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Sample records for hawaiian marine sponges

  1. Molecular Detection of Fungal Communities in the Hawaiian Marine Sponges Suberites zeteki and Mycale armata▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng; Li, Binglin; Zheng, Chengchao; Wang, Guangyi

    2008-01-01

    Symbiotic microbes play a variety of fundamental roles in the health and habitat ranges of their hosts. While prokaryotes in marine sponges have been broadly characterized, the diversity of sponge-inhabiting fungi has barely been explored using molecular approaches. Fungi are an important component of many marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and they may be an ecologically significant group in sponge-microbe interactions. This study tested the feasibility of using existing fungal primers for molecular analysis of sponge-associated fungal communities. None of the eight selected primer pairs yielded satisfactory results in fungal rRNA gene or internal transcribed spacer (ITS) clone library constructions. However, 3 of 10 denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) primer sets, which were designed to preferentially amplify fungal rRNA gene or ITS regions from terrestrial environmental samples, were successfully amplified from fungal targets in marine sponges. DGGE analysis indicated that fungal communities differ among different sponge species (Suberites zeteki and Mycale armata) and also vary between sponges and seawater. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands identified 23 and 21 fungal species from each of the two sponge species S. zeteki and M. armata, respectively. These species were representatives of 11 taxonomic orders and belonged to the phyla of Ascomycota (seven orders) and Basidiomycota (four orders). Five of these taxonomic orders (Malasseziales, Corticiales, Polyporales, Agaricales, and Dothideomycetes et Chaetothyriomcetes incertae sedis) have now been identified for the first time in marine sponges. Seven and six fungal species from S. zeteki and M. armata, respectively, are potentially new species because of their low sequence identity (≤98%) with their references in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis indicated sponge-derived sequences were clustered into “marine fungus clades” with those from other marine habitats. This is the first report of molecular

  2. Molecular detection of fungal communities in the Hawaiian marine sponges Suberites zeteki and Mycale armata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng; Li, Binglin; Zheng, Chengchao; Wang, Guangyi

    2008-10-01

    Symbiotic microbes play a variety of fundamental roles in the health and habitat ranges of their hosts. While prokaryotes in marine sponges have been broadly characterized, the diversity of sponge-inhabiting fungi has barely been explored using molecular approaches. Fungi are an important component of many marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and they may be an ecologically significant group in sponge-microbe interactions. This study tested the feasibility of using existing fungal primers for molecular analysis of sponge-associated fungal communities. None of the eight selected primer pairs yielded satisfactory results in fungal rRNA gene or internal transcribed spacer (ITS) clone library constructions. However, 3 of 10 denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) primer sets, which were designed to preferentially amplify fungal rRNA gene or ITS regions from terrestrial environmental samples, were successfully amplified from fungal targets in marine sponges. DGGE analysis indicated that fungal communities differ among different sponge species (Suberites zeteki and Mycale armata) and also vary between sponges and seawater. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands identified 23 and 21 fungal species from each of the two sponge species S. zeteki and M. armata, respectively. These species were representatives of 11 taxonomic orders and belonged to the phyla of Ascomycota (seven orders) and Basidiomycota (four orders). Five of these taxonomic orders (Malasseziales, Corticiales, Polyporales, Agaricales, and Dothideomycetes et Chaetothyriomcetes incertae sedis) have now been identified for the first time in marine sponges. Seven and six fungal species from S. zeteki and M. armata, respectively, are potentially new species because of their low sequence identity (< or =98%) with their references in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis indicated sponge-derived sequences were clustered into "marine fungus clades" with those from other marine habitats. This is the first report of molecular

  3. Marine sponges as pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Osinga, R.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Marine sponges have been considered as a gold mine during the past 50 years, with respect to the diversity of their secondary metabolites. The biological effects of new metabolites from sponges have been reported in hundreds of scientific papers, and they are reviewed here. Sponges have the

  4. Bioactive alkaloids from marine sponges

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, K.S.; Majik, M.S.

    of the molecules obtained from marine sponges have entered in market, while many are under clinical and preclinical trials. There is convincing report about the role of ecology on the production of these valuable secondary metabolites by marine organisms including...

  5. Sediment impacts on marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James J; McGrath, Emily; Biggerstaff, Andrew; Bates, Tracey; Bennett, Holly; Marlow, Joseph; Shaffer, Megan

    2015-05-15

    Changes in sediment input to marine systems can influence benthic environments in many ways. Sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems world-wide and as sessile suspension feeders are likely to be impacted by changes in sediment levels. Despite this, little is known about how sponges respond to changes in settled and suspended sediment. Here we review the known impacts of sedimentation on sponges and their adaptive capabilities, whilst highlighting gaps in our understanding of sediment impacts on sponges. Although the literature clearly shows that sponges are influenced by sediment in a variety of ways, most studies confer that sponges are able to tolerate, and in some cases thrive, in sedimented environments. Critical gaps exist in our understanding of the physiological responses of sponges to sediment, adaptive mechanisms, tolerance limits, and the particularly the effect of sediment on early life history stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Who's there? - First morphological and DNA barcoding catalogue of the shallow Hawai'ian sponge fauna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Núñez Pons

    Full Text Available The sponge fauna has been largely overlooked in the Archipelago of Hawai'i, notwithstanding the paramount role of this taxon in marine ecosystems. The lack of knowledge about Porifera populations inhabiting the Hawai'ian reefs limits the development of ecological studies aimed at understanding the functioning of these marine systems. Consequently, this project addresses this gap by describing the most representative sponge species in the shallow waters of the enigmatic bay of Kane'ohe Bay, in O'ahu Island. A total of 30 species (28 demosponges and two calcareous sponges living associated to the reef structures are here reported. Six of these species are new records to the Hawai'ian Porifera catalogue and are suspected to be recent introductions to these islands. Morphological descriptions of the voucher specimens are provided, along with sequencing data of two partitions involving the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI marker and a fragment covering partial (18S and 28S and full (ITS-1, 5.8S and ITS-2 nuclear ribosomal genes. Species delimitations based on genetic distances were calculated to valitate how taxonomic assignments from DNA barcoding aligned with morphological identifications. Of the 60 sequences submitted to GenBank ~88% are the first sequencing records for the corresponding species and genetic marker. This work compiles the first catalogue combining morphological characters with DNA barcoding of Hawai'ian sponges, and contributes to the repository of public databases through the Sponge Barcoding Project initiative.

  7. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dharmaraj, Selvakumar; Kandasamy, Dhevendaran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods...

  8. Ecological interactions of marine sponges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wulff, Janie L

    2006-01-01

    .... Considerable creative energy has been required to study and describe the amazing variety of sponge interactions, as sponges can hide symbionts deep inside, rapidly regenerate wounds from grazers...

  9. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj; Dhevendaran Kandasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strai...

  10. Marine Sponges as a Drug Treasure

    OpenAIRE

    Anjum, Komal; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Akhter, Najeeb; Batool, Sundas; Hassan, Syed Shams ul

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges have been considered as a drug treasure house with respect to great potential regarding their secondary metabolites. Most of the studies have been conducted on sponge?s derived compounds to examine its pharmacological properties. Such compounds proved to have antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antimalarial, antitumor, immunosuppressive, and cardiovascular activity. Although, the mode of action of many compounds by which they interfere with human pathogenesis have not been cl...

  11. New terpenoids from two Indonesian marine sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmoun, M.; Breakman, J.C.; Dewelle, J.; Darro, F.; Kiss, R.; de Voogd, N.J.; van Soest, R.W.M.

    2007-01-01

    A C16 norsesterterpenoid (euplectellodiol, 1) and a norditerpenoid (2) have been isolated from the marine sponges Mycale euplectelloides and Diacarnus megaspinorhabdosa, respectively. Their structures have been determined by spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1 and 2 are new natural products.

  12. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology, nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance, physiological (pH, temperature and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate, soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are

  13. Chemical ecology of marine sponges

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thakur, N.L.; Singh, A.

    the sponges both (1) directly by the pathogenic and/or parasitic behaviour and (2) indirectly by causing microbial films (as discussed in previous section). Most of diseases in sponges are due to bacterial or fungal infections (Webster 2007; Webster... have not been reported except a few cases (Webster et al. 2002; Mukherjee et al. 2009; Cervino et al. 2006). The identification of pri- mary causative agents of diseases in sponges is 46 N.L. Thakur and A. Singh difficult due to the presence of large...

  14. Polyketides from the marine sponge Plakortis angulospiculatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epifanio, Rosangela de A.; Pinheiro, Leandro S.; Alves, Natalia C. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica]. E-mail: rosangela@rmn.uff.br

    2005-11-15

    Organic extracts of the marine sponge Plakortis angulospiculatus were studied from two different collections from Pernambuco State, Brazil. Bioautography with opportunistic marine pathogens, with results from the brine shrimp lethality assay, were used to guide the purification of the known furanylidenic methyl ester 1 and two new derivatives 2 and 3. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and by selective reduction of 3 into 2. (author)

  15. Polyketides from the marine sponge Plakortis angulospiculatus

    OpenAIRE

    Epifanio,Rosângela de A.; Pinheiro,Leandro S.; Alves,Natalia C.

    2005-01-01

    Organic extracts of the marine sponge Plakortis angulospiculatus were studied from two different collections from Pernambuco State, Brazil. Bioautography with opportunistic marine pathogens, with results from the brine shrimp lethality assay, were used to guide the purification of the known furanylidenic methyl ester 1 and two new derivatives 2 and 3. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and by selective reduction of 3 into 2. Este trabalho relata o estudo da composição ...

  16. A heteroaromatic acid from marine sponge Suberites vestigium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mishra, P.D.; Wahidullah, S.; Kamat, S.Y.

    The 4-Methyl- pyrazole-3(5)-carboxylic acid has been isolated from the buttanol fraction of marine sponge, Sunerites vestigium for the first time. The methanol extract of the sponge exhibits in vitro antihistaminic activity. Pyrazole derivatives...

  17. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hoped to be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  18. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  19. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  20. Carbon conversion and metabolic rate in two marine sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, M.; Rijswijk, van P.; Martens, D.E.; Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The carbon metabolism of two marine sponges, Haliclona oculata and Dysidea avara, has been studied using a 13C isotope pulse-chase approach. The sponges were fed 13C-labeled diatoms (Skeletonema costatum) for 8 h and they took up between 75 and 85%. At different times, sponges were sampled for total

  1. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

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    Anthony D. Wright

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  2. Larvicidal and insecticidal properties of some marine sponges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... Among marine invertebrates, sponges are one of the most productive marine ecosystems, with regard to presence of novel bio-active compounds. Few sponges (n = 18) were collected from Palk Bay and. Gulf of Mannar waters of India and their methanol and dichloromethane (1:1) extracts were screened ...

  3. Marine Sponges as a Drug Treasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Komal; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Akhter, Najeeb; Batool, Sundas; Hassan, Syed Shams Ul

    2016-07-01

    Marine sponges have been considered as a drug treasure house with respect to great potential regarding their secondary metabolites. Most of the studies have been conducted on sponge's derived compounds to examine its pharmacological properties. Such compounds proved to have antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antimalarial, antitumor, immunosuppressive, and cardiovascular activity. Although, the mode of action of many compounds by which they interfere with human pathogenesis have not been clear till now, in this review not only the capability of the medicinal substances have been examined in vitro and in vivo against serious pathogenic microbes but, the mode of actions of medicinal compounds were explained with diagrammatic illustrations. This knowledge is one of the basic components to be known especially for transforming medicinal molecules to medicines. Sponges produce a different kind of chemical substances with numerous carbon skeletons, which have been found to be the main component interfering with human pathogenesis at different sites. The fact that different diseases have the capability to fight at different sites inside the body can increase the chances to produce targeted medicines.

  4. Bacteria From Marine Sponges: A Source of New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Fehmida; Faheem, Muhammad; Azhar, Esam I; Yasir, Muhammad; Alvi, Sana A; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ullah, Ikram; Naseer, Muhammad I

    2017-01-01

    Sponges are rich source of bioactive natural products synthesized by the symbiotic bacteria belonging to different phyla. Due to a competition for space and nutrients the marine bacteria associated with sponges could produce more antibiotic substances. To explore the proactive potential of marine microbes extensive research has been done. These bioactive metabolites have some unique properties that are pharmaceutically important. For this review, we have performed a non-systematic search of the available literature though various online search engines. This review provides an insight that how majority of active metabolites have been identified from marine invertebrates of which sponges predominate. Sponges harbor abundant and diverse microorganisms, which are the sources of a range of marine bioactive metabolites. From sponges and their associated microorganisms, approximately 5,300 different natural compounds are known. Current research on sponge-microbe interaction and their active metabolites has become a focal point for many researchers. Various active metabolites derived from sponges are now known to be produced by their symbiotic microflora. In this review, we attempt to report the latest studies regarding capability of bacteria from sponges as producers of bioactive metabolite. Moreover, these sponge associated bacteria are an important source of different enzymes of industrial significance. In present review, we will address some novel approaches for discovering marine metabolites from bacteria that have the greatest potential to be used in clinical treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Marine sponges: potential sources of new antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, M S; Santos, O C S; Muricy, G

    2009-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are sessile marine filter feeders that have developed efficient defense mechanisms against foreign attackers such as viruses, bacteria, or eukaryotic organisms. Marine sponges are among the richest sources of pharmacologically-active chemicals from marine organisms. It is suggested that (at least) some of the bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from sponges are produced by functional enzyme clusters, which originated from the sponges and their associated microorganisms. More than 5,300 different products are known from sponges and their associated microorganisms, and more than 200 new metabolites from sponges are reported each year. As infectious microorganisms evolve and develop resistance to existing pharmaceuticals, the marine sponge provides novel leads against bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic diseases. Many marine natural products have successfully advanced to the late stages of clinical trials, as for example ara-A (vidarabine), an anti-viral drug used against the herpes simplex encephalitis virus. This substance is in clinical use for many years. Moreover, a growing number of candidates have been selected as promising leads for extended preclinical assessment, including manzamine A (activity against malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and others), lasonolides (antifungal activity) and psammaplin A (antibacterial activity). In this review we have surveyed the discoveries of products derived from marine sponges and associated bacteria that have shown in vivo efficacy or potent in vitro activity against infectious and parasitic diseases, including bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan infections. Our objective was to highlight the substances that have the greatest potential to lead to clinically useful treatments.

  6. Screening of marine sponge-associated bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the evaluation of bacterial strain (MB2) bioactivity isolated from marine sponge. The sponge Echinodictyum gorgonoides associated bacterial strain MB2 was tested for its action against various human pathogenic bacterial isolates. The biochemical tests were done to determine the characterization of ...

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Sponge Clathria indica (Dendy, 1889)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravichandran, S.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Anbuchezhian, R.M.

    in marine invertebrates. The aim of the present work was to study the antimicrobial properties of the Indian sponge Clathria indica with special reference to the identification of antimicrobial peptides. Crude methanolic extract and its chloroform, n...

  8. Cultivation of Marine Sponges: From Sea to Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sponges are one of the richest natural sources of secondary metabolites with a potential pharmaceutical application. A plethora of chemical compounds, with widely varying carbon skeletons, possessing among other anticancer, antiviral, antibiotic, antiinflammatory and antimalaria activity has

  9. New purine derivatives from the marine sponge Petrosia nigricans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashour, M.; Edrada-Ebel, R.; Ebel, R.; Wray, V.; van Soest, R.W.M.; Proksch, P.

    2008-01-01

    Four new purine analogues (nigricines 1 - 4) have been isolated from the Indonesian marine sponge Petrosia nigricans. The structures were elucidated by extensive 2D-NMR spectroscopic experiments and mass spectrometry.

  10. Primmorphs from seven marine sponges : formation and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Wielink, van R.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.; Tramper, J.; Osinga, R.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Primmorphs were obtained from seven different marine sponges: Stylissa massa, Suberites domuncula, Pseudosuberites aff. andrewsi, Geodia cydonium, Axinella polypoides, Halichondria panicea and Haliclona oculata. The formation process and the ultra structure of primmorphs were studied. A positive

  11. Sponge-specific unknown bacterial groups detected in marine sponges collected from Korea through barcoded pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong-Bin; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Jin-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial diversity of 10 marine sponges belonging to the species Cliona celata, an unidentified Cliona species, Haliclona cinerea, Halichondria okadai, Hymeniacidon sinapium, Lissodendoryx isodictyalis, Penares incrustans, Spirastrella abata, and Spirastrella panis collected from Jeju Island and Chuja Island was investigated using amplicon pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The microbial diversity of these sponges has as of yet rarely or never been investigated. All sponges, except Cliona celata, Lissodendoryx isodictyalis, and Penares incrustans, showed simple bacterial diversity, in which one or two bacterial OTUs occupied more than 50% of the pyrosequencing reads and their OTU rank abundance curves saturated quickly. Most of the predominant OTUs belonged to Alpha-, Beta-, or Gammaproteobacteria. Some of the OTUs from the sponges with low diversity were distantly (88%~89%) or moderately (93%~97%) related to known sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of the representative sequences of the OTUs were related to the sequences originating from sponges and corals, and formed sponge-specific or -related clades. The marine sponges investigated herein harbored unexplored bacterial diversity, and further studies should be done to understand the microbes present in sponges.

  12. Phylogenetically and spatially close marine sponges harbour divergent bacterial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane C P Hardoim

    Full Text Available Recent studies have unravelled the diversity of sponge-associated bacteria that may play essential roles in sponge health and metabolism. Nevertheless, our understanding of this microbiota remains limited to a few host species found in restricted geographical localities, and the extent to which the sponge host determines the composition of its own microbiome remains a matter of debate. We address bacterial abundance and diversity of two temperate marine sponges belonging to the Irciniidae family--Sarcotragus spinosulus and Ircinia variabilis--in the Northeast Atlantic. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that S. spinosulus hosted significantly more prokaryotic cells than I. variabilis and that prokaryotic abundance in both species was about 4 orders of magnitude higher than in seawater. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE profiles of S. spinosulus and I. variabilis differed markedly from each other--with higher number of ribotypes observed in S. spinosulus--and from those of seawater. Four PCR-DGGE bands, two specific to S. spinosulus, one specific to I. variabilis, and one present in both sponge species, affiliated with an uncultured sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster in the order Acidimicrobiales (Actinobacteria. Two PCR-DGGE bands present exclusively in S. spinosulus fingerprints affiliated with one sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster in the phylum Chloroflexi and with sponge-derived sequences in the order Chromatiales (Gammaproteobacteria, respectively. One Alphaproteobacteria band specific to S. spinosulus was placed in an uncultured sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster with a close relationship to the genus Rhodovulum. Our results confirm the hypothesized host-specific composition of bacterial communities between phylogenetically and spatially close sponge species in the Irciniidae family, with S. spinosulus displaying higher bacterial community diversity and distinctiveness than I. variabilis

  13. Phylogenetically and spatially close marine sponges harbour divergent bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoim, Cristiane C P; Esteves, Ana I S; Pires, Francisco R; Gonçalves, Jorge M S; Cox, Cymon J; Xavier, Joana R; Costa, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have unravelled the diversity of sponge-associated bacteria that may play essential roles in sponge health and metabolism. Nevertheless, our understanding of this microbiota remains limited to a few host species found in restricted geographical localities, and the extent to which the sponge host determines the composition of its own microbiome remains a matter of debate. We address bacterial abundance and diversity of two temperate marine sponges belonging to the Irciniidae family--Sarcotragus spinosulus and Ircinia variabilis--in the Northeast Atlantic. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that S. spinosulus hosted significantly more prokaryotic cells than I. variabilis and that prokaryotic abundance in both species was about 4 orders of magnitude higher than in seawater. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiles of S. spinosulus and I. variabilis differed markedly from each other--with higher number of ribotypes observed in S. spinosulus--and from those of seawater. Four PCR-DGGE bands, two specific to S. spinosulus, one specific to I. variabilis, and one present in both sponge species, affiliated with an uncultured sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster in the order Acidimicrobiales (Actinobacteria). Two PCR-DGGE bands present exclusively in S. spinosulus fingerprints affiliated with one sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster in the phylum Chloroflexi and with sponge-derived sequences in the order Chromatiales (Gammaproteobacteria), respectively. One Alphaproteobacteria band specific to S. spinosulus was placed in an uncultured sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster with a close relationship to the genus Rhodovulum. Our results confirm the hypothesized host-specific composition of bacterial communities between phylogenetically and spatially close sponge species in the Irciniidae family, with S. spinosulus displaying higher bacterial community diversity and distinctiveness than I. variabilis. These findings

  14. Phylogenetically and Spatially Close Marine Sponges Harbour Divergent Bacterial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Esteves, Ana I. S.; Pires, Francisco R.; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.; Cox, Cymon J.; Xavier, Joana R.; Costa, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have unravelled the diversity of sponge-associated bacteria that may play essential roles in sponge health and metabolism. Nevertheless, our understanding of this microbiota remains limited to a few host species found in restricted geographical localities, and the extent to which the sponge host determines the composition of its own microbiome remains a matter of debate. We address bacterial abundance and diversity of two temperate marine sponges belonging to the Irciniidae family - Sarcotragus spinosulus and Ircinia variabilis – in the Northeast Atlantic. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that S. spinosulus hosted significantly more prokaryotic cells than I. variabilis and that prokaryotic abundance in both species was about 4 orders of magnitude higher than in seawater. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiles of S. spinosulus and I. variabilis differed markedly from each other – with higher number of ribotypes observed in S. spinosulus – and from those of seawater. Four PCR-DGGE bands, two specific to S. spinosulus, one specific to I. variabilis, and one present in both sponge species, affiliated with an uncultured sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster in the order Acidimicrobiales (Actinobacteria). Two PCR-DGGE bands present exclusively in S. spinosulus fingerprints affiliated with one sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster in the phylum Chloroflexi and with sponge-derived sequences in the order Chromatiales (Gammaproteobacteria), respectively. One Alphaproteobacteria band specific to S. spinosulus was placed in an uncultured sponge-specific phylogenetic cluster with a close relationship to the genus Rhodovulum. Our results confirm the hypothesized host-specific composition of bacterial communities between phylogenetically and spatially close sponge species in the Irciniidae family, with S. spinosulus displaying higher bacterial community diversity and distinctiveness than I. variabilis. These

  15. Assessing the complex sponge microbiota: core, variable and species-specific bacterial communities in marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Susanne; Tsai, Peter; Bell, James; Fromont, Jane; Ilan, Micha; Lindquist, Niels; Perez, Thierry; Rodrigo, Allen; Schupp, Peter J; Vacelet, Jean; Webster, Nicole; Hentschel, Ute; Taylor, Michael W

    2012-03-01

    Marine sponges are well known for their associations with highly diverse, yet very specific and often highly similar microbiota. The aim of this study was to identify potential bacterial sub-populations in relation to sponge phylogeny and sampling sites and to define the core bacterial community. 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing was applied to 32 sponge species from eight locations around the world's oceans, thereby generating 2567 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the 97% sequence similarity level) in total and up to 364 different OTUs per sponge species. The taxonomic richness detected in this study comprised 25 bacterial phyla with Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Poribacteria being most diverse in sponges. Among these phyla were nine candidate phyla, six of them found for the first time in sponges. Similarity comparison of bacterial communities revealed no correlation with host phylogeny but a tropical sub-population in that tropical sponges have more similar bacterial communities to each other than to subtropical sponges. A minimal core bacterial community consisting of very few OTUs (97%, 95% and 90%) was found. These microbes have a global distribution and are probably acquired via environmental transmission. In contrast, a large species-specific bacterial community was detected, which is represented by OTUs present in only a single sponge species. The species-specific bacterial community is probably mainly vertically transmitted. It is proposed that different sponges contain different bacterial species, however, these bacteria are still closely related to each other explaining the observed similarity of bacterial communities in sponges in this and previous studies. This global analysis represents the most comprehensive study of bacterial symbionts in sponges to date and provides novel insights into the complex structure of these unique associations.

  16. Marine Sponge Lectins: Actual Status on Properties and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Mascena Gomes Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are primitive metazoans that produce a wide variety of molecules that protect them against predators. In studies that search for bioactive molecules, these marine invertebrates stand out as promising sources of new biologically-active molecules, many of which are still unknown or little studied; thus being an unexplored biotechnological resource of high added value. Among these molecules, lectins are proteins that reversibly bind to carbohydrates without modifying them. In this review, various structural features and biological activities of lectins derived from marine sponges so far described in the scientific literature are discussed. From the results found in the literature, it could be concluded that lectins derived from marine sponges are structurally diverse proteins with great potential for application in the production of biopharmaceuticals, especially as antibacterial and antitumor agents.

  17. Potential of sponges and microalgae for marine biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Marine organisms can be used to produce several novel products that have applications in new medical technologies, in food and feed ingredients and as biofuels. In this paper two examples are described: the development of marine drugs from sponges and the use of microalgae to produce bulk chemicals

  18. Superoxide dismutase in the marine sponge Cliona celata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, D.; Esteves, A.I.; Almeida, M.; Xavier, J.; Humanes, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase in the cosmopolitan sponge Cliona celata (Grant, 1826), since this enzyme has been described as a useful biomarker for marine pollution in other marine invertebrates. The quantification of the

  19. Novel Secondary Metabolites from Marine Sponges and Sponge-Associated Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Sperry, Samuel

    1998-01-01

    The following thesis presents results from several investigations of marine natural products. It is divided into 5 chapters consisting of an introduction, three chapters examining the metabolites of tropical sponges. and a final chapter which discusses the chemical profile of a marine derived fungal culture. Chapter 1 is a brief survey of some of the most promising bioactive marine metabolites discovered to date. Furthermore, the first chapter includes some history and perspective pertaining...

  20. Marine Sponges and Symbionts: Chemical and Biological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Eric W.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis concerns two quite different types of research that are separated into distinct sections of the thesis, but which seek to answer the same question using diametrically opposite approaches. The first part (Chapters 1-8) covers research leading to novel, bioactive compounds in marine sponges, while the second (Chapters 9-10) involves molecular biological studies of symbiosis between microbes and sponges. Although these topics seem at first glance completely separate, they are in real...

  1. Field Keys to Common Hawaiian Marine Animals and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Presented are keys for identifying common Hawaiian marine algae, beach plants, reef corals, sea urchins, tidepool fishes, and sea cucumbers. Nearly all species considered can be distinguished by characteristics visible to the naked eye. Line drawings illustrate most plants and animals included, and a list of suggested readings follows each…

  2. Bioactive natural products from Papua New Guinea marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noro, Jeffery C; Kalaitzis, John A; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of novel natural products for drug development relies heavily upon a rich biodiversity, of which the marine environment is an obvious example. Marine natural product research has spawned several drugs and many other candidates, some of which are the focus of current clinical trials. The sponge megadiversity of Papua New Guinea is a rich but underexplored source of bioactive natural products. Here, we review some of the many natural products derived from PNG sponges with an emphasis on those with interesting biological activity and, therefore, drug potential. Many bioactive natural products discussed here appear to be derived from non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis pathways, strongly suggesting a microbial origin of these compounds. With this in mind, we also explore the notion of sponge-symbiont biosynthesis of these bioactive compounds and present examples to support the working hypothesis. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  3. Screening of marine sponge-associated bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakrishna

    2012-11-01

    Nov 1, 2012 ... Discodermia dissolute, Raspailia ramosa (Hooper, 2000). Marine sponges are considered as a gold mine during the past 50 years, with respect to the ..... source of antibacterial compounds for controlling the pathogenic bacteria especially to handle the occurrence of multi drugs resistant (MDR) strains.

  4. Antibacterial and antibiotic potentiating activities of tropical marine sponge extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesoo, Rima; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S; Li, Wen-Wu; Kagansky, Alexander; Bahorun, Theeshan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance has led research to focus on discovering new antimicrobial agents derived from the marine biome. Although ample studies have investigated sponges for their bioactive metabolites with promising prospects in drug discovery, the potentiating effects of sponge extracts on antibiotics still remains to be expounded. The present study aimed to investigate the antibacterial capacity of seven tropical sponges collected from Mauritian waters and their modulatory effect in association with three conventional antibiotics namely chloramphenicol, ampicillin and tetracycline. Disc diffusion assay was used to determine the inhibition zone diameter (IZD) of the sponge total crude extracts (CE), hexane (HF), ethyl acetate (EAF) and aqueous (AF) fractions against nine standard bacterial isolates whereas broth microdilution method was used to determine their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) and antibiotic potentiating activity of the most active sponge extract. MIC values of the sponge extracts ranged from 0.039 to 1.25mg/mL. Extracts from Neopetrosia exigua rich in beta-sitosterol and cholesterol displayed the widest activity spectrum against the 9 tested bacterial isolates whilst the best antibacterial profile was observed by its EAF particularly against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus with MIC and MBC values of 0.039mg/mL and 0.078mg/mL, respectively. The greatest antibiotic potentiating effect was obtained with the EAF of N. exigua (MIC/2) and ampicillin combination against S. aureus. These findings suggest that the antibacterial properties of the tested marine sponge extracts may provide an alternative and complementary strategy to manage bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioactive Natural Products of Marine Sponges from the Genus Hyrtios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourhan Hisham Shady

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are known as a rich source for novel bioactive compounds with valuable pharmacological potential. One of the most predominant sponge genera is Hyrtios, reported to have various species such as Hyrtios erectus, Hyrtios reticulatus, Hyrtios gumminae, Hyrtios communis, and Hyrtios tubulatus and a number of undescribed species. Members of the genus Hyrtios are a rich source of natural products with diverse and valuable biological activities, represented by different chemical classes including alkaloids, sesterterpenes and sesquiterpenes. This review covers the literature until June 2016, providing a complete survey of all compounds isolated from the genus Hyrtios with their corresponding biological activities whenever applicable.

  6. Brackish habitat dictates cultivable Actinobacterial diversity from marine sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Ellis

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates such as sponges and ascidians have demonstrated potential as sources of bio-medically relevant small molecules. Metagenomic analysis has shown that many of these invertebrates harbor populations of Actinobacteria, many of which are cultivable. While some populations within invertebrates are transmitted vertically, others are obtained from the environment. We hypothesized that cultivable diversity from sponges living in brackish mangrove habitats have associations with Actinobacterial populations that differ from those found in clear tropical waters. In this study, we analyzed the cultivable Actinobacterial populations from sponges found in these two distinct habitats with the aim of understanding the secondary metabolite potential. Importantly, we wanted to broadly evaluate the potential differences among these groups to guide future Actinobacterial collection strategies for the purposes of drug discovery.

  7. Brackish habitat dictates cultivable Actinobacterial diversity from marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Gregory A; Thomas, Chris S; Chanana, Shaurya; Adnani, Navid; Szachowicz, Emily; Braun, Doug R; Harper, Mary Kay; Wyche, Thomas P; Bugni, Tim S

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates such as sponges and ascidians have demonstrated potential as sources of bio-medically relevant small molecules. Metagenomic analysis has shown that many of these invertebrates harbor populations of Actinobacteria, many of which are cultivable. While some populations within invertebrates are transmitted vertically, others are obtained from the environment. We hypothesized that cultivable diversity from sponges living in brackish mangrove habitats have associations with Actinobacterial populations that differ from those found in clear tropical waters. In this study, we analyzed the cultivable Actinobacterial populations from sponges found in these two distinct habitats with the aim of understanding the secondary metabolite potential. Importantly, we wanted to broadly evaluate the potential differences among these groups to guide future Actinobacterial collection strategies for the purposes of drug discovery.

  8. Dragon exploration system on marine sponge compounds interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2013-02-16

    Natural products are considered a rich source of new chemical structures that may lead to the therapeutic agents in all major disease areas. About 50% of the drugs introduced in the market in the last 20 years were natural products/derivatives or natural products mimics, which clearly shows the influence of natural products in drug discovery. In an effort to further support the research in this field, we have developed an integrative knowledge base on Marine Sponge Compounds Interactions (Dragon Exploration System on Marine Sponge Compounds Interactions - DESMSCI) as a web resource. This knowledge base provides information about the associations of the sponge compounds with different biological concepts such as human genes or proteins, diseases, as well as pathways, based on the literature information available in PubMed and information deposited in several other databases. As such, DESMSCI is aimed as a research support resource for problems on the utilization of marine sponge compounds. DESMSCI allows visualization of relationships between different chemical compounds and biological concepts through textual and tabular views, graphs and relational networks. In addition, DESMSCI has built in hypotheses discovery module that generates potentially new/interesting associations among different biomedical concepts. We also present a case study derived from the hypotheses generated by DESMSCI which provides a possible novel mode of action for variolins in Alzheimer's disease. DESMSCI is the first publicly available (http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/desmsci) comprehensive resource where users can explore information, compiled by text- and data-mining approaches, on biological and chemical data related to sponge compounds.

  9. Symbiotic Fungus of Marine Sponge Axinella sp. Producing Antibacterial Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trianto, A.; Widyaningsih, S.; Radjasa, OK; Pribadi, R.

    2017-02-01

    The emerging of multidrug resistance pathogenic bacteria cause the treatment of the diseaseshave become ineffective. There for, invention of a new drug with novel mode of action is an essential for curing the disease caused by an MDR pathogen. Marine fungi is prolific source of bioactive compound that has not been well explored. This study aim to obtain the marine sponges-associated fungus that producing anti-MDR bacteria substaces. We collected the sponge from Riung water, NTT, Indonesia. The fungus was isolated with affixed method, followed with purification with streak method. The overlay and disk diffusion agar methods were applied for bioactivity test for the isolate and the extract, respectively. Molecular analysis was employed for identification of the isolate. The sponge was identified based on morphological and spicular analysis. The ovelay test showed that the isolate KN15-3 active against the MDR Staphylococcus aureus and Eschericia coli. The extract of the cultured KN15-3 was also inhibited the S. aureus and E. coli with inhibition zone 2.95 mm and 4.13 mm, respectively. Based on the molecular analysis, the fungus was identified as Aspergillus sydowii. While the sponge was identified as Axinella sp.

  10. Antifouling activities of marine bacteria associated with sponge ( Sigmadocia sp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheesh, S.; Soniamby, A. R.; Sunjaiy Shankar, C. V.; Mary Josephine Punitha, S.

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the antifouling activity of bacteria associated with marine sponges. A total of eight bacterial strains were isolated from the surface of sponge Sigmadocia sp., of them, SS02, SS05 and SS06 showed inhibitory activity against biofilm-forming bacteria. The extracts of these 3 strains considerably affected the extracellular polymeric substance producing ability and adhesion of biofilm-forming bacterial strains. In addition to disc diffusion assay, microalgal settlement assay was carried out with the extracts mixed with polyurethane wood polish and coated onto stainless steel coupons. The extract of strain SS05 showed strong microalgal settlement inhibitory activity. Strain SS05 was identified as Bacillus cereus based on its 16S rRNA gene. Metabolites of the bacterial strains associated with marine invertebrates promise to be developed into environment-friendly antifouling agents.

  11. Filamentous fungi from the Atlantic marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum

    OpenAIRE

    Passarini, Michel. R. Z.; Santos, C; Lima, Nelson; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Sette, Lara D

    2012-01-01

    Dragmacidon reticulatum is a marine sponge of wide occurrence in the Eastern and Western Atlantic. Little is known about D. reticulatum fungal diversity. Filamentous fungi recovered from D. reticulatum were assessed in the present study using a polyphasic taxonomic approach, including classical morphology, molecular biology and MALDI-TOF ICMS. Ninety-eight fungal strains were isolated from two D. reticulatum samples by using six different culture media, which were identified up to the genus l...

  12. Cultivation of Marine Sponges: From Sea to Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sipkema, D.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sponges are one of the richest natural sources of secondary metabolites with a potential pharmaceutical application. A plethora of chemical compounds, with widely varying carbon skeletons, possessing among other anticancer, antiviral, antibiotic, antiinflammatory and antimalaria activity has been discovered. While for most metabolites their molecular mode of action is still unclear, for a substantial number of compounds the mechanisms by which they interfere with the pathogenesis of a ...

  13. Biopotential of secondary metabolites isolated from marine sponge Dendrilla nigra

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Bhimba B; V Vinod; M Cindhu Beulah

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the biopotential activity of secondary metabolites from marine sponge Dendrilla nigra (D. nigra) collected from the Gulf of Mannar. Objective: Soxhlet extraction method was used to extract the secondary metabolites and various assays were carried out. Results: D. nigra showed potent antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities and it was also subjected for brine shrimp lethality and cytotoxicity assays. The secondary metabolites...

  14. PRIMARY CHARACTERIZATION OF SPONGE ASSOCIATED BACTERIA OF MARINE SPONGES- HALICHONDRIA GLABRATA, CLIONA LOBATA, SPIRASTRELLA PACHYSPIRA AND THEIR ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Maushmi Kumar; Shaishav Jogani

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponge associated bacterias have been recognized as an important and untapped resource for novel bioactive compounds. In the present study four strains of microorganisms were isolated from three different varieties of marine sponge viz. Halichondria glabrata, Cliona lobata and Spirastrella pachyspira. They showed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative indicator organisms. From the biochemical tests and cetrimide agar test, it was concluded th...

  15. 77 FR 27185 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... the following vacant seats on the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council was... groups that help to focus efforts and attention on the humpback whale and its habitat around the main...

  16. In vitro screening of antifungal activity of marine sponge extracts against five phytopathogenic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    El Amraoui, Belkassem; El Wahidi, Majida; Fassouane, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our research is the screening of extracts of marine sponges for their antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi. The in vitro screening of hydroalcoholic and organic extracts of ten marine sponges from Atlantic coast of Morocco against five phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris, Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium digitatum) showed that only two sponges (Haliclona viscosa and Cyna...

  17. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria inhibited by extracts and fractions from Brazilian marine sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Marinho,Palloma R.; Guilherme R. S. Muricy; Mara F. L. Silva; Marcia Giambiagi de Marval; Laport,Marinella S.

    2010-01-01

    The growing number of bacterial strains resistant to conventional antibiotics has become a serious medical problem in recent years. Marine sponges are a rich source of bioactive compounds, and many species can be useful for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. This study reports the in vitro screening of marine sponges in the search for novel substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Sponge extracts were tested against 44 bacterial strains, including fourteen antibiotic-resista...

  18. Diversity of bacteria in the marine sponge Aplysina fulva in Brazilian coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardoim, C.C.P.; Costa, R.; Araujo, F. V.; Hajdu, E.; Peixoto, R.; Lins, U.; Rosado, A. S.; van Elsas, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms can account for up to 60% of the fresh weight of marine sponges. Marine sponges have been hypothesized to serve as accumulation spots of particular microbial communities, but it is unknown to what extent these communities are directed by the organism or the site or occur randomly. To

  19. Diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from marine sponge Haliclona sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shumei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Minjie; Dai, Shikun; Zhang, Long; Liu, Yonghong; Lee, Kyung Jin; Li, Xiang

    2007-11-01

    This study describes actinobacteria isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona sp. collected in shallow water of the South China Sea. A total of 54 actinobacteria were isolated using media selective for actinobacteria. Species diversity and natural product diversity of isolates from marine sponge Haliclona sp. were analysed. Twenty-four isolates were selected on the basis of their morphology on different media and assigned to the phylum Actinobacteria by a combination of 16S rRNA gene based restriction enzymes digestion and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The 16S rRNA genes of 24 isolates were digested by restriction enzymes TaqI and MspI and assigned to different groups according to their restriction enzyme pattern. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the isolates belonged to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora and Verrucosispora; one other isolate was recovered that does not belong to known genera based on its unique 16S rRNA gene sequence. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterium classified as Verrucosispora sp. that has been isolated from a marine sponge. The majority of the strains tested belong to the genus Streptomyces and three isolates may be new species. All of the 24 isolates were screened for genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). PKS and NRPS sequences were detected in more than half of the isolates and the different "PKS-I-PKS-II-NRPS" combinations in different isolates belonging to the same species are indicators of their potential natural product diversity and divergent genetic evolution.

  20. Biopotential of secondary metabolites isolated from marine sponge Dendrilla nigra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Bhimba B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the biopotential activity of secondary metabolites from marine sponge Dendrilla nigra (D. nigra collected from the Gulf of Mannar. Objective: Soxhlet extraction method was used to extract the secondary metabolites and various assays were carried out. Results: D. nigra showed potent antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities and it was also subjected for brine shrimp lethality and cytotoxicity assays. The secondary metabolites were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. Conclusions: Based on the present study, it can be inferred that the bioassay guided fractionation and purification of D. nigra may come up with potent bioactive drug.

  1. Renierosides, cerebrosides from a marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Tayyab A; Shinde, Pramod B; Luo, Xuan; Hong, Jongki; Lee, Chong-O; Sim, Chung Ja; Son, Byeng Wha; Jung, Jee H

    2007-09-01

    Guided by the brine shrimp lethality assay, eight new cerebrosides (1-8) have been isolated from an extract of the marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. A novel feature of these cerebrosides was the presence of unprecedented amide-linked long-chain fatty acid moieties. The planar structures of the cerebrosides (1-8) were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques, mass spectrometric analyses, and chemical degradation methods. The isolated compounds did not display cytotoxicity to a panel of five human solid tumor cell lines.

  2. HMGB2 Protein from the Marine Sponge Suberites domuncula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lada Lukić-Bilela

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the phylogenetically conserved genes/proteins from marine sponges (Porifera, the most primitive metazoan phylum, can be applied for the reconstruction of ancient structures of genome/proteom complexity in the ancestral organism common to all multicellular animals. The complete nucleotide sequence of Suberites domuncula (Demospongiae cDNA coding for 183-amino-acid protein (21.3 kDa, which displays high overall similarity in primary structure and organization of domains with HMGB canonical proteins, belonging to High Mobility Group (HMG family of nuclear proteins, is reported here. The major role of these non-specific DNA binding proteins is to facilitate the formation of complex nucleoprotein assemblies and nucleosome remodelling. The encoded protein, named HMGB2SD, contains two typical, highly conserved DNA-binding domains: box A (69 aa and box B (71 aa. Short C-terminal »tail« is only 13 aa long. HMG2SD displays the highest overall similarity (58 % with HMGB2 proteins from mammals (pig, human, rat, mouse, higher than with Drosophila melanogaster (53 % or Caenorhabditis elegans (31 % homologues. This is in accordance with previous results, which showed the best homology between sponge and mammalian homologues/ortologues. Our results further confirm that sponges are an excellent model for molecular evolutionary studies.

  3. Sterol Ring System Oxidation Pattern in Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramakrishna Rao

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The marine sponges (Porifera are a unique group of sedentary organisms from which several novel natural products are reported, many of which have useful biological activities. In producing unusual sterols, they occupy a preeminent position among the various groups of organisms. The polar sterols of sponges reported as at the end of the year 2002 number about 250; their ring structure changing a hundred times. The oxidation pattern in the sterol ring system, from the point of view of biogenesis seems to be mainly of four types. Each sponge species is able to produce sterols fitting into one of the four main biogenetic pathways viz., (i 3β-hydroxy-Δ5-sterol pathway, (ii 3β-hydroxy-Δ7-sterol pathway, (iii 3β-hydroxy-Δ5,7-sterol pathway, and (iv 3α-hydroxy sterol pathway.

  4. Steroids from marine sponges Suberites vestigium and Chrotella australiensis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mishra, P.D.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Kamat, S.Y.

    The sponges Suberites vestigium and Chrotella australiensis have been examined for steriods. Both the sponges contain C sub(27-29) mono and diunsaturated sterols, in addition sponge C. australiensis contains cholest-4-ene-3-one and 24-ethyl cholest...

  5. 75 FR 57441 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... the following vacant seats on the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory..., and other various groups that help to focus efforts and attention on the humpback whale and its... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback...

  6. 75 FR 970 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... and alternate members of the following seats on its Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine... other various groups that help to focus efforts and attention on the humpback whale and its habitat... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback...

  7. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Melander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds.

  8. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Rui; Wang, Bochu; Zhub, Liancai, E-mail: wangbc2000@126.com [Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, (China); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro, E-mail: abei@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  9. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra: isolation and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Joseph; Gandhimathi, R.; Kiran, G. Seghal; Priya, S. Shanmugha; Ravji, T. Rajeetha; Hema, T. A.

    2009-09-01

    Culturable heterotrophic bacterial composition of marine sponge Dendrilla nigra was analysed using different enrichments. Five media compositions including without enrichment (control), enriched with sponge extract, with growth regulator (antibiotics), with autoinducers, and complete enrichment containing sponge extract, antibiotics, and autoinducers were developed. DNA hybridization assay was performed to explore host specific bacteria and ecotypes of culturable sponge-associated bacteria. Enrichment with selective inducers (AHLs and sponge extract) and regulators (antibiotics) considerably enhanced the cultivation potential of sponge-associated bacteria. It was found that Marinobacter (MSI032), Micromonospora (MSI033), Streptomyces (MSI051), and Pseudomonas (MSI057) were sponge-associated obligate symbionts. The present findings envisaged that “ Micromonospora-Saccharomonospora-Streptomyces” group was the major culturable actinobacteria in the marine sponge D. nigra. The DNA hybridization assay was a reliable method for the analysis of culturable bacterial community in marine sponges. Based on the culturable community structure, the sponge-associated bacteria can be grouped (ecotypes) as general symbionts, specific symbionts, habitat flora, and antagonists.

  10. Marine sponge-associated bacteria as a potential source for polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Saibaba, Ganesan; Kiran, George Seghal; Yang, Yung-Hun; Selvin, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Marine sponges are filter feeding porous animals and usually harbor a remarkable array of microorganisms in their mesohyl tissues as transient and resident endosymbionts. The marine sponge-microbial interactions are highly complex and, in some cases, the relationships are thought to be truly symbiotic or mutualistic rather than temporary associations resulting from sponge filter-feeding activity. The marine sponge-associated bacteria are fascinating source for various biomolecules that are of potential interest to several biotechnological industries. In recent times, a particular attention has been devoted to bacterial biopolymer (polyesters) such as intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) produced by sponge-associated bacteria. Bacterial PHAs act as an internal reserve for carbon and energy and also are a tremendous alternative for fossil fuel-based polymers mainly due to their eco-friendliness. In addition, PHAs are produced when the microorganisms are under stressful conditions and this biopolymer synthesis might be exhibited as one of the survival mechanisms of sponge-associated or endosymbiotic bacteria which exist in a highly competitive and stressful sponge-mesohyl microenvironment. In this review, we have emphasized the industrial prospects of marine bacteria for the commercial production of PHAs and special importance has been given to marine sponge-associated bacteria as a potential resource for PHAs.

  11. Microbial Communities and Bioactive Compounds in Marine Sponges of the Family Irciniidae—A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species—the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate—and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is ...

  12. Marine Sponge Derived Natural Products between 2001 and 2010: Trends and Opportunities for Discovery of Bioactives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehbub, Mohammad Ferdous; Lei, Jie; Franco, Christopher; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges belonging to the phylum Porifera (Metazoa), evolutionarily the oldest animals are the single best source of marine natural products. The present review presents a comprehensive overview of the source, taxonomy, country of origin or geographical position, chemical class, and biological activity of sponge-derived new natural products discovered between 2001 and 2010. The data has been analyzed with a view to gaining an outlook on the future trends and opportunities in the search for new compounds and their sources from marine sponges. PMID:25196730

  13. Marine Sponge Derived Natural Products between 2001 and 2010: Trends and Opportunities for Discovery of Bioactives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ferdous Mehbub

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges belonging to the phylum Porifera (Metazoa, evolutionarily the oldest animals are the single best source of marine natural products. The present review presents a comprehensive overview of the source, taxonomy, country of origin or geographical position, chemical class, and biological activity of sponge-derived new natural products discovered between 2001 and 2010. The data has been analyzed with a view to gaining an outlook on the future trends and opportunities in the search for new compounds and their sources from marine sponges.

  14. Sponge species composition, abundance, and cover in marine lakes and coastal mangroves in Berau, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, L.E.; Cleary, D.F.R.; Voogd, de N.J.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the species composition, abundance, and cover of sponges in 2 marine lakes (Kakaban Lake and Haji Buang Lake) and adjacent coastal mangroves on the islands of Kakaban and Maratua in the Berau region of Indonesia. We recorded a total of 115 sponge species, 33 of which were restricted to

  15. Multiple approaches to enhance the cultivability of bacteria associated with the marine sponge Haliclona (gellius) sp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Schippers, K.J.; Maalcke, W.J.; Yang, Y.; Salim, S.; Blanch, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Three methods were examined to cultivate bacteria associated with the marine sponge Haliclona (gellius) sp.: agar plate cultures, liquid cultures, and floating filter cultures. A variety of oligotrophic media were employed, including media with aqueous and organic sponge extracts, bacterial signal

  16. Filamentous fungi from the Atlantic marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarini, Michel R Z; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Sette, Lara D

    2013-02-01

    Dragmacidon reticulatum is a marine sponge of wide occurrence in the Eastern and Western Atlantic. Little is known about D. reticulatum fungal diversity. Filamentous fungi recovered from D. reticulatum were assessed in the present study using a polyphasic taxonomic approach, including classical morphology, molecular biology and MALDI-TOF ICMS. Ninety-eight fungal strains were isolated from two D. reticulatum samples by using six different culture media, which were identified up to the genus level. Sixty-four distinct fungal ribotypes were obtained, distributed among twenty-four different genera belonging to the Ascomycota and Zygomycota. Representatives of Penicillium and Trichoderma were the most diverse and abundant fungi isolated. Amongst Penicillium spp. three isolates belonged to the same ribotype can be considered as a putative new species. Data derived from the present study highlight the importance of using a polyphasic approach to get an accurate identification in order to structure a reliable culture collection.

  17. Chemical and bioactive diversities of marine sponge Neopetrosia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham Qaralleh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The marine sponge Neopetrosia contains about 27 species that is highly distributed in Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean (Caribbean Sea and Pacific Ocean. It has proven to be valuable to the discovery of medicinal products due to the presence of various types of compounds with variable bio-activities. More than 85 compounds including alkaloids, quinones, sterols and terpenoids were isolated from this genus. Moreover, the crude extracts and the isolated compounds revealed activities such as antimicrobial, anti-fouling, anti-HIV, cytotoxic, anti-tumor, anti-oxidant, anti-protozoal, anti-inflammatory. Because only 9 out of 27 species of the genus Neopetrosia have been chemically studied thus far, there are significant opportunities to find out new chemical constituents from this genus.

  18. Diversity of nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes in the microbial metagenomes of marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila Marie; Grozdanov, Lubomir; Proksch, Sebastian; Hentschel, Ute

    2012-06-01

    Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  19. Evaluation of the potential of the marine sponges of the Zanzibar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the potential of the marine sponges of the Zanzibar Island to yield antimalarial and antimicrobial active compounds. S. A. Said, M. J. Moshi, R. S.O. Nondo, P. J. Masimba, E. Innocent, A. Guantai ...

  20. In vitro screening of antifungal activity of marine sponge extracts against five phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amraoui, Belkassem; El Wahidi, Majida; Fassouane, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our research is the screening of extracts of marine sponges for their antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi. The in vitro screening of hydroalcoholic and organic extracts of ten marine sponges from Atlantic coast of Morocco against five phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris, Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium digitatum) showed that only two sponges (Haliclona viscosa and Cynachirella tarentina) are active against all phytopathogenic fungi studied.

  1. Marine Drugs from Sponge-Microbe Association—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tresa Remya A.; Kavlekar, Devanand P.; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam A.

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this review is the biodiversity of marine sponges and associated microbes which have been reported to produce therapeutically important compounds, along with the contextual information on their geographic distribution. Class Demospongiae and the orders Halichondrida, Poecilosclerida and Dictyoceratida are the richest sources of these compounds. Among the microbial associates, members of the bacterial phylum Actinobacteria and fungal division Ascomycota have been identified to be the dominant producers of therapeutics. Though the number of bacterial associates outnumber the fungal associates, the documented potential of fungi to produce clinically active compounds is currently more important than that of bacteria. Interestingly, production of a few identical compounds by entirely different host-microbial associations has been detected in both terrestrial and marine environments. In the Demospongiae, microbial association is highly specific and so to the production of compounds. Besides, persistent production of bioactive compounds has also been encountered in highly specific host-symbiont associations. Though spatial and temporal variations are known to have a marked effect on the quality and quantity of bioactive compounds, only a few studies have covered these dimensions. The need to augment production of these compounds through tissue culture and mariculture has also been stressed. The reviewed database of these compounds is available at www.niobioinformatics.in/drug.php. PMID:20479984

  2. Marine Drugs from Sponge-Microbe Association—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresa Remya A. Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this review is the biodiversity of marine sponges and associated microbes which have been reported to produce therapeutically important compounds, along with the contextual information on their geographic distribution. Class Demospongiae and the orders Halichondrida, Poecilosclerida and Dictyoceratida are the richest sources of these compounds. Among the microbial associates, members of the bacterial phylum Actinobacteria and fungal division Ascomycota have been identified to be the dominant producers of therapeutics. Though the number of bacterial associates outnumber the fungal associates, the documented potential of fungi to produce clinically active compounds is currently more important than that of bacteria. Interestingly, production of a few identical compounds by entirely different host-microbial associations has been detected in both terrestrial and marine environments. In the Demospongiae, microbial association is highly specific and so to the production of compounds. Besides, persistent production of bioactive compounds has also been encountered in highly specific host-symbiont associations. Though spatial and temporal variations are known to have a marked effect on the quality and quantity of bioactive compounds, only a few studies have covered these dimensions. The need to augment production of these compounds through tissue culture and mariculture has also been stressed. The reviewed database of these compounds is available at www.niobioinformatics.in/drug.php.

  3. Marine drugs from sponge-microbe association--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tresa Remya A; Kavlekar, Devanand P; LokaBharathi, Ponnapakkam A

    2010-04-22

    The subject of this review is the biodiversity of marine sponges and associated microbes which have been reported to produce therapeutically important compounds, along with the contextual information on their geographic distribution. Class Demospongiae and the orders Halichondrida, Poecilosclerida and Dictyoceratida are the richest sources of these compounds. Among the microbial associates, members of the bacterial phylum Actinobacteria and fungal division Ascomycota have been identified to be the dominant producers of therapeutics. Though the number of bacterial associates outnumber the fungal associates, the documented potential of fungi to produce clinically active compounds is currently more important than that of bacteria. Interestingly, production of a few identical compounds by entirely different host-microbial associations has been detected in both terrestrial and marine environments. In the Demospongiae, microbial association is highly specific and so to the production of compounds. Besides, persistent production of bioactive compounds has also been encountered in highly specific host-symbiont associations. Though spatial and temporal variations are known to have a marked effect on the quality and quantity of bioactive compounds, only a few studies have covered these dimensions. The need to augment production of these compounds through tissue culture and mariculture has also been stressed. The reviewed database of these compounds is available at www.niobioinformatics.in/drug.php.

  4. Analysis of bacterial composition in marine sponges reveals the influence of host phylogeny and environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Danilo T; Genuário, Diego B; Silva, Fabio Sérgio P; Pansa, Camila C; Kavamura, Vanessa N; Moraes, Fernando C; Taketani, Rodrigo G; Melo, Itamar S

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with sponges are influenced by environmental factors; however, some degree of genetic influence of the host on the microbiome is also expected. In this work, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed diverse bacterial phylotypes based on the phylogenies of three tropical sponges (Aplysina fulva, Aiolochroia crassa and Chondrosia collectrix). Despite their sympatric occurrence, the studied sponges presented different bacterial compositions that differed from those observed in seawater. However, lower dissimilarities in bacterial communities were observed within sponges from the same phylogenetic group. The relationships between operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered from the sponges and database sequences revealed associations among sequences from unrelated sponge species and sequences retrieved from diverse environmental samples. In addition, one Proteobacteria OTU retrieved from A. fulva was identical to sequences previously reported from A. fulva specimens collected along the Brazilian coast. Based on these results, we conclude that bacterial communities associated with marine sponges are shaped by host identity, while environmental conditions seem to be less important in shaping symbiont communities. This is the first study to assess bacterial communities associated with marine sponges in the remote St. Peter and St. Paul Archipelago using amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale... Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. Q, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Q of Part 922—Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates of...

  6. The Pharmacological Potential of Nonribosomal Peptides from Marine Sponge and Tunicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivankar Agrawal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine biodiversity is recognized by a wide and unique array of fascinating structures. The complex associations of marine microorganisms, especially with sponges, bryozoans, and tunicates, make it extremely difficult to define the biosynthetic source of marine natural products or to deduce their ecological significance. Marine sponges and tunicates are important source of novel compounds for drug discovery and development. Majority of these compounds are nitrogen containing and belong to non-ribosomal peptide (NRPs or mixed polyketide–NRP natural products. Several of these peptides are currently under trial for developing new drugs against various disease areas, including inflammatory, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and infectious disease. This review features pharmacologically active NRPs from marine sponge and tunicates based on their biological activities.

  7. Marine Resource Management in the Hawaiian Archipelago: The Traditional Hawaiian System in Relation to the Western Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Jokiel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over a period of many centuries the Polynesians who inhabited Hawai‘i developed a carefully regulated and sustainable “ahupua‘a” management system that integrated watershed, freshwater and nearshore marine resources based on the fundamental linkages between all ecosystems from the mountain tops to the sea. This traditional scheme employed adaptive management practices keyed to subtle changes in natural resources. Sophisticated social controls on resource utilization were an important component of the system. Over the past two centuries a “Western system” gradually replaced much of the traditional Hawaiian system. There are major differences between the two systems in the areas of management practices, management focus, knowledge base, dissemination of information, resource monitoring, legal authority, access rights, stewardship and enforcement. However, there is a recent shift toward incorporating elements of the traditional scheme using methods and terminology acceptable and appropriate to present day realities. This trend is exemplified by the management plan for the newly formed Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This is one of the largest protected areas in the world and is being managed with a focus on Native Hawaiian cultural values in relation to conservation, ecological, historical, scientific, and educational resource protection.

  8. Pharmacological perception of peptides from marine sponge: a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joseph, Baby; Nair, Vrundha M; Sujatha, S

    2012-01-01

    .... This review focuses on sponge symbiotic association with other organisms, significance of peptides as secondary metabolites and its pharmacological effects by highlighting its role as antbacterial...

  9. Evidence of unique and generalist microbes in distantly related sympatric intertidal marine sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Anoop; Silva, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and specificity of microbial communities in marine environments is a key aspect of the ecology and evolution of both the eukaryotic hosts and their associated prokaryotes. Marine sponges harbor phylogenetically diverse and complex microbial lineages. Here, we investigated the sponge bacterial community and distribution patterns of microbes in three sympatric intertidal marine demosponges, Hymeniacidon perlevis, Ophlitaspongia papilla and Polymastia penicillus, from the Atlantic coast of Portugal using classical isolation techniques and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Microbial composition assessment, with nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1400 bp) from the isolates (n = 31) and partial sequences (ca. 280 bp) from clone libraries (n = 349), revealed diverse bacterial communities and other sponge-associated microbes. The majority of the bacterial isolates were members of the order Vibrionales and other symbiotic bacteria like Pseudovibrio ascidiaceiocola, Roseobacter sp., Hahellaceae sp. and Cobetia sp. Extended analyses using ecological metrics comprising 142 OTUs supported the clear differentiation of bacterial community profiles among the sponge hosts and their ambient seawater. Phylogenetic analyses were insightful in defining clades representing shared bacterial communities, particularly between H. perlevis and the geographically distantly-related H. heliophila, but also among other sponges. Furthermore, we also observed three distinct and unique bacterial groups, Betaproteobactria (~81%), Spirochaetes (~7%) and Chloroflexi (~3%), which are strictly maintained in low-microbial-abundance host species O. papilla and P. penicillus. Our study revealed the largely generalist nature of microbial associations among these co-occurring intertidal marine sponges.

  10. Sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, J.; van der Hal, N.; van Soest, R.W.M.; Wehrtmann, I.S.; Cortés, J.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 127 species of sponges distributed in two classes, 14 orders, 42 families, and 72 genera are reported for Costa Rica in this part. Sixty-five species from the Caribbean coast are included here, belonging to 1 class, 10 orders, 29 families, and 45 genera; and 62 species in 2 classes, 13

  11. Sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-15

    Sponge provides a web interface to Pulp (http://pulpproject.org/) that implements a particular workflow as described in the paper "Staging Package Deployment via Repository Management" (http://www.usenix.org/events/lisa11/tech/full_papers/Pierre.pdf). Namely, it implements a process for intensive management of software repositories to apply more deterministic updates to clients of those repositories.

  12. Phylogenetic Diversity of Bacteria Associated with the Marine Sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile†

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Nicole S; Wilson, Kate J; Blackall, Linda L.; Russell T. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Molecular techniques were employed to document the microbial diversity associated with the marine sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated bacteria was assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by 16S rDNA analysis. The community structure was extremely diverse with representatives of the Actinobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bac...

  13. Diversity, abundance and natural products of marine sponge-associated actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Bayer, Kristina; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-03-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their unprecedented ability to produce novel lead compounds of clinical and pharmaceutical importance. This review focuses on the diversity, abundance and methodological approaches targeting marine sponge-associated actinomycetes. Additionally, novel qPCR data on actinomycete abundances in different sponge species and other environmental sources are presented. The natural products literature is covered, and we are here reporting on their chemical structures, their biological activities, as well as the source organisms from which they were isolated.

  14. Cytotoxic activity of marine sponge extracts from the sub-Antarctic Islands and the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth K. Olsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, marine invertebrates, especially sponges, have proven to be a valuable source of new and/or bioactive natural products that have the potential to be further developed as lead compounds for pharmaceutical applications. Although marine benthic invertebrate communities occurring off the coast of South Africa have been explored for their biomedicinal potential, the natural product investigation of marine sponges from the sub-Antarctic Islands in the Southern Ocean for the presence of bioactive secondary metabolites has been relatively unexplored thus far. We report here the results for the biological screening of both aqueous and organic extracts prepared from nine specimens of eight species of marine sponges, collected from around Marion Island and the Prince Edward Islands in the Southern Ocean, for their cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines. The results obtained through this multidisciplinary collaborative research effort by exclusively South African institutions has provided an exciting opportunity to discover cytotoxic compounds from sub-Antarctic sponges, whilst contributing to our understanding of the biodiversity and geographic distributions of these cold-water invertebrates. Therefore, we acknowledge here the various contributions of the diverse scientific disciplines that played a pivotal role in providing the necessary platform for the future natural products chemistry investigation of these marine sponges from the sub- Antarctic Islands and the Southern Ocean.

  15. Polyketide genes in the marine sponge Plakortis simplex: a new group of mono-modular type I polyketide synthases from sponge symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Sala, Gerardo; Hochmuth, Thomas; Costantino, Valeria; Teta, Roberta; Gerwick, William; Gerwick, Lena; Piel, Jörn; Mangoni, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sponge symbionts are a largely unexplored source of new and unusual metabolic pathways. Insights into the distribution and function of metabolic genes of sponge symbionts are crucial to dissect and exploit their biotechnological potential. Screening of the metagenome of the marine sponge Plakortis simplex led to the discovery of the swf family, a new group of mono-modular type I polyketide synthase/fatty acid synthase (PKS/FAS) specifically associated with sponge symbionts. Two different examples of the swf cluster were present in the metagenome of P. simplex. A third example of the cluster is present in the previously sequenced genome of a poribacterium from the sponge Aplysina aerophoba but was formerly considered orthologous to the wcb/rkp cluster. The swf cluster was also found in six additional species of sponges. Therefore, the swf cluster represents the second group of mono-modular PKS, after the supA family, to be widespread in marine sponges. The putative swf operon consists of swfA (type I PKS/FAS), swfB (reductase and sulphotransferase domains) and swfC (radical S-adenosylmethionine, or radical SAM). Activation of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of the SwfA protein to its holo-form by co-expression with Svp is the first functional proof of swf type genes in marine sponges. However, the precise biosynthetic role of the swf clusters remains unknown. PMID:24249289

  16. Diversity and antimicrobial activities of microbes from two Irish marine sponges, Suberites carnosus and Leucosolenia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemer, B; Kennedy, J; Margassery, L M; Morrissey, J P; O'Gara, F; Dobson, A D W

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the diversity and antimicrobial activity of bacteria from the marine sponges Suberites carnosus and Leucosolenia sp. Two hundred and thirty-seven bacteria were isolated from the sponges S. carnosus (Demospongiae) and Leucosolenia sp. (Calcarea). Isolates from the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were obtained. Isolates of the genus Pseudovibrio were dominant among the bacteria from S. carnosus, whereas Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio were the dominant genera isolated from Leucosolenia sp. Approximately 50% of the isolates from S. carnosus displayed antibacterial activity, and c. 15% of the isolates from Leucosolenia sp. demonstrated activity against the test fungal strains. The antibacterial activity observed was mostly from Pseudovibrio and Spongiobacter isolates, while the majority of the antifungal activity was observed from the Pseudoalteromonas, Bacillus and Vibrio isolates. Both sponges possess a diverse range of bioactive and potentially novel bacteria. Differences observed from the sponge-derived groups of isolates in terms of bioactivity suggest that S. carnosus isolates may be a better source of antibacterial compounds, while Leucosolenia sp. isolates appear to be a better source of antifungal compounds. This is the first study in which cultured bacterial isolates from the marine sponges S. carnosus and a Leucosolenia sp. have been evaluated for their antibacterial activity. The high percentage of antibacterial isolates from S. carnosus and of antifungal isolates from Leucosolenia sp. suggests that these two sponges may be good sources for potentially novel marine natural products. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. PRIMARY CHARACTERIZATION OF SPONGE ASSOCIATED BACTERIA OF MARINE SPONGES- HALICHONDRIA GLABRATA, CLIONA LOBATA, SPIRASTRELLA PACHYSPIRA AND THEIR ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maushmi Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponge associated bacterias have been recognized as an important and untapped resource for novel bioactive compounds. In the present study four strains of microorganisms were isolated from three different varieties of marine sponge viz. Halichondria glabrata, Cliona lobata and Spirastrella pachyspira. They showed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative indicator organisms. From the biochemical tests and cetrimide agar test, it was concluded that the Strain B isolated from Cliona lobata is a Pseudomonas species. Strain A (gram negative culture product isolated from Halichondria glabrata showed the antibiotic activity against Gram positive (B. subtillis and Gram negative (S. typhi, P. vulgaris, E.coli organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration for showing antibacterial activity on all the standard strain was found to be 40 µL of culture broth supernatant. This strain was further identified by ABIS software based on biochemical tests and confirmation of the strain was done after 16S r RNA gene sequencing. The strain showed close similarity with E. coli and Enterobacteria strains and most of the uncultured bacterium from different hosts, which confirmed its nature of being it a symbiont from sponge Halichondria glabrata with antimicrobial activity.

  18. Marine drugs from sponge-microbe association - A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thomas, T.R.A.; Kavlekar, D.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    genera and indicated the dominance of the genus Rhodobacter, suggesting the symbiotic relationship of these bacteria with the sponge. Evidence has been presented to support that growth of bacteria in Halichondria panacea is maintained by a lectin...

  19. 75 FR 77615 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Honolulu County (primary only), Research..., and other various groups that help to focus efforts and attention on the humpback whale and its... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback...

  20. Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with the marine sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, N S; Wilson, K J; Blackall, L L; Hill, R T

    2001-01-01

    Molecular techniques were employed to document the microbial diversity associated with the marine sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated bacteria was assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by 16S rDNA analysis. The community structure was extremely diverse with representatives of the Actinobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, the beta- and gamma-subdivisions of the Proteobacteria, Cytophaga/Flavobacterium, green sulfur bacteria, green nonsulfur bacteria, planctomycetes, and other sequence types with no known close relatives. FISH probes revealed the spatial location of these bacteria within the sponge tissue, in some cases suggesting possible symbiotic functions. The high proportion of 16S rRNA sequences derived from novel actinomycetes is good evidence for the presence of an indigenous marine actinomycete assemblage in R. odorabile. High microbial diversity was inferred from low duplication of clones in a library with 70 representatives. Determining the phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated microorganisms by 16S rRNA analysis facilitated the rational selection of culture media and isolation conditions to target specific groups of well-represented bacteria for laboratory culture. Novel media incorporating sponge extracts were used to isolate bacteria not previously recovered from this sponge.

  1. Phylogenetic Diversity of Bacteria Associated with the Marine Sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nicole S.; Wilson, Kate J.; Blackall, Linda L.; Hill, Russell T.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular techniques were employed to document the microbial diversity associated with the marine sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated bacteria was assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by 16S rDNA analysis. The community structure was extremely diverse with representatives of the Actinobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, the β- and γ-subdivisions of the Proteobacteria, Cytophaga/Flavobacterium, green sulfur bacteria, green nonsulfur bacteria, planctomycetes, and other sequence types with no known close relatives. FISH probes revealed the spatial location of these bacteria within the sponge tissue, in some cases suggesting possible symbiotic functions. The high proportion of 16S rRNA sequences derived from novel actinomycetes is good evidence for the presence of an indigenous marine actinomycete assemblage in R. odorabile. High microbial diversity was inferred from low duplication of clones in a library with 70 representatives. Determining the phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-associated microorganisms by 16S rRNA analysis facilitated the rational selection of culture media and isolation conditions to target specific groups of well-represented bacteria for laboratory culture. Novel media incorporating sponge extracts were used to isolate bacteria not previously recovered from this sponge. PMID:11133476

  2. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  3. Electrical Retrieval of Living Microorganisms from Cryopreserved Marine Sponges Using a Potential-Controlled Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Nishi, Shinro; Tokuda, Maki; Uemura, Moeka; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Seya, Takeshi; Chow, Seinen; Ise, Yuji; Hatada, Yuji; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel electrical retrieval method (ER method) for living sponge-associated microorganisms from marine sponges frozen at -80 °C. A -0.3-V vs. Ag/AgCl constant potential applied for 2 h at 9 °C induced the attachment of the sponge-associated microorganisms to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) or a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass (GZO) working electrode. The electrically attached microorganisms from homogenized Spirastrella insignis tissues had intact cell membranes and showed intracellular dehydrogenase activity. Dead microorganisms were not attracted to the electrode when the homogenized tissues were autoclaved for 15 min at 121 °C before use. The electrically attached microorganisms included cultivable microorganisms retrieved after detachment from the electrode by application of a 9-MHz sine-wave potential. Using the ER method, we obtained 32 phyla and 72 classes of bacteria and 3 archaea of Crenarchaeota thermoprotei, Marine Group I, and Thaumarchaeota incertae sedis from marine sponges S. insignis and Callyspongia confoederata. Employment of the ER method for extraction and purification of the living microorganisms holds potential of single-cell cultivation for genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome analyses of bioactive compounds producing sponge-associated microorganisms.

  4. Metagenomic Survey of Potential Symbiotic Bacteria and Polyketide Synthase Genes in an Indonesian Marine Sponge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia M. Kurnia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been emerging evidence that the bacteria associated with marine sponges are the key producers of many complex bioactive compounds. The as-yet uncultured candidate bacterial genus “Candidatus Entotheonella” of the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei from Japan have recently been recognized as the source of numerous pharmacologically relevant polyketides and modified peptides, as previously reported by the Piel group (Wilson et al. 2014. This work reported the presence of “Candidatus Entotheonella sp.” in the highly complex microbiome of an Indonesian marine sponge from Kapoposang Island, South Sulawesi. We further identified the Kapoposang sponge specimen used in this work as Rhabdastrella sp. based on the integrated morphological, histological, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI gene analyses. To detect the polyketide biosynthetic machinery called type I polyketide synthase (PKS in this Indonesian Rhabdastrella sp., we amplified and cloned the ketosynthase-encoding DNA regions of approximately 700 bp from the uncultured sponge's microbiome. Further sequencing and analysis of several randomly chosen clones indicated that all of them are mostly likely involved in the biosynthesis of methyl-branched fatty acids. However, employing a PKS-targeting primer designed in this work led to the isolation of four positive clones. BlastX search and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that one of the positive clones, designed as RGK32, displayed high homology with ketosynthase domains of many type I PKS systems and may belong to the subclass cis-AT PKS group.

  5. PROSPECTS FOR APPLICATION OF Aplysinidae FAMILY MARINE SPONGE SKELETONS AND MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS IN TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Yu. Rogulska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Development of the new types of tissue engineered structures is one of the promising trends of current biotechnology. The study was directed to the assessment of prospects for the application of chitin-based skeletons derived from marine sponges of Aplysinidae family (Aplysina fulva and Aplysina aerophoba for creation of bioengineered constructs based on human mesenchymal stromal cells. After cleaning and demineralization procedures, sponge skeletons appeared as three-dimensional macroporous matrices formed by intersecting chitin fibrils. After seeding into chitin-based matrices the cells were attached to the surface of the fibrils and were able to spread and proliferate. Mesenchymal stromal cells within Aplysina fulva differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic directions under the influence of appropriate inductors. Demineralized skeletons derived from marine sponges of Aplysinidae family could be used as scaffolds for mesenchymal stromal cells which provides new opportunities for the creation of adipose and bone tissue engineered structures.

  6. Bioactive compounds from marine sponges and their symbiotic microbes: a potential source of nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Dewapriya, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Sponges are considered as the chemical factory in marine environment because of its immense production of chemically diverse compounds. Other than the chemical diversity, these compounds possess remarkable bioactivities. This great potential has aroused applications of sponge-derived compounds as therapeutics and at present, a number of promising compounds are in clinical and preclinical trials. Recently, nutraceuticals have received considerable interest among the health conscious community because of its multiple therapeutic effects. Natural health-promoting substances gain continuous popularity as nutraceuticals due to its reduced risk of side effects. This overview discusses the potentials of marine sponge-derived bioactivities as natural health-promoting compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges (Porifera): an ancestor cell-cell adhesion event based on the carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Coutinho, Cristiano C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2009-08-01

    Marine sponges (Porifera) are ancient and simple eumetazoans. They constitute key organisms in the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals. We now demonstrated that pure sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges are responsible for the species-specific cell-cell interaction in these invertebrates. This conclusion was based on the following observations: (1) each species of marine sponge has a single population of sulfated polysaccharide, which differ among the species in their sugar composition and sulfate content; (2) sulfated polysaccharides from sponge interact with each other in a species-specific way, as indicated by an affinity chromatography assay, and this interaction requires calcium; (3) homologous, but not heterologous, sulfated polysaccharide inhibits aggregation of dissociated sponge cells; (4) we also observed a parallel between synthesis of the sulfated polysaccharide and formation of large aggregates of sponge cells, known as primmorphs. Once aggregation reached a plateau, the demand for the de novo synthesis of sulfated polysaccharides ceased. Heparin can mimic the homologous sulfated polysaccharide on the in vitro interaction and also as an inhibitor of aggregation of the dissociated sponge cells. However, this observation is not relevant for the biology of the sponge since heparin is not found in the invertebrate. In conclusion, marine sponges display an ancestor event of cell-cell adhesion, based on the calcium-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

  8. Puupehanol, a Sesquiterpene-Dihydroquinone Derivative from the Marine Sponge Hyrtios sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puupehanol (1), a new sesquiterpene-dihydroquinone derivative, was isolated from the marine sponge Hyrtios sp., along with the known compounds puupehenone (2) and chloropuupehenone (3). The structure of 1 was established as (20R,21R)-21-hydroxy-20,21-dihydropuupehenone by interpretation of spectros...

  9. Secomycalolide A: A New Proteasome Inhibitor Isolated from a Marine Sponge of the Genus Mycale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Tsukamoto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A new oxazole-containing proteasome inhibitor, secomycalolide A, together with known mycalolide A and 30-hydroxymycalolide A, was isolated from a marine sponge of the genus Mycale. They showed proteasome inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 11-45 μg/mL.

  10. Nepheliosyne B, a New Polyacetylenic Acid from the New Caledonian Marine Sponge Niphates sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Auberger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new C47 polyoxygenated acetylenic acid, nepheliosyne B (2, along with the previously described nepheliosyne A (1, have been isolated from the New Caledonian marine sponge Niphates sp. Their structures have been elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. These metabolites exhibited a moderate cytotoxicity against K562, U266, SKM1, and Kasumi cancer cell lines.

  11. Spatial distribution of bacteria associated with the marine sponge Tethya californiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Blanch, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial diversity and spatial distribution of the diversity within tissue of the marine sponge Tethya californiana was analyzed based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. One candidate division and nine bacterial phyla were detected, including members of all five subdivisions of Proteobacteria. Moreover,

  12. Taxonomic and Functional Microbial Signatures of the Endemic Marine Sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Rua, Cintia; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Edwards, Robert A.; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis (Porifera, Demospongiae, Haplosclerida) is a known source of secondary metabolites such as arenosclerins A-C. In the present study, we established the composition of the A. brasiliensis microbiome and the metabolic pathways associated with this community. We used 454 shotgun pyrosequencing to generate approximately 640,000 high-quality sponge-derived sequences (∼150 Mb). Clustering analysis including sponge, seawater and twenty-three other metagenomes derived from marine animal microbiomes shows that A. brasiliensis contains a specific microbiome. Fourteen bacterial phyla (including Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Cloroflexi) were consistently found in the A. brasiliensis metagenomes. The A. brasiliensis microbiome is enriched for Betaproteobacteria (e.g., Burkholderia) and Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Pseudomonas and Alteromonas) compared with the surrounding planktonic microbial communities. Functional analysis based on Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (RAST) indicated that the A. brasiliensis microbiome is enriched for sequences associated with membrane transport and one-carbon metabolism. In addition, there was an overrepresentation of sequences associated with aerobic and anaerobic metabolism as well as the synthesis and degradation of secondary metabolites. This study represents the first analysis of sponge-associated microbial communities via shotgun pyrosequencing, a strategy commonly applied in similar analyses in other marine invertebrate hosts, such as corals and algae. We demonstrate that A. brasiliensis has a unique microbiome that is distinct from that of the surrounding planktonic microbes and from other marine organisms, indicating a species-specific microbiome. PMID:22768320

  13. Molecular diversity of fungal and bacterial communities in the marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarini, Michel R Z; Miqueletto, Paula B; de Oliveira, Valéria M; Sette, Lara D

    2015-02-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the diversity of bacteria and filamentous fungi of southern Atlantic Ocean marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum using cultivation-independent approaches. Fungal ITS rDNA and 18S gene analyses (DGGE and direct sequencing approaches) showed the presence of representatives of three order (Polyporales, Malasseziales, and Agaricales) from the phylum Basidiomycota and seven orders belonging to the phylum Ascomycota (Arthoniales, Capnodiales, Dothideales, Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Pleosporales, and Saccharomycetales). On the other hand, bacterial 16S rDNA gene analyses by direct sequencing approach revealed the presence of representatives of seven bacterial phyla (Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Lentisphaerae, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes). Results from statistical analyses (rarefaction curves) suggested that the sampled clones covered the fungal diversity in the sponge samples studied, while for the bacterial community additional sampling would be necessary for saturation. This is the first report related to the molecular analyses of fungal and bacterial communities by cultivation-independent approaches in the marine sponges D. reticulatum. Additionally, the present work broadening the knowledge of microbial diversity associated to marine sponges and reports innovative data on the presence of some fungal genera in marine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Saline water as source of cancer drugs: anti-cancer metabolites from marine sponges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joseph, Baby; Nair, Vrundha M

    2013-01-01

    ... of its proved beneficial effects by age old folk traditions and moreover due to easy availability of specimens. However, in considering the rich biodiversity of oceans, several studies in exploiting the organisms of the "silent world" results in identification of approximately 22,000 natural products (2). The biological diversity of marine sponges has bee...

  15. Isolation, Phylogenetic Analysis and Anti-infective Activity Screening of Marine Sponge-Associated Actinomycetes

    OpenAIRE

    Safwat Ahmed; Ute Hentschel; Mona Radwan; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H.; Amro Hanora; Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila M.; Usama Ramadan Abdelmohsen

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt) and from Rovinj (Croatia). Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven diffe...

  16. Diversity and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes associated with marine sponges in the China Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Lijun; Ruan, Jisheng; Huang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The diversity and secondary metabolite potential of culturable actinomycetes associated with eight different marine sponges collected from the South China Sea and the Yellow sea were investigated. A total of 327 strains were isolated and 108 representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. Ten families and 13 genera of Actinomycetales were detected, among which five genera represent first records isolated from marine sponges. Oligotrophic medium M5 (water agar) proved to be efficient for selective isolation, and "Micromonospora-Streptomyces" was proposed as the major distribution group of sponge-associated actinomycetes from the China Seas. Ten isolates are likely to represent novel species. Sponge Hymeniacidon perleve was found to contain the highest genus diversity (seven genera) of actinomycetes. Housekeeping gene phylogenetic analyses of the isolates indicated one ubiquitous Micromonospora species, one unique Streptomyces species and one unique Verrucosispora phylogroup. Of the isolates, 27.5% displayed antimicrobial activity, and 91% contained polyketide synthase and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes, indicating that these isolates had a high potential to produce secondary metabolites. The isolates from sponge Axinella sp. contained the highest presence of both antimicrobial activity and NRPS genes, while those from isolation medium DNBA showed the highest presence of antimicrobial activity and PKS I genes.

  17. Diversity and Biosynthetic Potential of Culturable Actinomycetes Associated with Marine Sponges in the China Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and secondary metabolite potential of culturable actinomycetes associated with eight different marine sponges collected from the South China Sea and the Yellow sea were investigated. A total of 327 strains were isolated and 108 representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. Ten families and 13 genera of Actinomycetales were detected, among which five genera represent first records isolated from marine sponges. Oligotrophic medium M5 (water agar proved to be efficient for selective isolation, and “MicromonosporaStreptomyces” was proposed as the major distribution group of sponge-associated actinomycetes from the China Seas. Ten isolates are likely to represent novel species. Sponge Hymeniacidon perleve was found to contain the highest genus diversity (seven genera of actinomycetes. Housekeeping gene phylogenetic analyses of the isolates indicated one ubiquitous Micromonospora species, one unique Streptomyces species and one unique Verrucosispora phylogroup. Of the isolates, 27.5% displayed antimicrobial activity, and 91% contained polyketide synthase and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes, indicating that these isolates had a high potential to produce secondary metabolites. The isolates from sponge Axinella sp. contained the highest presence of both antimicrobial activity and NRPS genes, while those from isolation medium DNBA showed the highest presence of antimicrobial activity and PKS I genes.

  18. Cytotoxic Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges. A Review (2010-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioso, Roberto; Marante, Francisco J Toledo; Bezerra, Ranilson de Souza; Borges, Flávio Valadares Pereira; Santos, Bárbara V de Oliveira; Laguna, Irma Herrera Bravo de

    2017-01-28

    Abstract: This extensive review covers research published between 2010 and 2012 regarding new compounds derived from marine sponges, including 62 species from 60 genera belonging to 33 families and 13 orders of the Demospongia class (Porifera). The emphasis is on the cytotoxic activity that bioactive metabolites from sponges may have on cancer cell lines. At least 197 novel chemical structures from 337 compounds isolated have been found to support this work. Details on the source and taxonomy of the sponges, their geographical occurrence, and a range of chemical structures are presented. The compounds discovered from the reviewed marine sponges fall into mainly four chemical classes: terpenoids (41.9%), alkaloids (26.2%), macrolides (8.9%) and peptides (6.3%) which, along with polyketides, sterols, and others show a range of biological activities. The key sponge orders studied in the reviewed research were Dictyoceratida, Haplosclerida, Tetractinellida, Poecilosclerida, and Agelasida. Petrosia, Haliclona (Haplosclerida), Rhabdastrella (Tetractinellida), Coscinoderma and Hyppospongia (Dictyioceratida), were found to be the most promising genera because of their capacity for producing new bioactive compounds. Several of the new compounds and their synthetic analogues have shown in vitro cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activities against various tumor/cancer cell lines, and some of them will undergo further in vivo evaluation.

  19. Rearranged Terpenoids from the Marine Sponge Darwinella cf. oxeata and Its Predator, the Nudibranch Felimida grahami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Ramirez, Maria Camila; Williams, David E; Gubiani, Juliana R; Parra, Lizbeth L L; Santos, Mario F C; Ferreira, Daiane D; Mesquita, Juliana T; Tempone, Andre G; Ferreira, Antonio G; Padula, Vinícius; Hajdu, Eduardo; Andersen, Raymond J; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2017-03-24

    Marine sponges are a rich source of terpenoids with rearranged spongian carbon skeletons. Investigation of extracts from the sponge Darwinella cf. oxeata yielded four new rearranged diterpenoids, oxeatine (2) and oxeatamides H-J (3-5), as well as the known metabolites oxeatamide A (6), oxeatamide A methyl ester (7), and membranolide (1). Oxeatine (2) has a new heterocyclic skeleton, while oxeatamide J (5) has an N-methyl urea group included in a γ-lactam moiety. UPLC-QTOF analysis of the extract obtained from the mantle of the nudibranch Felimida grahami indicated the presence of 1 and 4.

  20. Antimicrobial activities of novel cultivable bacteria isolated from marine sponge Tedania anhelans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Dexiang

    2013-05-01

    Marine sponge Tedania anhelans distributes throughout the intertidal zone of Fujian, southeastern China, and is a potential source of natural bioactive products. The sponge harbors a large number of bacterial groups that have been identified using various techniques, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractionation of dissociated sponge allowed isolation of 25 bacterial species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis attributed most of these eubacteria to α- Proteobacteria, γ- Proteobacteria, Cytophaga / Flavobacterium / Bacteroidetes (CFB group), and the family Bacillaceae of Gram-positive bacteria. In sequence similarity, five putatively novel species were identified with less than 98% similarity to other strains in the NCBI database. Tests for antimicrobial activities were performed against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, antitumor indicators Escherichia coli 343/591 (with DNA repair deficiency), regular E. coli 343/636 (with different DNA repair capacity), and 10 bacterial isolates exhibited inhibitory bioactivities. Among these strains, three isolates were detected involving function gene NRPS-A domains, which were most closely related to the amino acid sequences of linear gramicidin synthetase and pyoverdine synthetase. These results contribute to our knowledge of the microbes associated with marine sponges and further reveal novel bacterial resources for the screening of bioactive marine natural products.

  1. [Phylogenetic diversity of the culturable rare actinomycetes in marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis by improved isolation media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yanjuan; Wu, Peichun; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Based on the molecular diversity information, seven actinomycete-selective culture media and isolation conditions were modified to isolate and cultivate diverse rare actinomycetes from Hymeniacidon perlevis. Modified, selective cultivation and enrichment media were used, with the addition of an elemental solution of simulating the elemental composition of marine sponge H. perlevis. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 16S rDNA sequence was used to reveal the diversity of culturable rare actinomycetes. A total of 59 actinomycete strains were isolated from the marine sponge H. perlevis. A total of 27 representative actinomycetes were selected according to their morphological feature, color and pigments. They gave 15 different RFLP patterns after digesting their PCR products of 16s rDNA with Hha I. The results showed that these isolates belonged to 10 genera: Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora, Cellulosimicrobium, Gordonia, Nocardia, Prauseria, Pseudonocardia , Saccharomonospora and Microbacterium. The modified isolation media and selective cultivation procedures are highly effective in the recovery of culturable actinomycetes from the marine sponge H. perlevis, resulting in the highest diversity of culturable rare actinomycetes from any sponges.

  2. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of marine sponge Clathria vulpina extract against chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Prasanna Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the antiplasmodial potential of marine sponge Clathria vulpina (C. vulpina against chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum. Methods: The marine sponge C. vulpina was collected from Thondi coast, authenticated and subjected for extraction by soaking in ethanol:water mixture (3:1 ratio. The percentage of extract was calculated. Filter sterilized extracts (100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25, 3.125 μg/mL were screened for antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine sensitive P. falciparum. The extract was also tested for its hemolytic activity. Results: The percentage yield of extract of C. vulpina was found to be 4.8%. The crude extract of C. vulpina showed excellent antiplasmodial activity (IC 50=14.75 μg/mL which was highly comparable to the positive control chloroquine (IC50=7 μg/mL. Statistical analysis reveals that the significant antiplasmodial activity (P<0.05 was observed between the concentrations and the time of exposure. The chemical injury to erythrocytes was also carried out, which showed that there were no morphological changes in erythrocytes by the ethanolic extracts of sponges after 48 h of incubation. The extract showed slight hemolytic activity which almost equal to chloroquine at 100 μg/mL concentration (1.023%. Conclusions: The marine sponge C. vulpina can be used as a putative antiplasmodial drug after completing successful clinical trials.

  3. New meroterpenoids from the marine sponge Aka coralliphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubina, Larisa K; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Fedorov, Sergey N; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Kapustina, Irina I; Mollo, Ernesto; Utkina, Natalia K; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Denisenko, Vladimir A; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-04-01

    Three new sulfated meroterpenoids containing sesquiterpene and hydroquinone moieties, namely siphonodictyal A sulfate (1), akadisulfate A (2) and akadisulfate B (3), along with the known siphonodictyal B3 and bis(sulfato)-cyclosiphonodictyol A were isolated from the sponge Aka coralliphaga. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Akadisulfate B and siphonodictyal B3 showed a radical-scavenging activity comparable with that of the known lipophylic antioxidant BHT.

  4. Isolation strategies of marine-derived actinomycetes from sponge and sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameş-Kocabaş, E Esin; Uzel, Ataç

    2012-03-01

    During the last two decades, discoveries of new members of actinomycetes and novel metabolites from marine environments have drawn attention to such environments, such as sediment and sponge. For the successful isolation of actinomycetes from marine environments, many factors including the use of enrichment and pre-treatment techniques, and the selection of growth media and antibiotic supplements should be taken into account. High-throughput cultivation is an innovative technique that mimics nature, eliminates undesired, fast-growing bacteria and creates suitable conditions for rare, slow-growing actinomycetes. This review comprehensively evaluates the traditional and innovative techniques and strategies used for the isolation of actinomycetes from marine sponge and sediment samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surviving in a marine desert: the sponge loop retains resources within coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Jasper M; van Oevelen, Dick; Vermeij, Mark J A; Osinga, Ronald; Middelburg, Jack J; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Admiraal, Wim

    2013-10-04

    Ever since Darwin's early descriptions of coral reefs, scientists have debated how one of the world's most productive and diverse ecosystems can thrive in the marine equivalent of a desert. It is an enigma how the flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the largest resource produced on reefs, is transferred to higher trophic levels. Here we show that sponges make DOM available to fauna by rapidly expelling filter cells as detritus that is subsequently consumed by reef fauna. This "sponge loop" was confirmed in aquarium and in situ food web experiments, using (13)C- and (15)N-enriched DOM. The DOM-sponge-fauna pathway explains why biological hot spots such as coral reefs persist in oligotrophic seas--the reef's paradox--and has implications for reef ecosystem functioning and conservation strategies.

  6. Evaluation of single and joint effect of metabolites isolated from marine sponges, Fasciospongia cavernosa and Axinella donnani on antimicrobial properties.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Shirodkar, D.; Rodrigues, C.; DeSouza, L.; Tilvi, S.

    The biochemical mechanisms that marine sponges have developed as a chemical defense to protect themselves against micro and subsequent macrobiofouling process might comprise a potential alternative for the preventing attack of biofilm forming...

  7. Affinities of the Aphanocapsa feldmanni-like cyanobacteria from the marine sponge Xestospongia muta based on genetic and morphological analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, R.; Erpenbeck, D.J.G.; Richelle-Maurer, E.; van Dijk, T.R.; Woldringh, C.L.; van Soest, R.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The marine sponge Xestospongia muta (Porifera: Demospongiae: Haplosclerida) harbours cyanobacteria in its peripheral tissue that have been described as having an Aphanocapsa feldmanni-type appearance. Through subsequent cell fractionation steps we obtained a virtually pure cell suspension of the

  8. Polyketide Synthases in the Microbiome of the Marine Sponge Plakortis halichondrioides: A Metagenomic Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Della Sala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sponge-associated microorganisms are able to assemble the complex machinery for the production of secondary metabolites such as polyketides, the most important class of marine natural products from a drug discovery perspective. A comprehensive overview of polyketide biosynthetic genes of the sponge Plakortis halichondrioides and its symbionts was obtained in the present study by massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing of complex and heterogeneous PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction products amplified from the metagenomic DNA of a specimen of P. halichondrioides collected in the Caribbean Sea. This was accompanied by a survey of the bacterial diversity within the sponge. In line with previous studies, sequences belonging to supA and swfA, two widespread sponge-specific groups of polyketide synthase (PKS genes were dominant. While they have been previously reported as belonging to Poribacteria (a novel bacterial phylum found exclusively in sponges, re-examination of current genomic sequencing data showed supA and swfA not to be present in the poribacterial genome. Several non-supA, non-swfA type-I PKS fragments were also identified. A significant portion of these fragments resembled type-I PKSs from protists, suggesting that bacteria may not be the only source of polyketides from P. halichondrioides, and that protistan PKSs should receive further investigation as a source of novel polyketides.

  9. Micro- and nano-structural characterization of six marine sponges of the class Demospongiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Elif Hilal; Ide, Semra; Bayari, Sevgi Haman; Hill, Malcolm

    2016-12-01

    The sponges produce their skeletal elements and silicateins are the key enzymes in this process. The mechanism underlying the formation of their silica skeleton and its structural properties are of exceptional interest for applications in technology. Micro- and nano-scale structural analysis of the six marine sponges belonging to Demospongiae [Callyspongia (Cladochalia) plicifera (Lamarck, 1814), Cervicornia cuspidifera (Lamarck, 1815), Cinachyrela sp., Niphates erecta (Duchassaing and Michelotti, 1864), Xestospongia muta (Schmidt, 1870) and Amphimedon compressa (Duchassaing and Michelotti, 1864)] were carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) techniques. The nano-structural characterizations give some informative evidence about the manner in which silica/silicatein in spicule skeletons is produced by the sponges. The sponge species were successfully discriminated using cluster analysis (HCA) based on FTIR spectra. This study demonstrates and detection of structural differences among sponges and their spicules using combined techniques.

  10. Anti-dermatophytic activity of marine sponge, Sigmadocia carnosa (Dendy) on clinically isolated fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayanithi, N B; Kumar, T T Ajith; Kalaiselvam, M; Balasubramanian, T; Sivakumar, N

    2012-08-01

    To screen the anti-fungal effects and find out the active metabolites from sponge, Sigmadocia carnosa (S. carnosa) against four dermatophytic fungi. The methanol, ethyl acetate and acetone extract of marine sponge, S. carnosa was examined against Trichophyton mentagrophytes (T. mentagrophytes), Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum), Epidermophyton floccosum (E. floccosum) and Microsporum gypseum (M. gypseum) and qualitative analysed to find out the active molecules. The methanol extract of sponge was expressed significant activity than ethyl acetate and acetone. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of methanol extract of sponge that resulted in complete growth inhibition of T. mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, E. floccosum and M. gypseum were found to 125, 250, 250 and 250 µg/mL respectively. But, 100 % inhibition of fungal spore germination was observed in T. mentagrophytes at 500 µg/mL concentration followed by T. rubrum, E. floccosum and M. gypseum at 1 000 µg/mL concentration. Other two extracts showed weak anti spore germination activity against the tested dermatophytic fungi. Methanol extracts showed presence of terpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. Based on the literature, this is the first study which has conducted to inhibit the growth and spore germination of dermatophytic fungi with S. carnosa. Further research also needs to purify and characterize the secondary metabolites from the sponge, S. carnosa for the valuable source of novel substances for future drug discovery.

  11. Isolation, Identification And Screening Antibacterial Activity from Marine Sponge-Associated Fungi Against Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandala Sibero, Mada; Sabdaningsih, Aninditia; Cristianawati, Olvi; Nuryadi, Handung; Karna Radjasa, Ocky; Sabdono, Agus; Trianto, Agus

    2017-02-01

    Irrational used of antibiotic in several decades ago causing resistant in bacteria and decreasing the cure rate of infectious diseases. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli is known to cause various of infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, nosocomial bloodstream infection, meningitis, bacteraemia, and gastrointestinal disease. Marine sponge-associated fungi have potential as source of new compound to combat MDR E. coli. The aims of this research were to isolate marine sponge-assosiated fungi, to screen potential fungi against MDR E. coli, to identify the potential fungi and its host sponge. There were 29 marine sponge-associated fungi successfully isolated from 9 sponges. Among 29 sponge-associated fungi screened, there were 7 isolates showed antibacterial activity against MDR E. coli. The best inhibition zone produced by MPS 14.1/MT 02 and MPS 14.3/MT 04 from sponge PP.SP.16.14. According to fungi identification result fungus MPS 14.1/MT 02 was identified as Trichoderma asperellum while MPS 14.3/MT 04 was identified as Trichoderma reesei. Sponge identification leaded the PP.SP.16.14 as Cinachyrella sp.

  12. Heavy metal distribution in organic and siliceous marine sponge tissues measured by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, S; Annibaldi, A; Truzzi, C; Scarponi, G

    2016-10-15

    May sponge spicules represent a "tank" to accumulate heavy metals? In this study we test this hypothesis determining the distribution of Cd, Pb and Cu concentrations between organic and siliceous tissues in Antarctic Demospongia (Sphaerotylus antarcticus, Kirkpatrikia coulmani and Haliclona sp.) and in the Mediterranean species Petrosia ficiformis. Results show that although, in these sponges, spicules represent about 80% of the mass content, the accumulation of pollutant is lower in the spicules than in the corresponding organic fraction. The contribution of tissues to the total sponge content of Cd, Pb and Cu is respectively 99%, 82% and 97% for Antarctic sponges and 96%, 95% and 96% for P. ficiformis, similar in polar and temperate organisms. These results pave the way to a better understanding of the role of marine sponges in uptaking heavy metals and to their possible use as monitor of marine ecosystems, recommend by the Water Framework Directive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hologenome analysis of two marine sponges with different microbiomes

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Tae Woo

    2016-02-29

    Background Sponges (Porifera) harbor distinct microbial consortia within their mesohyl interior. We herein analysed the hologenomes of Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria, which notably differ in their microbiome content. Results Our analysis revealed that S. carteri has an expanded repertoire of immunological domains, specifically Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich (SRCR)-like domains, compared to X. testudinaria. On the microbial side, metatranscriptome analyses revealed an overrepresentation of potential symbiosis-related domains in X. testudinaria. Conclusions Our findings provide genomic insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying host-symbiont coevolution and may serve as a roadmap for future hologenome analyses.

  14. Spongian diterpenes from Chinese marine sponge Spongia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guan-Ying; Sun, Dong-Yu; Liang, Lin-Fu; Yao, Li-Gong; Chen, Kai-Xian; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2018-02-12

    3-Nor-spongiolide A (1), belonging to the extremely rare 3-nor-spongian carbon skeleton, and spongiolides A (2) and B (3), having γ-butenolide instead of furan ring as usual for ring D, together with six related known metabolites were isolated from South China Sea sponge Spongia officinalis as its metabolic components. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configurations of three new compounds 1-3 were determined by ECD calculations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary study on swarming marine bacteria isolated from Pulau Tinggi's sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairi, Fareed; Idris, Hamidah; Zakaria, Nur Syuhana; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    Marine sponges were known to produce novel bioactive compounds that have anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-cancer and anti-fungal activities. Most of the bioactive compounds were secreted from the bacteria that lives on the sponges. The bacterial communities also produced biofilm, toxin or biosurfactant that protect the sponges from disease or in-coming predator. In this study, twenty nine marine bacteria with swarming motility characteristic was isolated from 2 different sponge samples collected in Pulau Tinggi These isolates were grown and their genome were extracted for molecular identification using the 16S rRNA approach. Sequence comparison using BLASTn and multiple alignments using MEGA4 was performed to produce a phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 20 of the isolates were grouped under α-Proteobacteria that comprised of 19 isolates in the Vibrionaceae family and one belongs to Aeromonadaceae family. Furthermore, six isolates from Actinobacteria family and three isolates from Firmicutes were also detected. The swarming characteristic indicates the possible production of biosurfactant.

  16. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria inhibited by extracts and fractions from Brazilian marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palloma R. Marinho

    Full Text Available The growing number of bacterial strains resistant to conventional antibiotics has become a serious medical problem in recent years. Marine sponges are a rich source of bioactive compounds, and many species can be useful for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. This study reports the in vitro screening of marine sponges in the search for novel substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Sponge extracts were tested against 44 bacterial strains, including fourteen antibiotic-resistant strains. Ten out of the twelve sponge species studied showed activity in one or more of the bioassays. Aqueous extracts of Cinachyrella sp. and Petromica citrina showed a large action spectrum over resistant-bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and Enterococcus faecalis. Aqueous extract of P. citrina was fractioned and aqueous fraction showed a greatest inhibitory activity on Staphylococcus strains. In addition, this fraction demonstrated a bactericidal effect on exponentially growing S. aureus cells at the MIC (16 µg/mL. The mechanism of action of bioactive fraction is still unclear, but we showed that it affect protein biosynthesis of Staphylococcus. Our results demonstrated for the first time that P. citrina is a potential source of new drugs for the treatment of infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  17. Comparative structural morphometry and elemental composition of three marine sponges from western coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Maushmi S; Shah, Bhaumik

    2014-04-01

    Three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata, Cliono lobata, and Spirastrella pachyspira from the western coastal region of India were compared for their morphometry, biochemical, and elemental composition. One-way analysis of variance was applied for spicule morphometry results. Length, width, and length:width ratio were calculated independently. The ratio of length:width varied from 35 to 42 among the grown samples, which remained in the range of 10-22 in young sample at the beginning of studies. However, no significant change was observed in spicule width compared to length. Elemental compositions of marine sponges were determined by field emission gun-scanning electron microscope. Scanning electron microscopy data revealed that the spicules of all the three sponges were mostly composed of O (47-56%) and Si (30-40%), whereas Al (14.33%) was only detected in the spicules of C. lobata. Apart from these, K, Ni, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, and S were additionally detected in all the three samples. Presence of heavy metals in the sponges was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Results showed that iron was present in a large amount in samples, followed by zinc, lead, and copper. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bioactive Sesterterpenes and Triterpenes from Marine Sponges: Occurrence and Pharmacological Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenHan Lin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine ecosystems (>70% of the planet's surface comprise a continuous resource of immeasurable biological activities and immense chemical entities. This diversity has provided a unique source of chemical compounds with potential bioactivities that could lead to potential new drug candidates. Many marine-living organisms are soft bodied and/or sessile. Consequently, they have developed toxic secondary metabolites or obtained them from microorganisms to defend themselves against predators [1]. For the last 30–40 years, marine invertebrates have been an attractive research topic for scientists all over the world. A relatively small number of marine plants, animals and microbes have yielded more than 15,000 natural products including numerous compounds with potential pharmaceutical potential. Some of these have already been launched on the pharmaceutical market such as Prialt® (ziconotide; potent analgesic and Yondelis® (trabectedin or ET-743; antitumor while others have entered clinical trials, e.g., alpidin and kahalalide F. Amongst the vast array of marine natural products, the terpenoids are one of the more commonly reported and discovered to date. Sesterterpenoids (C25 and triterpenoids (C30 are of frequent occurrence, particularly in marine sponges, and they show prominent bioactivities. In this review, we survey sesterterpenoids and triterpenoids obtained from marine sponges and highlight their bioactivities.

  19. Marine and freshwater sponges (Porifera) of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van R.W.M.

    1977-01-01

    The collections of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden and the Zoologisch Museum of Amsterdam contain 19 species of Porifera (15 marine and 4 freshwater species) originating from the Netherlands. Among the marine species, Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Halichondria bowerbanki

  20. New bioactive halenaquinone derivatives from South Pacific marine sponges of the genus Xestospongia

    OpenAIRE

    Longeon, A.; Copp, B. R.; Roué, M.; Dubois, J.; Valentin, A.; Petek, Sylvain; Debitus, Cécile; Bourguet-Kondracki, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of South Pacific marine sponges of the genus Xestospongia has led to the isolation of a number of halenaquinone-type polyketides, including two new derivatives named xestosaprol C methylacetal 7 and orhalquinone 8. Chemical characterization of these two new compounds was achieved by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies. Evaluation of anti-phospholipase A(2), anti-farnesyltransferase and antiplasmodial activities of this series is presented and structur...

  1. New Structures and Bioactivity Properties of Jasplakinolide (Jaspamide) Analogues from Marine Sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Sarah J.; Morinaka, Brandon I.; Amagata, Taro; Tenney, Karen; Walter M Bray; Gassner, Nadine C.; Lokey, R. Scott; Crews, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to isolate and study additional jasplakinolide analogues from two taxonomically distinct marine sponges including two Auletta spp. and one Jaspis splendens. This led to the isolation of jasplakinolide (1) and eleven jasplakinolide analogues (3 – 13) including seven new analogues (6 – 10, 12, and 13). Structure elucidation of the new compounds was based on a combination of 1D and 2D NMR analysis, optical rotation, circular dichroism, and preparation of Mosher’s ester...

  2. Pectenotoxin-2 from Marine Sponges: A Potential Anti-Cancer Agent?A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wun-Jae Kim; Yung Hyun Choi; Gi-Young Kim

    2011-01-01

    Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2), which was first identified as a cytotoxic entity in marine sponges, has been reported to display significant cytotoxicity to human cancer cells where it inhibits mitotic separation and cytokinesis through the depolymerization of actin filaments. In the late stage of endoreduplication, the effects of PTX-2 on different cancer cells involves: (i) down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members and IAP family proteins; (ii) up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein and t...

  3. Actinobacteria Associated with the Marine Sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and Their Culturability

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp.

  4. Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and their culturability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp.

  5. In Vitro Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities of Some Marine Sponges Collected off Misamis Oriental Coast, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, A. P.; Uy, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    The phosphomolybdenum method for total antioxidant activity determination showed that the hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts of five marine sponge species collected off misamis oriental coast-Aaptos suberitoides, Dactylospongia elegans, Stylissa massa, Haliclona sp. and an unidentified species coded as KL-05, have varying degrees of antioxidant capacity. Expressed as ascorbic acid equivalents in μg/mL of extract, the hexane extract of Dactylospongia elegans (DeH) and the ethyl...

  6. Haliscosamine: a new antifungal sphingosine derivative from the Moroccan marine sponge Haliclona viscosa

    OpenAIRE

    El-Amraoui, Belkassem; Biard, Jean-Fan?ois; Fassouane, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    In the aim of searching for new antifungal products from marine origin, we have isolated a sphingosine derivative, (9Z)-2-amino-docos-9-ene-1,3,13,14-tetraol (Haliscosamine) from the Moroccan sea sponge Haliclona viscosa using bio-guided (antifungal) HPLC methods. The molecular structure of this compound was elucidated by spectrometric techniques IR, UV, MS and NMR. The isolated metabolite showed a significant antifungal activity against Cryptococcus and Candida species and a weak general tox...

  7. An Overview on Marine Sponge-Symbiotic Bacteria as Unexhausted Sources for Natural Product Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice M. Brinkmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial symbiotic communities of marine macro-organisms carry functional metabolic profiles different to the ones found terrestrially and within surrounding marine environments. These symbiotic bacteria have increasingly been a focus of microbiologists working in marine environments due to a wide array of reported bioactive compounds of therapeutic importance resulting in various patent registrations. Revelations of symbiont-directed host specific functions and the true nature of host-symbiont interactions, combined with metagenomic advances detecting functional gene clusters, will inevitably open new avenues for identification and discovery of novel bioactive compounds of biotechnological value from marine resources. This review article provides an overview on bioactive marine symbiotic organisms with specific emphasis placed on the sponge-associated ones and invites the international scientific community to contribute towards establishment of in-depth information of the environmental parameters defining selection and acquisition of true symbionts by the host organisms.

  8. Marine actinomycetes related to the "Salinospora" group from the Great Barrier Reef sponge Pseudoceratina clavata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Garson, Mary J; Fuerst, John A

    2005-04-01

    Ten strains identified as marine actinomycetes related to the "Salinospora" group previously reported only from marine sediments were isolated from the Great Barrier Reef marine sponge Pseudoceratina clavata. The relationship of the isolates to "Salinospora" was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Colony morphology and pigmentation, occurrence and position of spores, and salinity requirements for growth were all consistent with this relationship. Genes homologous to beta-ketosynthase, an enzyme forming part of a polyketide synthesis complex, were retrieved from these isolates; these genes shared homology with other Type I ketosynthase genes, and phylogenetic comparison with amino acid sequences derived from database beta-ketosynthase genes was consistent with the close relationship of these isolates to the actinomycetes. Primers based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and designed for targeting amplification of members of the "Salinospora" group via polymerase chain reaction have been used to demonstrate occurrence of these actinomycetes within the sponge tissue. In vitro bioassays of extracts from the isolates for antibiotic activity demonstrated that these actinomycetes have the potential to inhibit other sponge symbionts in vivo, including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Isolation, phylogenetic analysis and anti-infective activity screening of marine sponge-associated actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila M; Hanora, Amro; Radwan, Mona; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H; Ahmed, Safwat; Hentschel, Ute

    2010-02-26

    Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt) and from Rovinj (Croatia). Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven different suborders. Fourteen putatively novel species were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other strains in the NCBI database. A putative new genus related to Rubrobacter was isolated on M1 agar that had been amended with sponge extract, thus highlighting the need for innovative cultivation protocols. Testing for anti-infective activities was performed against clinically relevant, Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans) and human parasites (Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei). Bioactivities against these pathogens were documented for 10 actinomycete isolates. These results show a high diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges as well as highlight their potential to produce anti-infective agents.

  10. Isolation, Phylogenetic Analysis and Anti-infective Activity Screening of Marine Sponge-Associated Actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safwat Ahmed

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt and from Rovinj (Croatia. Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven different suborders. Fourteen putatively novel species were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other strains in the NCBI database. A putative new genus related to Rubrobacter was isolated on M1 agar that had been amended with sponge extract, thus highlighting the need for innovative cultivation protocols. Testing for anti-infective activities was performed against clinically relevant, Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans and human parasites (Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei. Bioactivities against these pathogens were documented for 10 actinomycete isolates. These results show a high diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges as well as highlight their potential to produce anti-infective agents.

  11. Cytotoxic and antioxidant activity of selected marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairman K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anticancer activity of the crude extracts of Rhabdastrella globostellata (R. globostellata and Spirastrella inconstans (S. inconstans var. moeandrina Dendy. Methods: Soxhlet extraction method was used to extract the secondary metabolites and various assays antioxidant, anticancer and various assays were carried out. The extract were tested anticancer activity against a HeLa, Raw 264.7 and Hek-293. Results: The sponge extracts tested exhibited from median to high toxicity in at least one of the toxicity bioassays performed. The antioxidant activity of the isolated metabolite in ethylacetate solution was assessed by SOD and GTH assays and compared with that of other known natural antioxidants. Conclusions: Potent antioxidants have been detected among both phenolic metabolites and alkaloids. Antioxidant effects of tested compounds have been attributed to their action as chain-breaking antioxidants and/or as scavengers of radicals

  12. Development of cultures of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve for genotoxicity assessment using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpiri, Rachael U; Konya, Roseline S; Hodges, Nikolas J

    2017-12-01

    Sponges are a potential alternative model species to bivalves in pollution biomonitoring and environmental risk assessment in the aquatic ecosystem. In the present study, a novel in vivo exposure sponge culture model was developed from field-collected and cryopreserved sponge (Hymeniacidon perleve) cells to investigate the genotoxic effects of environmentally relevant metals in the laboratory. Sponge cell aggregates were cultured and exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-0.4 mg/L) of cadmium chloride, nickel chloride, and sodium dichromate as quantified by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and DNA-strand breaks assessed by the comet assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was quantified by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate in sponge cell aggregates exposed to the same concentrations of Cd, Cr, and Ni. There was a statistically significant (p comet assay to detect DNA-strand breaks in marine sponge cells and demonstrated that exposure to noncytotoxic concentrations of Cd, Cr, and Ni for 12 h results in a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage and levels of ROS production. In conclusion, we have developed a novel in vivo model based on culture of cryopreserved sponge cells that is compatible with the alkaline comet assay. Genotoxicity in marine sponges measured by the comet assay technique may be a useful tool for biomonitoring research and risk assessment in aquatic ecosystems. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3314-3323. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  14. Antibiotic resistance genes detected in the marine sponge Petromica citrina from Brazilian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinella Silva Laport

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Although antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health, the environmental reservoirs of the resistance determinants are still poorly understood. This study reports the detection of resistance genes (ermB, mecA, mupA, qnrA, qnrB and tetL to antibiotics among certain culturable and unculturable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Petromica citrina. The antimicrobial activities elicited by P. citrina and its associated bacteria are also described. The results indicate that the marine environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria.

  15. New polyhydroxy sterols from the marine sponge Callyspongia fibrosa (Ridley & Dendly)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.S.P.; Sarma, N.S.; Murthy, Y.L.N.; Kantamreddi, V.S.S.N.; Wright, C.W.; Parameswaran, P.S.

    polyhydroxy sterols from the marine sponge Callyspongia fibrosa (Ridley & Dendly) Thota S. Prakasa Rao a , Nittala S. Sarma* a , Y.L.N. Murthy a , Venkata S.S.N. Kantamreddi b , Colin W. Wright b , P.S. Parameswaran c a School of Chemistry, Andhra... University, Visakhaptnam – 530 003, India b School of Pharmacy, University of Bradford, Bradford-BD7 1DP, U.K. c National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004, India Abstract - Four new polyhydroxylated sterols are isolated from Marine...

  16. Antimicrobial potential of metabolites extracted from bacterial symbionts associated with marine sponges in coastal area of Gulf of Mannar Biosphere, India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skariyachan, S; G. Rao, A; Patil, M.R; Saikia, B; Bharadwaj KN, V; Rao GS, J

    2014-01-01

    Significance and Impact of the Study: This is the first study demonstrating antimicrobial potential of flurophoric and chromophoric metabolites extracted from bacterial biosymbionts associated with marine sponges...

  17. A comparative study on the phylogenetic diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from five marine sponge species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Yan; Jin, Meifang; Yu, Xingju

    2008-03-01

    A cultivation-based approach was employed to compare the culturable actinobacterial diversity associated with five marine sponge species (Craniella australiensis, Halichondria rugosa, Reniochalina sp., Sponge sp., and Stelletta tenuis). The phylogenetic affiliation of the actinobacterial isolates was assessed by 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis. A total of 181 actinobacterial strains were isolated using five different culture media (denoted as M1-M5). The type of medium exhibited significant effects on the number of actinobacteria recovered, with the highest number of isolates on M3 (63 isolates) and the lowest on M1 (12 isolates). The genera isolated were also different, with the recovery of three genera on M2 and M3, and only a single genus on M1. The number of actinobacteria isolated from the five sponge species was significantly different, with a count of 83, 36, 30, 17, and 15 isolates from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, Sponge sp., Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis, respectively. M3 was the best isolation medium for recovery of actinobacteria from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, and Sponge sp., while no specific medium preference was observed for the recovery of actinobacteria from Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis. The RFLP fingerprinting of 16S rDNA genes digested with HhaI revealed six different patterns, in which 16 representative 16S rDNAs were fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 12 strains belong to the group Streptomyces, three strains belong to Pseudonocardia, and one strain belongs to Nocardia. Two strains C14 (from C. australiensis) and N13 (from Sponge sp.) have only 96.26% and 96.27% similarity to earlier published sequences, and are therefore potential candidates for new species. The highest diversity of three actinobacteria genera was obtained from Sponge sp., though the number of isolates was low. Two genera of actinobacteria, Streptomyces, and Pseudonocardia, were isolated from both S. tenuis and C. australiensis. Only the genus of Streptomyces

  18. Signal Recognition Particle 54 kD Protein (SRP54 from the Marine Sponge Geodia cydonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Durajlija-Žinić

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the systematic search for phylogenetically conserved proteins in the simplest and most ancient extant metazoan phylum – Porifera, we have identified and analyzed a cDNA encoding the signal recognition particle 54 kD protein (SRP54 from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium (Demospongiae. The signal recognition particle (SRP is a universally conserved ribonucleoprotein complex of a very ancient origin, comprising SRP RNA and several proteins (six in mammals. The nucleotide sequence of the sponge cDNA predicts a protein of 499 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 55175. G. cydonium SRP54 displays unusually high overall similarity (90 % with human/mammalian SRP54 proteins, higher than with Drosophila melanogaster (88 %, or Caenorhabditis elegans (82 %. The same was found for the majority of known and phylogenetically conserved proteins from sponges, indicating that the molecular evolutionary rates in protein coding genes in Porifera as well as in highly developed mammals (vertebrates are slower, when compared with the rates in homologous genes from invertebrates (insects, nematodes. Therefore, genes/proteins from sponges might be the best candidates for the reconstruction of ancient structures of proteins and genome/proteome complexity in the ancestral organism, common to all multicellular animals.

  19. Appraisal of Antiophidic Potential of Marine Sponges against Bothrops jararaca and Lachesis muta Venom

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    Guilherme Muricy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites are a health problem in many countries due to the high incidence of such accidents. Antivenom treatment has regularly been used for more than a century, however, this does not neutralize tissue damage and may even increase the severity and morbidity of accidents. Thus, it has been relevant to search for new strategies to improve antiserum therapy, and a variety of molecules from natural sources with antiophidian properties have been reported. In this paper, we analyzed the ability of ten extracts from marine sponges (Amphimedon viridis, Aplysina fulva, Chondrosia collectrix, Desmapsamma anchorata, Dysidea etheria, Hymeniacidon heliophila, Mycale angulosa, Petromica citrina, Polymastia janeirensis, and Tedania ignis to inhibit the effects caused by Bothrops jararaca and Lachesis muta venom. All sponge extracts inhibited proteolysis and hemolysis induced by both snake venoms, except H. heliophila, which failed to inhibit any biological activity. P. citrina inhibited lethality, hemorrhage, plasma clotting, and hemolysis induced by B. jararaca or L. muta. Moreover, other sponges inhibited hemorrhage induced only by B. jararaca. We conclude that Brazilian sponges may be a useful aid in the treatment of snakebites caused by L. muta and B. jararaca and therefore have potential for the discovery of molecules with antiophidian properties.

  20. Microbial Communities and Bioactive Compounds in Marine Sponges of the Family Irciniidae—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species—the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate—and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is highly stable over space and time. Two types of quorum-sensing molecules have been detected in these animals, hinting at microbe-microbe and host-microbe signalling being important processes governing the dynamics of the Irciniidae holobiont. Irciniids are vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and concerns have emerged about their conservation in a changing climate. They are nevertheless amenable to mariculture and laboratory maintenance, being attractive targets for metabolite harvesting and experimental biology endeavours. Several bioactive terpenoids and polyketides have been retrieved from Irciniidae sponges, but the actual producer (host or symbiont) of these compounds has rarely been clarified. To tackle this, and further pertinent questions concerning the functioning, resilience and physiology of these organisms, truly multi-layered approaches integrating cutting-edge microbiology, biochemistry, genetics and zoology research are needed. PMID:25272328

  1. Microbial communities and bioactive compounds in marine sponges of the family irciniidae-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoim, Cristiane C P; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-09-30

    Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species-the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate-and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is highly stable over space and time. Two types of quorum-sensing molecules have been detected in these animals, hinting at microbe-microbe and host-microbe signalling being important processes governing the dynamics of the Irciniidae holobiont. Irciniids are vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and concerns have emerged about their conservation in a changing climate. They are nevertheless amenable to mariculture and laboratory maintenance, being attractive targets for metabolite harvesting and experimental biology endeavours. Several bioactive terpenoids and polyketides have been retrieved from Irciniidae sponges, but the actual producer (host or symbiont) of these compounds has rarely been clarified. To tackle this, and further pertinent questions concerning the functioning, resilience and physiology of these organisms, truly multi-layered approaches integrating cutting-edge microbiology, biochemistry, genetics and zoology research are needed.

  2. Microbial Communities and Bioactive Compounds in Marine Sponges of the Family Irciniidae—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane C. P. Hardoim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species—the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate—and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is highly stable over space and time. Two types of quorum-sensing molecules have been detected in these animals, hinting at microbe-microbe and host-microbe signalling being important processes governing the dynamics of the Irciniidae holobiont. Irciniids are vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and concerns have emerged about their conservation in a changing climate. They are nevertheless amenable to mariculture and laboratory maintenance, being attractive targets for metabolite harvesting and experimental biology endeavours. Several bioactive terpenoids and polyketides have been retrieved from Irciniidae sponges, but the actual producer (host or symbiont of these compounds has rarely been clarified. To tackle this, and further pertinent questions concerning the functioning, resilience and physiology of these organisms, truly multi-layered approaches integrating cutting-edge microbiology, biochemistry, genetics and zoology research are needed.

  3. Marine caves of the Mediterranean Sea: a sponge biodiversity reservoir within a biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerovasileiou, Vasilis; Voultsiadou, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Marine caves are widely acknowledged for their unique biodiversity and constitute a typical feature of the Mediterranean coastline. Herein an attempt was made to evaluate the ecological significance of this particular ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea, which is considered a biodiversity hotspot. This was accomplished by using Porifera, which dominate the rocky sublittoral substrata, as a reference group in a meta-analytical approach, combining primary research data from the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean) with data derived from the literature. In total 311 species from all poriferan classes were recorded, representing 45.7% of the Mediterranean Porifera. Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha are highly represented in marine caves at the family (88%), generic (70%), and species level (47.5%), the latter being the most favored group along with Dictyoceratida and Lithistida. Several rare and cave-exclusive species were reported from only one or few caves, indicating the fragmentation and peculiarity of this unique ecosystem. Species richness and phylogenetic diversity varied among Mediterranean areas; the former was positively correlated with research effort, being higher in the northern Mediterranean, while the latter was generally higher in caves than in the overall sponge assemblages of each area. Resemblance analysis among areas revealed that cavernicolous sponge assemblages followed a pattern quite similar to that of the overall Mediterranean assemblages. The same pattern was exhibited by the zoogeographic affinities of cave sponges: species with Atlanto-Mediterranean distribution and Mediterranean endemics prevailed (more than 40% each), 70% of them having warm-water affinities, since most caves were studied in shallow waters. According to our findings, Mediterranean marine caves appear to be important sponge biodiversity reservoirs of high representativeness and great scientific interest, deserving further detailed study and protection.

  4. Antagonistic activity of marine sponge associated Streptomyces sp. against isolated fish pathogens

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    G. Palani Selvan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antibacterial potential of the marine actinomycetes isolated from sponge samples. Methods: Thirty six marine sponge samples were collected from Palk Strait and further used for actinomycetes isolation by using serial dilution. The antibacterial activity was carried out by using cross streak assay method. Moreover, most potential strain also subjected to MIC and MBC techniques and the isolated potential strain was identified by molecular tools. Results: The maximum counts (26 x 102 CFU/g were observed in the month of May and minimum counts (1 x 102 CFU/g were noticed in April. A total of 21 actinomycetes were isolated and their antibacterial potential was assessed by using cross streak method. Among the 21 actinomycetes, the ACT-21 showed sensitivity against all the isolated fish pathogens. Further, the MIC and MBC results reveal that, the ACT-21 showed sensitivity at the concentration ranged between 500 毺 g/ mL-1 500 毺 g/mL. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that, the potential isolate ACT-21 (accession no: JF899543 showed maximum similarity index (>98% with Streptomyces sp. Conclusions: It is concluded from present study that, the crude extracts of sponge associated actinomycetes could be used as an effective antibacterial agent for the management of disease free fish culture system.

  5. In Vitro Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities of Some Marine Sponges Collected off Misamis Oriental Coast, Philippines

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    A. P. Rivera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phosphomolybdenum method for total antioxidant activity determination showed that the hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts of five marine sponge species collected off misamis oriental coast-Aaptos suberitoides, Dactylospongia elegans, Stylissa massa, Haliclona sp. and an unidentified species coded as KL-05, have varying degrees of antioxidant capacity. Expressed as ascorbic acid equivalents in μg/mL of extract, the hexane extract of Dactylospongia elegans (DeH and the ethyl acetate extract of Aaptos suberitoides (AsE showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Although the hexane extract of KL-05 (KL-05H has considerable antioxidant activity, the ethyl acetate extract (KL-05E showed no antioxidant activity. The brine shrimp assay for cytotoxicity indicated high bioactivity, with Haliclona sp., Dactylospongia elegans, Aaptos suberitoides and Stylissa massa exhibiting high % mortality and low LC50 values. The antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of the marine sponges may be attributed to the zoochemicals present. All sponge species contain alkaloids, saponins, tannins, and flavonoids. Terpenoids are present only in Haliclona sp. and the cardiac glycosides, only in Aaptos suberitoides and Haliclona sp.

  6. Antifouling substances against larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite from the marine sponge, Acanthella cavernosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogata, Yasuyukiy; Yoshimura, Erina; Shinshima, Kyouji; Kitano, Yoshikazu; Sakaguchi, Isamu

    2003-04-01

    A total of 118 Japanese marine invertebrates were extracted with methanol, and their chloroform-soluble materials tested for antifouling activity as well as toxicity against barnacle (Balanus amphitrite) larvae. Among 86 species that showed more than 80% larval settlement inhibition, 13 species, including 8 sponges were weakly toxic to the barnacle larvae. The sponge Acanthella cavernosa, which showed most promising activity, was extracted with ethanol and fractionated by solvent partitioning, silica gel column chromatography, gel filtration, and ODS HPLC to give two active compounds which on the basis of spectral data and chemical transformation were identified as a new compound, 10-formamido-4-cadinene and a known compound, T-cadinol, They inhibited larval settlement at concentrations of 0.5 microgram ml-1.

  7. Symbiotic archaea in marine sponges show stability and host specificity in community structure and ammonia oxidation functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Pita, Lucía; Erwin, Patrick M; Abaid, Summara; López-Legentil, Susanna; Hill, Russell T

    2014-12-01

    Archaea associated with marine sponges are active and influence the nitrogen metabolism of sponges. However, we know little about their occurrence, specificity, and persistence. We aimed to elucidate the relative importance of host specificity and biogeographic background in shaping the symbiotic archaeal communities. We investigated these communities in sympatric sponges from the Mediterranean (Ircinia fasciculata and Ircinia oros, sampled in summer and winter) and from the Caribbean (Ircinia strobilina and Mycale laxissima). PCR cloning and sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes showed that the archaeal community composition and structure were different from that in seawater and varied among sponge species. We found that the communities were dominated by ammonia-oxidizing archaea closely related to Nitrosopumilus. The community in M. laxissima differed from that in Ircinia spp., including the sympatric sponge I. strobilina; yet, geographical clusters within Ircinia spp. were observed. Whereas archaeal phylotypes in Ircinia spp. were persistent and belong to 'sponge-enriched' clusters, archaea in M. laxissima were closely related with those from diverse habitats (i.e. seawater and sediments). For all four sponge species, the expression of the archaeal amoA gene was confirmed. Our results indicate that host-specific processes, such as host ecological strategy and evolutionary history, control the sponge-archaeal communities. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Marine Biogeographic Assessment of the Main Hawaiian Islands: Synthesized physical and biological data offshore of the Main Hawaiian Islands from 1891-01-01 to 2015-03-01 (NCEI Accession 0155189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains analyses and data products used in a marine biogeographic assessment of the main Hawaiian Islands. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  9. Marine Sponge Dysidea herbacea revisited: Another Brominated Diphenyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce F. Bowden

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A pentabrominated phenolic diphenyl ether (1 that has not previously been reported from marine sources has been isolated from Dysidea herbacea collected at Pelorus Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The structure was determined by comparison of NMR data with those of known structurally-related metabolites. NMR spectral assignments for (1 are discussed in context with those of three previously reported isomeric pentabrominated phenolic diphenyl ethers.

  10. Characterisation of Non-Autoinducing Tropodithietic Acid (TDA) Production from Marine Sponge Pseudovibrio Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Catriona; Reen, F. Jerry; Mooij, Marlies J.

    2014-01-01

    is the antibacterial compound tropodithietic acid (TDA). The aim of this study was to provide insight into the bioactivity of and the factors governing the production of TDA in marine Pseudovibrio isolates from a collection of marine sponges. The TDA produced by these Pseudovibrio isolates exhibited potent...... antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of clinical pathogens, while TDA tolerance was frequent in non-TDA producing marine isolates. Comparative genomics analysis suggested a high degree of conservation among the tda biosynthetic clusters while expression studies revealed coordinated regulation of TDA...... synthesis upon transition from log to stationary phase growth, which was not induced by TDA itself or by the presence of the C10-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signal molecule....

  11. Antileishmanial potential of a marine sponge Haliclona oculata against experimental visceral leishmaniasis

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    Vijai Lakshmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antileishmanial activity of a marine sponge Haliclona oculata. Methods: The crude methanol extract was prepared from the freshly collected sponge and its three fractions were also prepared by maceration method. The antileishmanial activity of these extract and fractions was tested against Leishmania donovani. Results: The antileishmanial activity was tested both in vitro and in vivo. The crude methanol extract exerted almost complete inhibition of promastigotes (81.0%±6.9% and 78.8%± 5.2% inhibition of intracellular amastigotes at 100 μg/mL with IC50 values of 29.5 μg/mL and 40.6 μg/mL, respectively. The treatment of 500 mg/kg (p.o. of the crude methanol extract for 5 d for Leishmania donovani infected hamsters resulted in 78.35%±10.20% inhibition of intracellular amastigotes. At a lower dose (250 mg/kg, it exhibited poor efficacy. Among the fractions, highest in vitro (>75% and in vivo (84.3%±10.2% antileishmanial activity was observed in n-chloroform fraction with IC 50 values of 54.2 μg/mL and 61 μg/mL against promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes, respectively. Hexane fraction and n-butanol (both insoluble and soluble fractions were found inactive in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that this marine sponge has the potential to provide new insight toward development of an effective antileishmanial agent and, hence, more exhaustive studies are needed for exploiting the vast marine resources of the world to combat the scourge of several parasitic diseases.

  12. Evaluation of Marine Brown Algae and Sponges from Brazil as Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Products

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    Suzi Meneses Ribeiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The ischemic disorders, in which platelet aggregation and blood coagulation are involved, represent a major cause of disability and death worldwide. The antithrombotic therapy has unsatisfactory performance and may produce side effects. So, there is a need to seek molecules with antithrombotic properties. Marine organisms produce substances with different well defined ecological functions. Moreover, some of these molecules also exhibit pharmacological properties such as antiviral, anticancer, antiophidic and anticoagulant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through in vitro tests, the effect of two extracts of brown algae and ten marine sponges from Brazil on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation. Our results revealed that most of the extracts were capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and clotting measured by plasma recalcification tests, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogenolytic activity. On the other hand, five of ten species of sponges induced platelet aggregation. Thus, the marine organisms studied here may have molecules with antithrombotic properties, presenting biotechnological potential to antithrombotic therapy. Further chemical investigation should be conducted on the active species to discover useful molecules for the development of new drugs to treat clotting disorders.

  13. Evaluation of marine brown algae and sponges from Brazil as anticoagulant and antiplatelet products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade Moura, Laura; Ortiz-Ramirez, Fredy; Cavalcanti, Diana Negrao; Ribeiro, Suzi Meneses; Muricy, Guilherme; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Fuly, Andre Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The ischemic disorders, in which platelet aggregation and blood coagulation are involved, represent a major cause of disability and death worldwide. The antithrombotic therapy has unsatisfactory performance and may produce side effects. So, there is a need to seek molecules with antithrombotic properties. Marine organisms produce substances with different well defined ecological functions. Moreover, some of these molecules also exhibit pharmacological properties such as antiviral, anticancer, antiophidic and anticoagulant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through in vitro tests, the effect of two extracts of brown algae and ten marine sponges from Brazil on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation. Our results revealed that most of the extracts were capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and clotting measured by plasma recalcification tests, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogenolytic activity. On the other hand, five of ten species of sponges induced platelet aggregation. Thus, the marine organisms studied here may have molecules with antithrombotic properties, presenting biotechnological potential to antithrombotic therapy. Further chemical investigation should be conducted on the active species to discover useful molecules for the development of new drugs to treat clotting disorders.

  14. Bioaccumulation of metallic trace elements and organic pollutants in marine sponges from the South Brittany Coast, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentric, Charline; Rehel, Karine; Dufour, Alain; Sauleau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accumulation of metallic and organic pollutants in marine sponges with the oyster Crassostrea gigas used as sentinel species. The concentrations of 12 Metallic Trace Elements (MTEs), 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), 7 PolyChlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), and 3 organotin derivatives were measured in 7 marine sponges collected in the Etel River (South Brittany, France). Results indicated Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Pb, and Ti particularly accumulated in marine sponges such as Hymeniacidon perlevis and Raspailia ramosa at higher levels compared to oysters. At the opposite, Cu and Zn accumulated significantly at higher concentrations in oysters. Among PAHs analyzed, benzo(a)pyrene bioaccumulated in H. perlevis at levels up to 17-fold higher than in oysters. In contrast, PCBs bioaccumulated preferentially in oysters. Significant differences exist in the abilities of marine phyla and sponge species to accumulate organic and metallic pollutants however, among the few sponge species studied, H. perlevis showed impressive bioaccumulation properties. The use of this species as bioindicator and/or bioremediator near shellfish farming areas is also discussed.

  15. Marine sponge polyketide inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R H; Slate, D L; Moretti, R; Alvi, K A; Crews, P

    1992-04-30

    The marine polyketide natural product, halenaquinone, was shown to be an irreversible inhibitor of pp60v-src, the oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase encoded by the Rous sarcoma virus. This compound had an IC50 of approximately 1.5 microM against pp60v-src and also inhibited the ligand-stimulated kinase activity of the human epidermal growth factor receptor with an IC50 of approximately 19 microM. Halenaquinone blocked the proliferation of a number of cultured cell lines, including several transformed by oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases. Halenaquinol, xestoquinone, halenaquinol sulfate, and several simple synthetic quinone analogs were also shown to inhibit pp60v-src.

  16. Antifouling activity exhibited by secondary metabolites of the marine sponge, Haliclona exigua (Kirkpatrick)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LimnaMol, V.P.; Raveendran, T.V.; Parameswaran, P.S.

    stream_size 29406 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Int_Biodeterior_Biodegrad_63_67.pdf.txt stream_source_info Int_Biodeterior_Biodegrad_63_67.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... 1    Author version: Int. Biodeterior. Biodegrad.: 63(1); 2009; 67-72 Antifouling activity exhibited by secondary metabolites of the marine sponge, Haliclona exigua (Kirkpatrick) VP LIMNA MOL a , TV RAVEENDRAN a, * & PS PARAMESWARAN b a...

  17. Bioactive Hydantoin Alkaloids from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hemimycale arabica

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    Diaa T. A. Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of our continuing efforts to identify bioactive secondary metabolites from Red Sea marine invertebrates, we have investigated the sponge Hemimycale arabica. The antimicrobial fraction of an organic extract of the sponge afforded two new hydantoin alkaloids, hemimycalins A and B (2 and 3, together with the previously reported compound (Z-5-(4-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (1. The structures of the compounds were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC studies and high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Hemimycalins A (2 and B (3 represent the first examples of the natural N-alkylated hydantoins from the sponge Hemimycale arabica. Compounds 1–3 displayed variable antimicrobial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. In addition, compound 1 displayed moderate antiproliferative activity against the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa cell line. These findings provide further insight into the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of this class of compounds.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of heterotrophic bacterial communities from the marine sponge Erylus discophorus (Astrophorida, Geodiidae.

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    Ana Patrícia Graça

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic bacteria associated with two specimens of the marine sponge Erylus discophorus were screened for their capacity to produce bioactive compounds against a panel of human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus wild type and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, fish pathogen (Aliivibrio fischeri and environmentally relevant bacteria (Vibrio harveyi. The sponges were collected in Berlengas Islands, Portugal. Of the 212 isolated heterotrophic bacteria belonging to Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, 31% produced antimicrobial metabolites. Bioactivity was found against both Gram positive and Gram negative and clinically and environmentally relevant target microorganisms. Bioactivity was found mainly against B. subtilis and some bioactivity against S. aureus MRSA, V. harveyi and A. fisheri. No antifungal activity was detected. The three most bioactive genera were Pseudovibrio (47.0%, Vibrio (22.7% and Bacillus (7.6%. Other less bioactive genera were Labrenzia, Acinetobacter, Microbulbifer, Pseudomonas, Gordonia, Microbacterium, Micrococcus and Mycobacterium, Paenibacillus and Staphylococcus. The search of polyketide I synthases (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs genes in 59 of the bioactive bacteria suggested the presence of PKS-I in 12 strains, NRPS in 3 strains and both genes in 3 strains. Our results show the potential of the bacterial community associated with Erylus discophorus sponges as producers of bioactive compounds.

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Heterotrophic Bacterial Communities from the Marine Sponge Erylus discophorus (Astrophorida, Geodiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Ana Patrícia; Bondoso, Joana; Gaspar, Helena; Xavier, Joana R.; Monteiro, Maria Cândida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Vicente, Francisca; Lage, Olga Maria

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria associated with two specimens of the marine sponge Erylus discophorus were screened for their capacity to produce bioactive compounds against a panel of human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus wild type and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus), fish pathogen (Aliivibrio fischeri) and environmentally relevant bacteria (Vibrio harveyi). The sponges were collected in Berlengas Islands, Portugal. Of the 212 isolated heterotrophic bacteria belonging to Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, 31% produced antimicrobial metabolites. Bioactivity was found against both Gram positive and Gram negative and clinically and environmentally relevant target microorganisms. Bioactivity was found mainly against B. subtilis and some bioactivity against S. aureus MRSA, V. harveyi and A. fisheri. No antifungal activity was detected. The three most bioactive genera were Pseudovibrio (47.0%), Vibrio (22.7%) and Bacillus (7.6%). Other less bioactive genera were Labrenzia, Acinetobacter, Microbulbifer, Pseudomonas, Gordonia, Microbacterium, Micrococcus and Mycobacterium, Paenibacillus and Staphylococcus. The search of polyketide I synthases (PKS-I) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) genes in 59 of the bioactive bacteria suggested the presence of PKS-I in 12 strains, NRPS in 3 strains and both genes in 3 strains. Our results show the potential of the bacterial community associated with Erylus discophorus sponges as producers of bioactive compounds. PMID:24236081

  20. Cell turnover and detritus production in marine sponges from tropical and temperate benthic ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany E Alexander

    Full Text Available This study describes in vivo cell turnover (the balance between cell proliferation and cell loss in eight marine sponge species from tropical coral reef, mangrove and temperate Mediterranean reef ecosystems. Cell proliferation was determined through the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU and measuring the percentage of BrdU-positive cells after 6 h of continuous labeling (10 h for Chondrosia reniformis. Apoptosis was identified using an antibody against active caspase-3. Cell loss through shedding was studied quantitatively by collecting and weighing sponge-expelled detritus and qualitatively by light microscopy of sponge tissue and detritus. All species investigated displayed substantial cell proliferation, predominantly in the choanoderm, but also in the mesohyl. The majority of coral reef species (five showed between 16.1±15.9% and 19.0±2.0% choanocyte proliferation (mean±SD after 6 h and the Mediterranean species, C. reniformis, showed 16.6±3.2% after 10 h BrdU-labeling. Monanchora arbuscula showed lower choanocyte proliferation (8.1±3.7%, whereas the mangrove species Mycale microsigmatosa showed relatively higher levels of choanocyte proliferation (70.5±6.6%. Choanocyte proliferation in Haliclona vansoesti was variable (2.8-73.1%. Apoptosis was negligible and not the primary mechanism of cell loss involved in cell turnover. All species investigated produced significant amounts of detritus (2.5-18% detritus bodyweight(-1·d(-1 and cell shedding was observed in seven out of eight species. The amount of shed cells observed in histological sections may be related to differences in residence time of detritus within canals. Detritus production could not be directly linked to cell shedding due to the degraded nature of expelled cellular debris. We have demonstrated that under steady-state conditions, cell turnover through cell proliferation and cell shedding are common processes to maintain tissue homeostasis in a variety of

  1. Cell Turnover and Detritus Production in Marine Sponges from Tropical and Temperate Benthic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Brittany E.; Liebrand, Kevin; Osinga, Ronald; van der Geest, Harm G.; Admiraal, Wim; Cleutjens, Jack P. M.; Schutte, Bert; Verheyen, Fons; Ribes, Marta; van Loon, Emiel; de Goeij, Jasper M.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes in vivo cell turnover (the balance between cell proliferation and cell loss) in eight marine sponge species from tropical coral reef, mangrove and temperate Mediterranean reef ecosystems. Cell proliferation was determined through the incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and measuring the percentage of BrdU-positive cells after 6 h of continuous labeling (10 h for Chondrosia reniformis). Apoptosis was identified using an antibody against active caspase-3. Cell loss through shedding was studied quantitatively by collecting and weighing sponge-expelled detritus and qualitatively by light microscopy of sponge tissue and detritus. All species investigated displayed substantial cell proliferation, predominantly in the choanoderm, but also in the mesohyl. The majority of coral reef species (five) showed between 16.1±15.9% and 19.0±2.0% choanocyte proliferation (mean±SD) after 6 h and the Mediterranean species, C. reniformis, showed 16.6±3.2% after 10 h BrdU-labeling. Monanchora arbuscula showed lower choanocyte proliferation (8.1±3.7%), whereas the mangrove species Mycale microsigmatosa showed relatively higher levels of choanocyte proliferation (70.5±6.6%). Choanocyte proliferation in Haliclona vansoesti was variable (2.8–73.1%). Apoptosis was negligible and not the primary mechanism of cell loss involved in cell turnover. All species investigated produced significant amounts of detritus (2.5–18% detritus bodyweight−1·d−1) and cell shedding was observed in seven out of eight species. The amount of shed cells observed in histological sections may be related to differences in residence time of detritus within canals. Detritus production could not be directly linked to cell shedding due to the degraded nature of expelled cellular debris. We have demonstrated that under steady-state conditions, cell turnover through cell proliferation and cell shedding are common processes to maintain tissue homeostasis in a variety of sponge

  2. Isolation and cultivation of fungal strains from in vitro cell cultures of two marine sponges (Porifera: Halichondrida and Haplosclerida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique E. Rozas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of reports describing sponge-microbe associations, limited knowledge is available about associated fungi and their relationships with the hosts. In this work, specific fungal strains were obtained directly from in vitro sponge cell cultures (primmorphs and single sponge cells (cytospins and compared with those obtained from whole tissue preparations. A total of 27 fungal strains were isolated from the marine sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila and Haliclona melana. Fifteen strains, nine from H. heliophila and six from H. melana, were obtained from whole tissue and were considered as possible mesohyl associated or transient fungi. Twelve strains were isolated from in vitro sponge cell cultures (primmorphs and were, therefore, considered as cell associated. From these, five different strains were obtained from H. heliophila isolated cells, while five were identified from cytospins and two from primmorphs of H. melana. The fungal strains obtained from cell cultures from both sponge species were different, and none of them were detected in the whole tissue preparations of the same species. Nine H. heliophila and seven H. melana strains shows low similarity with the sequences available in public databases and belong to potentially new species. This is the first report of fungi isolated directly from sponge cells, which allowed the observation and selection of specific strains that probably would not be obtained by usual culture dependent techniques.

  3. A SARS-coronovirus 3CL protease inhibitor isolated from the marine sponge Axinella cf. corrugata: structure elucidation and synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Simone P. de; Seleghim, Mirna H.R.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: rgsberlinck@iqsc.usp.br; Williams, David E.; Marion, Frederic; Andersen, Raymond J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences; Hamill, Pamela; Jean, Francois [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Life Sciences Centre. Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology; Hajdu, Eduardo [Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-03-15

    Two coumarin derivatives, esculetin-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (1) and esculetin-4- carboxylic acid ethyl ester (2), have been isolated from the marine sponge Axinella cf. corrugata. Structure determination included analysis of spectroscopic data and total synthesis of compound 2. These are the first coumarin derivatives isolated from a marine sponge. The ethyl ester 2 was found to be an in vitro inhibitor of SARS 3CL-protease and an effective inhibitor of SARS-CoV replication in Vero cells at non-cytotoxic concentrations. (author)

  4. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Carleton R., E-mail: cbern@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 (United States); Chadwick, Oliver A. [Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 (United States); Kendall, Carol [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pribil, Michael J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ{sup 34}S VCDT) of − 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ{sup 34}S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil δ{sup 34}S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls

  5. Phylogeography of the Sponge Suberites diversicolor in Indonesia: Insights into the Evolution of Marine Lake Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becking, Leontine E.; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; de Voogd, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of multiple independently derived populations in landlocked marine lakes provides an opportunity for fundamental research into the role of isolation in population divergence and speciation in marine taxa. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea and could be regarded as the marine equivalents of terrestrial islands. The sponge Suberites diversicolor (Porifera: Demospongiae: Suberitidae) is typical of marine lake habitats in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Four molecular markers (two mitochondrial and two nuclear) were employed to study genetic structure of populations within and between marine lakes in Indonesia and three coastal locations in Indonesia, Singapore and Australia. Within populations of S. diversicolor two strongly divergent lineages (A & B) (COI: p = 0.4% and ITS: p = 7.3%) were found, that may constitute cryptic species. Lineage A only occurred in Kakaban lake (East Kalimantan), while lineage B was present in all sampled populations. Within lineage B, we found low levels of genetic diversity in lakes, though there was spatial genetic population structuring. The Australian population is genetically differentiated from the Indonesian populations. Within Indonesia we did not record an East-West barrier, which has frequently been reported for other marine invertebrates. Kakaban lake is the largest and most isolated marine lake in Indonesia and contains the highest genetic diversity with genetic variants not observed elsewhere. Kakaban lake may be an area where multiple putative refugia populations have come into secondary contact, resulting in high levels of genetic diversity and a high number of endemic species. PMID:24098416

  6. Phylogeography of the sponge Suberites diversicolor in Indonesia: insights into the evolution of marine lake populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontine E Becking

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple independently derived populations in landlocked marine lakes provides an opportunity for fundamental research into the role of isolation in population divergence and speciation in marine taxa. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea and could be regarded as the marine equivalents of terrestrial islands. The sponge Suberites diversicolor (Porifera: Demospongiae: Suberitidae is typical of marine lake habitats in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Four molecular markers (two mitochondrial and two nuclear were employed to study genetic structure of populations within and between marine lakes in Indonesia and three coastal locations in Indonesia, Singapore and Australia. Within populations of S. diversicolor two strongly divergent lineages (A & B (COI: p = 0.4% and ITS: p = 7.3% were found, that may constitute cryptic species. Lineage A only occurred in Kakaban lake (East Kalimantan, while lineage B was present in all sampled populations. Within lineage B, we found low levels of genetic diversity in lakes, though there was spatial genetic population structuring. The Australian population is genetically differentiated from the Indonesian populations. Within Indonesia we did not record an East-West barrier, which has frequently been reported for other marine invertebrates. Kakaban lake is the largest and most isolated marine lake in Indonesia and contains the highest genetic diversity with genetic variants not observed elsewhere. Kakaban lake may be an area where multiple putative refugia populations have come into secondary contact, resulting in high levels of genetic diversity and a high number of endemic species.

  7. Aeroplysinin-1, a Sponge-Derived Multi-Targeted Bioactive Marine Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A. García-Vilas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms lacking external defense mechanisms have developed chemical defense strategies, particularly through the production of secondary metabolites with antibiotic or repellent effects. Secondary metabolites from marine organisms have proven to be an exceptionally rich source of small molecules with pharmacological activities potentially beneficial to human health. (+-Aeroplysinin-1 is a secondary metabolite isolated from marine sponges with a wide spectrum of bio-activities. (+-Aeroplysinin-1 has potent antibiotic effects on Gram-positive bacteria and several dinoflagellate microalgae causing toxic blooms. In preclinical studies, (+-aeroplysinin-1 has been shown to have promising anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects. Due to its versatility, (+-aeroplysinin-1 might have a pharmaceutical interest for the treatment of different pathologies.

  8. Aeroplysinin-1, a Sponge-Derived Multi-Targeted Bioactive Marine Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vilas, Javier A.; Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Organisms lacking external defense mechanisms have developed chemical defense strategies, particularly through the production of secondary metabolites with antibiotic or repellent effects. Secondary metabolites from marine organisms have proven to be an exceptionally rich source of small molecules with pharmacological activities potentially beneficial to human health. (+)-Aeroplysinin-1 is a secondary metabolite isolated from marine sponges with a wide spectrum of bio-activities. (+)-Aeroplysinin-1 has potent antibiotic effects on Gram-positive bacteria and several dinoflagellate microalgae causing toxic blooms. In preclinical studies, (+)-aeroplysinin-1 has been shown to have promising anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects. Due to its versatility, (+)-aeroplysinin-1 might have a pharmaceutical interest for the treatment of different pathologies. PMID:26703630

  9. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of ingenamine G isolated from the Brazilian marine sponge Pachychalina alcaloidifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Sombra, Carla Maria Lima; de Oliveira, Jaine H H L; Berlinck, Roberto Gomes de Souza; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Pessoa, Claudia

    2008-05-01

    Marine sponges belonging to the order Haplosclerida are one of the more prolific sources of new natural products possessing various biological activities. The present study examined the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of ingenamine G, an alkaloid isolated from the Brazilian marine sponge Pachychalina alcaloidifera. Ingenamine G displayed a moderate cytotoxic activity against human proliferating lymphocytes evaluated by the MTT assay (IC(50) 15 microg/mL). The hemolytic assay showed that ingenamine G cytotoxic activity was not related to membrane disruption. The comet assay and chromosome aberration analysis were applied to determine the genotoxic and clastogenic potential of ingenamine G, respectively. Cultured human lymphocytes were treated with 5, 10, 15 and 20 microg/mL of ingenamine G during the G(1), G(1)/S, S (pulses of 1 and 6 h), and G(2) phases of the cell cycle. All tested concentrations were cytotoxic, reduced significantly the mitotic index, and were clastogenic in all phases of the cell cycle, especially in S phase. While an increase in DNA-strand breaks was observed starting with the concentration corresponding to the IC(50). The presence of genotoxicity and polyploidy during interphase and mitosis, respectively, suggests that ingenamine G at high concentrations is clastogenic and indirectly affects the construction of mitotic fuse.

  10. Trypanocidal activity of organic extracts from the Brazilian and Spanish marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Carreira de Paula

    Full Text Available Abstract Chagas' disease is a parasitic infection caused by protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi that affect millions of people worldwide. The available drugs for treatment of this infection cause serious side effects and have variable efficacy, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. In this context, natural compounds have shown great potential for the discovery of new chemotherapies for the treatment of this infection and various other diseases. In present study, we evaluated the in vitro antiprotozoal activity of five species of Brazilian and Spanish marine sponges (Condrosia reniformes, Tethya rubra, Tethya ignis, Mycale angulosa and Dysidea avara against T. cruzi. By GC–MS data, we observed that in these extracts were present the major classes of the following compounds: hydrocarbons, terpenes, steroids and alcohols. The extracts showed activity against the three forms of this parasite and did not induce toxicity in mammalian cells. Better activities were observed with the extracts of marine sponges, C. reniformes (EC50 = 0.6 μg/ml, D. avara (EC50 = 1.1 μg/ml and M. angulosa (EC50 = 3.8 μg/ml, against trypomastigote forms. In intracellular amastigote forms, the extract of T. ignis showed IC50 of 7.2 μg/ml and SI of 24.65. On this basis, our results indicate that these extracts can be promising chemotherapeutic agents against T. cruzi.

  11. Recovery and phylogenetic diversity of culturable fungi associated with marine sponges Clathrina luteoculcitella and Holoxea sp. in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bo; Yin, Ying; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2011-08-01

    Sponge-associated fungi represent an important source of marine natural products, but little is known about the fungal diversity and the relationship of sponge-fungal association, especially no research on the fungal diversity in the South China Sea sponge has been reported. In this study, a total of 111 cultivable fungi strains were isolated from two South China Sea sponges Clathrina luteoculcitella and Holoxea sp. using eight different media. Thirty-two independent representatives were selected for analysis of phylogenetic diversity according to ARDRA and morphological characteristics. The culturable fungal communities consisted of at least 17 genera within ten taxonomic orders of two phyla (nine orders of the phylum Ascomycota and one order of the phylum Basidiomycota) including some potential novel marine fungi. Particularly, eight genera of Apiospora, Botryosphaeria, Davidiella, Didymocrea, Lentomitella, Marasmius, Pestalotiopsis, and Rhizomucor were isolated from sponge for the first time. Sponge C. luteoculcitella has greater culturable fungal diversity than sponge Holoxea sp. Five genera of Aspergillus, Davidiella, Fusarium, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were isolated from both sponges, while 12 genera of Apiospora, Botryosphaeria, Candida, Marasmius, Cladosporium, Didymocrea, Hypocrea, Lentomitella, Nigrospora, Pestalotiopsis, Rhizomucor, and Scopulariopsis were isolated from sponge C. luteoculcitella only. Order Eurotiales especially genera Penicillium, Aspergillus, and order Hypocreales represented the dominant culturable fungi in these two South China Sea sponges. Nigrospora oryzae strain PF18 isolated from sponge C. luteoculcitella showed a strong and broad spectrum antimicrobial activities suggesting the potential for antimicrobial compounds production.

  12. Pyrosequencing characterization of the microbiota from Atlantic intertidal marine sponges reveals high microbial diversity and the lack of co-occurrence patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Anoop; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are ancient metazoans that host diverse and complex microbial communities. Sponge-associated microbial diversity has been studied from wide oceans across the globe, particularly in subtidal regions, but the microbial communities from intertidal sponges have remained mostly unexplored. Here we used pyrosequencing to characterize the microbial communities in 12 different co-occurring intertidal marine sponge species sampled from the Atlantic coast, revealing a total of 686 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% sequence similarity. Taxonomic assignment of 16S ribosomal RNA tag sequences estimated altogether 26 microbial groups, represented by bacterial (75.5%) and archaeal (22%) domains. Proteobacteria (43.4%) and Crenarchaeota (20.6%) were the most dominant microbial groups detected in all the 12 marine sponge species and ambient seawater. The Crenarchaeota microbes detected in three Atlantic Ocean sponges had a close similarity with Crenarchaeota from geographically separated subtidal Red Sea sponges. Our study showed that most of the microbial communities observed in sponges (73%) were also found in the surrounding ambient seawater suggesting possible environmental acquisition and/or horizontal transfer of microbes. Beyond the microbial diversity and community structure assessments (NMDS, ADONIS, ANOSIM), we explored the interactions between the microbial communities coexisting in sponges using the checkerboard score (C-score). Analyses of the microbial association pattern (co-occurrence) among intertidal sympatric sponges revealed the random association of microbes, favoring the hypothesis that the sponge-inhabiting microbes are recruited from the habitat mostly by chance or influenced by environmental factors to benefit the hosts.

  13. Onycocaris maui sp. nov., a new pontoniine sponge associate (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palaemonidae) from the Hawai'ian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, A J

    2013-01-01

    A new species of pontoniine shrimp, Onycocaris maui sp. nov., from Maui Island, Hawai'i, is described and illustrated. A heterosexual pair were found in an intertidal Haliclona sponge. A member of the O. quadratophthalma species group, its relationships are discussed and a key provided for their identification.

  14. Assessment of species composition, diversity, and biomass in marine habitats and subhabitats around offshore islets in the main Hawaiian islands, April 2 - September 20, 2007 (NCEI Accession 0042684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine algae, invertebrate and fish communities were surveyed at ten islet or offshore island sites in the Main Hawaiian Islands in the vicinity of Lanai, (Puu...

  15. Photographic Images of Benthic Coral, Algae, and Invertebrate Species in Marine Habitats and Subhabitats around Offshore Islets in the Main Hawaiian Islands 2007 (NODC Accession 0043046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine algae, invertebrate and fish communities were surveyed at ten islet or offshore island sites in the Main Hawaiian Islands in the vicinity of Lanai, (Puu...

  16. Assessment of Species Composition, Diversity, and Biomass in Marine Habitats and Subhabitats around Offshore Islets in the Main Hawaiian Islands 2007 (NODC Accession 0042684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine algae, invertebrate and fish communities were surveyed at ten islet or offshore island sites in the Main Hawaiian Islands in the vicinity of Lanai, (Puu...

  17. Defining Boundaries for Ecosystem-Based Management: A Multispecies Case Study of Marine Connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Toonen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the geographic scale at which to apply ecosystem-based management (EBM has proven to be an obstacle for many marine conservation programs. Generalizations based on geographic proximity, taxonomy, or life history characteristics provide little predictive power in determining overall patterns of connectivity, and therefore offer little in terms of delineating boundaries for marine spatial management areas. Here, we provide a case study of 27 taxonomically and ecologically diverse species (including reef fishes, marine mammals, gastropods, echinoderms, cnidarians, crustaceans, and an elasmobranch that reveal four concordant barriers to dispersal within the Hawaiian Archipelago which are not detected in single-species exemplar studies. We contend that this multispecies approach to determine concordant patterns of connectivity is an objective and logical way in which to define the minimum number of management units and that EBM in the Hawaiian Archipelago requires at least five spatially managed regions.

  18. Pentacyclic ingamine-type alkaloids, a new antiplasmodial pharmacophore from the marine sponge petrosid Ng5 Sp5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two new pentacyclic ingamine- type alkaloids, namely 22(S)-hydroxyingamine A (2) and dihydroingenamine D (3), together with the known ingamine A (1) have been isolated from marine sponge Petrosid Ng5 Sp5 (Family: Petrosiidae) obtained from the open repository of National Cancer Institute, USA. The s...

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Untenospongin B, a Metabolite from the Marine Sponge Hippospongia communis collected from the Atlantic Coast of Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Saida; Fassouane, Aziz; Kijjoa, Anake; Van Soest, Rob

    2004-01-01

    (−)-Untenospongin B isolated from the marine sponge Hippospongia communis has been tested for its antimicrobial activity against bacteria and human pathogenic fungi using agar disk method and was found to possess a broad and strong activity toward the test organisms. Its antifungal activity was further characterized by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against five fungal species using broth microdilution method.

  20. A brief review of potent anti-CNS tumourics from marine sponges: covering the period from 1994 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejin, Boris; Glumac, Miodrag

    2018-02-01

    This review covers the 1994-2014 literature data published for anti-CNS tumour natural products isolated from marine sponges. The focus was on highly potent antitumourics. It describes only eight promising bioactives (screened on even less number of the respective cell lines) suggesting that brain tumours actually represent quite a hot topic for the natural product research community worldwide.

  1. Temporal variability of marine debris deposition at Tern Island in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustin, Alyssa E; Merrifield, Mark A; Potemra, James T; Morishige, Carey

    2015-12-15

    A twenty-two year record of marine debris collected on Tern Island is used to characterize the temporal variability of debris deposition at a coral atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Debris deposition tends to be episodic, without a significant relationship to local forcing processes associated with winds, sea level, waves, and proximity to the Subtropical Convergence Zone. The General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment is used to estimate likely debris pathways for Tern Island. The majority of modeled arrivals come from the northeast following prevailing trade winds and surface currents, with trajectories indicating the importance of the convergence zone, or garbage patch, in the North Pacific High region. Although debris deposition does not generally exhibit a significant seasonal cycle, some debris types contain considerable 3 cycle/yr variability that is coherent with wind and surface pressure over a broad region north of Tern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Study the antimicrobial activity of six marine sponges and three parts of sea anemone on Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Hamayeli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antifungal and inhibitory activity of six different species of marine sponges and one species of sea anemone that were collected from the Persian Gulf on the growth of Candida albicans (C. albicans. Methods: Sea anemone and six different sponges were gathered from the Persian Gulf and extracted by methanol macerated with dichloromethane solvents. The activity of each extracts against C. albicans was determined by paper disc diffusion and agar well diffusion methods. Also, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration of each extract were determined. Results: The finding of current research confirmed that all sponge extracts had sufficient inhibitory effect against C. albicans but the extracts of sponge type 2 and 5 had the best inhibitory effect on C. albicans and their zones of inhibition were 45 mm and 38 mm, respectively. The tentacle of sea anemone had the best inhibitory effect against C. albicans compared to other part of the body and its zone of inhibition was 41 mm. Besides, the sponge type 5 extracts had the best minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration values with 6.25 and 12.5 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the crude extracts of six different sponges and sea anemone have high potential to produce broad spectral antifungal activity with minimal concentration against different pathogenic fungi.

  3. Marine microbial symbiosis heats up: the phylogenetic and functional response of a sponge holobiont to thermal stress

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Lu; Liu, Michael; Simister, Rachel; Webster, Nicole S; Thomas, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale mortality of marine invertebrates is a major global concern for ocean ecosystems and many sessile, reef-building animals, such as sponges and corals, are experiencing significant declines through temperature-induced disease and bleaching. The health and survival of marine invertebrates is often dependent on intimate symbiotic associations with complex microbial communities, yet we have a very limited understanding of the detailed biology and ecology of both the host and the symbio...

  4. Speciation of americium in seawater and accumulation in the marine sponge Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Michel, Hervé; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Oberhaensli, François R; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie Yasmine; Thomas, Olivier P; Monfort, Marguerite; Moulin, Christophe; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2015-12-21

    The fate of radionuclides in the environment is a cause of great concern for modern society, seen especially in 2011 after the Fukushima accident. Among the environmental compartments, seawater covers most of the earth's surface and may be directly or indirectly impacted. The interaction between radionuclides and the marine compartment is therefore essential for better understanding the transfer mechanisms from the hydrosphere to the biosphere. This information allows for the evaluation of the impact on humans via our interaction with the biotope that has been largely undocumented up to now. In this report, we attempt to make a link between the speciation of heavy elements in natural seawater and their uptake by a model marine organism. More specifically, because the interaction of actinides with marine invertebrates has been poorly studied, the accumulation in a representative member of the Mediterranean coralligenous habitat, the sponge Aplysina cavernicola, was investigated and its uptake curve exposed to a radiotracer (241)Am was estimated using a high-purity Ge gamma spectrometer. But in order to go beyond the phenomenological accumulation rate, the speciation of americium(III) in seawater must be assessed. The speciation of (241)Am (and natural europium as its chemically stable surrogate) in seawater was determined using a combination of different techniques: Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the LIII edge, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the resulting data were compared with the speciation modeling. In seawater, the americium(III) complex (as well as the corresponding europium complex, although with conformational differences) was identified as a ternary sodium biscarbonato complex, whose formula can be tentatively written as NaAm(CO3)2·nH2O. It is therefore this chemical form of americium that is

  5. The antimicrobial activity of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from the marine sponge Erylus deficiens (Astrophorida, Geodiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia Graça

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the study of marine sponges and their associated microbiome has increased both for ecological reasons and for their great biotechnological potential. In this work, heterotrophic bacteria associated with three specimens of the marine sponge Erylus deficiens, were isolated in pure culture, phylogenetically identified and screened for antimicrobial activity. The isolation of bacteria after an enrichment treatment in heterotrophic medium revealed diversity in bacterial composition with only Pseudoalteromonas being shared by two specimens. Of the 83 selected isolates, 58% belong to Proteobacteria, 23 % to Actinobacteria and 19 % to Firmicutes. Diffusion agar assays for bioactivity screening against four bacterial strains and one yeast, revealed that a high number of the isolated bacteria (68.7 % were active, particularly against Candida albicans and Vibrio anguillarum. Pseudoalteromonas, Microbacterium and Proteus were the most bioactive genera. After this preliminary screening, the bioactive strains were further evaluated in liquid assays against C. albicans, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Filtered culture medium and acetone extracts from three and five days-old cultures were assayed. High antifungal activity against C. albicans in both aqueous and acetone extracts as well as absence of activity against B. subtilis were confirmed. Higher levels of activity were obtained with the aqueous extracts when compared to the acetone extracts and differences were also observed between the 3 and 5 day-old extracts. Furthermore, a low number of active strains was observed against E. coli. Potential presence of type-I polyketide synthases (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs genes were detected in seventeen and thirty isolates, respectively. The high levels of bioactivity and the likely presence of associated genes suggest that Erylus deficiens bacteria are potential sources of novel marine bioactive compounds.

  6. Characterisation of non-autoinducing tropodithietic Acid (TDA) production from marine sponge Pseudovibrio species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Catriona; Reen, F Jerry; Mooij, Marlies J; Stewart, Fiona A; Chabot, Jean-Baptiste; Guerra, Antonio F; Glöckner, Frank O; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone; Dobson, Alan D W; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2014-12-10

    The search for new antimicrobial compounds has gained added momentum in recent years, paralleled by the exponential rise in resistance to most known classes of current antibiotics. While modifications of existing drugs have brought some limited clinical success, there remains a critical need for new classes of antimicrobial compound to which key clinical pathogens will be naive. This has provided the context and impetus to marine biodiscovery programmes that seek to isolate and characterize new activities from the aquatic ecosystem. One new antibiotic to emerge from these initiatives is the antibacterial compound tropodithietic acid (TDA). The aim of this study was to provide insight into the bioactivity of and the factors governing the production of TDA in marine Pseudovibrio isolates from a collection of marine sponges. The TDA produced by these Pseudovibrio isolates exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of clinical pathogens, while TDA tolerance was frequent in non-TDA producing marine isolates. Comparative genomics analysis suggested a high degree of conservation among the tda biosynthetic clusters while expression studies revealed coordinated regulation of TDA synthesis upon transition from log to stationary phase growth, which was not induced by TDA itself or by the presence of the C10-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signal molecule.

  7. Insights into the lifestyle of uncultured bacterial natural product factories associated with marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Gerald; Peters, Eike Edzard; Helfrich, Eric J N; Piel, Jörn

    2017-01-17

    The as-yet uncultured filamentous bacteria "Candidatus Entotheonella factor" and "Candidatus Entotheonella gemina" live associated with the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei Y, the source of numerous unusual bioactive natural products. Belonging to the proposed candidate phylum "Tectomicrobia," Candidatus Entotheonella members are only distantly related to any cultivated organism. The Ca E. factor has been identified as the source of almost all polyketide and modified peptides families reported from the sponge host, and both Ca Entotheonella phylotypes contain numerous additional genes for as-yet unknown metabolites. Here, we provide insights into the biology of these remarkable bacteria using genomic, (meta)proteomic, and chemical methods. The data suggest a metabolic model of Ca Entotheonella as facultative anaerobic, organotrophic organisms with the ability to use methanol as an energy source. The symbionts appear to be auxotrophic for some vitamins, but have the potential to produce most amino acids as well as rare cofactors like coenzyme F420 The latter likely accounts for the strong autofluorescence of Ca Entotheonella filaments. A large expansion of protein families involved in regulation and conversion of organic molecules indicates roles in host-bacterial interaction. In addition, a massive overrepresentation of members of the luciferase-like monooxygenase superfamily points toward an important role of these proteins in Ca Entotheonella. Furthermore, we performed mass spectrometric imaging combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize Ca Entotheonella and some of the bioactive natural products in the sponge tissue. These metabolic insights into a new candidate phylum offer hints on the targeted cultivation of the chemically most prolific microorganisms known from microbial dark matter.

  8. Metabolomic Profiling and Genomic Study of a Marine Sponge-Associated Streptomyces sp.

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    Christina Viegelmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics and genomics are two complementary platforms for analyzing an organism as they provide information on the phenotype and genotype, respectively. These two techniques were applied in the dereplication and identification of bioactive compounds from a Streptomyces sp. (SM8 isolated from the sponge Haliclona simulans from Irish waters. Streptomyces strain SM8 extracts showed antibacterial and antifungal activity. NMR analysis of the active fractions proved that hydroxylated saturated fatty acids were the major components present in the antibacterial fractions. Antimycin compounds were initially putatively identified in the antifungal fractions using LC-Orbitrap. Their presence was later confirmed by comparison to a standard. Genomic analysis of Streptomyces sp. SM8 revealed the presence of multiple secondary metabolism gene clusters, including a gene cluster for the biosynthesis of the antifungal antimycin family of compounds. The antimycin gene cluster of Streptomyces sp. SM8 was inactivated by disruption of the antimycin biosynthesis gene antC. Extracts from this mutant strain showed loss of antimycin production and significantly less antifungal activity than the wild-type strain. Three butenolides, 4,10-dihydroxy-10-methyl-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (1, 4,11-dihydroxy-10-methyl-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (2, and 4-hydroxy-10-methyl-11-oxo-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (3 that had previously been reported from marine Streptomyces species were also isolated from SM8. Comparison of the extracts of Streptomyces strain SM8 and its host sponge, H. simulans, using LC-Orbitrap revealed the presence of metabolites common to both extracts, providing direct evidence linking sponge metabolites to a specific microbial symbiont.

  9. Natural collagenic skeleton of marine sponges in pharmaceutics: Innovative biomaterial for topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langasco, Rita; Cadeddu, Barbara; Formato, Marilena; Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Cossu, Massimo; Giunchedi, Paolo; Pronzato, Roberto; Rassu, Giovanna; Manconi, Renata; Gavini, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in the use of recyclable and biodegradable natural materials has become a relevant topic in pharmaceutics. In this work, we suggest the use and valorization of natural horny skeleton of marine sponges (Porifera, Dictyoceratida) as bio-based dressing for topical drug delivery. Biomaterial characterization focusing on morpho-functional traits, swelling behavior, fluid uptake performances, glycosaminoglycans content and composition and microbiological quality assessment was carried out to investigate the collagenic skeleton properties. After grinding and sieving processes, l-cysteine hydrochloride-loaded formulations were designed in form of powder or polymeric film by testing various drug concentrations and different drying parameters. Drug content, SEM analyses and in vitro permeation studies were performed to test the suitability of skeleton-based formulations. To this respect, drying time and temperature are key parameters for skeleton-mediated drug crystallization. Consequently, this behavior seems to influence drug loading and permeation profiles of formulations. The high percentages of drug are found after absorption into sponge powder and in vitro permeation studies demonstrate that cysteine is released more slowly than the pure drug within 1h. Such a system is attractive because it combines the known healing properties of cysteine with the advantageous potentials of the collagen/proteoglycan network, which can act as biocompatible carrier able to absorb the excess of the wound exudate while releasing the drug. Furthermore, due to its glycosaminoglycans content, natural sponge skeletal scaffold might act as bioactive-biomimetic carrier regulating the wound healing processes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Carbon, Nitrogen, and Mercury Isotope Evidence for the Biogeochemical History of Mercury in Hawaiian Marine Bottomfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Dana K; Drazen, Jeffrey C; Popp, Brian N; Choy, C Anela; Blum, Joel D; Johnson, Marcus W

    2017-11-22

    The complex biogeochemical cycle of Hg makes identifying primary sources of fish tissue Hg problematic. To identify sources and provide insight into this cycle, we combined carbon (δ13C), nitrogen amino acid (δ15NPhe), and Hg isotope (Δ199Hg, Δ201Hg, δ202Hg) data for six species of Hawaiian marine bottomfish. Results from these isotopic systems identified individuals within species that likely fed from separate food webs. Terrestrial freshwater inputs to coastal sediments were identified as the primary source of tissue Hg in the jack species, Caranx ignobilis, which inhabit shallow marine ecosystems. Thus, coastal C. ignobilis were a biological vector transporting Hg from freshwater environments into marine ecosystems. Depth profiles of Hg isotopic compositions for bottomfish (excludung C. ignobilis) were similar, but not identical, to profiles for open-ocean pelagic fishes, suggesting that in both settings inorganic Hg, which was ultimately transformed to monomethylmercury (MeHg) and bioaccumulated, was dominantly from a single source. However, differences between pelagic fish and bottomfish profiles were attributable to mass-dependent fractionation in the benthos prior to incorporation into the food web. Results also confirmed that bottomfish relied, at least in part, on a benthic food web and identified the incorporation of deeper water oceanic MeHg sources into deeper water sediments prior to food web uptake and transfer.

  11. Optimization and production of novel antimicrobial agents from sponge associated marine actinomycetes Nocardiopsis dassonvillei MAD08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Joseph; Shanmughapriya, S; Gandhimathi, R; Seghal Kiran, G; Rajeetha Ravji, T; Natarajaseenivasan, K; Hema, T A

    2009-06-01

    The sponge-associated actinomycetes were isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra, collected from the southwest coast of India. Eleven actinomycetes were isolated depending upon the heterogeneity and stability in subculturing. Among these, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei MAD08 showed 100% activity against the multidrug resistant pathogens tested. The culture conditions of N. dassonvillei MAD08 was optimized under submerged fermentation conditions for enhanced antimicrobial production. The unique feature of MAD08 includes extracellular amylase, cellulase, lipase, and protease production. These enzymes ultimately increase the scope of optimization using broad range of raw materials which might be efficiently utilized. The extraction of the cell free supernatant with ethyl acetate yielded bioactive crude extract that displayed activity against a panel of pathogens tested. Analysis of the active thin layer chromatography fraction by Fourier transform infrared and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry evidenced 11 compounds with antimicrobial activity. The ammonium sulfate precipitation of the culture supernatant at 80% saturation yielded an anticandidal protein of molecular weight 87.12 kDa. This is the first strain that produces both organic solvent and water soluble antimicrobial compounds. The active extract was non-hemolytic and showed surface active property envisaging its probable role in inhibiting the attachment of pathogens to host tissues, thus, blocking host-pathogen interaction at an earlier stage of pathogenesis.

  12. Strain-weakening rheology of marine sponges and its evolutionary implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Emily; Janmey, Paul; Sweeney, Alison; van Oosten, Anne

    Animal cells respond to mechanical stimuli as sensitively as they do to chemical stimuli. Further, cell proliferation is dependent on the viscoelasticity of the polymeric extracellular matrix (ECM) in which they are embedded. Biophysicists are therefore motivated to understand the biomechanics of the ECM itself. To date, this work has focused on the more familiar Bilateria, animals, including humans, with bilateral symmetry. The ECM of this group of animals is now understood to exhibit non-linear rheology that is typically strain- and compression-stiffening, and shear moduli that are frequency-dependent. These complex properties have been attributed to the semi-flexible nature of the underlying polymers. In contrast, we show that marine sponges are markedly strain-weakening under physiologically relevant conditions. Since sponges are a much earlier evolutionary branch than Bilateria, we interrogate the evolutionary potential and biochemical underpinnings of this novel complex rheology in filamentous networks, and cells ability to respond. Further, their life history strategy is uniquely dependent on flow and correlated shear stress, making them a model organism to study self-assembly algorithms organized around flow.

  13. Biological Activities of Aqueous and Organic Extracts from Tropical Marine Sponges

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    Tom Turk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on screening tests of 66 extracts obtained from 35 marine sponge species from the Caribbean Sea (Curaçao and from eight species from the Great Barrier Reef (Lizard Island. Extracts were prepared in aqueous and organic solvents and were tested for hemolytic, hemagglutinating, antibacterial and anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE activities, as well as their ability to inhibit or activate cell protein phosphatase 1 (PP1. The most interesting activities were obtained from extracts of Ircinia felix, Pandaros acanthifolium, Topsentia ophiraphidites, Verongula rigida and Neofibularia nolitangere. Aqueous and organic extracts of I. felix and V. rigida showed strong antibacterial activity. Topsentia aqueous and some organic extracts were strongly hemolytic, as were all organic extracts from I. felix. The strongest hemolytic activity was observed in aqueous extracts from P. acanthifolium. Organic extracts of N. nolitangere and I. felix inhibited PP1. The aqueous extract from Myrmekioderma styx possessed the strongest hemagglutinating activity, whilst AChE inhibiting activity was found only in a few sponges and was generally weak, except in the methanolic extract of T. ophiraphidites.

  14. New R/V Falkor Multibeam Data from the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. R., Jr.; Kelley, C.; Boston, B.; Dechnik, B.; Habel, S.; Harrison, L.; Leonard, J.; Lichowski, F.; Luers, D.; Miller, J. E.; Orange, R.; Patterson, M. A.; Shiro, B.; Taylor, J.; Togia, H.; Tree, J. P.; Tucker, J.; Wagner, D.; Webster, J.; Wright, N.

    2014-12-01

    From March to June 2014, the Schmidt Ocean Institute, along with National Marine Sanctuaries and the National Science Foundation, supported 72 days of mapping surveys on two cruises using R/V Falkor in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM) located within the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). PMNM is one of the largest marine protected areas in the world. Approximately 127,000 km2, 35% of the PMNM, were surveyed using dual multibeam systems from less than 30 to >5000 meters water depth, and thus covering the habitat depth ranges for shallow living corals, mesophotic corals, drowned reefs, to deep-sea corals and sponge communities. A total of 18 seamounts, guyots, banks, or atoll flanks (e.g., Midway and Kure) were mapped in the upper northwestern section of the monument, including the generically named Bank 9 Seamount, which appears to be a composite of a younger Hawaiian seamount and an older Cretaceous guyot. The middle segment of the PMNM consists mostly of large volcanic rift zone ridges and broad carbonate platforms. The rift zones located there are comparable in shape and size with those off Maui and the Island of Hawai'i in the main islands. Likewise, the magnitude of the largest carbonate platform of Gardner Pinnacles suggests its original high island may have met or exceeded the enormity of the Island of Hawai'i. Furthermore, the new mapping data have revealed the detail of numerous landslides and their deposits all along the chain, including an unusual rift zone flank failure creating a knife-edge ridge off Pioneer Bank. Dives with the Pisces V submersible were previously carried out on this feature, where extensive filter feeding biological communities were discovered. Not to be overlooked, the sidescan backscatter component of the multibeam data proved essential for identifying subtle reef features, numerous carbonate terraces, and debris channels that appear to transport sediment down the edifice flanks to the deep seafloor

  15. New bioactive halenaquinone derivatives from South Pacific marine sponges of the genus Xestospongia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longeon, Arlette; Copp, Brent R; Roué, Mélanie; Dubois, Joëlle; Valentin, Alexis; Petek, Sylvain; Debitus, Cécile; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise

    2010-08-15

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of South Pacific marine sponges of the genus Xestospongia has led to the isolation of a number of halenaquinone-type polyketides, including two new derivatives named xestosaprol C methylacetal 7 and orhalquinone 8. Chemical characterization of these two new compounds was achieved by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies. Evaluation of anti-phospholipase A(2), anti-farnesyltransferase and antiplasmodial activities of this series is presented and structure/activity relationships are discussed. Orhalquinone 8 displayed a significant inhibition of both human and yeast farnesyltransferase enzymes, with IC(50) value of 0.40 microM and was a moderate growth inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Marine sponge skeleton photosensitized by copper phthalocyanine: A catalyst for Rhodamine B degradation

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    Norman Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined approach to photo-assisted degradation processes, in which a catalyst, H2O2 and UV irradiation are used together to enhance the oxidation of Rhodamine B (RB. The heterogeneous photocatalyst was made by the process of adsorption of copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (CuPC onto purified spongin-based Hippospongia communis marine sponge skeleton (HcS. The product obtained, CuPC-HcS, was investigated by a variety of spectroscopic (carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance 13C NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FTIR, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy EDS and microscopic techniques (scanning electron microscopy SEM, fluorescent and optical microscopy, as well as thermal analysis. The study confirms the stable combination of the adsorbent and adsorbate. For a 10 mg/L RB solution, the percentage degradation reached 95% using CuPC-HcS as a heterocatalyst. The mechanism of RB removal involves adsorption and photodegradation simultaneously.

  17. Bioactive indole derivatives from the South Pacific marine sponges Rhopaloeides odorabile and Hyrtios sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longeon, Arlette; Copp, Brent R; Quévrain, Elodie; Roué, Mélanie; Kientz, Betty; Cresteil, Thierry; Petek, Sylvain; Debitus, Cécile; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise

    2011-01-01

    Indole derivatives including bromoindoles have been isolated from the South Pacific marine sponges Rhopaloeides odorabile and Hyrtios sp. Their structures were established through analysis of mass spectra and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. Their potential inhibitory phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂), antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were evaluated. The new derivative 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine (9) isolated from Hyrtios sp. revealed a weak bee venom PLA₂ inhibition (IC₅₀ 0.2 mM) and a significant antioxidant activity with an Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) value of 0.22. The sesquiterpene aureol (4), also isolated from Hyrtios sp., showed the most potent antioxidant activity with an ORAC value of 0.29.

  18. New butenolide derivatives from the marine sponge-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yating; Liu, Jingtang; Li, Lei; Gong, Chi; Wang, Shuping; Yang, Fan; Hua, Huiming; Lin, Houwen

    2017-12-22

    Two new butenolide derivatives (±)-asperteretal D ((±)-1) and asperteretal E (2) containing rare 2-benzyl-3-phenyl substituted lactone core, together with nine known analogues (3-11) were obtained from a fungus Aspergillus terreus derived from the marine sponge Phakellia fusca. All the structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive NMR spectroscopic data. The chiral chromatography analyses allowed the separation of the (±)-asperteretal D, of which the absolute configurations were determined by comparing the experimental to calculated electronic circular dichroic (ECD) spectra. Compounds (±)-1, 2-5, and 7 exhibited potent inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase with IC 50 values ranging from 8.65 to 20.3 µM (positive control acarbose with an IC 50 value of 320 µM). In addition, derivatives 5-8 also showed moderate antioxidant activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Bioactive Indole Derivatives from the South Pacific Marine Sponges Rhopaloeides odorabile and Hyrtios sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Lise Bourguet-Kondracki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Indole derivatives including bromoindoles have been isolated from the South Pacific marine sponges Rhopaloeides odorabile and Hyrtios sp. Their structures were established through analysis of mass spectra and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. Their potential inhibitory phospholipase A2 (PLA2, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were evaluated. The new derivative 5,6-dibromo-l-hypaphorine (9 isolated from Hyrtios sp. revealed a weak bee venom PLA2 inhibition (IC50 0.2 mM and a significant antioxidant activity with an Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC value of 0.22. The sesquiterpene aureol (4, also isolated from Hyrtios sp., showed the most potent antioxidant activity with an ORAC value of 0.29.

  20. Unusual Anti-allergic Diterpenoids from the Marine Sponge Hippospongia lachne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Li-Li; Yu, Hao-Bing; Wang, Jie; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Cheng, Bao-Hui; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Yong-Jun; Gu, Bin-Bin; Song, Shao-Jiang; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Hipposponlachnins A (1) and B (2), possessing an unprecedented tetracyclo [9.3.0.02,8.03,7] tetradecane ring system, and the probable biogenetic precursor [3, (1R*,2E,4R*,7E,10S*,11S*,12R*)-10, 18-diacetoxydolabella-2,7-dien-6-one] of 1‒2 were isolated from the South China Sea marine sponge Hippospongia lachne. The structures of the novel compounds were determined using integrated spectroscopic methods in combination with single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 1‒2 showed potent inhibitory activity on the release of β-hexosaminidase, a biomarker for degranulation, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 and lipid mediator LTB4 in DNP-IgE-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells.

  1. New 2-Methoxy Acetylenic Acids and Pyrazole Alkaloids from the Marine Sponge Cinachyrella sp.

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    Amin Mokhlesi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Three new 2-methoxy acetylenic acids (1–3 and a known derivative (4, in addition to three new natural pyrazole alkaloids (5–7 were isolated from an Indonesian marine sponge of the genus Cinachyrella. Compounds 5 and 6 have previously been reported as synthetic compounds. The structures of the new compounds were established on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometric data. The absolute configuration of the new acetylenic acid derivatives (1–3 was established by ECD spectroscopy. All isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Compounds 1–4 exhibited strong activity with an IC50 value of 0.3 µM. A plausible biosynthetic pathway for the pyrazole metabolites 5–7 is proposed.

  2. Six New Polyacetylenic Alcohols from the Marine Sponges Petrosia sp. and Halichondria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Adeyemi Francis; Li, Zhen; Kusuda, Ryouhei; Tanaka, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Tomofumi

    2015-01-01

    Six new polyacetylenic alcohols, termed strongylotriols A and B; pellynols J, K, and L; and isopellynol A, together with three known polyacetylenic alcohols, pellynols A, B, and C were isolated from the marine sponges Petrosia sp., and Halichondria sp. collected in Okinawa, Japan. Their planer structures were determined based on 2D-NMR and mass spectrometric analysis of the degraded products by RuCl3 oxidation. The absolute stereochemistry of isolates was examined by their Mosher's esters. The strongylotriols were found to be optically pure compounds, whereas the pellynols are diastereomeric mixtures at the C-6 position. Proliferation experiments using the HeLa and K562 cell lines suggested that the essential structural units for activity are the "hexa-2,4-diyn-1,6-diol" and "pent-1-en-4-yn-3-ol" on the termini.

  3. A New 1,4-Diazepine from South China Sea Marine Sponge Callyspongia Species

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    Shi-Hai Xu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A new 1,4-diazepine, callysponine (1, was isolated from a South China Sea Callyspongia sp. marine sponge, together with four known proline-based diketopiperazines: cyclo-(S-Pro-R-Leu (2, cyclo-(S-Pro-R-Val (3, cyclo-(S-Pro-R-Ala (4, andcyclo-(S-Pro-R-Tyr (5. The new structure was determined on the basis of NMR and MS analysis, and the absolute stereochemistry was defined by NOESY spectroscopy and optical rotation. The structures of the known compounds were identified by comparison of their spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. Callysponine (1 did not inhibit the growth of HepG2 (hepatoma carcinoma cell, A549 (lung carcinoma cell, and HeLa (cervical cancer cell cell lines.

  4. Haliscosamine: a new antifungal sphingosine derivative from the Moroccan marine sponge Haliclona viscosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Amraoui, Belkassem; Biard, Jean-Fançois; Fassouane, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    In the aim of searching for new antifungal products from marine origin, we have isolated a sphingosine derivative, (9Z)-2-amino-docos-9-ene-1,3,13,14-tetraol (Haliscosamine) from the Moroccan sea sponge Haliclona viscosa using bio-guided (antifungal) HPLC methods. The molecular structure of this compound was elucidated by spectrometric techniques IR, UV, MS and NMR. The isolated metabolite showed a significant antifungal activity against Cryptococcus and Candida species and a weak general toxicity in the brine shrimp lethality test. Further research is needed to study its in vivo activity, as well as to elucidate the mechanism underlying its activity in the hope of a future use in medical mycology.

  5. Inhibitory activity of marine sponge-derived natural products against parasitic protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Ilkay; Sener, Bilge; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2010-01-15

    In this study, thirteen sponge-derived terpenoids, including five linear furanoterpenes: furospinulosin-1 (1), furospinulosin-2 (2), furospongin-1 (3), furospongin-4 (4), and demethylfurospongin-4 (5); four linear meroterpenes: 2-(hexaprenylmethyl)-2-methylchromenol (6), 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid (7), 4-hydroxy-3-tetraprenyl-phenylacetic acid (8), and heptaprenyl-p-quinol (9); a linear triterpene, squalene (10); two spongian-type diterpenes dorisenone D (11) and 11 beta-acetoxyspongi-12-en-16-one (12); a scalarane-type sesterterpene; 12-epi-deoxoscalarin (13), as well as an indole alkaloid, tryptophol (14) were screened for their in vitro activity against four parasitic protozoa; Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum. Cytotoxic potential of the compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed. All compounds were active against T. brucei rhodesiense, with compound 8 being the most potent (IC(50) 0.60 microg/mL), whereas 9 and 12 were the most active compounds against T. cruzi, with IC(50) values around 4 microg/mL. Compound 12 showed the strongest leishmanicidal activity (IC(50) 0.75 microg/mL), which was comparable to that of miltefosine (IC(50) 0.20 microg/mL). The best antiplasmodial effect was exerted by compound 11 (IC(50) 0.43 microg/mL), followed by compounds 7, 10, and 12 with IC(50) values around 1 microg/mL. Compounds 9, 11 and 12 exhibited, besides their antiprotozoal activity, also some cytotoxicity, whereas all other compounds had low or no cytotoxicity towards the mammalian cell line. This is the first report of antiprotozoal activity of marine metabolites 1-14, and points out the potential of marine sponges in discovery of new antiprotozoal lead compounds.

  6. Inhibitory Activity of Marine Sponge-Derived Natural Products against Parasitic Protozoa

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    Deniz Tasdemir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thirteen sponge-derived terpenoids, including five linear furanoterpenes: furospinulosin-1 (1, furospinulosin-2 (2, furospongin-1 (3, furospongin-4 (4, and demethylfurospongin-4 (5; four linear meroterpenes: 2-(hexaprenylmethyl-2-methylchromenol (6, 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid (7, 4-hydroxy-3-tetraprenyl-phenylacetic acid (8, and heptaprenyl-p-quinol (9; a linear triterpene, squalene (10; two spongian-type diterpenes dorisenone D (11 and 11β-acetoxyspongi-12-en-16-one (12; a scalarane-type sesterterpene; 12-epi-deoxoscalarin (13, as well as an indole alkaloid, tryptophol (14 were screened for their in vitro activity against four parasitic protozoa; Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum. Cytotoxic potential of the compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed. All compounds were active against T. brucei rhodesiense, with compound 8 being the most potent (IC50 0.60 μg/mL, whereas 9 and 12 were the most active compounds against T. cruzi, with IC50 values around 4 μg/mL. Compound 12 showed the strongest leishmanicidal activity (IC50 0.75 µg/mL, which was comparable to that of miltefosine (IC50 0.20 µg/mL. The best antiplasmodial effect was exerted by compound 11 (IC50 0.43 µg/mL, followed by compounds 7, 10, and 12 with IC50 values around 1 µg/mL. Compounds 9, 11 and 12 exhibited, besides their antiprotozoal activity, also some cytotoxicity, whereas all other compounds had low or no cytotoxicity towards the mammalian cell line. This is the first report of antiprotozoal activity of marine metabolites 1–14, and points out the potential of marine sponges in discovery of new antiprotozoal lead compounds.

  7. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Sponges Containing Dibrominated Indolic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Stefanucci

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum. produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine, 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products.

  8. Synthesis and bioactivity of secondary metabolites from marine sponges containing dibrominated indolic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Adriano; Locatelli, Marcello; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Pinnen, Francesco

    2012-05-21

    Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum.) produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine), 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products.

  9. Diversity and antibacterial activity of bacteria isolated from the coastal marine sponges Amphilectus fucorum and Eurypon major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margassery, L M; Kennedy, J; O'Gara, F; Dobson, A D; Morrissey, J P

    2012-07-01

    To assess the diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable bacteria associated with two temperate-water marine sponges, Amphilectus fucorum and Eurypon major. Sponge samples were collected in August 2008 and bacteria were cultured on several different media. The 16S rRNA gene of representative strains was sequenced to allow classification. It was found that Proteobacteria were the dominant group of bacteria cultured from both sponges, but overall, the bacterial composition was diverse and distinct between the sponges. The most notable features were the significantly higher proportion of firmicutes in E. major and the low frequency of actinobacteria in both sponges. Four bacterial isolates were identified as potentially novel species and will be characterised in future studies. Approximately 400 cultured bacteria were screened for antimicrobial activity against a collection of indicator strains, with only eight strains, all Pseudovibrio spp., displaying any such activity. These strains were active against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis but not Staphylococcus aureus or a selection of fungal strains. Diverse and distinct populations of culturable bacteria are present in the coastal sponges A. fucorum and E. major. Only a minority of isolates produce antibacterial metabolites in culture, but this activity is common in Pseudovibrio spp. This study illustrates the diversity of sponge-associated bacteria and the need to increase our knowledge about the function of these symbiotic bacteria. The data suggest that production of antibacterial metabolites is restricted to a subset of species, with the majority involved in other functions. The importance of Pseudovibrio as a reservoir of antibacterial metabolites is also highlighted. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Marine Protected Areas, Multiple-Agency Management, and Monumental Surprise in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. Kittinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Large, regional-scale marine protected areas (MPAs and MPA networks face different challenges in governance systems than locally managed or community-based MPAs. An emerging theme in large-scale MPA management is the prevalence of governance structures that rely on institutional collaboration, presenting new challenges as agencies with differing mandates and cultures work together to implement ecosystem-based management. We analyzed qualitative interview data to investigate multi-level social interactions and institutional responses to the surprise establishment of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (monument in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI. The governance arrangement for the monument represents a new model in US MPA management, requiring two federal agencies and the State of Hawai‘i to collaboratively manage the NWHI. We elucidate the principal barriers to institutional cotrusteeship, characterize institutional transformations that have occurred among the partner agencies in the transition to collaborative management, and evaluate the governance arrangement for the monument as a model for MPAs. The lessons learned from the NWHI governance arrangement are critical as large-scale MPAs requiring multiple-agency management become a prevalent feature on the global seascape.

  11. Marine sponge: a potential source for methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the Asia-Pacific food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Koichi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Endo, Tetsuya

    2011-12-28

    Marine sponges collected in Palau, Micronesia, were investigated for hydroxylated or methoxylated analogues of brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs), brominated dibenzo-p-dioxin (BDD), and brominated biphenyls. The neutral fractions of Haliclona sp. and Callyspongia sp. contained 2'-methoxy-2,3',4,5'-tetraBDE, 6-methoxy-2,2',4,4'-tetraBDE, 2',6-dimethoxy-2,3',4,5-tetraBDE 2,2'-dimethoxy-3,3',5,5'-tetrabromobiphenyl, several methoxy-triBDEs, and dimethoxy-penta-/hexaBDEs. The methoxylated BDEs in sponges were strikingly similar to those of local fish living in the western Pacific Ocean. The total concentrations of these compounds (ΣMeO-PBDE) in both sponges were 63.5 μg/g extractable organic matter (EOM) for Haliclona sp. and 36.5 μg/g EOM for Callyspongia sp., which were about 2 orders of magnitude higher than the levels seen in tropical coral reef fish (unicornfish or surgeonfish) (280-290 ng/g lipid) and groupers (550 ng/g lipid) from Okinawan coastal waters. The phenolic fractions of both sponges contained hydroxy-methoxy tetra-/pentaBDEs as well as hydroxy-tetraBDD, in addition to the corresponding phenolic tetraBDE analogues. Although the total concentrations of phenolic products (27-80 μg/g EOM) in both sponges fell within a range comparable to the methoxylated products, ΣOH-PBDE in local fish were trace level (less than 10 ng/g lipid of) or undetectable. This survey indicates that marine sponges are a possible source of the MeO-PBDE analogues that biomagnify via the food chain to the higher trophic organisms in the western Pacific, whereas the distribution of the corresponding hydroxylated analogues is limited.

  12. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G. [Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologische Chemie; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M. [Inst. of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  13. Evidence of a putative deep sea specific microbiome in marine sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kennedy

    Full Text Available The microbiota of four individual deep water sponges, Lissodendoryx diversichela, Poecillastra compressa, Inflatella pellicula, and Stelletta normani, together with surrounding seawater were analysed by pyrosequencing of a region of the 16S rRNA gene common to Bacteria and Archaea. Due to sampling constraints at depths below 700 m duplicate samples were not collected. The microbial communities of L. diversichela, P. compressa and I. pellicula were typical of low microbial abundance (LMA sponges while S. normani had a community more typical of high microbial abundance (HMA sponges. Analysis of the deep sea sponge microbiota revealed that the three LMA-like sponges shared a set of abundant OTUs that were distinct from those associated with sponges from shallow waters. Comparison of the pyrosequencing data with that from shallow water sponges revealed that the microbial communities of all sponges analysed have similar archaeal populations but that the bacterial populations of the deep sea sponges were distinct. Further analysis of the common and abundant OTUs from the three LMA-like sponges placed them within the groups of ammonia oxidising Archaea (Thaumarchaeota and sulphur oxidising γ-Proteobacteria (Chromatiales. Reads from these two groups made up over 70% of all 16S rRNA genes detected from the three LMA-like sponge samples, providing evidence of a putative common microbial assemblage associated with deep sea LMA sponges.

  14. Evidence of a putative deep sea specific microbiome in marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jonathan; Flemer, Burkhardt; Jackson, Stephen A; Morrissey, John P; O'Gara, Fergal; O'Gara, Ferghal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of four individual deep water sponges, Lissodendoryx diversichela, Poecillastra compressa, Inflatella pellicula, and Stelletta normani, together with surrounding seawater were analysed by pyrosequencing of a region of the 16S rRNA gene common to Bacteria and Archaea. Due to sampling constraints at depths below 700 m duplicate samples were not collected. The microbial communities of L. diversichela, P. compressa and I. pellicula were typical of low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges while S. normani had a community more typical of high microbial abundance (HMA) sponges. Analysis of the deep sea sponge microbiota revealed that the three LMA-like sponges shared a set of abundant OTUs that were distinct from those associated with sponges from shallow waters. Comparison of the pyrosequencing data with that from shallow water sponges revealed that the microbial communities of all sponges analysed have similar archaeal populations but that the bacterial populations of the deep sea sponges were distinct. Further analysis of the common and abundant OTUs from the three LMA-like sponges placed them within the groups of ammonia oxidising Archaea (Thaumarchaeota) and sulphur oxidising γ-Proteobacteria (Chromatiales). Reads from these two groups made up over 70% of all 16S rRNA genes detected from the three LMA-like sponge samples, providing evidence of a putative common microbial assemblage associated with deep sea LMA sponges.

  15. Physiologically active substances from marine sponges V: Isolation of physiologically active compounds from the sponge Verongia archeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chib, J S; Stempien, M F; Mierzwa, R A; Ruggieri, G D; Nigrelli, R F

    1978-02-01

    Methanolic extracts of hard and soft varieties of the sponge Verongia archeri were found to contain similar compounds. An isolation procedure and the structures of 2-(3',5'-dibromo-4'-hydroxyphenyl)-acetamide, 1-(3',5'-dibromo-1',6'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxycyclohexa-2',4'-diene)acetonitrile, and 2-oxo-5,7-dibromo-6-methoxy-9-hydroxy-8,9-dihydrocoumarin from one variety are described.

  16. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Effects of the Organic Extract of the Red Sea Marine Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria against Carrageenan Induced Rat Paw Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shitany, Nagla A.; Shaala, Lamiaa A.; Abbas, Aymn T.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Azhar, Esam I.; Ali, Soad S.; van Soest, Rob W. M.; Youssef, Diaa T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are found to be a rich source of bioactive compounds which show a wide range of biological activities including antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulator effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The chemical composition of the Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract was determined using Gas chromatography-mass sp...

  17. Bioremediation of bacteria pollution using the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis in the intensive mariculture water system of turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichang; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Lingyun; Zhang, Bi; Jin, Meifang; Fu, Wantao

    2010-01-01

    Sessile filter-feeding marine sponges (Porifera) have been reported to possess high efficiency in removing bacteria pollution from natural or aquaculture seawater. However, no investigation has been carried out thus far in a true mariculture farm water system. Therefore this study sought to investigate the ability of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis to bioremediate the bacteria pollution in the intensive aquaculture water system of turbot Scophthalmus maximus. Sponge specimens were hung in fish culture effluent at different temperature to investigate the optimal temperature condition for bacteria removal by H. perlevis. Turbots S. maximus were co-cultured with sponge H. perlevis in 1.5 m(3) of water system at 15-18 degrees C for 6 weeks to control the growth of bacteria. It was found that H. perlevis was able to remove pathogenic bacteria efficiently at 10-20 degrees C, with a maximal removal of 71.4-78.8% of fecal coliform, 73.9-98.7% of pathogenic vibrio, and 75.0-83.7% of total culturable bacteria from fish-culture effluent at 15 degrees C; H. perlevis continuously showed good bioremediation of bacteria pollution in the S. maximus culture water system, achieving removal of 60.0-90.2% of fecal coliform, 37.6-81.6% of pathogenic vibrio, and 45.1-83.9% of total culturable bacteria. The results demonstrate that H. perlevis is an effective bioremediator of bacteria pollution in the turbot S. maximus culture farm water system.

  18. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Kendall, Carol; Pribil, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S VCDT) of − 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ34S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil δ34S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls

  19. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R; Chadwick, Oliver A; Kendall, Carol; Pribil, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ(34)S VCDT) of -0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ(34)S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from +8.2 to +19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to +2.7‰) to relatively high (+17.8 to +19.3‰) soil δ(34)S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from +8.1 to +20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0-2000 m), distance from the coast (0-12 km), and annual rainfall (180-5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls over ecosystem sulfur

  20. A method to type the potential angucycline producers in actinomycetes isolated from marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yongchang; Wu, Houbo; Xie, Lianwu; Wang, Guanghua; Dai, Shikun; Chen, Minjie; Yang, Keqian; Li, Xiang

    2011-05-01

    Angucyclines are aromatic polyketides with antimicrobial, antitumor, antiviral and enzyme inhibition activities. In this study, a new pair of degenerate primers targeting the cyclase genes that are involved in the aromatization of the first and/or second ring of angucycline, were designed and evaluated in a PCR protocol targeting the jadomycin cyclase gene of Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. The identity of the target amplicon was confirmed by sequencing. After validation, the primers were used to screen 49 actinomycete isolates from three different marine sponges to identify putative angucycline producers. Seven isolates were positively identified using this method. Sequence analysis of the positive amplicons confirmed their identity as putative angucycline cyclases with sequence highly similar to known angucycline cyclases. Phylogenetic analysis clustered these positives into the angucycline group of cyclases. Furthermore, amplifications of the seven isolates using ketosynthase-specific primers were positive, backing the results using the cyclase primers. Together these results provided strong support for the presence of angucycline biosynthetic genes in these isolates. The specific primer set targeting the cyclase can be used to identify putative angucycline producers among marine actinobacteria, and aid in the discovery of novel angucyclines.

  1. Evaluation, partial characterization and purification of acetylcholine esterase enzyme and antiangiogenic activity from marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maushmi Shailesh Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata Keller, 1891; Spirastrella pachyspira (S. pachyspira Levi, 1958 and Cliona lobata Hancock, 1849 for the presence of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE in both young and developed samples from western coastal area of India. S. pachyspira methanolic extract was selected for anti/pro angiogenic activity. Methods: They were evaluated for AChE activity using Ellman’s assay based on production of yellow colored 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate. Purification of the enzyme was planned using ammonium sulphate precipitation and characterization by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chorioallantoic membrane (ChAM assay model was used for angiogenic/ antiangiogenic testing. Results: All the three sponges showed good specific enzyme activity and S. pachyspira contained maximum specific enzyme activity. Sixty percent of ammonium sulphate precipitation of crude protein sample gave single band at 66 kDa corresponding to the true AChE. ChAM assay was performed at 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 µg/mL. Dosage beyond 250 µg/mL extract showed toxic response with anti angiogenic activity at all the concentrations. Conclusions: AChE activity was detected in all samples. Extract showed good anti-angiogenic response at 62.5 µg/mL. Extract was highly toxic affecting microvasculature of ChAM as well as normal growth and development of the embryo at 500 µg/mL. With further characterization of bioactive compounds from the extract of S. pachyspira, the compounds can be developed for anti tumor activity.

  2. Recently confirmed apoptosis-inducing lead compounds isolated from marine sponge of potential relevance in cancer treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2011-09-20

    Despite intense efforts to develop non-cytotoxic anticancer treatments, effective agents are still not available. Therefore, novel apoptosis-inducing drug leads that may be developed into effective targeted cancer therapies are of interest to the cancer research community. Targeted cancer therapies affect specific aberrant apoptotic pathways that characterize different cancer types and, for this reason, it is a more desirable type of therapy than chemotherapy or radiotherapy, as it is less harmful to normal cells. In this regard, marine sponge derived metabolites that induce apoptosis continue to be a promising source of new drug leads for cancer treatments. A PubMed query from 01/01/2005 to 31/01/2011 combined with hand-curation of the retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 39 recently confirmed apoptosis-inducing anticancer lead compounds isolated from the marine sponge that are selectively discussed in this review. 2011 by the authors.

  3. Ecology of Hawaiian marine mammals emphasizing the impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) on endangered species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, S.F.; Hartwig, E.O.

    1982-06-01

    Twenty-two marine mammal species including 2 baleen whales, 20 toothed whales, and one pinniped occur in Hawaiian waters. Among these are two endangered species, the migratory humpback whale (Megaptera novaengliae) around the main islands, and the non-migratory Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi) in the extreme northwestern island chain. The endangered species are among those most commonly sighted, while spinner dolphins (Stenella spp.), bottle-nosed dolphins (Tursiops sp.), and false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) are sighted less frequently. Most Hawaiian cetacean species are Odontoceti, or toothed whales, and feed on fish and squid. The Mysteceti or baleen whales feed on plankton, however the endangered humpback whale, which migrates to Hawaii to breed and calve, presumably does not feed there. The endangered monk seal feeds on cephalopods and fish. The impact of OTEC on endangered and non-endangered marine mammals results from several direct and indirect effects and is discussed in the text. Careful siting of OTEC plants away from humpback breeding areas and monk seal breeding and feeding areas will avoid adverse effects on these populations.

  4. Brominated Compounds from Marine Sponges of the Genus Aplysina and a Compilation of Their 13C NMR Spectral Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Maria Barbosa-Filho; Celidarque da Silva Dias; Luis Cezar Rodrigues; Narlize Silva Lira; Petronio Filgueiras de Athayde-Filho; Emidio V. L. da Cunha; Josean Fechine Tavares; Ricardo Carneiro Montes; Marcelo Sobral da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has ...

  5. Investigating on the Correlation Between Some Biological Activities of Marine Sponge-Associated Bacteria Extracts and Isolated Diketopiperazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Hady, Faten K; Fayad, Walid; Iodice, Carmine; El-Shahid, Zeinab A; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S; Crudele, Egle; Tommonaro, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    Marine organisms have been considered as the richest sources of novel bioactive metabolites, which can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. In the last years, the interest for marine microorganisms has grown for their enormous biodiversity and for the evidence that many novel compounds isolated from marine invertebrates are really synthesized by their associated bacteria. Nevertheless, the discovery of a chemical communication Quorum sensing (QS) between bacterial cells and between bacteria and host has gained the researchers to expand the aim of their study toward the role of bacteria associated with marine invertebrates, such as marine sponge. In the present paper, we report the evaluation of biological activities of different extracts of bacteria Vibrio sp. and Bacillus sp. associated with marine sponges Dysidea avara and Ircinia variabilis, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the biological activities of some diketopiperazines (DKPs), previously isolated, and able to activate QS mechanism. The results showed that all extracts, fractions, and DKPs showed low scavenging activity against DPPH and superoxide anion, low cytotoxic and anti-tyrosinase activities, but no antimicrobial and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. One DKP [cyclo-(trans-4-hydroxy-L-prolyl-L-leucine)] has the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity even than the standard acarbose.

  6. RNA interference in marine and freshwater sponges: actin knockdown in Tethya wilhelma and Ephydatia muelleri by ingested dsRNA expressing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The marine sponge Tethya wilhelma and the freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri are emerging model organisms to study evolution, gene regulation, development, and physiology in non-bilaterian animal systems. Thus far, functional methods (i.e., loss or gain of function) for these organisms have not been available. Results We show that soaking developing freshwater sponges in double-stranded RNA and/or feeding marine and freshwater sponges bacteria expressing double-stranded RNA can lead to RNA interference and reduction of targeted transcript levels. These methods, first utilized in C. elegans, have been adapted for the development and feeding style of easily cultured marine and freshwater poriferans. We demonstrate phenotypic changes result from 'knocking down' expression of the actin gene. Conclusion This technique provides an easy, efficient loss-of-function manipulation for developmental and gene regulatory studies in these important non-bilaterian animals. PMID:21679422

  7. The Relative Abundance and Transcriptional Activity of Marine Sponge-Associated Microorganisms Emphasizing Groups Involved in Sulfur Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Fortunato, Sofia A V; Hoffmann, Friederike; Hoem, Solveig; Rapp, Hans Tore; Øvreås, Lise; Torsvik, Vigdis L

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, our knowledge about the activity of sponge-associated microorganisms and their contribution to biogeochemical cycling has gradually increased. Functional groups involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism are well documented, whereas knowledge about microorganisms involved in the sulfur cycle is still limited. Both sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation has been detected in the cold water sponge Geodia barretti from Korsfjord in Norway, and with specimens from this site, the present study aims to identify extant versus active sponge-associated microbiota with focus on sulfur metabolism. Comparative analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene (DNA) and transcript (complementary DNA (cDNA)) libraries revealed profound differences. The transcript library was predominated by Chloroflexi despite their low abundance in the gene library. An opposite result was found for Acidobacteria. Proteobacteria were detected in both libraries with representatives of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria related to clades with presumably thiotrophic bacteria from sponges and other marine invertebrates. Sequences that clustered with sponge-associated Deltaproteobacteria were remotely related to cultivated sulfate-reducing bacteria. The microbes involved in sulfur cycling were identified by the functional gene aprA (adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase) and its transcript. Of the aprA sequences (DNA and cDNA), 87 % affiliated with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They clustered with Alphaproteobacteria and with clades of deep-branching Gammaproteobacteria. The remaining sequences clustered with sulfate-reducing Archaea of the phylum Euryarchaeota. These results indicate an active role of yet uncharacterized Bacteria and Archaea in the sponge's sulfur cycle.

  8. Phylogenetically diverse ureC genes and their expression suggest the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Jin, Liling; Jiang, Qun; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs) in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota.

  9. Phylogenetically diverse ureC genes and their expression suggest the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Su

    Full Text Available Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota.

  10. Pyrosequencing characterization of the microbiota from Atlantic intertidal marine sponges reveals high microbial diversity and the lack of co-occurrence patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Alex

    Full Text Available Sponges are ancient metazoans that host diverse and complex microbial communities. Sponge-associated microbial diversity has been studied from wide oceans across the globe, particularly in subtidal regions, but the microbial communities from intertidal sponges have remained mostly unexplored. Here we used pyrosequencing to characterize the microbial communities in 12 different co-occurring intertidal marine sponge species sampled from the Atlantic coast, revealing a total of 686 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at 97% sequence similarity. Taxonomic assignment of 16S ribosomal RNA tag sequences estimated altogether 26 microbial groups, represented by bacterial (75.5% and archaeal (22% domains. Proteobacteria (43.4% and Crenarchaeota (20.6% were the most dominant microbial groups detected in all the 12 marine sponge species and ambient seawater. The Crenarchaeota microbes detected in three Atlantic Ocean sponges had a close similarity with Crenarchaeota from geographically separated subtidal Red Sea sponges. Our study showed that most of the microbial communities observed in sponges (73% were also found in the surrounding ambient seawater suggesting possible environmental acquisition and/or horizontal transfer of microbes. Beyond the microbial diversity and community structure assessments (NMDS, ADONIS, ANOSIM, we explored the interactions between the microbial communities coexisting in sponges using the checkerboard score (C-score. Analyses of the microbial association pattern (co-occurrence among intertidal sympatric sponges revealed the random association of microbes, favoring the hypothesis that the sponge-inhabiting microbes are recruited from the habitat mostly by chance or influenced by environmental factors to benefit the hosts.

  11. Predicting the HMA-LMA Status in Marine Sponges by Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Steinert, Georg; Nielsen, Shaun; Hardoim, Cristiane C. P.; Wu, Yu-Chen; McCormack, Grace P.; López-Legentil, Susanna; Marchant, Roman; Webster, Nicole; Thomas, Torsten; Hentschel, Ute

    2017-01-01

    The dichotomy between high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges has been observed in sponge-microbe symbiosis, although the extent of this pattern remains poorly unknown. We characterized the differences between the microbiomes of HMA (n = 19) and LMA (n = 17) sponges (575 specimens) present in the Sponge Microbiome Project. HMA sponges were associated with richer and more diverse microbiomes than LMA sponges, as indicated by the comparison of alpha diversity metrics. Microbial community structures differed between HMA and LMA sponges considering Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) abundances and across microbial taxonomic levels, from phylum to species. The largest proportion of microbiome variation was explained by the host identity. Several phyla, classes, and OTUs were found differentially abundant in either group, which were considered “HMA indicators” and “LMA indicators.” Machine learning algorithms (classifiers) were trained to predict the HMA-LMA status of sponges. Among nine different classifiers, higher performances were achieved by Random Forest trained with phylum and class abundances. Random Forest with optimized parameters predicted the HMA-LMA status of additional 135 sponge species (1,232 specimens) without a priori knowledge. These sponges were grouped in four clusters, from which the largest two were composed of species consistently predicted as HMA (n = 44) and LMA (n = 74). In summary, our analyses shown distinct features of the microbial communities associated with HMA and LMA sponges. The prediction of the HMA-LMA status based on the microbiome profiles of sponges demonstrates the application of machine learning to explore patterns of host-associated microbial communities. PMID:28533766

  12. Diversity of cultivable fungi associated with Antarctic marine sponges and screening for their antimicrobial, antitumoral and antioxidant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Marlene; Vergara, Karen; Norambuena, Javiera; Beiza, Andrea; Maza, Felipe; Ubilla, Pamela; Araya, Ivanna; Chávez, Renato; San-Martín, Aurelio; Darias, José; Darias, María J; Vaca, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of sponge-associated fungi has been poorly investigated in remote geographical areas like Antarctica. In this study, 101 phenotypically different fungal isolates were obtained from 11 sponge samples collected in King George Island, Antarctica. The analysis of ITS sequences revealed that they belong to the phylum Ascomycota. Sixty-five isolates belong to the genera Geomyces, Penicillium, Epicoccum, Pseudeurotium, Thelebolus, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Aureobasidium, Phoma, and Trichocladium but 36 isolates could not be identified at genus level. In order to estimate the potential of these isolates as producers of interesting bioactivities, antimicrobial, antitumoral and antioxidant activities of fungal culture extracts were assayed. Around 51% of the extracts, mainly from the genus Geomyces and non identified relatives, showed antimicrobial activity against some of the bacteria tested. On the other hand, around 42% of the extracts showed potent antitumoral activity, Geomyces sp. having the best performance. Finally, the potential of the isolated fungi as producers of antioxidant activity seems to be moderate. Our results suggest that fungi associated with Antarctic sponges, particularly Geomyces, would be valuable sources of antimicrobial and antitumoral compounds. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the biodiversity and the metabolic potential of fungi associated with Antarctic marine sponges.

  13. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  14. Diversity and biological activities of the bacterial community associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior (Porifera, Demospongiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; Carré-Mlouka, A; Descarrega, F; Ereskovsky, A; Longeon, A; Mouray, E; Florent, I; Bourguet-Kondracki, M L

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the cultivable microbiota of the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea was investigated, and its potential as a source of antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiplasmodial compounds was evaluated. The cultivable bacterial community was studied by isolation, cultivation and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Twenty-three bacterial strains were isolated and identified in the Proteobacteria (α or γ classes) and Actinobacteria phyla. Furthermore, three different bacterial morphotypes localized extracellularly within the sponge tissues were revealed by microscopic observations. Bacterial strains were assigned to seven different genera, namely Vibrio, Photobacterium, Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Ruegeria, Pseudovibrio and Citricoccus. The strains affiliated to the same genus were differentiated according to their genetic dissimilarities using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. Eleven bacterial strains were selected for evaluation of their bioactivities. Three isolates Pseudovibrio P1Ma4, Vibrio P1MaNal1 and Citricoccus P1S7 revealed antimicrobial activity; Citricoccus P1S7 and Vibrio P1MaNal1 isolates also exhibited antiplasmodial activity, while two Vibrio isolates P1Ma8 and P1Ma5 displayed antioxidant activity. These data confirmed the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria associated with marine sponges as a reservoir of bioactive compounds. This study presents the first report on the diversity of the cultivable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior, frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea. Evaluation of the antiplasmodial, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the isolates has been investigated and allowed to select bacterial strains, confirming the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria as sources of bioactive compounds. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Histology of Mice Skin Tissue Based on in Vivo Evaluation of the Anticancer Extracts of Marine Sponge Aaptos Suberitoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijayanti Pujitono

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The sponge Aaptos suberitoides can produce high secondary metabolite with some farmocological activities as antimicrobial, antiviral, antiinflamatory, and anticancer agents. The purpose of this research is to find out correlations between activities of the etanol extracts of marine sponges Aaptos suberitoides on the cancer growth of subcutaneous mice (Mus musculus injected by Benzo(apiren. For the purpose the mice were divided into six groups, i.e. I, II, III, IV, V, and VI. Each group was treated with carcinogenic inductions by intravenously injecting the Benzo(apiren concentration of 0.3g/0.2 ml oleum olivarum. After the cancer was appeared at the fifteenth day, the mice were treated by the anticancer extracts of marine sponges Aaptos suberitoides with concentrations of 500 mg/kg BB (Group IV, 1000 mg/kg BB (Group IV, and 1500 mg/kg BB (Group IV. The treatments were orally done each day for two weeks. At the twentieth week, subcutaneous cancer tissues were taken to make histological preparates using a parafin method. Result of the histological observation indicates that cancer in the mice was fibrosarcoma characterized by the thickening dermis layers, necrosis, mitosis, and nuclear polymorphsm. Necrosis, mitosis, and nuclear polymorphism occurred in Groups II, IV, V, and VI, and did not in Groups I and II. Presentation of necrosis was 20-60%, mitosis was in 3-4 cells, and nuclear polymorphism was 100%. Result of the statistical analyses by using the Kruskal-Wallis method and the Pair Comparison test indicates that the anticancer extracts of marine sponges with the concentrations of 500 mg/kg BB, 1000 mg/kg BB, and 1500 mg/kg BB had no activity inducing mice skin cancer.

  16. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae: Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Stonik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  17. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  18. 6-Hydroxymethyl-1-phenazine-carboxamide and 1,6-phenazinedimethanol from a marine bacterium, Brevibacterium sp. KMD 003, associated with marine purple vase sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Ju; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Ham, Jungyeob; Yang, Hyun Ok

    2009-11-01

    Two new antibacterial phenazines were isolated from the culture broth of Brevibacterium sp. KMD 003 obtained from a marine purple vase sponge of the genus Callyspongia, collected in Kyeongpo, Gangwondo, Korea. The structures of these compounds were determined to be 6-hydroxymethyl-1-phenazine-carboxamide (1) and 1,6-phenazinedimethanol (2) through analyses of HR-EI-MS and NMR data. Compounds 1 and 2 showed antibacterial activities against Enterococcus hirae and Micrococcus luteus with 5 microM MIC values.

  19. Pectenotoxin-2 from Marine Sponges: A Potential Anti-Cancer Agent—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wun-Jae Kim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2, which was first identified as a cytotoxic entity in marine sponges, has been reported to display significant cytotoxicity to human cancer cells where it inhibits mitotic separation and cytokinesis through the depolymerization of actin filaments. In the late stage of endoreduplication, the effects of PTX-2 on different cancer cells involves: (i down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members and IAP family proteins; (ii up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-receptor 1/receptor 2 (DR4/DR5; and (iii mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PTX-2 induces apoptotic effects through suppression of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB signaling pathway in several cancer cells. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins showed that PTX-2 increases phosphorylation of Cdc25c and decreases protein levels of Cdc2 and cyclin B1. Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk inhibitor p21 and Cdk2, which are associated with the induction of endoreduplication, were upregulated. Furthermore, it was found that PTX-2 suppressed telomerase activity through the transcriptional and post-translational suppression of hTERT. The purpose of this review was to provide an update regarding the anti-cancer mechanism of PTX-2, with a special focus on its effects on different cellular signaling cascades.

  20. Sulfated Polysaccharides in Marine Sponges: Extraction Methods and Anti-HIV Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. S. Esteves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction, fractionation and HIV-1 inhibition potential of polysaccharides extracted from three species of marine sponges, Erylus discophorus, Cliona celata and Stelletta sp., collected in the Northeastern Atlantic, is presented in this work. The anti-HIV activity of 23 polysaccharide pellets and three crude extracts was tested. Crude extracts prepared from Erylus discophorus specimens were all highly active against HIV-1 (90 to 95% inhibition. Cliona celata pellets showed low polysaccharide content (bellow 38.5% and almost no anti-HIV activity (<10% inhibition. Stelletta sp. pellets, although quite rich in polysaccharide (up to 97.3%, showed only modest bioactivity (<36% HIV-1 inhibition. Erylus discophorus pellets were among the richest in terms of polysaccharide content (up to 98% and the most active against HIV-1 (up to 95% inhibition. Chromatographic fractionation of the polysaccharide pellet obtained from a specimen of Erylus discophorus (B161 yielded only modestly active fractions. However, we could infer that the active molecule is most probably a high molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide (>2000 kDa, whose mechanism is possibly preventing viral attachment and entry (fusion inhibitor.

  1. Sulfated Polysaccharides in Marine Sponges: Extraction Methods and Anti-HIV Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Ana I. S.; Nicolai, Marisa; Humanes, Madalena; Goncalves, Joao

    2011-01-01

    The extraction, fractionation and HIV-1 inhibition potential of polysaccharides extracted from three species of marine sponges, Erylus discophorus, Cliona celata and Stelletta sp., collected in the Northeastern Atlantic, is presented in this work. The anti-HIV activity of 23 polysaccharide pellets and three crude extracts was tested. Crude extracts prepared from Erylus discophorus specimens were all highly active against HIV-1 (90 to 95% inhibition). Cliona celata pellets showed low polysaccharide content (bellow 38.5%) and almost no anti-HIV activity (polysaccharide (up to 97.3%), showed only modest bioactivity (polysaccharide content (up to 98%) and the most active against HIV-1 (up to 95% inhibition). Chromatographic fractionation of the polysaccharide pellet obtained from a specimen of Erylus discophorus (B161) yielded only modestly active fractions. However, we could infer that the active molecule is most probably a high molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide (>2000 kDa), whose mechanism is possibly preventing viral attachment and entry (fusion inhibitor). PMID:21339952

  2. Antioxidant activity of zyzzyanones and makaluvamines from the marine sponge Zyzzya fuliginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkina, Natalia K

    2013-11-01

    Antioxidant activities of zyzzyanones A-D (1-4) and makaluvamines C (8), E (5), G (6), H (9), and L (7) isolated from the marine sponge Zyzzya fuliginosa (Carter, 1879) were evaluated using 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) scavenging assay and AAPH (2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride) induced autoxidation of linoleic acid. Zyzzyanones A, B (1, 2; TE = 0.3), C, D (3, 4; TE = 0.24) and makaluvamines 5-7 (TE = 0.6) displayed moderate activities in the ABTS assay and in the autoxidation of linoleic acid (61-66% inhibition at concentrations of 0.1 mM). Makaluvamines C (8) and H (9) were essentially inactive in the both assays. Structure-activity relationships showed that antioxidant activities of tested compounds depended on the presence of a phenolic function in molecules. Makaluvamines 5-7 possessing a p-hydroxystyryl moiety were more active than zyzzyanones 1-4 possessing a p-hydroxyphenyl fragment. The presence of a charged side chain in 1 and 2 slightly increases their ABTS scavenging activity in comparison with compounds 3 and 4. Structural variations in a pyrroloquinoline skeleton of 5-7 and in a dipyrroloquinone core of 1-4 have no effect on activities.

  3. Pectenotoxin-2 from marine sponges: a potential anti-cancer agent-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2), which was first identified as a cytotoxic entity in marine sponges, has been reported to display significant cytotoxicity to human cancer cells where it inhibits mitotic separation and cytokinesis through the depolymerization of actin filaments. In the late stage of endoreduplication, the effects of PTX-2 on different cancer cells involves: (i) down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members and IAP family proteins; (ii) up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-receptor 1/receptor 2 (DR4/DR5); and (iii) mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PTX-2 induces apoptotic effects through suppression of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in several cancer cells. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins showed that PTX-2 increases phosphorylation of Cdc25c and decreases protein levels of Cdc2 and cyclin B1. Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21 and Cdk2, which are associated with the induction of endoreduplication, were upregulated. Furthermore, it was found that PTX-2 suppressed telomerase activity through the transcriptional and post-translational suppression of hTERT. The purpose of this review was to provide an update regarding the anti-cancer mechanism of PTX-2, with a special focus on its effects on different cellular signaling cascades.

  4. Pectenotoxin-2 from Marine Sponges: A Potential Anti-Cancer Agent—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2), which was first identified as a cytotoxic entity in marine sponges, has been reported to display significant cytotoxicity to human cancer cells where it inhibits mitotic separation and cytokinesis through the depolymerization of actin filaments. In the late stage of endoreduplication, the effects of PTX-2 on different cancer cells involves: (i) down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members and IAP family proteins; (ii) up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-receptor 1/receptor 2 (DR4/DR5); and (iii) mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, PTX-2 induces apoptotic effects through suppression of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in several cancer cells. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins showed that PTX-2 increases phosphorylation of Cdc25c and decreases protein levels of Cdc2 and cyclin B1. Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21 and Cdk2, which are associated with the induction of endoreduplication, were upregulated. Furthermore, it was found that PTX-2 suppressed telomerase activity through the transcriptional and post-translational suppression of hTERT. The purpose of this review was to provide an update regarding the anti-cancer mechanism of PTX-2, with a special focus on its effects on different cellular signaling cascades. PMID:22163180

  5. Comprehensive Investigation of Marine Actinobacteria Associated with the Sponge Halichondria panicea▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemann, Imke; Nagel, Kerstin; Kajahn, Inga; Labes, Antje; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2010-01-01

    Representatives of Actinobacteria were isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria panicea collected from the Baltic Sea (Germany). For the first time, a comprehensive investigation was performed with regard to phylogenetic strain identification, secondary metabolite profiling, bioactivity determination, and genetic exploration of biosynthetic genes, especially concerning the relationships of the abundance of biosynthesis gene fragments to the number and diversity of produced secondary metabolites. All strains were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and were found to belong to the genera Actinoalloteichus, Micrococcus, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, and Streptomyces. Secondary metabolite profiles of 46 actinobacterial strains were evaluated, 122 different substances were identified, and 88 so far unidentified compounds were detected. The extracts from most of the cultures showed biological activities. In addition, the presence of biosynthesis genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in 30 strains was established. It was shown that strains in which either PKS or NRPS genes were identified produced a significantly higher number of metabolites and exhibited a larger number of unidentified, possibly new metabolites than other strains. Therefore, the presence of PKS and NRPS genes is a good indicator for the selection of strains to isolate new natural products. PMID:20382810

  6. Comprehensive investigation of marine Actinobacteria associated with the sponge Halichondria panicea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemann, Imke; Nagel, Kerstin; Kajahn, Inga; Labes, Antje; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-06-01

    Representatives of Actinobacteria were isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria panicea collected from the Baltic Sea (Germany). For the first time, a comprehensive investigation was performed with regard to phylogenetic strain identification, secondary metabolite profiling, bioactivity determination, and genetic exploration of biosynthetic genes, especially concerning the relationships of the abundance of biosynthesis gene fragments to the number and diversity of produced secondary metabolites. All strains were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and were found to belong to the genera Actinoalloteichus, Micrococcus, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, and Streptomyces. Secondary metabolite profiles of 46 actinobacterial strains were evaluated, 122 different substances were identified, and 88 so far unidentified compounds were detected. The extracts from most of the cultures showed biological activities. In addition, the presence of biosynthesis genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in 30 strains was established. It was shown that strains in which either PKS or NRPS genes were identified produced a significantly higher number of metabolites and exhibited a larger number of unidentified, possibly new metabolites than other strains. Therefore, the presence of PKS and NRPS genes is a good indicator for the selection of strains to isolate new natural products.

  7. A new meroditerpenoid dimer from an undescribed Philippine marine sponge of the genus Strongylophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin-Oliveros, M; Edrada, R A; Proksch, P; Wray, V; Witte, L; Van Soest, R W

    1998-07-01

    An undescribed Philippine marine sponge of the genus Strongylophora yielded a new meroditerpenoid-strongylophorine dimer (1) and the known meroditerpenoids, strongylophorine-2 (2), strongylophorine-3 (3), and strongylophorine-4 (4). The structures of the compounds were established on the basis of NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric data. The position of the inter-unit linkage in the new compound was elucidated after methylation and 1D 1H NOE difference experiments. This is the first report wherein the1H and 13C NMR data of the strongylophorine congeners are fully and unambiguously assigned on the basis of 2D NMR spectroscopy. Compounds 2 and 3 exhibited slight activity against Micrococcus luteus and Salmonella typhii, respectively. Compound 3 was active against the phytopathogenic fungusCladosporium cucumerinum and also against the neonate larvae of the polyphagous pest insectSpodoptera littoralis (EC50 of 69 [+/-0.48 (S.E.)] ppm) when incorporated into artificial diet. Compound 1 was found to be the most active in the brine shrimp lethality test with a LC50 of 10.5 [+/-0.43 (S.E.)] microg/mL.

  8. Inter- and Intraspecific Variations of Bacterial Communities Associated with Marine Sponges from San Juan Island, Washington

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2009-04-10

    This study attempted to assess whether conspecific or congeneric sponges around San Juan Island, Washington, harbor specific bacterial communities. We used a combination of culture-independent DNA fingerprinting techniques (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) and culture-dependent approaches. The results indicated that the bacterial communities in the water column consisted of more diverse bacterial ribotypes than and were drastically different from those associated with the sponges. High levels of similarity in sponge-associated bacterial communities were found only in Myxilla incrustans and Haliclona rufescens, while the bacterial communities in Halichondria panicea varied substantially among sites. Certain terminal restriction fragments or DGGE bands were consistently obtained for different individuals of M. incrustans and H. rufescens collected from different sites, suggesting that there are stable or even specific associations of certain bacteria in these two sponges. However, no specific bacterial associations were found for H. panicea or for any one sponge genus. Sequencing of nine DGGE bands resulted in recovery of seven sequences that best matched the sequences of uncultured Proteobacteria. Three of these sequences fell into the sponge-specific sequence clusters previously suggested. An uncultured alphaproteobacterium and a culturable Bacillus sp. were found exclusively in all M. incrustans sponges, while an uncultured gammaproteobacterium was unique to H. rufescens. In contrast, the cultivation approach indicated that sponges contained a large proportion of Firmicutes, especially Bacillus, and revealed large variations in the culturable bacterial communities associated with congeneric and conspecific sponges. This study revealed sponge species-specific but not genus- or site-specific associations between sponges and bacterial communities and emphasized the importance of using a combination

  9. Exploring microbial diversity of marine sponges by culture-dependent and molecular approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naim, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary

    Discovery of sponge-grade metazoans dated 650 million years ago proved that sponges have been around since the Precambrian era. Their resilience to ever-changing environmental conditions and their global distribution is one of the features attributed to the

  10. Predicting the HMA-LMA status in marine sponges by machine learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Steinert, Georg; Nielsen, Shaun; Hardoim, Cristiane C.P.; Wu, Yu Chen; McCormack, Grace P.; López-Legentil, Susanna; Marchant, Roman; Webster, Nicole; Thomas, Torsten; Hentschel, Ute

    2017-01-01

    The dichotomy between high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges has been observed in sponge-microbe symbiosis, although the extent of this pattern remains poorly unknown. We characterized the differences between the microbiomes of HMA (n = 19) and LMA (n = 17)

  11. Identification and Antibacterial Activity of Bacteria Isolated from Marine Sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. against Multi-Drug Resistant Human Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhanu Asagabaldan, Meezan; Ayuningrum, D.; Kristiana, R.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    The marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. was a potential source of natural bioactive compounds. This sponge widely distributed along the coast of Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia. The aims of this research were to isolate the associated bacteria with Haliclona (Reniera) sp. and to screen the antibacterial activity against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria. Amount five bacteria were isolated using media selective for bacteria. The antibacterial activities of bacteria were performed by overlay methods. The bacteria strain PSP. 39-04 had the best activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterobacter cloaceae. Based on colony morphology and phylogenetic characterization using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, PSP 39-04 was closely related with Chromohalobacter salixigens strain DSM3043.

  12. pH-dependent cytotoxic effects of extracts of the marine sponge Polymastia janeirensis on cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegelmeyer, Renata; Schröder, Rafael; Rambo, Douglas F; Dresch, Roger R; Carraro, João L F; Mothes B, Beatriz; Moreira, José Cláudio F; da Frota Junior, Mario L C; Henriques, Amélia T

    2016-02-09

    The purpose of this work was to study the cytotoxic effects of marine sponge Polymastia janeirensis, which has been observed in the field to release an orange substance that is toxic to fish. The result showed that aqueous extract (pH 7.0) was highly cytotoxic to glioma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cancer cell lines (IC 50  antioxidant and procoagulant (decreased the clotting time by 1.7-fold) activities. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effects were pH-dependent since the viability of the cancer cells was not affected with the extract (pH 5.5). The close similarity between the aqueous extract (pH 7.0) and the orange liquid that is released by the sponge indicates that this potential chemical defence of P. janeirensis deserves further investigation.

  13. Cytotoxic and antibacterial substances against multi-drug resistant pathogens from marine sponge symbiont: Citrinin, a secondary metabolite of Penicillium sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Subramani, Ramesh; Kumar, Rohitesh; Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To Isolate, purify, characterize, and evaluate the bioactive compounds from the sponge-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FF001 and to elucidate its structure. Methods: The fungal strain FF001 with an interesting bioactivity profile was isolated from a marine Fijian sponge Melophlus sp. Based on conidiophores aggregation, conidia development and mycelia morphological characteristics, the isolate FF001 was classically identified as a Penicillium sp. The bioactive compound was identif...

  14. Purification, Chemical Characterization, and Bioactivity of an Extracellular Polysaccharide Produced by the Marine Sponge Endogenous Fungus Alternaria sp. SP-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Mao, Wen-Jun; Yan, Meng-Xia; Liu, Xue; Wang, Shu-Yao; Xia, Zheng; Xiao, Bo; Cao, Su-Jian; Yang, Bao-Qin; Li, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges are ancient and simple multicellular filter-feeding invertebrates attached to solid substrates in benthic habitats and host a variety of fungi both inside and on their surface because of its unique ingestion and digest system. Investigation on marine sponge-associated fungi mainly focused on the small molecular metabolites, yet little attention had been paid to the extracellular polysaccharides. In this study, a homogeneous extracellular polysaccharide AS2-1 was obtained from the fermented broth of the marine sponge endogenous fungus Alternaria sp. SP-32 using ethanol precipitation, anion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Results of chemical and spectroscopic analyses showed that AS2-1 was composed of mannose, glucose, and galactose with a molar ratio of 1.00:0.67:0.35, and its molecular weight was 27.4 kDa. AS2-1 consists of a mannan core and a galactoglucan chain. The mannan core is composed of (1→6)-α-Manp substituted at C-2 by (1→2)-α-Manp with different degrees of polymerization. The galactoglucan chain consists of (1→6)-α-Glcp residues with (1→6)-β-Galf residues attached to the last glucopyranose residue at C-6. (1→6)-β-Galf residues have additional branches at C-2 consisting of disaccharide units of (1→2)-β-Galf and (1→2)-α-Glcp residues. The glucopyranose residue of the galactoglucan chain is linked to the mannan core. AS2-1 possessed a high antioxidant activity as evaluated by scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and hydroxyl radicals in vitro. AS2-1 was also evaluated for cytotoxic activity on Hela, HL-60, and K562 cell lines by the MTT and SRB methods. The investigation demonstrated that AS2-1 was a novel extracellular polysaccharide with different characterization from extracellular polysaccharides produced by other marine microorganisms.

  15. Single-cell genomics reveals the lifestyle of Poribacteria, a candidate phylum symbiotically associated with marine sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegl, Alexander; Kamke, Janine; Hochmuth, Thomas; Piel, Jörn; Richter, Michael; Liang, Chunguang; Dandekar, Thomas; Hentschel, Ute

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a single-cell genomics approach for the functional characterization of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, members of which are nearly exclusively found in marine sponges. The microbial consortia of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba were singularized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and individual microbial cells were subjected to phi29 polymerase-mediated ‘whole-genome amplification'. Pyrosequencing of a single amplified genome (SAG) derived from a member of the Poribacteria resulted in nearly 1.6 Mb of genomic information distributed among 554 contigs analyzed in this study. Approximately two-third of the poribacterial genome was sequenced. Our findings shed light on the functional properties and lifestyle of a possibly ancient bacterial symbiont of marine sponges. The Poribacteria are mixotrophic bacteria with autotrophic CO2-fixation capacities through the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway. The cell wall is of Gram-negative origin. The Poribacteria produce at least two polyketide synthases (PKSs), one of which is the sponge-specific Sup-type PKS. Several putative symbiosis factors such as adhesins (bacterial Ig-like domains, lamininin G domain proteins), adhesin-related proteins (ankyrin, fibronectin type III) and tetratrico peptide repeat domain-encoding proteins were identified, which might be involved in mediating sponge–microbe interactions. The discovery of genes coding for 24-isopropyl steroids implies that certain fossil biomarkers used to date the origins of metazoan life on earth may possibly be of poribacterial origin. Single-cell genomic approaches, such as those shown herein, contribute to a better understanding of beneficial microbial consortia, of which most members are, because of the lack of cultivation, inaccessible by conventional techniques. PMID:20613790

  16. Marine Sponge/H3PO4: As a Naturally Occurring Chiral Catalyst for Solvent-free Fischer-Indole Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Mostoufi, Azar; Badri, Rashid; Azizyan, Somaye

    2013-11-01

    A new and efficient method have been developed for the synthesis of different indole derivatives from various ketones, having at least one hydrogen atom attached to each of their α-carbon atoms, and hydrazines in solvent-free conditions, using marine sponge/H3PO4 as a naturally occurring chiral catalyst. This study recommended the use of marine sponge/H3PO4 as a naturally occurring chiral catalyst for preparation of phenylhydrazones from ketones having one α-hydrogen and subsequent cyclisation of the products to indoles. The reaction was carried out by mixing the phenylhydrazine, ketone, and marine sponge/H3PO4 powder in mortar and pestle; the mixture was ground at room temperature in an appropriate time until TLC show the completion of the reaction. The product extracted by CH2Cl2 and evaporation of solvent yields the products. In this research work, several indoles are synthesized using phenylhydrazine and aliphatic or aromatic ketone as starting materials, in the presence of marine sponge/H3PO4 powder as a natural catalyst under solvent-free condition. We found marine sponge/H3PO4 to be an effective catalyst for indolisation of phenylhydrazones from ketones having α-hydrogens in solvent-free conditions.

  17. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of marine sponge Stylissa carteri associated bacteria against Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Jacob Inbaneson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the possible antiplasmodial drugs from bacteria associated with marine sponge Stylissa carteri (S. carteri. Methods: The S. carteri samples were collected from Thondi coast and subjected for enumeration and isolation of associated bacteria. Filter sterilized extracts (100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 3.125 毺 g/mL from isolated bacterial isolates were screened for antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum and potential extracts were also screened for biochemical constituents. Results: Twelve samples of S. carteri were collected and subjected for enumeration and isolation of associated bacteria. The count of bacterial isolates were maximum in November 2007 (34暳 104 CFU/g and the average count was maximum during the monsoon season (203暳 103 CFU/g. Thirty two morphologically different bacterial isolates were isolated from S. carteri and the ethyl acetate bacterial extracts were screened for antiplasmodial activity against P. falciparum. The antiplasmodial activity of a isolate THB17 (IC 50 20.56 毺 g/ mL extract is highly comparable with the positive control chloroquine (IC50 19.59 毺 g/mL and 13 bacterial extracts which showed IC 50 value of more than 100 毺 g/mL. Statistical analysis reveals that, significant in vitro antiplasmodial activity (P<0.05 was observed between the concentrations and time of exposure. The chemical injury to erythrocytes showed no morphological changes in erythrocytes by the ethyl acetate extract of bacterial isolates after 48 h of incubation. The in vitro antiplasmodial activity might be due to the presence of reducing sugars and alkaloids in the ethyl acetate extracts of bacterial isolates. Conclusions: The ethyl acetate extract of THB17 possesses lead compounds for the development of antiplasmodial drugs.

  18. Marine sponge depsipeptide increases gap junction length in HTC cells transfected with Cx43-GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Marisa; Ionta, Marisa; Cristina Pfister, Sandra; Adolpho Sant'anna Ferreira, Raphael; Maria Machado-Santelli, Glaucia

    2010-01-01

    Connexins are membrane proteins that form GJ (gap junction) channels between adjacent cells. Cx43 (connexin 43), the most widely expressed member of the connexin family, has a rapid turnover rate, and its degradation involves both the lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The goal of this work was to study the effects of geodiamolides, natural peptides from marine sponge that normally are involved with microfilament disruption, on connexin assembly or degradation in the plasma membrane. HTC (hepatocarcinoma cells) expressing Cx43-GFP (green fluorescent protein) were submitted to treatment with 200 nM geodiamolides A, B, H and I for 2 and 4 h. Microfilament distribution and the presence and size of GJ plaques were evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Among the four peptides tested, only Geo H (geodiamolide H) statistically enhanced the length of GJ plaques. Geodiamolide A also showed activity in the GJ plaque size; however, its effect was less pronounced. Treatment with Geo H could interfere with the delivery of connexins to the degradation structures, similar to proteasomal pathways, keeping the connexins assembled and accumulating GJ plaques. Further experiments, with the cells treated with Geo H, using the fungal antibiotic BFA (brefeldin A), were performed in order to uncouple events leading to GJ assembly from those related to GJ removal, since BFA is known to block protein trafficking within a fused ER (endoplasmic reticulum)/Golgi compartment. GJ plaques were drastically reduced after BFA/Geo H treatment, thus indicating that Geo H affects mainly the delivery pathway of Cx43 protein.

  19. Nocardia xestospongiae sp. nov., isolated from a marine sponge in the Andaman Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawai, Chitti; Rungjindamai, Nattawut; Klanbut, Khanungkan; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2017-05-01

    A marine sponge-derived actinomycete, strain ST01-07T, was isolated from Xestospongia sp. collected from the Andaman Sea. The strain was characterised taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. The strain contained meso-diaminopimelic acid in the peptidoglycan, whole-cell sugars were arabinose, galactose, glucose, mannose and ribose. Mycolic acids that co-migrated with those from Nocardia araoensis NBRC 100135T were observed in whole-cell extracts. MK-8(H4ω-cycl) was the predominant menaquinone. Major cellular fatty acids were C17 : 1ω8c, C16 : 0 and C17 : 0. The diagnostic phospholipids in the cell consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain ST01-07T belonged to the genus Nocardia and was most closely related to N. araoensis IFM 0575T (98.71 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Nocardia niwae W9241T (98.56 %), Nocardia beijingensis AS4.1521T (98.41 %) and Nocardia arthritidis IFM 10035T (98.36 %). In addition, low DNA-DNA relatedness values (13.6±0.1% to 40.1±0.6%) confirmed that strain ST01-07T represents a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia xestospongiae sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is ST01-07T (=BCC 45622T=NBRC 109069T).

  20. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity analysis of halistanol trisulphate from marine sponge Petromica citrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Palloma R; Simas, Naomi Kato; Kuster, Ricardo Machado; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Fracalanzza, Sergio Eduardo Longo; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Muricy, Guilherme; Giambiagi-Demarval, Marcia; Laport, Marinella Silva

    2012-10-01

    An aqueous extract and fraction from the marine sponge Petromica citrina have antibacterial activity. We performed a chemical and biological characterization of the antibiotic substance from P. citrina and investigated its mode of action on Staphylococcus aureus cells. The inhibitory activity of the aqueous extract of P. citrina was determined against 14 bacteria belonging to type strains and clinical antibiotic-resistant strains. The aqueous extract was fractionated under bioassay guidance and the bioactive substance was identified by its (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and mass spectra. The MIC and the MBC of this substance were determined. This substance was also subjected to cytotoxic bioassays. The mode of action on S. aureus cells was investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy analysis. P. citrina showed a large spectrum of activity against type strains and resistant-bacteria such as S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The aqueous extract was fractionated and halistanol trisulphate (24ε,25-dimethylcholestane-2β,3α,6α-triol trisodium sulphate) was isolated for the first time from P. citrina. Halistanol trisulphate had a bactericidal effect on exponentially growing S. aureus cells at the MIC (512 mg/L). Cytotoxicity biossays showed moderate toxicity against cancer cell line L929 (fibrosarcoma). This substance apparently acts by damaging the cell membrane, with subsequent cell lysis. Halistanol trisulphate is a broad-spectrum antibiotic isolated from P. citrina with a mode of action involving disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane. It is a new candidate for research on antibacterial substances.

  1. A Lactose-Binding Lectin from the Marine Sponge Cinachyrella Apion (Cal Induces Cell Death in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Uchoa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer represents a set of more than 100 diseases, including malignant tumors from different locations. Strategies inducing differentiation have had limited success in the treatment of established cancers. Marine sponges are a biological reservoir of bioactive molecules, especially lectins. Several animal and plant lectins were purified with antitumor activity, mitogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral, but there are few reports in the literature describing the mechanism of action of lectins purified from marine sponges to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells. In this work, a lectin purified from the marine sponge Cinachyrella apion (CaL was evaluated with respect to its hemolytic, cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties, besides the ability to induce cell death in tumor cells. The antiproliferative activity of CaL was tested against HeLa, PC3 and 3T3 cell lines, with highest growth inhibition for HeLa, reducing cell growth at a dose dependent manner (0.5–10 µg/mL. Hemolytic activity and toxicity against peripheral blood cells were tested using the concentration of IC50 (10 µg/mL for both trials and twice the IC50 for analysis in flow cytometry, indicating that CaL is not toxic to these cells. To assess the mechanism of cell death caused by CaL in HeLa cells, we performed flow cytometry and western blotting. Results showed that lectin probably induces cell death by apoptosis activation by pro-apoptotic protein Bax, promoting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cell cycle arrest in S phase and acting as both dependent and/or independent of caspases pathway. These results indicate the potential of CaL in studies of medicine for treating cancer.

  2. Antioxidant alkaloid from the South China Sea marine sponge Iotrochota sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghong; Ji, Hong; Dong, Junde; Zhang, Si; Lee, Kyung Jin; Matthew, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Purpurone was isolated from the sponge Iotrochota sp. by bioactivity-guided fractionation. The compound showed antioxidant activity using the DPPH assay. The structure was established on the basis of NMR data and comparison with data reported.

  3. Agelamadins C-E, bromopyrrole alkaloids comprising oroidin and 3-hydroxykynurenine from a marine sponge Agelas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusama, Taishi; Tanaka, Naonobu; Sakai, Kanae; Gonoi, Tohru; Fromont, Jane; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2014-10-03

    Three structurally unique bromopyrrole alkaloids, agelamadins C-E (1-3), were isolated from a marine sponge Agelas sp. Agelamadin C (1) possesses a hybrid structure of oroidin and 3-hydroxykynurenine connected through a dihydro-1,4-oxazine moiety. Agelamadins D (2) and E (3) are a C-9/C-10 diastereomer and a 10-epimer of 1, respectively. The structures of 1-3 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis as well as application of a PGME method and a TDDFT ECD calculation. Antimicrobial activity of 1-3 was evaluated.

  4. Phylogenetic identification of fungi isolated from the marine sponge Tethya aurantium and identification of their secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Jutta; Ohlendorf, Birgit; Blümel, Martina; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2011-01-01

    Fungi associated with the marine sponge Tethya aurantium were isolated and identified by morphological criteria and phylogenetic analyses based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. They were evaluated with regard to their secondary metabolite profiles. Among the 81 isolates which were characterized, members of 21 genera were identified. Some genera like Acremonium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, and Trichoderma are quite common, but we also isolated strains belonging to genera like Botryosphaeria, Epicoccum, Parasphaeosphaeria, and Tritirachium which have rarely been reported from sponges. Members affiliated to the genera Bartalinia and Volutella as well as to a presumably new Phoma species were first isolated from a sponge in this study. On the basis of their classification, strains were selected for analysis of their ability to produce natural products. In addition to a number of known compounds, several new natural products were identified. The scopularides and sorbifuranones have been described elsewhere. We have isolated four additional substances which have not been described so far. The new metabolite cillifuranone (1) was isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum strain LF066. The structure of cillifuranone (1) was elucidated based on 1D and 2D NMR analysis and turned out to be a previously postulated intermediate in sorbifuranone biosynthesis. Only minor antibiotic bioactivities of this compound were found so far.

  5. Phylogenetic Identification of Fungi Isolated from the Marine Sponge Tethya aurantium and Identification of Their Secondary Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Wiese

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungi associated with the marine sponge Tethya aurantium were isolated and identified by morphological criteria and phylogenetic analyses based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions. They were evaluated with regard to their secondary metabolite profiles. Among the 81 isolates which were characterized, members of 21 genera were identified. Some genera like Acremonium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, and Trichoderma are quite common, but we also isolated strains belonging to genera like Botryosphaeria, Epicoccum, Parasphaeosphaeria, and Tritirachium which have rarely been reported from sponges. Members affiliated to the genera Bartalinia and Volutella as well as to a presumably new Phoma species were first isolated from a sponge in this study. On the basis of their classification, strains were selected for analysis of their ability to produce natural products. In addition to a number of known compounds, several new natural products were identified. The scopularides and sorbifuranones have been described elsewhere. We have isolated four additional substances which have not been described so far. The new metabolite cillifuranone (1 was isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum strain LF066. The structure of cillifuranone (1 was elucidated based on 1D and 2D NMR analysis and turned out to be a previously postulated intermediate in sorbifuranone biosynthesis. Only minor antibiotic bioactivities of this compound were found so far.

  6. Isolation and analysis of bacteria with antimicrobial activities from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans collected from Irish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jonathan; Baker, Paul; Piper, Clare; Cotter, Paul D; Walsh, Marcella; Mooij, Marlies J; Bourke, Marie B; Rea, Mary C; O'Connor, Paula M; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; O'Gara, Fergal; Marchesi, Julian R; Dobson, Alan D W

    2009-01-01

    Samples of the marine sponge Haliclona simulans were collected from Irish coastal waters, and bacteria were isolated from these samples. Phylogenetic analyses of the cultured isolates showed that four different bacterial phyla were represented; Bacteriodetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. The sponge bacterial isolates were assayed for the production of antimicrobial substances, and biological activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were demonstrated, with 50% of isolates showing antimicrobial activity against at least one of the test strains. Further testing showed that the antimicrobial activities extended to the important pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Clostridium difficile, multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and pathogenic yeast strains. The Actinomycetes were numerically the most abundant producers of antimicrobial activities, although activities were also noted from Bacilli and Pseudovibrio isolates. Surveys for the presence of potential antibiotic encoding polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes also revealed that genes for the biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites were present in most bacterial phyla but were particularly prevalent among the Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. This study demonstrates that the culturable fraction of bacteria from the sponge H. simulans is diverse and appears to possess much potential as a source for the discovery of new medically relevant biological active agents.

  7. Biological and chemical characterization of ianthelline isolated from a marine sponge

    OpenAIRE

    Siiri, Anette Olli

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies of sponges have led to the discovery of the commercially available drugs cytarabin and vidarabin. The arctic sponge Stryphnus fortis showed antibacterial and anticancer activity in the primary screening in the MabCent screening program; most likely from more than one compound. Dereplication with TOF-MS suggested the presence of ianthelline as one of the active compounds. In order to purify large amounts of the ianthelline, the extract was fractionated using f...

  8. Antimicrobial potential of metabolites extracted from bacterial symbionts associated with marine sponges in coastal area of Gulf of Mannar Biosphere, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, S; G Rao, A; Patil, M R; Saikia, B; Bharadwaj Kn, V; Rao Gs, J

    2014-03-01

    Marine coastal areas of India have vast diversity of sponges which harbours many endosymbiotic bacteria which are the source of many potential antimicrobial metabolites. This study focuses the screening and characterization of drug-producing bacteria symbiotically which are associated with marine sponges collected from Gulf of Mannar, South Coast India. Six different sponges were collected and they were identified on the basis of their morphology. The drug-producing isolates were screened by agar overlay method towards various clinical strains. The secondary metabolites were characterized and were found to be quinones, alkaloids, flavanoids and flavonyl glycosides. The metabolites showed significant inhibitory properties against clinical strains that were further identified as chromophoric and fluorophoric in nature. Ethyl acetate extracts of chromophore and floureophore substances showed significant inhibitory properties against Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Salmonella typhi respectively. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of theses isolates revealed that chomophore-producing strain were closely related to Pseudomonas spp. RHLB12, isolated from Callyspongia spp. and floureophore-producing bacteria was related to Bacillus licheniformis T6-1 which was isolated from Haliclona spp. Hence, our study demonstrated that antimicrobial metabolites extracted from symbiotic bacteria associated with marine sponges have high therapeutic potential against many bacterial pathogens including multidrug-resistant strains. This is the first study demonstrating antimicrobial potential of flurophoric and chromophoric metabolites extracted from bacterial biosymbionts associated with marine sponges. Our study has significant scope as Indian coastal area especially harbours vast varieties of sponges with novel secondary metabolites-producing organisms. The natural metabolites extracted from sponge-derived bacteria pave novel therapeutic remedy against various pathogens when

  9. Genomics of sponge-associated Streptomyces spp. closely related to Streptomyces albus J1074: insights into marine adaptation and secondary metabolite biosynthesis potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ian

    Full Text Available A total of 74 actinomycete isolates were cultivated from two marine sponges, Geodia barretti and Phakellia ventilabrum collected at the same spot at the bottom of the Trondheim fjord (Norway. Phylogenetic analyses of sponge-associated actinomycetes based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated the presence of species belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Rhodococcus, Pseudonocardia and Micromonospora. Most isolates required sea water for growth, suggesting them being adapted to the marine environment. Phylogenetic analysis of Streptomyces spp. revealed two isolates that originated from different sponges and had 99.7% identity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences, indicating that they represent very closely related strains. Sequencing, annotation, and analyses of the genomes of these Streptomyces isolates demonstrated that they are sister organisms closely related to terrestrial Streptomyces albus J1074. Unlike S. albus J1074, the two sponge streptomycetes grew and differentiated faster on the medium containing sea water. Comparative genomics revealed several genes presumably responsible for partial marine adaptation of these isolates. Genome mining targeted to secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters identified several of those, which were not present in S. albus J1074, and likely to have been retained from a common ancestor, or acquired from other actinomycetes. Certain genes and gene clusters were shown to be differentially acquired or lost, supporting the hypothesis of divergent evolution of the two Streptomyces species in different sponge hosts.

  10. Reactivity and Biological Activity of the Marine Sesquiterpene Hydroquinone Avarol and Related Compounds from Sponges of the Order Dictyoceratida

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    Miroslav J. Gasic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of results of bioactivity and reactivity examinations of marine sesquiterpene (hydroquinones is presented. The article is focused mostly on friedo- rearranged drimane structural types, isolated from sponges of the order Dictyoceratida. Examples of structural correlations are outlined. Available results on the mechanism of redox processes and examinations of chemo- and regioselectivity in addition reactions are presented and, where possible, analyzed in relation to established bioactivities. Most of the bioactivity examinations are concerned with antitumor activities and the mechanism thereof, such as DNA damage, arylation of nucleophiles, tubulin assembly inhibition, protein kinase inhibition, inhibition of the arachidonic cascade, etc. Perspectives on marine drug development are discussed with respect to biotechnological methods and synthesis. Examples of the recognition of validated core structures and synthesis of structurally simplified compounds retaining modes of activity are analyzed.

  11. Total synthesis of (-)-reidispongiolide A, an actin-targeting macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Reidispongia coerulea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Ian; Ashton, Kate; Britton, Robert; Cecere, Giuseppe; Chouraqui, Gaëlle; Florence, Gordon J; Knust, Henner; Stafford, Jonathan

    2008-02-01

    A stereocontrolled total synthesis of the microfilament-destabilizing cytotoxic macrolide (-)-reidispongiolide A, isolated from the New Caledonian marine sponge Reidispongia coerulea, is described. This synthesis utilizes a convergent aldol-based strategy to construct the 26-membered macrolactone, followed by the late-stage coupling of a derived aldehyde with an N-vinylformamide-containing ketone subunit to install the full side chain. Two alternative routes were examined for the introduction of the 2E,4E-dienoate region, and a complex Mukaiyama aldol coupling was used to connect the northern and southern hemispheres to install the C13 stereocenter. This constitutes the first chemical synthesis of any member of the reidispongiolide/sphinxolide family of marine macrolides and unequivocally establishes the relative and absolute configuration.

  12. Action-mechanism of trichoderin A, an anti-dormant mycobacterial aminolipopeptide from marine sponge-derived Trichoderma sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruksakorn, Patamaporn; Arai, Masayoshi; Liu, Liu; Moodley, Prashini; Jacobs, William Robert; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2011-01-01

    In the course of our search for anti-dormant mycobacterial substances from marine organisms, we previously isolated three new aminolipopeptides, named trichoderins A, A1 and B, from the culture of the marine sponge-derived fungus of Trichoderma sp. and determined their chemical structures. To identify the gene that could confer a resistance to trichoderin A, we prepared transformants of Mycobacterium (M.) smegmatis, which were transformed with the genomic DNA library of M. bovis BCG constructed in the multi-copy shuttle cosmid pYUB145. Then, the transformant of M. smegmatis, which over-expressed a part of genes that coded mycobacterial ATP synthase, was found to exhibit a resistance to trichoderin A. In addition, trichoderin A reduced ATP contents in M. bovis BCG. These findings elucidated that the anti-mycobacterial activity of trichoderins comes from the inhibition of ATP synthesis.

  13. Subtilomycin: A New Lantibiotic from Bacillus subtilis Strain MMA7 Isolated from the Marine Sponge Haliclona simulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Barbosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are attracting increased attention as an alternative to classic antibiotics in the fight against infectious disease and multidrug resistant pathogens. Bacillus subtilis strain MMA7 isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans displays a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, which includes Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, as well as several pathogenic Candida species. This activity is in part associated with a newly identified lantibiotic, herein named as subtilomycin. The proposed biosynthetic cluster is composed of six genes, including protein-coding genes for LanB-like dehydratase and LanC-like cyclase modification enzymes, characteristic of the class I lantibiotics. The subtilomycin biosynthetic cluster in B. subtilis strain MMA7 is found in place of the sporulation killing factor (skf operon, reported in many B. subtilis isolates and involved in a bacterial cannibalistic behaviour intended to delay sporulation. The presence of the subtilomycin biosynthetic cluster appears to be widespread amongst B. subtilis strains isolated from different shallow and deep water marine sponges. Subtilomycin possesses several desirable industrial and pharmaceutical physicochemical properties, including activity over a wide pH range, thermal resistance and water solubility. Additionally, the production of the lantibiotic subtilomycin could be a desirable property should B. subtilis strain MMA7 be employed as a probiotic in aquaculture applications.

  14. Anticancer Activity of Marine Sponge Hyrtios sp. Extract in Human Colorectal Carcinoma RKO Cells with Different p53 Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development using marine bioresources is limited even though the ocean occupies about 70% of the earth and contains a large number of biological materials. From the screening test of the marine sponge extracts, we found Hyrtios sp. sponge collected from Chuuk island, Micronesia. In this study, the Hyrtios sp. extract was examined for anticancer activity against human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells that are wildtype for p53 and RKO-E6 that are p53 defective. The Hyrtios sp. extract dose-dependently inhibited viability in both cell lines. Multinucleation as an indication of mitotic catastrophe was also observed. Cytotoxicity tests gave significantly different results for RKO and RKO-E6 cells after 48 h exposure to Hyrtios sp. extract. In RKO cells treated with Hyrtios sp. extract, cell death occurred by induction of p53 and p21 proteins. In p53-defective RKO-E6 cells, Hyrtios sp. extract decreased expression of JNK protein and increased p21 protein. These results indicate that Hyrtios sp. extract induced apoptosis via different pathways depending on p53 status and could be a good natural product for developing new anticancer drugs.

  15. Antibacterial activity of the marine sponge Ircinia Campana collected at Punta Uva Limón against Staphylococcus Aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rojas Brenes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sponges are simple multicellularorganisms; they inhabit in marine environments from the polar seas to the tropical waterswhere they are more abundant. These species are exposed to large populations of microbes, reason that explains their complex morphological and cellular defense mechanism, which are used by these organisms to fight against pathogens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the marine sponge Ircinia campana, whichinhabits in the south of the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica against  Sthapylococcus aureus gram-positive bacteria. Sampleswere collected in Punta Uva in Limónduring July of 2007. The active compounds were obtainedby extraction with acetone (crude extract; and subsequently, chromatographic extracts were obtained using fractions 1:4 hexane: ethyl acetate. The antibacterial activities of the different fractions, including the  crude extract were tested.Our results suggest a zone of inhibition of 14.60 ±0.25 mm for the crude extract and18.70±0.25mm for the most active fraction separated by chromatography. The metabolite responsible for the antibacterial activity was isolated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLCand preliminarily characterized through ultraviolet (UV and infrared (IR spectroscopy.

  16. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegelmeyer, Renata; Schröder, Rafael; Rambo, Douglas F.; Dresch, Roger R.; Carraro, João L. F.; Mothes, Beatriz; Moreira, José Cláudio F.; da Frota Junior, Mário L. C.; Henriques, Amélia T.

    2015-01-01

    Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z)-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3,6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R)-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy. PMID:26308014

  17. HPLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS Analysis and Biological Activity of Triterpene Glycosides from the Colombian Marine Sponge Ectyoplasia ferox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonny Colorado-Ríos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The marine sponge Ectyoplasia ferox produces antipredatory and allelopathic triterpenoid glycosides as part of its chemical defense repertoire against predators, competitors, and fouling organisms. These molecules are responsible for the pharmacological potential found in the glycosides present in this species. In order to observe the glycochemical diversity present in E. ferox, a liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry approach to analyse a complex polar fraction of this marine sponge was performed. This gave valuable information for about twenty-five compounds three of which have been previously reported and another three which were found to be composed of known aglycones. Furthermore, a group of four urabosides, sharing two uncommon substitutions with carboxyl groups at C-4 on the terpenoid core, were identified by a characteristic fragmentation pattern. The oxidized aglycones present in this group of saponins can promote instability, making the purification process difficult. Cytotoxicity, cell cycle modulation, a cell cloning efficiency assay, as well as its hemolytic activity were evaluated. The cytotoxic activity was about IC50 40 µg/mL on Jurkat and CHO-k1 cell lines without exhibiting hemolysis. Discussion on this bioactivity suggests the scanning of other biological models would be worthwhile.

  18. Identification of the target protein of agelasine D, a marine sponge diterpene alkaloid, as an anti-dormant mycobacterial substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayoshi; Yamano, Yoshi; Setiawan, Andi; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2014-01-03

    One of the major reasons for the wide epidemicity of tuberculosis and for the necessity for extensive chemotherapeutic regimens is that the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has an ability to become dormant. Therefore, new lead compounds that are anti-bacterial against M. tuberculosis in both active and dormant states are urgently needed. Marine sponge diterpene alkaloids, agelasines B, C, and D, from an Indonesian marine sponge of the genus Agelas were rediscovered as anti-dormant-mycobacterial substances. Based on the concept that the transformants over-expressing targets of antimicrobial substances confer drug resistance, strains resistant to agelasine D were screened from Mycobacterium smegmatis transformed with a genomic DNA library of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Sequence analysis of the cosmids isolated from resistant transformants revealed that the responsible gene was located in the genome region between 3475.051 and 3502.901 kb. Further analysis of the transformants over-expressing the individual gene contained in this region indicated that BCG3185c (possibly a dioxygenase) might be a target of the molecule. Moreover, agelasine D was found to bind directly to recombinant BCG3185c protein (KD 2.42 μm), based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR). This evidence strongly suggests that the BCG3185c protein is the major target of agelasine D, and that the latter is the anti-mycobacterial substance against dormant bacilli. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Functional and Structural Characterization of FAU Gene/Protein from Marine Sponge Suberites domuncula

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    Dragutin Perina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV ubiquitously expressed (FAU gene is down-regulated in human prostate, breast and ovarian cancers. Moreover, its dysregulation is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Sponges (Porifera are animals without tissues which branched off first from the common ancestor of all metazoans. A large majority of genes implicated in human cancers have their homologues in the sponge genome. Our study suggests that FAU gene from the sponge Suberites domuncula reflects characteristics of the FAU gene from the metazoan ancestor, which have changed only slightly during the course of animal evolution. We found pro-apoptotic activity of sponge FAU protein. The same as its human homologue, sponge FAU increases apoptosis in human HEK293T cells. This indicates that the biological functions of FAU, usually associated with “higher” metazoans, particularly in cancer etiology, possess a biochemical background established early in metazoan evolution. The ancestor of all animals possibly possessed FAU protein with the structure and function similar to evolutionarily more recent versions of the protein, even before the appearance of true tissues and the origin of tumors and metastasis. It provides an opportunity to use pre-bilaterian animals as a simpler model for studying complex interactions in human cancerogenesis.

  20. Growth and metabolism of sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, M.

    2009-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are multi cellular filter-feeding invertebrate animals living attached to a substratum in mostly marine but also in freshwater habitats. The interest in sponges has increased rapidly since the discovery of potential new pharmaceutical compounds produced by many sponges. An

  1. Sponge cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Marine sponges are a rich source of bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical potential and are the most prolific source of newly discovered bioactive compounds with more than 7,000 novel molecules discovered in 40 years. Despite its enormous potential, only a few sponge-derived bioactive compounds

  2. Culture-independent nested PCR method reveals high diversity of actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yanjuan; Huang, Jianyu; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2008-11-01

    A culture-independent nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to investigate the diversity of actinobacteria communities associated with the sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-derived actinobacteria was then assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. A total of 196 positive clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis; 48 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were selected for sequencing. Rarefaction analysis indicated that the clone libraries represented 93% and 94% of the total estimated diversity for the two species, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data revealed representatives of various phylogenetic divisions, which were related to the following ten actinobacterial genera: Acidimicrobium, Corynebacterium, Propionibacterium, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Microbacterium, Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Cellulosimicrobium, Sporichthya, and unidentified actinobacterial clones. A sponge-specific, previously uncultured actinobacteria community grouped within the subclass Acidimicrobidae was discovered from both H. perleve and Sponge sp. Sequences belonging to Acidimicrobium in the H. perleve and the Sponge sp. clone libraries represented 33% and 24% of the clones, respectively. In the Sponge sp. clone library Mycobacterium dominated, accounting for 70% of all clones. The presence of Acidimicrobium and mycobacteria within two sponges can lay the groundwork for attempts to culture these interesting bacteria for industrial applications.

  3. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Assessing and Monitoring Cryptic Reef Diversity of Colonizing Marine Invertebrates using Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structure (ARMS) Deployed at Coral Reef Sites across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2010 to 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) are used to assess and monitor cryptic reef diversity of colonizing marine invertebrates in the Hawaiian and Mariana...

  4. Photographic images of benthic coral, algae and invertebrate species in marine habitats and subhabitats around offshore islets in the main Hawaiian Islands, April 2 - September 20, 2007 (NODC Accession 0043046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine algae, invertebrate and fish communities were surveyed at ten islet or offshore island sites in the Main Hawaiian Islands in the vicinity of Lanai, (Puu...

  5. Culturable epibacteria of the marine sponge Ircinia fusca: Temporal variations and their possible role in the epibacterial defense of the host

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thakur, N.L.; Anil, A.C.; Muller, W.E.G.

    : harbor also for putatively toxic bacteria. Mar Biol 130:529–536 Amade P, Charroin C, Baby C, Vacelet J (1987) Antimicrobial activities of marine sponges from the Mediterranean Sea. Mar Biol 94:271–275 Bakus GJ, Shulte B, Jhu S, Wright M, Green G, Gomez P...

  6. A novel Chromatiales bacterium is a potential sulfide oxidizer in multiple orders of marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Adi; Keren, Ray; Yu, Ke; Thomas, Brian C; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Banfield, Jillian F; Ilan, Micha

    2017-12-01

    Sponges are benthic filter feeders that play pivotal roles in coupling benthic-pelagic processes in the oceans that involve transformation of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen into biomass. While the contribution of sponge holobionts to the nitrogen cycle has been recognized in past years, their importance in the sulfur cycle, both oceanic and physiological, has only recently gained attention. Sponges in general, and Theonella swinhoei in particular, harbor a multitude of associated microorganisms that could affect sulfur cycling within the holobiont. We reconstructed the genome of a Chromatiales (class Gammaproteobacteria) bacterium from a metagenomic sequence dataset of a T. swinhoei-associated microbial community. This relatively abundant bacterium has the metabolic capability to oxidize sulfide yet displays reduced metabolic potential suggestive of its lifestyle as an obligatory symbiont. This bacterium was detected in multiple sponge orders, according to similarities in key genes such as 16S rRNA and polyketide synthase genes. Due to its sulfide oxidation metabolism and occurrence in many members of the Porifera phylum, we suggest naming the newly described taxon Candidatus Porisulfidus. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Evaluation of marine sponge extracts as new sources of antimicrobial substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J A; Newmark, F; Santos-Acevedo, M; Sánchez, J

    2008-09-01

    As part of the search for new natural sources of antibiotic compounds, in this study, carried out in the northeastern coast of Colombia, 15 sponge species were collected. A crude organic extract was obtained from each one and evaluated regarding their antimicrobial properties in vitro against microorganisms with clinical importance for humans (one strain for each specie of Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans). Sponge extracts from Halichondria spp., Petromica ciocalyptoides and Xestospongia proxima exhibited antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria and antifungal activity against the fungi, while the sponge Dragmacidon reticulata showed activity only for the same yeast specie. Bioactivity of the extracts was compared with that of both a antibiotic (cefoperazone) and an antimicotic (nistatine). It was found that inhibition values of X. proxima extracts in vitro are, in some cases, higher than those observed for cefoperazone and nistatine. Crude extracts from the sponges Myrmekioderma gyroderma, Myrmekioderma rea, Biemna cribaria, Cinachyrella kuekenthali, Iotrochota imminuta, Oceanapia peltata, Polymastia tenax, Desmapsamma anchorata, Spirastrella coccinea, Cribrochalina infundibulum and Oceanapia bartschi did not show any antimicrobial activity whatsoever.

  8. Structure Elucidation and Cytotoxic Evaluation of New Polyacetylenes from a Marine Sponge Petrosia sp.

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    Yung-Shun Juan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The sponge Petrosia sp. yielded five polyacetylenic compounds (1–5, including two new polyacetylenes, petrosianynes A (1 and B (2. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with the physical and spectral data of related known analogues. Compounds 1–5 exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against a limited panel of cancer cell lines.

  9. Phylogeography of the Sponge Suberites diversicolor in Indonesia: Insights into the Evolution of Marine Lake Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, L.E.; Erpenbeck, D.; Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.; Voogd, de N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of multiple independently derived populations in landlocked marine lakes provides an opportunity for fundamental research into the role of isolation in population divergence and speciation in marine taxa. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through

  10. Unusual C24, C25, C26 and C27 polyunsaturated fatty acids of the marine sponge Microciona prolifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, R W; Litchfield, C

    1976-05-27

    (1) Complete characterization of the fatty acids of the marine sponge Microciona prolifera, including double bond positional isomers, has identified 95 different acids in amounts of 0.1% or more. Trace amounts of 23 other acids were found. (2) 48% of the fatty acids present have C24--C28 chain lengths. These are all saturates, monoenes, dienes and trienes; the tetraene, pentaene and hexaene acids possess the usual C18--C22 carbon chains. The numerous C24--C28 acids present apparently originate within the sponge itself, indicating a highly active chain elongation system. (3) A new family of C24, C25, C26 and C27 polyunsaturated acids with isolated double bonds has been discovered. All contain delta 5,9 unsaturation. Specific acids identified were 5,9-24:2; 5,9-25:2; 5,9-26:2; 5,9,17-26:3; 5,9,19-26:3; 5,9,19-27:3 and 5,9,20-27:3. Biosynthetic pathways for such acids are proposed, based on intermediates found in our fatty acid analyses.

  11. Brominated Compounds from Marine Sponges of the Genus Aplysina and a Compilation of Their 13C NMR Spectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Narlize Silva; Montes, Ricardo Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; da Cunha, Emidio V. L.; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A), cavernicolins (B), hydroverongiaquinols (C), bromotyrosineketals (D), bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E), oxazolidones (F), spiroisoxazolines (G), verongiabenzenoids (H), verongiaquinols (I), and dibromocyclohexadienes (J). A compilation of their 13C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted. PMID:22163189

  12. Brominated compounds from marine sponges of the genus Aplysina and a compilation of their 13C NMR spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Narlize Silva; Montes, Ricardo Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; da Cunha, Emidio V L; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A), cavernicolins (B), hydroverongiaquinols (C), bromotyrosineketals (D), bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E), oxazolidones (F), spiroisoxazolines (G), verongiabenzenoids (H), verongiaquinols (I), and dibromocyclohexadienes (J). A compilation of their (13)C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted.

  13. Brominated Compounds from Marine Sponges of the Genus Aplysina and a Compilation of Their 13C NMR Spectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Maria Barbosa-Filho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A, cavernicolins (B, hydroverongiaquinols (C, bromotyrosineketals (D, bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E, oxazolidones (F, spiroisoxazolines (G, verongiabenzenoids (H, verongiaquinols (I, and dibromocyclohexadienes (J. A compilation of their 13C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted.

  14. In vitro antiproliferative effect of fractions from the caribbean marine sponge Myrmekioderma gyroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Márquez Fernández

    Full Text Available Introduction: studies performed to Myrmekioderma genus sponges show phospholipid fatty acids, volatile compounds, sterols, bioactive cyclic diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, lineal diterpenes and glycolipid ethers. Objetive: to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of seven fractions (F1-F7 obtained by flash column chromatography from the most bioactive extract of the sponge Myrmekioderma gyroderma, and to analyze the chemical composition of the most active fraction. Methods: samples of dried sponge were extracted with two different solvents: CH2Cl2 (2 x 50 mL, and CH3OH (2 x 50 mL. Each fraction was evaluated on tumor cell derived cell lines; and the cell growth, and viability were determined by a colorimeter assay using sulforhodamine B. Fatty acids structure of the most active fraction was possible by GC-MS analysis of the methyl ester, and pyrrolidine derivatives. Results: the fraction with higher activity on the assessed tumor cell lines is F4 due to it totally inhibited MDA-MB-231, and HT29 cell line growth to 5, and 25 µg/mL concentration (IC50< 1 µg/mL. Fatty acids identified in bioactive F4 fraction of the M. gyroderma sponge can be classified on the following groups: lineal chain saturated, branched-saturated, unsaturated, and a 3-hydroxy acid. Conclusions: 43 fatty acids among saturated, branched-saturated, and unsaturated were identified out of the F4 fraction with activity on the cell lines derived of breast cancer MDA-MB-231, colon carcinoma HT29, and lung carcinoma cells A-549. These results show the growth inhibitory effect shown by the fractions, on the tumor cell lines, depends on the dose.

  15. Papuamides E and F, Cytotoxic Depsipeptides from the Marine Sponge Melophlus sp

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William; Feussner, Klaus-D; Van Wagoner, Ryan M.

    2011-01-01

    Two known papuamides C (1) and D (2) together with two new depsipeptides, papuamides E (3) and F (4), were isolated from an undescribed sponge of the genus Melophlus collected in the Solomon Islands. The planar structures of the compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic studies. Papuamides C–F (1–4) showed cytotoxicity against brine shrimp with LD50 values between 92 and 106 μg/mL.

  16. Papuamides E and F, Cytotoxic Depsipeptides from the Marine Sponge Melophlus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William; Feussner, Klaus-D; Van Wagoner, Ryan M

    2011-11-04

    Two known papuamides C (1) and D (2) together with two new depsipeptides, papuamides E (3) and F (4), were isolated from an undescribed sponge of the genus Melophlus collected in the Solomon Islands. The planar structures of the compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic studies. Papuamides C-F (1-4) showed cytotoxicity against brine shrimp with LD(50) values between 92 and 106 μg/mL.

  17. Highly Expressed Genes in Marine Sponge Suberites domuncula Prefer C- and G-Ending Codons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Perina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are the simplest extant phylum of Metazoa; they are closest to the common ancestor of all multicellular animals. A total of 223 coding sequences from Suberites domuncula (Demospongiae represent the dataset for the codon usage analysis. A total of 46038 codons had an average guanine and cytosine (G+C content of 45.8 % and an average content of guanine and cytosine at the synonymous third position of codons (GC3S of 43.4 %. In this sample of genes considerable variations in synonymous codon usage were found. The G+C content of the coding sequences varied from 34 to 56.1 % and GC3S from 19 to 58.7 %. Correspondence analysis revealed that highly expressed genes preferentially use a limited subset of codons (preferred codons. A total of 15 preferred codons were found and they all, with one exception, end with C or G. The preferential use of C- or G-ending codons in highly expressed genes was possibly developed in a common ancestor of sponges and other Metazoa and it has remained conserved throughout the sponge evolution.

  18. Culture of marine sponges with potential applications in Aquaculture and Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana M F Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the sponges were collected from the sea bottom in the surrounding areas of Peniche (central western coast of Portugal, by scuba diving. They were sealed in plastic zip bags during transportation to the surface and laboratory, to avoid air contact, which they are not able to endure. They were maintained in a closed water circulation system, transplanted into artificial substrates of plastic and fed every two days, with a mixed solution of microalgae Nanochloropsis salina culture and faeces of gilt-head sea bream (Sparus aurata. As this species is susceptible to the light, half of the tanks of the culture system were protected with a black cloth and the other half were submitted to an acclimation process to this factor, in order for them to be used in aquariophilia. The sponges dimension and weight were assessed. The establishment of an efficient culture strategy will allow to use sponges as ornamental organism, as well as a diet for other interesting commercial species (also potentially as probiotics, or even as source of extracts for different biotechnology fields.

  19. The antibacterial capacity of marine bacteria isolated from sponge Acanthella cavernosa collected from Lombok Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Murniasih

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find a potent antibiotic producer from the sponge-associated bacteria as well as to profile the important substances. Methods: Sponge collection, bacteria isolation, extraction and characterization of potent active compounds were carried out for this study. Results: Approximately 59 single strains of bacteria were isolated from this sponge. Totally 40 strains showed activity against Escerichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio eltor. The chemical separation of the potent strain Bacterium sp. Lb.10%.2.1.1.b, using n-phase column chromatography revealed 7 active fractions (7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14 and 15. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of Fraction 7 indicated some phenolic compounds including 4-nonylphenol, methyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenylpropionate, acetosyringone, 2,4-bis(1-phenylethylphenol, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, mono(2- ethylhexyl ester, tri(2-ethylhexyl trimellitate and oleamide. Conclusions: Indeed, this is a preliminary information in profiling chemical substances, produced by Bacterium sp. Lb.10%.2.1.1.b. Further purification and structural chemical determination were needed to find a comprehensive result.

  20. Culture-dependent and independent approaches for identifying novel halogenases encoded by Crambe crambe (marine sponge) microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öztürk, B.; Jaeger, de L.; Smidt, H.; Sipkema, D.

    2013-01-01

    Sponges harbour microbial communities that contribute to the genetic and metabolic potential of their host. Among metabolites produced by sponge-associated microbial communities, halogenated compounds are of special interest because of their biotechnological potential. In this study, we have

  1. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the first Porifera tumor necrosis factor superfamily member and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Ghignone, Stefano; Mussino, Francesca; Vezzulli, Luigi; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the first Tumor Necrosis Factor homologous and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis: chTNF and chTNFR, respectively. The deduced chTNF amino acid sequence is a type II transmembrane protein containing the typical TNFSF domain. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that chTNF is more related to Chordata TNFs rather than to other invertebrates. chTNF and chTNFR are constitutively expressed both in the ectosome and in the choanosome of the sponge, with higher levels in the ectosome. chTNF and chTNFR mRNAs were monitored in sponge fragmorphs treated with Gram(+) or Gram(-) bacteria. chTNF was significantly upregulated in Gram(+)-treated fragmorphs as compared to controls, while chTNFR was upregulated by both treatments. Finally, the possible chTNF fibrogenic role in sponge fragmorphs was studied by TNF inhibitor treatment measuring fibrillar and non fibrillar collagen gene expression; results indicate that the cytokine is involved in sponge collagen deposition and homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Swinholide J, a Potent Cytotoxin from the Marine Sponge Theonella swinhoei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Zampella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In our ongoing search for new pharmacologically active leads from Solomon organisms, we have examined the sponge Theonella swinhoei. Herein we report the isolation and structure elucidation of swinholide A (1 and one new macrolide, swinholide J (2. Swinholide J is an unprecedented asymmetric 44-membered dilactone with an epoxide functionality in half of the molecule. The structural determination was based on extensive interpretation of high-field NMR spectra and HRESIMS data. Swinholide J displayed potent in vitro cytotoxicity against KB cells (human nasopharynx cancer with an IC50 value of 6 nM.

  3. Supplementary Material for: Hologenome analysis of two marine sponges with different microbiomes

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Tae Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Sponges (Porifera) harbor distinct microbial consortia within their mesohyl interior. We herein analysed the hologenomes of Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria, which notably differ in their microbiome content. Results Our analysis revealed that S. carteri has an expanded repertoire of immunological domains, specifically Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich (SRCR)-like domains, compared to X. testudinaria. On the microbial side, metatranscriptome analyses revealed an overrepresentation of potential symbiosis-related domains in X. testudinaria. Conclusions Our findings provide genomic insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying host-symbiont coevolution and may serve as a roadmap for future hologenome analyses.

  4. Negombins A-I, new chlorinated polyfunctional diterpenoids from the marine sponge Negombata species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudi, Amira; Benayahu, Yehuda; Kashman, Yoel

    2007-06-07

    Nine novel compounds designated negombins A-I (1-9) were isolated, together with latrunculin, from the Tanzanian sponge Negombata sp. The nine are sacculatane type diterpenes, previously only known from liverworts. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by interpretation of MS and 1D and 2D NMR spectra. A possible biogenesis initiated by the naturally rare chloronium ion is suggested, possibly hinting to a guest microorganism as the source of the compounds. Compound 4 is toxic to brine shrimp larvae.

  5. New marine natural products from sponges (Porifera) of the order Dictyoceratida (2001 to 2012); a promising source for drug discovery, exploration and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehbub, Mohammad F; Perkins, Michael V; Zhang, Wei; Franco, Christopher M M

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of new drugs can no longer rely primarily on terrestrial resources, as they have been heavily exploited for over a century. During the last few decades marine sources, particularly sponges, have proven to be a most promising source of new natural products for drug discovery. This review considers the order Dictyoceratida in the Phylum Porifera from which the largest number of new marine natural products have been reported over the period 2001-2012. This paper examines all the sponges from the order Dictyoceratida that were reported as new compounds during the time period in a comprehensive manner. The distinctive physical characteristics and the geographical distribution of the different families are presented. The wide structural diversity of the compounds produced and the variety of biological activities they exhibited is highlighted. As a representative of sponges, insights into this order and avenues for future effective natural product discovery are presented. The research institutions associated with the various studies are also highlighted with the aim of facilitating collaborative relationships, as well as to acknowledge the major international contributors to the discovery of novel sponge metabolites. The order Dictyoceratida is a valuable source of novel chemical structures which will continue to contribute to a new era of drug discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of deep coral and sponge communities in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary: Rittenburg Bank, Cochrane Bank and the Farallon Escarpment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etnoyer, P.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Salgado, E.; Graiff, K.; Roletto, J.; Williams, G.J.; Reyna, K.; Hyland, J.

    2014-01-01

    Benthic surveys were conducted in the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) aboard R/V Fulmar, October 3-11, 2012 using the large observation-class remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Beagle. The purpose of the surveys was to groundtruth mapping data collected in 2011, and to characterize the seafloor biota, particularly corals and sponges, in order to support Essential Fish Habitat designations under Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA) and other conservation and management goals under the National Marine Sanctuaries Act (NMSA). A total area of 25,416 sq. meters of sea floor was surveyed during 34 ROV transects. The overall research priorities were: (1) to locate and characterize DSC and sponge habitats in priority areas; (2) to collect information to help understand the value of DSCs and sponges as reservoirs of biodiversity, or habitat for associated species, including commercially important fishes and invertebrates; (3) to assess the condition of DSC/sponge assemblages in relation to potential anthropogenic or environmental disturbances; and (4) to make this information available to support fisheries and sanctuary management needs under MSA and NMSA requirements.

  7. Contraceptive Sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contraceptive sponge Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff The contraceptive sponge is a type of birth control (contraceptive) that prevents ... shaped, and made of polyurethane foam. The contraceptive sponge contains spermicide, which blocks or kills sperm. Before ...

  8. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from the Red Sea Marine Verongid Sponge Suberea Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiaa A. Shaala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In a continuation of our efforts to identify bioactive compounds from Red Sea Verongid sponges, the organic extract of the sponge Suberea species afforded seven compounds including two new dibrominated alkaloids, subereamollines C and D (1 and 2, together with the known compounds aerothionin (3, homoaerothionin (4, aeroplysinin-1 (5, aeroplysinin-2 (6 and a revised subereaphenol C (7 as ethyl 2-(2,4-dibromo-3,6-dihydroxyphenylacetate. The structures of the isolated compounds were assigned by different spectral data including optical rotations, 1D (1H and 13C and 2D (COSY, multiplicity-edited HSQC, and HMBC NMR and high-resolution mass spectroscopy. Aerothionin (3 and subereaphenol C (7 displayed potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cell line with IC50 values of 29 and 13.3 µM, respectively. In addition, aeroplysinin-2 (6 showed potent antimigratory activity against the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with IC50 of 18 µM. Subereamollines C and D are new congeners of the previously reported compounds subereamollines A and B with methyl ester functionalities on the side chain. These findings provide further insight into the biosynthetic capabilities of members of the genus Suberea and the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of these compounds.

  9. Screening and Characterization of Protease Inhibitors from Marine Bacteria Associated with Sponge Jaspis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIS TRI WAHYUDI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three isolates among 138 sponge-associated bacteria were isolated from Waigeo Island, Raja Ampat West Papua Province, Indonesia, have been shown protease inhibitory activity against subtilisin (serine protease, thermolysin (metalloprotease, and crude extract from pathogenic bacteria (Eschericia coli enteropathogenic/EPEC K.1.1, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Those three isolates were designated as sponge associated bacteria SAB S-12, SAB S-21, and SAB S-17. A simple casein and Sea Water Complete (SWC double layer agar method was used to screen the bacteria against pathogenic bacteria producing protease, i.e. EPEC K.1.1, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Among them, SAB S-12 isolate showed no inhibitory zone indicated. The isolate had the highest inhibitory activity against subtilisin and crude extract enzyme of pathogenic bacteria, the inhibitory activity was 91.6 and 98.9%, respectively. In addition, the SAB S-21 isolate had the highest inhibitory activity against thermolysin, it was 70.4%. The optimum pH and temperature for protease inhibition of the three isolates was at pH 7.0-8.0 and 40-50 oC respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, the closest related with SAB S-12, SAB-17, and SAB-21 isolates was Providencia sp. (92% identity, Paracoccus sp. (86% identity, and Bacillus sp. (% identity, respectively.

  10. An Overview on Marine Sponge-Symbiotic Bacteria as Unexhausted Sources for Natural Product Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Candice M. Brinkmann; Amberlee Marker; D. İpek Kurtböke

    2017-01-01

    Microbial symbiotic communities of marine macro-organisms carry functional metabolic profiles different to the ones found terrestrially and within surrounding marine environments. These symbiotic bacteria have increasingly been a focus of microbiologists working in marine environments due to a wide array of reported bioactive compounds of therapeutic importance resulting in various patent registrations. Revelations of symbiont-directed host specific functions and the true nature of host-symbi...

  11. Marine debris accumulation in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands: an examination of rates and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameron, Oliver J; Parke, Michael; Albins, Mark A; Brainard, Russell

    2007-04-01

    Large amounts of derelict fishing gear accumulate and cause damage to shallow coral reefs of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). To facilitate maintenance of reefs cleaned during 1996-2005 removal efforts, we identify likely high-density debris areas by assessing reef characteristics (depth, benthic habitat type, and energy regime) that influence sub-regional debris accumulation. Previously cleaned backreef and lagoonal reefs at two NWHI locations were resurveyed for accumulated debris using two survey methods. Accumulated debris densities and weights were found to be greater in lagoonal reef areas. Sample weight-based debris densities are extrapolated to similar habitats throughout the NWHI using a spatial 'net habitat' dataset created by generalizing IKONOS satellite derivatives for depth and habitat classification. Prediction accuracy for this dataset is tested using historical debris point data. Annual NWHI debris accumulation is estimated to be 52.0 metric tonnes. For planning purposes, individual NWHI atolls/reefs are allotted a proportion of this total.

  12. Global conservation status of sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James J; McGrath, Emily; Biggerstaff, Andrew; Bates, Tracey; Cárdenas, César A; Bennett, Holly

    2015-02-01

    Sponges are important for maintaining ecosystem function and integrity of marine and freshwater benthic communities worldwide. Despite this, there has been no assessment of their current global conservation status. We assessed their status, accounting for the distribution of research effort; patterns of temporal variation in sponge populations and assemblages; the number of sponges on threatened species lists; and the impact of environmental pressures. Sponge research effort has been variable; marine sponges in the northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean and freshwater sponges in Europe and North America have received the most attention. Although sponge abundance has increased in some locations since 1990, these were typically on coral reefs, in response to declines in other benthic organisms, and restricted to a few species. Few data were available on temporal trends in freshwater sponge abundance. Despite over 8500 described sponge species, only 20 are on threatened species lists, and all are marine species from the northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Of the 202 studies identified, the effects of temperature, suspended sediment, substratum loss, and microbial pathogens have been studied the most intensively for marine sponges, although responses appear to be variable. There were 20 studies examining environmental impacts on freshwater sponges, and most of these were on temperature and heavy metal contamination. We found that most sponges do not appear to be threatened globally. However, little information is available for most species and more data are needed on the impacts of anthropogenic-related pressures. This is a critical information gap in understanding sponge conservation status. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. Book review: Medicinal Sponges of the Persian Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Arezoo Najafi

    2012-01-01

    Marine sponges with about 107 genuses and more than 15000 species constitute one of the most wonderful marine invertebrates. These creatures with wide variety of biologic compounds has offered unique source of marine bioproducts towards marine researchers and chemists. Persian Gulf is habitant of various marine organisms including different species of marine sponges. The book “Medicinal sponges of the Persian Gulf” offers comprehensive review of marine bioproducts of Persian Gulf ...

  14. Hawaii Institute for Marine Biology and NOAA National Ocean Service, Marine Sanctuary Program Partnership, in affiliation with the Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program, 2007 Survey of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve: Digital Still Images (NODC Accession 0052882)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rapid Assessment Transects were conducted in 2007 in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument of the Northwest Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve....

  15. Hawaii Institute for Marine Biology and NOAA National Ocean Service, Marine Sanctuary Program Partnership, in affiliation with the Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program, 2007 Survey of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve: Benthic Data from Digital Still Images (NODC Accession 0000881)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rapid Assessment Transects were conducted in 2007 in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument of the Northwest Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve....

  16. Culture-dependent and culture-independent diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve from the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Dai, Shikun; Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Guanghua; Liu, Guohui; Wu, Houbo; Li, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    In this report, the diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve collected from a remote island of the South China Sea was investigated employing classical cultivation and characterization, 16S rDNA library construction, 16S rDNA-restriction fragment length polymorphism (rDNA-RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis. A total of 184 strains were isolated using seven different media and 24 isolates were selected according to their morphological characteristics for phylogenetic analysis on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results showed that the 24 isolates were assigned to six genera including Salinispora, Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces. This is the first report that Salinispora is present in a marine sponge from the South China Sea. Subsequently, 26 rDNA clones were selected from 191 clones in an Actinobacteria-specific 16S rDNA library of the H. perleve sample, using the RFLP technique for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. In total, 26 phylotypes were clustered in eight known genera of Actinobacteria including Mycobacterium, Amycolatopsis, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces. This study contributes to our understanding of actinobacterial diversity in the marine sponge H. perleve from the South China Sea.

  17. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Effects of the Organic Extract of the Red Sea Marine Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria against Carrageenan Induced Rat Paw Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shitany, Nagla A; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Abbas, Aymn T; Abdel-Dayem, Umama A; Azhar, Esam I; Ali, Soad S; van Soest, Rob W M; Youssef, Diaa T A

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are found to be a rich source of bioactive compounds which show a wide range of biological activities including antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulator effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The chemical composition of the Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract was determined using Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl) was measured to assess the antioxidant activity of the sponge extract. Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was adopted in this study. Six groups of rats were used: group1: Control, group 2: Carrageenan, group 3: indomethacin (10 mg/kg), group 4-6: Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg). Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity was performed by both calculating the percentage increase in paw weight and hisopathologically. Assessment of the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity was performed. GC-MS analysis revealed that there were 41 different compounds present in the methanolic extract. Sponge extract exhibited antioxidant activity against DPPH free radicals. Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (100 mg/kg) significantly decreased % increase in paw weight measured at 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after carrageenan injection. Histopathologically, the extract caused a marked decrease in the capillary congestion and inflammatory cells infiltrate. The extract decreased paw malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) and increased the reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activity. It also decreased the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 β(IL-1β) and IL-6. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea sponge

  18. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Effects of the Organic Extract of the Red Sea Marine Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria against Carrageenan Induced Rat Paw Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla A El-Shitany

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are found to be a rich source of bioactive compounds which show a wide range of biological activities including antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulator effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The chemical composition of the Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract was determined using Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS analysis. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl was measured to assess the antioxidant activity of the sponge extract. Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was adopted in this study. Six groups of rats were used: group1: Control, group 2: Carrageenan, group 3: indomethacin (10 mg/kg, group 4-6: Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity was performed by both calculating the percentage increase in paw weight and hisopathologically. Assessment of the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity was performed. GC-MS analysis revealed that there were 41 different compounds present in the methanolic extract. Sponge extract exhibited antioxidant activity against DPPH free radicals. Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (100 mg/kg significantly decreased % increase in paw weight measured at 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after carrageenan injection. Histopathologically, the extract caused a marked decrease in the capillary congestion and inflammatory cells infiltrate. The extract decreased paw malondialdehyde (MDA and nitric oxide (NO and increased the reduced glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT activity. It also decreased the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1 β(IL-1β and IL-6. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of the methanolic extract of the Red

  19. Sponge cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Marine sponges are a rich source of bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical potential and are the most prolific source of newly discovered bioactive compounds with more than 7,000 novel molecules discovered in 40 years. Despite its enormous potential, only a few sponge-derived bioactive compounds have been successfully developed into products. A major obstacle is the lack of sufficient supply of biological material for preclinical and clinical development. An option to supply materials for ea...

  20. CReefs Biodiversity Census at French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Personnel from the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...

  1. Comparison of spiculogenesis in in vitro ADCP-primmorph and explants culture of marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve with 3-TMOSPU supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xupeng; Yu, Xingju; Zhang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to test the feasibility of introducing functional chemical groups into biogenic silica spicules by examining the effect of supplementing a silican coupler [3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (3-TMOSPU) as silica source in the cultures of archaeocytes-dominant-cell-population (ADCP) primmorphs and explants of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve. Analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed that the organic group in 3-TMOSPU was introduced into silica spicules. By comparing ADCP-primmorph cultures when supplemented with Na2SiO3, 3-TMOSPU supplementation showed no notable effect on the primmorphs development and cell locomotion behaviors. A decline in silicatein expression quantified by real-time RT-PCR was, however, observed during spiculogenesis. The decline was slower for the 3-TMOSPU group whereas significantly fewer spicules were formed. When sponge papillae explants were cultured, 3-TMOSPU supplementation had no negative effect on sponge growth but inhibited the growth biofouling of the diatom Nitzschia closterium. By monitoring the detectable Si concentration, it seemed that 3-TMOSPU was converted by the sponge and its conversion was related to spiculogenesis. Analysis of spicule dimensional changes indicated that the inhibition of spiculogenesis by 3-TMOSPU supplementation was less in ADCP-primmorphs culture due to lower 3-TMOSPU/detectable Si ratio in the media.

  2. Lamellarin O, a Pyrrole Alkaloid from an Australian Marine Sponge, Ianthella sp., Reverses BCRP Mediated Drug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters, such as P-gp, BCRP and MRP1, can increase efflux of clinical chemotherapeutic agents and lead to multi-drug resistance (MDR in cancer cells. While the discovery and development of clinically useful inhibitors has proved elusive to date, this molecular target nevertheless remains a promising strategy for addressing and potentially overcoming MDR. In a search for new classes of inhibitor, we used fluorescent accumulation and efflux assays supported by cell flow cytometry and MDR reversal assays, against a panel of sensitive and MDR human cancer cell lines, to evaluate the marine sponge co-metabolites 1–12 as inhibitors of P-gp, BCRP or MRP1 initiated MDR. These studies identified and characterized lamellarin O (11 as a selective inhibitor of BCRP mediated drug efflux. A structure–activity relationship analysis inclusive of the natural products 1–12 and the synthetic analogues 13–19, supported by in silico docking studies, revealed key structural requirements for the lamellarin O (11 BCRP inhibitory pharmacophore.

  3. New Polyketides and New Benzoic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadaporn Prompanya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new pentaketides, including a new benzofuran-1-one derivative (1 and a new isochromen-1-one (5, and seven new benzoic acid derivatives, including two new benzopyran derivatives (2a, b, a new benzoxepine derivative (3, two new chromen-4-one derivatives (4b, 7 and two new benzofuran derivatives (6a, b, were isolated, together with the previously reported 2,3-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (4a, from the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081. The structures of the new compounds were established based on 1D and 2D NMR spectral analysis, and in the case of compounds 1, 2a, 4b, 5, 6a and 7, the absolute configurations of their stereogenic carbons were determined by an X-ray crystallographic analysis. None of the isolated compounds were active in the tests for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as multidrug-resistant isolates from the environment (MIC > 256 μg/mL, antifungal activity against yeast (Candida albicans ATTC 10231, filamentous fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus ATTC 46645 and dermatophyte (Trichophyton rubrum FF5 (MIC > 512 µg/mL and in vitro growth inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma, NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer and A375-C5 (melanoma cell lines (GI50 > 150 µM by the protein binding dye SRB method.

  4. HR-LC-MS based analysis of two antibacterial metabolites from a marine sponge symbiont Streptomyces pharmamarensis ICN40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Francis-Joseph Rosemary Sharmila; Iniyan, Appadurai Muthamil; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash

    2017-10-01

    On the effort to screen antibiotics against Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an actinomycete strain which can produce bactericidal compound was isolated from a marine sponge of Kanyakumari Coast, India. Two anti-MRSA compounds (PVI401 and PVI402) were isolated from the fermentation plates of Streptomyces pharmamarensis ICN40. TLC bioautography analysis yielded two active spots with Rf value of 0.75 (PVI401) and 0.8 (PVI402) from the crude extract. Both the compounds were characterized by HR-LC-MS analysis. LC-MS based de-replication analysis found out the compound PVI401 with an exact mass of 376.09435 Da and PVI402 with an exact mass of 273.26795 Da were found to be unidentified. Antibacterial spectrum showed significant minimal inhibitory concentration as 0.5 μg/ml of PVI401 and 2 μg/ml of PVI402 against MRSA. The whole organism zebrafish safety evaluation exhibited the compound PVI402 is safe upto 1 mg/ml 40 μg/ml of PVI401 exhibited thrombosis in cardiac chamber and this compound exhibited 44 μg/ml of LC 50 against HepG2 hepatic carcinoma cell line. Both the compounds may be identified further for its structural novelty and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Haliclonacyclamines, tetracyclic alkylpiperidine alkaloids, as anti-dormant mycobacterial substances from a marine sponge of Haliclona sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayoshi; Ishida, Shunsuke; Setiawan, Andi; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2009-10-01

    A new tetracyclic alkylpiperidine alkaloid, 22-hydroxyhaliclonacyclamine B (1), together with two known alkaloids, haliclonacyclamine A (2) and B (3), were isolated from a marine sponge of Haliclona sp. as anti-dormant mycobacterial substances. The chemical structure of 22-hydroxyhaliclonacyclamine B (1) was determined on the basis of spectroscopic study. The compounds 2 and 3 showed strong anti-mycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guérin (BCG) under both aerobic condition and hypoxic condition inducing dormant state with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the ranges of 1.0-2.5 microg/ml. In addition, the anti-microbial activity of compound 3 was bactericidal against M. bovis BCG under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The 22-hydroxy group in 1 was found to reduce anti-mycobacterial activity, because 22-hydroxyhaliclonacyclamine B (1) exhibited weaker anti-microbial activities against Mycobacterium bacilli with MICs in the ranges of 12.5-50 microg/ml.

  6. Pretreatment Hepatoprotective Effect of the Marine Fungus Derived from Sponge on Hepatic Toxicity Induced by Heavy Metals in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehad M. Abdel-Monem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pretreatment hepatoprotective effect of the extract of marine-derived fungus Trichurus spiralis Hasselbr (TS isolated from Hippospongia communis sponge on hepatotoxicity. Twenty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups (n=7. Group I served as −ve control, group II served as the induced group receiving subcutaneously for seven days 0.25 mg heavy metal mixtures, group III received (i.p. TS extract of dose 40 mg for seven days, and group IV served as the protected group pretreated with TS extract for seven days as a protection dose, and then treated with the heavy metal-mixture. The main pathological changes within the liver after heavy-metal mixtures administrations marked hepatic damage evidenced by foci of lobular necrosis with neutrophilic infiltration, adjacent to dysplastic hepatocytes. ALT and AST measurements show a significant increase in group II by 46.20% and 45.12%, respectively. Total protein, elevated by about 38.9% in induction group compared to the −ve control group, in contrast to albumin, decreased as a consequence of metal administration with significant elevation on bilirubin level. The results prove that TS extract possesses a hepatoprotective property due to its proven antioxidant and free-radical scavenging properties.

  7. A New Cyclic Hexapeptide and a New Isocoumarin Derivative from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Aspergillus similanensis KUFA 0013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadaporn Prompanya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new isocoumarin derivative, similanpyrone C (1, a new cyclohexapeptide, similanamide (2, and a new pyripyropene derivative, named pyripyropene T (3 were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Aspergillus similanensis KUFA 0013. The structures of the compounds were established based on 1D and 2D NMR spectral analysis, and in the case of compound 2 the stereochemistry of its amino acid constituents was determined by chiral HPLC analysis of the hydrolysate by co-injection with the d and l amino acids standards. Compounds 2 and 3 were evaluated for their in vitro growth inhibitory activity against MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma, NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer and A373 (melanoma cell lines, as well as antibacterial activity against reference strains and the environmental multidrug-resistant isolates (MRS and VRE. Only compound 2 exhibited weak activity against the three cancer cell lines, and neither of them showed antibacterial activity.

  8. The sponge microbiome project

    KAUST Repository

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2017-08-16

    Marine sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse, phylogenetically deep-branching clade known for forming intimate partnerships with complex communities of microorganisms. To date, 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies have largely utilised different extraction and amplification methodologies to target the microbial communities of a limited number of sponge species, severely limiting comparative analyses of sponge microbial diversity and structure. Here, we provide an extensive and standardised dataset that will facilitate sponge microbiome comparisons across large spatial, temporal, and environmental scales. Samples from marine sponges (n = 3569 specimens), seawater (n = 370), marine sediments (n = 65) and other environments (n = 29) were collected from different locations across the globe. This dataset incorporates at least 268 different sponge species, including several yet unidentified taxa. The V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced from extracted DNA using standardised procedures. Raw sequences (total of 1.1 billion sequences) were processed and clustered with (i) a standard protocol using QIIME closed-reference picking resulting in 39 543 operational taxonomic units (OTU) at 97% sequence identity, (ii) a de novo clustering using Mothur resulting in 518 246 OTUs, and (iii) a new high-resolution Deblur protocol resulting in 83 908 unique bacterial sequences. Abundance tables, representative sequences, taxonomic classifications, and metadata are provided. This dataset represents a comprehensive resource of sponge-associated microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequences that can be used to address overarching hypotheses regarding host-associated prokaryotes, including host specificity, convergent evolution, environmental drivers of microbiome structure, and the sponge-associated rare biosphere.

  9. [Effect of temperature on the eubacteria associated with marine sponge Pachychalina sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zaiguang; Tong, Chunfu; Feng, Yongqin; Lu, Jianjian

    2009-08-01

    Temperature is important factor affecting the bacterial diversity. In order to disclose the effect of temperature on the diversity of microorganisms. The diversity of microorganisms associated with the sponge Pachychilina sp. at 16 degrees C and 30 degrees C of the seawater in the Gulf of Zhanjiang was examined by a restriction fragment length analysis termed ARDRA (amplified rDNA restriction analysis) and 16S rRNA-encoding DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis. The computer-aided clustering was performed after separate restriction analysis with enzymes Hae III. By this method, 100 cloned 16S rDNA fragments were clustered into a total of 34 different groups at 16 degrees C and 32 different groups at 30 degrees C. Hae III ARDRA patterns showed different among eubacteria living at different temperature degree, whereas the whole communities of eubacteria were not changed distinctly. Screening 60 clones by sequence analysis suggested vast majority of eubacteria related to alpha, gamma, delta subclasses of the class Proteobacteria, some related to sulfur bacteria, desulfobacter, and hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria, minority belonging to actinomyceten at 16 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria were the predominant bacteria at 30 degrees C, and gamma-Proteobacteria were predominant bacteria at 16 degrees C, additionally sulfur bacteria and desulfobacter were mainly attributed to chilly-enduring bacteria. Sequence analysis of clones with an identical ARDRA pattern confirmed that members of an ARDRA group were closely related to each other.

  10. Bioleaching of electronic waste using bacteria isolated from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon heliophila (Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, Enrique E; Mendes, Maria A; Nascimento, Claudio A O; Espinosa, Denise C R; Oliveira, Renato; Oliveira, Guilherme; Custodio, Marcio R

    2017-05-05

    The bacteria isolated from Hymeniacidon heliophila sponge cells showed bioleaching activity. The most active strain, Hyhel-1, identified as Bacillus sp., was selected for bioleaching tests under two different temperatures, 30°C and 40°C, showing rod-shaped cells and filamentous growth, respectively. At 30°C, the bacteria secreted substances which linked to the leached copper, and at 40°C metallic nanoparticles were produced inside the cells. In addition, infrared analysis detected COOH groups and linear peptides in the tested bacteria at both temperatures. The Hyhel-1 strain in presence of electronic waste (e-waste) induced the formation of crust, which could be observed due to bacteria growing on the e-waste fragment. SEM-EDS measurements showed that the bacterial net surface was composed mostly of iron (16.1% w/w), while a higher concentration of copper was observed in the supernatant (1.7% w/w) and in the precipitated (49.8% w/w). The substances linked to copper in the supernatant were sequenced by MALDI-TOF-ms/ms and identified as macrocyclic surfactin-like peptides, similar to the basic sequence of Iturin, a lipopeptide from Bacillus subtilis. Finally, the results showed that Hyhel-1 is a bioleaching bacteria and cooper nanoparticles producer and that this bacteria could be used as a copper recovery tool from electronic waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surviving in a Marine Desert: The Sponge Loop Retains Resources Within Coral Reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, J.M.; van Oevelen, D.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Osinga, R.; Middelburg, J.J.; de Goeij, A.F.P.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Darwin’s early descriptions of coral reefs, scientists have debated how one of the world’s most productive and diverse ecosystems can thrive in the marine equivalent of a desert. It is an enigma how the flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the largest resource produced on reefs, is

  12. Surviving in a marine desert: The sponge loop retains resources within coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, J.M.; van Oevelen, D.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Osinga , R.; Middelburg, J.J.; de Goeij, A.F.P.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Darwin’s early descriptions of coral reefs, scientists have debated how one of the world’s most productive and diverse ecosystems can thrive in the marine equivalent of a desert. It is an enigma how the flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the largest resource produced on reefs, is

  13. Surviving in a marine desert: the sponge loop retains resources within coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goei, J.M.; van Oevelen, D.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Osinga, R.; Middelburg, J.J.; de Goei, A.F.P.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Darwin’s early descriptions of coral reefs, scientists have debated how one of the world’s most productive and diverse ecosystems can thrive in the marine equivalent of a desert. It is an enigma how the flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the largest resource produced on reefs, is

  14. Mass coral bleaching due to unprecedented marine heatwave in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney S Couch

    Full Text Available 2014 marked the sixth and most widespread mass bleaching event reported in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, home to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM, the world's second largest marine reserve. This event was associated with an unusual basin-scale warming in the North Pacific Ocean, with an unprecedented peak intensity of around 20°C-weeks of cumulative heat stress at Lisianksi Island. In situ bleaching surveys and satellite data were used to evaluate the relative importance of potential drivers of bleaching patterns in 2014, assess the subsequent morality and its effects on coral communities and 3D complexity, test for signs of regional acclimation, and investigate long-term change in heat stress in PMNM. Surveys conducted at four island/atoll (French Frigate Shoals, Lisianski Island, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, and Midway Atoll showed that in 2014, percent bleaching varied considerably between islands/atolls and habitats (back reef/fore reef and depth, and was up to 91% in shallow habitats at Lisianski. The percent bleaching during the 2014 event was best explained by a combination of duration of heat stress measured by Coral Reef Watch's satellite Degree Heating Week, relative community susceptibility (bleaching susceptibility score of each taxon * the taxon's abundance relative to the total number of colonies, depth and region. Mean coral cover at permanent Lisianski monitoring sites decreased by 68% due to severe losses of Montipora dilatata complex, resulting in rapid reductions in habitat complexity. Spatial distribution of the 2014 bleaching was significantly different from the 2002 and 2004 bleaching events likely due to a combination of differences in heat stress and local acclimatization. Historical satellite data demonstrated heat stress in 2014 was unlike any previous event and that the exposure of corals to the bleaching-level heat stress has increased significantly in the northern PMNM since 1982, highlighting

  15. Mass coral bleaching due to unprecedented marine heatwave in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (Northwestern Hawaiian Islands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Courtney S; Burns, John H R; Liu, Gang; Steward, Kanoelani; Gutlay, Tiffany Nicole; Kenyon, Jean; Eakin, C Mark; Kosaki, Randall K

    2017-01-01

    2014 marked the sixth and most widespread mass bleaching event reported in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, home to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM), the world's second largest marine reserve. This event was associated with an unusual basin-scale warming in the North Pacific Ocean, with an unprecedented peak intensity of around 20°C-weeks of cumulative heat stress at Lisianksi Island. In situ bleaching surveys and satellite data were used to evaluate the relative importance of potential drivers of bleaching patterns in 2014, assess the subsequent morality and its effects on coral communities and 3D complexity, test for signs of regional acclimation, and investigate long-term change in heat stress in PMNM. Surveys conducted at four island/atoll (French Frigate Shoals, Lisianski Island, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, and Midway Atoll) showed that in 2014, percent bleaching varied considerably between islands/atolls and habitats (back reef/fore reef and depth), and was up to 91% in shallow habitats at Lisianski. The percent bleaching during the 2014 event was best explained by a combination of duration of heat stress measured by Coral Reef Watch's satellite Degree Heating Week, relative community susceptibility (bleaching susceptibility score of each taxon * the taxon's abundance relative to the total number of colonies), depth and region. Mean coral cover at permanent Lisianski monitoring sites decreased by 68% due to severe losses of Montipora dilatata complex, resulting in rapid reductions in habitat complexity. Spatial distribution of the 2014 bleaching was significantly different from the 2002 and 2004 bleaching events likely due to a combination of differences in heat stress and local acclimatization. Historical satellite data demonstrated heat stress in 2014 was unlike any previous event and that the exposure of corals to the bleaching-level heat stress has increased significantly in the northern PMNM since 1982, highlighting the increasing

  16. Marinobacter xestospongiae sp. nov., isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria collected from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2011-10-14

    A Gram-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-sporulating, rod-shaped and slightly halophilic bacterial strain, designated UST090418-1611(T), was isolated from the marina sponge Xestospongia testudinaria collected from the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. Phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain UST090418-1611(T) in the family Alteromonadaceae with the closest relationship to the genus Marinobacter. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the strain and the type strains of recognized Marinobacter species ranged from 92.9 to 98.3%. Although strain UST090418-1611(T) shared high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Marinobacter mobilis CN46(T), M. zhejiangensis CN74(T) and M. sediminum R65(T) (98.3, 97.4 and 97.3%, respectively), the relatedness of the strain to these three strains in DNA DNA hybridization was only 58, 56 and 33%, respectively, supporting the novelty of the strain. In contrast to most strains in the genus Marinobacter, strain UST090418-1611(T) tolerated only 6% (w/v) NaCl, and optimal growth occurred at 2.0% (w/v) NaCl, pH 7.0-8.0 and 28-36 degrees C. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C-12:0 3-OH, C-16:0, C-12:0 and summed feature 3 (C-16.1 omega 6c and/or C-16:1 omega 7c) The genomic DNA G+C content was 57.1 mol%. Based on the physiological, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics presented in this study, we suggest that the strain represents a novel species in the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter xestospongiae sp. nov. is proposed, with UST090418-1611(T) (=JCM 17469(T) =NRRL B-59512(T)) as the type strain.

  17. Marine Caves of the Mediterranean Sea: A Sponge Biodiversity Reservoir within a Biodiversity Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilis Gerovasileiou; Eleni Voultsiadou

    2012-01-01

    Marine caves are widely acknowledged for their unique biodiversity and constitute a typical feature of the Mediterranean coastline. Herein an attempt was made to evaluate the ecological significance of this particular ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea, which is considered a biodiversity hotspot. This was accomplished by using Porifera, which dominate the rocky sublittoral substrata, as a reference group in a meta-analytical approach, combining primary research data from the Aegean Sea (easte...

  18. Evaluation of Marine Brown Algae and Sponges from Brazil as Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Products

    OpenAIRE

    Suzi Meneses Ribeiro; Fredy Ortiz-Ramirez; Diana Negrao Cavalcanti; Laura de Andrade Moura; Guilherme Muricy; Valeria Laneuville Teixeira; Andre Lopes Fuly

    2011-01-01

    The ischemic disorders, in which platelet aggregation and blood coagulation are involved, represent a major cause of disability and death worldwide. The antithrombotic therapy has unsatisfactory performance and may produce side effects. So, there is a need to seek molecules with antithrombotic properties. Marine organisms produce substances with different well defined ecological functions. Moreover, some of these molecules also exhibit pharmacological properties such as antiviral, anticancer,...

  19. Macrolactone Nuiapolide, Isolated from a Hawaiian Marine Cyanobacterium, Exhibits Anti-Chemotactic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shogo; Williams, Howard; Cagle, Davey; Karanovich, Kristopher; Horgen, F. David; Smith, Roger; Watanabe, Coran M. H.

    2015-01-01

    A new bioactive macrolactone, nuiapolide (1) was identified from a marine cyanobacterium collected off the coast of Niihau, near Lehua Rock. The natural product exhibits anti-chemotactic activity at concentrations as low as 1.3 μM against Jurkat cells, cancerous T lymphocytes, and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle shift. Structural characterization of the natural product revealed the compound to be a 40-membered macrolactone with nine hydroxyl functional groups and a rare tert-butyl carbinol residue. PMID:26473885

  20. Contraceptive Sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kills sperm. Before having sex, you insert the sponge deep inside the vagina so that it covers the cervix. Your vaginal muscles hold it in place. The contraceptive sponge has a strap on one side for easier ...

  1. New Cyclotetrapeptides and a New Diketopiperzine Derivative from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Neosartorya glabra KUFA 0702

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    War War May Zin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new cyclotetrapeptides, sartoryglabramides A (5 and B (6, and a new analog of fellutanine A (8 were isolated, together with six known compounds including ergosta-4, 6, 8 (14, 22-tetraen-3-one, ergosterol 5, 8-endoperoxide, helvolic acid, aszonalenin (1, (3R-3-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl-3,4-dihydro-1H-1,4-benzodiazepine-2,5-dione (2, takakiamide (3, (11aR-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine-5,11(10H,11aH-dione (4, and fellutanine A (7, from the ethyl acetate extract of the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya glabra KUFA 0702. The structures of the new compounds were established based on extensive 1D and 2D spectral analysis. X-ray analysis was also used to confirm the relative configuration of the amino acid constituents of sartoryglabramide A (5, and the absolute stereochemistry of the amino acid constituents of sartoryglabramide A (5 and sartoryglabramides B (6 was determined by chiral HPLC analysis of their hydrolysates by co-injection with the d- and l- amino acids standards. Compounds 1–8 were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Gram-negative (Staphyllococus aureus ATCC 25923 bacteria, as well as for their antifungal activity against filamentous (Aspergillus fumigatus ATCC 46645, dermatophyte (Trichophyton rubrum ATCC FF5 and yeast (Candida albicans ATCC 10231. None of the tested compounds exhibited either antibacterial (MIC > 256 μg/mL or antifungal activities (MIC > 512 μg/mL.

  2. Effects of sulfate restriction upon cell motility and sup 35 SO sub 4 incorporation in Microciona prolifera, the marine sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhns, W.J.; Misevic, G.; Burger, M.M. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States) University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland) Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland))

    1991-03-11

    Cells of the marine sponge, Microciona prolifera, secrete reduced amounts of macromolecules and became less motile than normal when the medium is deprived of sulfate. Aggregation factor (MAF) secreted from rotated cells under these conditions is less copious than normal. To understand this change, the authors introduced carrier free {sup 35}SO{sub 4} into rotated cells treated beforehand to remove preformed secretions and separated into medium with (SO{sub 4+}) or without (SO{sub 4{minus}})sulfate. The authors demonstrated a 3 to 10 fold increase in {sup 35}SO{sub 4} uptake in sulfate deprived cells over normals over a period of five days, while protein synthesis was similar in both cohorts. Triton X100 extracts from washed cells at different times following {sup 35}SO{sub 4} were assayed for MAF by mixing with monoclonal anti-MAF, and then exposing them to Sepharose-staph protein A beads. Washed test and control beads were examined for {sup 35}SO{sub 4} and results were related to total {sup 35}SO{sub 4} macromolecules separated from the corresponding cell extracts by high voltage electrophoresis. Cell extracts 15 h after {sup 35}SO{sub 4} addition yielded as MAF, 30.3% and 62.4% of total {sup 35}SO{sub 4} macromolecules, respectively, in SO{sub 4{minus}} and SO{sub 4+} cell cohorts. MAF from SO{sub 4{minus}} Triton extracts was increased compared with the SO{sub 4+} yield and when correlated with earlier findings, suggested cell retention of undersulfated MAF. The authors believe from this result that MAF sulfate is of importance in MAF transport from vesicle to surface membrane and in MAF functions and possibly as related to factors regulating cellular SO{sub 4} uptake.

  3. Antifouling effect of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata and different species of bacterial film on larval attachment of Balanus amphitrite (cirripedia, crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswambaran Ganapiriya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antifouling activity of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata (Dendy and five species of bacterial biofilm were studied. Larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cyprids and nauplii were used to monitor the settlement inhibition and the extent to which inhibition was due to toxicity. The crude extract and partially purified fractions of A.elongata showed significant inhibition over the settlement individually, and with the interaction of bacterial species. No bacterial film stimulated the barnacle settlement. The high but variable levels of antifouling activity in combination with less amount of toxicity showed the potential of these metabolites in environmentally-friendly antifouling preparations.

  4. SUSPENSION-FEEDING IN MARINE SPONGES HALICHONDRIA-PANICEA AND HALICLONA-URCEOLUS - EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON FILTRATION-RATE AND ENERGY-COST OF PUMPING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, H.U.; Thomassen, S.; Jakobsen, H.

    1993-01-01

    Filtration rate (measured as clearance of algal cells) was measured at different temperatures in the sponge Halichondria panicea. An increase in water temperature from 6 to 12-degrees-C caused the mean filtration rate to increase 4.3 +/- 2.3 times. This value was higher than previously found...... for other marine ciliary suspension-feeding animals. Filtration rate at 12-degrees-C was also measured in Haliclona urceolus by means of an indirect clearance method in addition to a direct technique for measuring pumping rate. It was found that the 2 sponge species had near-identical filtration rates......) O(p) was found to be 0.673 mm H2O and the power output P(p) from the sponge pump was 0.677 muW. The pump work, defined as P(p)R-1 where R is the respiratory output, was 0.85 %. The low energy cost of filtration and the temperature effect are discussed and compared with recent data for other ciliary...

  5. Marine sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae) from the Gulf of México, new records and redescription of Erylus trisphaerus (de Laubenfels, 1953).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Diana; Gómez, Patricia; Simões, Nuno

    2015-01-19

    Marine sponges usually constitute the most diverse group of the benthic community in coral reefs. Although they are reasonably well studied at the northern Gulf of Mexico (GMx), the southern GMx is poorly known and lacks records from many major reef systems that lie off the Mexican coast. The present taxonomic study is the first sponge account from Alacranes reef, the largest coral reef system in the GMx, and from the shallow reef banks of Sisal, both in the northwest Yucatan Peninsula. The 19 species herein described represent the first sponge fauna records from these reefs. Among these, seven species represent new record for GMx: Erylus formosus, Cliona flavifodina, Spirastrella aff. mollis, Strongylacidon bermuda, Topsentia bahamensis, Agelas tubulata and Chelonaplysilla aff. erecta. Twelve species are new records for the Southern GMx: Erylus trisphaerus, Cliona amplicavata, Chondrilla caribensis, Halichondria lutea, Hymeniacidon caerulea, Axinella corrugata, Dragmacidon reticulatum, Chalinula molitba, Amphimedon caribica, A. complanata, Hyatella cavernosa and Dysidea variabilis. Additionally, a redescription of Erylus trisphaerus is presented which had not been reviewed since its original description in 1953 off Western Florida, except that it was listed for north La Habana, Cuba. 

  6. Influence of spatial competitor on the growth and regeneration of the marine sponge Cinachyrella cf. cavernosa (Porifera, demospongiae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, A.; Thakur, N.L.

    ). In the manipulative experiment, additional fifteen sponges of various sizes were tagged in a similar way and polyps of Z. sansibaricus which surrounded the tagged sponges 5 were carefully removed using a scalpel (Fig. 1). For a period of 18 months (from October... compounds which have important role in defence mechanisms (Harper et al., 2001). They can acquire the substratum by overgrowth (Rabelo et al., 2013) and /or using allelochemicals to inhibit growth of neighbouring fauna (Sammarco et al., 1985). However...

  7. Diversity and Bioactivity of Marine Bacteria Associated with the Sponges Candidaspongia flabellata and Rhopaloeides odorabile from the Great Barrier Reef in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice M. Brinkmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sponges and their associated microbial communities have sparked much interest in recent decades due on the abundant production of chemically diverse metabolites that in nature serve as functional compounds required by the marine sponge host. These compounds were found to carry therapeutic importance for medicinal applications. In the presented study, 123 bacterial isolates from the culture collection of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS previously isolated from two different sponge species, namely Candidaspongia flabellata and Rhopaloeides odorabile, originating from different locations on the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland, Australia, were thus studied for their bioactivity. The symbiotic bacterial isolates were first identified using 16S rRNA gene analysis and they were found to belong to five different dominating classes of Domain Bacteria, namely Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Following their taxonomical categorization, the isolates were screened for their antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic microbial reference strains: Escherichia coli (ATCC® BAA-196™, E. coli (ATCC® 13706™, E. coli (ATCC® 25922™, Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC® BAA-1705™, Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC® 51575™, Bacillus subtilis (ATCC® 19659™, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC® 29247™, Candida albicans (ATCC® 10231™ and Aspergillus niger (ATCC® 16888™. Over 50% of the isolates displayed antimicrobial activity against one or more of the reference strains tested. The subset of these bioactive bacterial isolates was further investigated to identify their biosynthetic genes such as polyketide synthase (PKS type I and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS genes. This was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with degenerate primers that have been previously used to amplify PKS-I and NRPS genes. These specific genes have been reported to be possibly involved in bacterial

  8. A budget of marine and terrigenous sediments, Hanalei Bay, Kauai, Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, R.S.; Fletcher, C.H.; Harney, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    The sediment budget of Hanalei Bay on the north shore of Kauai was calculated using sedimentological and geophysical methods. The calculations of the budget subsequently allowed an interpretation of the Holocene history of the bay. The bay sediments are easily separated into marine (carbonate) and terrigenous (siliciclastic) grains. Surficial sediments are dominated by carbonate grains ( ??? 70%) of coralline algae, coral, and mollusc fragments as well as foraminifera, Halimeda, bryozoa, and echinoderm tests. However, siliciclastic grains (e.g. olivine, plagioclase, volcanic lithics) from the Hanalei River watershed draining shield volcanic highlands are the most common individual grain type ( ??? 27%) and form a zone of high concentration from the mouth of the Hanalei River into the center of the bay. Flooding in the bay by the post-glacial sea-level rise began soon after 11.7 kyears. The resulting marine environment caused the net deposition of 45.5 ?? 1.5 ?? 106 m3 of sediment in the bay and approximately 33.7 ?? 11.2 ?? 106 m3 of sediment on the Hanalei coastal plain. The total volume of carbonate sediment stored in the bay and coastal plain is greater than the volume likely to have been produced exclusively within the bay during the same time. Calculations indicate that approximately 2490 m3 year-1 have been imported into the bay or coastal plain and deposited since 11,700 years ago. The majority of this sediment influx is likely delivered from the east by the strong tradewind-driven littoral currents that characterize Kauai's north shore. Net carbonate sediment deposition in Hanalei Bay peaked at a rate of 15,500 m3 year-1 between 5000 and 3000 years ago (when sea level may have been 2 m above present) diminishing to 3890 m3 year-1 from 1000 years ago to the present. This influx is likely to have played a significant role in the mid to late Holocene progradation of the Hanalei shoreline. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The sponge microbiome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Nielsen, Shaun; Amir, Amnon; Gonzalez, Antonio; Ackermann, Gail L.; Cerrano, Carlo; Astudillo-Garcia, Carmen; Easson, Cole; Sipkema, Detmer; Liu, Fang; Steinert, Georg; Kotoulas, Giorgos; McCormack, Grace P.; Feng, Guofang; Bell, James J.; Vicente, Jan; Björk, Johannes R.; Montoya, Jose M.; Olson, Julie B.; Reveillaud, Julie; Steindler, Laura; Pineda, Mari Carmen; Marra, Maria V.; Ilan, Micha; Taylor, Michael W.; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Erwin, Patrick M.; Schupp, Peter J.; Simister, Rachel L.; Knight, Rob; Thacker, Robert W.; Costa, Rodrigo; Hill, Russell T.; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna; Dailianis, Thanos; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute; Li, Zhiyong; Webster, Nicole S.; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Marine sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse, phylogenetically deep-branching clade known for forming intimate partnerships with complex communities of microorganisms. To date, 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies have largely utilised different extraction and amplification methodologies to target the

  10. Cytotoxic and antibacterial substances against multi-drug resistant pathogens from marine sponge symbiont: Citrinin, a secondary metabolite of Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramesh; Kumar, Rohitesh; Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William; Retheesh, S T

    2013-04-01

    To Isolate, purify, characterize, and evaluate the bioactive compounds from the sponge-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FF001 and to elucidate its structure. The fungal strain FF001 with an interesting bioactivity profile was isolated from a marine Fijian sponge Melophlus sp. Based on conidiophores aggregation, conidia development and mycelia morphological characteristics, the isolate FF001 was classically identified as a Penicillium sp. The bioactive compound was identified using various spectral analysis of UV, high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. Further minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) assay and brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay were also carried out to evaluate the biological properties of the purified compound. Bioassay guided fractionation of the EtOAc extract of a static culture of this Penicillium sp. by different chromatographic methods led the isolation of an antibacterial, anticryptococcal and cytotoxic active compound, which was identified as citrinin (1). Further, citrinin (1) is reported for its potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), rifampicin-resistant S. aureus, wild type S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium showed MICs of 3.90, 0.97, 1.95 and 7.81 µg/mL, respectively. Further citrinin (1) displayed significant activity against the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC 3.90 µg/mL), and exhibited cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae LD50 of 96 µg/mL. Citrinin (1) is reported from sponge associated Penicillium sp. from this study and for its strong antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens including cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae, which indicated that sponge associated Penicillium spp. are promising sources of natural bioactive metabolites.

  11. Biological and Chemical Study of Some Soft Corals and Sponges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guaianediol). Seventeen sponges have also been taxonomically identified. Keywords: Soft corals, sponges, taxonomy, secondary metabolite, biological screening, Mauritius West Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science Vol. 5 (2) 2006: pp. 115-122 ...

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Methanol Extract from the Marine Sponge Geodia cydonium on the Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Costantini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many research groups are working to find new possible anti-inflammatory molecules, and marine sponges represent a rich source of biologically active compounds with pharmacological applications. In the present study, we tested different concentrations of the methanol extract from the marine sponge, Geodia cydonium, on normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A and human breast cancer cells (MCF-7. Our results show that this extract has no cytotoxic effects on both cell lines whereas it induces a decrease in levels of VEGF and five proinflammatory cytokines (CCL2, CXCL8, CXCL10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α only in MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, thereby indicating an anti-inflammatory effect. Moreover, interactomic analysis suggests that all six cytokines are involved in a network and are connected with some HUB nodes such as NF-kB subunits and ESR1 (estrogen receptor 1. We also report a decrease in the expression of two NFKB1 and c-Rel subunits by RT-qPCR experiments only in MCF-7 cells after extract treatment, confirming NF-kB inactivation. These data highlight the potential of G. cydonium for future drug discovery against major diseases, such as breast cancer.

  13. Utilizing Pro-bono Commercial Assets for Marine Mammal Surveys in High Naval Activity Area in Hawaiian Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    Fri-pm Arr: Sat-am Pacific Ocean Island oi Hawaii Hawaii Volcanoes Nafl Park 70 mi Figure 1. Map of the main Hawaiian Islands and three...collected so far has been synced with GIS , and will be compared to remotely sensed oceanographic data as shown in Figure 7. Custom matlab programs have

  14. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Assessing and Monitoring Cryptic Reef Diversity of Colonizing Marine Invertebrates using Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structure (ARMS) Deployed at Coral Reef Sites across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2008-10-07 to 2013-09-13 (NCEI Accession 0162470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) are used to assess and monitor cryptic reef diversity of colonizing marine invertebrates in the Hawaiian and Mariana...

  15. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Assessing and Monitoring Cryptic Reef Diversity of Colonizing Marine Invertebrates using Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structure (ARMS) Deployed at Coral Reef Sites across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2013-08-03 to 2016-09-24 (NCEI Accession 0162465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) are used to assess and monitor cryptic reef diversity of colonizing marine invertebrates in the Hawaiian and Mariana...

  16. Estimating Surface Area of Sponges and Marine Gorgonians as Indicators of Habitat Availability on Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface area and topographical complexity are fundamental attributes of shallow tropical coral reefs and can be used to estimate habitat for fish and invertebrates. This study presents empirical methods for estimating surface area provided by sponges and gorgonians in the Central...

  17. Amsterdam Expeditions to the West Indian Islands, Report 13. Marine sponges from an island cave on San Salvador Island, Bahamas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van R.W.M.; Sass, B. Daniel

    1981-01-01

    Dixon Hill Lighthouse Cave, about 800 m (0.5 miles) inshore on San Salvador Island, Bahamas, was found to hold populations of three sponge species new to science, viz. Pellina penicilliformis n. sp., Prosuberites geracei n. sp., and Cinachyra subterranea n. sp. The new species are described and

  18. Principal Hawaiian Islands Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 61,000 terrestrial and marine gravity data held...

  19. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Entanglement data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals in marine debris. The data set comprises records of seals entangled by derelict fishing...

  20. 75 FR 40759 - Initiation of Review of Management Plan/Regulations of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    .../Regulations of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary; Intent To Prepare Draft...) has initiated a review of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary (HIHWNMS or... Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary will be considered if received on or before...

  1. Antiviral Activity of Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Marine Sponge Petromica citrina against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; de Menezes, Cláudia Beatriz Afonso; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2013-01-01

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced from the Bacillus sp. isolated from the sponge Petromica citrina. The extracts 555 (500 µg/mL, SI>18) and 584 (150 µg/mL, SI 27) showed a percentage of protection of 98% against BVDV, and the extract 616, 90% of protection. All of them showed activity during the viral adsorption. Thus, various substances are active on these studied organisms and may lead to the development of drugs which ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C. PMID:23628828

  2. Antiviral activity of Bacillus sp. isolated from the marine sponge Petromica citrina against bovine viral diarrhea virus, a surrogate model of the hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; de Menezes, Cláudia Beatriz Afonso; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2013-04-29

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced from the Bacillus sp. isolated from the sponge Petromica citrina. The extracts 555 (500 µg/mL, SI>18) and 584 (150 µg/mL, SI 27) showed a percentage of protection of 98% against BVDV, and the extract 616, 90% of protection. All of them showed activity during the viral adsorption. Thus, various substances are active on these studied organisms and may lead to the development of drugs which ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C.

  3. Hexa-, hepta- and nonaprenylhydroquinones isolated from marine sponges Sarcotragus muscarum and Ircinia fasciculata inhibit NF-kappaB signalling in H4IIE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätjen, Wim; Putz, Annika; Chovolou, Yvonni; Kampkötter, Andreas; Totzke, Frank; Kubbutat, Michael H G; Proksch, Peter; Konuklugil, Belma

    2009-07-01

    Marine organisms have proven to be a rich source of potent pharmacologically active compounds. Three polyprenyl-1,4-hydroquinone derivates (hexaprenyl-1,4-hydroquinone, heptaprenyl-1,4-hydroquinone and nonaprenyl-1,4-hydroquinone) were isolated from the Zoobenthos-inhabiting sponges Sarcotragus muscarum and Ircinia fasciculata from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (phylum: Porifera; class: Demospongiae). Hexa-, hepta- and nonaprenylhydroquinone were identified by (1)H-NMR, H,H-COSY, heteronuclear multiple bond correlation, FAB-MS and UV spectroscopy. The effects of the compounds on cell viability was determined using the MTT assay; anti-oxidative potential was measured using the Trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity assay. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB activity was detected by secreted alkaline phosphatase assay. Activity against an array of protein kinases was determined in 96-well FlashPlates. All compounds had prominent antioxidative activity, comparable to that of the synthetic vitamin E derivate Trolox. Hexaprenylhydroquinone showed the greatest cytotoxicity in H4IIE hepatoma cells (EC50 2.5 muM). All three compounds inhibited NF-kappaB signalling in this cell line, with heptaprenylhydroquinone being the most active. Screening of 23 kinases involved in signal transduction pathways (cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis) showed that hexaprenylhydroquinone and heptaprenylhydroquinone inhibited the activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (IC50 1.6 and 1.4 mug/ml, respectively), and heptaprenylhydroquinone also inhibited the activity of other kinases (Src tyrosine kinase, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor). The prenylated hydroquinones isolated from the marine sponges S. muscarum and I. fasciculata showed cytotoxic and antioxidative activities and inhibited NF-kappaB signalling in H4IIE hepatoma cells and protein kinases. These findings may result in the generation of new lead

  4. Isolation and diversity of natural product biosynthetic genes of cultivable bacteria associated with marine sponge Mycale sp. from the coast of Fujian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pei; Wang, De-Xiang; Ding, Shao-Xiong; Zhao, Jing

    2014-04-01

    The marine sponge Mycale sp., a potential source of natural bioactive products, is widely distributed along the coast of Fujian, China. The cultivable bacterial community associated with Mycale sp., the antibacterial activities, and the PKS (polyketide synthase) and NRPS (nonribosomal peptide synthetase) gene diversity of these bacteria were investigated. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that the 51 isolates from Mycale sp. belonged to Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Among them, some bacteria were first isolated from marine sponge. The 20 isolates with antimicrobial activities were primarily clustered within the groups Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacillus. Strain HNS054, which showed 99% similarity to Streptomyces labedae, exhibited the strongest antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 1430, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 441) and Vibrio species. The screening of natural product biosynthetic genes revealed that 8 Actinobacteria species with antimicrobial activities possessed PKS-KS (ketosynthase) or NRPS-A domains, and the Nocardiopsis species contained a hybrid or mixed PKS-NRPS system. The phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the identified KS domains clustered with those from diverse bacterial groups, including Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Firmicutes. Most KS domain sequences had high homology (>80%) to type I KSs, but the KS domain of Nocardiopsis sp. strain HNS048 had 77% similarity to the type II KS domain of Burkholderia gladioli. The NRPS-A domains of the 8 isolates were grouped into the Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes groups. The NRPS-A gene of strain HNS052, identified as Nocardiopsis cyriacigeorgica, showed only 54% similarity to Rhodococcus opacus. All results suggested that Mycale sp. harboured diverse bacteria that could contribute to the production of novel

  5. Recruitment in the field of Balanus improvisus and Mytilus edulis in response to the antifouling cyclopeptides barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin from the marine sponge Geodia barretti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Martin; Dahlström, Mia; Göransson, Ulf; Jonsson, Per R; Bohlin, Lars

    2004-12-01

    In this field investigation the two cyclopeptides, isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti Bowerbank (Geodiidae, Astrophorida), are shown to be very efficient in preventing recruitment of the barnacle Balanus improvisus (Cirripedia, Crustacea) and the blue mussel Mytilis edulis (Protobranchia, Lamellibranchia) when included in different marine paints. These brominated cyclopeptides, named barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin were incorporated in different non-toxic coatings. The substances were used in the concentrations 0.1 and 0.01% in all treatments. The most efficient paint was a SPC polymer. This paint, in combination with barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin, reduced the recruitment of B. improvisus by 89% (barettin, 0.1%) and by 67% (8,9-dihydrobarettin, 0.1%) as compared to control panels. For M. edulis, the reduction of recruitment was 81% with barettin (0.1%) and 72% with 8,9-dihydrobarettin (0.1%) included in the SPC paint. This indicates that the two compounds from G. barretti could provide non-toxic alternatives as additives in antifouling paints, since the heavy metal-based marine paints are to be replaced.

  6. The Sponge Hologenome

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Nicole S.; Torsten Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A paradigm shift has recently transformed the field of biological science; molecular advances have revealed how fundamentally important microorganisms are to many aspects of a host?s phenotype and evolution. In the process, an era of ?holobiont? research has emerged to investigate the intricate network of interactions between a host and its symbiotic microbial consortia. Marine sponges are early-diverging metazoa known for hosting dense, specific, and often highly diverse microbial c...

  7. 76 FR 77779 - Availability of Seats for the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... Council: Native Hawaiian Representative, Ocean Related Tourism Representative, Conservation Alternate... of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, extending approximately 1200 nautical miles long and 100 nautical miles wide. The Reserve is managed by the Secretary of Commerce pursuant to the National Marine...

  8. SWFSC/MMTD/PI: Hawaiian Islands Cetacean and Ecosystem Assessment Survey (HICEAS) 2002, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaiian Islands Cetacean and Ecosystem Assessment Survey, called HICEAS, is a marine mammal assessment survey of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Hawaiian...

  9. Shallow-water Marine Invertebrates French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2000 and 2002, (NODC Accession 0001083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset focuses on marine surveys used to obtain a more in depth record of the marine fauna from French Frigate Shoals and includes a note on nonindigenous...

  10. Book review: Medicinal Sponges of the Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Najafi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges with about 107 genuses and more than 15000 species constitute one of the most wonderful marine invertebrates. These creatures with wide variety of biologic compounds has offered unique source of marine bioproducts towards marine researchers and chemists. Persian Gulf is habitant of various marine organisms including different species of marine sponges. The book “Medicinal sponges of the Persian Gulf” offers comprehensive review of marine bioproducts of Persian Gulf sponges. Due to limited information regarding various species of Persian gulf sponges, list of identified marine sponges of Persian gulf and Red sea that is presented in the book was collected in collaboration with Dr. Helmut Lehnert from Germany, Dr. Rob Van Soest from Amsterdam university and Dr. Jochen Gugel from Stuttgart university. Derivatives of about 55 genuses and 28 species of Persian Gulf sponges were found to be bioactive through searching medical databases and are reviewed in different chapters of the book. Cytotoxic and antitumor compounds constitute the most products derived from Persian Gulf sponges. The review explores Persian gulf sponges as a natural pharmacy with potential pharmaceutical derivatives in near future and indicates further need for investigation of Persian gulf marine organisms’ for bioactive products.

  11. Production and purification of a bioactive substance against multi-drug resistant human pathogens from the marine-sponge-derived Salinispora sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyendra Singh

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The present study reported the rifamycin W from sponge-associated Salinispora sp. and it exhibited appreciable antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens which indicated that sponge-associated Actinobacteria are significant sources of bioactive metabolites.

  12. Ageloline A, new antioxidant and antichlamydial quinolone from the marine sponge-derived bacterium Streptomyces sp. SBT345

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Cheng; Othman, Eman M.; Reimer, Anastasija; Grüne, Matthias; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Stopper, Helga; Hentschel, Ute; Abdelmohsen, Usama R.

    2016-01-01

    A new chlorinated quinolone, ageloline A, was isolated from the broth culture of Streptomyces sp. SBT345 that was cultivated from the Mediterranean sponge Agelas oroides. The structure of this compound was determined by spectroscopic analysis including 1D and 2D NMR as well as HR-ESI-MS experiments. Ageloline A exhibited antioxidant potential using cell-free and cell-based assays and was further able to reduce oxidative stress and genomic damage induced by the oxidative stress inducer 4-nitro...

  13. Biotechnological potential of sponge-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Gandelman, Juliana F; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Oelemann, Walter M R; Laport, Marinella S

    2014-01-01

    As sessile and filter-feeding metazoans, marine sponges represent an ecologically important and highly diverse component of marine benthic communities throughout the world. It has been suggested that marine sponges are hosts to many microorganisms which can constitute up to 40-60% of its biomass. Recently, sponges have attracted a high interest from scientific community because two important factors. First there is the fact that sponges have a wide range of associated bacteria; and, second, they are a rich source of bioactive substances. Since 1950, a number of bioactive substances with various pharmacological functions have been isolated from marine sponges. However, many of these substances were subsequently shown to be actually synthesized by sponge-associated bacteria. Bacteria associated with marine sponges constitute an interesting source of novel bioactive compounds with biotechnological potential such as antimicrobial substances, enzymes and surfactants. In addition, these bacteria may be biofilm forming and can act as bioindicators in bioremediation processes of environmental pollution caused by oil and heavy metals. This review focuses on the biotechnological applications of these microorganisms.

  14. Deep Coral Habitat Characterization of the North End of Raita Bank, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, L.; Sautter, L.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and explore the north end of Raita Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, to assess where deep marine coral would most likely grow and flourish. The bank is located within the largest U.S marine protected area, the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM), 1120 km northwest of Honolulu, Hawaii. Multibeam sonar data were collected by the Schmidt Ocean Institute using the R/V Falkor's Kongsberg EM302 and EM710 during an exploratory cruise within the PMNM in May-June 2014. Raita Bank hosts both shallow and deep coral; however, this study was focused on potential deep coral habitat at depths ranging 400 to 3000 m. The bank stretches approximately 44.0 km east-west and 35.8 km north-south and its shallowest point surveyed is 320 m. Overall gradients between 400 and 3000 m depths range from 0.10 to 0.26, including major terraces at 500 and 1000 m. The steeper gradients and terraced areas indicate favorable conditions for deep coral. A bathymetric map created with CARIS HIPS and SIPS 9.0 software was used to visualize seafloor geomorphology and characterize deep coral habitat by examining slope relief, distance to shelf edge, and other geomorphologic features. Additionally, backscatter was used to analyze the seafloor's relative hardness to identify hard-bottom seafloor areas that would be more likely to support deep coral. Maps generated from this study will be invaluable for future explorations of deep coral habitat on the bank.

  15. Isolation identification and biochemical characterization of a novel halo-tolerant lipase from the metagenome of the marine sponge Haliclona simulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvin Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3 catalyze the hydrolysis of triacyl glycerol to glycerol and are involved in the synthesis of both short chain and long chain acylglycerols. They are widely used industrially in various applications, such as baking, laundry detergents and as biocatalysts in alternative energy strategies. Marine ecosystems are known to represent a large reservoir of biodiversity with respect to industrially useful enzymes. However the vast majority of microorganisms within these ecosystems are not readily culturable. Functional metagenomic based approaches provide a solution to this problem by facilitating the identification of novel enzymes such as the halo-tolerant lipase identified in this study from a marine sponge metagenome. Results A metagenomic library was constructed from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans in the pCC1fos vector, containing approximately 48,000 fosmid clones. High throughput plate screening on 1% tributyrin agar resulted in the identification of 58 positive lipase clones. Following sequence analysis of the 10 most highly active fosmid clones the pCC1fos53E1 clone was found to contain a putative lipase gene lpc53E1, encoded by 387 amino acids and with a predicted molecular mass of 41.87 kDa. Sequence analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of Lpc53E1 revealed that it is a member of the group VIII family of lipases possessing the SXTK motif, related to type C β-lactamases. Heterologous expression of lpc53E1 in E. coli and the subsequent biochemical characterization of the recombinant protein, showed an enzyme with the highest substrate specificity for long chain fatty acyl esters. Optimal activity was observed with p- nitrophenyl palmitate (C16 at 40°C, in the presence of 5 M NaCl at pH 7; while in addition the recombinant enzyme displayed activity across broad pH (3–12 and temperature (4 -60°C ranges and high levels of stability in the presence of various solvents at NaCl concentrations

  16. Isolation identification and biochemical characterization of a novel halo-tolerant lipase from the metagenome of the marine sponge Haliclona simulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Joseph; Kennedy, Jonathan; Lejon, David P H; Kiran, G Seghal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2012-06-01

    Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) catalyze the hydrolysis of triacyl glycerol to glycerol and are involved in the synthesis of both short chain and long chain acylglycerols. They are widely used industrially in various applications, such as baking, laundry detergents and as biocatalysts in alternative energy strategies. Marine ecosystems are known to represent a large reservoir of biodiversity with respect to industrially useful enzymes. However the vast majority of microorganisms within these ecosystems are not readily culturable. Functional metagenomic based approaches provide a solution to this problem by facilitating the identification of novel enzymes such as the halo-tolerant lipase identified in this study from a marine sponge metagenome. A metagenomic library was constructed from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans in the pCC1fos vector, containing approximately 48,000 fosmid clones. High throughput plate screening on 1% tributyrin agar resulted in the identification of 58 positive lipase clones. Following sequence analysis of the 10 most highly active fosmid clones the pCC1fos53E1 clone was found to contain a putative lipase gene lpc53E1, encoded by 387 amino acids and with a predicted molecular mass of 41.87 kDa. Sequence analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of Lpc53E1 revealed that it is a member of the group VIII family of lipases possessing the SXTK motif, related to type C β-lactamases. Heterologous expression of lpc53E1 in E. coli and the subsequent biochemical characterization of the recombinant protein, showed an enzyme with the highest substrate specificity for long chain fatty acyl esters. Optimal activity was observed with p- nitrophenyl palmitate (C16) at 40°C, in the presence of 5 M NaCl at pH 7; while in addition the recombinant enzyme displayed activity across broad pH (3-12) and temperature (4 -60°C) ranges and high levels of stability in the presence of various solvents at NaCl concentrations as high as 5 M and at temperatures ranging from

  17. Sponge Hybridomas: Applications and Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomponi, S.A.; Jevitt, A.; Patel, J.; Diaz, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Many sponge-derived natural products with applications to human health have been discovered over the past three decades. In vitro production has been proposed as one biological alternative to ensure adequate supply of marine natural products for preclinical and clinical development of drugs.

  18. Defining Boundaries for Ecosystem-Based Management: A Multispecies Case Study of Marine Connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    OpenAIRE

    Toonen, Robert J.; Kimberly R Andrews; Iliana B Baums; Bird, Christopher E.; Concepcion, Gregory T.; Daly-Engel, Toby S.; Eble, Jeff A.; Anuschka Faucci; Gaither, Michelle R.; Matthew Iacchei; Puritz, Jonathan B.; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Derek J. Skillings; Timmers, Molly A.; Brian W. Bowen

    2011-01-01

    Determining the geographic scale at which to apply ecosystem-based management (EBM) has proven to be an obstacle for many marine conservation programs. Generalizations based on geographic proximity, taxonomy, or life history characteristics provide little predictive power in determining overall patterns of connectivity, and therefore offer little in terms of delineating boundaries for marine spatial management areas. Here, we provide a case study of 27 taxonomically and ecologically diverse ...

  19. The marine sponge-derived polyketide endoperoxide plakortide F acid mediates its antifungal activity by interfering with calcium homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakortide F acid (PFA) is a marine-derived polyketide endoperoxide exhibiting strong inhibitory activity against several clinically important fungal pathogens. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses were conducted using the model organism Sacch...

  20. Global diversity of sponges (Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soest, Rob W M; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Vacelet, Jean; Dohrmann, Martin; Erpenbeck, Dirk; De Voogd, Nicole J; Santodomingo, Nadiezhda; Vanhoorne, Bart; Kelly, Michelle; Hooper, John N A

    2012-01-01

    With the completion of a single unified classification, the Systema Porifera (SP) and subsequent development of an online species database, the World Porifera Database (WPD), we are now equipped to provide a first comprehensive picture of the global biodiversity of the Porifera. An introductory overview of the four classes of the Porifera is followed by a description of the structure of our main source of data for this paper, the WPD. From this we extracted numbers of all 'known' sponges to date: the number of valid Recent sponges is established at 8,553, with the vast majority, 83%, belonging to the class Demospongiae. We also mapped for the first time the species richness of a comprehensive set of marine ecoregions of the world, data also extracted from the WPD. Perhaps not surprisingly, these distributions appear to show a strong bias towards collection and taxonomy efforts. Only when species richness is accumulated into large marine realms does a pattern emerge that is also recognized in many other marine animal groups: high numbers in tropical regions, lesser numbers in the colder parts of the world oceans. Preliminary similarity analysis of a matrix of species and marine ecoregions extracted from the WPD failed to yield a consistent hierarchical pattern of ecoregions into marine provinces. Global sponge diversity information is mostly generated in regional projects and resources: results obtained demonstrate that regional approaches to analytical biogeography are at present more likely to achieve insights into the biogeographic history of sponges than a global perspective, which appears currently too ambitious. We also review information on invasive sponges that might well have some influence on distribution patterns of the future.

  1. Global Diversity of Sponges (Porifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soest, Rob W. M.; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Vacelet, Jean; Dohrmann, Martin; Erpenbeck, Dirk; De Voogd, Nicole J.; Santodomingo, Nadiezhda; Vanhoorne, Bart; Kelly, Michelle; Hooper, John N. A.

    2012-01-01

    With the completion of a single unified classification, the Systema Porifera (SP) and subsequent development of an online species database, the World Porifera Database (WPD), we are now equipped to provide a first comprehensive picture of the global biodiversity of the Porifera. An introductory overview of the four classes of the Porifera is followed by a description of the structure of our main source of data for this paper, the WPD. From this we extracted numbers of all ‘known’ sponges to date: the number of valid Recent sponges is established at 8,553, with the vast majority, 83%, belonging to the class Demospongiae. We also mapped for the first time the species richness of a comprehensive set of marine ecoregions of the world, data also extracted from the WPD. Perhaps not surprisingly, these distributions appear to show a strong bias towards collection and taxonomy efforts. Only when species richness is accumulated into large marine realms does a pattern emerge that is also recognized in many other marine animal groups: high numbers in tropical regions, lesser numbers in the colder parts of the world oceans. Preliminary similarity analysis of a matrix of species and marine ecoregions extracted from the WPD failed to yield a consistent hierarchical pattern of ecoregions into marine provinces. Global sponge diversity information is mostly generated in regional projects and resources: results obtained demonstrate that regional approaches to analytical biogeography are at present more likely to achieve insights into the biogeographic history of sponges than a global perspective, which appears currently too ambitious. We also review information on invasive sponges that might well have some influence on distribution patterns of the future. PMID:22558119

  2. A New Ergosterol Analog, a New Bis-Anthraquinone and Anti-Obesity Activity of Anthraquinones from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Talaromyces stipitatus KUFA 0207

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jidapa Noinart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new ergosterol analog, talarosterone (1 and a new bis-anthraquinone derivative (3 were isolated, together with ten known compounds including palmitic acid, ergosta-4,6,8(14,22-tetraen-3-one, ergosterol-5,8-endoperoxide, cyathisterone (2, emodin (4a, questinol (4b, citreorosein (4c, fallacinol (4d, rheoemodin (4e and secalonic acid A (5, from the ethyl acetate extract of the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Talaromyces stipitatus KUFA 0207. The structures of the new compounds were established based on extensive 1D and 2D spectral analysis, and in the case of talarosterone (1, the absolute configurations of its stereogenic carbons were determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The structure and stereochemistry of cyathisterone (2 was also confirmed by X-ray analysis. The anthraquinones 4a–e and secalonic acid A (5 were tested for their anti-obesity activity using the zebrafish Nile red assay. Only citreorosein (4c and questinol (4b exhibited significant anti-obesity activity, while emodin (4a and secalonic acid A (5 caused toxicity (death for all exposed zebrafish larvae after 24 h.

  3. Lista de esponjas marinas asociadas al arrecife Tuxpan, Veracruz, México Checklist of marine sponges from Tuxpan Reef, Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos González-Gándara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la lista de esponjas marinas (Porifera: Demospongiae del arrecife Tuxpan, Veracruz, México, colectadas en 2004, 2005 y 2006 mediante buceo libre y con equipo autónomo SCUBA. Los resultados muestran la presencia de 18 especies pertenecientes a 13 géneros y 13 familias, 17 de estas especies son nuevos registros para los arrecifes coralinos del norte de Veracruz y una (Aplysina cauliformis Carter, 1882 para el estado. La información puede auxiliar para definir las estrategias de manejo, monitoreo y protección de estas formaciones arrecifales que recientemente han sido propuestas como área de protección de flora y fauna.A checklist of marine sponge species (Porifera: Demospongiae from Tuxpan reef, Veracruz, Mexico, collected during 2004, 2005 and 2006 by free and SCUBA diving equipment, is presented. The results show the presence of 18 species belonging to 13 genera and 13 families. 17 speices represent new records for the northern coral reefs of Veracruz, and the 18th species (Aplysina cauliformis Carter, 1882 is a new record for the state. This information may help to define appropriate management, monitoring and protection strategies for the coral reefs of the north of Veracruz, which have been proposed as a natural preserve area recently.

  4. Culturable actinobacteria from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve: isolation and phylogenetic diversity by 16S rRNA gene-RFLP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Zhang, Wei; Lee, Hong Kum

    2006-08-01

    A total of 106 actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve collected from the Yellow Sea, China were isolated using eight different media. The number of species and genera of actinobacteria recovered from the different media varied significantly, underlining the importance of optimizing the isolation conditions. The phylogenetic diversity of the actinobacteria isolates was assessed using 16S rRNA gene amplification-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 106 strains with different morphologies. The RFLP fingerprinting of selected strains by HhaI-digestion of the 16S rRNA genes resulted in 11 different patterns. The HhaI-RFLP analysis gave good resolution for the identification of the actinobacteria isolates at the genus level. A phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolates belonged to seven genera of culturable actinobacteria including Actinoalloteichus, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces. The dominant genus was Streptomyces, which represented 74% of the isolates. Three of the strains identified are candidates for new species.

  5. A dimeric urea of the bisabolene sesquiterpene from the Okinawan marine sponge Axinyssa sp. inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Kanno, Syu-Ichi; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-01-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays an important role as a negative regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways. Therefore, this enzyme is regarded as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our screening program for PTP1B inhibitors led to the isolation of four sesquiterpenes and sterol: N,N'-bis[(6R,7S)-7-amino-7,8-dihydro-α-bisabolen-7-yl]urea (1), (6R,7S)-7-amino-7,8-dihydro-α-bisabolene (2), (1R,6S,7S,10S)-10-isothiocyanato-4-amorphene (3), axinisothiocyanate J (4), and axinysterol (5) from the marine sponge Axinyssa sp. collected at Iriomote Island. Of these, compound 1 was the most potent inhibitor of PTP1B activity (IC50=1.9μM) without cytotoxicity at 50μM in two human cancer cell lines, hepatoma Huh-7 and bladder carcinoma EJ-1 cells. Compound 1 also moderately enhanced the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation levels of Akt in Huh-7 cells. Therefore, compound 1 has potential as a new type of anti-diabetic drug candidate possessing PTP1B inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Actinomycetes from the South China Sea sponges: isolation, diversity and potential for aromatic polyketides discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyong eLi; Wei eSun; Fengli eZhang; Liming eHe; Karthik eLoganathan

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges often harbor dense and diverse microbial communities including actinobacteria. To date no comprehensive investigation has been performed on the culturable diversity of the actinomycetes associated with South China Sea sponges. Structurally novel aromatic polyketides were recently discovered from marine sponge-derived Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora strains, suggesting that sponge-associated actinomycetes can serve as a new source of aromatic polyketides. In this study, a tot...

  7. Medullary Sponge Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponge Kidney? Complications of medullary sponge kidney include hematuria, or blood in the urine kidney stones urinary ... both kidneys. Complications of medullary sponge kidney include hematuria, or blood in the urine kidney stones urinary ...

  8. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... counter; Contraceptives - over the counter; Family planning - vaginal sponge; Contraception - vaginal sponge ... Spermicides and vaginal sponges do not work as well at preventing pregnancy as some other forms of birth control. However, using a spermicide ...

  9. IN VITRO ANTAGONISTIC ACTIVITIES OF INDONESIAN MARINE SPONGE AAPTOS AAPTOS AND CALLYSPONGIA PSEUDORETICULATA EXTRACTS AND THEIR TOXICITY AGAINST Vibrio spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmiati Rosmiati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vibriosis is one of diseases which often results in mass mortality of Penaeus monodon larval rearing systems. It attacks shrimp of all stages in zoea, mysis and shrimp postlarva stage. This disease is caused by Vibrio spp, particularly Vibrio harveyi (a luminescent bacterium. Several kinds of antibiotics and chemical material have been used to overcome the disease but they have side effects to environment and human. The searching of bioactive compounds as an alternative treatment has been done for multi purposes. In this study diethyl eter, butanol and aqueous extract of Indonesian sponges Aaptos aaptos and Callyspongia pseudoreticulata were tested for in vitro activity against Vibrio spp. and Vibrio harveyi by using disc diffusion method. The result showed that all extracts of Aaptos aaptos gave a positive antibacterial activity towards those pathogenic bacteria. Meanwhile, only butanol extract of Callyspongia pseudoreticulata obtained to exhibit an antibacterial activity on those pathogenic bacteria. The strong anti-vibrio activity were shown by butanol and aqueous extract of Aaptos aaptos with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value of 0.313 and 0.625 mg/mL, respectively. Whilst, the butanol extract of Callyspongia pseudoreticulata indicated a low antibacterial activity with the MIC value of 10 mg/mL. Toxicity of those active extracts was evaluated by Brine Shrimp Lethality Test (BST. Interestingly, butanol and aqueous extracts of Aaptos aaptos did not show any toxic effect in Artemia salina larvae up to 8 x MIC (2.504 mg/mL and 5.000 mg/mL. It is the first report for the anti-vibr io activity of both Aaptos aaptos and Callyspongia pseudoreticulata. This results suggest that Aaptos aaptos has a potential to be used as a source of alternative compound to vibriosis prevention for mariculture.

  10. Hawaiian birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Michael; Sincock, John L.; Di Silvestro, Roger L.

    1985-01-01

    Hawaii's 132 islands, reefs, and shoals extend 1,523 miles from the southernmost island of Hawaii to the northernmost islands at Kure Atoll. The northernmost islands, now eroded almost to sea level, are about 27 million years old, whereas the still-forming island of Hawaii is only about 750,000 years old. The Hawaiian Islands are the most isolated in the world and, as such, have developed many species and subspecies of plants and animals found nowhere else. the arrival of few ancestral species and the isolation of the islands, with their varying ages, elevations, climates, and microhabitats, were ideal for creating this great endemic biota through adaptive radiation.

  11. Fossil and modern sponge fauna of southern Australia and adjacent regions compared: interpretation, evolutionary and biogeographic significance of the late Eocene ‘soft’ sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Łukowiak, M.

    2016-01-01

    The late Eocene ‘soft’ sponge fauna of southern Australia is reconstructed based on disassociated spicules and is used to interpret the paleoecology and environmental context of shallow marine communities in this region. The reconstructed sponge association was compared with coeval sponge

  12. Identification and analysis of cDNAs encoding two nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPK/Nm23) from the marine sponge Suberites domuncula

    OpenAIRE

    Harcet, Matija; Lukić-Bilela, Lada; Ćetković, Helena; Müller, E.G. Werner; Gamulin, Vera

    2005-01-01

    Suberites domuncula is a member of the most ancient and simplest extant phylum of multicellular animals - sponges (Porifera). A database of S. domuncula expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was recently constructed by random cDNA sequencing. Two NDPK/Nm23 proteins from the sponge Suberites domuncula are reported here. Sponge proteins were named Nm23-SD1 and Nm23-SD6, because they display the highest sequence similarity with human Nm23-H1 and -H6 proteins. Overall sequence conservation of Nm23-SD1 w...

  13. Principles of Biofouling Protection in Marine Sponges: A Model for the Design of Novel Biomimetic and Bio-inspired Coatings in the Marine Environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, W.E.G.; Wang, X.; Proksch, P.; Perry, C.C.; Osinga, R.; Gardères, J.; Schröder, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    The process of biofouling of marine structures and substrates, such as platforms or ship hulls, proceeds in multiple steps. Soon after the formation of an initial conditioning film, formed via the adsorption of organic particles to natural or manmade substrates, a population of different bacterial

  14. Hawaiian Islands North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 61,000 terrestrial and marine...

  15. Hawaiian Islands East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 61,000 terrestrial and marine...

  16. Hawaiian Islands Gravity Data per 2 min Cell (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity density grid for the Principal Hawaiian Islands displays the distribution of about 61,000 terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the National...

  17. Pore forming polyalkylpyridinium salts from marine sponges versus synthetic lipofection systems: distinct tools for intracellular delivery of cDNA and siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagbrough Ian S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haplosclerid marine sponges produce pore forming polyalkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS, which can be used to deliver macromolecules into cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the delivery of DNA, siRNA and lucifer yellow into cells mediated by poly-APS and its potential mechanisms as compared with other lipofection systems (lipofectamine and N4,N9-dioleoylspermine (LipoGen. DNA condensation was evaluated and HEK 293 and HtTA HeLa cells were used to investigate pore formation and intracellular delivery of cDNA, siRNA and lucifer yellow. Results Poly-APS and LipoGen were both found to be highly efficient DNA condensing agents. Fura-2 calcium imaging was used to measure calcium transients indicative of cell membrane pore forming activity. Calcium transients were evoked by poly-APS but not LipoGen and lipofectamine. The increases in intracellular calcium produced by poly-APS showed temperature sensitivity with greater responses being observed at 12°C compared to 21°C. Similarly, delivery of lucifer yellow into cells with poly-APS was enhanced at lower temperatures. Transfection with cDNA encoding for the expression enhanced green fluorescent protein was also evaluated at 12°C with poly-APS, lipofectamine and LipoGen. Intracellular delivery of siRNA was achieved with knockdown in beta-actin expression when lipofectamine and LipoGen were used as transfection reagents. However, intracellular delivery of siRNA was not achieved with poly-APS. Conclusion Poly-APS mediated pore formation is critical to its activity as a transfection reagent, but lipofection systems utilise distinct mechanisms to enable delivery of DNA and siRNA into cells.

  18. Genomics of "Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarium", a Cyanobacterial Sponge Symbiont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaby, Beate M. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany); Copeland, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hentschel, Ute [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-03-21

    Marine sponges (Porifera): ancient metazoans of ecological importance, that produce bioactive secondary metabolites and interact with various microorganisms including cyanobacteria1: Marine Synechococcus spp.: cyanobacteria, important contributors to the global carbon cycle and major primary producers in the oceans2 Ca. S. spongiarum: an ecotype of this genus, widespread and abundant symbiont of various marine sponges around the world3, e.g. Aplysina aerophoba

  19. Marine sponge Craniella austrialiensis‐associated bacterial diversity revelation based on 16S rDNA library and biologically active Actinomycetes screening, phylogenetic analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Z.‐Y; Liu, Y

    2006-01-01

    Aims:  The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial diversity associated with the sponge Craniella australiensis using a molecular strategy and isolating Actinomycetes with antimicrobial potentials...

  20. GeoChip-based insights into the microbial functional gene repertoire of marine sponges (high microbial abundance, low microbial abundance) and seawater

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Kristina

    2015-01-08

    The GeoChip 4.2 gene array was employed to interrogate the microbial functional gene repertoire of sponges and seawater collected from the Red Sea and the Mediterranean. Complementary amplicon sequencing confirmed the microbial community composition characteristic of high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges. By use of GeoChip, altogether 20 273 probes encoding for 627 functional genes and representing 16 gene categories were identified. Minimum curvilinear embedding analyses revealed a clear separation between the samples. The HMA/LMA dichotomy was stronger than any possible geographic pattern, which is shown here for the first time on the level of functional genes. However, upon inspection of individual genes, very few specific differences were discernible. Differences were related to microbial ammonia oxidation, ammonification, and archaeal autotrophic carbon fixation (higher gene abundance in sponges over seawater) as well as denitrification and radiation-stress-related genes (lower gene abundance in sponges over seawater). Except for few documented specific differences the functional gene repertoire between the different sources appeared largely similar. This study expands previous reports in that functional gene convergence is not only reported between HMA and LMA sponges but also between sponges and seawater.

  1. Marine sponge Craniella austrialiensis-associated bacterial diversity revelation based on 16S rDNA library and biologically active Actinomycetes screening, phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z-Y; Liu, Y

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial diversity associated with the sponge Craniella australiensis using a molecular strategy and isolating Actinomycetes with antimicrobial potentials. The bacterial diversity associated with South China Sea sponge C. austrialiensis was assessed using a 16S rDNA clone library alongside restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. It was found that the C. austrialiensis-associated bacterial community consisted of alpha, beta and gamma-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes as well as Actinobacterium. Actinomycetes were isolated successfully using seawater medium with sponge extracts. According to the BLAST and phylogenetic analysis based on about 600-bp 16S rDNA sequences, 11 of the representative 23 isolates closely matched the Streptomyces sp. while the remaining 12 matched the Actinomycetales. Twenty Actinomycetes have antimicrobial potentials, of which 15 are found to possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial potentials. The sponge C. austrialiensis-associated bacterial community is very abundant including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacterium while Actinomycetes is not predominant. Artificial seawater medium with sponge extracts is suitable for Actinomycetes isolation. Most of the isolated C. austrialiensis-associated Actinomycetes have a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. This study revealed the diversity of the bacterial community and the isolated Actinomycetes with antimicrobial potentials associated with sponge C. australiensis.

  2. GeoChip-based insights into the microbial functional gene repertoire of marine sponges (high microbial abundance, low microbial abundance) and seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Kristina; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Brümmer, Franz; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-12-01

    The GeoChip 4.2 gene array was employed to interrogate the microbial functional gene repertoire of sponges and seawater collected from the Red Sea and the Mediterranean. Complementary amplicon sequencing confirmed the microbial community composition characteristic of high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges. By use of GeoChip, altogether 20,273 probes encoding for 627 functional genes and representing 16 gene categories were identified. Minimum curvilinear embedding analyses revealed a clear separation between the samples. The HMA/LMA dichotomy was stronger than any possible geographic pattern, which is shown here for the first time on the level of functional genes. However, upon inspection of individual genes, very few specific differences were discernible. Differences were related to microbial ammonia oxidation, ammonification, and archaeal autotrophic carbon fixation (higher gene abundance in sponges over seawater) as well as denitrification and radiation-stress-related genes (lower gene abundance in sponges over seawater). Except for few documented specific differences the functional gene repertoire between the different sources appeared largely similar. This study expands previous reports in that functional gene convergence is not only reported between HMA and LMA sponges but also between sponges and seawater. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Screening of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from Sea Sponge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The marine sponge Clathria indica, collected from Thondi-Palk Strait region of Tamil Nadu, was studied for bacterial antagonistic activity. Sponge species were identified based on specula morphology. Ethyl Acetate extracts yielded a total of 0.8g, 0.12g, 0.01g, 0.13g and 0.17g from 1.5g of sponge crude extracts respectively ...

  4. Sponge-Associated Microorganisms: Evolution, Ecology, and Biotechnological Potential†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael W.; Radax, Regina; Steger, Doris; Wagner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Marine sponges often contain diverse and abundant microbial communities, including bacteria, archaea, microalgae, and fungi. In some cases, these microbial associates comprise as much as 40% of the sponge volume and can contribute significantly to host metabolism (e.g., via photosynthesis or nitrogen fixation). We review in detail the diversity of microbes associated with sponges, including extensive 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic analyses which support the previously suggested existence of a sponge-specific microbiota. These analyses provide a suitable vantage point from which to consider the potential evolutionary and ecological ramifications of these widespread, sponge-specific microorganisms. Subsequently, we examine the ecology of sponge-microbe associations, including the establishment and maintenance of these sometimes intimate partnerships, the varied nature of the interactions (ranging from mutualism to host-pathogen relationships), and the broad-scale patterns of symbiont distribution. The ecological and evolutionary importance of sponge-microbe associations is mirrored by their enormous biotechnological potential: marine sponges are among the animal kingdom's most prolific producers of bioactive metabolites, and in at least some cases, the compounds are of microbial rather than sponge origin. We review the status of this important field, outlining the various approaches (e.g., cultivation, cell separation, and metagenomics) which have been employed to access the chemical wealth of sponge-microbe associations. PMID:17554047

  5. Sponge-associated microorganisms: evolution, ecology, and biotechnological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael W; Radax, Regina; Steger, Doris; Wagner, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Marine sponges often contain diverse and abundant microbial communities, including bacteria, archaea, microalgae, and fungi. In some cases, these microbial associates comprise as much as 40% of the sponge volume and can contribute significantly to host metabolism (e.g., via photosynthesis or nitrogen fixation). We review in detail the diversity of microbes associated with sponges, including extensive 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic analyses which support the previously suggested existence of a sponge-specific microbiota. These analyses provide a suitable vantage point from which to consider the potential evolutionary and ecological ramifications of these widespread, sponge-specific microorganisms. Subsequently, we examine the ecology of sponge-microbe associations, including the establishment and maintenance of these sometimes intimate partnerships, the varied nature of the interactions (ranging from mutualism to host-pathogen relationships), and the broad-scale patterns of symbiont distribution. The ecological and evolutionary importance of sponge-microbe associations is mirrored by their enormous biotechnological potential: marine sponges are among the animal kingdom's most prolific producers of bioactive metabolites, and in at least some cases, the compounds are of microbial rather than sponge origin. We review the status of this important field, outlining the various approaches (e.g., cultivation, cell separation, and metagenomics) which have been employed to access the chemical wealth of sponge-microbe associations.

  6. ABOUT SPONGE FARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Marijana Pećarević; Ana Bratoš Cetinić

    2005-01-01

    Sponges are the simplest multicellular animals. Farming of sponges is facilitated by their asexual reproduction and great ability of regeneration. Farming of filter-feeding sponges is environment friendly, and it can positively influence on environmental impact of other aquaculture activities. Natural populations of sponges in Mediterranean Sea are endangered by inappropriate overfishing. Farming of sponges is possible solution for regeneration and protection of natural populations.

  7. ABOUT SPONGE FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Pećarević

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are the simplest multicellular animals. Farming of sponges is facilitated by their asexual reproduction and great ability of regeneration. Farming of filter-feeding sponges is environment friendly, and it can positively influence on environmental impact of other aquaculture activities. Natural populations of sponges in Mediterranean Sea are endangered by inappropriate overfishing. Farming of sponges is possible solution for regeneration and protection of natural populations.

  8. Bioprospecting sponge-associated microbes for antimicrobial compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indraningrat, Anak Agung Gede; Smidt, Hauke; Sipkema, Detmer

    2016-01-01

    Sponges are the most prolific marine organisms with respect to their arsenal of bioactive compounds including antimicrobials. However, the majority of these substances are probably not produced by the sponge itself, but rather by bacteria or fungi that are associated with their host. This review

  9. Fossil freshwater sponges: Taxonomy, geographic distribution, and critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Pronzato; Andrzej Pisera; Renata Manconi

    2017-01-01

    Sponges are one of the most ancient animal phyla with about 8850 living species and about 5000 described fossil taxa. Most sponges are marine and live at all depths of all oceans. Freshwater bodies (lakes, rivers) are inhabited only by a small minority of species, ca. 240 (

  10. Development of in vivo sponge cultures: Particle feeding by the tropical sponge pseudosuberits aff. andrewski

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, R.; Kleijn, R.; Groenendijk, E.; Niesink, P.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    The rate of food particle uptake of the tropical sponge Pseudosuberites aff. andrewsi was studied in relation to particle concentrations and particle size. A range of different concentrations of either the marine microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta (~5-8 7m) or the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus

  11. Why do dolphins carry sponges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Sargeant, Brooke L; Watson-Capps, Jana J; Gibson, Quincy A; Heithaus, Michael R; Connor, Richard C; Patterson, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Tool use is rare in wild animals, but of widespread interest because of its relationship to animal cognition, social learning and culture. Despite such attention, quantifying the costs and benefits of tool use has been difficult, largely because if tool use occurs, all population members typically exhibit the behavior. In Shark Bay, Australia, only a subset of the bottlenose dolphin population uses marine sponges as tools, providing an opportunity to assess both proximate and ultimate costs and benefits and document patterns of transmission. We compared sponge-carrying (sponger) females to non-sponge-carrying (non-sponger) females and show that spongers were more solitary, spent more time in deep water channel habitats, dived for longer durations, and devoted more time to foraging than non-spongers; and, even with these potential proximate costs, calving success of sponger females was not significantly different from non-spongers. We also show a clear female-bias in the ontogeny of sponging. With a solitary lifestyle, specialization, and high foraging demands, spongers used tools more than any non-human animal. We suggest that the ecological, social, and developmental mechanisms involved likely (1) help explain the high intrapopulation variation in female behaviour, (2) indicate tradeoffs (e.g., time allocation) between ecological and social factors and, (3) constrain the spread of this innovation to primarily vertical transmission.

  12. Why do dolphins carry sponges?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mann

    Full Text Available Tool use is rare in wild animals, but of widespread interest because of its relationship to animal cognition, social learning and culture. Despite such attention, quantifying the costs and benefits of tool use has been difficult, largely because if tool use occurs, all population members typically exhibit the behavior. In Shark Bay, Australia, only a subset of the bottlenose dolphin population uses marine sponges as tools, providing an opportunity to assess both proximate and ultimate costs and benefits and document patterns of transmission. We compared sponge-carrying (sponger females to non-sponge-carrying (non-sponger females and show that spongers were more solitary, spent more time in deep water channel habitats, dived for longer durations, and devoted more time to foraging than non-spongers; and, even with these potential proximate costs, calving success of sponger females was not significantly different from non-spongers. We also show a clear female-bias in the ontogeny of sponging. With a solitary lifestyle, specialization, and high foraging demands, spongers used tools more than any non-human animal. We suggest that the ecological, social, and developmental mechanisms involved likely (1 help explain the high intrapopulation variation in female behaviour, (2 indicate tradeoffs (e.g., time allocation between ecological and social factors and, (3 constrain the spread of this innovation to primarily vertical transmission.

  13. Same, same but different: symbiotic bacterial associations in GBR sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole S Webster

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Symbioses in marine sponges involve diverse consortia of microorganisms that contribute to the health and ecology of their hosts. The microbial communities of 13 taxonomically diverse Great Barrier Reef (GBR sponge species were assessed by DGGE and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to determine intra and inter species variation in bacterial symbiont composition. Microbial profiling revealed communities that were largely conserved within different individuals of each species with intra species similarity ranging from 65-100%. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Nitrospira and Cyanobacteria. Sponge-associated microbes were also highly host-specific with no operational taxonomic units (OTUs common to all species and the most ubiquitous OTU found in only 5 of the 13 sponge species. In total, 91% of the OTUs were restricted to a single sponge species. However, GBR sponge microbes were more closely related to other sponge-derived bacteria than they were to environmental communities with sequences falling within 50 of the 173 previously defined sponge-(or sponge-coral specific sequence clusters. These sequence clusters spanned the Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira and the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae superphylum. The number of sequences assigned to these sponge-specific clusters across all species ranged from 0% to 92%. No relationship between host phylogeny and symbiont communities were observed across the different sponge orders, although the highest level of similarity was detected in two closely related Xestospongia species. This study identifies the core microbial inhabitants in a range of GBR sponges thereby providing the basis for future studies on sponge symbiotic function and research aiming to predict how sponge holobionts will respond to environmental

  14. Functional Insights into Sponge Microbiology by Single Cell Genomics

    KAUST Repository

    Hentschel, Ute

    2011-04-09

    Marine Sponges (Porifera) are known to harbor enormous amounts of microorganisms with members belonging to at least 30 different bacterial phyla including several candidate phyla and both archaeal lineages. Here, we applied single cell genomics to the mic

  15. New cyclitol derivative from a sponge Sarcotragus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghong; Jung, Jee H; Xu, Tunhai; Long, Lijuan; Lin, Xiuping; Yin, Hao; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yang, Xianwen

    2011-03-01

    Guided by the brine shrimp lethality assay, a new cyclitol derivative, sarcotride D (1), was isolated from a marine sponge Sarcotragus species. The structure was established based on NMR and MS analyses.

  16. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Dynamic Chemical Defenses in Tropical Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Sven; Nietzer, Samuel; Schupp, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Sponges and other sessile invertebrates are lacking behavioural escape or defense mechanisms and rely therefore on morphological or chemical defenses. Studies from terrestrial systems and marine algae demonstrated facultative defenses like induction and activation to be common, suggesting that sessile marine organisms also evolved mechanisms to increase the efficiency of their chemical defense. However, inducible defenses in sponges have not been investigated so far and studies on activated defenses are rare. We investigated whether tropical sponge species induce defenses in response to artificial predation and whether wounding triggers defense activation. Additionally, we tested if these mechanisms are also used to boost antimicrobial activity to avoid bacterial infection. Laboratory experiments with eight pacific sponge species showed that 87% of the tested species were chemically defended. Two species, Stylissa massa and Melophlus sarasinorum, induced defenses in response to simulated predation, which is the first demonstration of induced antipredatory defenses in marine sponges. One species, M. sarasinorum, also showed activated defense in response to wounding. Interestingly, 50% of the tested sponge species demonstrated induced antimicrobial defense. Simulated predation increased the antimicrobial defenses in Aplysinella sp., Cacospongia sp., M. sarasinorum, and S. massa. Our results suggest that wounding selects for induced antimicrobial defenses to protect sponges from pathogens that could otherwise invade the sponge tissue via feeding scars.

  17. Stereochemical determination and bioactivity assessment of {(S)}-(+)-curcuphenol dimers isolated from the marine sponge Didiscus aceratus and synthesized through laccase biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Peter Rygaard

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry-guided isolation of extracts from Didiscus aceratus led to the discovery of several new derivatives of the bioactive bisabolene-type sponge metabolite (S)-(+)-curcuphenol (1). The compounds obtained by this method included a mixture of known (2) and new (3...

  18. Sponge-Associated Bacteria Are Strictly Maintained in Two Closely Related but Geographically Distant Sponge Hosts ▿ † ‡ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Naomi F.; Hill, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    The giant barrel sponges Xestospongia muta and Xestospongia testudinaria are ubiquitous in tropical reefs of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, respectively. They are key species in their respective environments and are hosts to diverse assemblages of bacteria. These two closely related sponges from different oceans provide a unique opportunity to examine the evolution of sponge-associated bacterial communities. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene sequences from X. muta and X. testudinaria showed little divergence between the two species. A detailed analysis of the bacterial communities associated with these sponges, comprising over 900 full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed remarkable similarity in the bacterial communities of the two species. Both sponge-associated communities include sequences found only in the two Xestospongia species, as well as sequences found also in other sponge species and are dominated by three bacterial groups, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. While these groups consistently dominate the bacterial communities revealed by 16S rRNA gene-based analysis of sponge-associated bacteria, the depth of sequencing undertaken in this study revealed clades of bacteria specifically associated with each of the two Xestospongia species, and also with the genus Xestospongia, that have not been found associated with other sponge species or other ecosystems. This study, comparing the bacterial communities associated with closely related but geographically distant sponge hosts, gives new insight into the intimate relationships between marine sponges and some of their bacterial symbionts. PMID:21856832

  19. Diversity and biotechnological potential of the sponge-associated microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyi

    2006-07-01

    Sponges are well known to harbor diverse microbes and represent a significant source of bioactive natural compounds derived from the marine environment. Recent studies of the microbial communities of marine sponges have uncovered previously undescribed species and an array of new chemical compounds. In contrast to natural compounds, studies on enzymes with biotechnological potential from microbes associated with sponges are rare although enzymes with novel activities that have potential medical and biotechnological applications have been identified from sponges and microbes associated with sponges. Both bacteria and fungi have been isolated from a wide range of marine sponge, but the diversity and symbiotic relationship of bacteria has been studied to a greater extent than that of fungi isolated from sponges. Molecular methods (e.g., rDNA, DGGE, and FISH) have revealed a great diversity of the unculturable bacteria and archaea. Metagenomic approaches have identified interesting metabolic pathways responsible for the production of natural compounds and may provide a new avenue to explore the microbial diversity and biotechnological potential of marine sponges. In addition, other eukaryotic organisms such as diatoms and unicellular algae from marine sponges are also being described using these molecular techniques. Many natural compounds derived from sponges are suspected to be of bacterial origin, but only a few studies have provided convincing evidence for symbiotic producers in sponges. Microbes in sponges exist in different associations with sponges including the true symbiosis. Fungi derived from marine sponges represent the single most prolific source of diverse bioactive marine fungal compounds found to date. There is a developing interest in determining the true diversity of fungi present in marine sponges and the nature of the association. Molecular methods will allow scientists to more accurately identify fungal species and determine actual diversity of

  20. Environmental shaping of sponge associated archaeal communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S Turque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archaea are ubiquitous symbionts of marine sponges but their ecological roles and the influence of environmental factors on these associations are still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the diversity and composition of archaea associated with seawater and with the sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila, Paraleucilla magna and Petromica citrina in two distinct environments: Guanabara Bay, a highly impacted estuary in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the nearby Cagarras Archipelago. For this we used metagenomic analyses of 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene libraries. Hymeniacidon heliophila was more abundant inside the bay, while P. magna was more abundant outside and P. citrina was only recorded at the Cagarras Archipelago. Principal Component Analysis plots (PCA generated using pairwise unweighted UniFrac distances showed that the archaeal community structure of inner bay seawater and sponges was different from that of coastal Cagarras Archipelago. Rarefaction analyses showed that inner bay archaeaoplankton were more diverse than those from the Cagarras Archipelago. Only members of Crenarchaeota were found in sponge libraries, while in seawater both Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota were observed. Although most amoA archaeal genes detected in this study seem to be novel, some clones were affiliated to known ammonia oxidizers such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Cenarchaeum symbiosum. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The composition and diversity of archaeal communities associated with pollution-tolerant sponge species can change in a range of few kilometers, probably influenced by eutrophication. The presence of archaeal amoA genes in Porifera suggests that Archaea are involved in the nitrogen cycle within the sponge holobiont, possibly increasing its resistance to anthropogenic impacts. The higher diversity of Crenarchaeota in the polluted area suggests that some marine sponges are able to change the composition

  1. The marine sponge Agelas citrina as a source of the new pyrrole–imidazole alkaloids citrinamines A–D and N-methylagelongine

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    Christine Cychon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical investigation of the Caribbean sponge Agelas citrina revealed four new pyrrole–imidazole alkaloids (PIAs, the citrinamines A–D (1–4 and the bromopyrrole alkaloid N-methylagelongine (5. All citrinamines are dimers of hymenidin (6 which was also isolated from this sponge as the major metabolite. Citrinamines A (1 and B (2 are derivatives of the PIA dimer mauritiamine (7, whereas citrinamine C (3 is derived from the PIA dimer nagelamide B (8. Citrinamine D (4 shows an uncommon linkage between the imidazole rings of both monomeric units as it is only observed in the benzocyclobutane ring moiety of benzosceptrins A–C (9–11. Compound 5 is the N-methyl derivative of agelongine (12 which consist of a pyridinium ring and an ester linkage instead of the aminoimidazole moiety and the common amide bond in PIAs.

  2. Plakilactones G and H from a marine sponge. Stereochemical determination of highly flexible systems by quantitative NMR-derived interproton distances combined with quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Di Micco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stereostructural investigation of two new oxygenated polyketides, plakilactones G and H, isolated from the marine sponge Plakinastrella mamillaris collected at Fiji Islands, is reported. The stereostructural studies began on plakilactone H by applying an integrated approach of the NOE-based protocol and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts. In particular, plakilactone H was used as a template to extend the application of NMR-derived interproton distances to a highly flexible molecular system with simultaneous assignment of four non-contiguous stereocenters. Chemical derivatization and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C on plakilactone G along with a plausible biogenetic interconversion between plakilactone G and plakilactone H allowed us to determine the absolute configuration in this two new oxygenated polyketides.

  3. Reporter Dyes Demonstrate Functional Expression of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano: The Sponge-Derived Dye Ageladine A Is Not a Substrate of These Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Bickmeyer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The marine plathyhelminth Macrostomum lignano was recently isolated from Adriatic shore sediments where it experiences a wide variety of environmental challenges, ranging from hypoxia and reoxygenation, feeding on toxic algae, to exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. As multidrug resistance transporters constitute the first line of defense against toxins and toxicants we have studied the presence of such transporters in M. lignano in living animals by applying optical methods and pharmacological inhibitors that had been developed for mammalian cells. Application of the MDR1 inhibitor Verapamil or of the MRP1 inhibitors MK571 or Probenecid increased the intracellular fluorescence of the reporter dyes Fura-2 am, Calcein am, Fluo-3 am in the worms, but did not affect their staining with the dyes Rhodamine B, CMFDA or Ageladine A. The marine sponge alkaloid Ageladine A remained intracellularly trapped for several days in the worms, suggesting that it does not serve as substrate of multidrug resistance exporters. In addition, Ageladine A did not affect multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP-mediated dye export from M. lignano or the MRP1-mediated glutathione (GSH export from cultured rat brain astrocytes. The data obtained demonstrate that life-imaging is a useful tool to address physiological drug export from intact marine transparent flatworms by using multiphoton scanning microscopy.

  4. Reporter dyes demonstrate functional expression of multidrug resistance proteins in the marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano: the sponge-derived dye Ageladine A is not a substrate of these transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietje, Kristin; Rivera-Ingraham, Georgina; Petters, Charlotte; Abele, Doris; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2013-10-16

    The marine plathyhelminth Macrostomum lignano was recently isolated from Adriatic shore sediments where it experiences a wide variety of environmental challenges, ranging from hypoxia and reoxygenation, feeding on toxic algae, to exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. As multidrug resistance transporters constitute the first line of defense against toxins and toxicants we have studied the presence of such transporters in M. lignano in living animals by applying optical methods and pharmacological inhibitors that had been developed for mammalian cells. Application of the MDR1 inhibitor Verapamil or of the MRP1 inhibitors MK571 or Probenecid increased the intracellular fluorescence of the reporter dyes Fura-2 am, Calcein am, Fluo-3 am in the worms, but did not affect their staining with the dyes Rhodamine B, CMFDA or Ageladine A. The marine sponge alkaloid Ageladine A remained intracellularly trapped for several days in the worms, suggesting that it does not serve as substrate of multidrug resistance exporters. In addition, Ageladine A did not affect multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-mediated dye export from M. lignano or the MRP1-mediated glutathione (GSH) export from cultured rat brain astrocytes. The data obtained demonstrate that life-imaging is a useful tool to address physiological drug export from intact marine transparent flatworms by using multiphoton scanning microscopy.

  5. Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in a hydrofluoric acid solution of siliceous spicules of marine sponges (from the Ligurian Sea, Italy, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truzzi, C.; Annibaldi, A.; Illuminati, S.; Bassotti, E.; Scarponi, G. [Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy). Department of Marine Science

    2008-09-15

    Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was set up and optimized for simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead, and copper in siliceous spicules of marine sponges, directly in the hydrofluoric acid solution ({proportional_to}0.55 mol L{sup -1} HF, pH {proportional_to}1.9). A thin mercury-film electrode (TMFE) plated on to an HF-resistant epoxy-impregnated graphite rotating-disc support was used. The optimum experimental conditions, evaluated also in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, were as follows: deposition potential -1100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl 3 mol L{sup -1}, deposition time 3-10 min, electrode rotation 3000 rpm, SW scan from -1100 mV to +100 mV, SW pulse amplitude 25 mV, frequency 100 Hz, {delta}E{sub step} 8 mV, t{sub step} 100 ms, t{sub wait} 60 ms, t{sub delay} 2 ms, t{sub meas} 3 ms. Under these conditions the metal peak potentials were Cd -654{+-}1 mV, Pb -458 {+-} 1 mV, Cu -198{+-}1 mV. The electrochemical behaviour was reversible for Pb, quasi-reversible for Cd, and kinetically controlled (possibly following chemical reaction) for Cu. The linearity of the response with concentration was verified up to {proportional_to}4 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cd and Pb and {proportional_to}20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cu. The detection limits were 5.8 ng L{sup -1}, 3.6 ng L{sup -1}, and 4.3 ng L{sup -1} for Cd, Pb, and Cu, respectively, with t{sub d}=5 min. The method was applied for determination of the metals in spicules of two specimens of marine sponges (Demosponges) from the Portofino natural reserve (Ligurian Sea, Italy, Petrosia ficiformis) and Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica, Sphaerotylus antarcticus). The metal contents varied from tens of ng g{sup -1} to {proportional_to}1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, depending on the metal considered and with significant differences between the two sponge species. (orig.)

  6. Archaea appear to dominate the microbiome of Inflatella pellicula deep sea sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Jackson

    Full Text Available Microbes associated with marine sponges play significant roles in host physiology. Remarkable levels of microbial diversity have been observed in sponges worldwide through both culture-dependent and culture-independent studies. Most studies have focused on the structure of the bacterial communities in sponges and have involved sponges sampled from shallow waters. Here, we used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to compare the bacterial and archaeal communities associated with two individuals of the marine sponge Inflatella pellicula from the deep-sea, sampled from a depth of 2,900 m, a depth which far exceeds any previous sequence-based report of sponge-associated microbial communities. Sponge-microbial communities were also compared to the microbial community in the surrounding seawater. Sponge-associated microbial communities were dominated by archaeal sequencing reads with a single archaeal OTU, comprising ~60% and ~72% of sequences, being observed from Inflatella pellicula. Archaeal sequencing reads were less abundant in seawater (~11% of sequences. Sponge-associated microbial communities were less diverse and less even than any other sponge-microbial community investigated to date with just 210 and 273 OTUs (97% sequence identity identified in sponges, with 4 and 6 dominant OTUs comprising ~88% and ~89% of sequences, respectively. Members of the candidate phyla, SAR406, NC10 and ZB3 are reported here from sponges for the first time, increasing the number of bacterial phyla or candidate divisions associated with sponges to 43. A minor cohort from both sponge samples (~0.2% and ~0.3% of sequences were not classified to phylum level. A single OTU, common to both sponge individuals, dominates these unclassified reads and shares sequence homology with a sponge associated clone which itself has no known close relative and may represent a novel taxon.

  7. Archaea appear to dominate the microbiome of Inflatella pellicula deep sea sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen A; Flemer, Burkhardt; McCann, Angela; Kennedy, Jonathan; Morrissey, John P; O'Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2013-01-01

    Microbes associated with marine sponges play significant roles in host physiology. Remarkable levels of microbial diversity have been observed in sponges worldwide through both culture-dependent and culture-independent studies. Most studies have focused on the structure of the bacterial communities in sponges and have involved sponges sampled from shallow waters. Here, we used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to compare the bacterial and archaeal communities associated with two individuals of the marine sponge Inflatella pellicula from the deep-sea, sampled from a depth of 2,900 m, a depth which far exceeds any previous sequence-based report of sponge-associated microbial communities. Sponge-microbial communities were also compared to the microbial community in the surrounding seawater. Sponge-associated microbial communities were dominated by archaeal sequencing reads with a single archaeal OTU, comprising ~60% and ~72% of sequences, being observed from Inflatella pellicula. Archaeal sequencing reads were less abundant in seawater (~11% of sequences). Sponge-associated microbial communities were less diverse and less even than any other sponge-microbial community investigated to date with just 210 and 273 OTUs (97% sequence identity) identified in sponges, with 4 and 6 dominant OTUs comprising ~88% and ~89% of sequences, respectively. Members of the candidate phyla, SAR406, NC10 and ZB3 are reported here from sponges for the first time, increasing the number of bacterial phyla or candidate divisions associated with sponges to 43. A minor cohort from both sponge samples (~0.2% and ~0.3% of sequences) were not classified to phylum level. A single OTU, common to both sponge individuals, dominates these unclassified reads and shares sequence homology with a sponge associated clone which itself has no known close relative and may represent a novel taxon.

  8. Pezizomycotina dominates the fungal communities of South China Sea sponges Theonella swinhoei and Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liling; Liu, Fang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karuppiah, Valliappan; Li, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Compared with the knowledge of sponge-associated bacterial diversity and ecological roles, the fungal diversity and ecological roles of sponges remain largely unknown. In this study, the fungal diversity and protein synthesis potential in two South China Sea sponges Theonella swinhoei and Xestospongia testudinaria were investigated by rRNA vs. rRNA gene analysis. EF4/fung5 was chosen after a series of PCR tests to target fungal 18S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene. Altogether, 283 high-quality sequences were obtained, which resulted in 26 Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that were assigned to Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Blastocladiomycota. At subphylum level, 77.3% of sponge-derived sequences were affiliated with Pezizomycotina. The fungal compositions of T. swinhoei and X. testudinaria were different from that of ambient seawater. The predominant OTU shared between two sponges was rare in seawater, whereas the most abundant OTUs in seawater were not found in sponges. Additionally, the major OTUs of sponge cDNA datasets were shared in two sponges. The fungal diversity illustrated by sponge cDNA datasets correlated well with that derived from sponge DNA datasets, indicating that the major members of sponge-associated fungi had protein synthesis potential. This study highlighted the diversity of Pezizomycotina in marine sponge-fungi symbioses and the necessity of investigating ecological roles of sponge-associated fungi. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Hawaiian Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalta, Wilfred

    1981-01-01

    The history and tradition of the ceremonial games of ancient Hawaii are described. A physical education unit was developed for grades 7-12 to preserve this part of Hawaiian culture. The legend of the origin of games and various athletic activities unique to the Hawaiian people are presented. (JN)

  10. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and species-specific microbial communities in sponges from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Onon

    2010-11-18

    Marine sponges are associated with a remarkable array of microorganisms. Using a tag pyrosequencing technology, this study was the first to investigate in depth the microbial communities associated with three Red Sea sponges, Hyrtios erectus, Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria. We revealed highly diverse sponge-associated bacterial communities with up to 1000 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and richness estimates of up to 2000 species. Altogether, 26 bacterial phyla were detected from the Red Sea sponges, 11 of which were absent from the surrounding sea water and 4 were recorded in sponges for the first time. Up to 100 OTUs with richness estimates of up to 300 archaeal species were revealed from a single sponge species. This is by far the highest archaeal diversity ever recorded for sponges. A non-negligible proportion of unclassified reads was observed in sponges. Our results demonstrated that the sponge-associated microbial communities remained highly consistent in the same sponge species from different locations, although they varied at different degrees among different sponge species. A significant proportion of the tag sequences from the sponges could be assigned to one of the sponge-specific clusters previously defined. In addition, the sponge-associated microbial communities were consistently divergent from those present in the surrounding sea water. Our results suggest that the Red Sea sponges possess highly sponge-specific or even sponge-species-specific microbial communities that are resistant to environmental disturbance, and much of their microbial diversity remains to be explored. © 2011 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  11. Antibacterial Activities of Bacteria Isolated from the  Marine Sponges Isodictya compressa and Higginsia  bidentifera Collected from Algoa Bay, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relebohile Matthew Matobole

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rise in multi‐drug resistant pathogens and other diseases, there is renewed interest in marine sponge endosymbionts as a rich source of natural products (NPs. The South African marine environment is rich in marine biota that remains largely unexplored and may represent an important source for the discovery of novel NPs. We first investigated the bacterial diversity associated with five South African marine sponges, whose microbial populations had not previously been investigated, and select the two sponges (Isodictya compressa and Higginsia bidentifera with highest species richness to culture bacteria. By employing 33 different growth conditions 415 sponge‐associated bacterial isolates were cultured and screened for antibacterial activity. Thirty‐five isolates showed antibacterial activity, twelve of which exhibited activity against the multi‐drug resistant Escherichia coli 1699, implying that some of the bioactive compounds could be novel. Genome sequencing of two of these isolates confirmed that they harbour uncharacterized biosynthetic pathways that may encode novel chemical structures.

  12. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  13. Metabolite variability in Caribbean sponges of the genus Aplysina

    OpenAIRE

    Puyana, Monica; Pawlik, Joseph; Blum, James; Fenical, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sponges of the genus Aplysina are among the most common benthic animals on reefs of the Caribbean, and display a wide diversity of morphologies and colors. Tissues of these sponges lack mineralized skeletal elements, but contain a dense spongin skeleton and an elaborate series of tyrosine-derived brominated alkaloid metabolites that function as chemical defenses against predatory fishes, but do not deter some molluscs. Among the earliest marine natural products to be isolated and ide...

  14. 76 FR 77214 - Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2012 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of lobster harvest guideline. SUMMARY: NMFS establishes the annual harvest guideline for the commercial lobster fishery in the...

  15. 75 FR 1597 - Western Pacific Crustacean Fisheries; 2010 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of lobster harvest guideline. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the annual harvest guideline for the commercial lobster fishery in...

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Nutrient Cycling Pathways in the Microbiota of Deep-Sea and Shallow-Water Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Jinlong; Liu, Fang; He, Liming; He, Ying; Wang, Shenyue

    2016-12-01

    Sponges host complex symbiotic communities, but to date, the whole picture of the metabolic potential of sponge microbiota remains unclear, particularly the difference between the shallow-water and deep-sea sponge holobionts. In this study, two completely different sponges, shallow-water sponge Theonella swinhoei from the South China Sea and deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi from the Indian Ocean, were selected to compare their whole symbiotic communities and metabolic potential, particularly in element transformation. Phylogenetically diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi, and algae were detected in both shallow-water sponge T. swinhoei and deep-sea sponge N. huxleyi, and different microbial community structures were indicated between these two sponges. Metagenome-based gene abundance analysis indicated that, though the two sponge microbiota have similar core functions, they showed different potential strategies in detailed metabolic processes, e.g., in the transformation and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur by corresponding microbial symbionts. This study provides insight into the putative metabolic potentials of the microbiota associated with the shallow-water and deep-sea sponges at the whole community level, extending our knowledge of the sponge microbiota's functions, the association of sponge- microbes, as well as the adaption of sponge microbiota to the marine environment.

  17. Similar sponge-associated bacteria can be acquired via both vertical and horizontal transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipkema, Detmer; de Caralt, Sònia; Morillo, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges host diverse communities of microorganisms that are often vertically transmitted from mother to oocyte or embryo. Horizontal transmission has often been proposed to co-occur in marine sponges, but the mechanism is poorly understood. To assess the impact of the mode of transmission...... on the microbial assemblages of sponges, we analysed the microbiota in sympatric sponges that have previously been reported to acquire bacteria via either vertical (Corticium candelabrum and Crambe crambe) or horizontal transmission (Petrosia ficiformis). The comparative study was performed by PCR......-DGGE and pyrosequencing of barcoded PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. We found that P. ficiformis and C. candelabrum each harbor their own species-specific bacteria, but they are similar to other high-microbial-abundance sponges, while the low-microbial-abundance sponge C. crambe hosts microbiota of a very different...

  18. Immunomodulatory N-acyl Dopamine Glycosides from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Myxilla incrustans Collected at a Hydrothermal Vent Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Eydis; Liu, Hong Bing; Freysdottir, Jona

    2016-01-01

    A chemical investigation of the sponge (Porifera) Myxilla incrustans collected from the unique submarine hydrothermal vent site Strytan, North of Iceland, revealed a novel family of closely related N-acyl dopamine glycosides. Three new compounds, myxillin A (1), B (2) and C (3), were isolated...... and structurally elucidated using several analytical techniques, such as HR-MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. Myxillin A (1) and B (2)were shown to be structurally similar, composed of a dopamine moiety, but differ in the acyl chain length and saturation. The myxillin C (3) has a dehydrotyrosine moiety composing...... the same acyl chain and glycosylation as myxillin B (2). Myxillins A (1) and C (3) were tested for immunomodulating activity in an in vitro dendritic cell model. Dendritic cells matured and stimulated in the presence of myxillin A (1) secreted lower levels of IL-12p40, whilst dendritic cells matured...

  19. Transcriptome Changes during the Life Cycle of the Red Sponge, Mycale phyllophila (Porifera, Demospongiae, Poecilosclerida)

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Fan; Ding, Shaoxiong; Ou, Huilong; Wang, Dexiang; Chen, Jun; Miyamoto, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are an ancient metazoan group with broad ecological, evolutionary, and biotechnological importance. As in other marine invertebrates with a biphasic life cycle, the developing sponge undergoes a significant morphological, physiological, and ecological transformation during settlement and metamorphosis. In this study, we compare new transcriptome datasets for three life cycle stages of the red sponge (Mycale phyllophila) to test whether gene expression (as in the model poriferan, Amphi...

  20. Sponge distribution and the presence of photosymbionts in Moorea, French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher J. Freeman; Easson, Cole G.

    2016-01-01

    Photosymbionts play an important role in the ecology and evolution of diverse host species within the marine environment. Although sponge-photosymbiont interactions have been well described from geographically disparate sites worldwide, our understanding of these interactions from shallow water systems within French Polynesia is limited. We surveyed diverse habitats around the north coast of Moorea, French Polynesia and screened sponges for the presence of photosymbionts. Overall sponge abund...

  1. Investigation of the marine communities of Midway Harbor and adjacent lagoon, Midway Atoll, Northwest Hawaiian Islands in 1998 (NODC Accession 0001098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the marine communities of Midway Atoll harbor and surrounding lagoon was conducted at 12 sites from September 5 to 9, 1998. The primary focus of these...

  2. Microbial community structure of two freshwater sponges using Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed high microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Swapnil; Shouche, Yogesh S; Gade, Wasudev N

    2016-12-01

    Sponges are primitive metazoans that are known to harbour diverse and abundant microbes. All over the world attempts are being made to exploit these microbes for their biotechnological potential to produce, bioactive compounds and antimicrobial peptides. However, the majority of the studies are focussed on the marine sponges and studies on the freshwater sponges have been neglected so far. To increase our understanding of the microbial community structure of freshwater sponges, microbiota of two fresh water sponges namely, Eunapius carteri and Corvospongilla lapidosa is explored for the first time using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology. Overall the microbial composition of these sponges comprises of 14 phyla and on an average, more than 2900 OTUs were obtained from C. lapidosa while E. carteri showed 980 OTUs which is higher than OTUs obtained in the marine sponges. Thus, our study showed that, fresh water sponges also posses highly diverse microbial community than previously thought and it is distinct from the marine sponge microbiota. The present study also revealed that microbial community structure of both the sponges is significantly different from each other and their respective water samples. In the present study, we have detected many bacterial lineages belonging to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, etc. that are known to produce compounds of biotechnological importance. Overall, this study gives insight into the microbial composition of the freshwater sponges which is highly diverse and needs to be studied further to exploit their biotechnological capabilities.

  3. Distribution and Abundance of Archaea in South China Sea Sponge Holoxea sp. and the Presence of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Sponge Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with bacterial symbionts, little is known about archaea in sponges especially about their spatial distribution and abundance. Understanding the distribution and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea will help greatly in elucidating the potential function of symbionts in nitrogen cycling in sponges. In this study, gene libraries of 16S rRNA gene and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA genes and quantitative real-time PCR were used to study the spatial distribution and abundance of archaea in the South China Sea sponge Holoxea sp. As a result, Holoxea sp. specific AOA, mainly group C1a (marine group I: Crenarchaeota were identified. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaea was observed for the first time within sponge cells. This study suggested a close relationship between sponge host and its archaeal symbionts as well as the archaeal potential contribution to sponge host in the ammonia-oxidizing process of nitrification.

  4. Evidence for selective bacterial community structuring in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, R.; Keller-Costa, T.; Gomes, N.C.M.; Nunes da Rocha, U.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Elsas, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the functioning of sponges, knowledge of the structure of their associated microbial communities is necessary. However, our perception of sponge-associated microbiomes remains mainly restricted to marine ecosystems. Here, we report on the molecular diversity and composition of bacteria

  5. Evidence for selective bacterial community structuring in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Rodrigo; Keller-Costa, Tina; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; van Overbeek, Leo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    To understand the functioning of sponges, knowledge of the structure of their associated microbial communities is necessary. However, our perception of sponge-associated microbiomes remains mainly restricted to marine ecosystems. Here, we report on the molecular diversity and composition of bacteria

  6. Host-specific microbial communities in three sympatric North Sea sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naim, M.A.; Morillo, J.A.; Sørensen, S.J.; Waleed, A.A.; Smidt, H.; Sipkema, D.

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of next-generation technology sequencing has deepened our knowledge of marine sponge-associated microbiota with the identification of at least 32 phyla of Bacteria and Archaea from a large number of sponge species. In this study, we assessed the diversity of the microbial

  7. Identification of the Antibacterial Compound Produced by the Marine Epiphytic Bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. D323 and Related Sponge-Associated Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhelen Egan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface-associated marine bacteria often produce secondary metabolites with antagonistic activities. In this study, tropodithietic acid (TDA was identified to be responsible for the antibacterial activity of the marine epiphytic bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. D323 and related strains. Phenol was also produced by these bacteria but was not directly related to the antibacterial activity. TDA was shown to effectively inhibit a range of marine bacteria from various phylogenetic groups. However TDA-producers themselves were resistant and are likely to possess resistance mechanism preventing autoinhibition. We propose that TDA in isolate D323 and related eukaryote-associated bacteria plays a role in defending the host organism against unwanted microbial colonisation and, possibly, bacterial pathogens.

  8. First report on chitinous holdfast in sponges (Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Kaluzhnaya, Oksana V; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Ereskovsky, Alexander; Tabachnick, Konstantin R; Ilan, Micha; Stelling, Allison; Galli, Roberta; Petrova, Olga V; Nekipelov, Serguei V; Sivkov, Victor N; Vyalikh, Denis; Born, René; Behm, Thomas; Ehrlich, Andre; Chernogor, Lubov I; Belikov, Sergei; Janussen, Dorte; Bazhenov, Vasilii V; Wörheide, Gert

    2013-07-07

    A holdfast is a root- or basal plate-like structure of principal importance that anchors aquatic sessile organisms, including sponges, to hard substrates. There is to date little information about the nature and origin of sponges' holdfasts in both marine and freshwater environments. This work, to our knowledge, demonstrates for the first time that chitin is an important structural component within holdfasts of the endemic freshwater demosponge Lubomirskia baicalensis. Using a variety of techniques (near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, Raman, electrospray ionization mas spectrometry, Morgan-Elson assay and Calcofluor White staining), we show that chitin from the sponge holdfast is much closer to α-chitin than to β-chitin. Most of the three-dimensional fibrous skeleton of this sponge consists of spicule-containing proteinaceous spongin. Intriguingly, the chitinous holdfast is not spongin-based, and is ontogenetically the oldest part of the sponge body. Sequencing revealed the presence of four previously undescribed genes encoding chitin synthases in the L. baicalensis sponge. This discovery of chitin within freshwater sponge holdfasts highlights the novel and specific functions of this biopolymer within these ancient sessile invertebrates.

  9. Bioprospecting Sponge-Associated Microbes for Antimicrobial Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indraningrat, Anak Agung Gede; Smidt, Hauke; Sipkema, Detmer

    2016-05-02

    Sponges are the most prolific marine organisms with respect to their arsenal of bioactive compounds including antimicrobials. However, the majority of these substances are probably not produced by the sponge itself, but rather by bacteria or fungi that are associated with their host. This review for the first time provides a comprehensive overview of antimicrobial compounds that are known to be produced by sponge-associated microbes. We discuss the current state-of-the-art by grouping the bioactive compounds produced by sponge-associated microorganisms in four categories: antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antiprotozoal compounds. Based on in vitro activity tests, identified targets of potent antimicrobial substances derived from sponge-associated microbes include: human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) (2-undecyl-4-quinolone, sorbicillactone A and chartarutine B); influenza A (H1N1) virus (truncateol M); nosocomial Gram positive bacteria (thiopeptide YM-266183, YM-266184, mayamycin and kocurin); Escherichia coli (sydonic acid), Chlamydia trachomatis (naphthacene glycoside SF2446A2); Plasmodium spp. (manzamine A and quinolone 1); Leishmania donovani (manzamine A and valinomycin); Trypanosoma brucei (valinomycin and staurosporine); Candida albicans and dermatophytic fungi (saadamycin, 5,7-dimethoxy-4-p-methoxylphenylcoumarin and YM-202204). Thirty-five bacterial and 12 fungal genera associated with sponges that produce antimicrobials were identified, with Streptomyces, Pseudovibrio, Bacillus, Aspergillus and Penicillium as the prominent producers of antimicrobial compounds. Furthemore culture-independent approaches to more comprehensively exploit the genetic richness of antimicrobial compound-producing pathways from sponge-associated bacteria are addressed.

  10. Publication impact in sponge chemical and microbial ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Sacristán-Soriano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that sponges constitute one of the most prevalent groups in marine benthic communities based on their challenging structural organization, abundance and diversity, and their functional roles in natural communities. The evolutionary success of this group may be explained by the close interaction between sponges and microbes, which dates back to the Precambrian era. This particular symbiosis has become a key factor within sponge research and is an emerging topic of two scientific disciplines: chemical and microbial ecology. This mini-review evaluates the influence of these two disciplines on the general scientific community using a series of bibliometric indicators to ensure objectivity. Our analyses showed that, although sponge chemical ecology has a greater overall impact on the scientific community, both disciplines are cited equally and more frequently than expected. Both research areas show a great impact on applied sciences, but the ecological perspectives of sponge chemistry and microbiology may fall outside the interests of a broader ecological audience. Moreover, we highlight some research topics (e.g. effects of environmental stress that may require further attention. Hence, sponge chemical and microbial ecology have the opportunity to contribute to broader ecological issues in topics that make sponges particularly important, such as symbiosis.

  11. Preliminary assessment of sponge biodiversity on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles.

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    Robert W Thacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Saba Bank Atoll, Netherlands Antilles, is one of the three largest atolls on Earth and provides habitat for an extensive coral reef community. To improve our knowledge of this vast marine resource, a survey of biodiversity at Saba Bank included a multi-disciplinary team that sampled fishes, mollusks, crustaceans, macroalgae, and sponges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single member of the dive team conducted surveys of sponge biodiversity during eight dives at six locations, at depths ranging from 15 to 30 m. This preliminary assessment documented the presence of 45 species pooled across multiple locations. Rarefaction analysis estimated that only 48 to 84% of species diversity was sampled by this limited effort, clearly indicating a need for additional surveys. An analysis of historical collections from Saba and Saba Bank revealed an additional 36 species, yielding a total of 81 sponge species recorded from this area. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This observed species composition is similar to that found on widespread Caribbean reefs, indicating that the sponge fauna of Saba Bank is broadly representative of the Caribbean as a whole. A robust population of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, appeared healthy with none of the signs of disease or bleaching reported from other Caribbean reefs; however, more recent reports of anchor chain damage to these sponges suggests that human activities can have dramatic impacts on these communities. Opportunities to protect this extremely large habitat should be pursued, as Saba Bank may serve as a significant reservoir of sponge species diversity.

  12. Bioprospecting Sponge-Associated Microbes for Antimicrobial Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Gede Indraningrat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are the most prolific marine organisms with respect to their arsenal of bioactive compounds including antimicrobials. However, the majority of these substances are probably not produced by the sponge itself, but rather by bacteria or fungi that are associated with their host. This review for the first time provides a comprehensive overview of antimicrobial compounds that are known to be produced by sponge-associated microbes. We discuss the current state-of-the-art by grouping the bioactive compounds produced by sponge-associated microorganisms in four categories: antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antiprotozoal compounds. Based on in vitro activity tests, identified targets of potent antimicrobial substances derived from sponge-associated microbes include: human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 (2-undecyl-4-quinolone, sorbicillactone A and chartarutine B; influenza A (H1N1 virus (truncateol M; nosocomial Gram positive bacteria (thiopeptide YM-266183, YM-266184, mayamycin and kocurin; Escherichia coli (sydonic acid, Chlamydia trachomatis (naphthacene glycoside SF2446A2; Plasmodium spp. (manzamine A and quinolone 1; Leishmania donovani (manzamine A and valinomycin; Trypanosoma brucei (valinomycin and staurosporine; Candida albicans and dermatophytic fungi (saadamycin, 5,7-dimethoxy-4-p-methoxylphenylcoumarin and YM-202204. Thirty-five bacterial and 12 fungal genera associated with sponges that produce antimicrobials were identified, with Streptomyces, Pseudovibrio, Bacillus, Aspergillus and Penicillium as the prominent producers of antimicrobial compounds. Furthemore culture-independent approaches to more comprehensively exploit the genetic richness of antimicrobial compound-producing pathways from sponge-associated bacteria are addressed.

  13. A New Sponge, Antho (Acarnia seogwipoensis (Poecilosclerida: Microcionidae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim, Hyung June

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new marine sponge, Antho (Acarnia seogwipoensis n. sp., of the family Microcionidae, was collected from Seogwipo-si, Jeju-do, Korea, about 100 m in depth using a gill net on 1969. The genus Antho Gray, 1867 including Demospongiae, Poecilosclerida, Microcionidae, is a large group of sponges. About 100 species in Antho were reported from worldwide. The genus Antho contains five subgenera: Antho, Acarnia, Isopenectya, Jia, and Plocamia. Among them, about 30 species in Acarnia were described in world sponge. A new sponge's body shape is branching, size up to 124 mm wide, 213 mm high, 3-8 mm thick in branch and 7-9 mm thick in stalk. Antho (Acarnia seogwipoensis n. sp. is similar to A. (A. novizelanicum Ridley and Duncan, 1881 based on their spicules type and skeletal structure, but differs in the spicules dimension and growth form. This new species is branched growth form and have three kinds of toxa.

  14. Growth inhibition of periphytic diatoms by methanol extracts of sponges and holothurians

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mokashe, S.S.; Garg, A; Anil, A; Wagh, A

    Crude methanol extracts of a holothurian Holothuria leucospilota, and two sponges Craniella sp. and Ircinia ramosa were tested for their inhibitory effects on the growth of two marine diatoms, Navicula subinflata and N. crucicula, by diatom plating...

  15. Coexistence of poribacterial phylotypes among geographically widespread and phylogenetically divergent sponge hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinert, Georg; Gutleben, Johanna; Atikana, Akhirta; Wijffels, Rene H.; Smidt, Hauke; Sipkema, Detmer

    2017-01-01

    Marine sponges are benthic 'filter-feeding' invertebrates that can host dense and diverse bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic communities. Due to the finding of several genes encoding symbiosis factors, such as adhesins, ankyrin repeats and tetratricopeptide repeats, the candidate phylum

  16. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of twelve sponges collected from the Anambas Islands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masteria Yunovilsa Putra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate antimicrobial activities in methanolic extracts of twelve sponges collected from the Anambas Islands, Indonesia. Methods: The antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts was tested against two Grampositive bacteria, viz. Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633 and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923, and two Gram-negative bacteria, viz. Eschericia coli (ATCC 25922 and Vibrio anguillarum (ATCC 19264 using the disk diffusion assay. The antifungal activity was similarly tested against Candida albicans (ATCC 10231 and Aspergillus niger (ATCC 16404. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of promising sponges extracts were determined by the microdilution technique. Results: All the sponge species in this study showed antimicrobial activities against at least one of the test strains. Antibacterial activities were observed in 66.7% of the sponges extracts, while 30.0% of the extracts exhibited antifungal activities. Among them, the extracts of the sponges Stylissa massa and Axinyssa sp. were the most active against four tested bacteria and the yeast Candida albicans. The sponge Theonella swinhoei and two species of Xestospongia also displayed significant activities against two fungal pathogens Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. Conclusions: Antimicrobial activities were demonstrated in extracts from various marine sponges collected from the Anambas Islands, Indonesia. The most promising sponges among them were Stylissa massa and Axinyssa sp. This is the first report of antimicrobial activity in extracts of marine sponges from the Indonesian Anambas Islands.

  17. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    George Seghal Kiran; Joseph eSelvin; Sathiyanarayanan eGanesan; Lipton eAnuj Nishanth; Naif eAbdullah Al-Dhabi; Mariadhas eValan Arasu

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was also explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of var...

  18. Sponge cell culture? A molecular identification method for sponge cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Osinga, R.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Dissociated sponge cells are easily confused with unicellular organisms. This has been an obstacle in the development of sponge-cell lines. We developed a molecular detection method to identify cells of the sponge Dysidea avara in dissociated cell cultures. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene from a Dysidea

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio associated with three South China Sea sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Sun, W; Feng, G; Zhang, F; Anbuchezhian, R; Li, Z; Jiang, Q

    2015-05-01

    Marine sponges harbour dense and diverse micro-organisms which includes sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB are known to play a key role in the cycling of marine elements. However, in contrast to carbon and nitrogen cycling bacteria, SRB associated with marine sponges are largely unexplored. In this study, we explored the phylogenetic diversity of the SRB associated with three shallow-water sponges Arenosclera heroni, Dysidea arenaria and Astrosclera willeyana from the South China Sea by cloning-and-sequencing approach of SRB 16S rRNA gene with specific primers. The results showed that SRB associated with sponges mainly belonged to the genus Desulfovibrio in the class Deltaproteobacteria, i.e. a total of 14 Desulfovibrio-related OTUs were obtained from three sponges. The exception is identical OTUs from different sponges. Each sponge species harboured a unique set of Desulfovibrio OTUs, with only a few shared OTUs observed between species, suggesting different species of Desulfovibrio in different species of sponges. Meanwhile, some Desulfovibrio OTUs had a low similarity (South China Sea demosponges by cloning-and-sequencing approach of SRB 16S rRNA gene. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Spherulization as a process for the exudation of chemical cues by the encrusting sponge C. crambe

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Ternon; Lina Zarate; Sandrine Chenesseau; Julie Croué; Rémi Dumollard; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Thomas, Olivier P.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Ecological interactions in the marine environment are now recognized to be partly held by chemical cues produced by marine organisms. In particular, sponges are sessile animals thought to rely on the bioactive substances they synthesize to ensure their development and defense. However, the mechanisms leading the sponges to use their specialized metabolites as chemical cues remain unknown. Here we report the constant release of bioactive polycyclic guanidinic alkaloids ...

  1. Could some coral reefs become sponge reefs as our climate changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James J; Davy, Simon K; Jones, Timothy; Taylor, Michael W; Webster, Nicole S

    2013-09-01

    Coral reefs across the world have been seriously degraded and have a bleak future in response to predicted global warming and ocean acidification (OA). However, this is not the first time that biocalcifying organisms, including corals, have faced the threat of extinction. The end-Triassic mass extinction (200 million years ago) was the most severe biotic crisis experienced by modern marine invertebrates, which selected against biocalcifiers; this was followed by the proliferation of another invertebrate group, sponges. The duration of this sponge-dominated period far surpasses that of alternative stable-ecosystem or phase-shift states reported on modern day coral reefs and, as such, a shift to sponge-dominated reefs warrants serious consideration as one future trajectory of coral reefs. We hypothesise that some coral reefs of today may become sponge reefs in the future, as sponges and corals respond differently to changing ocean chemistry and environmental conditions. To support this hypothesis, we discuss: (i) the presence of sponge reefs in the geological record; (ii) reported shifts from coral- to sponge-dominated systems; and (iii) direct and indirect responses of the sponge holobiont and its constituent parts (host and symbionts) to changes in temperature and pH. Based on this evidence, we propose that sponges may be one group to benefit from projected climate change and ocean acidification scenarios, and that increased sponge abundance represents a possible future trajectory for some coral reefs, which would have important implications for overall reef functioning. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sponge-associated bacteria: general overview and special aspects of bacteria associated with Halichondria panicea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, J F; Stöhr, R

    2003-01-01

    Increasing evidence is accumulating that highlights the important role of bacteria in bacteria-sponge associations. It appears to be equally important to analyse the specific association of bacteria with sponges, to realise the biological function of biologically active substances produced by sponge-associated bacteria, and to consider the relationship between bacteria and sponges in the search for new pharmaceutical products. In this chapter the current knowledge on bacteria-sponge associations is briefly reviewed. Results are summarised that were obtained by three major methodological approaches: (1) classical microscope observations, (2) investigations attempting to characterise sponge-associated bacteria by describing pure culture isolates, and (3) the rapidly growing evidence from genetic analyses of sponge-associated bacteria. Special emphasis is given to the evidence of possible symbiotic interactions between bacteria and sponges and to the synthesis of natural products by bacteria isolated from or associated with marine sponges. Case studies including morphological and genetic studies together with results from pure culture studies have been performed with bacteria from the sponges Rhodopaloeides odorabile, Aplysina cavernicola, and Halichondria panicea. In addition, new results on bacteria associated with Halichondria panicea are also presented.

  3. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Obesity Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  4. Stable microbial communities in the sponge Crambe crambe from inside and outside a polluted Mediterranean harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Shelby E; López-Legentil, Susanna; Erwin, Patrick M

    2017-06-15

    Marine sponges have been shown to harbor diverse microbial symbiont communities that play key roles in host functioning, yet little is known about how anthropogenic disturbances impact sponge-microbe interactions. The Mediterranean sponge Crambe crambe is known to accumulate heavy metals in polluted harbors. In this study, we investigated whether the microbiome of C. crambe differed between sponges inhabiting a polluted harbor in Blanes (Spain) and a nearby (86% of all sequence reads. These results indicate that sponge microbiomes exhibit greater stability and pollution tolerance than their free-living microbial counterparts, potentially mitigating the effects of pollutants on coastal marine communities. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Ketide Synthase (KS domain prediction and analysis of iterative type II PKS gene in marine sponge-associated actinobacteria producing biosurfactants and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Seghal Kiran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The important biological macromolecules such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS genes was also explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of amino acid sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogues still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species with known PKS and metabolic products to correlate the domain architecture and structural features shared with known PKS proteins. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products.

  6. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products.

  7. Lipophilic fractions from the marine sponge Halichondria sitiens decrease secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells and decrease their ability to induce a Th1 type response by allogeneic CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xiaxia; Oskarsson, Jon T; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Freysdottir, Jona; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg

    2017-12-01

    Halichondria (Halichondriidae) marine sponges contain components possessing various biological activities, but immunomodulation is not among the ones reported. This study evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of fractions/compounds from Halichondria sitiens Schmidt. Crude dichloromethane/methanol extracts of H. sitiens were subjected to various chromatographic techniques to obtain fractions/compounds with immunomodulatory activity, using bioassay-guided isolation. The effects of the fractions/compounds were determined by measuring secretion of cytokines and expression of surface molecules by dendritic cells (DCs) and their ability to stimulate and modify cytokine secretion by allogeneic CD4+ T cells. The bioactive fractions were chemically analyzed to identify the immunomodulatory constituents by 1D, 2D NMR, and HRMS data. Several lipophilic fractions from H. sitiens at 10 μg/mL decreased secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 and IL-6 by the DCs, with maximum inhibition being 64% and 25%, respectively. In addition, fractions B3b3F and B3b3J decreased the ability of DCs to induce T cell secretion of IFN-γ. Fraction B3b3 induced morphological changes in DCs, characterized by extreme elongation of dendrites and cell clustering. Chemical screening revealed the presence of glycerides and some minor unknown constituents in the biologically active fractions. One new glyceride, 2,3-dihydroxypropyl 2-methylhexadecanoate (1), was isolated from one fraction and two known compounds, 3-[(1-methoxyhexadecyl)oxy]propane-1,2-diol (2) and monoheptadecanoin (3), were identified in another, but none of them had immunomodulatory activity. These results demonstrate that several lipophilic fractions from H. sitiens have anti-inflammatory effects on DCs and decrease their ability to induce a Th1 type immune response.

  8. Secondary metabolites extracted from marine sponge associated Comamonas testosteroni and Citrobacter freundii as potential antimicrobials against MDR pathogens and hypothetical leads for VP40 matrix protein of Ebola virus: an in vitro and in silico investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Acharya, Archana B; Subramaniyan, Saumya; Babu, Sumangala; Kulkarni, Shruthi; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2016-09-01

    The current study explores therapeutic potential of metabolites extracted from marine sponge (Cliona sp.)-associated bacteria against MDR pathogens and predicts the binding prospective of probable lead molecules against VP40 target of Ebola virus. The metabolite-producing bacteria were characterized by agar overlay assay and as per the protocols in Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology. The antibacterial activities of extracted metabolites were tested against clinical pathogens by well-diffusion assay. The selected metabolite producers were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing. Chemical screening and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis for selected compounds were performed. The probable lead molecules present in the metabolites were hypothesized based on proximate analysis, FTIR data, and literature survey. The drug-like properties and binding potential of lead molecules against VP40 target of Ebola virus were hypothesized by computational virtual screening and molecular docking. The current study demonstrated that clear zones around bacterial colonies in agar overlay assay. Antibiotic sensitivity profiling demonstrated that the clinical isolates were multi-drug resistant, however; most of them showed sensitivity to secondary metabolites (MIC-15 μl/well). The proximate and FTIR analysis suggested that probable metabolites belonged to alkaloids with O-H, C-H, C=O, and N-H groups. 16S rDNA characterization of selected metabolite producers demonstrated that 96% and 99% sequence identity to Comamonas testosteroni and Citrobacter freundii, respectively. The docking studies suggested that molecules such as Gymnastatin, Sorbicillactone, Marizomib, and Daryamide can designed as probable lead candidates against VP40 target of Ebola virus.

  9. These squatters are not innocent: the evidence of parasitism in sponge-inhabiting shrimps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Ďuriš

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are frequently inhabited by a wide range of associated invertebrates, including caridean shrimps. Symbiotic shrimps are often considered to be commensals; however, in most cases, the relationship with sponge hosts remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that sponge-inhabiting shrimps are often parasites adapted to consumption of sponge tissues. First, we provide detailed examination of morphology and stomach contents of Typton carneus (Decapoda: Palaemonidae: Pontoniinae, a West Atlantic tropical shrimp living in fire sponges of the genus Tedania. Remarkable shear-like claws of T. carneus show evidence of intensive shearing, likely the result of crushing siliceous sponge spicules. Examination of stomach contents revealed that the host sponge tissue is a major source of food for T. carneus. A parasitic mode of life is also reflected in adaptations of mouth appendages, in the reproduction strategy, and in apparent sequestration of host pigments by shrimp. Consistent results were obtained also for congeneric species T. distinctus (Western Atlantic and T. spongicola (Mediterranean. The distribution of shrimps among sponge hosts (mostly solitary individuals or heterosexual pairs suggests that Typton shrimps actively prevent colonisation of their sponge by additional conspecifics, thus protecting their resource and reducing the damage to the hosts. We also demonstrate feeding on host tissues by sponge-associated shrimps of the genera Onycocaris, Periclimenaeus, and Thaumastocaris (Pontoniinae and Synalpheus (Alpheidae. The parasitic mode of life appears to be widely distributed among sponge-inhabiting shrimps. However, it is possible that under some circumstances, the shrimps provide a service to the host sponge by preventing a penetration by potentially more damaging associated animals. The overall nature of interspecific shrimp-sponge relationships thus warrants further investigation.

  10. Trade-offs in defensive metabolite production but not ecological function in healthy and diseased sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochfeld, Deborah J; Kamel, Haidy N; Olson, Julie B; Thacker, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Diseases of marine organisms, and sponges in particular, are increasingly reported worldwide. Prior research indicates that the survival of sponges on reefs is due largely to their production of biologically active secondary metabolites that provide protection from a diversity of stressors. Aplysina Red Band Syndrome (ARBS) is an emerging disease affecting Caribbean rope sponges (Aplysina spp.), but it is not known whether secondary metabolites play a role in disease susceptibility and resistance. To investigate whether differences in secondary metabolites may explain variability in susceptibility to ARBS in Aplysina cauliformis, we used high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to generate chemical profiles from healthy tissue in both healthy and diseased sponges, and quantified peak areas for 15 metabolites. Analyses of healthy and diseased sponges revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in their chemical profiles. Aplysamine-1 and fistularin-3 were produced in significantly higher concentrations by healthy sponges, whereas aerothionin and 11-oxoaerothionin were found only in diseased sponges. At natural concentrations, extracts from both healthy and diseased sponges deterred feeding by an omnivorous reef fish. Fistularin-3 deterred feeding at concentrations found in healthy sponges, but not at concentrations found in diseased sponges. Aerothionin deterred feeding at concentrations found in diseased sponges, and may at least partially replace the loss of fistularin-3 as a feeding deterrent compound following pathogenesis, suggesting a trade-off in the production of feeding deterrent compounds. Extracts from healthy and diseased sponges inhibited bacterial growth, and both aplysamine-1 and fistularin-3 displayed selective antibacterial activity. Despite differences in secondary metabolite production between healthy and diseased sponges, the stress associated with ARBS does not appear to compromise the ability of A. cauliformis to maintain defenses

  11. Antifouling potential of seaweed, sponge and cashew nut oil extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seaweeds, Sargassum wightii, Ulva lactuca; sponge Desmopsongiae sp., and cashew nut oil extracts were tested in vitro against ten marine fouling bacteria isolated from test panels and the green mussel Perna viridis. The biofilm bacteria growth was inhibited by methanol extracts of the seaweeds S. wightii, U. lactuca, ...

  12. Gene Expression Dynamics Accompanying the Sponge Thermal Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges are important members of coral reef ecosystems. Thus, their responses to changes in ocean chemistry and environmental conditions, particularly to higher seawater temperatures, will have potential impacts on the future of these reefs. To better understand the sponge thermal stress response, we investigated gene expression dynamics in the shallow water sponge, Haliclona tubifera (order Haplosclerida, class Demospongiae), subjected to elevated temperature. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we show that these conditions result in the activation of various processes that interact to maintain cellular homeostasis. Short-term thermal stress resulted in the induction of heat shock proteins, antioxidants, and genes involved in signal transduction and innate immunity pathways. Prolonged exposure to thermal stress affected the expression of genes involved in cellular damage repair, apoptosis, signaling and transcription. Interestingly, exposure to sublethal temperatures may improve the ability of the sponge to mitigate cellular damage under more extreme stress conditions. These insights into the potential mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of sponges contribute to a better understanding of sponge conservation status and the prediction of ecosystem trajectories under future climate conditions. PMID:27788197

  13. Fossil freshwater sponges: Taxonomy, geographic distribution, and critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pronzato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are one of the most ancient animal phyla with about 8850 living species and about 5000 described fossil taxa. Most sponges are marine and live at all depths of all oceans. Freshwater bodies (lakes, rivers are inhabited only by a small minority of species, ca. 240 (<3% comprising the order Spongillida (Demospongiae most of which are able to produce specialized resting bodies to survive harsh terrestrial environmental conditions. This highly disproportionate ratio of marine and freshwater sponges is even more accentuated in the field of palaeontology with rare records reported up to the Miocene (<0.4% of all known fossil sponges. Only a few fossil taxa were correctly supported by strong and convincing taxonomic morphotraits at genus and species level, thus we provide here an overview of fossil freshwater sponges focusing on their morphotraits and distribution in time and space. Each recorded taxon is described in detail following the modern taxonomy and nomenclature. All fossil data suggest a clear trend of long term conservative morphology in the evolutionary history of Spongillida, although some traits of Recent gemmules evolved in a wide array of adaptive morpho-functional novelties. The majority of accepted fossil species belongs to the cosmopolitan family Spongillidae. The genera Oncosclera and Potamophloios of the family Potamolepidae seem to have had, in the past, a much larger geographic range than today. A synthesis of fossil taxa morphotraits is also provided in an Appendix 1.

  14. Evaluation of differential protein expression in Haliclona aquarius and sponge-associated microorganisms under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanick, Rodrigo Cunha; de Sousa Barbosa, Herbert; Frazão, Leonardo Revoredo; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; Coutinho, Cristiano Carvalho

    2013-09-01

    A comparative proteomic approach was used to assess differentially expressed proteins in marine sponges after 36 h of exposure to cadmium (Cd). After separation performed by 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 46 protein spots indicated differential expression, and 17 of these proteins were identified by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. From the proteins identified, 76% were attributed to sponge-associated microorganisms (fungi and bacteria), and 24% were attributed to Haliclona aquarius. Some of the proteins that were identified may be related to cell proliferation and differentiation or processes of oxidative stress repair and energy procurement. An integrated evaluation based on spot expression levels and the postulated functions of these proteins allowed a more accurate evaluation of the stress caused to the sponge holobiont system by cadmium exposure. This study could provide new insights into the use of a proteomic approach in the marine sponge to assess the effects of Cd pollution in a marine environment.

  15. Generalized Morphology using Sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Gronde, Jasper J.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical morphology has traditionally been grounded in lattice theory. For non-scalar data lattices often prove too restrictive, however. In this paper we present a more general alternative, sponges, that still allows useful definitions of various properties and concepts from morphological

  16. Characterization of Bacterial, Archaeal and Eukaryote Symbionts from Antarctic Sponges Reveals a High Diversity at a Three-Domain Level and a Particular Signature for This Ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rodríguez-Marconi

    Full Text Available Sponge-associated microbial communities include members from the three domains of life. In the case of bacteria, they are diverse, host specific and different from the surrounding seawater. However, little is known about the diversity and specificity of Eukarya and Archaea living in association with marine sponges. This knowledge gap is even greater regarding sponges from regions other than temperate and tropical environments. In Antarctica, marine sponges are abundant and important members of the benthos, structuring the Antarctic marine ecosystem. In this study, we used high throughput ribosomal gene sequencing to investigate the three-domain diversity and community composition from eight different Antarctic sponges. Taxonomic identification reveals that they belong to families Acarnidae, Chalinidae, Hymedesmiidae, Hymeniacidonidae, Leucettidae, Microcionidae, and Myxillidae. Our study indicates that there are different diversity and similarity patterns between bacterial/archaeal and eukaryote microbial symbionts from these Antarctic marine sponges, indicating inherent differences in how organisms from different domains establish symbiotic relationships. In general, when considering diversity indices and number of phyla detected, sponge-associated communities are more diverse than the planktonic communities. We conclude that three-domain microbial communities from Antarctic sponges are different from surrounding planktonic communities, expanding previous observations for Bacteria and including the Antarctic environment. Furthermore, we reveal differences in the composition of the sponge associated bacterial assemblages between Antarctic and tropical-temperate environments and the presence of a highly complex microbial eukaryote community, suggesting a particular signature for Antarctic sponges, different to that reported from other ecosystems.

  17. Characterization of Bacterial, Archaeal and Eukaryote Symbionts from Antarctic Sponges Reveals a High Diversity at a Three-Domain Level and a Particular Signature for This Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Marconi, Susana; De la Iglesia, Rodrigo; Díez, Beatriz; Fonseca, Cássio A; Hajdu, Eduardo; Trefault, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Sponge-associated microbial communities include members from the three domains of life. In the case of bacteria, they are diverse, host specific and different from the surrounding seawater. However, little is known about the diversity and specificity of Eukarya and Archaea living in association with marine sponges. This knowledge gap is even greater regarding sponges from regions other than temperate and tropical environments. In Antarctica, marine sponges are abundant and important members of the benthos, structuring the Antarctic marine ecosystem. In this study, we used high throughput ribosomal gene sequencing to investigate the three-domain diversity and community composition from eight different Antarctic sponges. Taxonomic identification reveals that they belong to families Acarnidae, Chalinidae, Hymedesmiidae, Hymeniacidonidae, Leucettidae, Microcionidae, and Myxillidae. Our study indicates that there are different diversity and similarity patterns between bacterial/archaeal and eukaryote microbial symbionts from these Antarctic marine sponges, indicating inherent differences in how organisms from different domains establish symbiotic relationships. In general, when considering diversity indices and number of phyla detected, sponge-associated communities are more diverse than the planktonic communities. We conclude that three-domain microbial communities from Antarctic sponges are different from surrounding planktonic communities, expanding previous observations for Bacteria and including the Antarctic environment. Furthermore, we reveal differences in the composition of the sponge associated bacterial assemblages between Antarctic and tropical-temperate environments and the presence of a highly complex microbial eukaryote community, suggesting a particular signature for Antarctic sponges, different to that reported from other ecosystems.

  18. Actinomycetes from the South China Sea sponges: isolation, diversity and potential for aromatic polyketides discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges often harbor dense and diverse microbial communities including actinobacteria. To date no comprehensive investigation has been performed on the culturable diversity of the actinomycetes associated with South China Sea sponges. Structurally novel aromatic polyketides were recently discovered from marine sponge-derived Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora strains, suggesting that sponge-associated actinomycetes can serve as a new source of aromatic polyketides. In this study, a total of 77 actinomycete strains were isolated from 15 South China Sea sponge species. Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 12 families and 20 genera, among which three rare genera (Marihabitans, Polymorphospora and Streptomonospora were isolated from marine sponges for the first time. Subsequently, β-ketoacyl synthase (KSα gene was used as marker for evaluating the potential of the actinomycete strains to produce aromatic polyketides. As a result, KSα gene was detected in 35 isolates related to 7 genera (Kocuria, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinispora and Streptomyces. Finally, ten strains were selected for small-scale fermentation, and one angucycline compound was detected from the culture extract of Streptomyces anulatus strain S71. This study advanced our knowledge of the sponge-associated actinomycetes regarding their diversity and potential in producing aromatic polyketides.

  19. Actinomycetes from the South China Sea sponges: isolation, diversity, and potential for aromatic polyketides discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; He, Liming; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges often harbor dense and diverse microbial communities including actinobacteria. To date no comprehensive investigation has been performed on the culturable diversity of the actinomycetes associated with South China Sea sponges. Structurally novel aromatic polyketides were recently discovered from marine sponge-derived Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora strains, suggesting that sponge-associated actinomycetes can serve as a new source of aromatic polyketides. In this study, a total of 77 actinomycete strains were isolated from 15 South China Sea sponge species. Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 12 families and 20 genera, among which three rare genera (Marihabitans, Polymorphospora, and Streptomonospora) were isolated from marine sponges for the first time. Subsequently, β-ketoacyl synthase (KSα) gene was used as marker for evaluating the potential of the actinomycete strains to produce aromatic polyketides. As a result, KSα gene was detected in 35 isolates related to seven genera (Kocuria, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinispora, and Streptomyces). Finally, 10 strains were selected for small-scale fermentation, and one angucycline compound was detected from the culture extract of Streptomyces anulatus strain S71. This study advanced our knowledge of the sponge-associated actinomycetes regarding their diversity and potential in producing aromatic polyketides.

  20. Actinomycetes from the South China Sea sponges: isolation, diversity, and potential for aromatic polyketides discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; He, Liming; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges often harbor dense and diverse microbial communities including actinobacteria. To date no comprehensive investigation has been performed on the culturable diversity of the actinomycetes associated with South China Sea sponges. Structurally novel aromatic polyketides were recently discovered from marine sponge-derived Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora strains, suggesting that sponge-associated actinomycetes can serve as a new source of aromatic polyketides. In this study, a total of 77 actinomycete strains were isolated from 15 South China Sea sponge species. Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 12 families and 20 genera, among which three rare genera (Marihabitans, Polymorphospora, and Streptomonospora) were isolated from marine sponges for the first time. Subsequently, β-ketoacyl synthase (KSα) gene was used as marker for evaluating the potential of the actinomycete strains to produce aromatic polyketides. As a result, KSα gene was detected in 35 isolates related to seven genera (Kocuria, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinispora, and Streptomyces). Finally, 10 strains were selected for small-scale fermentation, and one angucycline compound was detected from the culture extract of Streptomyces anulatus strain S71. This study advanced our knowledge of the sponge-associated actinomycetes regarding their diversity and potential in producing aromatic polyketides. PMID:26483773