was analyzed using STATA 13.0, and BBN was analyzed using HUGIN 8.0. We generated a list of KPIs composed of 4 perspectives, 10 strategic objectives, and 31 KPIs. In the validity test of the performance prediction model, the factor with the greatest variance for increasing profit was maximum cost reduction of HCN services. The factor with the smallest variance for increasing profit was a minimum image improvement for HCN. During sensitivity analysis, the probability of the expert group did not affect the sensitivity. Furthermore, simulation of a 10% image improvement predicted the most effective way to increase profit. KPIs of HCN can estimate financial and non-financial performance. The performance prediction model for HCN will be useful to improve performance.

  16. A molecular toolbox for rapid generation of viral vectors to up- or down-regulate in vivo neuronal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D. White

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1 and Kir3.2 and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miR. We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miR produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miR with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience.

  17. Transport of regional pollutions to UTLS during Asian Summer Monsoon - A CTM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Bian, Jianchun; Lu, Daren

    2013-04-01

    We use a 3-D global Chemical Transport Model (CTM) GEOS-Chem to simulate the observed Asian Summer Monsoon transport of biomass burning tracers HCN and CO from local emissions to UTLS. By analyzing the satellite observations, we focus on the distribution and spatial-temporal variation of HCN and CO concentration in UTLS. The model simulations capture well the main features of distribution of HCN and CO compared with satellite observations. Recent studies (Li et al., 2009; Randel et al., 2010) indicated that regional emissions may play an important role controlling the distribution and variation of HCN in tropical UTLS during Asian Summer Monsoon seasons, mainly due to the local dynamical uplift of Asian Summer Monsoon. By using GEOS-Chem simulations, we will analyze the UTLS distribution and variation of HCN and CO from emissions of different regions including S.E. Asia, Boreal Asia, Indonesia and Australia, Africa, Europe, Northern America and Southern America. According to the amount and seasonal variability of emissions, the contribution of biomass burning and biofuel burning emissions of different regions to the highly concentrated HCN and CO in UTLS during Asian Summer Monsoon seasons will be discussed, individually.

  18. "Personified as Paragon of Suffering...... Optimistic Being of Achieving Normalcy:" A Conceptual Model Derived from Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shalini G; Pai, Mamatha Shivananda; George, Linu Sara

    2018-01-01

    Background: Conceptual models developed through qualitative research are based on the unique experiences of suffering and individuals’ adoptions of each participant. A wide array of problems are faced by head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients due to disease pathology and treatment modalities which are sufficient to influence the quality of life (QOL). Men possess greater self-acceptance and are better equipped with intrapersonal strength to cope with stress and adequacy compared to women. Methodology: A qualitative phenomenology study was conducted among seven women suffering from HNC, with the objective to understand their experiences of suffering and to describe the phenomenon. Data were collected by face-to-face, in-depth, open-ended interviews. Data were analyzed using Open Code software (OPC 4.0) by following the steps of Colaizzi process. Results: The phenomenon that emerged out of the lived experiences of HNC women was "Personified as paragon of suffering.optimistic being of achieving normalcy," with five major themes and 13 subthemes. Conclusion: The conceptual model developed with the phenomenological approach is very specific to the women suffering from HNC, which will be contributing to develop strategies to improve the QOL of women. PMID:29440812

  19. Thermally-activated vortex dynamics in bismuth calcium strontium copper oxide (Bi2CaSr2Cu2O8+δ) studied by complex susceptibility measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, J.H.P.M.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Jonge, de W.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Complex AC magnetic susceptibility has been measured on Bi2CaSr2Cu2O8+d single crystals with hnc, Hdc|c-axis. It will be shown that field, frequency and temperature dependence of both ¿' and ¿¿ in a constant but sufficiently large DC magnetic field can quantitatively be described by

  20. Institutional clinical trial accrual volume and survival of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J; Zhang, Qiang; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Fortin, André; Silverman, Craig L; Raben, Adam; Kim, Harold E; Horwitz, Eric M; Read, Nancy E; Harris, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Le, Quynh-Thu; Gillison, Maura L

    2015-01-10

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receive treatment at centers with expertise, but whether provider experience affects survival is unknown. The effect of institutional experience on overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III or IV HNC was investigated within a randomized trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 0129), which compared cisplatin concurrent with standard versus accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. As a surrogate for experience, institutions were classified as historically low- (HLACs) or high-accruing centers (HHACs) based on accrual to 21 RTOG HNC trials (1997 to 2002). The effect of accrual volume on OS was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Median RTOG accrual (1997 to 2002) at HLACs was four versus 65 patients at HHACs. Analysis included 471 patients in RTOG 0129 (2002 to 2005) with known human papillomavirus and smoking status. Patients at HLACs versus HHACs had better performance status (0: 62% v 52%; P = .04) and lower T stage (T4: 26.5% v 35.3%; P = .002) but were otherwise similar. Radiotherapy protocol deviations were higher at HLACs versus HHACs (18% v 6%; P accounting for radiotherapy protocol deviations. Institutional experience substantially influences survival in locally advanced HNC. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Consumption of vegetables and fruits and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, B.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between consumption of vegetables and fruits and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes [i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC) and laryngeal cancer (LC)]. Therefore, we investigated these associations within the

  2. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  3. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management.

  4. Circulating Vitamin D in relation to cancer incidence and survival of the head and neck and oesophagus in the EPIC cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanidi, Anouar; Muller, David C.; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Vollset, Stein Emil; Relton, Caroline; Vineis, Paolo; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Brustad, Magritt; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Grioni, Sara; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. B.; Peeters, Petra H.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Kvaskoff, Marina; Cadeau, Claire; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, Maria José; Agudo, Antonio; Lasheras, Cristina; Quirós, J. Ramón; Chamosa, Saioa; Riboli, Elio; Travis, Ruth C.; Ward, Heather; Murphy, Neil; Khaw, Kay Tee; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Papatesta, Eleni Maria; Boeing, Heiner; Kuehn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Steffen, Annika; Johansson, Anders; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D play a role in pathogenesis and progression of cancer, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747

  5. Comparison of the ‘ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in cancer patients 2016’ with the recommendations of the Dutch Dietitians in Oncology Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Annemieke; Doornink, Niki; Ariens, Marleen; Beijer, Sandra; van den Berg, Manon; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; van Lieshout, Rianne; Sijtema, Bea; van Veen, Merel; Breedveld-Peters, Jose

    Rationale: In 2016, a completely revised second version of the ‘Handbook Nutrition in Cancer’ (HNC, in Dutch) by the Dutch Dietitians Oncology Group (DDOG) was published. In this project, the DDOG evaluated similarities and potential discrepancies between DDOG recommendations and the ESPEN

  6. One-component plasma dynamical structure factor and the plasma dispersion: Method of moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamjan, S.V.; Tkachenko, I.M.; Meyer, T.

    1989-01-01

    The molecular dynamics data of Hansen, McDonald and Pollock on the dynamical properties of the classical one-component plasma (OCP) are compared with the results based on an approximation formula for the dielectric function satisfying all known sum rules and exact relations using HNC plasma static properties. (author)

  7. Psychological Factors Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Treatment and Survivorship : Evidence and Opportunities for Behavioral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howren, M. Bryant; Christensen, Alan J.; Karnell, Lucy Hynds; Funk, Gerry F.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC) not only face a potentially life-threatening diagnosis but must endure treatment that often results in significant, highly visible disfigurement and disruptions of essential functioning, such as deficits or complications in eating, swallowing, breathing, and speech. Each year, approximately…

  8. Ghrelin may reduce radiation-induced mucositis and anorexia in head-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Yildiz; Ozel Turkcu, Ummuhani; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Nalca Andrieu, Meltem; Kurtman, Cengiz

    2007-01-01

    Body weight loss is common in cancer patients, and is often associated with poor prognosis, it greatly impairs quality of life (QOL). Radiation therapy (RT) is used in head and neck cancers (HNC) either as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant therapy to surgery. Patients with HNC are most susceptible to malnutrition especially due to anorexia, which is aggravated by RT. Multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha), have been all associated with the development of both anorexia and oral mucositis. Radiation-induced mucositis occurs in almost all patients, who are treated for HNC, it could also cause weight loss. Ghrelin is a novel 28-amino acid peptide, which up-regulates body weight through appetite control, increase food intake, down-regulate energy expenditure and induces adiposity. Furthermore, ghrelin inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha which may cause oral mucositis and aneroxia, which are the results of weight loss. Thus weight loss during RT is an early indicator of nutritional decline, we propose that recombinant ghrelin used prophylactically could be useful as an appetite stimulant; and preventive of mucositis because of its anti-inflammatory effect, it might help patients maintain weight over the course of curative RT of the HNC and can improve specific aspects of QOL. This issue warrants further studies.

  9. Patients with advanced periodontal disease before intensity-modulated radiation therapy are prone to develop bone healing problems : a 2-year prospective follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M; Stokman, Monique A; Witjes, Max J H; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K L

    PURPOSE: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has changed radiation treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC). However, it is still unclear if and how IMRT changes oral morbidity outcomes. In this prospective study, we assessed the outcome of reducing post-IMRT sequelae by means of

  10. Head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy leads to an increase of opportunistic oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M.; Stokman, Monique A.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K. L.

    Objectives: The introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has led to new possibilities in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC). Limited information is available on how this more advanced radiation technique affects the oral microflora. In a prospective study we assessed the

  11. High prevalence of cachexia in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Dijkstra, Pieter; Dijkstra, Gerard; Bijzet, Johan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van der Laan, Bernard; Roodenburg, Jan

    2017-01-01

    In patients with cancer, weight loss can be related to simple starvation, disturbed metabolism, or both. In patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), weight loss often is attributed to simple starvation because the obvious oral symptoms are known to hinder dietary intake. In this population,

  12. High prevalence of cachexia in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Bijzet, Johan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Objective: In patients with cancer, weight loss can be related to simple starvation, disturbedmetabolism, or both. In patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), weight loss often is attributed to simple starvation because the obvious oral symptoms are known to hinder dietary intake. In this

  13. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Keishi; Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Mera, Kiyomi; Doi, Toshihiko; Sano, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed our clinical experiences of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer (EC) in 44 patients with multiple primary malignant neoplasms. Among them, 34 were accompanied with synchronous tumors, 8 were accompanied with antecedent tumors and 8 with subsequent tumors. The sites of primary malignant neoplasms were as follows; stomach 24 (43.6%), head and neck 17 (30.9%), colon and rectum 4 (7.3%). Among the 19 patients with synchronous cancer in the stomach, 6 patients underwent gastrectomy or endoscopic mucosal resection before CRT, and the others received definitive CRT as initial treatment. While 5 patients were alive without recurrence of EC and gastric cancer, more than half of the patients died of EC. Among 11 patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), 9 patients underwent surgery for HNC before CRT, because the clinical stages of the HNC was more progressive than that of EC. Only 3 patients achieved complete cure of both EC and HNC. The number of patients who developed subsequent tumors after CRT for EC was too small for us to draw definitive conclusions from our discussion, so further long-term follow-up and analysis based on large-scale surveys are required. Although CRT has become one of the standard treatments for EC, there is no treatment strategy for patients with both EC and other malignant primary neoplasms. Our results suggest that we should consider the curability of EC by CRT when we treat such patients. (author)

  14. A study on the adsorption of methylene blue onto gum ghatti/TiO2nanoparticles-based hydrogel nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mittal, Hemant

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the isotherm and kinetic models for the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a TiO(sub2) nanoparticle (TiO(sub2)NP)-containing hydrogel nanocomposite (HNC) of polyacrylamide-grafted gum ghatti (PAAm...

  15. Solvation in atomic liquids: connection between Gaussian field theory and density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sergiievskyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of molecular solvation, formulated as a liquid submitted to the external potential field created by a molecular solute of arbitrary shape dissolved in that solvent, we draw a connection between the Gaussian field theory derived by David Chandler [Phys. Rev. E, 1993, 48, 2898] and classical density functional theory. We show that Chandler's results concerning the solvation of a hard core of arbitrary shape can be recovered by either minimising a linearised HNC functional using an auxiliary Lagrange multiplier field to impose a vanishing density inside the core, or by minimising this functional directly outside the core — indeed a simpler procedure. Those equivalent approaches are compared to two other variants of DFT, either in the HNC, or partially linearised HNC approximation, for the solvation of a Lennard-Jones solute of increasing size in a Lennard-Jones solvent. Compared to Monte-Carlo simulations, all those theories give acceptable results for the inhomogeneous solvent structure, but are completely out-of-range for the solvation free-energies. This can be fixed in DFT by adding a hard-sphere bridge correction to the HNC functional.

  16. Resting energy expenditure in head and neck cancer patients before and during radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langius, Jacqueline A. E.; Kruizenga, Hinke M.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene; Weijs, Peter J. M.

    Background & aims: Weight loss is a frequently observed problem in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) during radiotherapy. It is still to be assessed whether hypermetabolism is contributing to this problem. The aim of this study was to investigate hypermetabolism before radiotherapy, and

  17. Prospective clinical study on long-term swallowing function and voice quality in advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and preventive swallowing exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, Sophie A. C.; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) is associated with substantial early and late side effects, most notably regarding swallowing function, but also regarding voice quality and quality of life (QoL). Despite increased awareness/knowledge on acute dysphagia in

  18. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer : Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and

  19. Salvage Stereotactic Reirradiation With or Without Cetuximab for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, Benedicte [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Kramar, Andrew [Department of Statistical Analysis, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Faivre-Pierret, Mathieu [Department of Radiology, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Dewas, Sylvain; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Degardin, Marian; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Lacornerie, Thomas [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric F., E-mail: e-lartigau@o-lambret.fr [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret and University Lille II, Lille (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. Results of a feasibility study using SBRT with or without cetuximab are reported for reirradiation of recurrent primary HNC. Methods and Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor, in a previously irradiated area were included. Reirradiation dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the planning target volume. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma received concomitant cetuximab. Results: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 40 patients were prospectively treated for 43 lesions. Median age was 60 and median tumor size was 29 mm. Fifteen patients received concomitant cetuximab and 1 received concomitant cisplatin. Median follow-up was 25.6 months with 34 patients evaluable for tumor response. Median overall survival was 13.6 months and response rate was 79.4% (15 complete and 12 partial responses). Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 4 patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with or without cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. A prospective multicenter Phase II trial of SRT and concomitant cetuximab in recurrent HNC squamous cell carcinoma is ongoing.

  20. Salvage Stereotactic Reirradiation With or Without Cetuximab for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comet, Bénédicte; Kramar, Andrew; Faivre-Pierret, Mathieu; Dewas, Sylvain; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Degardin, Marian; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lacornerie, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for rec