WorldWideScience

Sample records for hate

  1. Hate speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Birgitta Nilsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The manifesto of the Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik is based on the “Eurabia” conspiracy theory. This theory is a key starting point for hate speech amongst many right-wing extremists in Europe, but also has ramifications beyond these environments. In brief, proponents of the Eurabia theory claim that Muslims are occupying Europe and destroying Western culture, with the assistance of the EU and European governments. By contrast, members of Al-Qaeda and other extreme Islamists promote the conspiracy theory “the Crusade” in their hate speech directed against the West. Proponents of the latter theory argue that the West is leading a crusade to eradicate Islam and Muslims, a crusade that is similarly facilitated by their governments. This article presents analyses of texts written by right-wing extremists and Muslim extremists in an effort to shed light on how hate speech promulgates conspiracy theories in order to spread hatred and intolerance.The aim of the article is to contribute to a more thorough understanding of hate speech’s nature by applying rhetorical analysis. Rhetorical analysis is chosen because it offers a means of understanding the persuasive power of speech. It is thus a suitable tool to describe how hate speech works to convince and persuade. The concepts from rhetorical theory used in this article are ethos, logos and pathos. The concept of ethos is used to pinpoint factors that contributed to Osama bin Laden's impact, namely factors that lent credibility to his promotion of the conspiracy theory of the Crusade. In particular, Bin Laden projected common sense, good morals and good will towards his audience. He seemed to have coherent and relevant arguments; he appeared to possess moral credibility; and his use of language demonstrated that he wanted the best for his audience.The concept of pathos is used to define hate speech, since hate speech targets its audience's emotions. In hate speech it is the

  2. Histories of Hating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Shepherd

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This roundtable discussion presents a dialogue between digital culture scholars on the seemingly increased presence of hating and hate speech online. Revolving primarily around the recent #GamerGate campaign of intensely misogynistic discourse aimed at women in video games, the discussion suggests that the current moment for hate online needs to be situated historically. From the perspective of intersecting cultural histories of hate speech, discrimination, and networked communication, we interrogate the ontological specificity of online hating before going on to explore potential responses to the harmful consequences of hateful speech. Finally, a research agenda for furthering the historical understandings of contemporary online hating is suggested in order to address the urgent need for scholarly interventions into the exclusionary cultures of networked media.

  3. Neural correlates of hate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semir Zeki

    Full Text Available In this work, we address an important but unexplored topic, namely the neural correlates of hate. In a block-design fMRI study, we scanned 17 normal human subjects while they viewed the face of a person they hated and also faces of acquaintances for whom they had neutral feelings. A hate score was obtained for the object of hate for each subject and this was used as a covariate in a between-subject random effects analysis. Viewing a hated face resulted in increased activity in the medial frontal gyrus, right putamen, bilaterally in premotor cortex, in the frontal pole and bilaterally in the medial insula. We also found three areas where activation correlated linearly with the declared level of hatred, the right insula, right premotor cortex and the right fronto-medial gyrus. One area of deactivation was found in the right superior frontal gyrus. The study thus shows that there is a unique pattern of activity in the brain in the context of hate. Though distinct from the pattern of activity that correlates with romantic love, this pattern nevertheless shares two areas with the latter, namely the putamen and the insula.

  4. Hateful symbols or hateful people? Predictive features for hate speech detection on Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem, Zeerak; Hovy, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Hate speech in the form of racist and sexist remarks are a common occurrence on social media. For that reason, many social media services address the problem of identifying hate speech, but the definition of hate speech varies markedly and is largely a manual effort. We provide a list of criteria...

  5. Pedagogy of Hate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Mike

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a critical engagement with Peter McLaren's book "Pedagogy of Insurrection: From Resurrection to Revolution". The paper focusses on a number of key themes in the book: the historical Jesus; the dialectic of love and hate; cognition and consciousness; and the relationship between capitalist abstraction and revolutionary…

  6. 2011 Hours against hate

    OpenAIRE

    Cátedra Intercultural. UCO

    2011-01-01

    2011 Hours Against Hate is a campaign to stop bigotry and promote respect across lines of culture, religion, tradition, class, and gender. Launched by Special Representative to Muslim Communities Farah Pandith, and Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism Hannah Rosenthal, the State Department is asking young people around the world to pledge their time to stop hate—to do something for someone who doesn’t look like you, pray like you, or live like you. We are asking the next generati...

  7. Hate as a Political Outcast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Birgitte Schepelern

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, certain types of crime, speech and prejudice are being targeted by European policy makers under the label of “hate.” Building on participant observations at anti-hate crime conferences in Copenhagen and Vilnius, and policy documents and campaign material from a range of national...... dislike. In both cases, hate is seen to jeopardize personal freedom, equality, tolerance, and democracy. This way of mobilizing potentially marginalizes the perpetrators and makes it difficult to discuss the possible ways in which liberal democracy itself is entangled in labeling, producing and sustaining...

  8. Hate crimes and normative regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is primarily devoted to issues related to the normative regulation of hate crimes, with special reference to the regulations of the Republic of Serbia, which are indirectly related to this matter. This kind of crimes are characterized by prejudices that perpetrators have towards injured parties, as members of certain, mostly, minority groups, due to which many hate crimes could be also called crimes of prejudice. In comparative law there are two different basic directions when it comes to regulating hate crimes: separation of hate crimes in a separate category on the one hand, and punishment of perpetrators of criminal acts with the detriment of minority groups through the usual charges of a given criminal justice system, on the other. The author finds that, regardless of the formal response forms, real life suggests that hate crimes can be essentially suppressed only by promoting values such as equality, respect for diversity and tolerance, and by continuous education of public about the danger of hate crimes.

  9. Contextualizing Restorative Justice for Hate Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrielides, Theo

    2012-01-01

    The application of restorative justice (RJ) with hate crime remains an underdeveloped field of research, policy, and practice. This article aims to advance the understanding of these two areas of inquiry: RJ and hate crime. It is known that while most hate incidents involve minor, punishable offenses, their impact can be long lasting and…

  10. Hate and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Antti

    2015-06-01

    According to legal expressivism, neither crime nor punishment consists merely in intentionally imposing some kind of harm on another. Crime and punishment also have an expressive aspect. They are what they are in part because they enact attitudes toward others--in the case of crime, some kind of disrespect, at least, and in the case of punishment, society's condemnation or reprobation. Punishment is justified, at least in part, because (and when) it uniquely expresses fitting condemnation or other retributive attitude. What makes retributive attitudes fitting is that they protect the victim's status as inviolable. Hate or bias crimes dramatize the expressive aspect of crime, as they are often designed to send a message to the victim's group and society at large. Treating the enactment of contempt and denigration toward a historically underprivileged group as an aggravating factor in sentencing may be an appropriate way to counter this message, as it reaffirms and indeed realizes the fundamental equality and inviolability of all members of a democratic community. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Evaluations of Antigay Hate Crimes and Hate Crime Legislation: Independent and Differentially Predicted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Wayne W; Peters, Christopher S

    2017-08-11

    Minimal studies have investigated individuals' evaluations of antigay hate crimes and hate crime legislation simultaneously, with most research focusing on one or the other. In a sample of 246 heterosexual undergraduates, the present study found that evaluations of antigay hate crimes and hate crime legislation were unrelated. Higher social dominance orientation (SDO) and crime control orientation scores were associated with more positive evaluations of antigay hate crimes. Positive evaluations of hate crime legislation were associated with more positive attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. We also found that the relationship between SDO and evaluations were mediated by crime control beliefs (for hate crimes evaluations) and antigay attitudes (for hate crime legislation evaluations). The present findings have possible implications for the manner in which organizations advocate for the extension of hate crime legislation to include sexual orientation.

  12. Regulating Internet Hate: A Flying Pig?

    OpenAIRE

    Alkiviadou, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This paper will assess the regulation of the internet in the ambit of hate speech expressed digitally through the internet. To do so, it will provide a definitional framework of hate speech, an overview of the internet’s role in the ambit of hate speech and consider the challenges in legally regulating online hate speech through a discussion of relevant\\ud case-law as well as the Additional Protocol to the Cybercrime Convention. The jurisprudential analysis will allow for a comparis...

  13. Hating the Neighbors: The Role of Hate Crime in the Perpetuation of Black Residential Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami M. Lynch

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Grounded in group conflict theory and the defended neighborhoods thesis, this nationwide empirical study of cities and their residential segregation levels examines the occurrence of hate crime using data for all U.S. cities with populations over 95,000 and Uniform Crime Reporting data for hate crime, in conjunction with 2000 census data. Hate crime is any illegal act motivated by pre-formed bias against, in this case, a person’s real or perceived race. This research asks: Do hate crime levels predict white/black segregation levels? How does hate crime predict different measures of white/black segregation? I use the dissimilarity index measure of segregation operationalized as a continuous, binary, and ordinal variable, to explore whether hate crime predicts segrega- tion of blacks from whites. In cities with higher rates of hate crime there was higher dissimilarity between whites and blacks, controlling for other factors. The segregation level was more likely to be “high” in a city where hate crime occurred. Blacks are continually multiply disadvantaged and distinctly affected by hate crime and residential segregation. Prior studies of residential segregation have focused almost exclusively on individual choice, residents’ lack of finances, or discriminatory actions that prevent racial minorities from moving, to explore the correlates of segregation. Notably absent from these studies are measures reflecting the level of hate crime occurring in cities. This study demonstrates the importance of considering hate crime and neighborhood conflict when contemplating the causes of residential segregation.

  14. The need for hate crime legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as hate crimes,3 undermine social cohesion4 and have been shown to have ... a bias motive'.8 A 'hate crime' is thus an act which constitutes a ... not report their experience to the police and that ... police officers appear to share such sentiments.28 ... considerable media attention. ..... opening the lodge to gay tourists. During ...

  15. When Love Meets Hate: The Relationship Between State Policies on Gay and Lesbian Rights and Hate Crime Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Brian L.; Levy, Denise L.

    2016-01-01

    Do public policies on gay and lesbian rights affect the incidence of hate crimes based on sexual orientation? We propose that legal inequalities increase hate crimes because they provide discursive opportunities for bias, discrimination, and violence. Legal equality, however, will reduce violence. Using annual panel data from 2000 to 2012, a period of substantial policy change, we analyze how three state policies affect reported hate crimes: same-sex partnerships, employment non-discrimination, and hate crime laws. Hate crime and employment non-discrimination laws that include sexual orientation reduce hate crime incidence. Partnership recognition increases reported hate crimes, though it may not increase actual crime incidence. Because incidence is spatially correlated, policy changes in one state yield spillover benefits in other states. These results provide some of the first quantitative evidence that public policies affect hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Findings confirm the roles of institutional heterosexism and discursive opportunities in producing hate crimes. PMID:27886725

  16. Hateful Help--A Practical Look at the Issue of Hate Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Michael W.

    Many college and university administrators have responded to the recent increase in hateful incidents on campus by putting hate speech codes into place. The establishment of speech codes has sparked a heated debate over the impact that such codes have upon free speech and First Amendment values. Some commentators have suggested that viewing hate…

  17. The Deeper the Love, the Deeper the Hate

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Wang; Xiang, Yanhui; Lei, Mo

    2017-01-01

    Love and hate are basic human affects. Previous research has focused on the classification, functions, and other aspects of these two affects. However, few studies have been conducted on the relationship between love and hate. The present study investigated whether similarity within romantic partners was associated with greater feelings of love in the absence of betrayal, and greater hate induced in the presence of betrayal by using vignettes to induce love and hate in a sample of 59 young ad...

  18. Religion, hate speech, and non-domination

    OpenAIRE

    Bonotti, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper I argue that one way of explaining what is wrong with hate speech is by critically assessing what kind of freedom free speech involves and, relatedly, what kind of freedom hate speech undermines. More specifically, I argue that the main arguments for freedom of speech (e.g. from truth, from autonomy, and from democracy) rely on a “positive” conception of freedom intended as autonomy and self-mastery (Berlin, 2006), and can only partially help us to understand what is wrong with ...

  19. Hate Speech on Small College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Joseph J., Jr.

    A study identified and evaluated the approach of small colleges in dealing with hate speech and/or verbal harassment incidents. A questionnaire was sent to the Dean of Students at 200 randomly-selected small (500-2000 students), private, liberal arts colleges and universities. Responses were received from 132 institutions, for a response rate of…

  20. Fighting Words. The Politics of Hateful Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Laurence R.

    This book explores issues typified by a series of hateful speech events at Kean College (New Jersey) and on other U.S. campuses in the early 1990s, by examining the dichotomies that exist between the First and the Fourteenth Amendments and between civil liberties and civil rights, and by contrasting the values of free speech and academic freedom…

  1. The Deeper the Love, the Deeper the Hate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Xiang, Yanhui; Lei, Mo

    2017-01-01

    Love and hate are basic human affects. Previous research has focused on the classification, functions, and other aspects of these two affects. However, few studies have been conducted on the relationship between love and hate. The present study investigated whether similarity within romantic partners was associated with greater feelings of love in the absence of betrayal, and greater hate induced in the presence of betrayal by using vignettes to induce love and hate in a sample of 59 young adults. The results showed that people who shared similar values and interests with the target persons were more likely to experience stronger love. Additionally, stronger feelings of love were associated with greater hate after the relationship was broken, suggesting a link between romantic love and hate. Our study revealed a complex picture of love and hate. People have different emotional reactions toward different target persons in the context of romantic love and hate. If one loves someone deeply and sometimes hates that person, the feeling of love may still be dominant in the context of betrayal. However, if one does not love that person, hate will be a much stronger feeling than love. PMID:29270137

  2. The Deeper the Love, the Deeper the Hate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Love and hate are basic human affects. Previous research has focused on the classification, functions, and other aspects of these two affects. However, few studies have been conducted on the relationship between love and hate. The present study investigated whether similarity within romantic partners was associated with greater feelings of love in the absence of betrayal, and greater hate induced in the presence of betrayal by using vignettes to induce love and hate in a sample of 59 young adults. The results showed that people who shared similar values and interests with the target persons were more likely to experience stronger love. Additionally, stronger feelings of love were associated with greater hate after the relationship was broken, suggesting a link between romantic love and hate. Our study revealed a complex picture of love and hate. People have different emotional reactions toward different target persons in the context of romantic love and hate. If one loves someone deeply and sometimes hates that person, the feeling of love may still be dominant in the context of betrayal. However, if one does not love that person, hate will be a much stronger feeling than love.

  3. Hate crimes: American and Balkan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirić Jovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the nineties of the last century it was noticed in the U.S.A. that suddenly the number of crimes with violence in the inter-racial and inter-ethnical conflicts rose. Also the phenomenon of ignition of churches, religious and sacral objects, especially in the south of the U.S.A., objects which were used by black people, was recorded. Directly in relation to that - the term „hate crimes“ then arose in science and became outspread very quickly, primarily in criminology. Several events, and above all the murder of a young homosexual in Wyoming influenced for both the violence and the crimes commited towards the homosexuals and all due to the prejudices towards this sexual minority to be included in this term. Today, this term is used not only in the U.S.A. and not only in a criminological sense, but also in a purely legal sense to denote the crimes which were carried out under the influence of hate towards a correspondent racial, ethnical or sexual minority. This term is linked also to the terminology and thus the problems which are related to the „hate speech“. The author of this paper writes about how this term arose in the first place and which problems emerge related to hate crimes and primarily in relation to the issues of expansion of democracy and tolerance, and also education, primarily among the police force and the young population. The author also ascertains that only with the law, no great effects in the battle against this phenomenon can be achieved and that before the criminal-legal intervention some other measures have to be approached, like the creation of an atmosphere of tolerance and the education of the citizens about the phenomenon of hate crimes.

  4. Mechanisms of improving institutional capacities of the state to prevent hate speech and hate crimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokmanović Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Serbia has introduced special circumstances for the determination of sentence for hate crime in the Criminal Code amended in December 2012. If a criminal offence is committed through hate based on race or religion, national or ethnic affiliation, sex, sexual orientation or gender identity of another, the court shall consider any aggravating factors except when it is not stipulated as a feature of the criminal offence. However, the State still neglects to consider mitigating factors. Moreover, it does not pay sufficient attention to eliminating verbal expressions of hatred and discrimination that often precede crimes motivated by hate. The paper discusses the possibility of improving education and coordinated activities of the State, particularly of courts, prosecutors, police and local self-governments, to combat hate speech and hate crimes. The aim of the paper is to present mechanisms of improving institutional capacities to prevent these phenomena that have been implemented within the project “Implementation of Anti-Discrimination Policies in Serbia” financed by the European Union. The paper concludes that central to the success of this process are the education of state actors, and the development of a value system based on equality and acceptance of diversity.

  5. Investigating the brand love-brand hate relationship, and the effects of brand attitude and brand attachment on brand hate

    OpenAIRE

    Silden, Sandra Emilie; Skeie, Malin Elida

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increase in consumer research on consumer-brand relationships, specifically positive relationship between the consumer and brands. This thesis tries to shed light on a topic that has received less attention, though highly related, namely brand hate. Study 1 was conducted in order to investigate an antecedent to brand hate, building on the fact that love for a competing brand can cause brand hate. To our knowledge this topic has not been examined before. However, a line of re...

  6. Challenges in discriminating profanity from hate speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmasi, Shervin; Zampieri, Marcos

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we approach the problem of distinguishing general profanity from hate speech in social media, something which has not been widely considered. Using a new dataset annotated specifically for this task, we employ supervised classification along with a set of features that includes ?-grams, skip-grams and clustering-based word representations. We apply approaches based on single classifiers as well as more advanced ensemble classifiers and stacked generalisation, achieving the best result of ? accuracy for this 3-class classification task. Analysis of the results reveals that discriminating hate speech and profanity is not a simple task, which may require features that capture a deeper understanding of the text not always possible with surface ?-grams. The variability of gold labels in the annotated data, due to differences in the subjective adjudications of the annotators, is also an issue. Other directions for future work are discussed.

  7. When love meets hate: The relationship between state policies on gay and lesbian rights and hate crime incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Brian L; Levy, Denise L

    2017-01-01

    Do public policies on gay and lesbian rights affect the incidence of hate crimes based on sexual orientation? We propose that legal inequalities increase hate crimes because they provide discursive opportunities for bias, discrimination, and violence. Legal equality, however, will reduce violence. Using annual panel data from 2000 to 2012, a period of substantial policy change, we analyze how three state policies affect reported hate crimes: same-sex partnerships, employment non-discrimination, and hate crime laws. Hate crime and employment non-discrimination laws that include sexual orientation reduce hate crime incidence. Partnership recognition increases reported hate crimes, though it may not increase actual crime incidence. Because incidence is spatially correlated, policy changes in one state yield spillover benefits in other states. These results provide some of the first quantitative evidence that public policies affect hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Findings confirm the roles of institutional heterosexism and discursive opportunities in producing hate crimes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Digitized Ethnic Hate Speech: Understanding Effects of Digital Media Hate Speech on Citizen Journalism in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gichuhi Kimotho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethnicity in Kenya permeates all spheres of life. However, it is in politics that ethnicity is most visible. Election time in Kenya often leads to ethnic competition and hatred, often expressed through various media. Ethnic hate speech characterized the 2007 general elections in party rallies and through text messages, emails, posters and leaflets. This resulted in widespread skirmishes that left over 1200 people dead, and many displaced (KNHRC, 2008. In 2013, however, the new battle zone was the war of words on social media platform. More than any other time in Kenyan history, Kenyans poured vitriolic ethnic hate speech through digital media like Facebook, tweeter and blogs. Although scholars have studied the role and effects of the mainstream media like television and radio in proliferating the ethnic hate speech in Kenya (Michael Chege, 2008; Goldstein & Rotich, 2008a; Ismail & Deane, 2008; Jacqueline Klopp & Prisca Kamungi, 2007, little has been done in regard to social media.  This paper investigated the nature of digitized hate speech by: describing the forms of ethnic hate speech on social media in Kenya; the effects of ethnic hate speech on Kenyan’s perception of ethnic entities; ethnic conflict and ethics of citizen journalism. This study adopted a descriptive interpretive design, and utilized Austin’s Speech Act Theory, which explains use of language to achieve desired purposes and direct behaviour (Tarhom & Miracle, 2013. Content published between January and April 2013 from six purposefully identified blogs was analysed. Questionnaires were used to collect data from university students as they form a good sample of Kenyan population, are most active on social media and are drawn from all parts of the country. Qualitative data were analysed using NVIVO 10 software, while responses from the questionnaire were analysed using IBM SPSS version 21. The findings indicated that Facebook and Twitter were the main platforms used to

  9. Hate Studies: Toward Jesuit Leadership on Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, James M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how the academic study of hate can be understood through Catholic social justice teachings with an emphasis on the Jesuit commitment to faith and justice to allow for a critical reflection on the relationship between theory and practice. To make the connections between social justice and the study of hate, the paper begins with…

  10. HATE CRIMES DI INDONESIA DALAM PERSPEKTIF PERBANDINGAN HUKUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widati Wulandari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the deficiency of the Indonesian criminal law with regard to the criminalization of hate crimes. Taking into consideration the fact that Indonesia faces a high incidence of social conflict due to rising intolerance and discrimination targeting minority groups.  The combination of (racial-ethnic-religious discrimination and hatred against minority groups in most cases results in various forms of common crimes which generally is known as hate crimes. Using a comparative law method, by and between Indonesian criminal law and the criminal law of other countries experiencing hate crimes, the author highlights options for eradicating hate crimes. One important finding is the tendency of a number of countries to perceive hatred or prejudice which motivate the perpetrator of hate crimes as aggravating factor and not to as as separate substantive offence.

  11. Digitized Ethnic Hate Speech: Understanding Effects of Digital Media Hate Speech on Citizen Journalism in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimotho, Stephen Gichuhi; Nyaga, Rahab Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Ethnicity in Kenya permeates all spheres of life. However, it is in politics that ethnicity is most visible. Election time in Kenya often leads to ethnic competition and hatred, often expressed through various media. Ethnic hate speech characterized the 2007 general elections in party rallies and through text messages, emails, posters and…

  12. Digitized Ethnic Hate Speech: Understanding Effects of Digital Media Hate Speech on Citizen Journalism in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Gichuhi Kimotho; Rahab Njeri Nyaga

    2016-01-01

    Ethnicity in Kenya permeates all spheres of life. However, it is in politics that ethnicity is most visible. Election time in Kenya often leads to ethnic competition and hatred, often expressed through various media. Ethnic hate speech characterized the 2007 general elections in party rallies and through text messages, emails, posters and leaflets. This resulted in widespread skirmishes that left over 1200 people dead, and many displaced (KNHRC, 2008). In 2013, however, the new battle zone wa...

  13. Loving + hating mathematics challenging the myths of mathematical life

    CERN Document Server

    Hersh, Reuben

    2011-01-01

    Mathematics is often thought of as the coldest expression of pure reason. But few subjects provoke hotter emotions--and inspire more love and hatred--than mathematics. And although math is frequently idealized as floating above the messiness of human life, its story is nothing if not human; often, it is all too human. Loving and Hating Mathematics is about the hidden human, emotional, and social forces that shape mathematics and affect the experiences of students and mathematicians. Written in a lively, accessible style, and filled with gripping stories and anecdotes, Loving and Hating Mathema

  14. Perceptions of Police Legitimacy and Citizen Decisions to Report Hate Crime Incidents in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Wiedlitzka

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the importance of perceptions of police legitimacy in the decision to report hate crime incidents in Australia. It addresses an identified gap in the literature by analysing the 2011-2012 National Security and Preparedness Survey (NSPS results to not only explore differences between hate crime and non-hate crime reporting but also how individual characteristics and perceptions of legitimacy influence decisions about reporting crime to police. Using the NSPS survey data, we created three Generalised Linear Latent and Mixed Models (Gllamm, which explore the influence of individual characteristics and potential barriers on the decision to report crime/hate crime incidents to police. Our results suggest that hate crimes are less likely to be reported to police in comparison to non-hate crime incidents, and that more positive perceptions of police legitimacy and police cooperation are associated with the victim’s decision to report hate crime victimisation.

  15. Peace Education: How We Come to Love and Hate War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2011-01-01

    There is a huge volume of work on war and its causes, most of which treats its political and economic roots. In Loving and Hating War: An Approach to Peace Education, Nel Noddings explores the psychological factors that support war: nationalism, hatred, delight in spectacles, masculinity, religious extremism, and the search for existential…

  16. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-11-04

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the "motive attribution asymmetry," driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group's aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup's aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party's involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party's involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group's involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries' actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale.

  17. Hate Speech Provisions and Provisos: A Response to Marais and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    2017-11-06

    Nov 6, 2017 ... right to freedom of expression and the hate speech limitation in section ... important to take into account that the Act was enacted as a legal means to ...... Films and Publications Act,91 both of which exclude bona fide forms of ..... Likewise, in the context of a bona fide stand-up comedy production, a rude.

  18. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the “motive attribution asymmetry,” driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group’s aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup’s aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party’s involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party’s involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group’s involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries’ actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale. PMID:25331879

  19. Hate Speech Detection: A Solved Problem? The Challenging Case of Long Tail on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ziqi; Luo, Lei

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing propagation of hate speech on social media and the urgent need for effective counter-measures have drawn significant investment from governments, companies, and empirical research. Despite a large number of emerging, scientific studies to address the problem, the performance of existing automated methods at identifying specific types of hate speech - as opposed to identifying non-hate -is still very unsatisfactory, and the reasons behind are poorly understood. ...

  20. The excess in the hate discourse of the haters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Recuero Rebs

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to identify and comprehend the marks of the excess present in the hate discourse of the haters. By using the power of social media’s information diffusion on the internet, the haters appropriate of such spaces to disseminate ideologies related to violence, intending to generate more hate. Among the strategies utilized by this group, there is the excess. However, it is necessary to understand the subject’s social and historical contexts and the meanings of their discourse in these environments. As the corpus, we start off the analysis from the attacks towards the actress Taís Araújo occurred on Facebook. As shown by the results, the excess is perceived on authority demonstrations, on the repetition of ideals and onto the search of values such as visibility, popularity (among participants of the networks and the media, authority and reputation (inside the hater’s group of belonging.elonging.

  1. Don't hate the business, become the business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik; Cox, Geoff; Pold, Søren Bro

    intersections between business and art become a crucial territory for re-invention and the rewriting of symbolic and cultural codes, generating political actions or social hacks that use a deep level of irony, but also unexpected consequences. The tactics demonstrate the permeability of systems — that these can...... this mean that well-meaning critical strategies of artists and activists are self-defeating? How do we develop disruptive business models that do not simply become new models for business that ultimately follow capitalist logic? We maintain there is nothing wrong with doing business as such.......DON’T HATE THE BUSINESS, BECOME THE BUSINESS The panel investigates some of the interconnections between art, activism and business. “Don’t hate the media, become the media”, was one of the slogans of Indymedia. We are applying this critical hands-on perspective to the business framework...

  2. Policing cyber hate, cyber threat and cyber terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers-Jones, C.

    2013-01-01

    In late August 2012 the Government Forum of Incident Response and Cyber security Teams (GFIRST) gathered in Atlanta to discuss cyber threats and how new realities are emerging and how new forms of regulation are needed. At the same time Policing cyber hate, cyber threat and cyber terrorism was published. This comprehensive book brings together a divergent problem and tackles each with a candid exploration. The book has ten chapters and covers aspects such as extortion via the internet, the ps...

  3. Interview with the Creators of Love/Hate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolan, Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available On 25th November 2015, Studies in Arts and Humanities (SAH Journal hosted a public interview with leading Irish film and television producer James Flynn (Octagon Productions and creator/writer of the groundbreaking Irish television drama Love/Hate Stuart Carolan. The interview was conducted by Conor Murphy (Editor-in-Chief, SAH Journal at Filmbase Ireland before a live audience comprising students and faculty from the film schools of Dublin Business School, Filmbase and Pulse College. This lively and thought-provoking interview provided key insights into the artistic and production processes behind the making of a successful TV drama. James Flynn gave a detailed overview of the funding and legislative frameworks in which the modern day film producer operates both in Ireland and overseas. He provided a fascinating timeline of developments in the filmmaking industry in Ireland in parallel with his own career over the last twenty years. Stuart Carolan explained how the rich and varied characters that inhabit Love/Hate come into being and offered an insight into the daily writing rituals that shaped the development of character, plot and pace. He also spoke about the significance of casting in Love/Hate on the development of the story. The casting of John Connors, for example, influenced Stuart to develop a traveller theme to a greater extent than initially intended. Stuart’s passion for social justice and equality was evident throughout the interview. The interview is replete with analysis of the process of developing Love/Hate including the logistics of shooting in multiple locations and the tight deadlines under which they operated. In addition, James and Stuart offered focussed, helpful and encouraging advice for emerging screenwriters and filmmakers.

  4. Deep Learning for Hate Speech Detection in Tweets

    OpenAIRE

    Badjatiya, Pinkesh; Gupta, Shashank; Gupta, Manish; Varma, Vasudeva

    2017-01-01

    Hate speech detection on Twitter is critical for applications like controversial event extraction, building AI chatterbots, content recommendation, and sentiment analysis. We define this task as being able to classify a tweet as racist, sexist or neither. The complexity of the natural language constructs makes this task very challenging. We perform extensive experiments with multiple deep learning architectures to learn semantic word embeddings to handle this complexity. Our experiments on a ...

  5. Making a home for the homeless in hate crime legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hakim, Mohamad

    2015-06-01

    Several jurisdictions in the United States (e.g., Florida and Washington) have recently incorporated the status of "homeless" under the protection of hate crime legislation. This was largely promoted by new data and reports by the National Coalition for the Homeless urging added protection for the homeless. The issue of whether the homeless belong under hate crime provisions raises the following question: What criteria must a group meet to be eligible for its inclusion? What similarities do the homeless have with other protected groups? Finally, what implications does the recognition of economic status have on other economic groups, particularity the top wealthy 1%? In this article, I explore some of the issues raised by including the homeless as a protected group. I survey several rationales offered for the selection of protected characteristics. I argue that the rationales currently offered suffer from descriptive inadequacy by either being under- or over-inclusive. I turn instead to the political conception of "disadvantage" for an identity marker that better explains the link between the various protected groups and identities under hate crime legislation. Moreover, the use of disadvantage allows for the inclusion of the homeless without the need for incorporating other socio-economic identities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Retheorizing Actionable Injuries in Civil Lawsuits Involving Targeted Hate Speech:Hate Speech as Degradation and Humiliation

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Many legal jurisdictions permit victims of targeted hate speech to sue for damages in civil courts. In the US plaintiffs may sue for damages using the tort of intentional infliction of emotional distress. Indeed, back in 1982, Richard Delgado proposed the introduction of a new tort of racial insult to handle such cases. In South Africa, plaintiffs can use the delict of injuria. Although there have been some successful lawsuits, the tort of intentional infliction of emotional distress has been...

  7. FCJ-170 Challenging Hate Speech With Facebook Flarf: The Role of User Practices in Regulating Hate Speech on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Abraham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article makes a case study of ‘flarfing’ (a creative Facebook user practice with roots in found-text poetry in order to contribute to an understanding of the potentials and limitations facing users of online social networking sites who wish to address the issue of online hate speech. The practice of ‘flarfing’ involves users posting ‘blue text’ hyperlinked Facebook page names into status updates and comment threads. Facebook flarf sends a visible, though often non-literal, message to offenders and onlookers about what kinds of speech the responding activist(s find (unacceptable in online discussion, belonging to a category of agonistic online activism that repurposes the tools of internet trolling for activist ends. I argue this practice represents users attempting to ‘take responsibility’ for the culture of online spaces they inhabit, promoting intolerance to hate speech online. Careful consideration of the limits of flarf's efficacy within Facebook’s specific regulatory environment shows the extent to which this practice and similar responses to online hate speech are constrained by the platforms on which they exist.

  8. Empathy, Ways of Knowing, and Interdependence as Mediators of Gender Differences in Attitudes toward Hate Speech and Freedom of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Gloria; Khatchadourian, Desiree

    2003-01-01

    Women are more intolerant of hate speech than men. This study examined relationality measures as mediators of gender differences in the perception of the harm of hate speech and the importance of freedom of speech. Participants were 107 male and 123 female college students. Questionnaires assessed the perceived harm of hate speech, the importance…

  9. A contextual analysis of the hate speech provisions of the equality act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article presents a detailed contextual analysis of the categorical prohibition of hate speech in terms of section 10(1) of the Equality Act. It is argued that this provision is not primarily intended to describe and effectively regulate the extreme expression that falls within the narrow ambit of "hate speech" as defined in section ...

  10. Close Cousins or Distant Relatives? The Relationship between Terrorism and Hate Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloughery, Kathleen; King, Ryan D.; Asal, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has frequently drawn parallels between the study of hate crimes and the study of terrorism. Yet, key differences between the two behaviors may be underappreciated in extant work. Terrorism is often an "upward crime," involving a perpetrator of lower social standing than the targeted group. By contrast, hate crimes are…

  11. Responding to Hate and Bias at School. A Guide for Administrators, Counselors and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Your school has plans and protocols in place to respond to fires, severe weather, medical emergencies, fights and weapons possession. But what about school incidents like those listed above that involve bigotry and hate? Are plans in place to respond to a bias incident or hate crime? Too often these plans are created in the moment during the…

  12. Responding to Hate at School: A Guide for Teachers, Counselors and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jim, Ed.

    This guide offers proven strategies and recommendations for addressing day-to-day problems with respect to hate, bias, and prejudice in the schools. A main focus is on racial issues, but bias against homosexuals and ethnic minority groups is also addressed. A key ingredient for response to and prevention of hateful acts is getting students,…

  13. The Shaping, Enactment and Interpretation of the First Hate-Crime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    2017-10-02

    Oct 2, 2017 ... of Constantine v Imperial Hotels Ltd [1944] KB 693, which was one of the few legal challenges to ..... intention to include hate-speech provisions93 in a future hate-crime law.94 In. 2016 the ..... Books London 2002). Jackson ...

  14. Hate Speech in a Juvenile Male Prison School and in US Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Sabina E.

    2012-01-01

    This article theoretically examines the meaning and function of hate speech in a high-security juvenile male prison school. Specifically, the article draws on data from an ethnographic study of this prison school site in order to map the institutional mechanisms of hate speech. Additionally, the article suggests these mechanisms are not anomalous…

  15. Sexual Orientation in State Hate Crime Laws: Exploring Social Construction and Criminal Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcore, Jace L

    2017-09-15

    Several studies have described and analyzed the development and diffusion of hate crime laws in the United States, but none specifically examined state-level differences in protected categories. Forty-five of the 50 states have a hate crime statute, but only 30 of those include sexual orientation. In this study the social construction framework is applied to the hate crime policy domain in order to determine whether or not variations in the social and political status of gays and lesbians are associated with the inclusion of sexual orientation in state hate crime laws. Content analysis of daily newspapers in six states revealed that a positive social construction is associated with groups seeking hate crime law protections, and that political influence may also be a key factor.

  16. For Whom Does Hate Crime Hurt More? A Comparison of Consequences of Victimization Across Motives and Crime Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellgren, Caroline; Andersson, Mika; Ivert, Anna-Karin

    2017-12-01

    Hate crimes have been found to have more severe consequences than other parallel crimes that were not motivated by the offenders' hostility toward someone because of their real or perceived difference. Many countries today have hate crime laws that make it possible to increase the penalties for such crimes. The main critique against hate crime laws is that they punish thoughts. Instead, proponents of hate crime laws argue that sentence enhancement is justified because hate crimes cause greater harm. This study compares consequences of victimization across groups of victims to test for whom hate crimes hurt more. We analyzed data that were collected through questionnaires distributed to almost 3,000 students at Malmö University, Sweden, during 2013. The survey focused on students' exposure to, and experiences of, hate crime. A series of separate logistic regression analyses were performed, which analyzed the likelihood for reporting consequences following a crime depending on crime type, perceived motive, repeat victimization, gender, and age. Analyzed as one victim group, victims of hate crime more often reported any of the consequences following a crime compared with victims of parallel non-hate-motivated crimes. And, overall victims of threat more often reported consequences compared with victims of sexual harassment and minor assault. However, all hate crime victim groups did not report more consequences than the non-hate crime victim group. The results provide grounds for questioning that hate crimes hurt the individual victim more. It seems that hate crimes do not hurt all more but hate crimes hurt some victims of some crimes more in some ways.

  17. L’odio proibito: la repressione giuridica dello hate speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Gometz

    2017-10-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is two-folded. First, it offers a general overview of the legal repression of various categories of expressive behaviours ascribed to the notion of hate speech. Especially in Europe, such repression often passes through criminalization, long since used by law to suppress thoughts or points of view for some reason considered harmful. The social groups nowadays protected by such repressive measures, however, are different from the past: weak and/or minoritarian groups rather than strong and/or majoritarian ones. The second aim of this work is to identify the reasons for the legal repression of expressions, beliefs or doctrines certainly in many cases morally deplorable, yet protected by other high-ranking legal reasons: the principles of freedom of thought and speech. It will be noted that especially for untargeted hate speech not connected to a clear and present danger of unlawful actions, there is no general agreement about those reasons. Furthermore, they tend to be structured in justifications showing some typical flaws of, respectively, deontological and teleological reasoning: the former tend to be superficial as apodictic, generic and vacuous; the latter tend to evade the argumentative burdens of factual order from which their validity depends.

  18. The hateful patient revisited: Relevance for 21st century medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Ulman, Anne-Marie; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-10-01

    While the practice of medicine has changed over the years, including technological advances, access to medical information, and the narrowing of socio-economic and educational gaps between the clinician and his/her patients, the importance of the doctor-patient relationship has not diminished over time. This can be a very rewarding interaction. However, many physicians experience a great deal of anger, inadequacy and frustration, and much of the actual practice of medicine may become a burden rather than a source of satisfaction. Physicians may encounter a subset of patients who engender strong negative feelings, despair and even downright malice. An understanding of the "hateful patient" can therefore be very informative to the physician. Several categories of such patients may be described, and sensitivity to the phenomenon will lead to improved physician well-being, less self-destructive patient behavior and a lower risk of litigation. Several factors may assist the 21st century physician in managing the "hateful patient" in an empathic manner and in making some sense of why the patient has resorted to negative response patterns. Ultimately, a failure to consider these issues will result in poorer medical care and, no less important, reduced satisfaction of both patients and doctors. The intention of this article is to revisit the concept and to place it in the context of contemporary medical practice.

  19. ‘Stop Fake Hate Profiles on Facebook’: Challenges for crowdsourced activism in social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Johan; Neumayer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    This research examines how activists mobilise against fake hate profiles on Facebook. Based on six months of participant observation, this paper demonstrates how Danish Facebook users organised to combat fictitious Muslim profiles that spurred hatred against ethnic minorities. Crowdsourced action...

  20. Seeking solace in West Hollywood: sexual orientation-based hate crimes in Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotzer, Rebecca L

    2010-01-01

    Many thriving "gay communities" across the United States report high levels of sexual orientation-based hate crimes every year, raising questions about the level of safety in these gay communities and neighborhoods. This study examines hate crime data from 2002-2006 in Los Angeles County and the relationship those hate crimes have to West Hollywood, the best known gay community of Los Angeles County. Results suggest that although West Hollywood does consistently report high numbers of hate crimes, this does not reflect a greatly increased risk to any one lesbian, gay, or bisexual person. Results suggest that we need to consider other variables as predictors (such as poverty, business density, and population density) in determining safe versus unsafe space, rather than just the percentage of lesbians, gay, and bisexuals in a population.

  1. South Africa: ANC Youth League President found guilty of hate speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    On 15 March 2010, the Johannesburg Equality Court found African National Congress (ANC) Youth League President Julius Malema guilty of hate speech and harassment for his comments regarding rape survivors.

  2. Race, gender, and sexual orientation in hate crime victimization: identity politics or identity risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Edward

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the impact of hate crimes upon gay and lesbian victims, reviewing 1538 hate crimes committed in Los Angeles County. Differences between sexual orientation and other hate crime categories were considered for offense severity, reportage to law enforcement, and victim impact. The type of offense varied between crimes classified for sexual orientation (n=551) and other bias-motivated crimes (n=987). Assault, sexual assault, sexual harassment, and stalking were predictive of sexual orientation hate crimes. Sexual orientation bias crimes evidenced greater severity of violence to the person and impact upon victim level of functioning. More violent forms of aggression were predictive of gay and lesbian victim's underreportage to law enforcement. For sexual orientation offenses, victim gender and race/ethnicity differences were predictive of the base rates of crime reportage as well. These findings are considered in terms of a group-risk hypothesis, encountered by multiple outgroup persons, that influences help-seeking behavior and ingroup identity.

  3. Current Trends in Organized Hate Groups and Their Impact on the United States Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, George

    1999-01-01

    The hate-motivated murders of Michael James and Jackie Burden in Fayetteville, North Carolina, by three Fort Bragg soldiers resulted in an unprecedented self-examination by direction of the Secretary...

  4. A mock juror investigation of blame attribution in the punishment of hate crime perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Clark, John W; Kehn, Andre; Burks, Alixandra C; Wechsler, Hayley J

    2014-01-01

    We examined blame attribution as a moderator of perceptions of hate crimes against gay, African American, and transgender victims. Participants were 510 Texas jury panel members. Results of vignette-based crime scenarios showed that victim blame displayed significant negative, and perpetrator blame significant positive, effects on sentencing recommendations. Also as hypothesized, victim and perpetrator blame moderated the effect of support for hate crime legislation. Interaction patterns suggested that both types of blame attribution influence sentencing recommendations, but only for participants disagreeing with hate crime legislation. Three-way interactions with victim type also emerged, indicating that the effects of both types of blame attribution show particular influences when the victim is gay, as opposed to transgender or African American. Implications for attribution theory, hate crime policy, and jury selection are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What is so special about online (as compared to offline) hate speech?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature on whether or not online hate speech, or cyberhate, might be special compared to offline hate speech. This article aims to both critique and augment that literature by emphasising a distinctive feature of the Internet and of cyberhate that, unlike other features, such as ease of access, size of audience, and anonymity, is often overlooked: namely, instantaneousness. This article also asks whether there is anything special about online (as compared to offl...

  6. Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) persons protected against discrimination and hate crime in Georgia?

    OpenAIRE

    Japaridze, Sophio

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses whether lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people are protected against discrimination and hate crime in Georgia. Georgia is dominated by deeply rooted traditions, history and religion which promote stigmatisation and enhance existing negative stereotypes of the LGBT community. This is aggravated by state practice and poor legislation which fail to ensure adequate protection of LGBT individuals against discrimination and hate crime. Even though homosexuality ...

  7. A qualitative analysis of hate speech reported to the Romanian National Council for Combating Discrimination (2003‑2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Iordache

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the specificities of Romanian hate speech over a period of twelve years through a qualitative analysis of 384 Decisions of the National Council for Combating Discrimination. The study employs a coding methodology which allows one to separate decisions according to the group that was the victim of hate speech. The article finds that stereotypes employed are similar to those encountered in the international literature. The main target of hate speech is the Roma, who are ...

  8. Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Johnson, Renee M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate whether past-30 day illicit drug use among sexual minority youth was more common in neighborhoods with a greater prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT, or sexual minority) individuals. We used a population-based survey of public school youth in Boston, Massachusetts, consisting of 1292 9th-12th grade students from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (sexual minority n=108). Data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults and battery between 2005 and 2008 were obtained from the Boston Police Department and linked to youths' residential address. Youth reported past-30 day use of marijuana and other illicit drugs. Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests and corresponding p-values were computed to assess differences in substance use by neighborhood-level LGBT assault hate crime rate among sexual minority youth (n=103). The LGBT assault hate crime rate in the neighborhoods of sexual minority youth who reported current marijuana use was 23.7 per 100,000, compared to 12.9 per 100,000 for sexual minority youth who reported no marijuana use (p=0.04). No associations between LGBT assault hate crimes and marijuana use among heterosexual youth (p>0.05) or between sexual minority marijuana use and overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes (p>0.05) were detected, providing evidence for result specificity. We found a significantly greater prevalence of marijuana use among sexual minority youth in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of LGBT assault hate crimes. These results suggest that neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in marijuana use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The good, the bad, and the voter: the impact of hate speech prosecution of a politician on the electoral support for his party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spanje, J.; de Vreese, C.

    2015-01-01

    Hate speech prosecution of politicians is a common phenomenon in established democracies. Examples of politicians tried for hate speech include Nick Griffin in Britain and Jean-Marie Le Pen in France. Does hate speech prosecution of politicians affect the electoral support for their party? This is

  10. No hate speech movement: Evolving genres and discourses in the European online campaign to fight discrimination and racism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zollo, S.A.; Loos, E.

    2017-01-01

    In March 2013, the Council of Europe (COE) launched the No Hate Speech Movement, a media youth campaign against hate speech in cyberspace. In this paper, we analyze a corpus collected from the COE’s website. The corpus includes web site pages designed by the COE’s campaigners, as well as materials

  11. No Hate Speech Movement : evolving genres and discourses in the European online campaign to fight discrimination and racism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zollo, S.A.; Loos, E.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078758475

    2017-01-01

    In March 2013, the Council of Europe (COE) launched the No Hate Speech Movement, a media youth campaign against hate speech in cyberspace. In this paper, we analyze a corpus collected from the COE’s website. The corpus includes web site pages designed by the COE’s campaigners, as well as materials

  12. Audience Perception of Hate Speech and Foul Language in the Social Media in Nigeria: Implications for Morality and Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terfa T. Alakali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the phenomenon of hate speech and foul language on social media platforms in Nigeria, and assessed their moral and legal consequences in the society and to journalism practice. It used both quantitative and qualitative methodology to investigate the phenomenon. In the first place, the paper employed the survey research methodology to sample 384 respondents using questionnaire and focus group discussion as instruments for data collection. Findings from the research indicate that promoting hate speech and foul language on social media have moral and legal consequences in the society and to journalism practice. Findings also show that although, the respondents understand that hate speech and foul language attract legal consequences, they do not know what obligations are created by law against perpetrators of hate speech and foul language in Nigeria. The paper therefore, adopted the qualitative, doctrinal and analytical methodology to discuss the legal consequences and obligations created against perpetrators of hate speech and foul language in Nigeria. The paper concluded based on the findings that hate speech and foul language is prevalent on social media platforms in Nigeria and that there are adequate legal provisions to curb the phenomenon in Nigeria. It recommends among others things that the Nigerian government and NGOs should sponsor monitoring projects like the UMATI in Kenya to better understand the use of hate speech and that monitoring agencies set up under the legal regime should adopt mechanisms to identify and remove hate speech content on social media platforms in Nigeria.

  13. Symbolic hate: intention to intimidate, political ideology, and group association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Richard L; Richter, Erin

    2008-12-01

    In Virginia v. Black (123 S.Ct. 1536, 2003), the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment did not bar statutes that prohibit cross burnings in which defendants acted with intention to intimidate others. Using a variety of symbols including cross burnings, swastikas, confederate flags, and skin fists, the current research tested how mock jurors used alternative actor intentions to judge culpability in symbolic hate speech cases. Only partially validating the Court's assumptions, participants rated guilt certainty highest when they believed the speakers conveyed direct threats, sometimes regardless of whether defendants intended to intimidate others. Further, results showed the level of perceived intimidation only partially mediated the relationship between type of fact pattern and guilt certainty ratings. While alternative intentions did produce different levels of intention to intimidate, path analysis showed that the participants' ratings of the defendant's intention to convey a direct threat influenced guilt certainty ratings in all cases. Perceived intimidation levels predicted culpability in only some of the cases and not for cross burning on private property.

  14. Authoritarianism, conservatism, racial diversity threat, and the state distribution of hate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Stewart J H

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of K. Stenner's (2005) authoritarian dynamic theory, the author hypothesized that there is an interaction between U.S. state conservatism-liberalism and state racial heterogeneity threat, such that greater diversity threat tends to be associated with more hate groups in more conservative states and fewer hate groups in more liberal states. State aggregates of the conservative-liberal ideological preferences of 141,798 participants from 122 CBS News/New York Times national telephone polls conducted between 1976 and 1988 (R. S. Erikson, G. C. Wright, & J. P. McIver, 1993) served as proxies for authoritarian-nonauthoritarian dispositions. For the 47 states with complete data, the hypothesized interaction was tested for 2000, 2005, and 2006 with hierarchical multiple regression strategies and supported. The author's hypothesis was also affirmed with SES and the interaction of SES and diversity threat controlled for. In contrast, SES entirely accounted for simple relationships between threat and hate group frequency.

  15. Hate crimes hurt some more than others: implications for the just sentencing of offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iganski, Paul; Lagou, Spiridoula

    2015-06-01

    An accumulation of research evidence indicates that hate crimes are more serious than similar but otherwise motivated crimes in respect of the greater post-victimization distress for victims. Such evidence has been used by advocates of hate crime laws to justify greater penalties for hate crime offenders. However, in focusing on the commonalities of the post-victimization impacts inflicted by hate crimes, the research evidence to date has obscured the diversity of reactions between victims. Consequently, this article expands the evidence by illuminating the variation in reported victim impacts. The analysis presented uses data from the Crime Survey for England and Wales on racially motivated crime and reveals that not all victims report being affected by hate crime, not all victims are affected the same way, and some victims of racially motivated crime report less of an emotional impact than some victims of equivalent but otherwise motivated crimes. It is reasoned that in any individual case of hate crime the motivating sentiments of the offender provide an unreliable indicator of the harms inflicted on the victim. Therefore, a blanket uplift in penalty in every case which rests on the offender's motivations cannot be justified if the justification for sentence uplift is to give offenders their just deserts for the harms they inflict. Instead, the justification must rest on the culpability of the offender for the harms they may or may not actually inflict. Just as there is variation in victim impacts, there will be variation in offender culpability: Discretion and flexibility in sentencing is therefore necessary to ensure justice for offenders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Us and them: identifying cyber hate on Twitter across multiple protected characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Burnap, Peter; Williams, Matthew Leighton

    2016-01-01

    Hateful and antagonistic content published and propagated via the World Wide Web\\ud has the potential to cause harm and suffering on an individual basis, and lead to\\ud social tension and disorder beyond cyber space. Despite new legislation aimed at\\ud prosecuting those who misuse new forms of communication to post threatening,\\ud harassing, or grossly offensive language - or cyber hate - and the fact large social\\ud media companies have committed to protecting their users from harm, it goes ...

  17. Love, Hate, and Crystal Meth: Abjection and Teacher Narcissism in Breaking Bad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowich, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author looks at a particular episode of the television show, Breaking Bad, as a means to explore the pedagogical implications of the Kristevan notion of abjection, and its relation to the emotions of love and hate, and the emergence of teacher narcissism as an inevitable offshoot of the antagonisms in learning. This particular…

  18. DAKWAH MOVEMENT FOR MUSLIM MINORITY IN KUPANG, EAST NUSA TENGGARA AND ITS ANTICIPATION FROM HATE SPEECH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenal Abidin Eko Putro

    2018-11-01

    Full Text Available Islamic proselytizing or dakwah in Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara has been still persisted today. It targets solely for Muslim. Islamic proselytizing for non-Muslim is impossible because of the minority of Muslim in total number in this city. Technically, religious teaching doesn’t use loud speaker except for azan calling and iqamat. Dakwah activist in Kupang usually tries to hinder the possibility of hate speech that possibly sounded by Muslim clerics. In addition, there is a local mechanism run by mosque management for not tolerate of hate speech by issuing a set of guidance for preaching. That issued guidance and then sending it several days before helps preacher for hindrance of hate speech. This research done with qualitative method wants to elaborate and to know to what extent the Islamic preaching dealing with hate speech phenomenon di Kupang city where Muslim is set as minority in number. Some data gathering methods are used including in-depth interview, observation and literature study.

  19. Hate crimes recording: Recommendations of the international bodies and their significance to Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokmanović Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data recording and keeping the official unique database on hate crimes contributes to increasing visibility of this type of crimes, as well as to formulating effective policies of preventing discrimination, racism and non-tolerance. At the end of 2012, the Republic of Serbia introduced the aggravating circumstance in sentencing crimes motivated by hatred on the basis of race, religion belief, national or ethnical belonging, sex, sexual orientation or gender identity. The Action Plan of the Implementation of the Strategy of Prevention and Protection against Discrimination (2014 foresees introducing the unique database on hate crimes by the end of 2016. The subject of the paper is the analysis of the importance of establishing this type of database from the perspective of acknowledging victims’ rights. The relevant activities and the recommendations of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA and the OSCE to the member states, with respect to efficient recording data on hate crimes, have been also introduced. The aim of the paper is to contribute developing of the methodology of data recording of hate crimes in the Republic of Serbia in line with the given recommendations of the FRA and the OSCE. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179044: Razvoj metodologije evidentiranja kriminaliteta kao osnova efikasnih mera za njegovo suzbijanje i prevenciju

  20. Moral Imagination in Education: A Deweyan Proposal for Teachers Responding to Hate Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneback, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This article is about moments when teachers experience hate speech in education and need to act. Based on John Dewey's work on moral philosophy and examples from teaching practice, I would like to contribute to the discussion about moral education by emphasizing the following: (1) the importance of experience, (2) the problem with prescribed…

  1. Anti-Roma Hate Speech in the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belavusau, U.; Goodwin, M.; De Hert, P.

    2013-01-01

    The chapter examines the protection against anti-Romani hate speech provided by the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland, in particular the legal avenues of redress available to victims. This research combines an analysis of the legal framework with its functioning in practice, and situates both in a

  2. Teaching about and against Hate in a Challenging Environment in Hungary: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildikó Barna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, in cooperation with the Action and Protection Foundation, Kristóf Bodó, a practicing lawyer, and I had the opportunity to teach a course titled The Background and Social Consequences of Hate Crimes at the University of Public Service for students in the Faculty of Law Enforcement, Public Administration, and Military Sciences. The opportunity was exceptional indeed, since teaching about hate crimes in Hungary is rarely present, especially not in an institutional environment. However, this would be generally important, especially in university programmes where students are likely to encounter minority group members, human rights issues, and possible hate crimes in their future profession. All the students of the course belong to this group. The main aim of this article is to present this pilot course. To achieve this goal, I describe the pedagogical context first, then the social context and the prejudices present in Hungarian society. The aim of the first section is to place the course described within the context of human rights education using the concept and a typology of affective education. In talking about the latter, the trends of prejudice against the most vulnerable minorities are presented, and hate crimes and incidents committed in Hungary are also described. After introducing the context, the article presents the whole process from planning the curriculum to the realization of the course with all its experiences and challenges. After evaluating the experience some future prospects are presented.

  3. Dangers on the Web--Pornography, Hate, the Internet, and the Character Development of America's Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoj, John

    1998-01-01

    Cautions that with growing access to new technologies, the expansion of Internet pornography and hate sites is fast becoming a danger for students, teachers, parents, and communities. Discusses technological possibilities for regulating Internet use available at school and at home. Relates Internet regulation with the goals of character education.…

  4. South Africa: ANC Youth League President issues apology following conviction for hate speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shalini

    2011-10-01

    In June 2011, fifteen months after he had been found guilty of hate speech and discrimination, African National Congress (ANC)Youth President Julius issued a formal apology and agreed to pay a R50,000 (CAN$7,120) fine that was part of the conviction.

  5. Automatic detection of hate speech in text: an overview of the topic and dataset annotation with hierarchical classes

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Cristina Teixeira Fortuna

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays people are using more and more social networks to communicate their opinions, share information and experiences. In social networks people have the feeling of being deindividualized and can incur more frequently in aggressive communication. In this context, it is important that government and social networks platforms have tools to detect hate speech because it is harmful to its targets. In our work we investigate the problem of detecting hate speech online. Our first goal is to make...

  6. Gendered Hate Speech and Political Discourse in Recent U.S. Elections and in Postsocialist Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Vasvári, Louise O.

    2013-01-01

    In her article "Gendered Hate Speech and Political Discourse in Recent U.S. Elections and in Postsocialist Hungary" Louise O. Vasvári illustrates gendered political discourse in the U.S. through a case study of the 2008 presidential campaign. While the campaign turned into a plebiscite on gender and sexual politics with Hillary Clinton and other female political figures depicted in the most traditionally misogynist terms, Barack Obama has in some leftist circles been seen as an empathetic fig...

  7. European regulation of cross-border hate speech in cyberspace: The limits of legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the complexities of regulating hate speech on the Internet through legal frameworks. It demonstrates the limitations of unilateral national content legislation and the difficulties inherent in multilateral efforts to regulate the Internet. The paper highlights how the US's commitment to free speech has undermined European efforts to construct a truly international regulatory system. It is argued that a broad coalition of citizens, industry and government, employing technol...

  8. From Hate to Bias: Reflections on Subjectivity and its Proof in Anti- Discrimination Criminal Dispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Augusto Escobar Beltran

    2016-07-01

    hate, which implies evidencing the attacker’s hostility towards the group the victim belongs to. This will allow criminal law to have better chances at tackling the true causes of discrimination, which take place beyond individual attitudes. This model will also allow the context in which the hierarchical and symbolic uses of violence occur, to be used as a distinctive sign of a prejudiced crime within the safeguards of criminal law.

  9. Hate Crime Victims in Serbia: A Case Study of Context and Social Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jokanovic

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the Republic of Serbia’s legal framework that incorporates strong guarantees for protection from discrimination, national minorities’ rights, and prosecution of (ethnic hate crimes, but also describes a social context loaded with strong prejudices. To illustrate the above, I present a case study of two similar incidents of alleged hate crimes reported in a local Serbian newspaper. In both cases, the victims were young men belonging to ethnic minorities. In 2015, within a period of two months, a Serb was attacked in the Croatian capital, Zagreb, and an Albanian-speaking man in the Serbian town, Novi Sad. The articles attracted online comments, 205 and 134 respectively, mostly from readers from Serbia. These comments elicited what are likely to be honest responses because of the relative anonymity provided to authors. By analyzing commentaries on these newspaper items, this article compares social responses to hate crime cases where victims belonged to different ethnic groups and where the incidents occurred in different geographic and social contexts.

  10. The Normalizing of Hate Speech and How Communication Educators Should Respond. Wicked Problems Forum: Freedom of Speech at Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltman, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    Whereas hate is defined as extreme negative feelings for others because of some aspect of their identity (Perry, 2001; Waltman & Haas, 2011), hate speech is discourse devoted to the vilification of the other's identity (Waltman, 2015; Waltman & Mattheis, 2017). It is an attempt to vandalize the other's identity to such an extent that the…

  11. A qualitative analysis of hate speech reported to the Romanian National Council for Combating Discrimination (2003‑2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Iordache

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the specificities of Romanian hate speech over a period of twelve years through a qualitative analysis of 384 Decisions of the National Council for Combating Discrimination. The study employs a coding methodology which allows one to separate decisions according to the group that was the victim of hate speech. The article finds that stereotypes employed are similar to those encountered in the international literature. The main target of hate speech is the Roma, who are seen as „dirty“, „uncivilized“ and a threat to Romania’s image abroad. Other stereotypes encountered were that of the „disloyal“ Hungarian and of the sexually promiscuous woman. Moreover, women are seen as unfit for management positions. The article also discusses stereotypes about homosexuals, who are seen as „sick“ and about non-orthodox religions, portrayed as „sectarian“.

  12. Hate speech v české právní teorii a mediální praxi

    OpenAIRE

    Moravová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the topic of "hate speech" in relation to the freedom of expression. In the first part, I went into the legislation on freedom of expression and hate speech in our legal system. I devoted a considerable part to international treaties concerning this issue that, according to the Constitution, are a part of our laws and base of the national legislation to a great extent. There are two different approaches to the freedom of expression - the American and European o...

  13. To heal the mind's eye of hate--Dr. Ludwik Zamenhof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2007-05-01

    Ludwik Zamenhof (1859-1917), born in Poland, invented and propagated Esperanto - an artificial, easy-to-learn language. Literally meaning "language of hope," Esperanto was constructed to avoid misunderstandings, establish communication and facilitate harmony among different nationalities. Simply, he wanted people to accept one another despite observed differences. He was a skilled ophthalmologist, but figuratively, he wished to heal the eyes of humankind to look without hate, just as the biblical Tobias removed the cataract from the corners of his father's eyes to restore his sight.

  14. Know Your Rights on Campus: A Guide on Racial Profiling, and Hate Crime for International Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Civil Rights Project, Cambridge, MA.

    This guide to the rights of international students explains racial profiling and hate crimes. Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, many immigrants and international students have experienced heightened scrutiny and outright discrimination. Racial profiling refers to the reliance by law enforcement officers on a person's ethnicity,…

  15. LIBERDADE DE EXPRESSÃO E DISCURSO DO ÓDIO NO BRASIL / FREE SPEECH AND HATE SPEECH IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevita Maria Pessoa de Aquino Franca Luna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to analyze the restriction of free speech when it comes close to hate speech. In this perspective, the aim of this study is to answer the question: what is the understanding adopted by the Brazilian Supreme Court in cases involving the conflict between free speech and hate speech? The methodology combines a bibliographic review on the theoretical assumptions of the research (concept of free speech and hate speech, and understanding of the rights of defense of traditionally discriminated minorities and empirical research (documental and jurisprudential analysis of judged cases of American Court, German Court and Brazilian Court. Firstly, free speech is discussed, defining its meaning, content and purpose. Then, the hate speech is pointed as an inhibitor element of free speech for offending members of traditionally discriminated minorities, who are outnumbered or in a situation of cultural, socioeconomic or political subordination. Subsequently, are discussed some aspects of American (negative freedom and German models (positive freedom, to demonstrate that different cultures adopt different legal solutions. At the end, it is concluded that there is an approximation of the Brazilian understanding with the German doctrine, from the analysis of landmark cases as the publisher Siegfried Ellwanger (2003 and the Samba School Unidos do Viradouro (2008. The Brazilian comprehension, a multicultural country made up of different ethnicities, leads to a new process of defending minorities who, despite of involving the collision of fundamental rights (dignity, equality and freedom, is still restrained by incompatible barriers of a contemporary pluralistic democracy.

  16. Hate Won, but Love Will Have the Final Word: Critical Pedagogy, Liberation Theology, and the Moral Imperative of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirylo, James D

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the recent presidential election in the United States, this article examines the place of critical pedagogy and liberation theology and its positionality in impacting the moral imperative of resisting a climate of hate and intolerance. Particularly drawing from the work of Peter McLaren, Gustavo Gutiérrez, Paulo Freire and…

  17. The Shadow of Hate: A History of Intolerance in America. Student Text ("Us and Them") and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jim; Roberson, Houston

    "The Shadow of Hate" resource kit provides a videotape program (40 minutes), 20 copies of a 128-page student text ("Us and Them"), and a 32-page teacher's guide. This document consists of single copies of the two printed components of this kit. The resource traces the history of racial, religious, and social intolerance in the…

  18. A CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS OF THE HATE SPEECH PROVISIONS OF THE EQUALITY ACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marais

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a detailed contextual analysis of the categorical prohibition of hate speech in terms of section 10(1 of the Equality Act. It is argued that this provision is not primarily intended to describe and effectively regulate the extreme expression that falls within the narrow ambit of "hate speech" as defined in section 16(2(c of the Constitution. Rather, it is concerned with the promotion of equality in the broad societal context. It acknowledges the hurt and harm that discriminatory expression may entail and it condemns the reinforcement of systemic discrimination by means of expression. Therefore, the principal interpretive frame of reference for the analysis of section 10(1 of the Equality Act is the explicit constitutional obligation in terms of sections 9(3 and (4 of the Constitution to enact legislation to prevent and prohibit unfair discrimination, and not section 16(2(c of the Constitution. The fact that section 10(1 categorically prohibits hate speech, instead of premising its prohibition on the unfairness analysis generally applicable to discrimination in other contexts, however, implies that only expression with no reasonable prospect of meeting the constitutional fairness standard ought to be covered by section 10. Put differently, the prohibited expression may in no way promote rather than jeopardise the achievement of equality. The interpretation takes into account that section 10(1 applies only to engagement in expression that, in terms of an objective reasonableness assessment, is clearly primarily aimed at hurting or harming others, or at inciting others to hurt or harm, or at promoting hatred based on group identity. Furthermore, bona fide expression in accordance with the essential characteristics of the freedoms of expression mentioned in section 16(1 of the Constitution is explicitly excluded from its ambit. An analysis of the expression covered by section 10(1 leads to a conclusion that it prohibits only low

  19. Dansk Rapport: Work Stream 3: Fokus gruppe interviews:Militante fra den anden side Side: Demokratiske kræfter mod hate-speech i Danmark

    OpenAIRE

    Siim, Birte; Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang; Meret, Susi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this national report is to analyze the role of social movements/organizations/initiatives in the struggle against racism, discrimination, hate-speech and behavior in Denmark. The first part includes a brief summary of the Danish political landscape for the democratic anti-bodies. This is followed by a mapping of voluntary movements/groups/organizations comparing the diverse policies and strategies towards racism, discrimination and hate-speech and behavior as well as the kind o...

  20. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Hate Crimes and Suicidality Among a Population-Based Sample of Sexual-Minority Adolescents in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether past-year suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents was more common in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Methods. Participants’ data came from a racially/ethnically diverse population-based sample of 9th- through 12th-grade public school students in Boston, Massachusetts (n = 1292). Of these, 108 (8.36%) reported a minority sexual orientation. We obtained data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults with battery between 2005 and 2008 from the Boston Police Department and linked the data to the adolescent’s residential address. Results. Sexual-minority youths residing in neighborhoods with higher rates of LGBT assault hate crimes were significantly more likely to report suicidal ideation (P = .013) and suicide attempts (P = .006), than were those residing in neighborhoods with lower LGBT assault hate crime rates. We observed no relationships between overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes and suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents (P > .05), providing evidence for specificity of the results to LGBT assault hate crimes. Conclusions. Neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual-orientation disparities in adolescent suicidality, highlighting potential targets for community-level suicide-prevention programs. PMID:24328619

  1. Hate Speech or Genocidal Discourse? An Examination of Anti-Roma Sentiment in Contemporary Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Townsend

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Roma in contemporary Europe are the frequent targets of hate speech and discriminatory state policies. Despite being the largest minority in the European Union with a population of 10-12 million, they are frequently denied a space in European society, and are widely perceived to be unchangeable and inherently ‘other’. As a result, Roma experience substantially inferior life conditions when compared to majority European populations. Despite the many recent European Union initiatives and action plans, such as the Decade of Roma Inclusion (2005-2015, the situation of Roma in contemporary Europe is not improving, and in some cases is actually worsening. This persecution is not a modern phenomenon; Roma have suffered stigmatisation and exclusion throughout their history in Europe. The severity and continuity of the persecution of Roma at the hands of a multitude of European authorities suggests the presence of an underlying motivation or intent that informs both the rhetoric about and treatment of Romani people. This paper will examine if the persecution of Roma in contemporary Europe is guided by a genocidal discourse. To this end, the boundaries between hate speech, genocidal discourse, and incitement to genocide will be scrutinised. It will be argued that both the way the Roma are spoken about and the treatment they receive are informed by a genocidal discourse that has endured relatively unchanged throughout their history in Europe. Roma are not just racially vilified, rather their culture as well as their physical presence in contemporary Europe are widely devalued in both words and in state action. Any improvement in their situation is therefore unlikely while this discourse continues.

  2. The limit between freedom of expression and hate speech: an analysis of the European Court of Human Rights judgements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García Santos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current situation in Europe and the Western world is to some extent a reflection of the latent conflict between the rise of hate speech and freedom of expression. Phenomena such as globalization and the increase of immigration to Europe have generated a wave of rejection and anxiety towards a changing reality, mainly due to aggravating factors such as the refugee crisis and terrorism. This trend highlights the debate about the limits of freedom of expression on the continent, a right that represents one of the most fundamental pillars of European democracies. In this way, this article analyses the state of the debate within the regional institutions, through a series of judgments from the European Court of Human Rights, to illustrate the current tug of war between freedom of expression and the limitation of hate speech.

  3. Self-Censorship Regulatory Structure: Can We Control Political of Hates, Violence & Sex in Children Computer & Video Games?

    OpenAIRE

    Zanuddin, Hasmah

    2008-01-01

    This article examines some of the extreme negative content available to teenagers and young children in the market. Extreme negative values such as political of hates, violence and sex in some of the children computer and video games were made possible due to several factors such as lacking in regulatory structure, week policy implementation, rampant of illegal and uncensored materials. Computer and video games have been the subject of frequent controversy and censorship, due to the depiction...

  4. The Trolls Disappear in the Light: Swedish Experiences of Mediated Sexualised Hate Speech in the Aftermath of Behring Breivik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Edstrom

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Feminist journalists have come to expect special resistance, and even threats, from men’s groups as part of their work as journalists. However, the biggest threats might not originate in men’s groups’ activities. A big threat currently comes from Internet trolls’ responses to individuals who engage in hate-provoked and hate-provoking attacks on women as women. This is exemplified in the case of Anders Behring Breivik, who blew up government buildings in Oslo in 2011 and murdered youth from the Labour Party at Utøya as part of his explicitly articulated xenophobic and misogynist campaign against the Islamification of Norway. His ideas are still being shared in social media responses to this tragedy across Nordic countries. This paper argues that this demonstrates that the harms to women and to society go well beyond the individual victims of an identifiable incident. Largely because of their role in condemning and rejecting the hateful ideas advanced across social media forums, troll responses to the Breivik tragedy constitute a particular threat to female and especially feminist journalists.

  5. El Odio Se Cura: Un Programa Nacional para la Prevencion de los Crimenes de Odio para las Escuelas Intermedias (Healing the Hate: A National Crime Prevention Curriculum for Middle Schools).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Karen A.; Brilliant, Kelly J.

    Designed for use in middle schools and youth organizations, this curriculum, in Spanish, deals with the extent of hate crime in the United States and presents strategies for reducing hate crimes among our youth. This flexible nine-unit curriculum is based on the principles that violence and prejudice are learned and therefore preventable, and that…

  6. FROM CONVENIENT HIBERNATION TO CIRCUMSTANTIAL DESPERATION: HATE SPEECH, PARTY POLITICAL COMMUNICATION AND THE NIGERIA’S 2015 GENERAL ELECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Omilusi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Until a few months to the 2015 general elections, many political parties that have conveniently hibernated for a better part of their existence, perhaps owing to lack of proper organizational structure or support base, uncoordinated programmes or were registered because of pecuniary gains or admittance of anticipated poor electoral outing, suddenly began to jostle for political space. The main opposition party and the ruling party were either perfecting a merger processes or engulfed in internal wrangling such that communication with the electorate on fundamental issues became inconsequential. In fact, the two dominant parties, the Peoples Democratic Party and All Progressive Congress only produced their presidential candidates less than five months to the election; and the electoral campaign assumed desperate contestation in a climate of prejudice and intolerance. Hate speeches and violence were the hallmarks of their electoral campaigns. The 2015 general elections therefore, offer a unique context to interrogate the place of party political communication in an emerging democracy and specifically how hate campaigns among political gladiators/contending parties could generate violence, and if not tamed, derail democratic consolidation. This essay affirms that hate speech is not only inspired by some social circumstances but also part of a general democratic process. It attests to the fact that Nigerian politicians have become more desperate and daring in taking and retaining political power; and more intolerant of opposition, criticism and efforts at replacing them. Relying extensively on secondary sources with the aid of descriptive and narrative tools, this essay concludes that the political culture of a country determines the behavior and attitude of the population towards the political system and that democratic transition from one administration to another, particularly in emerging democracies, has often been accompanied by violence

  7. 2011 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Reserve Component Members: Qualitative Analysis on Extremist Groups, Hate Crimes, and Gangs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-15

    White  “There are young teenagers that are in the gangs. Some of these teens do crimes such as theft or trespassing.” —ANG, male, senior...have been forced to eat my meals by myself because of my race and sexual orientation.” — USMCR, male, junior enlisted, Asian  “In [LOCATION] there...senior enlisted, Two or More Races Some comments highlighted hate crimes based on sexual orientation as well as race/ethnicity.  “We have people

  8. Mental Health of Transgender Veterans in US States With and Without Discrimination and Hate Crime Legal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R; Marsiglio, Mary C; Gao, Shasha; Gordon, Adam J; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael; Brown, George R; Fine, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    To examine whether indicators of community- and state-level lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender equality are associated with transgender veterans' mental health. We extracted Veterans Administration data for patients who were diagnosed with gender identity disorder, had at least 1 visit in 2013, and lived in a zip code with a Municipality Equality Index score (n = 1640). We examined the associations of whether a state included transgender status in employment nondiscrimination laws and in hate crimes laws with mood disorders; alcohol, illicit drug, and tobacco use disorders; posttraumatic stress disorder; and suicidal ideation or attempt. Nearly half (47.3%) of the sample lived in states with employment discrimination protection, and 44.8% lived in states with hate crimes protection. Employment nondiscrimination protection was associated with 26% decreased odds of mood disorders (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59, 0.93) and 43% decreased odds of self-directed violence (AOR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.34, 0.95). Understanding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender social stressors can inform treatment and care coordination for transgender populations.

  9. Immigrants in Brazil - Speeches of Hate and Xenophobia in the Information Society: How to Assign Function Social a Internet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elany Almeida de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social relations in the context of the information society have ridges where some users of the World Wide Web disregard complexities and specifics of interpersonal relationships, making the Internet an end in itself or a means to practice rights violations, consisting of one real paradox between the sovereignty of x sovereignty of the subject object. The reality of human mobility is in the Information Society also a challenge, transcend imaginary boundaries and tear down pre-conceptual walls in order to instigate a reflection on the social function of the internet as well as the possibility of a networked society that expands rights and not mitigate. The discussion proposed here draws attention to the wide spread of hate speech published on the internet against immigrants in Brazil and the limits of freedom of expression. Keeping in view the phenomena arising from the information society, especially in that concern the disclosure rights violators content in its scope, it is necessary that the internet is also tool promoter of fundamental rights. In order to meet this goal, research was used the monographic method, by means of bibliographic and documentary research, making use of representative emblematic cases of the building structure of hate speech toward immigrants and the factors that influenced him, to the end find that although there is legal provision (Article 20 of Law 7.716 / 89 to punish that to practice, induce or incite discrimination or prejudice based on race, color, ethnicity, religion or national origin, further aggravating the penalty if the crime is committed through media such as the Internet, the criminal type in reference has not been sufficient to inhibit the hate speech on the World Wide Web, which shows that in the information society still hangs a feeling that its scope is Law rise to. The Brazilian legal system is still walking at a slow pace on the network speed and has struggled in its possession to the limits of free

  10. Faith in public debate: an inquiry into the relationship between freedom of expression and hate speech pertaining to religion and race in France, the Netherlands and European and international law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.H.

    2014-01-01

    ‘Faith in public debate’ forms an inquiry into the relationship between freedom of expression and hate speech pertaining to religion and race in France, the Netherlands and European and international law.

  11. 'The Accidental Birth of Hate Crime in Transnational Criminal Law: 'Discrepancies' in the Prosecution for "Incitement to Genocide" during the Nuremberg Process involving the cases of Julius Streicher, Hans Fritzsche and Carl Schmitt.'

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Kim; Salter, Michael; Eastwood, Maggi

    2013-01-01

    This volume of three interrelated studies aims to explore the various contingencies through which individuals responsible, to various degrees, for promoting expressions of racist hate were subjected to markedly different types of legal responses within the landmark Nuremberg trials programme. These contingencies, together with loose judicial reasoning, complicate scholarly efforts to identify the historical emergence of this type of transnational hate crime, and to illustrate the complication...

  12. Issues and challenges in the application of Husserlian phenomenology to the lived experience of hate crime and its legal aftermath: an enlightenment prejudice against prejudice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Michael; McGuire, Kim

    2015-06-01

    The field of hate crime research addresses the presence, sources, and impact of particular types of expressions of prejudice, often perceived as particularly damaging and hurtful forms of interpersonal abuse and violence. There is the reflexive question of the possibilities of researchers themselves ever being able to adopt a truly "unprejudiced" approach to the presence of such damaging prejudices. Can this goal be realized without a researcher necessarily losing an experientially grounded understanding of what these meanings, values and purposes have come to mean, and how they are themselves interpretively reconstituted anew, including within the lived experience of victims, witnesses, police, prosecutors, judges, and victim support workers? A possible philosophically informed approach to the dilemmas posed by this topic is offered by Husserl's phenomenology. This study critically explores the possibilities, reflective stages, and theoretical limitations of a sympathetically reconstructed Husserlian approach to hate crime. It argues that despite its manifest tensions, gaps, ambiguities, and internal contradictions, aspects of the Husserlian philosophical approach directed toward the different levels of experienced hate crime still retain the potential to both challenge and advance our understanding of this topic. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. 8 things we hate about IT how to move beyond the frustrations to form a new partnership with IT

    CERN Document Server

    Cramm, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Why can't you get what you really want from IT? All you desire is a ready-and-willing partner to help you exploit IT to drive your business. Instead, you get endless rules and regulations, not to mention processes, projects, and technologies that deliver too little, too late, for too much. It's frustrating! How to build a relationship that puts you firmly in control and produces the business results you need? In The 8 Things We Hate About IT, Susan Cramm provides the answers. Start by understanding differences between operational and IT managers - in backgrounds, personality, pressures, and incentives. Cramm explains how differences prevent operational managers and IT from communicating what, why, and how they do what they do. Citing case studies and stories, the author then presents practical strategies for overcoming the difficulty. These include seeing things from your IT partners' perspective, developing a single version of 'truth,' and assuming accountability for IT just as you've done for management of ...

  14. Racism, Ideology and Hate: An Attempt of Understanding Contemporary Racism in EU Anti-Rasist Policies, through a Thesis on Racism without Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Jalušič

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the question of today’s role of racism and racist discrimination, and attempts to discuss the relationship between ideology and act (deed in cases of individual and collective violent deeds. The main question is whether racism represents above all an ideology, and if so, what kind of ideology this is and to which end it serves. Is racism in the first place an ideology of hatred that changes ideas and words into deeds, into violence, i.e. is racism above all an ideological blueprint for violence that emerges from hatred? On the basis of the thesis on neoracisms as cultural racisms, the article first drafts the contemporary understanding of racism as racism without the race. The second part is dedicated to the analysis of racist ideological features that emerged in the preparation of collective violence in cases of former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and to the question how those experiences could help understand today’s role of racism(s. The main observation is that violence did not emerge from the ideological/racist constructions of (elusive enemies, but that racist constructions represented complex constructs of inequality that served as buffers against (political responsibility. In the contemporary global world, such constructs above all justify racist institutions and deeds. In the conclusion, the EU anti-racist policy, which focuses on racist ideology like hate speech and hate crime and leaves the inconvenient questions of systematic structural racism of EU laws and institutions aside, is questioned.

  15. Adult and child use of love, like, don't like and hate during family mealtimes. Subjective category assessments as food preference talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Food preference is now a ubiquitous concept in eating research, and closely associated with actual consumption, particularly in relation to children's food preferences. Research in this area is beginning to reveal the effects of parent-child interaction on eating practices though relatively little attention has been paid to the discursive and lexical processes involved. Food preferences are typically associated with the terms 'likes' and 'dislikes' in food preference research. By contrast, adults and children typically use the terms 'love', 'like', 'don't like' and 'hate' to construct and manage food preferences in everyday meal conversations. A corpus of 270 video- and audio-recorded English and Scottish family mealtimes, involving children aged 1-17 years, was searched and analysed for any and all occurrences of subjective category assessments (SCAs; e.g., 'I like X'), featuring the terms 'love', 'like', 'don't like' and 'hate'. Discursive psychology was used to analyse the transcripts and recordings, and illustrated the disparity between adult and child use of SCAs and food preference talk. Within the data set, parents typically made claims about what their children like, and in doing so claimed epistemic primacy over their children's food preferences. Children, by contrast, typically made claims about their own 'don't likes' and likes, and these were frequently countered by their parents or treated as inappropriate claims. Implications for how parents and researchers might reorient to the food preferences lexicon are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. State of the Art. Work Stream 3 - the Danish Report:Militante fra den anden side. Anti-bodies og hate-speech og adfærd i Danmark.

    OpenAIRE

    Siim, Birte; Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang; Meret, Susi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the State Of the Art (SOA) is to gain knowledge about the Danish Context on organisations, groups and movements in civil society countering hate speech, institutional racism and exclusionary practices and to identify gaps in national research on the issue that can be explored through field work, interviews and group discussions/dialogues, possibly to be debated at roundtable convening in the autumn of 2014.The SOA gives an overview of the role of the state, institutions, the po...

  17. Neofascismos e movimentos sociais no Brasil e nos Estados Unidos: aproximações e distanciamentos por meio do hate rock (1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Carvalho Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo debater o conceito histórico de movimentos sociais, tentando entender a inadequação dos movimentos neofascistas no Brasil e nos Estados Unidos, entre 1990 e 2010, ao mesmo. Tal análise, realizada por meio do Hate Rock, gênero musical executado por neofascistas, procura entender também a formação histórica dos neofascismos nos dois países, respeitando suas diferenças e semelhanças, e a adaptação ao presente de discursos que surgiram no início do século XX. Portanto, ao mesmo tempo, vamos buscar uma síntese que mostre rupturas e continuidades com o passado entre os dois casos, bem como a sua participação social e política à luz das definições do que são os movimentos sociais.

  18. "I hate when they do that!"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Jakob Borrits

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing online practices of mourning and memorialization on Facebook, this article identifies underlying norms behind Danish Facebook users’ attitudes towards networked grieving and emotional displays on Facebook. Drawing on the concept “context collapse” and Jakoby’s model for social rules...... of displaying emotions of grief, quantitative and qualitative methods of analysis are combined, through the use of survey techniques and grounded theory. The article helps explain contrasting attitudes to emotional displays on Facebook and significant differences between “netiquettes” of mourning...... and memorialization. The findings counter popular perceptions of Facebook as a desired online mourning platform....

  19. Companies and the customers who hate them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Gail; Moon, Youngme

    2007-06-01

    Why do companies bind customers with contracts, bleed them with fees, and baffle them with fine print? Because bewildered customers, who often make bad purchasing decisions, can be highly profitable. Most firms that profit from customers' confusion are on a slippery slope. Over time, their customer-centric strategies for delivering value have evolved into company-centric strategies for extracting it. Not surprisingly, when a rival comes along with a friendlier alternative, customers defect. Adversarial value-extracting strategies are common in such industries as cell phone service, retail banking, and health clubs. Overly complex product and pricing options, for example, may have been designed to serve various segments. But in fact they take advantage of how difficult it is for customers to predict their needs (such as how many cell phone minutes they'll use each month) and make it hard for them to choose the right product. Similarly, penalties and fees, which may have been instituted to offset the costs of undesirable customer behavior, like bouncing checks, turn out to be very profitable. As a result, companies have no incentive to help customers avoid them. Tactics like these generate bad publicity and fuel customer defections, creating opportunities for competitors. Virgin Mobile USA, for example, has lured millions of angry cell phone customers away from the incumbents by offering a straightforward plan with no hidden fees, no time-of-day restrictions, and no contracts. ING Direct, now the fourth-largest thrift bank in the United States, offers accounts with no fees, no tiered interest rates, and no minimums. In industries where squeezing value from customers is commonplace, companies that dismantle these harmful practices and design a transparent, value-creating offer can head off customer retaliation and spur rapid growth.

  20. Simulated rape, orgy, gory killings & hate speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Sylvia; Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Schwarzenegger v. Entertainment Merchants Association has been identified as one of the most important case on games before the US Supreme Court and the “the single most important challenge gaming has ever face”. To resolve Schwarzenegger, the Justices will need to decide how much First Amendment....... If it follows established precedent dealing with freedom of speech, the sale of gratuitously violent video games to minors will continue with contents for kids getting gorier, bloodier and grittier – all for fun, of course....

  1. Free Speech, Hate Speech, and Hate Beards : Language ideologies of Dutch populism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leezenberg, M.; Silva, D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the discourse and verbal strategies of the Dutch ‘Freedom Party’ (PVV), an islamophobic populist party that emerged in the first decade of the twenty-first century. In particular, it focuses on the linguistic ideologies implicit in PVV discourse, arguing that PVV spokespersons

  2. Hate crimes in the current criminal law of lithuania: hate speech

    OpenAIRE

    Šlekonytė, Julija

    2011-01-01

    Neapykantos nusikaltimai, jų išaiškinimas ir prevencija yra vertintini kaip svarbūs šio laikmečio prioritetai Lietuvos valstybei ir visuomenei, žmogaus teisių srityje veikiančioms institucijoms, mūsų šalies tarptautiniam įvaizdžiui. Todėl šio tyrimo objektas yra neapykantos kalbos nusikaltimų reglamentavimas Lietuvos baudžiamojoje teisėje. Tyrimas buvo atliktas naudojantis loginės analizės, teleologiniu, sisteminiu, istoriniu, lingvistiniu (gramatiniu) ir kitais metodais. Analizuojama aktuali...

  3. The Ethnic Hate Speech was Networked: What Social Media Online Political Discussions Reveal about the 2013 General Elections in Kenya / El discurso étnico del odio se difundió por las redes. Análisis de las discusiones políticas en las redes sociales dur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Mwende Maweu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This chapter examines if the increased political discussions on social media especially Twitter and Face Book before and after the March 4th, 2013 general elections in Kenya translated to a more robust Alternative Public Sphere that broke the hegemony of the traditional media as Agenda setters or an alternative space for the audience to vent out their frustrations and grievances about the election. In the last most contentious elections in 2007, in Kenya, both new and old media were blamed for fueling ethnic hate speech which culminated into the 2007/ 2008 post election violence. It is argued in this chapter that although voting patterns in the March 2013 elections were clearly along ethnic lines just like in 2007, there was no physical post election violence like was the case in 2008. What was clearly evident was Ethnic hate speech before and after the general elections on social media networks. We therefore observe that unlike in 2008 where ethnic violence was fought in the streets, in the 2013 general elections, the ‘Ethnic War was Networked’. The chapter analyses the content of some of the messages send on Twitter and Face Book to argue that social media platforms only acted as alternative spaces for Kenyans to fight out their ethnic political wars and not alternative public spheres for constructive political deliberation. The chapter concludes by observing that social media networks in the 2013 general elections in Kenya acted as ‘Opiums of the Masses’ only serving the function of keeping Kenya ‘quiet and peaceful’ to prevent a repeat of the 2008 post election violence, but not alternative public spheres to facilitate constructive political deliberation. En este artículo se analiza si el aumento de las discusiones políticas sobre las redes sociales, especialmente Twitter y Facebook, antes y después de las elecciones generales en Kenia del 04 de marzo de 2013, se tradujeron en una esfera pública alternativa sólida que

  4. Energy and environment: the relationship love-hate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toharias Cortes, M.

    1995-01-01

    From the beginning of mankind, the obtaining and use of energy was always made against the natural environment. But only after the Industrial Revolution the human civilization has endangered some ecosystems because an immeasurable, but also harmful in regard to natural resources, economic, sanitary and cultural development. The solutions pass through preserving what we have yet obtained, including its generalisation to the poor people of the world, but above all it needs the harmonization between this kind of development and the conservation of natural resources if we want a sustainable situation. In this way, the environmental management of the economic resources must replace gradually the mere economist management that we are using until all over the world. (Author)

  5. Loving and Hating Mathematics: Challenging the Myths of Mathematical Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Reuben; John-Steiner, Vera

    2010-01-01

    Mathematics is often thought of as the coldest expression of pure reason. But few subjects provoke hotter emotions--and inspire more love and hatred--than mathematics. And although math is frequently idealized as floating above the messiness of human life, its story is nothing if not human; often, it is all too human. "Loving and Hating…

  6. Chemistry and Star Formation: A Love-Hate Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Zhang, Qizhou; Patel, Nimesh; Lu, Xing; Wang, Ke; Testi, Leonardo; Caselli, Paola; Martin-Pintado, Jesus

    2014-06-01

    The development of the broad bandwidth receivers at the Submillimeter Array (SMA) a decade ago opened up the possibility to observe tens of molecular lines at high angular resolution simultaneously. The unprecedented wealth of molecular line data provided by the SMA allowed for the first time detailed studies of the chemistry in star-forming regions. These studies have revealed that chemistry is a useful tool to pin down the internal physical structure and the physical processes involved in the process of low-mass and high-mass star formation. In this talk, I will review the most important advances in our understanding of the star-formation process through chemistry thanks to the SMA, and I will present the challenges that will be faced in the next decade in this field of research thanks to the advent of new instrumentation such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array and the Square Kilometer Array.

  7. The Zimbabwe student movement: Love-hate relationship with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imposed by ESAP resulted in financial problems and poverty for students. Confrontation .... In November. 1953, Dr William Rollo, formerly Professor of Classics at the University of Cape Town, ... signified a moral outrage and moral pressures affecting society. Authorities ..... disrupted normal business on campus. Indeed, in ...

  8. "Hate Speech" and Discriminatory Practices towards Other People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperovich, Valeriya

    2016-01-01

    The images of "enemies" and "friends" remain in the focus of attention due to escalating discriminatory practices towards communication partners from different groups that one tends to ascribe negative features based on various stereotypes, social attitudes and representations. In this paper, the problem of metaphorical and…

  9. Don’t hate the business, become the business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    , as well as contribute to setting precedence for corporate strategy and consumer/commons responses to strategy. This paper explores three types of activism affected by this tension between activists in the commons and the slowly changing power structures of corporations: 1. Artists creating online......This paper explores the world of digital artist activists, consumer activists and emerging business models as they challenge the past and present and work to (re)create the future of the intersection of the Internet, corporations, and the commons. A key issue at the intersection of technology, art...... activism to a new level, in which cyber e-mail protests by consumers actually changed corporate strategy and in the case of the Clipper Chip and Lotus Marketplace (Gurak 1997), caused corporations to discontinue product development plans. In 2000, the most expensive art production and protest ever recorded...

  10. Beyond Hate: Countering Violent Extremism from the White Power Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    perceived unfair treatment.144 The “second floor” is often indicative of dictatorships when an individual acts independently of the population, referred to...renewed his Klan involvement from childhood .504 Spence also explained the Klan is a family tradition, which makes it normal, perhaps even expected, with

  11. The rise and fall of a Facebook hate group

    OpenAIRE

    Oboler, Andre

    2008-01-01

    One Facebook group has repeatedly caught the media’s attention. The group is called "Israel" is not a country!... ... Delist it from Facebook as a country! Despite the opinions of experts who highlighted the racist nature of the group, Facebook refused to take action. After unsuccessfully lobbying Facebook for intervention, a organization known as the Jewish Internet Defense Force took control of the Facebook group in late July 2008 and began to manually dismantle it from the inside. The rise...

  12. Science and Philosophy: A Love-Hate Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    de Haro, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I review the problematic relationship between science and philosophy; in particular, I will address the question of whether science needs philosophy, and I will offer some positive (if incomplete) perspectives that should be helpful in developing a synergetic relationship between the two. I will review three lines of reasoning often employed in arguing that philosophy is useless for science: a) philosophy's death diagnosis ('philosophy is dead') and what follows from it; b) the ...

  13. The Zimbabwe student movement: Love-hate relationship with government?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessing Makunike

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to trace the development of student unionism in Zimbabwe.On the basis of a discussion of the nature of the university, the article argues that becausethe university environment tolerates and promotes academic freedom and liberal values, itprovides an environment conducive to critical thought and oppositional politics, while theuniversity quite often itself becomes the target for student attack. Student representationduring the pre-independence period in Zimbabwe sought to engage the institution in itseffort to re-order society at a time of racial struggle and class conflict. After independence,student representation was in support of government efforts to create a better Zimbabweand to consolidate the gains of independence. However, after the first decade ofindependence, the relationship between students and government soured due to students’opposition to the one-party system as well as the University of Zimbabwe AmendmentBill, among other issues. This article thus documents and analyses the relationship betweenstudents and government with reference to three periods and two key moments: the 1973protests against racial discrimination in the pre-independence phase and the post-1990developments in Zimbabwean national and university politics.

  14. Johann Baptist von Schweitzer: the queer Marx loved to hate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, H

    1995-01-01

    Despite his conviction on a morals charge involving a boy, the early German Social Democrat Johann Baptist von Schweitzer went on to have a successful political career. His life furnishes the context to present remarks by his political opponents Marx and Engels, which reveal their deep-seated homophobia. It is pointed out that this has been glossed over by the translations of the recently published Marx/Engels Collected Works. Some remarks on boy-love and anarchism are appended.

  15. “I hate coke”: an nethnographic analysis about speech anti-brand of the virtual community on orkut “Eu odeio Coca-Cola”: uma análise netnográfica sobre o discurso antimarca da comunidade virtual do orkut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Moutinho Abdalla

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} It is evident broad organizational concerns regarding the management and maintenance of their brands. Retaliatory and repudiation action against product and services brands are shown as imposing barriers to be implemented by organizations. Thus, this study aims to deepen understanding of the subject by analyzing the speech of members of the virtual community antibrand "eu odeio coca-cola (I hate Coke" in Orkut social network, besides seeking the motivations that led these members to express their opinions. As research procedures, drew on an exploratory analysis by conducting a search netnography, which led the researchers to immerse themselves in the community for a period of one year, featuring a longitudinal study. For the analysis of information, was employed discourse analysis, which enabled the categorization of the motivations for community members to express their opinions. As a result, we found six categories of behavior, which were (1 negative experience of consumption, (2 brand association with health/aesthetics problems, (3 presumed use of illicit material in the product, (4 concern with the effects of globalization, and

  16. Hate speech y tolerancia religiosa en el sistema helvético de democracia participativa // Hate speech and religious tolerance in the swiss participatory democracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martín Herrera

    2014-08-01

    On December 21 of 1965, the General Assembly of the United Nations sent out an alarm signal because of the constant manifestations of racial discrimination and because of the governmental policies based on racial superiority or hatred. Result of that assembly was an agreement which condemned all propaganda and all organisations based on the superiority of one race or groups of persons of a specific skin colour or ethnic origin. It declared as illegal all organised propaganda activities, and anyone that would promote the racial discrimination and incite to it. One year later, on December 16 of 1966, the same assembly announced another international agreement by which it prohibited any propaganda for war, any advocacy of national, racial or religious hatred that incites discrimination, hostility or violence. Both were widely accepted and internationally ratified. However, more than four decades later, we still stand between Zenith and Nadir. Also Switzerland was not immune to these manifestations of superiority and hatred. Its famous historical hospitality has been affected in recent years; on one hand, due to Swiss skepticism in accepting international law, and on the other, because of the rise of ultra conservative political parties, which, through their speeches and propaganda, have managed in numerous occasions, to incite against minorities by breaking the international law of human rights and the national law. Minorities, who they consider threatening to the Swiss cultural and historical values .

  17. "Why Do They Hate Us?": Leading amid Criticism, Crisis, and Disrespect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinski, Carol F.

    2012-01-01

    Laura Dannon, an educator with experience as teacher, assistant principal, and principal, enjoys her profession. Faculty camaraderie and student/teacher busyness at her school have led her to think all is well. A sudden outburst by a new teacher causes her to reflect on what is really happening. What has changed? Have media criticism, movements…

  18. Eliminating the "I hate you" in the supplier-purchasing relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M

    1996-05-01

    Throughout time there has always been a supplier of some service or goods, and there has always been a purchaser of that service or goods. The one thing that has remained constant throughout that time is that they have an agreement not to like each other. This article will approach the subject in the "today" sense using current practical approaches that are used in all industries and will not deal with the relationships of the future. To cover this complex arena, the article will deal with four areas: (1) where we are now, (2) supplier-based concentration, (3) single sourcing, and (4) transportation techniques.

  19. "Love Honey, Hate Honey Bees": Reviving Biophilia of Elementary School Students through Environmental Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoori; Lee, Dowon

    2018-01-01

    The concept of emotional affinity and connection with nature using the term of "biophilia" along with its counter-part "biophobia" has been merely researched in the area of environmental education. In this study, it was hypothesized that children's negative emotions (biophobia) such as fear towards insects can be changed into…

  20. Love-hate for man-machine metaphors in Soviet physiology: from Pavlov to "physiological cybernetics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerovitch, Slava

    2002-06-01

    This article reinterprets the debate between orthodox followers of the Pavlovian reflex theory and Soviet "cybernetic physiologists" in the 1950s and 60s as a clash of opposing man-machine metaphors. While both sides accused each other of "mechanistic," reductionist methodology, they did not see anything "mechanistic" about their own central metaphors: the telephone switchboard metaphor for nervous activity (the Pavlovians), and the analogies between the human brain and a computer (the cyberneticians). I argue that the scientific utility of machine analogies was closely intertwined with their philosophical and political meanings and that new interpretations of these metaphors emerged as a result of political conflicts and a realignment of forces within the scientific community and in society at large. I suggest that the constant travel of man-machine analogies, back and forth between physiology and technology has blurred the traditional categories of the "mechanistic" and the "organic" in Soviet neurophysiology, as perhaps in the history of physiology in general.

  1. "Don't Hate Me Because I'm Beautiful": Feminist Resistance to Advertising's Irresistible Meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Lana F.

    1992-01-01

    Cites ways in which advertising generates sexist meanings and creates sexual and racial difference through target marketing. Gives examples of feminist resistance to advertising. Argues that, ultimately, new systems of representation by which women and men can create meanings are needed. (SR)

  2. Why I hate windfarms and think there should be more of them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, Peter.

    1997-01-01

    Event renewable energy sources has adverse environmental impacts. In the case of wind power these are visual and aesthetic. Because of the low energy density of wind power many wind turbines spread over a wide area are required to generate realistic amounts of electricity. To replace the typical output of one conventional power station, for example, 10,000 wind turbines would be required. Moreover they have to be sited in exposed upland areas making them highly visible. However, wind farms have almost no ecological impact, pose no health risks, combine well with traditional land uses such as agriculture, can be decommissioned easily, safety and quickly if necessary, and their components can be re-used and recycled. In the light of all the advantages they offer, the aesthetic price is one we should be prepared to pay. (UK)

  3. Constant Observation of Suicidal Patients: The Intervention We Love to Hate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Constant observation (CO) of psychiatric inpatients at risk for suicidal behavior has been criticized in the literature because of the absence of demonstrable effectiveness, associated costs, staff and patient acceptance, and related issues. Our inability to demonstrate effectiveness, however, is an ethical conundrum that cannot readily be solved. Frequent and often vociferous references in the literature to the absence of an evidence base for this intervention carries the risk that CO may be underutilized in particular clinical circumstances with untoward results. A case is made for shifting focus from the lack of evidence supporting CO to agreement on an observation protocol that achieves the desired goal of maximizing patient safety. A sample protocol is presented.

  4. Do Biology Students Really Hate Math? Empirical Insights into Undergraduate Life Science Majors’ Emotions about Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Lucas P.; Runyon, Christopher R.; Drake, John M.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate life science majors are reputed to have negative emotions toward mathematics, yet little empirical evidence supports this. We sought to compare emotions of majors in the life sciences versus other natural sciences and math. We adapted the Attitudes toward the Subject of Chemistry Inventory to create an Attitudes toward the Subject of Mathematics Inventory (ASMI). We collected data from 359 science and math majors at two research universities and conducted a series of statistical tests that indicated that four AMSI items comprised a reasonable measure of students’ emotional satisfaction with math. We then compared life science and non–life science majors and found that major had a small to moderate relationship with students’ responses. Gender also had a small relationship with students’ responses, while students’ race, ethnicity, and year in school had no observable relationship. Using latent profile analysis, we identified three groups—students who were emotionally satisfied with math, emotionally dissatisfied with math, and neutral. These results and the emotional satisfaction with math scale should be useful for identifying differences in other undergraduate populations, determining the malleability of undergraduates’ emotional satisfaction with math, and testing effects of interventions aimed at improving life science majors’ attitudes toward math. PMID:28798211

  5. Do Biology Students Really Hate Math? Empirical Insights into Undergraduate Life Science Majors' Emotions about Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Lucas P; Runyon, Christopher R; Drake, John M; Dolan, Erin L

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate life science majors are reputed to have negative emotions toward mathematics, yet little empirical evidence supports this. We sought to compare emotions of majors in the life sciences versus other natural sciences and math. We adapted the Attitudes toward the Subject of Chemistry Inventory to create an Attitudes toward the Subject of Mathematics Inventory (ASMI). We collected data from 359 science and math majors at two research universities and conducted a series of statistical tests that indicated that four AMSI items comprised a reasonable measure of students' emotional satisfaction with math. We then compared life science and non-life science majors and found that major had a small to moderate relationship with students' responses. Gender also had a small relationship with students' responses, while students' race, ethnicity, and year in school had no observable relationship. Using latent profile analysis, we identified three groups-students who were emotionally satisfied with math, emotionally dissatisfied with math, and neutral. These results and the emotional satisfaction with math scale should be useful for identifying differences in other undergraduate populations, determining the malleability of undergraduates' emotional satisfaction with math, and testing effects of interventions aimed at improving life science majors' attitudes toward math. © 2017 L.P. Wachsmuth et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Do Older Adults Hate Video Games until they Play them? A Proof-of-Concept Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Chris; Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal; Maguire, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The issue of negative video game influences on youth remains contentious in public debate, the scholarly community and among policy makers. Recent research has indicated that negative attitudes toward video games are, in part, generational in nature with older adults more inclined to endorse negative beliefs about video games. The current mixed design study examined the impact of exposure to games on beliefs about video games in a small (n = 34) sample of older adults. Results indicated that ...

  7. DO WE REALLY HATE OUR JOBS? DETERMINANTS OF JOB SATISFACTION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveanu Tomina Gabriela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction is said to be an important factor of work productivity along with having the proper training, interests and motivation. Frustrations at work may derive from different aspects of the job itself, the work environment as well as personal motivation for work and its results. Human resources management theories focus on job satisfaction and motivations as means for achieving the institution's objectives, and consequently see motivations and satisfaction at an individual level. Our paper investigated these issues at macro level, going beyond the individual variables of job satisfaction to the ones that explain the attitudes towards work at national level. This approach is derived from cultural theories analyzing attitudes towards work as a cultural value that varies across nations. In this manner we analyze data at national level, investigating the factors that influence work satisfaction and attitudes towards work of Romanians. Our aim is to explain the identified differences regarding the individual's attitude towards their professional life. Considering the fact that work occupies a lot of time in people's life and it is considered the second most important aspect of life after family, we questioned the aspects that explain the levels of job satisfaction both in the light of theoretical constructs and as results on the Romanian population. These indexes have a direct impact on the quality of life, reflect the level of development, as well as point to further social aspirations of individual actors. The current analysis reflects on different aspects of the appreciation of work and investigates variations of work satisfaction: Which is the value attributed to work? How important is work and how satisfied are individuals with their jobs? Which are the characteristics that determine variations of job satisfaction? After a theoretical synthesis of different approaches of work related attitudes in the literature, the second section presents the data and the main research findings. For data analysis we used the data obtained in the European Values Survey 2008, research conducted by the Romanian group for the study of social values, supported by the Quality of Life Research Institute. Other data used in this paper derived from a research program developed at University of Oradea - Social Sciences Faculty - HURO 0801/180 ENRI. The research section of this paper follows the theoretical questions: first we focus on the value attributed to work by Romanians and its contribution to self definition, then reflect on the significations of work, and finally explain the levels of work satisfaction. The main findings of our analysis suggest that even though work is seen as very important by Romanians, the main explanatory factor of job satisfaction at a general level is connected to economical status provided by a certain job. In the concluding section we stated several research directions that would provide better insight in this topic.

  8. Drowning in negativism, self-hate, doubt, madness: Linguistic insights into Sylvia Plath's experience of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjén, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how a range of linguistic methods can be harnessed in pursuit of a deeper understanding of the 'lived experience' of psychological disorders. It argues that such methods should be applied more in medical contexts, especially in medical humanities. Key extracts from The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath are examined, as a case study of the experience of depression. Combinations of qualitative and quantitative linguistic methods, and inter- and intra-textual comparisons are used to consider distinctive patterns in the use of metaphor, personal pronouns and (the semantics of) verbs, as well as other relevant aspects of language. Qualitative techniques provide in-depth insights, while quantitative corpus methods make the analyses more robust and ensure the breadth necessary to gain insights into the individual experience. Depression emerges as a highly complex and sometimes potentially contradictory experience for Plath, involving both a sense of apathy and inner turmoil. It involves a sense of a split self, trapped in a state that one cannot overcome, and intense self-focus, a turning in on oneself and a view of the world that is both more negative and more polarized than the norm. It is argued that a linguistic approach is useful beyond this specific case.

  9. World-Hating: Apocalypse and Trauma in We Need to Talk about Kevin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Desilets

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Ramsay’s 2011 film We Need to Talk about Kevin alternates between two narrative times, one occurring before its protagonist Eva’s son commits a terrible crime, and one after. The film invites us to read the crime as a traumatic event in Eva’s life, an event of such terrible force that it transforms Eva’s identity. This essay uses Jacob Taubes’s understanding of Gnosticism to suggest that this event does not transform who Eva is, but rather how she knows. Like a Gnostic believer, Eva comes to understanding the fundamental ontological evil of community life. Eva’s ‘trauma,’ her alienation from the world she occupies, predates Kevin’s crime, but the aftermath of that crime reveals her alienation to her. The worldview thus presented by the film casts some light on how art house films are marketed. Like many middlebrow products, art house films present marketers with the challenge of concealing the fact that the commodity they are selling is indeed a commodity. This ambivalent distrust of the marketplace is a softened repetition of the Gnostic’s anticosmism, and We Need to Talk About Kevin both performs and thematizes a displacement from the world that is primary, not contingent upon any traumatic event.

  10. The shaping, enactment and interpretation of the first hate-crime law ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While Britain has had a long historical record of criminal conduct that was motivated by the race and the ethnicity of victims, it was only in the twentieth century that civil society first drew attention to the problem of violent racist crimes. Nevertheless, successive British governments denied the problem of racist crimes and ...

  11. The Game TV Plays: Or, Why an English Teacher Came to Hate Barnaby Jones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Patrick W.

    The message of current popular television shows in which the hero is, or appears to be, a dumb clod (e.g., Archie Bunker, Fred Sanford, Columbo, and Barnaby Jones), apparently is that corruption may be equated with articulation, wealth, and education, while virtue may be equated with poverty and, often, illiteracy. Unfortunately, the effect of…

  12. The Affects of Not Reading: Hating Characters, Being Bored, Feeling Stupid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Anna; Seaboyer, Judith; Kennedy, Rosanne; Barnett, Tully; Douglas, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This article brings recent debates in literary studies regarding the practice of close reading into conversation with Derek Attridge's idea of "readerly hospitality" (2004) to diagnose the problem of students in undergraduate literary studies programme not completing set reading. We argue that the method of close reading depends on…

  13. Combating “I Hate This Stupid Book!”: Black Males and Critical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Summer; Jocius, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Too often, instruction designed to improve literacy achievement for black male readers and writers focuses on skill-based learning, ignoring cultural, social, and personal development. This article calls for the use of critical literacy strategies with African American male students, which can raise expectations for academic achievement by…

  14. I Hate Chicken Breast: A Tale of Resisting Stories and Disembodied Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    In this performance autoethnography, the author explores the simultaneity of telling and resisting stories of lived experience. In the process, the author constructs the notion of "resisting stories" as autoethnographic narratives that both resist and demand telling in the process of making themselves public. In the process the author engages in a…

  15. Do Older Adults Hate Video Games until they Play them? A Proof-of-Concept Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferguson, Chris; Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal; Maguire, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The issue of negative video game influences on youth remains contentious in public debate, the scholarly community and among policy makers. Recent research has indicated that negative attitudes toward video games are, in part, generational in nature with older adults more inclined to endorse...... negative beliefs about video games. The current mixed design study examined the impact of exposure to games on beliefs about video games in a small (n = 34) sample of older adults. Results indicated that older adults were more concerned about video games as an abstract concept but when exposed...

  16. Book Review: The Country we Want to Live in: Hate Crimes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  17. Hate speech and ethnic discrimination with special focus on social media

    OpenAIRE

    Ananiev, Jovan

    2012-01-01

    Old freedoms (namely, the freedom of religion, of speech, of the press, of petition, and of assembly), are at times incompatible with newer forms of freedom. Freedom of speech conflicts with the “right not to be discriminated against.” The great problem modern society faces is not a lack of freedom, per se. It is a question of how to resolve the conflict of many different incompatible freedoms

  18. How to get students to love (or not hate) MATLAB and programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckinger, Shanon; Reckinger, Scott

    2014-11-01

    An effective programming course geared toward engineering students requires the utilization of modern teaching philosophies. A newly designed course that focuses on programming in MATLAB involves flipping the classroom and integrating various active teaching techniques. Vital aspects of the new course design include: lengthening in-class contact hours, Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) method worksheets (self-guided instruction), student created video content posted on YouTube, clicker questions (used in class to practice reading and debugging code), programming exams that don't require computers, integrating oral exams into the classroom, fostering an environment for formal and informal peer learning, and designing in a broader theme to tie together assignments. However, possibly the most important piece to this programming course puzzle: the instructor needs to be able to find programming mistakes very fast and then lead individuals and groups through the steps to find their mistakes themselves. The effectiveness of the new course design is demonstrated through pre- and post- concept exam results and student evaluation feedback. Students reported that the course was challenging and required a lot of effort, but left largely positive feedback.

  19. ofMin° . ..... ,phoS 'hate Rock IUPR and Fann ard Manure" Effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tive interactions between phosphate rock organic air dried ground and sieved using a 2mm. sieve, .... combinations,A42. factorial comb'ination in a ran- ..... , . " - domized ..... A.L. Page. R.H. Miller and D.R.. ... Building up soil capital in sub-.

  20. Pathologizing dissent: identity politics, Zionism and the 'self-hating Jew'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W M L

    2005-06-01

    This article discusses problems with Kurt Lewin's notion of self-hatred among Jews (Lewin, 1941/1948), and illustrates the ways in which the concept is used in identity politics. It argues that the way the notion of self-hatred is often used makes it problematic as a psychological concept because it requires that we accept particular definitions of group identities and particular political positions as central to those identities. Often, however, such issues are disputed by group members. Examination of the literature illustrates that it is rarely a straightforward decision whether those behaviours or attitudes identified as manifestations of self-hatred are best explained in this way. The function of the self-hatred concept in current debate over Israeli policy is described as an example of how arguments over identity are part of political conflict. In the case of current Middle Eastern politics, the concept of self-hatred is used by rightwing Zionists to label those who criticize policies of the current Israeli government as disloyal and pathological.

  1. Book Review Book Review The Country we Want to Live in: Hate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... the book highlights violence against lesbians as a gender-based violence issue that warrants attention within this campaign. Given the campaign's general heteronormative focus, the emphasis was to highlight why lesbian and gay matters are gendered issues, and is definitely a human rights concern.

  2. Why The Better Angels of Our Nature Must Hate the State

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Hanna

    2017-01-01

    In this brief reply to Anne Margaret Baxley’s comments on my paper, “Exiting the State and Debunking the State of Nature,” I respond to her two critical worries about my thesis that there is an unbridgeable gap between Kant’s political theory, which is classically liberal, and his ethics/theory of enlightenment/moral theology, which is anarchist: (i) that Kant’s strong moral epistemic skepticism in the Groundwork about knowing the true motives of our choices and actions, requires coercive Sta...

  3. Blame Attribution as a Moderator of Perceptions of Sexual Orientation-Based Hate Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J.; Chandler, Joseph F.; Wakeman, Emily E.

    2010-01-01

    Blame attribution is a valuable mechanism explaining decision making. However, present literature mainly employs blame attribution as a dependent variable. The shortcoming of this fact is that blame attribution offers a potentially valuable explanatory mechanism for decision making. The authors designed two studies to investigate blame attribution…

  4. Love and Hate in University Technology Transfer: Examining Faculty and Staff Conflicts and Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clovia; Schumann, David

    2016-01-01

    With respect to university technology transfer, the purpose of this paper is to examine the literature focused on the relationship between university research faculty and technology transfer office staff. We attempt to provide greater understanding of how research faculty's personal values and research universities' organization values may differ…

  5. De vrijheid van meningsuiting en hate speech: een rechtsvergelijking met de VS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Eva

    2016-01-01

    De vrijheid van meningsuiting is een groot goed in een democratische samenleving maar kan onder bepaalde voorwaarden ingeperkt worden. Haatuitingen genieten bijvoorbeeld in veel westerse democratieën geen (volledige) bescherming. De VS vormt een uitzondering in dit opzicht

  6. The Banality of Exhibitionism and the Building a Culture of Hate in Digital Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos AntonioMadeira De Mattos Martins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The digital society brought the man full of technology and connectivity functions, creating agility to exchange information. With the ability to share your privacy in the social network, the selfie culture began to be used as a form of trivialization of exhibitionism.Virtual conflicts was created a community of users that discriminate people by color, race, ethnicity, religion and expression of thoughts, crerating a culture of hatred, intolerance. The moral values of the digital society are weakened by sharing habit of language that shows the trend of disregard for the principle of human dignity.

  7. Language of globalized media as a hate generator on the Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostadinović Maja R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Language of hatred in its basic war inciting sense has almost disappeared from media. However, its mutants still may come out into public though intolerance or political settlements. There is no community insensitive to some kinds of hatred. Neither developed democratic nor, even less communities in new Balkan states. Members of minority groups are specially under impact - from ethnic via religious to those specially vulnerable community groups such as handicapped, with specific diseases and juveniles and alike. This paper is about that tolerance and hatred which still exists in media on Balkan. The writer points to the relationship of journalists to those minority groups and offers some of possible ways for improving the relationship between them.

  8. “I don’t hate living here, but…”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Mette; Sørensen, Niels Ulrik

    experiences which capture neither the lives of rural young people nor the spatial dimensions of the structures and cultures that make up contemporary youth.” (Farrugia 2013:295). By this, youth sociology tends to focus on young lives in urban areas, while there has been little attention pointed towards how...

  9. The Affects of not Reading: Hating Characters, Being Bored, Feeling Stupid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poletti, A.L.; Seaboyer, Judith; Kennedy, Rosanne; Barnett, Tully; Douglas, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This article brings recent debates in literary studies regarding the practice of close reading into conversation with Derek Attridge’s idea of ‘readerly hospitality’ (2004) to diagnose the problem of students in undergraduate literary studies programme not completing set reading. We argue that the

  10. Mommy Hates Daddy: A Child-Parent Psychotherapy Story of Engagement, Domestic Violence, and Intergenerational Ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Markita; Lieberman, Alicia F.

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of violence for young children and their caregivers are multidimensional. The story of 2-year-old Tyronne, his mother, Josephine, and his father, James, illustrates the use of a relationship-focused treatment, child-parent psychotherapy (CPP), in addressing the traumatic consequences of exposure to violence. This family's story…

  11. Why do you hate me so much? An exploration of religious freedom from the perspective of African religion(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibusiso T. Masondo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the 1996 constitution and the promotion of freedom of religion gave space to previously discriminated religious traditions to flourish. There have been a number of revivals of aspects of African Traditional Religion. The Bill of Rights guarantees Religious Freedom but tends to limit it to Freedom of belief. People have every right to believe and practice as long as their practice is in line with the law. This paper is a reflection on the difficulties posed by the notion of Religious Freedom as contained in the 1996 South African constitution for practitioners of African Indigenous Religions and other minority religions. In a case that captured the imagination of the legal fraternity, Gareth Prince, a practicing Rastafarian, was prevented from joining the Bar of the Western Cape because of a prior conviction of being caught in possession of dagga, an illegal substance. He argued that he used cannabis as part of his religious observance. Justice Ngcobo, in his judgement dismissing the case, made it very clear that ‘the right to freedom of religion is not absolute’. In other words, religious practices need to fall within the provisions of the law of the land. At the core of our argument is that the intellectual and cultural resources that were mobilised in writing the South African constitution failed to reflect on the religious practices of indigenous people and other minority religions.

  12. Homophobia and hate speech in Serbian public discourse : how nationalist myths and stereotypes influence prejudices against the LGBT minority

    OpenAIRE

    Stakic, Isidora

    2011-01-01

    Human rights abuses targeted towards LGBT persons constitute a global pattern of serious concern. Despite the fact that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity is prohibited by various international, regional and national legal provisions, prejudices and stereotypes related to LGBT people significantly impede the implementation of non-discrimination laws. This study focuses on contemporary Serbia, and attempts to understand the role of public discourse in incitin...

  13. The Geopolitics of Peace Education. Learning to Hate the War, to Love Peace, and to Do Something About it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Galtung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present four central theories, four policy tasks and four education topics that build a Peace education. We start from the thesis that every education should be prepared for practice, but guided from the general theory. From a Peace education, we aim to mediate and illustrate in stages and practical exercises to help us understand how important Peace research are in a true comprehensive education.

  14. Black hole how an idea abandoned by Newtonians, hated by Einstein, and gambled on by Hawking became loved

    CERN Document Server

    Bartusiak, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    For more than half a century, physicists and astronomers engaged in heated dispute over the possibility of black holes in the universe. The weirdly alien notion of a space-time abyss from which nothing escapes-not even light-seemed to confound all logic. This engrossing book tells the story of the fierce black hole debates and the contributions of Einstein and Hawking and other leading thinkers who completely altered our view of the universe. Renowned science writer Marcia Bartusiak shows how the black hole helped revive Einstein's greatest achievement, the general theory of relativity, after decades during which it had been pushed into the shadows. Not until astronomers discovered such surprising new phenomena as neutron stars and black holes did the once-sedate universe transform into an Einsteinian cosmos, filled with sources of titanic energy that can be understood only in the light of relativity. This book celebrates the hundredth anniversary of general relativity, uncovers how the black hole really got ...

  15. Do Biology Students Really Hate Math? Empirical Insights into Undergraduate Life Science Majors' Emotions about Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Lucas P.; Runyon, Christopher R.; Drake, John M.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate life science majors are reputed to have negative emotions toward mathematics, yet little empirical evidence supports this. We sought to compare emotions of majors in the life sciences versus other natural sciences and math. We adapted the Attitudes toward the Subject of Chemistry Inventory to create an Attitudes toward the Subject of…

  16. A Slightly Longer History of E=mc 2, Or How I Came to Hate 4/3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, Tony [Princeton University

    2012-05-02

    According to popular mythology, the equivalence of mass and energy was suddenly conceived of and proven by Einstein in 1905. In fact, serious attempts to connect mass and energy went back at least to J.J. Thomson in 1881 and over the next two decades became the subject of numerous investigations by Maxwellians such as Heaviside, Abraham and Poincaré. The talk focuses on a 1904 thought experiment of Fritz Hasenöhrl, who first announced that blackbody radiation had an equivalent mass such that E = (3/8)mc2, which he subsequently corrected to E = (3/4)mc2. Why did Hasenöhrl get the wrong answer and Einstein get the right one? What does it mean to prove a law of nature? Stephen Boughn and myself have recently carried out an complete relativistic analysis of Hasenöhrl’s thought experiment and, for the first time in the century since it was proposed, have correctly solved the problem. I will try to keep the mathematics at a reasonable level but it will require familiarity with electrodynamics and special relativity.

  17. Our love-hate relationship with DNA barcodes, the Y2K problem, and the search for next generation barcodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Marcus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA barcodes are very useful for species identification especially when identification by traditional morphological characters is difficult. However, the short mitochondrial and chloroplast barcodes currently in use often fail to distinguish between closely related species, are prone to lateral transfer, and provide inadequate phylogenetic resolution, particularly at deeper nodes. The deficiencies of short barcode identifiers are similar to the deficiencies of the short year identifiers that caused the Y2K problem in computer science. The resolution of the Y2K problem was to increase the size of the year identifiers. The performance of conventional mitochondrial COI barcodes for phylogenetics was compared with the performance of complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA repeats obtained by genome skimming for a set of caddisfly taxa (Insect Order Trichoptera. The analysis focused on Trichoptera Family Hydropsychidae, the net-spinning caddisflies, which demonstrates many of the frustrating limitations of current barcodes. To conduct phylogenetic comparisons, complete mitochondrial genomes (15 kb each and nuclear ribosomal repeats (9 kb each from six caddisfly species were sequenced, assembled, and are reported for the first time. These sequences were analyzed in comparison with eight previously published trichopteran mitochondrial genomes and two triochopteran rRNA repeats, plus outgroup sequences from sister clade Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths. COI trees were not well-resolved, had low bootstrap support, and differed in topology from prior phylogenetic analyses of the Trichoptera. Phylogenetic trees based on mitochondrial genomes or rRNA repeats were well-resolved with high bootstrap support and were largely congruent with each other. Because they are easily sequenced by genome skimming, provide robust phylogenetic resolution at various phylogenetic depths, can better distinguish between closely related species, and (in the case of mitochondrial genomes, are backwards compatible with existing mitochondrial barcodes, it is proposed that mitochondrial genomes and rRNA repeats be used as next generation DNA barcodes.

  18. "Why Do You Make Me Hate Myself?": Re-Teaching Whiteness, Abuse, and Love in Urban Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Cheryl E.

    2016-01-01

    Teacher educators are constantly trying to improve the field to meet the needs of a growing urban populace. Inclusion of socially just philosophies in the curriculum is indeed essential, yet it can mask the recycling of normalized, oppressive Whiteness. This reflective and theoretical paper employs critical race theory and critical Whiteness…

  19. Our love/hate relationship with workplace meetings: How good and bad meeting attendee behaviors impact employee engagement and wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Allen, J.A.; Belyeu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Employees at all organizational levels spend large portions of their work lives in meetings, many of which are not effective. Previous process-analytical research has identified counterproductive communication patterns to help explain why many meetings go wrong. This study aims to

  20. 78 FR 53727 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Wisconsin Advisory Committee for Fact Finding on Hate Crimes in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Gill, Sikh Student Association--UW Madison Elana Kohn-Oren, Director, Jewish Community Relations Council Ibrahim Saeed, Ph.D., Islamic Center of Madison Steve Starkey, Executive Director, OutReach Panel 3 4:55 p.m. to 6:05 p.m. James L. Santelle, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Wisconsin...

  1. Facebook: Hate it or Love it, But Can You Ignore it? A Comparative Study of US and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora, Shivani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Facebook has been a part of our lives for the last decade. For a company started in 2004 to have penetrated the lives of people across the globe is commendable. The perpetuation of Facebook has led to a phenomena called Facebook Addiction Disorder. Companies are using Facebook to promote their business and people are using it to promote themselves, in addition to staying connected. In this paper, an effort is made to study respondents from India and the United States of America in order to gauge their dependence on Facebook, and a comparative view of it is presented.

  2. #whitegenocide, the Alt-right and Conspiracy Theory: How Secrecy and Suspicion Contributed to the Mainstreaming of Hate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Wilson,

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the relationship between “hashtag activism” as it is currently being used by the alt-right and the tendency to draw on conspiracy theory that Richard Hofstadter identified as being prevalent among what he termed “pseudo-conservatives” half a century earlier. Both the alt-right and Hofstadter’s “pseudo-conservatives” can be characterised by a pronounced populist nationalism that understands its aims as protecting a particular way of life whilst drawing on an aggrieved sense of injustice at being conspired against by an unseen enemy. That this “enemy” is typically foreign in actuality or in spirit confirms the cultural dimension on which their politics is played out. It is argued here that this paranoid populist nationalism has been figuratively drawn upon in the rhetoric of Donald Trump and that this apparent openness to the “pseudo-conservative” discourse on nationalism has provided a bridging effect via which far right elements are seeking to normalize extremist viewpoints

  3. Religions and Ethno-Religious Differences in Bosnia and Herzegovina. From Laboratories of Hate to Peaceful Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Alicino

    2016-11-01

    ABSTRACT: It would be wrong to understand the Bosnian war (the main source of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s current problems only in terms of a religious war. Yet, it would also be wrong to adopt the explanation that religion had no role in Bosnia and Herzegovina’s catastrophe. The misfortunes that occurred in the region during the first half of 1990s was in many respects the result of the abuse of the people’s religious identity, relieved through myth and tradition that even today remain important inspirations for the future. In this article the Author analyses the genesis of this situation and, in particular, the radical nationalism of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which since the collapse of socialist Yugoslavia has been strictly related to the processes of politicization of religion. Under this perspective, the main aim of the article is to understand the place and the role of religion and confessions in the Country’s current legal system.

  4. Loving “Mapple Store” but Hating “Sprawl-Mart”: A Case Study of Brand Parodies in The Simpsons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Qiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of a total of 96 brands and 405 tweets reveal that 1 feature imitation is more frequently employed than theme imitation in brands with parodies in The Simpsons; 2 brands with parodies contain significantly more negative connotations than positive connotations; and 3 audiences have significantly more positive attitudes than negative attitudes toward both fictional brands and defictionalized brands. The findings are mainly consistent with 1 information processing and persuasive theory in communication and 2 brand defictionalization phenomenon in marketing, providing practical suggestions for both television and marketing practitioners. More theoretical and practical implications were further discussed.

  5. On Self‐Love and Outgroup Hate: Opposite Effects of Narcissism on Prejudice via Social Dominance Orientation and Right‐Wing Authoritarianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Kristof; Makwana, Arti P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous research has obtained mixed findings as to whether feelings of self‐worth are positively or negatively related to right‐wing ideological beliefs and prejudice. We propose to clarify the link between self‐worth and ideology by distinguishing between narcissistic and non‐narcissistic self‐evaluations as well as between different dimensions of ideological attitudes. Four studies, conducted in three different socio‐political contexts: the UK (Study 1, N = 422), the US (Studies 2 and 3, Ns = 471 and 289, respectively), and Poland (Study 4, N = 775), investigated the associations between narcissistic and non‐narcissistic self‐evaluations, social dominance orientation (SDO), right‐wing authoritarianism (RWA), and ethnic prejudice. Confirming our hypotheses, the results consistently showed that after controlling for self‐esteem, narcissistic self‐evaluation was positively associated with SDO (accounting for RWA), yet negatively associated with RWA (accounting for SDO). These associations were similar after controlling for psychopathy and Machiavellianism (Study 3) as well as collective narcissism and Big Five personality characteristics (Study 4). Studies 2–4 additionally demonstrated that narcissistic self‐evaluation was indirectly positively associated with prejudice through higher SDO (free of RWA) but indirectly negatively associated with prejudice through lower RWA (free of SDO). Implications for understanding the role of self‐evaluation in right‐wing ideological attitudes and prejudice are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Personality published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Association of Personality Psychology PMID:28983151

  6. 'I think condoms are good but, aai, I hate those things': condom use among adolescents and young people in a Southern African township

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    MacPhail, C

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available availability: adult attitudes to condoms and sex; gendered power relations and the economic context of adolescent sexuality. Informants did not constitute a homogenous group in terms of their understandings of sexuality. While there was clear evidence...

  7. Racism, Ideology and Hate: An Attempt of Understanding Contemporary Racism in EU Anti-Rasist Policies, through a Thesis on Racism without Race

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasta Jalušič

    2015-01-01

    The article focuses on the question of today’s role of racism and racist discrimination, and attempts to discuss the relationship between ideology and act (deed) in cases of individual and collective violent deeds. The main question is whether racism represents above all an ideology, and if so, what kind of ideology this is and to which end it serves. Is racism in the first place an ideology of hatred that changes ideas and words into deeds, into violence, i.e. is racism above all an ideologi...

  8. Patients with adrenal insufficiency hate their medication: concerns and stronger beliefs about the necessity of hydrocortisone intake are associated with more negative illness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemensma, Jitske; Andela, Cornelie D.; Pereira, Alberto M.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Kaptein, Adrian A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI) require daily and life-long hydrocortisone substitution with risks of under- and overreplacement, the necessity to adjust the dose in stressful situations, and a lack of clinical and biochemical parameters to assess optimal dosing. The spectrum of medication

  9. Is Pornography Really about "Making Hate to Women"? Pornography Users Hold More Gender Egalitarian Attitudes Than Nonusers in a Representative American Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohut, Taylor; Baer, Jodie L; Watts, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    According to radical feminist theory, pornography serves to further the subordination of women by training its users, males and females alike, to view women as little more than sex objects over whom men should have complete control. Composite variables from the General Social Survey were used to test the hypothesis that pornography users would hold attitudes that were more supportive of gender nonegalitarianism than nonusers of pornography. Results did not support hypotheses derived from radical feminist theory. Pornography users held more egalitarian attitudes--toward women in positions of power, toward women working outside the home, and toward abortion--than nonusers of pornography. Further, pornography users and pornography nonusers did not differ significantly in their attitudes toward the traditional family and in their self-identification as feminist. The results of this study suggest that pornography use may not be associated with gender nonegalitarian attitudes in a manner that is consistent with radical feminist theory.

  10. Snake oil, silver buckshot, and people who hate us: metaphors and conventional discourses of wood-based bioenergy in the rural southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah Hitchner; John Schelhas; J. Peter  Brosius

    2016-01-01

    Multiple experiences and sources of information influence ideas about wood-based bioenergy, and people often use similar language to reference various discourses (e.g., energy independence, rural development, environmental sustainability). We collected data during ethnographic research in three primary and three secondary field sites in the southeastern...

  11. To love or hate thy neighbor : The role of authoritarianism and traditionalism in explaining the link between fundamentalism and racial prejudice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; Reyna, C.

    2014-01-01

    Fundamentalism is consistently related to racial prejudice (Hall, Matz, & Wood, 2010), yet the mechanisms for this relationship are unclear. We identify two core values of fundamentalism, authoritarianism and traditionalism, that independently contribute to the fundamentalism‐racial prejudice

  12. "I Have a Love-Hate Relationship with ATLAS.ti"™: Integrating Qualitative Data Analysis Software into a Graduate Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Trena M.; Bennett, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    While research on teaching qualitative methods in education has increased, few studies explore teaching qualitative data analysis software within graduate-level methods courses. During 2013, we required students in several such courses to use ATLAS.ti™ as a project management tool for their assignments. By supporting students' early experiences…

  13. ヘイト・スピーチに対する非強制的施策に関する原理的考察(二) : Corey Brettschneider の価値民主主義(Value Democracy)論と民主的説得(Democratic Persuasion)論の考察を中心として

    OpenAIRE

    山邨, 俊英

    2017-01-01

    The legal situation regarding hate speech regulation in Japan is currently at a turning point, owing to the introduction of a law and ordinance to restrict hate speech, the first of its kind in Japan. The legislation assumes the “cautious approach of regulation”, deemed a majority theory in the scholarly debate on hate speech regulation. Following such a cautious approach, legal regulation of hate speech (in particular, criminal sanctions) has limited effectiveness. It has been suggested that...

  14. ヘイト・スピーチに対する非強制的施策に関する原理的考察(三・完) : Corey Brettschneider の価値民主主義(Value Democracy)論と民主的説得(Democratic Persuasion)論の考察を中心として

    OpenAIRE

    山邨, 俊英

    2017-01-01

    The legal situation regarding hate speech regulation in Japan is currently at a turning point, owing to the introduction of a law and ordinance to restrict hate speech, the first of its kind in Japan. The legislation assumes the “cautious approach of regulation”, deemed a majority theory in the scholarly debate on hate speech regulation. Following such a cautious approach, legal regulation of hate speech (in particular, criminal sanctions) has limited effectiveness. It has been suggested that...

  15. ヘイト・スピーチに対する非強制的施策に関する原理的考察(一) : Corey Brettschneider の価値民主主義(Value Democracy)論と民主的説得(Democratic Persuasion)論の考察を中心として

    OpenAIRE

    山邨, 俊英

    2016-01-01

    The legal situation regarding hate speech regulation in Japan is currently at a turning point, owing to the introduction of a law and ordinance to restrict hate speech, the first of its kind in Japan. The legislation assumes the “cautious approach of regulation”, deemed a majority theory in the scholarly debate on hate speech regulation. Following such a cautious approach, legal regulation of hate speech (in particular, criminal sanctions) has limited effectiveness. It has been suggested that...

  16. Effects of Racism on Perceptions and Punishment of Intra- and Interracial Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Donald A.; Hockett, Jericho M.; Zanotti, Danielle C.; Heffel, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The majority of hate crimes in the United States are driven by racial bias. However, extra-legal factors such as the perpetrators' motivations, the races of the victims and perpetrators, and the presence or absence of hate symbols or slurs often result in ambiguity in the classification of crimes as hate crimes. This uncertainty evokes…

  17. Danish Report: Work Stream 3: Fokus Group Interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang; Meret, Susi

    2014-01-01

    on – not only at the national level but especially beyond and below the nation state – at the transnational and local levels. It shows that some of the groups, for example Sabaah, offering counselling to homosexual youths with a Muslim background, work mainly on the local municipality level in Copenhagen. Other...... initiatives to combat hate speech hate crimes. The mapping of voluntary movements/groups/organizations presents an overview of the diverse policies and strategies towards racism, discrimination and hates speech and hate behavior. It looks at the kind of activities, campaigns and demonstrations...... the organizations have been engaged in demonstrating the close collaborations and negotiations/networking between the democratic anti-bodies as well as the struggles between antibodies and groups practicing hate speech and hate behavior. This identified important gaps in our knowledge about what is going...

  18. "You Know I Hate It when People Half Ass Things": A Case Study of a High School Science Student and the Role of Pre-Instructional Activities, Goal Orientation, and Self-Efficacy in Learning with Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Samuel Arthur

    2010-01-01

    This single subject case study followed a high school student and his use of a simulation of marine ecosystems. The study examined his metaworld, motivation, and learning before, during and after using the simulation. A briefing was conceptualized based on the literature on pre-instructional activities, advance organizers, and performance…

  19. Por que todo mundo odeia o Chris? Uma análise discursiva sobre o imaginário de afro-americanidade na série Everybody hates Chris

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Crema

    2015-01-01

    Como telespectadores de Black sitcoms norte-americanas, temos observado, nessas séries, uma propensão à abordagem de temáticas que silenciam a luta pela dessegregação racial nos Estados Unidos. Nossa hipótese é que grande parte dos seriados tende a assimilar uma percepção homogeneizante de afro-americanidade, firmada em estereótipos e verdades supostamente inquestionáveis acerca de negritude. O negro é sempre visto pela perspectiva de um outro, cuja posição central no discurso produz sentidos...

  20. "I Hate Maths: Why Do We Need to Do Maths?" Using iPad Video Diaries to Investigate Attitudes and Emotions towards Mathematics in Year 3 and Year 6 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Kevin; Jorgensen, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Accessing children's feelings and attitudes towards mathematics is a challenging proposition since methods for data collection may be fraught in terms of bias and power relations. This article explores a method of collecting information from young students about their attitudes towards mathematics using iPads, and a video diary technique not…

  1. Plaadid / Urmas Piht, Mart Virkus, Virko Pirrus...[jt.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Hate Eternal "Fury And Flames", Havoc Unit "h.IV+", Heidevolk "Walhalla Wacht", Klone "All Seeing Eye", Midnattsol "Nordlys", Helloween "Gambling with the devil", Septicflesh "Communion"

  2. The Impact of Racial Slurs and Racism on the Perceptions and Punishment of Violent Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Donald A.; Hockett, Jericho M.; Wallenberg, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    When a crime is committed by an individual of one race against an individual of another race, there is the possibility that the crime is a hate crime. Legislation often mandates harsher penalties for perpetrators convicted of crimes determined to be hate crimes, yet this determination is difficult to make. This study used vignettes of violent…

  3. A Case Analysis of the Turkish Football in Regard to the UEFA's 10-Point Action Plan against Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrahoglu, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Football is enjoyable and meaningful together with the fans. However, the hate crimes (racism, discrimination, humiliation, xenophobia and Islamophobia) are social diseases of some fan groups, and threaten public safety and the social life. UEFA has been determined to fight against hate crimes in football by creating a network called FARE, and by…

  4. Black holes matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge Stjernholm

    2016-01-01

    Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).......Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015)....

  5. 160 | P a g e

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    of hate speech whether verbally or in print that might endanger public safety, unity and ... race, color, ethnicity, gender, disability, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, ... or indirectly likely to injure religious, ethnic, tribal or sectional feelings. ... 6 Nigeria's Human Rights Commission denounces Hate speech in political ...

  6. Creating Effective Holocaust Education Programmes for Government Schools with Large Muslim Populations in Sydney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Suzanne D.

    2010-01-01

    Holocaust education can play a role in countering the ongoing problem of prejudice and incitement to hate that can lead to racial tension and violence. This article examines the beliefs of Muslim school children towards Jews in Sydney, Australia. It then discusses efforts to use Holocaust education to combat racist beliefs and hate language, and…

  7. Challengers from the Sidelines: Understanding America’s Violent Far-Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Baird-Windle and Bader, 61–62. 121 Joni Scott, “From Hate Rhetoric to Hate Crimes: A Link Acknowledged Too Late,” Humanist , January/February (1999...vociferous local leadership which framed the legislation as almost an “ existential threat” to the community’s way of life. Both aspects—catastrophic

  8. Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Methods? Methodological Games and Role Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollars, Nina; Rosen, Amanda M.

    2017-01-01

    In terms of gamification within political science, some fields-particularly international relations and American politics--have received more attention than others. One of the most underserved parts of the discipline is research methods; a course that, coincidentally, is frequently cited as one that instructors hate to teach and students hate to…

  9. Negative and positive externalities in intergroup conflict: exposure to the opportunity to help the outgroup reduces the inclination to harm it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Ori

    2015-01-01

    Outgroup hate, in the context of intergroup conflict, can be expressed by harming the outgroup, but also by denying it help. Previous work established that this distinction-whether the externality on the outgroup is negative or positive-has an important effect on the likelihood of outgroup hate emerging as a motivation for individual participation in intergroup conflict. The current work uses a within-subject design to examine the behavior of the same individuals in intergroup conflict with negative and positive externalities on the outgroup. Each participant made two choices, one for each type of externality, and the order was counter balanced. The main results are that (1) behavior is fairly consistent across negative and positive externalities, i.e., the tendency to display outgroup hate by harming the outgroup is correlated with the tendency to display outgroup hate by avoiding to help the outgroup; (2) People are reluctant to harm the outgroup after being exposed to the opportunity to help it; (3) Groupness-the degree to which people care about their group and its well-being-is related to outgroup hate only when participants encounter the opportunity to harm the outgroup first (before they encounter the opportunity to help it). In this setting the relationship between groupness and outgroup hate spilled over to the subsequent interaction, where it was possible to help the outgroup. When the opportunity to help the outgroup was encountered first, groupness was not related to outgroup hate.

  10. Negative and positive externalities in intergroup conflict: Exposure to the opportunity to help the outgroup reduces the inclination to harm it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori eWeisel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Outgroup hate, in the context of intergroup conflict, can be expressed by harming the outgroup, but also by denying it help.Previous work established that this distinction---whether the externality on the outgroup is negative or positive---has an important effect on the likelihood of outgroup hate emerging as a motivation for individual participation in intergroup conflict.The current work uses a within-subject design to examine the behaviour of the same individuals in intergroup conflict with negative and positive externalities on the outgroup.Each participant made two choices, one for each type of externality, and the order was counter balanced.The main results are that(1 behaviour is fairly consistent across negative and positive externalities, i.e., the tendency to display outgroup hate by harming the outgroup is correlated with the tendency to display outgroup hate by avoiding to help the outgroup; (2 People are reluctant to harm the outgroup after being exposed to the opportunity to help it; (3 emph{Groupness}---the degree to which people care about their group and its well-being---is related to outgroup hate only when participants encounter the opportunity to harm the outgroup first (before they encounter the opportunity to help it. In this setting the relationship between groupness and outgroup hate spilled over to the subsequent interaction, where it was possible to help the outgroup. When the opportunity to help the outgroup was encountered first, groupness was not related to outgroup hate.

  11. South African Crime Quarterly - Vol 42 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "Dip me in Chocolate and Thow me to the Lesbians": Homophobic hate crimes, the state and civil society · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. K Williams, 39-46 ...

  12. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies - Vol 20 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perverts and sodomites: homophobia as hate speech in Africa · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Vasu Reddy, 163-175. http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16073610209486308 ...

  13. Conservatism, institutionalism, and the social control of intergroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ryan D

    2008-03-01

    This research investigates the state social control of intergroup conflict by assessing the sociopolitical determinants of hate crime prosecutions. Consistent with insights from the political sociology of punishment, group-threat accounts of intergroup relations and the state, and neoinstitutional theory, the findings suggest that hate crime prosecutions are fewer where political conservatism, Christian fundamentalism, and black population size are higher, although this last effect is nonlinear. Linkages between district attorneys' offices and communities, on the other hand, increase hate crime prosecutions and the likelihood of offices' creating hate crime policies. Yet these policies are sometimes decoupled from actual enforcement, and such decoupling is more likely in politically conservative districts. The results indicate that common correlates of criminal punishment have very different effects on types of state social control that are protective of minority groups, and also suggest conditions under which policy and practice become decoupled in organizational settings.

  14. Nüüdiskunst on maailmas hinnas / Sarah Cosulich Canarutto ; interv. Reet Varblane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Cosulich Canarutto, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Põhja-Itaalias Passariano villa Maninis avatud kaasaegse kunsti keskuse kuraator Sarah Cosulich Canarutto uue kunstikeskuse tulevikuplaanidest. Keskust juhatab Francesco Bonami. Alustati näitustega "Love/Hate" ja "Vernice"

  15. Advancing LGBTQI2 rights in developing countries through research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    More than 70 countries criminalize same-sex sexual conduct using laws that ... people risk hate-motivated violence, arbitrary arrest, torture, sexual assault, ... their gender identities and expressions — crimes that authorities sometimes ignore.

  16. Pop / Jan Berkovitch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Berkovitch, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Must Missa "The Target of Hate", Four Tet "Everything Ecstatic", Pat Metheny/Ornette Coleman "Song X (20th Anniversary)", Dream Theater "Octavarium", Vanessa & The O's "La Ballade d'O", The Lucksmiths "Warmer Corners"

  17. Pop / Tõnis Kahu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kahu, Tõnis, 1962-

    2005-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: 50 Cent "The Massacre", Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor ja dirigent Paul Hillier "Sergei Rahmaninov. All-Night Vigil". My Chemical Romance "Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". Combichrist "Everybody Hates You"

  18. hegemony of heteronormativity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    assumption that social identity theories underlie homophobia. Empathy with .... hating, sexual orientationalism (along with racism, sexism, etc) and heterosexism .... consequences of homophobia whilst sets of statistics on 'gay-bashing' and.

  19. REFORMING THE ETHIOPIAN ELECTORAL SYSTEM: LOOKING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Russia, Hungary and Chile replaced their electoral systems by new ones in response to ... inclusive. The article rather examines the practical consequences of FPTP .... programs but rather were inclined to hate mongering propagandas. The.

  20. KILLING, VIEWED FROM A CONFLICT RESOLUTION PERSPECTIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DODO

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... ... million people were killed as part of the industrial policy of Belgium's ..... the seeds of hate and further conspiracies against others, the entire .... International Commission On Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS) 2001.

  1. From disgust to contempt-speech: The nature of contempt on the map of prejudicial emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilewicz, Michal; Kamińska, Olga Katarzyna; Winiewski, Mikołaj; Soral, Wiktor

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing the contempt as an intergroup emotion, we suggest that contempt and anger are not built upon each other, whereas disgust seems to be the most elementary and specific basic-emotional antecedent of contempt. Concurring with Gervais & Fessler, we suggest that many instances of "hate speech" are in fact instances of "contempt speech" - being based on disgust-driven contempt rather than hate.

  2. King and King: Learning to Treat Others Royally Through Diversity Education

    OpenAIRE

    Dube', Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Of the hate crimes reported to the FBI in 2007, 16.6% were the result of a sexual orientation bias. In the wake of horrific hate crimes such as the shooting and death of Lawrence King earlier this year, killed because of his sexual orientation, and the murder of Matthew Shepard ten years ago, homophobia and its effects must be addressed. A proposed solution to the problem is mandatory diversity education in public schools, with no parental opt out.

  3. Murder by YouTube - anti-Islamic speech and homicide liability.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohlander, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Usually, hate-speech and its criminalisation are looked at from the angle of a separate hate-speech offence, and often in the context of human rights law, especially freedom of speech and religion. In the Islamic world, such issues are treated under blasphemy laws and the availability of severe sanctions for that offence, not infrequently the death penalty, may make a separate recourse to homicide offences unnecessary. Yet, recent events in the Islamic world suggest that it would not be unima...

  4. State of the Art. Work Stream 3 – the Danish Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang; Meret, Susi

    2014-01-01

    field work, interviews and group discussions/dialogues, possibly to be debated at roundtable convening in the autumn of 2014. The SOA gives an overview of the role of the state, institutions, the political parties and social movements in combating racism, discrimination hate-speech and exclusionary...... and of the formal institutional organisations featuring what we define the ‘anti-bodies’, which combat racism, discrimination, hate-speech and exclusionary behaviours. The focus is on the implementation of UN, EU and CoE regulations and policies, foundation of legislation related to gender and minority groups...

  5. Indirect detection in solid state NMR: An illustrious history and a bright future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Many of us have a love/hate relationship with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We love the information content of NMR data, which provides us with essential information about structure, dynamics, and material properties that is not available from any other measurement, and we love the fact that NMR methods can be applied to almost any problem in almost any area of science. But we hate the low sensitivity of NMR, which forces us to make big samples, spend many tedious hours or days taking data, or live with marginal signal-to-noise.

  6. Hatretorikk: Den intolerante språkbruken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Birgitta Nilsen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The manifesto of the Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik is based on the “Eurabia” conspiracy theory. This theory is a key starting point for hate speech amongst many right-wing extremists in Europe, but also has ramifications beyond these environments. In brief, proponents of the Eurabia theory claim that Muslims are occupying Europe and destroying Western culture, with the assistance of the EU and European governments. By contrast, members of Al-Qaeda and other extreme Islamists promote the conspiracy theory “the Crusade” in their hate speech directed against the West. Proponents of the latter theory argue that the West is leading a crusade to eradicate Islam and Muslims, a crusade that is similarly facilitated by their governments. This article presents analyses of texts written by right-wing extremists and Muslim extremists in an effort to shed light on how hate speech promulgates conspiracy theories in order to spread hatred and intolerance.The aim of the article is to contribute to a more thorough understanding of hate speech’s nature by applying rhetorical analysis. Rhetorical analysis is chosen because it offers a means of understanding the persuasive power of speech. It is thus a suitable tool to describe how hate speech works to convince and persuade. The concepts from rhetorical theory used in this article are ethos, logos and pathos. The concept of ethos is used to pinpoint factors that contributed to Osama bin Laden's impact, namely factors that lent credibility to his promotion of the conspiracy theory of the Crusade. In particular, Bin Laden projected common sense, good morals and good will towards his audience. He seemed to have coherent and relevant arguments; he appeared to possess moral credibility; and his use of language demonstrated that he wanted the best for his audience.The concept of pathos is used to define hate speech, since hate speech targets its audience's emotions. In hate speech it is the

  7. The emergence of the Black Methodist Consultation and its possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... address during the South African apartheid rule, a view which black theologians and church .... the impact of racism on self-hate was created by the slogan, ..... white culture, blackness is associated with bad mystique, danger ...

  8. 75 FR 69571 - World Freedom Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... A Proclamation The Berlin Wall once stood as a painful barrier between family and friends, a dark... exercise their universal human rights. The 21st anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is an occasion..., Germans from both sides of the wall joined to tear down the hated blockade. World Freedom Day commemorates...

  9. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach than the UK and the USA if it wishes to deal effectively with this kind of offending. We also warn that hate ... orientation or other such factors'.3 Breen and Nel explain that what are ... additional characteristics, such as gender identity.

  10. Reimagining the Group Project for the Business Law Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Patricia Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Students love to hate group projects. Not surprisingly, one of the most ubiquitous complaints about college on social media often centers on group projects. Despite the seemingly deep-rooted distaste for group projects, instructors and employers alike agree that students must be equipped with the skills of communication, teamwork, and critical…

  11. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dixon, B. Vol 41 (2012) - Articles Understanding 'Poinry face': What is criminology for? Abstract PDF · Vol 40 (2012) - Articles Look before you leap: Hate crime legislation reconsidered. Abstract PDF · Vol 53 (2015) - Articles Making further inquiries - Policing in context in Brixton and Khayelitsha Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1991- ...

  12. Delayed Hypersensitivity in Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty two adult male patients of psoriasis and 100 normal Volunteers Were skin-tested ′ with DNC-B, mumps skin antigen, candidin coccidiodin, PPD, croton Oil and histamine hate Except for ′decreased mine phosphate sensitization seen: with DNCB, the response of psoriabics to, skin testing was comparable with the normals.

  13. Three Challenges for Teachers in the Era of Trump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Mica

    2017-01-01

    Since the presidential election on Nov. 8, there has been a wave of hate speech, harassment, bullying, and violent incidents hit K-12 and college campuses nationwide. One informal collection of nationwide social media posts quickly amassed more than 500 incident reports, with harassment targeted at Latinos, immigrants, Blacks, Muslims, Jews, gays,…

  14. Attitudes toward gay and lesbian individuals in Russia: An exploration of the interpersonal contact hypothesis and personality factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon G. Horne

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Negative attitudes toward Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual people in Russia are common, and may have become more prevalent due to recent policy changes. Objective. This study explored whether interpersonal contact and personality characteristics predicted Hateful Attitudes Toward GLB people and Endorsement of GLB Rights. Design. The design of the study included 154 heterosexual undergraduate students in Moscow and Volgodonsk who were surveyed about their attitudes toward GLB people as well as their personality characteristics assessed with the NEO-FFI. Results. Results suggested that Moscow students held less hateful attitudes and endorsed greater GLB Rights than Volgodonsk students. Women were also more favorable toward GLB Rights than men. In terms of Hateful Attitudes, having GLB friends or acquaintances was a negative predictor of Hateful Attitudes, while neuroticism and conscientiousness were positive predictors. In conclusion, living in a large urban area, knowing GLB individuals, and low levels of neuroticism and conscientiousness appear to be associated with positive attitudes toward GLB people in Russia, however, personality characteristics and knowing GLB people did not appear to relate to endorsement of GLB Civil Rights. Conclusion. Current sociopolitical policies such as the propaganda ban, and historical censure of GLB rights during the Soviet era, may impact how “out” GLB Russian people can be, particularly outside of large urban centers, and may reinforce general lack of support for GLB Civil Rights in the Russian population.

  15. The "New Racism" of K-12 Schools: Centering Critical Research on Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Rita; Pizarro, Marcos; Nevárez, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    While organizing efforts by movements such as Black Lives Matter and responses to the hate-filled policies and rhetoric of President Donald Trump are heightening public discourse of racism, much less attention is paid to mechanisms of racial oppression in the field of education. Instead, conceptualizations that allude to racial difference but are…

  16. Intersectionality as Education Policy Reform: Creating Schools That Empower Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Brittney

    2017-01-01

    Brittney Beck wrote this commentary two days after the act of terror and hate that occurred at Pulse in Orlando, Florida in which Omar Mateen murdered 50 people at a queer night club during a celebration of LatinX cultures and identities. Historians have long observed that social movements are preceded by tragedy. Anyon (2014) argued that schools…

  17. AFRREV IJAH, Vol.1 (4) November, 2012

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    mention is made of Diaspora with regards to America, attention is on the former African slaves who ... Chinua Achebeřs Things Fall Apart in 1958, the literary world woke up to a new invention Ŕ ... years in Nigeria jilts him and marries someone else. Obi is crushed but ..... The explanation for such a love-hate relationship ...

  18. Prejudice, Ethnocentrism, and Violence in an Age of High Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, David A.

    This essay provides an historical perspective on conflict and discusses the relationship of prejudice and ethnocentrism to intergroup conflict, prejudice and conflict resolution in childhood, as well as approaches to conflict resolution in society. History is full of hateful and destructive indulgences based on religious, racial, and other…

  19. Rethinking Intractable Conflict: The Perspective of Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallacher, Robin R.; Coleman, Peter T.; Nowak, Andrzej; Bui-Wrzosinska, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Intractable conflicts are demoralizing. Beyond destabilizing the families, communities, or international regions in which they occur, they tend to perpetuate the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Although the common factors and processes associated with intractable conflicts have been identified…

  20. Experimental evidence for innate predator recognition in the Seychelles warbler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Thor; Richardson, David S.; Blaakmeer, Karen; Komdeur, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Nest predation is a major determinant of fitness in birds and costly nest defence behaviours have evolved in order to reduce nest predation. Some avian studies have suggested that predator recognition is innate whereas others hate stressed the importance: of learning. However, none of these studies

  1. The politics of rape: Traces of radical feminism in Disgrace by J. M. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The charge of sexual harassment is therefore unsatisfactory for both sides and, since David refuses to read the charges brought against him, he effectively silences his accuser. When his daughter, Lucy, equates heterosexual sex with killing and hating women, one can read it as evoking the radical feminist idea that men as ...

  2. High-Five Fridays: (Mis)Trust-Building in One White Liberal Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Denise; Cammack, Camille

    2017-01-01

    The shocking election of President Donald Trump following a campaign characterized by hateful and divisive rhetoric has left many people fearful. In this essay the authors recount their story about the difficulties they encountered trying to disrupt the normalization of white experience through a local community policing initiative in their…

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 291 ... Vol 6, No 1 (2009), Book Review: Living with AIDS in Uganda: Impacts on Banana-Farming Households in Two Districts, Abstract PDF. J Seager. Vol 8, No 1 (2011), Book Review: The Country we Want to Live in: Hate Crimes and Homophobia in the Lives of Black Lesbian South Africans, Abstract PDF.

  4. SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS - Vol 8, No 1 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: The Country we Want to Live in: Hate Crimes and Homophobia in the Lives of Black Lesbian South Africans · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Y Naidoo ...

  5. Disrupting Islamophobia: Teaching the Social Construction of Terrorism in the Mass Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueeney, Krista

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a critical media literacy technique for teaching about the social construction of terrorism. In a post-9/11 context where the human rights of Arabs and Muslims in the United States and overseas are threatened by drone attacks, profiling, detentions, and hate crimes, educators must not shy away from this issue. I use visual…

  6. Lexical Availability of Young Spanish EFL Learners: Emotion Words versus Non-Emotion Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Catalán, Rosa M.; Dewaele, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    This study intends to contribute to L2 emotion vocabulary research by looking at the words that primary-school English as foreign language learners produce in response to prompts in a lexical availability task. Specifically, it aims to ascertain whether emotion prompts (Love, Hate, Happy and Sad) generate a greater number of words than non-emotion…

  7. Nurturing Nonconformists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    Gifted students, particularly nonathletes or introverts, may suffer feelings of alienation and isolation in school. Geeks and nerds do not hate people, but abhor a school culture that glorifies athletics. Lack of respect for bright nonconformists can lead to emotional problems and underachievement. (MLH)

  8. Marcel Wandersi esteetiline huumor / Kadi Lehtmets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lehtmets, Kadi

    2007-01-01

    Hollandi disainerist Marcel Wandersist (sünd. 1963), tema loomingust, Pumale kavandatud sporditoodete sarjast "I hate camping", mõtteid disainist. Marcel Wanders disainib Euroopa disainitööstustele, nagu Cappellini, Bisazza, B&B Italia, Poliform, Moroso, Flos, Boffi, Droog Design, Moooi (kunstiline juht, osanik)

  9. The Wilders Case in the Netherlands and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Temperman (Jeroen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDutch Politician Geert Wilders, leader of the rightist Party for Freedom (PVV), was tried in relation to (religious) defamation and hate speech charges in a case that lasted from 2009 to 2011. While fully acquitted, stakeholders are now bringing a case against the Netherlands for

  10. Sticks and Stones: Why First Amendment Absolutism Fails When Applied to Campus Harassment Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Linda

    This paper analyzes how absolutist arguments against campus harassment codes violate the spirit of the first amendment, examining in particular the United States Supreme Court ruling in "RAV v. St. Paul." The paper begins by tracing the current development of first amendment doctrine, analyzing its inadequacy in the campus hate speech…

  11. Interpretation of the phosphate showings found in Uruguay. Recommendations for a a working programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slansky, M.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactive anomalies put in evidence during the investigation of uranium and the mining inventory carried out in Uruguay, are due to rocks more or less strongly phosp hated of the top proterozoic and of the paleozoic. These anomalies drive to interrogating ourselves on the possibilities of existence of deposits of phosphates exploitable

  12. Using "Big Data" Versus Alternative Measures of Aggregate Data to Predict the U.S. 2016 Presidential Election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Kellams, Christine; Bishop, Brianna; Zhang, Mei Fong; Villagrana, Brian

    2017-01-01

    To what extent could "Big Data" predict the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election better than more conventional sources of aggregate measures? To test this idea, the present research used Google search trends versus other forms of state-level data (i.e., both behavioral measures like the incidence of hate crimes, hate groups, and police brutality and implicit measures like Implicit Association Test (IAT) data) to predict each state's popular vote for the 2016 presidential election. Results demonstrate that, when taken in isolation, zero-order correlations reveal that prevalence of hate groups, prevalence of hate crimes, Google searches for racially charged terms (i.e., related to White supremacy groups, racial slurs, and the Nazi movement), and political conservatism were all significant predictors of popular support for Trump. However, subsequent hierarchical regression analyses show that when these predictors are considered simultaneously, only Google search data for historical White supremacy terms (e.g., "Adolf Hitler") uniquely predicted election outcomes earlier and beyond political conservatism. Thus, Big Data, in the form of Google search, emerged as a more potent predictor of political behavior than other aggregate measures, including implicit attitudes and behavioral measures of racial bias. Implications for the role of racial bias in the 2016 presidential election in particular and the utility of Google search data more generally are discussed.

  13. Cyberspace and Real-World Behavioral Relationships: Towards the Applications of Interest Search Queries to Identify Individuals At-Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    optima ducati cva 308 dealers Topic 30: 11 101 24 23 13 boat afman vol 110 21 Topic 31: travel government citi camp writing apa az 5k essay ...password connect reset ip corral monitor Topic 67: lyrics amazon mac michelle want jesus highest hate congress cast Topic 68: 2009 block southern

  14. Sigtuna Think Piece 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be overturned and changed as central metaphor in climate change ... originated the notion of metaphorical vision, three periods in the history of Western attitudes to ... In line with this definition, I shall argue in this paper that Western society .... Could it therefore be that hating climate change performs the same function ...

  15. Interpretation of the phosphate showings found in Uruguay. Recommendations for a a working programme; Interpretacion de los indicios de fosfato encontrados en Uruguay: recomendaciones para un programa de trabajo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slansky, M

    1983-07-01

    The radioactive anomalies put in evidence during the investigation of uranium and the mining inventory carried out in Uruguay, are due to rocks more or less strongly phosp hated of the top proterozoic and of the paleozoic. These anomalies drive to interrogating ourselves on the possibilities of existence of deposits of phosphates exploitable.

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrabure, KO. Vol 6 (2015) - Articles The right to self-determination under international law: The current Biafra struggle. Abstract PDF · Vol 7 (2016) - Articles Counteracting hate speech and the right to freedom of expression in selected jurisdictions. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2276-7371. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  17. 78 FR 2439 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed New Collection; Comments Requested: COPS/“Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... discussed in the different media such as: hate crimes, community relations for diversity, school collaborations with law enforcement, and community collaborations with law enforcement. These are one-time... will be asked or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Law enforcement agencies and other...

  18. South African Medical Journal Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EDITORIAL. 159. Should a murderer forfeit his life for his crime? ... necessary to examine the nature of the crime itself. .... little clearer than that of sanity, and the law may indulge in some ... where race crimes generate great waves of hate, this.

  19. 78 FR 16536 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed New Collection; Comments Requested: COPS/“Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... elicit audience opinions and responses regarding topics discussed in the different media such as: Hate crimes, community relations for diversity, school collaborations with law enforcement, and community... as a brief abstract: Law enforcement agencies and other public and private entities that view the...

  20. Discrimination? - Exhibition of posters

    OpenAIRE

    Jakimovska, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Participation in the exhibition with the students form the Art Academy. The exhibition consisted of 15 posters tackling the subjects of hate speech and discrimination. The exhibition happened thanks to the invitation of the Faculty of Law at UGD, and it was a part of a larger event of launching books on the aforementioned subjects.

  1. Civility: The Right Thing to Teach in Contentious Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace

    2008-01-01

    Drawing attention to widespread instances of discourteous speech and hate discourse that permeate US and world culture, Alleen Pace Nilsen maintains that our imperative as educators is to teach "students the benefits of being civil to each other." She proposes some avenues for enriching students' understanding of the power of civil…

  2. An Introduction to the Medieval English: The Historical and Literary Context, Traces of Church and Philosophical Movements in the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behtash, Esmail Zare; Toroujeni, Seyyed Morteza Hashemi; Samani, Farzane Safarzade

    2017-01-01

    The Transition from Greek to medieval philosophy that speculated on religion, nature, metaphysics, human being and society was rather a rough transition in the history of English literature. Although the literature content of this age reflected more religious beliefs, the love and hate relationship of medieval philosophy that was mostly based on…

  3. Globalization and Dual Modes of Higher Education Policymaking in France: Je T'aime Moi Non Plus. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.2.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoareau, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    The French Government has had a paradoxical relationship with globalization. Globalization is perceived as both a threat to react against and a cradle for new policy ideas. French policymakers have a love-hate relationship with the European higher education reforms that started in the 1990s, a mixed sentiment that French singer Serge Gainsbourg…

  4. Woodrow Wilson's Public Relations: Wag the Hun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsdorf, Marion K.

    1999-01-01

    Considers how during World War I populations were mobilized, "taught" to hate and fight the evil enemy, responded emotionally to atrocities, even if invented or exaggerated. Discusses how George Creel, leader of the Committee of Public Information, used every means of communications available to conscript opinion, to control, centralize,…

  5. Rice, sugar, and livestock in Java, 1820-1940: Geertz’s Agricultural Involution 50 years on

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomgaard, P.; Kroonenberg, P.M.; Bray, F.; Coclanis, P.A.; Fields-Black, E.L.; Schäfer, D.

    2015-01-01

    Do we love him or do we loath him? Do we love Clifford Geertz (1926-2006) because he put Java (and Bali) on the scholarly map with his well-written books that appealed to a large audience? Or do we hate him because his Agricultural Involution (1963) was such a travesty of Java’s economic and social

  6. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  7. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    one can ever be sure, of course, but it is possible that Einstein was as much hated as ... of thought, which is not to say one is better or worse than the other, of course. ... being passed over when assistantships at the University were offered to his ..... young men to refuse military service, provoking the hostility of nationalists in ...

  8. A Dialogue on Reclaiming Troubled Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichhorn, August; Redl, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    This discussion is drawn from the writings of two eminent founders of strength-based approaches to troubled children and adolescents. August Aichhorn is best known for his classic book, "Wayward Youth," and Fritz Redl as co-author of "Children Who Hate". August Aichhorn and Anna Freud mentored a young educational psychologist, Fritz Redl…

  9. Reparative Readings: Re-Claiming Black Feminised Bodies as Sites of Somatic Pleasures and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohito, Esther O.; Khoja-Moolji, Shenila

    2018-01-01

    Black girls and women in the west reside at the nexus of racism and sexism, pinned down by a vitriolic hate for the black feminised body that is wedded to legacies of slavery. Dominant discourses configure these bodies as animalistic and other (than human), thus informing a range of (educational) policies, practices, and programmes. These…

  10. In Search of a Better Mousetrap: A Look at Higher Education Ranking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swail, Watson Scott

    2011-01-01

    College rankings create much talk and discussion in the higher education arena. This love/hate relationship has not necessarily resulted in better rankings, but rather, more rankings. This paper looks at some of the measures and pitfalls of the current rankings systems, and proposes areas for improvement through a better focus on teaching and…

  11. State behavior during the Ukrainian crisis: the perspectives of Romania, France, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    survival tool.86 Facing the Russian expansionist culture, bilateral ties has always been a love -hate relationship based on overlapping or conflicting... love you so much! v Acronyms AA Association Agreement...after 1989 led Professor Robert Kagan to announce the return of history as the restart of new competition between great powers.27 The Ukrainian crisis

  12. Inspired by Athletes, Myths, and Poets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Tales of love and hate, of athleticism, heroism, devotion to gods and goddesses that influenced myth and culture are a way of sharing ancient Greece's rich history. In this article, the author describes how her students created their own Greek-inspired clay vessels as artifacts of their study. (Contains 6 online resources.)

  13. The Places of the Humanities: Thinking through Bureaucracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David

    2007-01-01

    Administrators hate to be called bureaucrats. They prefer to be seen as academic leaders. Leaders articulate priorities and values, serve as exemplars, and represent an institution to both others and itself. Today, more than ever, the humanities and the arts need academic leaders at every level of the university to give them voice, to avow their…

  14. The Expulsion from Disneyland: The Social Psychological Impact of 9/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, G. Scott; Wisneski, Daniel C.; Skitka, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    People expressed many different reactions to the events of September 11th, 2001. Some of these reactions were clearly negative, such as political intolerance, discrimination, and hate crimes directed toward targets that some, if not many, people associated with the attackers. Other reactions were more positive. For example, people responded by…

  15. A Menu Technique for Utilizing VERT Interactively

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    FIELD ft, 12) IFhtF = 1FFCF ♦ 1 RLTLPN TKArSFtH Ctlfi EiTFER R1GFT OR LEFT FANC JLSI IF ICATILN CL lr.33 I...D-49 FILE: VEKTTELE CATA Al MIDWEST S+E COMPUTER CENTER GENE HATE ^RAKE. Y AXIS X GRID Y GRID Y AXI S A PLCT. HI H 1.0

  16. Kommunikatørers professionsforståelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    on and - at the same time - share certain values of how to act as a professionel. Nevertheless, the relationship between communicators and journalists is still characterized by love-hate, because journalists like to maintain their ideals of being independent watchdogs when researchers ask them, whereas they couldn...

  17. Changing Attitudes among South African Prisoners of War towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karen Horn

    and other first-hand accounts of South African POW experience, including diaries and memoirs. ... Kent Fedorowich, Barbara Hately-Broad, Arieh J. Kochavi, S.P. Mackenzie ... Afrikaners volunteered, the majority of them did so mostly for financial reasons ..... at Tuturano camp as an event that “sent prisoners wild with joy.”45.

  18. Social exclusion in Europe 1

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    dcp

    topic of considerable political and media debate since the ... said I must ask questions about your social status because […] she found out ... felt it was, it was horrible, I hated it. But at the ... about other things, his private life and...I didn‟t have ...

  19. Interest of Grade Ten Students toward Physics among Other Science Subjects, Case of Wolaita Soddo Town Governmental Secondary Schools, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelo, Shewangzaw

    2016-01-01

    This paper has proposed to investigate the interest in students towards physics among other science subjects. The investigation was carried out with 490 samples of grade ten students in Wolaita Soddo town governmental schools. Thus, overall result indicates that the interest in students towards physics is low and students hate to learn physics in…

  20. 75 FR 3525 - Sentencing Guidelines for United States Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... probation. In particular: (1) Is the characteristic relevant in making the ``in/out'' decision, i.e., the..., if the characteristic is relevant in making the decision, when is it relevant, why is it relevant... to Sec. 3A1.1 (Hate Crime Motivation or Vulnerable Victim); (6) a proposed amendment to Chapter Eight...

  1. Whose "Jihad"? Oral History of an American Muslim Educational Leader and U.S. Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzani, Miriam D.; King, Kelley M.

    2018-01-01

    While case studies have documented how teachers can either ameliorate or exacerbate situations of ignorance or hate in the classroom toward Muslim students, the role of educational leaders in U.S. public schools remains negligible. In response, this paper aims to develop the knowledge base of educational leadership as it pertains to the jihad or…

  2. Performers of sovereignty: on the privatization of security in urban South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom Hansen, T.

    2006-01-01

    The police force was the most hated and visible representation of South Africa's apartheid state. The massive crime wave after 1994 and the new anxieties in a democratic South Africa have made security the primary concern in everyday life in the country. This article explores the paradoxes of

  3. The N-Word: Reducing Verbal Pollution in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ericka J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on the crisis of verbal pollution in our society. "Verbal pollution" refers to the use of words and comments that the majority agrees are offensive, are damaging, and may lead to the deterioration of social institutions. Verbal pollution encompasses hate speech, such as the derogatory words used by…

  4. Stretching the Frontiers: Exploring the Relationships Between Entrepreneurship and Ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisscher, O.A.M.; Frenkel, D.; Lurie, Y.; Nijhof, A.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between entrepreneurship and ethics can be characterised as an intense love-hate relationship. On the one hand, entrepreneurs, who are regarded as creative innovators, are praised for their contribution to the development of society by creating new products, employment opportunities

  5. Regulation of speech in multicultural societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maussen, M.; Grillo, R.

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the way in which public debate and legal practice intersect when it comes to the value of free speech and the need to regulate "offensive", "blasphemous" or "hate" speech, especially, though not exclusively where such speech is thought to be offensive to members of ethnic and

  6. Old Dogs, Children, and Watermelon Wine: Focus on the Older Adult Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasworm, Carol E.

    1978-01-01

    Three significant elements should be considered in offering educational programs for the older learner: acceptance (old dogs); support (God bless little children while they're too young to hate); and dependability (watermelon wine). Guidelines are offered for the teacher entering the classroom composed of adult learners. (KC)

  7. "You Can Do Nasty Things to Your Brothers and Sisters without a Reason": Siblings' Backstage Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punch, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    This article contributes to the recent, but still limited, literature on the sociology of sibship. It argues that during childhood the ambivalent love/hate nature of sibship is played out through the sharing of knowledge, time and space. It draws on the work of Goffman to illustrate that children's sibling interactions tend to consist of…

  8. Racialized Aggressions and Social Media on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, Kevin J.; Martínez-Alemán, Ana M.; Rowan-Kenyon, Heather T.; Hottell, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Using a phenomenological approach, rooted in critical theory's desire to challenge systemic structures of inequality, we explored the impact of racialized hate encountered on social media by students of color at a predominately White institution. The encounters of racialized hostility manifested as anti-Black sentiments and produced racial battle…

  9. TOLERATING INTOLERANCE: AUTOCHTONE AND ALLOCHTONE RADICALIZATION IN THE NETHERLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljujic, V.

    2016-01-01

    Ideological extremism poses a great challenge to highly diversified Dutch society. In the context of Islamic radicalization, hate narative plays a prominent role in legitimization of violence and martydom, while in the context of right wing extremism it facilitates systematic harassment of

  10. A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom: On the Human Condition in Education. Transforming Subjects: Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Studies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzman, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    "A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom" provides rich descriptions of the surprising ways individuals handle matters of love and hate when dealing with reading and writing in the classroom. With wit and sharp observations, Deborah P. Britzman advocates for a generous recognition of the vulnerabilities, creativity, and responsibilities of…

  11. IN BRITAIN 1760-1890 Paul Edwards & David Dabydeen (eds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and other whites led him "to hate those who professed themselves christians": but ... black colonisation, in the same breath that sounds the bugle for an attack on ... speaking: a black voice among many other distinctive black voices which strive ...

  12. Social Justice Leadership in Action: The Case of Tony Stewart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield-Davis, Kathy; Gardiner, Mary E.; Joki, Russell A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflecting on the 140th anniversary of the Fourteenth Amendment (ratified July, 1868), this qualitative case study described a response by educator-activist Tony Stewart to the Aryan Nations, a neo-Nazi hate group that attempted to intimidate Stewart's community, Coeur d' Alene, Idaho, between 1972-2000. Stewart galvanized community response using…

  13. Is There a Hemingway in the House?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    Creative warm-up activities help most of the articulate students who hate writing and unblock the most reluctant writers. Some of the warm-up activities for students in elementary grades that help in taking the fright out of writing, or just reduce the initial resistance are described.

  14. Teaching Physiology of Exercise to Reluctant Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Exercise physiology seems to be a course that students love or hate. Many physical education students and others involved in the related areas of health, teaching, recreation, dance, athletic training, fitness, and motor learning and development find this course a requirement at some point in their curriculum. Inquiry-based learning is an…

  15. Exploring How to Change Stereotypical Attitudes toward Students Who Are LGBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeck, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The experience of being a gay teen is tremendously difficult. The statistics regarding hate crimes and threats are staggering. The results of these threats are even more appalling: Gay and lesbian youth are at greater risk of dropping out of school, engaging in substance abuse, and running away from home, and are two to three times more likely to…

  16. مظاهر المكروه في رسوم الاطفال

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    لمى صلاح احمد

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to reveal the manifestations of the hated in the drawings of the primary schoolgirls by building a subjective tool through which these drawings are analyzed. The researcher has found that the characteristics of the drawings are gathered in three key axes which are: 1 the character of the hated 2 creation elements 3 drawing background . The total numbers of the key items are 11 items and 88 sub-items. After achieving the validity by using Cooper equation and reliability by using Scoot equation, the agreement of experts was 90% . The researcher has used the descriptive approach. She has selected AL-AQEELAH Primary School for girls (with 683 schoolgirls in Babil Province Center as a sample. The most significant conclusions are: 1-\tThe manifestations of the hated in children's drawings appeared in patterns that are consistent with the environmental conditions of each schoolgirl and according to the schoolgirl's attitudes that reflect the negative side so that the schoolgirl (child has a sense of hatred towards the causer of the position. 2-\tThe character of the hated appeared moveable by 73% to cause harm for all the characters. The character of the hated appeared in most drawings in a human form to represent in one scene showing the harm that causes hatred. 3-\tThe current social and political reality and the crises created by the war have an impact on the child's nature as he is a real participant in this war. There are variables in the child's concept of art and painting, so he draws the scenes of killing and slaughtering, expressing what is called ISIS. The most important recommendations are: 1-\tFocus on the role of educational institutions in helping schoolboys and girls by including them with appropriate care and help them in forming social relations with colleagues. 2-\tThe researcher recommends the need to have a social advisor in each primary school, the researcher has noted, during the drawing test, the reluctance of

  17. Beyond "homophobia": Thinking more clearly about stigma, prejudice, and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Gregory M

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses the topic of homophobia. Recent events might make it seem as though it is dying out. Hate crimes based on a person's sexual orientation or gender presentation can now be prosecuted by the federal government, even when they occur in states lacking their own hate crime laws. Numerous states have changed their laws to permit same-sex couples to marry, some through the passage of legislation and others through ballot measures. Since the U.S. Supreme Court's 2013 decision overturning part of the Defense of Marriage Act, those marriages have been recognized by the federal government. With the dramatic and relatively rapid turnaround in public opinion, this article focuses on the changes in stigma and issues of sexual prejudice as well. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Media and the 2013 Kenyan election

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In March 2013, Kenya held its first election after the post-election violence (PEV) in 2008, which media were blamed for contributing to by partisan reporting and hate speech. Prior to the 2013 election, several organizations worked to raise awareness of the negative consequences of hate speech...... and the need of responsible journalism. This article sheds light on how Kenyan journalists perceived their role and evaluated their own reporting of the 2013 election and whether they were influenced by the experience of the PEV. The article shows how the experience of the PEV became a reference point when...... discussing the election reporting and the role of journalists. Several journalists admitted that important issues were avoided due to fear of steering up emotions....

  19. “Ingroup love” and “outgroup hate” in intergroup conflict between natural groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Ori; Böhm, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We report on two studies investigating the motivations (“ingroup love” and “outgroup hate”) underlying individual participation in intergroup conflict between natural groups (fans of football clubs, supporters of political parties), by employing the Intergroup Prisoner's Dilemma Maximizing-Difference (IPD-MD) game. In this game group members can contribute to the ingroup (at a personal cost) and benefit ingroup members with or without harming members of an outgroup. Additionally, we devised a novel version of the IPD-MD in which the choice is between benefiting ingroup members with or without helping members of the outgroup. Our results show an overall reluctance to display outgroup hate by actively harming outgroup members, except when the outgroup was morality-based. More enmity between groups induced more outgroup hate only when it was operationalized as refraining from help. PMID:26339099

  20. JPRS Report, Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    consequences. Those who do not share our faith also feel the need for a sensible , patriotic understanding that will put an end to the climate of hate...that the opposition has sensibly proposed to it, carrying out only its own plans without caring about the will of the people. It is the government that...Commodities] 1971-1976. Experience in other areas: A) Teaching and Research: Professor in the Technological Institute of Ciudad Madero, Tamaulipas

  1. Gamsberg Macmillan P

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    loaf: a large piece of bread frown: have lines on your face dislike: not like, hate someone or something are examples of this. In the case of loaf, no sense is given of its being a single mass of bread in the shape it has when it comes from the oven. The definition suggests a hunk or large slice from a loaf. The example sentence ...

  2. but also just: reflections on the severe god of the catechism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    make sense to reflect on an ideal state of perfection, somewhere in the ancient past, if we live ... loving God who saves his children from their misery, even if this misery ..... hate someone is not to give preference to him or her; he or she comes second. .... of God, for his mercies are infinite, than to fall into the hands of men, as ...

  3. Love Bomb

    OpenAIRE

    Caruana, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Love Bomb charts evidence of love and hate through a series of still lives constructed and informed by sourcery, chemistry and psychotherapy. The photographic work is a response to the breakup of relationship and metaphorical investigation of the links between the two emotions on wider scale. Restlessly the artist documents her attempts to stay in love, searching for love potions on the internet then making and photographing them in her studio. Interspersed amongst these attempts is the docum...

  4. Lost in Translation: U.S. Forces and Crime in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    attended by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, U.S. Secretary of Defense William Gates, Japanese Foreign Minister Takeaki Matsumoto and Japanese...particular, have been at the heart of the controversy.102 According to Lisa Takeuchi Cullen , “Okinawa hates America, and Okinawa loves America...February 3, 2010, http://nippon.com/en/in-depth/a00501/. 103 Lisa Takeuchi Cullen , “Sex and Race in Okinawa,” Time, August 19, 2001, http

  5. Positive and negative emotions in motivation for second language learning

    OpenAIRE

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Vincze, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The role of basic emotions in SLA has been underestimated in both research and pedagogy. The present article examines 10 positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love) and 9 negative emotions (anger, contempt, disgust, embarrassment, guilt, hate, sadness, feeling scared, and being stressed). The emotions are correlated with core variables chosen from three well-known models of L2 motivation: Gardner’s integrative motive, Clément’s so...

  6. Taxonomía de la comunicación violenta y el discurso del odio en Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Miró Llinares, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Even though the Law has always focused on words that are offensive and damaging, and which convey hate or incite to violence, during the last few years there has been a growing preoccupation with the capacity of cyberspace to augment the harmful effect of some expressions or forms of violent communication. This paper approaches the topic beginning with the observation and analysis of more than 250,000 tweets published in Spanish after the Paris attacks that victimized those responsible for th...

  7. Martyrdom redefined: self-destructive killers and vulnerable narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla, Leonardo

    2014-08-01

    Lankford shows that suicide terrorists have much in common with maladjusted persons who die by suicide. However, what differentiates suicidal killers from those who "only" commit suicide? A key element may be vulnerable narcissism. Narcissism has been simultaneously linked to interpersonal aggression, achievement, and depression. These traits may explain the paradoxical picture of a person who may appear "normal" in some aspects, and yet hate himself and others so intensely as to seek mutual destruction.

  8. The Political Economy of the United States Military Market: 1963-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    motivation 34 of individuals to behave morally. Rawls (1971) depicts a similar process, but in the opposite direction; where the moral (or cooperative...develop or maintain optimal levels of commitment. Machiavelli ([1513] 1995) argued that although a military leader should try to avoid being hated, it is...very necessary that he does not worry about a reputation for cruelty ( Machiavelli , p. 94)". On the other hand, Rousseau ([1762] 1951) argues that

  9. Large Scale Crowdsourcing and Characterization of Twitter Abusive Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Founta, Antigoni-Maria; Djouvas, Constantinos; Chatzakou, Despoina; Leontiadis, Ilias; Blackburn, Jeremy; Stringhini, Gianluca; Vakali, Athena; Sirivianos, Michael; Kourtellis, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, offensive, abusive and hateful language, sexism, racism and other types of aggressive and cyberbullying behavior have been manifesting with increased frequency, and in many online social media platforms. In fact, past scientific work focused on studying these forms in popular media, such as Facebook and Twitter. Building on such work, we present an 8-month study of the various forms of abusive behavior on Twitter, in a holistic fashion. Departing from past work, we examine a ...

  10. Rational versus Emotional Reasoning in a Realistic Multi-Objective Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mayboudi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Emotional intelligence and its associated with models have recently become one of new active studies in the field of artificial intelligence. Several works have been performed on modelling of emotional behaviours such as love, hate, happiness and sadness. This study presents a comparative evaluation of rational and emotional behaviours and the effects of emotions on the decision making process of agents in a realistic multi-objective environment. NetLogo simulation environment is u...

  11. Trolling a další nestandardní chování na internetu

    OpenAIRE

    Stěpanovová, Anna

    2016-01-01

    My thesis is titled Trolling and other unusual online behaviours. It focuses on deviant behaviours of internet users in Czech and foreign context. Trolling and hate became inseparable part of online environment, it is sort of a side product of the development of technology. The aim of this thesis is to reveal strategies hidden behind behaviour of users of the internet who intentionally disrupt the continuity of online environment (trolling etc.), also depicting the profile of this kind of int...

  12. Systems Approach to Terrorism: Countering the Terrorist Training Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    37 Albert Bandura , “Mechanisms of Moral Disengagement” in Origins of Terrorism ed. Walter Reich, (Washington D.C.: Woodrow...52 Albert Bandura , “Mechanisms of Moral Disengagement” in Origins of Terrorism ed. Walter Reich (Washington D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center...Hitler?” in Mass Hate: the Global Rise of Genocide and Terror (New York , London: Plennium Press), p.165 55 Albert Bandura p.45 56 Ibid. 32 As

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EDL933] pdb|1KDT|B Chain B, ... Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli In Complex ... With... 2',3'-Dideoxy-Cytidine Monophosphate pdb|1KDT|A ... Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli...|1KDR|B Chain B, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara-Cytidine Monophosp...hate ... pdb|1KDR|A Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EDL933] pdb|1KDT|B Chain B, ... Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli In Complex ... With... 2',3'-Dideoxy-Cytidine Monophosphate pdb|1KDT|A ... Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli...|1KDR|B Chain B, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara-Cytidine Monophosp...hate ... pdb|1KDR|A Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EDL933] pdb|1KDT|B Chain B, ... Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli In Complex ... With... 2',3'-Dideoxy-Cytidine Monophosphate pdb|1KDT|A ... Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli...|1KDR|B Chain B, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara-Cytidine Monophosp...hate ... pdb|1KDR|A Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EDL933] pdb|1KDT|B Chain B, ... Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli In Complex ... With... 2',3'-Dideoxy-Cytidine Monophosphate pdb|1KDT|A ... Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From E.Coli...|1KDR|B Chain B, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara-Cytidine Monophosp...hate ... pdb|1KDR|A Chain A, Cytidine Monophosphate Kinase From ... E.Coli In Complex With Ara

  17. Civil Disobedience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2014-01-01

    There is a good child, of any race, who is bullied. And as he grows older, He joins a hate group or a gang too, was bullied by every race, who bullied me. And as I grew older fought for equality for everyone. This is why I became an activist. Thesis why I am a poet. God asks are unwilling to die, fighting for what you believe. This is where I…

  18. Narrative Strategien in der TV-Serie Desperate Housewives

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Marion

    2005-01-01

    The TV-series Desperate Housewives is desperately loved by fans and desperately hated by critics. American columnist Jennifer L. Pozner accuses the series of portraying every female character as incompetent, in her opinion that is "just good old fashioned Hollywood crap." But why is this "Hollywood crap" so astonishingly successful (25 million viewers in the US, 3 million viewers in Germany) and who is the typical viewer? Why is the (dead) narrator so important and does the TV-Series really r...

  19. “We’d Be Free”: Narratives of Life Without Homophobia, Racism, or Sexism

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Ilan H.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Haile, Rahwa; McFarlane, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of exposure to everyday experiences of inequality. It finds that stigma and social inequality can increase stress and reduce well-being for LGB people,  even in the absence of major traumatic events such as hate crimes and discrimination. The study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, used qualitative analysis with 57 sexual minority men and women to identify aspects of stigma that are difficult to identify.  Subjects reported estrangement from f...

  20. ディケンズの『デイヴィッド・コパーフィールド』における時間

    OpenAIRE

    福島, 光義

    1995-01-01

    David Copperfield (1849-50) is an autobiographical novel which is narrated by the hero David Tune m this novel will be discussed in connection with Dickens' traumatic experiences, identity, writing, and memory. As the narrator says, "this narrative is my [his] written memory." David narrates his birth (by hearsay), child-hood, school days and matrimony, with his "good memory" and "close observation." The hero's feelings of love and hate, happiness and misery, pride and shame are frank-ly reco...

  1. Japanese Immigrants in the United States and Canada : A Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Glenn G.

    2000-01-01

    The experiences of Japanese immigrants to the United States and Canada is the difference between assimilating cultures, which bear different attitudes towards wealth and immigration. The United States population does not openly hate Japanese, but in times of economic problems the inherent discrimination shown towards those perceived as outsiders rises. Canada does not have such constrictions, although this should not be construed as implying that there is no discrimination in Canada. It is si...

  2. “Eu odeio Coca-Cola”: uma análise netnográfica sobre o discurso antimarca da comunidade virtual do orkut

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, Márcio Moutinho; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Bravo, Igor Garcia; Universidade Federal Fluminense

    2011-01-01

    It is evident broad organizational concerns regarding the management and maintenance of their brands. Retaliatory and repudiation action against product and services brands are shown as imposing barriers to be implemented by organizations. Thus, this study aims to deepen understanding of the subject by analyzing the speech of members of the virtual community antibrand "eu odeio coca-cola (I hate Coke)" in Orkut social network, besides seeking the motivations that led these members to express...

  3. Killing in Combat: Utilizing a Christian Perspective, When is a Soldier Justified in Taking a Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    Vietnam War combat veterans suffering from PTSD, has to say concerning subjects such as grief, guilt , honor, suffering, and healing while investigating...Gray, who served as an intelligence 11 officer in World War I, offers his thoughts on death and killing while discussing the guilt Soldiers so...battlefield (1959, 104). Gray also discusses the need for hating one’s enemy while having pride in the number of kills on the battlefield as a necessity

  4. Lexical availability of young Spanish EFL learners: emotion words versus non-emotion words

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Catalán, R.; Dewaele, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    This study intends to contribute to L2 emotion vocabulary research by looking at the words that primary school EFL learners produce in response to prompts in a lexical availability task. Specifically, it aims to ascertain whether emotion prompts (Love, Hate, Happy and Sad) generate a greater number of words than non-emotion prompts (School and Animals). It also seeks to identify the words learners associate with each semantic category to determine whether the words produced in response to emo...

  5. Sibling Relationships and Adolescent Adjustment: Longitudinal Associations in Two-Parent African American Families

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Solmeyer, Anna R.; McHale, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sibling relationships have been described as love-hate relationships by virtue of their emotional intensity, but we know little about how sibling positivity and negativity operate together to affect youth adjustment. Accordingly, this study charted the course of sibling positivity and negativity from age 10 to 18 in African American sibling dyads and tested whether changes in relationship qualities were linked to changes in adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Participants ...

  6. On The Limits of Free Speech: Towards the Fair Value of Communicative Liberties

    OpenAIRE

    Francisquini,Renato

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses, from a theoretically oriented perspective, the relationship between freedom of expression and democracy, trying to assess its implications for the regulation of mass media. Starting with a legal case in which a TV channel and a journalist were prosecuted for hate speech, looking at the reaction of the São Paulo Press Association to the case, I examine three perspectives on the statute and the reach of expressive liberties—the Millian Principle, the collectivist app...

  7. To Bayes or Not To Bayes? That's no longer the question!

    OpenAIRE

    Fokoue, Ernest

    2018-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide a thorough account of the ubiquitous nature of the Bayesian paradigm in modern statistics, data science and artificial intelligence. Once maligned, on the one hand by those who philosophically hated the very idea of subjective probability used in prior specification, and on the other hand because of the intractability of the computations needed for Bayesian estimation and inference, the Bayesian school of thought now permeates and pervades virtually all areas of sc...

  8. Identifying Deceptive Speech Across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-25

    enough from the truth. Subjects were then interviewed individually in a sound booth to obtain “norming” speech data, pre- interview. We also...e.g. pitch, intensity, speaking rate, voice quality), gender, ethnicity and personality information, our machine learning experiments can classify...Have you ever been in trouble with the police?” vs. open-ended (e.g. “What is the last movie you saw that you really hated ?”) DISTRIBUTION A

  9. The Approach Of The Sports Press To Public Relations Activities in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    OKAY, Aydemir

    2007-01-01

    Journalism and public relations are professional fields very close to each other. Despite some evidences regarding the usefulness of public relations supports on news work, a number of studies have described the perceptions of public relations practitioners and journalists as sometimes adversarial,  cooperative, or a love-hate relationship, and mostly skeptical toward each other. Most studies confirm that practitioners try to influence the news process and journalists try to defend against un...

  10. Social Tie Strength and Online Victimization: An Analysis of Young People Aged 15–30 Years in Four Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Keipi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online interaction through the use of social networking sites (SNS continues to be a significant component of the socialization of young people today, yet little research exists toward linking various relational forms to prevalent and much-studied online risks cross-nationally. This article provides a link between relational dynamics and online risks identified in previous research toward a new perspective on how social tie strength is related to experiences of hate victimization and harassment online. The analysis is based on survey data of Finnish ( n  = 555, American ( n  = 1033, German ( n  = 978, and British ( n  = 999 young people aged 15–30 years. Variables, including age, gender, main activity, SNS use, quantity, and extent of online and offline social networks including social tie strength and online community identification, were analyzed toward finding their associations with online hate victimization and harassment. Results showed that experiences of hate victimization and harassment were similar cross-nationally and that those who were personally harassed online also reported high SNS activity. Furthermore, no association was found between social network size and negative experiences. Notable cross-national differences were also detected in the results. Findings emphasize the importance of understanding variables fostering online risks for young people while providing a new perspective on what aspects of social life may help negate negative effects online.

  11. Origin of Everything and the 21 Dimensions of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loev, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The Dimensions of the Universe correspond with the Dimensions of the human body. The emotion that is a positive for every dimension is Love. The negative emotion that effects each dimension are listed. All seven negative emotions effect Peace, Love and Happiness. 21st Dimension: Happiness Groin & Heart 20th Dimension: Love Groin & Heart 19th Dimension: Peace Groin & heart 18th Dimension: Imagination Wave Eyes Anger 17th Dimension: Z Wave / Closed Birth 16th Dimension: Electromagnetic Wave Ears Anger 15th Dimension: Universal Wave Skin Worry 14th Dimension: Lover Wave Blood Hate 13th Dimension: Disposal Wave Buttocks Fear 12th Dimension: Builder Wave Hands Hate 11th Dimension: Energy Wave Arms Fear 10th Dimension: Time Wave Brain Pessimism 9th Dimension: Gravity Wave Legs Fear 8th Dimension: Sweet Wave Pancreas Fear 7th Dimension: File Wave Left Lung Fear 6th Dimension: Breathing Wave Right Lung Fear 5th Dimension: Digestive Wave Stomach Fear 4th Dimension: Swab Wave Liver Guilt 3rd Dimension: Space Wave Face Sadness 2nd Dimension: Line Wave Mouth Revenge 1st Dimension: Dot Wave Nose Sadness The seven deadly sins correspond: Anger Hate Sadness Fear Worry Pessimism Revenge Note: Guilt is fear

  12. Will the war for the Croatian Homeland War veterans ever end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Davor; Matić, Aldenita; Rak, Benedict

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the psychological consequences of participation in the Homeland War and experienced trauma which can indirectly be seen through drawing even after more than 15 years after the war had ended. The research was conducted on a sample of 125 patients of both genders treated in the Daily Hospital program of University Hospital Dubrava, Psychiatry Clinics. All the tested had trauma in their medical history and all of them met the PTSD diagnostic criteria, 75 examinees participated in the Homeland War and they represent the veteran group, and 50 examinees went through a stressful situation during peacetime and they represent the civilian group. All the examinees had to make two individual drawings, and the task was to portray feelings of term "love" (first drawing) and term "hate" (second drawing). They could choose motifs and colors freely. When portraying the term love, choice of motifs between the civilian and the veteran group wasn't considerably different, and only a small number of male veteran population (6.6%) drawings hinted at the connection with the Homeland War. The results between two groups are completely different in portraying the term hate. As much as 76% examinees from the veteran group have unequivocally and directly decided to portray wartime motifs, unlike the civilian group whose use of wartime motifs was just 10%. When choosing color, nearly 90% of the veteran group used neutral and cool colors to portray the term hate.

  13. “You Need to Be Sorted Out With a Knife”: The Attempted Online Silencing of Women and People of Muslim Faith Within Academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Barlow

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Academics are increasingly expected to use social media to disseminate their work and knowledge to public audiences. Although this has various advantages, particularly for alternative forms of dissemination, the web can also be an unsafe space for typically oppressed or subordinated groups. This article presents two auto-ethnographic accounts of the abuse and hate academics researching oppressed groups, namely, women and people of Muslim faith, experienced online. In doing so, this article falls into four parts. The first section provides an overview of existing literature, particularly focusing on work which explores the violence and abuse of women and people of Muslim faith online. The second section considers the auto-ethnographic methodological approach adopted in this article. The third section provides the auto-ethnographic accounts of the author’s experiences of hate and abuse online. The final section locates these experiences within broader theoretical concepts, such as silencing, and considers possible implications of such online hate in both an academic context and beyond.

  14. Our Angry Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reynolds; Dodson; 张江云

    1996-01-01

    Recently my college-age daughter said,“I hate modem classi-cal music.It always sounds so angry.”I had never thought of modern music that way,but as soon asshe said it,I knew what she meant.I’ve often criticized rap forthat reason.“It’s not like jazz or early rock,”I’d say.“Thosewere happy.When you hear rap blasting from a passing car,youwonder what the driver’s so mad at.”I submit that historians will lable our times The Age of

  15. Future classics / Priit Kruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kruus, Priit, 1981-

    2005-01-01

    Sisust: 1.1 Kõusaar - protagonist of a bestseller ; 1.2 Henno, a positive double ; 1.3 Angst filter Jürgen Rooste 1.4 Child-like Wimberg ; 2.1 The Estonian Finnegans Wake : [Berk Vaher's Lugulaul] ; 2.2 Agent Smith : [Mihkel Samarüütel] ; 2.3 A saviour against his will : [Mehis Heinsaar] ; 2.4 Flight : [Heiti Kender] ; 3.1 Viiding's hate and Keil's pain ; 3.2 Kind hearted nerd and beautiful babe : [Jan Kaus, Kerttu Rakke

  16. Al Sahawa - The Awakening. Volume V: Al Anbar Province, Area of Operations Raleigh, Fallujah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    occupations. You have to distinguish be- tween the freedom of that person, his freedom of speech and religion , so you do not gain his or her hate. Every...us in the name of all the religion . I’d rather not come back at all. He said to me, “if Sheikh Mishan come back they can start fighting and isolate...the United States’ historic credibility because of their attention to personal freedom , freedom of speech and expression, and to the expansion of

  17. Sprawl for Large Orchestra

    OpenAIRE

    Marschak, Daniel Francis

    2012-01-01

    Sprawl is a single movement work written in AABA form with an intro. The music is intended to be a love/hate letter to Los Angeles. On the one hand the city has its obvious downsides: traffic, pollution, and of course its daunting expanse. But the longer one lives here, the more one discovers that despite these negative aspects, there are countless hidden natural L.A. gems where the gridlock and tumult of the city melts away and all that's left is the desert, the ocean, and the hills. Althoug...

  18. Instant Cassandra query language

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Amresh

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. It's an Instant Starter guide.Instant Cassandra Query Language is great for those who are working with Cassandra databases and who want to either learn CQL to check data from the console or build serious applications using CQL. If you're looking for something that helps you get started with CQL in record time and you hate the idea of learning a new language syntax, then this book is for you.

  19. Cyberspace as a new arena for terroristic propaganda: an updated examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minei, Elizabeth; Matusitz, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    This paper analyzes the role of propaganda use in cyberterrorism. The main premise is that cyberterrorists display various semiotic gestures (e.g., the use of images and Internet videos) to communicate their intents to the public at large. In doing so, they communicate themes-these themes range from hate to anger. Cyberterrorism, then, is a form of theater or spectacle in which terrorists exploit cyberspace to trigger feelings of panic and overreaction in the target population. In many cases, this form of propaganda is the primary means of communication for various cyberterrorist groups to convey their intents. Internet sites also produce numerous opportunities for in-group communication and publicity.

  20. When Sentry Goes Stealing: An Information Systems Security Case Study in Behavioural Context

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Irfan Nabi; Zaheeruddin Asif; Abdulrahman A Mirza

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a case where the top management of a small holding company is involved in a love-hate relationship with its own IT department. The top management firmly believes that IT staff is involved in leaking out company’s secrets. However, having no expertise in IT and even lesser grasp on the complexity of IT architecture resulting from recent mergers and acquisition, the top management finds itself crucially dependent on its IT systems, yet unable to trust them fully. The ...

  1. Terror Talk: A Genealogy of the Racialization of the Muslim Body and of Right Wing Anti-Terrorism Rhetoric in Trump’s America

    OpenAIRE

    Mousa, Zeina

    2017-01-01

    On September 11th , 2001, men working for the extremist group, Al-Qaeda, hijacked commercial airplanes and targeted several United States federal buildings: The Pentagon, The White House, and the World Trade Center in New York City. This caused an uproar within the US state and civil society, along with a mass-media coverage on the “terrorist” attacks; this event also resulted in an outbreak of hate-crimes towards Muslims, and those who were believed to be Muslim. The Muslim body was somehow ...

  2. Who is to Blame on July 22, 2011? Psychological and Sociological Blame Frames in the Reporting of Anders Breivik in the Dutch Speaking Broadsheet Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertens Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On July 22, 2011 Anders Breivik murdered a large amount of people in Norway. In this study we investigate a sample of articles that were published about Breivik and his deeds in the Flemish and Dutch press. We will investigate these articles looking for the so-called “attribution of responsibility frame.” The murders from Breivik could be explained psychologically (“he is insane” as well as sociologically (far-right political parties are responsible because of having spread hate speech. We present a typology of subtypes of frames. We will furthermore investigate how many times these types of frames occur in different media outlets.

  3. Once a physicist: Nick Horvath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Nick

    2009-05-01

    How did you get into basketball? That's an easy one: I was tall. I had zero interest in sport at a young age and was pushed into basketball against my will when I was about eight. I hated it. The next year, however, I was so much taller than everyone else that in my first game, even though I had no idea what I was doing, I could simply hold the ball above my head and shoot over everyone. I fell in love with basketball after that first game. If I had played badly that day, it is likely that I would not have played again in my entire life.

  4. With malice toward none and charity for some: ingroup favoritism enables discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Anthony G; Pettigrew, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    Dramatic forms of discrimination, such as lynching, property destruction, and hate crimes, are widely understood to be consequences of prejudicial hostility. This article focuses on what has heretofore been only an infrequent countertheme in scientific work on discrimination-that favoritism toward ingroups can be responsible for much discrimination. We extend this counterthesis to the strong conclusion that ingroup favoritism is plausibly more significant as a basis for discrimination in contemporary American society than is outgroup-directed hostility. This conclusion has implications for theory, research methods, and practical remedies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. «Tu, solo, con la storia alle spalle». Durs Grünbein e la DDR: un bilancio critico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vecchiato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses some of the most significant (post-GDR poems by Grünbein and traces the development of aesthetic and poetological issues that are central to the poet’s oeuvre. It provides an articulated overview of Grünbein’s poetics by examining funda­mental themes like the love/hate attitude towards his hometown Dresden, the comple­mentary concepts of history and memory, and the materialism of the body as an antidote to utopias.

  6. Kek, Cucks, and God Emperor Trump: A Measurement Study of 4chan's Politically Incorrect Forum and its Effects on the Web

    OpenAIRE

    Hine, G.; Onaolapo, J.; De Cristofaro, E.; Kourtellis, N.; Leontiadis, I.; Samaras, R.; Stringhini, G.; Blackburn, J.

    2017-01-01

    The discussion-board site 4chan has been part of the Internet's dark underbelly since its inception, and recent political events have put it increasingly in the spotlight. In particular, /pol/, the “Politically Incorrect'” board, has been a central figure in the outlandish 2016 US election season, as it has often been linked to the alt-right movement and its rhetoric of hate and racism. However, 4chan remains relatively unstudied by the scientific community: little is known about its user bas...

  7. Taking advantage of Google's Web-based applications and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Tara J

    2014-01-01

    Google is a company that is constantly expanding and growing its services and products. While most librarians possess a "love/hate" relationship with Google, there are a number of reasons you should consider exploring some of the tools Google has created and made freely available. Applications and services such as Google Docs, Slides, and Google+ are functional and dynamic without the cost of comparable products. This column will address some of the issues users should be aware of before signing up to use Google's tools, and a description of some of Google's Web applications and services, plus how they can be useful to librarians in health care.

  8. El ataque del Batallón Cuchara: odios y conflicto entre chinos y mataperros en Lima (1863-1911

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Alonso Paroy Villafuerte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chineses in Lima suffered many ill-treatmens. This article details the attacks, ill-treatments and the conflicts as a common interrelations between chineses and citizens from Lima, especially younger mataperros, representing the multiethnic in Lima, particularly, under the group known as “Batallón Cuchara”, against who pretended belong to the peruvian life, who was intolerable to the “others”, showed in usually ill-treatments, degenerate in hate in both, but the chinese was an strange, at fault.

  9. The YouTube Jihadists: A Social Network Analysis of Al-Muhajiroun’s Propaganda Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jytte Klausen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Producers of Al-Qaeda inspired propaganda have shifted their operations in recent years from closed membership online forums to mainstream social networking platforms. Using social network analysis, we show that behind the apparent proliferation of such sources, YouTube account holders associated with incarnations of the British al-Muhajiroun collude to post propaganda and violent content. European groups commonly use American platforms and domain names registered with American companies. Seeking shelter under speech rights granted by the First Amendment, they evade European laws against incitement and hate speech.

  10. Exploring Student Attitudes to the Refugee Crisis: Songs on Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hempkin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of migrants and refugees has occupied Europe for the last few months. Much of the discourse surrounding this issue has been overwhelmingly negative, lapsing at times into stereotype, prejudice and even hate speech. As language teachers at a humanities faculty, we have a responsibility to address this issue in the classroom, especially as classroom experience tells us that our students are prone to stereotypical thinking. The article presents a series of song-based activities intended for use in language development classes for future teachers and translators at the Faculty of Arts, University of Maribor.

  11. From Playground to Salon: Challenges in Designing a System for Online Public Debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvlie, Anders Sundnes

    2017-01-01

    This article brings together two separate strands of media research: Online comments and media design. Online comments have long been a topic of much concern, both among scholars and the public at large, fearing negative effects from phenomena such as echo chambers, filter bubbles and hate speech......" model to a "salon" model. Building on Löwgren and Reimer's work on collaborative media, I suggest some of the broadcaster's struggles point to a lack of adequate methods for balancing interaction design concerns with the concerns of mass communication and journalism....

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available amine-6-Phosphate ... Deaminase From E.Coli, T Conformer, At 1.9a Resolution ... pdb|1FS6|A Ch...ain A, Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deaminase ... From E.Coli, T Conformer, At ...phate Isomerase pdb|1FRZ|B Chain B, ... Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deaminase From E.Coli, R ... C...lution ... pdb|1FRZ|A Chain A, Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deaminase ... From E.Coli, R Conformer....hate At 2.2 A ... Resolution pdb|1CD5|A Chain A, Glucosamine-6-Phosphate ... Deaminase From E.Coli

  13. Etiese perspektiewe op haatspraak in die lig van die derde gebod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobus M. (Koos Vorster

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hierdie artikel fokus op die implikasies van die derde gebod met betrekking tot haatspraak in Suid-Afrika (SA vandag. Die artikel gaan uit van die standpunt dat die name van God op sy wese dui. Die name van God soos dit in die bybelse openbaringsgeskiedenis ontwikkel word, druk die gemeenskapskarakter van God se verhouding met mense en die skepping uit. Die betekenis van die name kulmineer in die Nuwe-Testamentiese uitdrukkings Vader en God is liefde. Alle verbale gedrag wat hierdie gemeenskaps- en liefdesverhouding inhibeer, oortree die derde gebod. Die misbruik van die Naam van God vind onder andere plaas wanneer mense, wat na die beeld van God geskep is, gedegradeer word deur haatspraak, omdat sodanige degradering die gemeenskap en liefde tussen God en die mens skend. Ten slotte word sekere gevalle van haatspraak soos dit vandag in Suid-Afrika voorkom, teologies-eties belig teen die agtergrond van die betekenis van die derde gebod. Hierdie vorms sluit religieuse, rassistiese, xenofobiese, seksistiese en homofobiese haatspraak in. This article focuses on the implications of the third commandment for hate speech in modern-day South Africa. The article contends that the names of God are expressions of his Being. The names of God as they are developed in the biblical history of revelation express his creation of covenantal community and restored relations with humankind and creation. The meaning of the names of God culminates in the New Testament expressions Father and God is love. Verbal actions that inhibit the new community created by God or violate love transgress the third commandment. Misuse of the name of God occurs among others when people, created in the image of God, are verbally degraded by hate speech because such degradation violates the community of love between God and humankind. In conclusion, the article indicates forms of hate speech in South Africa that should be dealt with in the light of the third commandment. These are acts

  14. CTC Sentinel. Volume 6, Issue 8, August 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    future. Syria,” CTC Sentinel 6:8 (2013). 16 For some interesting work on this issue, see Thomas Hegghammer, “Should I Stay or Should I Go? Explain- ing...the late 1980s and early 1 Arie Perliger, “Democracy in an Ongoing Conflict: The Politics of Defence in Israel,” in James Forest and Isaiah Wilson...people of Syria and Iran…will not Hates Most, U.S. or Iran?” Bloomberg, February 5, 2013. 24 Thomas Erdbrink, “Khamenei: Iran Will Back ‘Any Nations

  15. Restorative justice training in intercultural settings in Serbia, and the contribution of the arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebmann Marian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes restorative justice training courses the author delivered in Serbia and Montenegro in the period 2003-2006, set in the context of the post-conflict situation, and reflects on the intercultural elements added to this course. The author also makes reference to recent work on hate crime and restorative justice in the UK as an extreme example of intercultural conflict. The final two sections discuss the potential of the arts in providing an extra (non-verbal tool in this work, using as examples two courses the author ran in Serbia.

  16. The Threat to Religious Liberties and the European Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Kiska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The following article analyzes the 3 chief threats facing religious liberty today in Europe, namely: (1 hate speech legislation; (2 anti-discrimination laws; (3 attacks on parental rights. Concrete examples are given of offenses to religious freedom. Additionally, the black letter law is set out in each section with suggested action points for national governments. The Article also discusses the Lautsi v. Italy judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, explaining its importance and using it as evidence to establish the political nature of the Strasbourg based court.

  17. Cloaked Facebook pages: Exploring fake Islamist propaganda in social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Johan Dam; Schou, Jannick; Neumayer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    This research analyses cloaked Facebook pages that are created to spread political propaganda by cloaking a user profile and imitating the identity of a political opponent in order to spark hateful and aggressive reactions. This inquiry is pursued through a multi-sited online ethnographic case...... study of Danish Facebook pages disguised as radical Islamist pages, which provoked racist and anti-Muslim reactions as well as negative sentiments towards refugees and immigrants in Denmark in general. Drawing on Jessie Daniels’ critical insights into cloaked websites, this research furthermore analyses...

  18. Global health in an open world requires an open mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    Why global health? Health has never been more clearly global than now. Social media have reorganized our way of talking, discussing and interacting globally by spreading happiness, hate speech, obesity and knowledge at the same time. Diseases have never had respect for border control. Polio has s...... is not a fashionable subject anymore but the story of HIV/AIDS is a lesson to global health decision makers. Rephrasing Elisabeth Pisani: whores have wisdom, and we had better open our minds and face it...

  19. The Coast Artillery Journal. Volume 65, Number 5, November 1926

    Science.gov (United States)

    1926-11-01

    Fmm the habit of mentally reviewing every paragraph as soon as you have read it. 31. Do not hesitate to mark up your ov.- nbooks to make the essen... economics of war, inter- national relations, causes and consequences of war, he can keep occu- pied to the very end of his career. If, then, an officer is...Europeans feel that we are economically rich, that they are kept out of this country and can’t sell their goods here, hence they hate us, as was

  20. Sexual Prejudice among Puerto Rican young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, José A.; Morales, Mercedes M.; Seda, Gretchen; González-Rivera, Milagritos

    2014-01-01

    Sexual prejudice is linked to hate crimes, mental health, risk behaviors, and stigma. Few studies have examined sexual prejudice among Latinos. We surveyed 382 college students in Puerto Rico. A structural model tested whether contact and positive experiences with homosexuals, perceived similarities with peers' attitudes toward homosexuality, and religiosity were predictive of sexual prejudice among Puerto Rican young adults. Sex differences in the structural model were explored. With the exception of peers' attitudes toward homosexuality, all study variables predict sexual prejudice. No sex differences were found. Implications for decreasing sexual prejudice among Puerto Rican youth in a college setting are discussed. PMID:18689195

  1. Den tavse venstrefløjspolitik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech

    2012-01-01

    , leftists have been keen to silence political adversaries by advocating the censoring of the freedom of speech, which is particularly evident during the cartoon crisis 2005/6 and in cases of hate speech. These two aspects of the politics of silence – to remain silent and to silence others – have been...... legitimized in three ways. First, by displacing the question of freedom of speech from a political right to a morality of empathy; second, by moralizing and antagonizing the political climate in good/evil, which stigmatizes the adversary; and finally, calling for self-censorship and censorship of those who do...

  2. Micro-sociology of mass rampage killings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Spectacular but very rare violent events such as mass killings by habitual non-criminals cannot be explained by factors which are very widespread, such as possession of firearms, being a victim of bullying, an introvert, or a career failure. A stronger clue is clandestine preparation of attack by one or two individuals, against randomly chosen representatives of a hated collective identity. Mass killers develop a deep back-stage, obsessed with planning their attack, overcoming social inferiority and isolation by an emotion of clandestine excitement.

  3. The Political Psychology of European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2015-01-01

    express for the EU and fellow Europeans, and the passion with which supporters of the EU argue for greater integration and enlargement are today central to understanding European integration. Being mindful of Europe - reflecting on the ways in which psychology and politics are deeply implicated in under......In an era of European crises over political legitimacy, economic austerity, and collapse of confidence in the EU the topic of European integration has be-come a very emotional subject. The anger which protestors demonstrate against economic austerity, the hate which nationalist far-right parties...

  4. Race Superiority or Racism: A review in the light of World Religions and Islamic Teachings (urdu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Race represents a specific caste, creed and a generation of a common ancestor. It has been a source of identification among different tribes and group of people, since humankind started life on this earth. With the passage of time different races have started using their racial backgrounds as negative sentiments which created superiority and inferiority complexes among people. Concepts of chosen people aroused in different races which created great gap, differences and hate in the society. The current research work is based upon the concept of superiority in Hinduism and Judaism, which will be further reviewed in the light of Islamic teachings.

  5. Emotions in aristotle: animic faculties in the formation of opinions and judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Garcés Giraldo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Emotions for Aristotle are emotional faculties in human beings, which can generate susceptibility and cause at some point that judgments be changed and other types of impressions be generated; they are accompanied by pleasure and pain, depending on the moods (that are present at the moment of feeling some emotion. In this article, in addition to developing a reflection on emotions from the Stagirita, there are described some of them and their opposites, which are the most common in all his writings, such as anger and calmness; love and hate; fear and trust; shame and shamelessness; compassion and indignation; and finally, envy and emulation.

  6. When Sentry Goes Stealing: An Information Systems Security Case Study in Behavioural Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Irfan Nabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a case where the top management of a small holding company is involved in a love-hate relationship with its own IT department. The top management firmly believes that IT staff is involved in leaking out company’s secrets. However, having no expertise in IT and even lesser grasp on the complexity of IT architecture resulting from recent mergers and acquisition, the top management finds itself crucially dependent on its IT systems, yet unable to trust them fully. The theories of deterrence and reasoned action are used to explain the otherwise objectionable behaviour of the perpetrator.

  7. Unmasking: on violence, masculinity, and superheroes in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Francis S.; Leafgren, Sheri L.

    2012-09-01

    Through exploration of public mask/private face, the authors trouble violence and its role in science education through three media: schools, masculinity, and science acknowledging a violence of hate, but dwelling on a violence of caring. In schools, there is the poisonous "for your own good" pedagogy that becomes a "for your own good" curriculum or a coercive curriculum for science teaching and learning; however, the antithetical curriculum of I'm here entails violence—the shedding of the public mask and the exposing of the private face. Violence, likewise, becomes social and political capital for masculinity that is a pubic mask for private face. Lastly, science, in its self-identified cultural, political and educational form of a superhero, creates permanent harm most often as palatable violence in order to save and to redeem not the private face, but the public mask. The authors conclude that they do not know what violence to say one should not do, but they know the much of the violence has been and is being committed. All for which we can hope is not that we cease all violence or better yet not hate, but that we violently love.

  8. The motivation to express prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forscher, Patrick S.; Cox, William T. L.; Graetz, Nicholas; Devine, Patricia G.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary prejudice research focuses primarily on people who are motivated to respond without prejudice and the ways in which unintentional bias can cause these people to act inconsistent with this motivation. However, some real-world phenomena (e.g., hate speech, hate crimes) and experimental findings (e.g., Plant & Devine, 2001; 2009) suggest that some expressions of prejudice are intentional. These phenomena and findings are difficult to explain solely from the motivations to respond without prejudice. We argue that some people are motivated to express prejudice, and we develop the motivation to express prejudice (MP) scale to measure this motivation. In seven studies involving more than 6,000 participants, we demonstrate that, across scale versions targeted at Black people and gay men, the MP scale has good reliability and convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. In normative climates that prohibit prejudice, the internal and external motivations to express prejudice are functionally non-independent, but they become more independent when normative climates permit more prejudice toward a target group. People high in the motivation to express prejudice are relatively likely to resist pressure to support programs promoting intergroup contact and vote for political candidates who support oppressive policies. The motivation to express prejudice predicted these outcomes even when controlling for attitudes and the motivations to respond without prejudice. This work encourages contemporary prejudice researchers to broaden the range of samples, target groups, and phenomena that they study, and more generally to consider the intentional aspects of negative intergroup behavior. PMID:26479365

  9. Organizational Commitment, Psychological Contract Fulfillment and Job Performance: A Longitudinal Quanti-qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Gomes Maia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this study are to contribute to the understanding of the development of organizational commitment and to explore the relations among psychological contract fulfillment, organizational commitment, and job performance. This paper reports the findings of a longitudinal quanti-qualitative study conducted with newcomers over three years. We identified four trajectories of commitment development: Learning to Love, High Match, Honeymoon Hangover and Learning to Hate. The last one is originally proposed in this study, and it is represented by individuals who began work highly committed to the organization, but then their commitment levels decreased dramatically over time. We discuss some characteristics associated with these trajectories. Our results corroborate the assumption that psychological contract fulfillment is positively related to commitment. Nevertheless, our findings about the relationship between commitment and job performance were different according to the trajectories. The trajectories Learning to Love and Learning to Hate support the assumption that higher commitment levels would lead to better performance, and vice versa; however, the trajectories High Match and Honeymoon Hangover contradict it. We offer and discuss some possible explanations for these findings.

  10. Transphobic Murders in Italy: An Overview of Homicides in Milan (Italy) in the Past Two Decades (1993-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunas, Antonio; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Gentile, Guendalina; Muccino, Enrico; Veneroni, Laura; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-10-01

    In Europe, 71 murders resulting in the death of transgendered persons were reported between 2008 and 2013, 20 of which perpetrated in Italy, the second highest rate in Europe after Turkey. We retrospectively analyzed the homicides of transgender people recorded at the Medicolegal Bureau in Milan from January 1993 to December 2012. First we considered the sociodemographic data of 20 victims and the circumstantial details of their deaths, then we examined the data related to the cause of death from the autopsy reports. Our data show that victims are mostly immigrants, biological males presenting with a feminine attire and with varying degrees of feminization. The large majority of the victims were sex workers from South America. As for murderers, they were unknown in 7 cases (35%); all the 13 murderers identified were males, aged between 17 and 63 (M age = 31 years). In 38% of the cases, the murderer was the victim's current or former partner. For half of the homicides, it was possible to identify at least one primary indicator of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) hate crime. Our findings call for the need to make explicit in Italian legislation that a crime perpetrated on the ground of sexual orientation and gender identity constitutes a hate crime. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Who Decides What Is Acceptable Speech on Campus? Why Restricting Free Speech Is Not the Answer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Stephen J; Williams, Wendy M

    2018-05-01

    Recent protests on dozens of campuses have led to the cancellation of controversial talks, and violence has accompanied several of these protests. Psychological science provides an important lens through which to view, understand, and potentially reduce these conflicts. In this article, we frame opposing sides' arguments within a long-standing corpus of psychological research on selective perception, confirmation bias, myside bias, illusion of understanding, blind-spot bias, groupthink/in-group bias, motivated skepticism, and naive realism. These concepts inform dueling claims: (a) the protestors' violence was justified by a higher moral responsibility to prevent marginalized groups from being victimized by hate speech, versus (b) the students' right to hear speakers was infringed upon. Psychological science cannot, however, be the sole arbiter of these campus debates; legal and philosophical considerations are also relevant. Thus, we augment psychological science with insights from these literatures to shed light on complexities associated with positions supporting free speech and those protesting hate speech. We conclude with a set of principles, most supported by empirical research, to inform university policies and help ensure vigorous freedom of expression within the context of an inclusive, diverse community.

  12. Injury resulting from targeted violence: An emergency department perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivarajasingam, Vaseekaran; Read, Simon; Svobodova, Martina; Wight, Lucy; Shepherd, Jonathan

    2018-06-01

    Hate crimes - those perpetrated because of perceived difference, including disability, race, religion, sexual orientation or transgender status - have not been studied at the point of the victim's hospital emergency department (ED) use. To investigate the frequency, levels of physical harm and circumstances of targeted violence in those seeking treatment at EDs in three UK cities. In a multimethods study, face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 124 adult ED attenders with violent injuries. Victim and perpetrator socio-demographics were recorded. Patient narratives about perceived motives and circumstances were transcribed, uploaded onto NVivo for thematic analysis. Nearly a fifth (23, 18.5%) of the injured patients considered themselves to have been attacked by others motivated by hostility or prejudice to their 'difference' (targeted violence). Thematic analyses suggested these prejudices were to appearance (7 cases), racial tension (5 cases), territorial association (3 cases) and race, religious or sexual orientation (8 cases). According to victims, alcohol intoxication was particularly relevant in targeted violence (estimated reported frequency 90% and 56% for targeted and non-targeted violence, respectively). Our findings support a broader concept of hate victimisation and suggest that emergency room violence surveys could act as a community tension sensor and early warning system in this regard. Tackling alcohol misuse seems as important in this as in other forms of violence perpetration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. La haine à l’œuvre dans Carpenter’s Gothic (1999 de William Gaddis Cultivating Hatred in Carpenter’s Gothic (1999 by William Gaddis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Sohier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Carpenter’s Gothic, hatred is given pride of place. William Gaddis delineates a society in which hatred proliferates. Characters are caught in the turmoils of their hatred whether it derives from the Vietnam War or from fundamentalist movements, from their individualistic quest for social recognition or from self-aggrandizement. We mean to develop a typology derived from psychoanalysis and anthropology so as to take into account all the different facets hate has in the novel. We shall devote analyses to jealousy caused by hatred, then describe the primary hate that underpins all types of relationships as a preliminary to questioning the excess that fuels Gaddis’s writing. Lastly, by referring to the author’s non-fictional work we shall put forward the thesis that the voluble protagonist is to a large extent the author’s mouthpiece. McCandless’s vindictive disquisitions on the course of the world will be seen as the equivalent of a tragic mask through which William Gaddis gives vent to his melancholia and intense detestation of the ways of the world.

  14. Libertad de expresión y el caso del lenguaje del odio. Una aproximación desde la perspectiva norteamericana y la perspectiva alemana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Pérez de la Fuente

    2010-11-01

    Abstract This article analyzes the conceptions on freedom of expression in the case of hate speech, focusing in some aspects of the North American perspective and in some aspects of the German perspective. The first model is based on negative freedom and it corresponds with the vision of marketplace of ideas that has elaborated the jurisprudence of the North American Supreme Court. This Court has given a priority role to the free speech that only must be limited in cases of clear and present danger or a threat of the breach of the peace. The second model is focused in the positive freedom, it gives a priority role to the human dignity in front of free speech. The Federal Constitutional Court has established that the conflict between fundamental rights must be considered according to the circumstances of the specific case.

  15. (Re)visualizing Black lesbian lives, (trans)masculinity, and township space in the documentary work of Zanele Muholi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imma, Z'étoile

    2017-04-03

    This article explores the politics of representing Black queer and trans subjectivities in the recent documentary film and photography of South African lesbian visual activist Zanele Muholi. While Muholi's work has been most often been positioned as an artistic response to the hate-crimes and violence perpetuated against Black lesbians in South African townships, most notably acts of sexual violence known increasingly as corrective rape, I argue that Muholi's documentary texts trouble the spatial, gendered, and highly racialized articulations that make up an increasingly global corrective rape discourse. The article considers how her visual texts foreground and (re)visualize Black queer and trans gender experiences that relocate, challenge, collaborate with, and at times, perform, masculinity as means to subvert heterosexist and racist constructions of township space and the Black gendered body.

  16. Negative hallucinations, dreams and hallucinations: The framing structure and its representation in the analytic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelberg, Rosine Jozef

    2016-12-01

    This paper explores the meaning of a patient's hallucinatory experiences in the course of a five times a week analysis. I will locate my understanding within the context of André Green's ideas on the role of the framing structure and the negative hallucination in the structuring of the mind. The understanding of the transference and countertransference was crucial in the creation of meaning and enabling the transformations that took place in the analytic process. Through a detailed analysis of a clinical example the author examines Bion's distinction between hysterical hallucinations and psychotic hallucinations and formulates her own hypothesis about the distinctions between the two. The paper suggests that whilst psychotic hallucinations express a conflict between life and death, in the hysterical hallucination it is between love and hate. The paper also contains some reflections on the dramatic nature of the analytic encounter. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  17. Being seen or being watched? A psychoanalytic perspective on body dysmorphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Alessandra

    2009-08-01

    The focus of this paper is on individuals who present as excessively preoccupied with their body, perceiving some aspect(s) to be 'ugly' such that they feel compelled to alter and/or conceal this 'ugly' body part. These difficulties are understood as symptoms of an underlying narcissistic disturbance. The author suggests that the relative pervasiveness of an identification with a 'super'-ego accounts for the degree of severity of the disturbance (increasing the compulsion to alter and/or conceal the hated body part) and that it has implications for the patient's accessibility in analytic treatment. Understanding the vicissitudes of the development of the body-self in the context of the earliest relationship with the 'object of desire' is core to helping these patients because of the quality of the identifications that ensue and that are then enacted the transference.

  18. Joaquín Monegro: el vano intento de liberar una pasión.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Torres Torres

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ENGLISH:Freedom topic is examined from attitudes adopted by Joaquín Monegro, a character from Miguel de Unamuno novel Abel Sánchez. Those attitudes are held on throughout the novel plot. This character lives under an existencial anguish sign opprossed by a hateful passion which Joaquín Monegro can only be rid of in his agony and daeth. SPANISH: En el presente estudio se examina el tema de la libertad en la novela Abel Sánchez de Miguel de Unamuno, a partir de las actitudes que adopta en el desarrollo de la historia el personaje Joaquín Monegro, que vive bajo el signo de una angustia existencial, oprimido por una odiosa pasión, posible de liberar recién en su agonía y muerte.

  19. Cine-Anthology of Hotels as a Place of Time and Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertaç Timur Demir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Every place has a story. Hotels, however, have thousands of stories that are multilayered, interwoven, and imbricated. Their puzzled fictions resemble films in that they both overlap unrelated tales, phenomena, and characters within a short temporal fragment. Mysteries, secrets, love, cabal, fraud, hate, cheating, shows, fun, prostitution, gambling, falls, and so on—all of these conditions and emotions pertain to hotels, as well as films. Working under this framework, then, this paper aims to approach hotels as a temporal experience which goes beyond space for the purpose of both analyzing hotel deaths as a symbolic case of urban living and in order to interpret films as a type of testimony regarding social change. Beyond all of the bright surfaces, hotels represent and reproduce insincerity, insusceptibility, omission, coldness, and distance. Hotels represent gaps, desolateness, devastation, homelessness, and timelessness.

  20. Interventions Highlighting Hypocrisy Reduce Collective Blame of Muslims for Individual Acts of Violence and Assuage Anti-Muslim Hostility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Emile; Kteily, Nour; Falk, Emily

    2018-03-01

    Collectively blaming groups for the actions of individuals can license vicarious retribution. Acts of terrorism by Muslim extremists against innocents, and the spikes in anti-Muslim hate crimes against innocent Muslims that follow, suggest that reciprocal bouts of collective blame can spark cycles of violence. How can this cycle be short-circuited? After establishing a link between collective blame of Muslims and anti-Muslim attitudes and behavior, we used an "interventions tournament" to identify a successful intervention (among many that failed). The "winning" intervention reduced collective blame of Muslims by highlighting hypocrisy in the ways individuals collectively blame Muslims-but not other groups (White Americans, Christians)-for individual group members' actions. After replicating the effect in an independent sample, we demonstrate that a novel interactive activity that isolates the psychological mechanism amplifies the effectiveness of the collective blame hypocrisy intervention and results in downstream reductions in anti-Muslim attitudes and anti-Muslim behavior.

  1. Xenophobic attitudes and personal characteristics of adolescents with deviant behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurina O.D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are often racial, ethnic intolerance among adolescents, which, in our opinion, caused by the presence of xenophobic attitudes, some combination of personality structures and situational factors. We hypothesized that there is a specificity of the relationship of xenophobic attitudes and personality characteristics in the structure of the person of adolescents with deviating (including illegal behavior and normative behavior. The study involved 254 female and a teenage male aged 14 - 18 years. The study used a questionnaire to identify the severity of xenophobic attitudes, as well as the methodology and questionnaires to identify the personality characteristics of adolescents and semantic constructs of personality. As a result, significant differences were found in the personal features (criterion U-Mann-Whitney test with p <0,01 and semantic structures in adolescents with regulations and illegal behavior of offenders with a nationalist orientation and without it. The results can be used in the framework of the prevention of hate crimes among adolescents.

  2. [The Effects of Exercising in Childhood on Bone Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Jun; Torii, Suguru; Masujima, Atsushi

    In contemporary Japan, there is a polarizing trend in children who exercise more than 1,800 minutes a week and those who exercise less than 60 minutes a week. Quite a lot of girls in particular hate exercise,and therefore they don't get enough of it. Osteoporosis is a preventable disease from childhood. It is crucial for girls to exercise and to provide appropriate stimulation to bones before menarche, which increases bone mineral content. Exercise and sports in childhood are characterized as the ways to the lifelong prevention strategies against osteoporosis and fractures. It is hoped that all children practice appropriate exercise program based on scientific evidence to promote bone health. In this review article, the effects of exercising in childhood on bone health, and the points to be noted regarding childhood sports are described.

  3. Cyberbullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    2017-01-01

    Cyberbullying is the term used for bullying behavior conducted by or involving electronic communication. This entry offers descriptions of different attempts to define cyberbullying and mentions some of the differentiations between traditional bullying and the new forms of cyberbullying...... in ways that entangle digital and analog practices of relating. Cyberbullying may involve humiliating, ridiculing, exposing vulnerabilities and revealing secrets shared in confidence. Cyberbullying also may involve posing threats, sometimes even death threats or suggestions that the recipient commit...... suicide. It may involve shaming or insulting other children. When digital communication is involved, the means of bullying expand. Launching hate groups on Facebook, creating fake social profiles and sending fake messages from targeted children’s accounts are just some of the common means of cyberbullying...

  4. Sociocultural theory and blind taste-tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Paul Gee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In his entertaining 1986 book, The Real Coke, the Real Story, Thomas Oliver tells the story of the now infamous “New Coke”, a story retold in Malcolm Gladwell’s (2005 best-seller Blink. In the early 1980s, Pepsi began running commercials in which people took a sip from two glasses, not knowing which was Coke and which Pepsi. The majority preferred Pepsi. The Coca-Cola Company replicated these blind taste-tests and found the same result. Losing market share, Coke—long the dominant brand—changed its old formula and came out with “New Coke”, a soda made to a new formula, one that in a new round of blind taste-tests came out above Pepsi. But New Coke was a disaster.Consumers hated it. Coke not only returned to its old formula, but Pepsi never did overtake Coke, which remains today the dominant brand world-wide.

  5. Multiculturalism as Governmentality in Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    Britain has been a multicultural nation for the better part of the past century, but multiculturalism has only manifested itself as a political phenomenon roughly since the Rushdie affair. Multiculturalism did not emerge as a proactive political initiative, but became a strategy for solving...... the problems ushered in by the multicultural society. Specifically, the challenges arose following the recent history immigration and emerged as discrimination, hate speech, reaffirmed religious identities, terrorism and radicalism. These challenges and politics of British multiculturalism have been studied...... be understood as the guiding principles of the modern British state? Is a multicultural politics, as applied by the British government, the better strategy for solving the problems and reaffirming its position as the immediately apparent governing institution of society?...

  6. Revisiting the Contagion Hypothesis: Terrorism, News Coverage, and Copycat Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte L. Nacos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Contagion refers here to a form of copycat crime, whereby violence-prone individuals and groups imitate forms of (political violence attractive to them, based on examples usually popularized by mass media. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, for instance, Palestinian terrorists staged a number of spectacular hijackings of commercial airliners, exploited the often prolonged hostage situations to win massive news coverage for their political grievances, and appeared to inspire other groups to follow their example. Although terrorism scholars, government officials, and journalists have pondered the question of mass-mediated contagion for decades, they have arrived at different conclusions. Because of significant advances in communication and information technology, and changes in the global media landscape during the last decade or so, this article reconsiders arguments surrounding contagion theories and contends that various types of media are indeed important carriers of the virus of hate and political violence. 

  7. Between Two Worlds: Concert-giving and Rioting in the Post-Yugoslav Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Petrov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Starting in the late 1990s, some musicians from the territory of former Yugoslavia gradually embarked on the project of giving concerts in Belgrade, the capital of the former country. Others refused to perform in Serbia after the wars, which fuelled a negative attitude toward these musicians. In this paper I deal with the reception of those concerts, pointing to the ways they have become specific affective sites of memory. I focus on two major issues: the discourse produced in the concerts by the performers themselves and members of the audience and the discourse produced by various protest groups (which resulted in the organization of protests in Belgrade against performances by musicians who ‘hate Serbs’.

  8. The conflict and process theory of Melanie Klein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaler-Adler, S

    1993-09-01

    This article depicts the theory of Melanie Klein in both its conflict and process dimensions. In addition, it outlines Klein's strategic place in psychoanalytic history and in psychoanalytic theory formation. Her major contributions are seen in light of their clinical imperatives, and aspects of her metapsychology that seem negligible are differentiated from these clinical imperatives. Klein's role as a dialectical fulcrum between drive and object relations theories is explicated. Within the conflict theory, drive derivatives of sex and aggression are reformulated as object-related passions of love and hate. The process dimensions of Klein's theory are outlined in terms of dialectical increments of depressive position process as it alternates with regressive paranoid-schizoid-position mental phenomenology. The mourning process as a developmental process is particularly high-lighted in terms of self-integrative progression within the working through of the depressive position.

  9. Good and Bad: Love and Intimacy From Plato to Melanie Klein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, David

    2018-06-01

    Melanie Klein's theories on love outline a complex system of relations-an oscillating dynamic of psychical and emotional tendencies following from both actual experience and fantasies produced by the mind. Her insights are often discussed and applied in psychoanalytical contexts, but the philosophical implications of her theory-especially in relation to Platonic thought-have rarely been discussed. In this article, I will attempt to address this gap by setting out some preliminary yet core considerations shared by both Plato and Klein. First, I will describe some structural parallels between Kleinian and Platonic thought, especially in dialectical terms. Second, I will outline Plato's covert influence on Freud as passing through the teachings of philosopher Franz Brentano. And last, I will discuss intimacy as a struggle between the forces of good and bad, creativity and destruction, and love and hate-suggesting that Klein's conception of love emerges as a moral exigency.

  10. A new look at the theory of Melanie Klein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R

    1990-01-01

    This paper tried to show that Melanie Klein's theory can very profitably be viewed as a descriptive theory of strong emotions rather than an instinct or developmental theory. Furthermore, since in Klein's thinking feelings 'create' objects, the primacy of feelings in this theory is central. The paper contains a short chronological study of Klein's formulations of psychic phenomena in terms of affects. It is also maintained that the paranoid-schizoid and the depressive positions are constellations of affects and of reactions to them; that psychic development is essentially in terms of the capacity to tolerate feelings, and that the basic conflict in mental life is between feelings of love and hate and associated feelings. Such a view solves many of the conceptual difficulties of Kleinian theory and in addition promises rewarding insights into the world of feelings.

  11. Public acceptance and public relations. Communication approach to related pre-public relation problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Y [Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-07-01

    A set of problems are discussed, which must be studied before the public relations are dealt with. Firstly, the trade-off between energy and health must be considered. Although the probability of death caused by atomic accidents is very small (one three hundred millionth a year), many peoples hate atomic power and oppose to the construction of nuclear power plants. Four reasons for this are considered: (1) social diffusion of innovation, (2) nuclear allergy, (3) shortage of the conception of risk-benefit, and (4) heterogeneity of the public. According to the investigation of the relationship between electric power and livelihood, carried out by the policyand science research institute in Tokyo, the highly subjective decision for the acceptance of atomic power is independent of the objective knowledge on atomic power.

  12. Forms, Frequency, and Correlates of Perceived Anti-Atheist Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Hammer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The nationally representative 2008 American Religious Identification Survey found that 41% of self-identified atheists reported experiencing discrimination in the last 5 years due to their lack of religious identification.  This mixed-method study explored the forms and frequency of discrimination reported by 796 self-identified atheists living in the United States.  Participants reported experiencing different types of discrimination to varying degrees, including slander; coercion; social ostracism; denial of opportunities, goods, and services; and hate crime.  Similar to other minority groups with concealable stigmatized identities, atheists who more strongly identified with their atheism, who were “out” about their atheism to more people, and who grew up with stricter familial religious expectations reported experiencing more frequent discrimination.  Implications for future research tied to the ongoing religion/spirituality-health debate are discussed.

  13. Gender violence: transgender experiences with violence and discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, E L; Wilchins, R A; Priesing, D; Malouf, D

    2001-01-01

    There is a pervasive pattern of discrimination and prejudice against transgendered people within society. Both economic discrimination and experiencing violence could be the result of a larger social climate that severely sanctions people for not conforming to society's norms concerning gender; as such, both would be strongly associated with each other. Questionnaires were distributed to people either through events or through volunteers, and made available upon the World Wide Web. A sample of 402 cases was collected over the span of 12 months (April 1996-April 1997). We found that over half the people within this sample experienced some form of harassment or violence within their lifetime, with a quarter experiencing a violent incident. Further investigation found that experiencing economic discrimination because one is transgendered had the strongest association with experiencing a transgender related violent incident. Economic discrimination was related to transgendered people's experience with violence. Therefore, both hate crimes legislation and employment protections are needed for transgendered individuals.

  14. Othering practice in a right-wing extremist online forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgarten, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the linguistic-discursive construction of others in one international right-wing extremist online discussion forum. By means of a positioning analysis and an appraisal analysis, the article shows how reference to absent third parties is used to establish others...... as outgroups in forum posts aimed at an international audience. The analysis reveals an othering practice that links the online extremist discourse world with international and local as well as with political, social, and personal concerns, providing various opportunities for user affiliation. The results...... of this investigation contribute to understanding of the linguistic-discursive construction of online hate speech in multicultural virtual (rhetorical) communities; the study also highlights how social media and the use of English as a lingua franca combine to connect geographically and linguistically separate...

  15. Alternative careers in science leaving the ivory tower

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Many science students find themselves in the midst of graduate school or sitting at a lab bench, and realize that they hate lab work! Even worse is realizing that they may love science, but science (at least academic science) is not providing many job opportunities these days. What's a poor researcher to do !? This book gives first-hand descriptions of the evolution of a band of hardy scientists out of the lab and into just about every career you can imagine. Researchers from every branch of science found their way into finance, public relations, consulting, business development, journalism, and more - and thrived there! Each author tells their personal story, including descriptions of their career path, a typical day, where to find information on their job, opportunities to career growth, and more. This is a must-read for every science major, and everyone who is looking for a way to break out of their career rut.

  16. FCJ-167 Spraying, fishing, looking for trouble: The Chinese Internet and a critical perspective on the concept of trolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele de Seta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet research has dealt with trolls from many different perspectives, framing them as agents of disruption, nomadic hate breeders and lowbrow cynics spawned by the excessive freedoms of online interaction, or as legitimate and necessary actors in the ecology of online communities. Yet, the question remains: what is a troll, where it come from and where does it belong? Presenting the results of a brief troll-hunt on the Chinese Internet and discussing the features of troll-like figures in Chinese digital folklore, I argue in favour of a localised understanding of Internet cultures, presenting trolling as a culture-specific construct that has come to embody disparate kinds of online behaviour and to function as an umbrella term for different kinds of discourse about the Internet itself.

  17. Questioning the role of Facebook in maintaining Syrian social capital during the Syrian crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ramadan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Syrian crisis is considered the ‘world’s single largest crisis for almost a quarter of a century that has the biggest refugee population from a single conflict in a generation’ (UN High Commissioner for Refugees, 2016. The rapid adoption of Facebook among Syrians questions whether it helps in maintaining the social capital of a war-torn nation and a dispersed Syrian population worldwide. Data was collected by means of a Facebook survey from 964 Syrian users. Results indicated that Facebook enhanced social identity and social capital through facilitating communication, collaboration and resource sharing among dispersed Syrians inside and outside the country. However, the offline rift of the nation was extended to Facebook through promoting hate speech among opposed parties. Results of this study may advance the understanding of the role of Facebook on social capital in countries going through similar crisis situations.

  18. «La çibdad está escandalizada». Social Unrest and Factional Fight in Late Medieval Toledo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar LÓPEZ GÓMEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the riots occurred since the thirteenth Century served mainly to educate the state organizations in Western Europe in the defense of the sociopolitical status quo, the voice of the común never was silenced. The evidence and hundreds of testimonials preserved until today show us protests of all kinds: from those born in the privacy of hate against the noble to those who desperately emerged, result of the collapse of situations that are believed untenable. Individual protests, religious groups and artisans, in masse; using songs and scandalous words, peacefully or with ferocious violence. It was on the eve of the uprisings when the protest turned bloodiest speech, providing an ideological basis for the achievement of purposes for both aspiring social groups together as specific powerful individuals.

  19. Good God?!? Lamentations as a model for mourning the loss of the good God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck-Loomis, Tiffany

    2012-09-01

    This article will address the devastating psychological and social effects due to the loss of one's primary love-object, namely God in the case of faith communities and religious individuals. By using Melanie Klein's Object Relations Theory (Klein in Envy and gratitude and other works 1946/1963. The Free Press, New York, 1975a) as a way to enter the text of Lamentations, I will articulate an alternative reading that can serve as a model for Pastors and Educators to use when walking with individuals and communities through unspeakable losses. I will argue that Lamentations may be used as a tool for naming confounding depression and anxiety that stems from a damaged introjected object (one's personal God). This tool may provide individuals and communities a framework for placing anger and contempt upon God in order to re-assimilate this loved yet hated object, eventually leading toward healing and restoration of the self.

  20. Computer programmes development for environment variables setting for use with C compiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyotha, P.; Prasertchiewcharn, N.; Yamkate, P.

    1994-01-01

    Compilers generally need special environment variables that operating system has not given at the beginning. Such an environment variables as COMSPEC, PATH, TMP, LIB, INCLUDE can be used as data exchange among programmes.Those variables normally occupy memories and, in some cases, an 'Out of Environment Space' error message frequently occurs when the user set a new environment variable. We would hate to give up in such a situation that just one variable has gotten too large as well as destroying all environment variables. In order to bring everything down to an earth, we try to save an old environment setting, clear and set a new one. Later on, a new setting shall have been cleared and an old one from a saved setting shall have been restored

  1. Community radio and peace-building in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    and interviews with community radio practitioners conducted between 2007 and 2013, and addresses the following questions: How do the community radio stations work during elections – times of increased tensions? How do they discourage ethnic violence in their community? How is participation used in order to bring......In December 2007, violence broke out after the disputed general election in Kenya, which resulted in the death of 1100 Kenyans and left more than 660,000 displaced. Reports criticised media, especially vernacular media, for inflating the violence by using hate speech and incitement to violence......, and suggested that Kenya would benefit from more community media to prevent history from repeating itself. This article focuses on how Koch FM and Pamoja FM, two community radio stations in Nairobi, Kenya, worked during the 2007–08 tumult and 2013 general election. The article is based on observations...

  2. [Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

    2012-04-01

    Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane.

  3. “Honestly, We’re Not Spying on Kids”: School Surveillance of Young People’s Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Regan Shade

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social media is one of the top activities and sites for young people’s socialization in North America, raising concerns over their social privacy, because of reported instances of cyberbullying and sexting, and their informational privacy, because of commercial data collection. A trend in schools and school districts in the United States is to monitor and track, through third party applications and software, student social media during and after school, in an attempt to prevent or reduce the perceived dissemination of violence, bullying, threats, or hate instigated by students and directed toward other students or entire schools. This article will provide an overview of four of these US companies (Geo Listening, Varsity Monitor, Snaptrends, Digital Fly and consider the policy and ethical issues of data monitoring with respect to young people’s rights to privacy and their freedom of speech.

  4. THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL AND ITS ROLE IN PROMOTING AND DEFENDING HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE EUROPEAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion, POPESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Council of Europe advocates freedom of expression and of the media, freedom of assembly, equality, and the protection of minorities. It has launched campaigns on issues such as child protection, online hate speech, and the rights of the Roma, Europe's largest minority. The Council of Europe helps member states fight corruption and terrorism and undertake necessary judicial reforms. Its group of constitutional experts, known as the Venice Commission, offers legal advice to countries throughout the world. The Council of Europe promotes human rights through international conventions, such as the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence and the Convention on Cybercrime. It monitors member states' progress in these areas and makes recommendations through independent expert monitoring bodies. All Council of Europe member states have abolished the death penalty.

  5. Mediatized Spirituality: A Critical Appraisal of the Media-Religion Nexus in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allwell Okechukwu Nwankwo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Religion in Nigeria is predominantly manifested in three identifiable forms: Christianity, Islam and African Traditional Religion. All three forms, but especially the first two, have in recent years embraced the “media logic,” packaging religious experience in ways that appeal to the media. These religions have adopted the media as platforms for worship, proselytization, image-building and investment. Thus, religion in Nigeria has come under the grip of mediatization, giving rise to a mediatized spiritual experience. This paper contends that the strong infusion of the media into religious life in Nigeria could have both positive and negative implications for society. It advocates a responsible use of the media to curtail the purveyance of hate, incendiary and predatory messages.

  6. Media and manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Braco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role and importance of the media are huge, both in everyday life and in cultural, spiritual and political life of modern man. Their power in the sense of political shaping of people and shaping of public opinion is very distinctive. In the process of propaganda to influence public opinion, they use various manipulative procedures in order to accomplish certain interests and objectives. Through the media, politics realizes its economic, ideological, political and even military activities. The war in the former Yugoslavia and former Bosnia and Herzegovina was also waged through the media. This media war still is spreading the hate speech, thus still causing conflicts and disintegration processes in the Balkans.

  7. What do we mean by social networking sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sala, Louise; Skues, Jason; Wise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore people's conceptual understanding of Social Networking Sites (SNSs) through exploring the combined use of a range of popular SNSs, including Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn and Google Plus. Seventy-three adults, aged 18 to 63, participated in an online survey that used open-ended questions to ask how participants define and use different SNSs. Four themes were identified, including the explicit presentation and interpretation of different selves, the love-hate relationship with SNSs, privacy and danger concerns, and limited SNS knowledge. The findings from this study suggest that researchers need to consider how people use SNSs in combination as this influences the decisions people make about which SNS accounts they use and how they present themselves on these sites.

  8. Angels or demons? You decide!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The new film Angels & Demons starring Tom Hanks and directed by Ron Howard is being premiered worldwide on 15 May, but you could see it 10 days earlier at a special preview screening as the CERN Press Office has a limited number of tickets to give away. Preview of the new CERN website to be published on 5 May. Opinion is split among CERNois when talking about Dan Brown’s book Angels & Demons. Should he be praised for bringing particle physics into the spotlight or should he be demonised for the ‘creative liberties’ he took - for example, although it would be useful for the international collaborations, CERN doesn’t actually have its own private airport and supersonic jet. But love it or hate it, with the upcoming release of the multi-million dollar Hollywood film adaptation, Angels & Demons will introduce a huge new audience to CERN. "Guess what? – CERN really exists!" said...

  9. Questioning the role of Facebook in maintaining Syrian social capital during the Syrian crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Reem

    2017-12-01

    The Syrian crisis is considered the 'world's single largest crisis for almost a quarter of a century that has the biggest refugee population from a single conflict in a generation' (UN High Commissioner for Refugees, 2016). The rapid adoption of Facebook among Syrians questions whether it helps in maintaining the social capital of a war-torn nation and a dispersed Syrian population worldwide. Data was collected by means of a Facebook survey from 964 Syrian users. Results indicated that Facebook enhanced social identity and social capital through facilitating communication, collaboration and resource sharing among dispersed Syrians inside and outside the country. However, the offline rift of the nation was extended to Facebook through promoting hate speech among opposed parties. Results of this study may advance the understanding of the role of Facebook on social capital in countries going through similar crisis situations.

  10. Refugee crisis representation on German online press: the case of Aylan Kurdi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramírez Plascencia

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is focused in examining the digital news representation of Syrian refugee crisis and the conformation of the reader’s opinions in Germany. Data collection will be addressed on reviewing German online news and the reader’s comments related with one remarkable event during the actual migration crisis in Europe: The note about the child Aylan or Alan Kurdi, that drowned in the coast of Turkey in September 02 of 2015. The main aim of this paper is to understand the role of media crisis representation on the opinions of German people. How does media shape public reactions in pro and against helping refugees? And what kind of actions could the European authorities undertake to protect the human rights of refugees and to diminish hate discourse online.

  11. A Confession as Clear as Mud? Making Sense of Lance Armstrong’s Revelations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gleaves, John; Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2013-01-01

    Researching the world of doping can often feel like work as an undertaker: when business is good, it’s usually bad for someone else. And these past few months have been especially good for business. Confessions from high profile cyclists, including Lance Armstrong and a number of high profile...... Rabobank riders, e.g. Michael Rasmussen, doping scandals in American collegiate sport, a whole cluster of revelations from Australian elite sport and testimonies from the Operacion Puerto trial have added new information about closed doping practices. Moreover, it seems that the complex love......-hate relationship between sporting organizations and their anti-doping programs has pointed towards previously underexplored conflicts of interest. So while the past few months would leave any hungry doctoral student salivating over the wealth of new material, it is important to separate out what has become clearer...

  12. Titania und ihr Meister. Epigonale Inszenierung und Habsburgischer Mythos in Elisabeth von Österreichs Lyrik[Titania and her Master. Epigonous Self-Presentation and Habsburg Myth in the Poetry of Elisabeth of Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Götze

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers an inventory of the rarely analyzed poetry of the mythical Austrian Empress and thereby shows the masterful self-presentation of a historically am­bivalent personality. Using selected poems, this article brings out Elizabeth’s appraisal of the contemporary court society, for which she often had only biting scorn. Her poetry reveals an almost religious veneration for Heinrich Heine and an almost subversive attitude towards the k.u.k. monarchy. It also illustrates Elizabeth’s literary strategy of dismantling a hated society, though its effect could also be interpreted to the contrary, i.e. as an unin­tended contribution of the opposition to the transfiguration of the Habsburg myth.

  13. Introduction: Racial and Ethnic Conflict and Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Crutchfield

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Racial and ethnic violence takes many forms. Genocides, ethnic cleansing, pogroms, civil wars, and violent separatist movements are the most obvious and extreme expressions, but less organized violence such as rioting, and hate crimes by individuals or small groups are products of racial and ethnic conflict as well. Also, the distribution of criminal violence within societies, which may or may not be aimed at members of another group, is in some places a by-product of ongoing conflicts between superior and subordinated racial or ethnic groups. Although estimates of the number of deaths attributable to ethnic violence vary widely, range of eleven to twenty million given for the period between 1945 and the early 1990s show the gravity of this type of conflict (Williams 1994, 50. So it comes as no surprise that scholars have paid increasing attention to such conflicts over the last decades.

  14. ""Fahrenheit 451" and the debate on the limits to freedom of expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Locchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Considered a classic of dystopian literature of the twentieth century, Fahrenheit 451 still reveals a narrative full of questions for jurists, enabling several reading paths. If, by tradition, the burning of books by the Firemen refers to the censorship of authoritarian or totalitarian states, Ray Bradbury’s work is also capable of eliciting legal reflection on the crucial issue of the limits to freedom of expression in the democratic and pluralistic states, highlighting central and highly relevant problems such as freedom of education in public schools and the criminalization of hate speech to protect minorities in western constitutional systems. The question that Fahrenheit 451 seems to direct to law ultimately revolves around the relation between freedom and authority and the determination of the conditions of coexistence in the face of diversity in contemporary plural societies..

  15. Perceptions of the United States and the Americans: the collage approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Hottola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available National and regional stereotypes are difficult to study in a practical manner. The Collage method, an experimental method for descriptive research material analysis, was designed to that end. It was first tested in a seven-nation survey of college and university students, on the sociotype of the United States and its typical inhabitants. Among the samples the one collected in Spain (Pais Vasco was more critical and sometimes more realistic in its perceptions than the rest. The criticism focused on the US way of life and especially on the nation’s role in world politics. The positive aspects of the love-hate relationship with the USA were mostly projected on the typically American female, whereas the male represented the majority of negative connotations. For the students, the typical USA was located on the West Coast, in California. The perceptions were clearly influenced by US media entertainment, in addition to more factual news media information.

  16. [Federik Grisogono and alchemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausek-Bazdar, Snjezana

    2011-01-01

    Frederico Grisogono's 1958 collection of essays De modo collegiandi, prognosticandi et curandi febres: necnon de humana felicitate ac denique de fluxu et refluxu maris presents his views on alchemy. He acknowledges the traditional association between the sky and earth and the correlation between the seven planets and seven earthly metals. He attempted to empirically determine the position and the properties of these planets (the Sun and the Moon were also considered planets at the time). He clearly distinguished the good and the bad planets and those that agree (love) or disagree (hate) with one another. However, Grisogono abandons the traditional Renaissance viewpoint on planet position inasmuch as he claims that Venus (copper) and Jupiter (tin) need to change places. He discards alchemist practical teaching that base metals can be turned into noble metals such as gold and silver. His argument against it is based on then generally adopted sulphur-mercury metal structure theory.

  17. Us and Them: A Vision of Heroes on the Move in John McGahern’s Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radler Dana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current explorations of migration in fiction focus on innovative perspectives, linking memory and trauma with the concepts of exile and conflict. Personal memories ask for an understanding of what belonging and identity represent for the Irish; immigration has hybrid and fertile links to memory studies, psychology and psychoanalysis (Akhtar, making the immigrant both love and hate his new territory, while returning to the past or homeland to reflect and regain emotional balance. From the focus on ‘the sexy foreigner’ (Beltsiou, we rely on the idea of crisis discussed by León Grinberg and Rebeca Grinberg, Frank Summers’ examination of identity, the place of the modern polis and the variations of the narrative (Phillips, the trans-generational factor (Fitzgerald and Lambkin, the departure seen as an exile (Murray and Said and the impact of guilt (Wills.

  18. AMOR FATI: LOVE THYSELF BY BECOMING WHAT YOU ARE! NIETZSCHE ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai NOVAC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nietzsche’s distinction between the master and the slave moralities is certainly one of his most notoriously famous moral and political notions. To claim that there are two main perspectives on the world, one belonging to the accomplished, the other to the unaccomplished side of humanity and, moreover, that the last two millennia of European alleged cultural progress constitute, in fact, nothing more than the history of the progressive permeation of our entire Weltanschauung, of our very values, thoughts and feelings by the so called slave morality, while all the more finding the virtue of this process in a future self-demise of this entire decadent cultural and human strain, is something that has shocked and enraged most of the ideological philosophers ever since. As such, at a certain moment, despite their substantial doctrinaire differences, almost everybody in the ideologized philosophical world, would agree on hating Nietzsche: he was hated by the Christians, for claiming that “God is dead”, by the socialists for treating their view as herd or slave mentality and denying the alleged progressively rational structure of the world, by the liberals much on the same accounts, by the ‘right wingers’ for his explicit anti-nationalism, by the anarchists for his ontological anti-individualism (i.e. dividualism, by the collectivists for his mockery of any gregarious existence, by the capitalists for his contempt for money and the mercantile worldview, by the positivists for his late mistrust in science and explicit illusionism (i.e. the notion that illusions are a necessary fact of life. However, being equally resented by all sides of the political, moral, theological and epistemic spectra might indicate that one is, if not right, or unbiased, at least originally and personally biased. Any view that coherently achieves such form of specific equal contestation, especially one that has so robustly continued to do so for more than a century

  19. Striving for LGBTQ rights in Russian psychology and society: A personal narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor I. Lunin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Based on a long personal story of dealing with LGBTQ rights in Russia, the author reviews several transformations in the psychological approach and research to gender and sexual identity. The author describes his professional growth as a psychologist. First his interest was in child sex-role development and then transformed to prevention of sexual crimes, AIDS prevention and sexual education among adolescents. The author shows how his area of expertise in human sexuality brought him to professional ethics for psychologists. Discussion. In the second part of the article the author reviews changes in social attitudes towards same sex- relationships from their criminalization and medicalization to acceptance and respect. The author emphasizes the pioneering role of Professor Igor Kon in changes of mass attitudes towards sexuality and same sex relationships. The author sees Kon’s legacy in his statement that “As long as gays and lesbians are objects of bullying and discrimination, everybody who considers himself/herself as a thinking person must support LGBTQ people’s fight for their human rights.” At the end of this part of the article, the author describes a recent hate crime based in homophobia, and its victim, the talented St. Petersburg journalist, Dmitry Tsilikin. Tsilikin was involved in sex education in the 1990s and published a book about these issues. His murder was not considered by the court to be a hate crime against an LGBTQ person, despite enormous protest from progressive-minded people all over Russia. Conclusion. The author recommends the Russian Psychological Ethics Code as a way to help psychologists support and advocate for people regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

  20. The motivation to express prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forscher, Patrick S; Cox, William T L; Graetz, Nicholas; Devine, Patricia G

    2015-11-01

    Contemporary prejudice research focuses primarily on people who are motivated to respond without prejudice and the ways in which unintentional bias can cause these people to act in a manner inconsistent with this motivation. However, some real-world phenomena (e.g., hate speech, hate crimes) and experimental findings (e.g., Plant & Devine, 2001, 2009) suggest that some prejudice is intentional. These phenomena and findings are difficult to explain solely from the motivations to respond without prejudice. We argue that some people are motivated to express prejudice, and we develop the Motivation to Express Prejudice Scale (MP) to measure this motivation. In 7 studies involving more than 6,000 participants, we demonstrate that, across scale versions targeted at Black people and gay men, the MP has good reliability and convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. In normative climates that prohibit prejudice, the internal and external motivations to express prejudice are functionally nonindependent, but they become more independent when normative climates permit more prejudice toward a target group. People high in the motivation to express prejudice are relatively likely to resist pressure to support programs promoting intergroup contact and to vote for political candidates who support oppressive policies. The motivation to express prejudice predicted these outcomes even when controlling for attitudes and the motivations to respond without prejudice. This work encourages contemporary prejudice researchers to give greater consideration to the intentional aspects of negative intergroup behavior and to broaden the range of phenomena, target groups, and samples that they study. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. ‘Sonate, que me veux-tu?’ and Other Quandaries of the Epistemology of Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Nagode

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the question of today’s role of racism and racist discrimination, and attempts to discuss the relationship between ideology and act (deed in cases of individual and collective violent deeds. The main question is whether racism represents above all an ideology, and if so, what kind of ideology this is and to which end it serves. Is racism in the first place an ideology of hatred that changes ideas and words into deeds, into violence, i.e. is racism above all an ideological blueprint for violence that emerges from hatred? On the basis of the thesis on neoracisms as cultural racisms, the article first drafts the contemporary understanding of racism as racism without the race. The second part is dedicated to the analysis of racist ideological features that emerged in the preparation of collective violence in cases of former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and to the question how those experiences could help understand today’s role of racism(s. The main observation is that violence did not emerge from the ideological/racist constructions of (elusive enemies, but that racist construc­tions represented complex constructs of inequality that served as buffers against (political responsibility. In the contemporary global world, such constructs above all justify racist institutions and deeds. In the conclusion, the EU anti-racist policy, which focuses on racist ideology like hate speech and hate crime and leaves the inconvenient questions of systematic structural racism of EU laws and institutions aside, is questioned.

  2. Lifting the veil of silence: Jamuna's narrative of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, S

    1995-09-01

    This article relates the story of the life of Jamuna, a married mother of two boys and a girl living among a scheduled caste in India. The female researcher had been interviewing Jamuna's husband, who sells excess cloth to wholesalers and is active in the Bahujan Samaj Party, which is seeking to liberate India's lower castes. Jamuna usually ignored the female researcher or treated her curtly. The researcher, however, invited herself to lunch at Jamuna's house one day, and Jamuna unexpectedly began talking about her life while she prepared the food. Jamuna refers to her husband as "Bhim's father" (Bhim is her oldest son). Bhim's father rules the household, controls the money, never consults his wife, and treats her like a servant. Jamuna looks much older than her estimated 25 years. She was engaged when she was 8, never attended school, and was kept indoors. Her children attend an expensive school, and her husband wants them all to stay in school as long as possible and then get jobs. Jamuna was married to Bhim's father because his family did not demand a dowry. Both families have small farms, but her family grows more crops and makes more money. She used to live with her in-laws but now they avoid her. Jamuna feels strongly that girls should be married early to avoid disgrace. Jamuna was shocked by menstruation and intercourse. After her third delivery, Bhim's father allowed her to become sterilized. She hates her husband and believes he hates her. He treats her like a slave and insults her. His only virtue is that he ignores other women. Jamuna has no friends or confidants. She was not consulted about the move from the village to Delhi. When Bhim's father is away, she has to tend to his business and risk his anger over her mistakes. After this outpouring, Jamuna retreated to silence when the interviewer came to visit.

  3. Incitement to Genocide against a Political Group: The Anti-Communist Killings in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Elizabeth Pohlman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genocide and mass atrocities can be seen as the culminative result of extreme social exclusion. Two of the critical steps on the path to genocidal persecution are the isolation and exclusion of a particular group and the mobilisation and incitement of perpetrators. This paper examines the case of the 1965-1966 massacres in Indonesia in light of these two incipient stages of genocide. First, I discuss the Indonesian killings of 1965-1966 by situating them within the conceptual and legal understandings of genocide and argue that those persecuted belonged predominantly to a defined political group, that is, members and associates of the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI. I argue that the exclusion of political groups from the legal definition of genocide given in the UN Convention on Genocide is unsupportable when examined both within the context that it was created and the greater conceptual understandings of genocide studies. To support this argument, I then outline the political situation in Indonesia prior to the 1 October 1965 coup and explain how the country went through a process of political pillarisation, effectively creating the conditions for the creation and then eradication of the Left in Indonesia. In the final part of the paper, I examine how these killings were incited. I argue that hate propaganda was used against the PKI and its supporters by the main perpetrators of the massacres, the Indonesian military, to incite a popular, genocidal campaign. As a result of this hate-propaganda campaign, Leftists in Indonesia experienced extreme forms of dehumanisation and social death which, in turn, facilitated their eradication.

  4. Freedom of racist speech: Ego and expressive threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark H; Crandall, Christian S

    2017-09-01

    Do claims of "free speech" provide cover for prejudice? We investigate whether this defense of racist or hate speech serves as a justification for prejudice. In a series of 8 studies (N = 1,624), we found that explicit racial prejudice is a reliable predictor of the "free speech defense" of racist expression. Participants endorsed free speech values for singing racists songs or posting racist comments on social media; people high in prejudice endorsed free speech more than people low in prejudice (meta-analytic r = .43). This endorsement was not principled-high levels of prejudice did not predict endorsement of free speech values when identical speech was directed at coworkers or the police. Participants low in explicit racial prejudice actively avoided endorsing free speech values in racialized conditions compared to nonracial conditions, but participants high in racial prejudice increased their endorsement of free speech values in racialized conditions. Three experiments failed to find evidence that defense of racist speech by the highly prejudiced was based in self-relevant or self-protective motives. Two experiments found evidence that the free speech argument protected participants' own freedom to express their attitudes; the defense of other's racist speech seems motivated more by threats to autonomy than threats to self-regard. These studies serve as an elaboration of the Justification-Suppression Model (Crandall & Eshleman, 2003) of prejudice expression. The justification of racist speech by endorsing fundamental political values can serve to buffer racial and hate speech from normative disapproval. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. The Study of Figurative Languages using Stylistics Theory in What My Mother Doesn’t Know by Sonya Sones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Winnie

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available What My Mother Doesn’t Know is a novel-in-verse by Sonya Sones which tells about a teenage girl named Sophie who tries to find her Mr. Right and her bad relationship with her parents. In the end, Sophie finds her Mr. Right who is actually not her type of boy friend but he can make her feel happy and even though she hates her parents, she realizes that she loves them nevertheless. The purpose of this article is to prove that the author’s use of style can reveal the themes of novel-in-verse The analysis of the novel-in-verse focuses mainly on the themes and the figurative language of simile, metaphor, personification, paradox, and hyperbole. Research methods are conducted in qualitative method in the form of library research and statistics to calculate how many poems use the five figurative languages and are related to the themes. In the analysis, the author’s style is figurative language and there are three themes that can be taken from the novel-in-verse. The themes are overwhelmed feeling does not show the true feeling, the bond of family will always be there, no matter how hateful we are to them and love is not determined by someone’s physical appearance. The result shows that 91.36 percents of poems that use the five figurative languages are related to the themes. It can be concluded that the author’s style in writing the novel-in-verse can reveal the three themes.

  6. When family drawings reveal vulnerabilities and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Rachel; Weisbart, Cindy; Dubowitz, Howard; Rowe, Jeffrey; Stein, Martin T

    2010-04-01

    drug abuse by her father and mental illness in the father's family. While conducting an interview with her mother, Sonia was asked to draw a picture of her family. Instead, she illustrated a book detailing her past experience in words accompanying each drawing. She described how she watched her father physically abuse her mother and her persistent fear of danger when conflict occurred at home. Although spelling was poor, her vocabulary, sequencing, and illustrations demonstrated above age-level skills for written expression and drawing. Examples of the writing that accompanied the drawings include: "I hate when my parents fight. I get scared and feel sick to my tummy like I want to throw up. I just hate that feeling!" "My mom told me she had a 'boyfriend.' These words were the most horrible I ever heard. Soon a nightmare began. Nightmares make me very, very scared."

  7. Psychological research with Muslim Americans in the age of Islamophobia: trends, challenges, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Mona M; Bagasra, Anisah

    2013-04-01

    Like other minority groups in North America, Muslim Americans have been largely ignored in the psychological literature. The overwhelming pressures faced by this group, including surveillance, hate crimes, and institutional discrimination, stimulate an urgent need for psychologists to better understand and ensure the well-being of this population. This article reviews challenges in conducting research with Muslim Americans in order to offer recommendations for culturally sensitive approaches that can enhance the growth of future scholarship. We first contextualize this endeavor by assessing trends in psychological scholarship pertinent to Muslims in North America over the past two decades. A total of 559 relevant publications were identified through a PsycINFO database search. The 10 years post 9/11 saw a more than 900% increase in the annual number of publications, paralleling a national interest in the Muslim American community subsequent to the World Trade Center attacks. Researchers who conducted these studies faced numerous barriers, including unclear definition of the target sample, unavailability of culturally sensitive measures, sampling difficulties, and obstacles to participant recruitment. To navigate these challenges, we provide a framework for effective research design along the continuum of the research process from study conceptualization to dissemination of results. The challenges and recommendations are illustrated with examples from previous studies.

  8. Perceptions of Safety Among LGBTQ People Following the 2016 Pulse Nightclub Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stults, Christopher B; Kupprat, Sandra A; Krause, Kristen D; Kapadia, Farzana; Halkitis, Perry N

    2017-09-01

    The goals of this manuscript are two-fold. First, we provide a brief reaction to this journal's "Special Section: Reflections on the Orlando Massacre on its First Anniversary." Second, we present findings from a study on perceptions of safety among LGBTQ individuals following the Pulse shooting. These issues are discussed within the historical context of hate crimes experienced by the LGBTQ population (Herek), media coverage following the shooting (Hancock & Halderman), and the immediate reaction of LGBTQ graduate students to the event (Jackson). Our study sought to examine differences in perceptions of personal and peer safety by race/ethnicity, gender identity, and sexual orientation among a large, diverse sample of LGBTQ people. Findings from our study indicate that there were differences in perceptions of personal safety by gender identity, and differences in perceptions of peer safety by gender identity and sexual orientation. These findings also suggest that subgroups of the LGBTQ community with more marginalized gender and sexual identities (e.g., female, transgender, genderqueer, bisexual, queer respondents) perceived more concerns related to safety, on average, than subgroups with relatively more privilege (e.g., gay, male). Elevated safety concern may exacerbate multiple minority stress burden, a known driver of poor health outcomes among LGBTQ people. These findings are a call to action to healthcare providers to be well informed and trained to provide the appropriate care and counseling referrals that can address the safety-related concerns of LGBTQ individuals in the aftermath of identity-related attacks.

  9. Pollution tax heuristics: An empirical study of willingness to pay higher gasoline taxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.-L.; Walters, Joshua; Purgas, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Economists widely agree that in concept, pollution taxes are the most cost-effective means of reducing pollution. With the advent of monitoring and enforcement technologies, the case for pollution taxation is generally getting stronger on the merits. Despite widespread agreement among economists, however, pollution taxes remain unpopular, especially in North America. Some oppose pollution taxes because of a suspicion that government would misspend the tax proceeds, while others oppose pollution taxes because they would impose economic hardships upon certain individuals, groups, or industries. And there is no pollution tax more pathologically hated as the gasoline tax. This is unfortunate from an economic perspective, as a gasoline tax is easy to implement, and is a reasonable Pigouvian tax, scaling proportionately with the harms of consumption. Surprisingly, there is a dearth of theory explaining this cleave between economists and virtually everybody else. Drawing on behavioralist literatures, this paper introduces several theories as to why people and governments so vehemently oppose pollution taxes. Using the example of gasoline taxes, we provide some empirical evidence for these theories. We also show that 'revenue recycling,' the use of tax proceeds to reduce other taxes, is an effective means of reducing opposition to gasoline taxes

  10. The King of Norway: negative individuation, the hero myth and psychopathic narcissism in extreme violence and the life of Anders Behring Breivik.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Harri

    2013-11-01

    The paper discusses negative individuation and the hero myth as developmental concepts. It is suggested that in negative individuation healthy psychological development is hindered and goes astray. Aggression then becomes the central psychic system. Repressed anger is the core element in psychopathic narcissism (Diamond) and malignant narcissism (Kernberg). Both Diamond and Kernberg extend narcissistic personality structure to antisocial, psychopathic personality in an effort to better understand extreme violence. According to Freud, love (libido) and hate (the death drive) are the major motivational systems in the human psyche. In contrast to Freud, Jung sees libido as a life force in general, not simply as a sexual drive. Jung writes about evil and the shadow but does not present a comprehensive theory of the negative development of an individual's life. The concept of negative individuation connects the shadow and the death drive with psychopathology, psychiatry and psychotherapy. In this paper, I explore these concepts in the light of contemporary affect theory according to Kernberg. I also ask how ideology is tied to extreme violence and how it is possible that narcissistic personality structures can lead to such radically different outcomes as were manifested in the lives of Anders Behring Breivik and Steve Jobs. © 2013, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  11. Metaphoric Reference: An Eye Movement Analysis of Spanish-English and English-Spanish Bilingual Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ramírez Heredia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the processing of metaphoric reference by bilingual speakers. English dominant, Spanish dominant, and balanced bilinguals read passages in English biasing either a figurative (e.g., describing a weak and soft fighter that always lost and everyone hated or a literal (e.g., describing a donut and bakery shop that made delicious pastries meaning of a critical metaphoric referential description (e.g., creampuff. We recorded the eye movements (first fixation, gaze duration, go-past duration, and total reading time for the critical region, which was a metaphoric referential description in each passage. The results revealed that literal vs. figurative meaning activation was modulated by language dominance, where Spanish dominant bilinguals were more likely to access the literal meaning, and English dominant and balanced bilinguals had access to both the literal and figurative meanings of the metaphoric referential description. Overall, there was a general tendency for the literal interpretation to be more active, as revealed by shorter reading times for the metaphoric reference used literally, in comparison to when it was used figuratively. Results are interpreted in terms of the Graded Salience Hypothesis (Giora, 2002, 2003 and the Literal Salience Model (Cieślicka, 2006, 2015.

  12. Violência doméstica: uma contribuição da psicanálise Violence in the family: a psychoanalytical contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia C. Lamanno- Adamo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho busca compreender a violência doméstica fundamentada em conceitos desenvolvidos pela psicanálise. Entende-se violência como a expressão física, tanto do amor como do ódio, quando desvinculados do interesse pela vida e pela verdade e, portanto, se apresentando em estado selvagem e apavorante. Discutem-se as estruturas inconscientes nas quais pode repousar uma dinâmica viciosa entre violência e defesa contra reconhecê-la e a importância de formação adequada de profissionais no sentido de que haja uma recuperação das funções mentais que propiciam vincular experiências emocionais com desenvolvimento e crescimento.This article intends to understand family violence based on concepts developed by psychoanalysis. Violence, in this context, is understood as a physical expression of love and hate, disconnected from interest in life and in truth. When it happens, emotional experience appears in a wild and terrifying state. Unconscious structures which accomodate a vicious dynamic between violence and defence against recognizing it are discussed. This paper also stresses the need for an adequate professional trainning in order to help the reconstitution of mental functions which link emotional experiences to growth and development.

  13. Conflicts between river dolphins (Cetacea: Odontoceti and fisheries in the Central Amazon: a path toward tragedy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pinto de Sá Alves

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dolphin interactions with fishermen have increased significantly and pose potential risks to the boto, Inia geoffrensis (Blainville, 1817, and the tucuxi, Sotalia fluviatilis (Gervais & Deville, 1853. The main objective of the present paper was to describe the existing conflicts between river dolphins and fishermen in the municipality of Manacapuru region. Sixteen fishermen were interviewed in Manacapuru, state of Amazonas, Brazil who described a situation of ongoing conflict that may be unsustainable. Two merchants from Manacapuru made unconfirmed reports on a boto carcass trade. Data collection for this study occurred between April 20th and April 25th, 2009, but the first author had been conducting research on river dolphins and fisheries in Manacapuru and nearby cities since the beginning of 2008, in order to gain the trust of the fishermen interviewed. The hunting and deliberate killing of the species is probably more threatening to botos than their incidental capture in fishing gears in the Manacapuru region. This practice may result from the fact that dolphins are prone to damaging fishing equipment, and stealing (and possibly damaging fish from the nets. They are portrayed negatively in numerous myths and superstitions of traditional Amazonian folklore, making them extremely undesired or even hated, seen as pests, and used in the piracatinga, Calophysus macropterus (Lichtenstein, 1819 fishery as bait. For tucuxis, incidental capture still represents the major threat to their conservation in the region evaluated here.

  14. Suicide on Instagram - Content Analysis of a German Suicide-Related Hashtag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Florian

    2018-06-21

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-29-year-olds globally. Unfortunately, the suicide-related content on Instagram, a popular social media platform for youth, has not received the scholarly attention it deserves. The present study provides a content analysis of posts tagged as #selbstmord, a German suicide-related hashtag. These posts were created between July 5 and July 11, 2017. Approximately half of all posts included words or visuals related to suicide. Cutting was by far the most prominent method. Although sadness was the dominant emotion, self-hate and loneliness also appeared regularly. Importantly, inconsistency - a gap between one's inner mental state (e.g., sadness) and one's overtly expressed behavior (e.g., smiling) - was also a recurring theme. Conversely, help-seeking, death wishes, and professional awareness-intervention material were very rare. An explorative analysis revealed that some videos relied on very fast cutting techniques. We provide tentative evidence that users may be exposed to purposefully inserted suicide-related subliminal messages (i.e., exposure to content without the user's conscious awareness). We only investigated the content of posts on one German hashtag, and the sample size was rather small. Suicide prevention organizations may consider posting more awareness-intervention materials. Future research should investigate suicide-related subliminal messages in social media video posts. Although tentative, this finding should raise a warning flag for suicide prevention scholars.

  15. Media Images and Experiences of Being a Jew in the Swedish City of Malmö

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Wigerfelt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of high-profile incidents in and after 2008 placed Malmö in southern Sweden on the national and international map as a place that was unsafe for people identified as Jews. The primary aim of this article is to explore and exemplify what it is like to live with Jewish identity in Malmö within a framework of how the media reports anti-Semitism and how this group copes with being the potential target of anti-Semitic harassment and hate crime. Based on interviews with people with Jewish identity in Malmö, we analyze and discuss their experiences using different themes, such as violent and everyday anti-Semitism, the local impact of the Israel–Palestine conflict, how media images affect their lives, and how exposure and vulnerability are dealt with. The findings are important in terms of both possible long-term measures against anti-Semitism and as immediate support for those targeted.

  16. THE BEAUTY OF THE WORLD IN PLATO’S TIMAEUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Meara, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Timaeus Plato describes the world as the ‘most beautiful’ (kallistos, 29a5 of generated things. Perhaps indeed this is the first systematic description of the beauty of the world. It is, at any rate, one of the most influential statements of the theme. The Stoics were deeply convinced by it and later, in the third century A.D., at a time when contempt and hate for the world were propagated by Gnostic movements, Plotinus, interpreting the Timaeus, would write magnificent passages on the beauty and value of the world. But what does Plato mean by the ‘beauty’ of the world? What makes the world beautiful? In this paper these questions are approached first (1 by a brief discussion of the distinction which Plato appears to make in the Timaeus between beauty and the good. In one passage (Tim. 87c ‘measure’ seems to relate to this distinction. It is suitable then (2 to look at a section of another late work of Plato, the Philebus, where the themes of beauty, goodness and measure may be compared in more detail. The theme of measure then takes us back (3 to the Timaeus, in order to examine the role played by measure, in particular mathematical measure, in constituting the beauty of the world. I discuss in detail the way in which mathematical structures make for the beauty of soul and body in the living whole that is the world.

  17. Psychoanalytic and musical ambiguity: the tritone in gee, officer krupke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffee Nagel, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The poignant and timeless Broadway musical West Side Story is viewed from the standpoint of taking musical forms as psychoanalytic data. The musical configuration of notes called the tritone (or diabolus in musica) is taken as a sonic metaphor expressing ambiguity both in musical vocabulary and in mental life. The tritone, which historically and harmonically represents instability, is heard throughout the score and emphasizes the intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social dramas that unfold within and between the two gangs in West Side Story. Particular emphasis is given to the comic but exceedingly sober song Gee, Officer Krupke. Bernstein's sensitivity to the ambiguity and tension inherent in the tritone in West Side Story is conceptualized as an intersection of music theory and theories of mind; this perspective holds implications for clinical practice and transports psychoanalytic concepts from the couch to the Broadway stage and into the community to address the complexities of love, hate, aggression, prejudice, and violence. Ultimately, West Side Story cross-pollinates music and theater, as well as music and psychoanalytic concepts.

  18. Plant extracts as radioprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baydoun, S; Al-Oudat, M [Atomic Energy Commission, Department of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Achkar, W [Atomic Energy Commission, Department of Radiobiology and Health, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1996-09-01

    Several studies show that the extracts of some plants, namely containing vitamins or sulfide components, have radioprotection properties against the effects of ionizing radiation. In Syria, many of hates plants are available. This experiment was conducted in order to test the ability of ten different plants to protect against the radiation damages. These plants are Daucus carota L., Brassica oleracea L, Aloe vera L., Opuntia ficus-indica, Allium cepa L., Capsicum annuum L., Scilla maritima L., Allium sativum L., Rubus sanctus L. and Rosa canina L.Their effects on the protection of E. Coli growth after the exposure to L.D 50 of gamma radiation (100 Gy) were investigated . Two concentrations to each plant extract were tested, both were than 1%. Our results are indicating that the protection depend on plant. The radioprotection factors were ranged between 1.42 to 2.39. The best results were obtained by using the extract of Allium sativum L. (2.01), Opuntia ficus-indica (2.14) and Capsiucum annuum L. (2.39). (author) 16 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Mammalian Gut Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T.; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a “love–hate relationship.” Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases. PMID:25163502

  20. Cyber Crime – Der digitalisierte Täter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reindl-Krauskopf, Susanne

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available „Smart Home: Hacker übernehmen Kontrolle über Thermostat“,„Medjacking – Attacke auf Herzschrittmacher“, „Inside the Cunning, Unprecedented Hack of Ukraine’s Power Grid“, „Ransomware: Erpressung per Lösegeld-Trojaner“, „Tesla’s Self-Driving System Cleared in Deadly Crash.“ Schlagzeilen wie diese beschreiben den digitalisierten Täter der heutigen Zeit. Die Liste der Beispiele an modernen Straftaten lässt sich zwanglos erweitern durch Phänomene wie Online-Pornographie, Online-Glückspiel und Geldwäsche, digitale Erpressung, Cybermobbing und überhaupt Hate speech im Internet oder durch Eingriffe in die Privatsphäre über das Internet. Wie stets, wenn der technische Fortschritt für den Einzelnen und die Gesellschaft Vorteile bringt, zeigt sich auch bei der fortschreitenden Digitalisierung die Kehrseite der Medaille, nämlich der Kriminelle, der die neu eröffneten Möglichkeiten zu verpönten Zwecken nutzt. Was der solcherart digitalisierte Täter für das gerichtliche Strafrecht bedeutet, möchte ich im Folgenden exemplarisch beleuchten.

  1. Peperangan Generasi Digital Natives Melawan Digital Hoax Melalui Kompetisi Kreatif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanti Dwi Astuti

    2017-12-01

    threaten the unity and unity of the nation. Fenomena penyebaran hoax dan hate speech yang terjadi di dunia digital telah membawa kecemasan dan keprihatinan di dalam masyarakat. Banyak informasi hoax, hatespeech dan cyberbullying yang disebarkan oknum melalui Social Media dan Instant Messaging yang cenderung berbau SARA, provokatif dan bombastis. Ironisnya tidak sedikit pula masyarakat yang tanpa berpikir panjang langsung menshare informasi tersebut bahkan mereproduksi ulang informasi tanpa memikirkan dampak yang ditimbulkan setelahnya. Media digital saat ini didominasi oleh remaja yang lahir di zaman millennium yang merupakan “digital natives” yaitu generasi yang tidak dapat terpisahkan oleh dunia digital. Jika generasi ini tidak diberikan amunisi yang cukup untuk memerangi digital hoax, maka dikhawatirkan akan menimbulkan masalah dan bahaya laten. Menyikapi hal ini Prodi Ilkom UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta melakukan kampanye anti-hoax dengan target pesertanya adalah mahasiswa yang merupakan remaja akhir dan dewasa awal yang dikemas melalui kegiatan ADUIN Fest 2017 “Nyepik Becik” (Pikirkan Apa yang Kamu Katakan” pada 17-18 Mei 2017. Metode pendekatannya dilakukan partisipatif dengan langsung mempraktekkannya melalui penciptaan karya-karya kreatif berupa Print-Ad, TVC dan film pendek oleh peserta yang dikompetisikan. Kemudian mengadakan creative seminar, pameran karya, Sharing Session dan Awarding Night. Harapannya anak-anak muda calon penerus bangsa ini menjadi cerdas, kritis dan mendapatkan pemahaman yang baik sehingga dapat memerangi digital hoax yang dapat mengancam persatuan dan kesatuan bangsa.

  2. [Discrimination and homophobia associated to the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Núñez, Emanuel; Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Ruiz-Larios, José Arturo; Sucilla-Pérez, Héctor; García-Cerde, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    To describe a political mapping on discrimination and homophobia associated to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the context of public institutions in Mexico. The political mapping was conducted in six Mexican states. Stakeholders who were involved in HIV actions from public and private sectors were included. Semistructured interviews were applied to explore homophobia and discrimination associated with HIV. Information was systematized using the Policy Maker software, which is a good support for analyzing health policies. Discriminatory and homophobic practices in the public domain occurred, damaging people´s integrity via insults, derision and hate crimes. Most stakeholders expressed a supportive position to prevent discrimination and homophobia and some of them had great influence on policy-making decisions. It was found that state policy frameworks are less specific in addressing these issues. Homophobia and discrimination associated to HIV are still considered problematic in Mexico. Homophobia is a very sensitive issue that requires further attention. Also, an actual execution of governmental authority requires greater enforcement of laws against discrimination and homophobia.

  3. Positive and negative emotions underlie motivation for L2 learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. MacIntyre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of basic emotions in SLA has been underestimated in both research and pedagogy. The present article examines 10 positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love and 9 negative emotions (anger, contempt, disgust, embarrassment, guilt, hate, sadness, feeling scared, and being stressed. The emotions are correlated with core variables chosen from three well-known models of L2 motivation: Gardner’s integrative motive, Clément’s social-contextual model, and Dörnyei’s L2 self system. Respondents came from Italian secondary schools, and most participants were from monolingual Italian speaking homes. They described their motivation and emotion with respect to learning German in a region of Italy (South Tyrol that features high levels of contact between Italians and Germans. Results show that positive emotions are consistently and strongly correlated with motivation-related variables. Correlations involving negative emotions are weaker and less consistently implicated in motivation. The positivity ratio, that is, the relative prevalence of positive over negative emotion, showed strong correlations with all of the motivation constructs. Regression analysis supports the conclusion that a variety of emotions, not just one or two key ones, are implicated in L2 motivation processes in this high-contact context.

  4. "The Best of Chile is now in Mexico". The Political Ideas and Pedagogical Work of Gabriela Mistral in Mexico (1922-1924

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Moraga Valle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at a brief and little-known period of the intellectual biography of the Chilean poet Gabriela Mistral (1889-1957, who was in Mexico from 1922 to 1924.  She arrived in Mexico to take part in Education Secretary Jose Vasconcelos’ project to implement cultural missions and rural education as primary axes of his post-revolutionary strategy to integrate country folk and indigenous peoples into the nation. This study focuses on two central areas of the poet’s life that have not been extensively researched, her political thought and her pedagogical ideas, both of which were formed not in formal education, but rather through her personal experiences and self-teaching. Contrary to traditional interpretations offered by biographers and literary experts, which suggest that Mistral fled under pressure from enemies and rivals and hating her native Chile, our hypothesis is that she chose to go to Mexico because it was the best place to carry out her pedagogical project and because she perceived there to be an atmosphere conducive to her political and intellectual aspirations.

  5. Challenge of Goodness II: new humanitarian technology, developed in croatia and bosnia and Herzegovina in 1991-1995, and applied and evaluated in Kosovo 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents improvements of the humanitarian proposals of the Challenge of Goodness project published earlier (1). In 1999 Kosovo crisis, these proposals were checked in practice. The priority was again on the practical intervention - helping people directly - to prevent, stop, and ease suffering. Kosovo experience also prompted us to modify the concept of the Challenge of Goodness. It should include research and education (1. redefinition of health, 2. confronting genocide, 3. university studies and education, and 4. collecting experience); evaluation (1. Red Cross forum, 2. organization and technology assessment, 3. Open Hand - Experience of Good People); activities in different stages of war or conflict in: 1. prevention (right to a home, Hate Watch, early warning), 2. duration (refugee camps, prisoners-of-war camps, global hospital, minorities), 3. end of conflict (planned, organized, and evaluated protection), 4. post conflict (remaini ng and abandoned populations, prisoners of war and missing persons, civilian participation, return, and renewal). Effectiveness of humanitarian intervention may be performed by politicians, soldiers, humanitarian workers, and volunteers, but the responsibility lies on science. Science must objectively collect data, develop hypotheses, check them in practice, allow education, and be the force of good, upon which everybody can rely. Never since the World War II has anybody in Europe suffered in war and conflict so much as peoples in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Kosovo. We should search for the meaning of their suffering, and develop new knowledge and technology of peace.

  6. A silent yet radical future revolution: Winnicott's innovative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabozzi, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    The author begins with an examination of two unpublished notes by Melanie Klein, written in 1953 and tracked down by Hinshelwood (2008). In these notes, the role of the study of projective identification as a tool that can permit the analyst to master countertransferential difficulties is highlighted; in 1953, this is the most advanced point of psychoanalytic investigations into unconscious object relations. The author also considers Winnicott's essays "Primitive Emotional Development" (1945) and "Hate in the Countertransference" (1947). In the former, Winnicott begins to inquire into the relationship between subjectivity and objectivity, in relation both to the birth of the mind and to the analyst's psychic functioning. Ultimately, the author demonstrates that the origins of an extraordinary transformation of psychoanalytic theory are contained in Winnicott's essay on countertransference of 1947. In fact, the Winnicottian conception of psychic functioning is founded on the radical and absolutely innovative principle by which the object's unconscious functioning, as well as its transformations caused by the subject's unconscious, must be investigated and transformed in order for the subject to be capable of beginning a psychic transformation.

  7. Erna and Melanie Klein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak de Bianchedi, Elizabeth; Etchegoyen, R Horacio; Ungar de Moreno, Virginia; Nemas de Urman, Clara; Zysman, Samuel

    2003-12-01

    Erna was one of the child patients treated by Melanie Klein in Berlin, employing her recently discovered play technique. Since Erna died in Chile, the authors considered the IPA Congress in Santiago an opportunity to present a paper as a homage both to Erna and, especially, to Klein. She learned much from that very disturbed child, which she later used to sustain the ongoing development of her theories. The paper explores biographic data relevant to understanding both the case and the theories. It analyses the case material to follow Klein in the discovery and the handling of the child's transference and the harsh expressions of hate, jealousy and envy, which are brought in, with sad consequences, by strong persecutory feelings. Klein's comparison of this case with that of Freud's Wolf-man is also considered, mostly to show that the similarities were less than originally claimed, and that Klein, perhaps, was introducing a theoretic shift which led her technique to gradually change from 'Nachträglichkeit' to the 'signification-resignification' pair, akin to Strachey's concept of the mutative interpretation. Lastly, the comprehension of Erna's strong psychotic traits and the links with later developments of the theory on psychosis are studied.

  8. Transference to the analyst as an excluded observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John

    2008-02-01

    In this paper I briefly review some significant points in the development of ideas on transference which owe so much to the discoveries of Freud. I then discuss some of the subsequent developments which were based on Freud 's work and which have personally impressed me. In particular I mention Melanie Klein's elaboration of an internal world peopled by internal object and her description of the mechanisms of splitting and projective identification, both of which profoundly affect our understanding of transference. Using some clinical material I try to illustrate an important transference situation which I do not think has been sufficiently emphasized although it is part of the 'total situation' outlined by Klein. In this kind of transference the analyst finds himself in an observing position and is no longer the primary object to whom love and hate are directed. Instead he is put in a position of an excluded figure who can easily enact rather than understand the role he has been put in. In this situation he may try to regain the position as the patient's primary object in the transference or avoid the transference altogether and make extra-transference interpretations and in this way enact the role of a judgemental and critical super-ego. If he can tolerate the loss of a central role and understand the transference position he has been put in, the analyst can sometimes reduce enactments and release feelings to do with mourning and loss in both himself and his patient.

  9. Plant extracts as radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydoun, S.; Al-Oudat, M.; Al-Achkar, W.

    1996-09-01

    Several studies show that the extracts of some plants, namely containing vitamins or sulfide components, have radioprotection properties against the effects of ionizing radiation. In Syria, many of hates plants are available. This experiment was conducted in order to test the ability of ten different plants to protect against the radiation damages. These plants are Daucus carota L., Brassica oleracea L, Aloe vera L., Opuntia ficus-indica, Allium cepa L., Capsicum annuum L., Scilla maritima L., Allium sativum L., Rubus sanctus L. and Rosa canina L.Their effects on the protection of E. Coli growth after the exposure to L.D 50 of gamma radiation (100 Gy) were investigated . Two concentrations to each plant extract were tested, both were than 1%. Our results are indicating that the protection depend on plant. The radioprotection factors were ranged between 1.42 to 2.39. The best results were obtained by using the extract of Allium sativum L. (2.01), Opuntia ficus-indica (2.14) and Capsiucum annuum L. (2.39). (author) 16 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  10. Plant extracts as radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydoun, S.; Al-Oudat, M.; Al-Achkar, W.

    1997-01-01

    Several studies show that the extracts of some plants, namely containing vitamins or sulfide components, have radioprotection properties against the effects of ionizing radiation. In Syria, many of hates plants are available. This experiment was conducted in order to test the ability of ten different plants to protect against the radiation damages. These plants are Daucus carota L., Brassica oleracea L, Aloe vera L., Opuntia ficus-indica, Allium cepa L., Capsicum annuum L., Scilla maritima L., Allium sativum L., Rubus sanctus L. and Rosa canina L.Their effects on the protection of E. Coli growth after the exposure to L.D 50 of gamma radiation (100 Gy) were investigated . Two concentrations to each plant extract were tested, both were than 1%. Our results are indicating that the protection depend on plant. The radioprotection factors were ranged between 1.42 to 2.39. The best results were obtained by using the extract of Allium sativum L. (2.01), Opuntia ficus-indica (2.14) and Capsiucum annuum L. (2.39). (author)

  11. Deconstructing persecution and betrayal in the discourse of Anders Behring Breivik: A preliminary essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    On 22 July 2011, a 32-year-old Norwegian launched two planned murderous rampages claiming the lives of 77 victims. Shortly before his attacks, Anders Behring Breivik uploaded to the internet a self-styled compendium written in English in which he explained the motivation for his attacks. By deconstructing this text and the documentation contained in the first [court-ordered] psychiatric evaluation of Breivik, we can undertake to analyse his sense of persecution. In pursing this analysis, we start with Breivik's description of his personal concept of contemporary European history and politics, and then proceed to the autobiographical and phantasmic aspects of his discourse. The analysis reveals the transformation of love into hate, the original persecutor, the installation of a projection mechanism, notions of betrayal and their subsequent development into an ideology. With Breivik's conceptions thus revealed, we conclude by comparing different psychoanalytic hypotheses which deepen or challenge the Freudian thesis of a defence against a feeling of homosexual love in persecution, and which to the contrary favour the importance of the relationship with the mother, anal sadism or the 'narcissistic rage' behind the genesis of these ideas. We leave open the question of whether there is a constant relationship between feelings of persecution and the tendency to commit criminal acts. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  12. Ulva Lactuca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Peri Rossi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available She looked loathingly at the spoon. It was a metal spoon, dark, with a small engraving on its handle – a sharp taste. “Open your mouth, slowly, eaaaasy, like a little birdie in its nest,” he said, bringing the spoon to her mouth. He hated spoons; they had seemed despicable little things since he was small. Why did he now find himself having to wield it, full of soup, having to usher it now into this young child’s mouth, as his parents had done to him, as surely as his parents’ parents had also done? If they even had spoons then, if some fool had already invented them. He had to find himself an encyclopedia and figure out when the first spoon had been forged; he had to get his hands on an encyclopedia, a source of infinite knowledge by which he might survive. Spoon: A piece of silverware with a concave scoop at its end; typically used for carrying liquids to the mouth.

  13. On passion and sports fans: a look at football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallerand, Robert J; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Philippe, Frederick L; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Carbonneau, Noémie; Bonneville, Arielle; Lagacé-Labonté, Camille; Maliha, Gabrielle

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the present research was to test the applicability of the Dualistic Model of Passion (Vallerand et al., 2003) to being a sport (football) fan. Three studies provided support for this dualistic conceptualization of passion. Study 1 showed that harmonious passion was positively associated with adaptive behaviours (e.g. celebrate the team's victory), whereas obsessive passion was positively associated with maladaptive behaviours (e.g. risking losing one's job to go to a game). Study 2 used a short Passion Scale and showed that harmonious passion was positively related to the positive affective life of fans during the 2006 FIFA World Cup, psychological health (self-esteem and life satisfaction), and public displays of adaptive behaviours (e.g. celebrate the team's victory into the streets), whereas obsessive passion was predictive of maladaptive affective life (e.g. hating opposing teams' fans) and behaviours (e.g. mocking opposing teams' fans). Finally, Study 3 examined the role of obsessive passion as a predictor of partner's conflict that in turn undermined partner's relationship satisfaction. Overall, the present results provided support for the Dualistic Model of Passion. The conceptual and applied implications of the findings are discussed.

  14. Inter-faith dialogue and policing in a multicultural society and the conspiracy of Eurabia/Diálogo entre fe y policía en una sociedad multicultural y la conspiración de Eurabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasihuddin (Pakistán

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En las sociedades multiculturales como Canadá, Estados Unidos de América o Europa, el problema de delitos de odio o por intolerancia racial han ganado interés dentro del sistema de justicia criminal, científicos sociales, defensores de los Derechos Humanos y los medios de comunicación. Para lograr prevenir estos tipos de delitos en una ciudad en donde las distintas posturas religiosas convergen, es importante tratar de conocer el diferente enfoque que cada uno le otorga a su religión para así crear puentes entre los diálogos y generar por consecuencia una mayor tolerancia a las otras formas de pensar. In multicultural societies such as Canada, United States or Europe, the problem of hate crimes or racial intolerance have gained interest within the system of criminal justice, social scientists and defenders of human rights and the media. To prevent these types of crime in a city where the different religious positions converge, it is important to know the different approach that each gives their religion to create bridges between the dialogues and consequently generate greater tolerance to other forms of thinking.

  15. Parental recall, attachment relating and self-attacking/self-reassurance: their relationship with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, C; Gilbert, P; Baldwin, M W; Baccus, J R; Palmer, M

    2006-09-01

    When things go wrong for people they can become self-critical or focus on positive, reassuring aspects of the self. This study explored the relationship between forms of self-criticism and self-reassurance, recall of parental experiences and attachment style in relation to depressed symptoms in students. A sample of 197 undergraduate students from the UK and Canada completed self-report questionnaires measuring recall of parental styles, attachment, forms of self-criticism, self-reassurance, and depression symptoms. Recall of parents as rejecting and overprotecting was significantly related to both inadequacy and self-hating self-criticism. In contrast, parental warmth was negatively correlated with these forms of self-criticism. In addition, when things go wrong for the person, recall of parental warmth was associated with the ability to be self-reassuring. A mediator analysis suggested that (I) the impact of recall of negative parenting on depression is mediated through the forms of self-criticism and (2) the effect of parental warmth on depression was mediated by the ability to be self-reassuring. The impacts of negative parenting styles may translate into vulnerabilities to depression via the way children (and later adults) develop their self-to-self relating (e.g. as self-critical versus self-reassuring). Hence, there is a need for further research on the link between attachment experiences, recall of parental rejection/warmth and their relationship to internal, self-evaluative and affect systems in creating vulnerabilities to psychopathology.

  16. The Development of Hierarchy of Effects Model in Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Sukma Wijaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review the hierarchy of effects models in adverti-sing, especially the well-known model, AIDA (Attention, Interest, De-sire, and Action. Since its introduction by Lewis (1900 and generally attributed in the marketing and advertising literature by Strong (1925, the concept of AIDA’s hierarchy of effects model has been used by many researchers, both academicians and practitioners. The model is used to measure the effect of an advertisement. However, the deve-lopment of information technology has radically changed the way of how people communicate and socialize; as well as a paradigm shift from product-oriented marketing to consumer-oriented marketing or people-oriented marketing. Therefore, the variables in the hierarchy of effects model needs to be updated in respond to the latest develop-ments in the notice of public power as consumer audience. Based on deep literature review and reflective method, this paper introduces a new developed concept of hierarchy of effects model that was adop-ted from AIDA’s hierarchy of effects model, namely: AISDALSLove (At-tention, Interest, Search, Desire, Action, Like/dislike, Share, and Love/hate.

  17. The Development of Hierarchy of Effects Model in Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Sukma Wijaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review the hierarchy of effects models in advertising, especially the well-known model, AIDA (Attention, Interest, Desire, and Action. Since its introduction by Lewis (1900 and generally attributed in the marketing and advertising literature by Strong (1925, the concept of AIDA’s hierarchy of effects model has been used by many researchers, both academicians and practitioners. The model is used to measure the effect of an advertisement. However, the development of information technology has radically changed the way of how people communicate and socialize; as well as a paradigm shift from product-oriented marketing to consumer-oriented marketing or people-oriented marketing. Therefore, the variables in the hierarchy of effects model needs to be updated in respond to the latest developments in the notice of public power as consumer audience. Based on deep literature review and reflective method, this paper introduces a new developed concept of hierarchy of effects model that was adopted from AIDA’s hierarchy of effects model, namely: AISDALSLove (At-tention, Interest, Search, Desire, Action, Like/dislike, Share, and Love/hate.

  18. Negative ratings play a positive role in information filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zhu, Yu-Xiao; Lü, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao

    2011-11-01

    The explosive growth of information asks for advanced information filtering techniques to solve the so-called information overload problem. A promising way is the recommender system which analyzes the historical records of users’ activities and accordingly provides personalized recommendations. Most recommender systems can be represented by user-object bipartite networks where users can evaluate and vote for objects, and ratings such as “dislike” and “I hate it” are treated straightforwardly as negative factors or are completely ignored in traditional approaches. Applying a local diffusion algorithm on three benchmark data sets, MovieLens, Netflix and Amazon, our study arrives at a very surprising result, namely the negative ratings may play a positive role especially for very sparse data sets. In-depth analysis at the microscopic level indicates that the negative ratings from less active users to less popular objects could probably have positive impacts on the recommendations, while the ones connecting active users and popular objects mostly should be treated negatively. We finally outline the significant relevance of our results to the two long-term challenges in information filtering: the sparsity problem and the cold-start problem.

  19. Manifest Dream Content as a Predictor of Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucksman, Myron L; Kramer, Milton

    2017-01-01

    A number of behavioral, social, biological, and cultural factors are associated with suicide. However, the ability to predict an imminent suicide attempt remains problematic. Prior studies indicate that the manifest dream content of depressed, non-suicidal patients differs from that of depressed, suicidal patients. The dream imagery of depressed, suicidal patients contains themes of death, dying, violence, and departure. The dream imagery of depressed, non-suicidal patients contains themes of rejection, helplessness, hopelessness, humiliation, failure, and loss. In the present study, the dream reports of 52 depressed patients were collected and rated for various themes. Patients were divided into three groups: Depressed and non-suicidal; Depressed, with suicidal ideation; Depressed, with suicidal ideation and/or attempt(s). Themes of death and/or dying, and to a lesser extent, themes of violence, injury, and/or murder occurred with greater frequency in the dream reports of depressed patients with suicidal ideation and/or attempts, than in the dream reports of depressed patients without suicidal ideation or behavior. These observations correspond with the prevailing psychodynamic explanation of suicide; namely, that it is a murderous attack on the self that is identified with hated internalized objects.

  20. The colours of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Would you move into an office painted in a colour you hate? As we all know, taste in colour is individual. Thanks to the establishment of a new Painting Charter, conflicting opinions will be unified.   The four new paint colours established in the Painting Charter. There were many reasons behind the creation of the Painting Charter by the GS SEM Department. Unlike many companies, CERN has not until now regulated which colours can be used inside buildings. With many nationalities passing through CERN, tastes tend to differ: northern countries usually prefer colder colours, while southern countries seem to prefer warm colours. It’s not hard to imagine how quickly we could make a rainbow! In addition, whenever an office needs to be repainted, it can be difficult to find exactly the same colour. This results in entire walls being repainted, which increases the cost. If – by chance – the original colour is found, it could be out of stock. While ...

  1. A Study on Emotional Valence of the Relation between Tourists and Host in Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bakhshi

    Full Text Available The research is conducted to “describe the emotional valence of the relation between tourists and host in Mashhad”. Using the secondary analysis method, the researchers have used data from “assessment of pilgrims’ attitudes about Mashhad residents and service providers” survey. During the survey interviewees described Mashhad residents with specific words (attributions. In this research the attributions have been analyzed in platform of related literatures in sphere of psychology and sociology of emotions theories (especially the Turner and Plutchik categorization of emotions. Findings examined that the pilgrims’ emotions was positive rather than negative. Thus security- fear dimension was not explicitly remarked. Besides “acceptance” was marked as a factor in building positive emotions while the “hate” was marked as a factor that creates negative emotions. Negative emotions indicate on the existence of gap between tourists’ expectation and their real trip. The hate, contempt and anger emotions of tourist have been described as outcome of not receiving desired respect and attention from host community, violation of ethical and accepted high social norms and finally, voilation of justice and fairness from Mashhad residents’ side.

  2. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson's Patients and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzinger, Cleo; Vollstedt, Eva-Juliane; Hückelheim, Katja; Lorwin, Anne; Graf, Julia; Tunc, Sinem; Klein, Christine; Kasten, Meike

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease (PD); in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment), and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD). The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5%) had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC) the PD patients endorsed more "dissatisfaction" and "loss of appetite" but less "feelings of guilt," "self-hate," and "loss of libido." Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  3. Radio as the Voice of God: Peace and Tolerance Radio Programming’s Impact on Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Aldrich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observers have argued that radio programming can alter norms, especially through hate radio designed to increase animosity between groups. This article tests whether or not radio programming under the Countering Violent Extremism (CVE policy framework can reduce potential conflict and increase civic engagement and positive views of foreign nations. Data from surveys of more than 1,000 respondents in Mali, Chad, and Niger illuminate the ways in which peace and tolerance programming changed perspectives and altered behavior in statistically significant ways. Results show that individuals exposed to multi-level U.S. government programming were more likely to listen to peace and tolerance radio. Further, bivariate, multivariate regression, and propensity score matching techniques show that individuals who listened more regularly to such programs participated more frequently in civic activities and supported working with the West to combat terrorism (holding constant a number of potential confounding economic, demographic, and attitudinal factors. However, higher levels of radio listening had no measurable impact on opposition to the use of violence in the name of Islam or opposition to the imposition of Islamic law. Further, data indicate that women and men have responded to programming in measurably different ways. These mixed results have important implications for current and future “soft-side” programs for countering violent extremism.

  4. FAROESTE CABOCLO: PSYCHOANALYSIS INTERPRETATION OF THE SONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Teixeira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to integrate the psychoanalytic concepts of discontent, violence, aggressiveness and enemy with the acclaimed song “Faroeste Caboclo”, an important legacy of Brazilian Pop-Rock from the 1980s. The song narrates the saga of João de Santo Cristo, an orphan whose life story was characterized by uneasiness, racial discrimination, and difficulty to deal with authority figures, which turned him into a renowned drug dealer. With an ending marked by passional tragedy, culminating with the death of all the main characters, the plot is traversed by violence, aggressiveness and hate. This demonstrates how the story unfolds to the field of alterity through the emergence of friendship and enmity, allowing a thorough discussion and comprehension of João de Santo Cristo’s story. Assuming that music is both an individual form of expression and a form of apprehension and description of social reality, this study sought to comprehend the psychic dimensions demonstrated in the lyrics, which narrate a story that is very similar to real life stories of many adolescents involved in violent criminality in Brazil. The main objective was to discuss the possible meanings of these lyrics, hence promoting a constructive dialog between psychoanalysis and culture.

  5. Civility vs. Incivility in Online Social Interactions: An Evolutionary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoci, Angelo; Delfino, Alexia; Paglieri, Fabio; Panebianco, Fabrizio; Sabatini, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is growing that forms of incivility-e.g. aggressive and disrespectful behaviors, harassment, hate speech and outrageous claims-are spreading in the population of social networking sites' (SNS) users. Online social networks such as Facebook allow users to regularly interact with known and unknown others, who can behave either politely or rudely. This leads individuals not only to learn and adopt successful strategies for using the site, but also to condition their own behavior on that of others. Using a mean field approach, we define anevolutionary game framework to analyse the dynamics of civil and uncivil ways of interaction in online social networks and their consequences for collective welfare. Agents can choose to interact with others-politely or rudely-in SNS, or to opt out from online social networks to protect themselves from incivility. We find that, when the initial share of the population of polite users reaches a critical level, civility becomes generalized if its payoff increases more than that of incivility with the spreading of politeness in online interactions. Otherwise, the spreading of self-protective behaviors to cope with online incivility can lead the economyto non-socially optimal stationary states. JEL Codes: C61, C73, D85, O33, Z13. PsycINFO Codes: 2240, 2750.

  6. A magic bullet for the “African” mother? Neo-Imperial reproductive futurism and the pharmaceutical “solution” to the HIV/AIDS Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Karen M

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of a close reading of popular and medical texts which address a debate over the ethics of clinical drug trials funded by the United States and designed mainly for sub-Saharan Africa, I argue that international public health discourse about infant HIV infection in that region reflects and legitimates a neo-imperialist, anti-reproductive justice ideology. Participants share a fetal-centered logic that US-funded biomedicine must shoulder the burden of rescuing sub-Saharan Africa from itself by using the bodies of HIV-positive pregnant women to transmit biomedicine's magic bullet—antiretroviral drugs—to the next generation. The survival of the fetus, disguised as the well-being of the HIV-positive woman and accomplished by the magic of biomedical research, becomes the survival of a region otherwise doomed by its present state of economic, political, and medical incapacity. This version of what queer theorist Lee Edelman (2004, No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive) calls “reproductive futurism” redounds to the benefit of the more explicitly women-hating and nationalist ideologies of still-powerful right-wing movements against reproductive and sexual rights.

  7. Digital Clusters: How the Net is Marking Us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Giustini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The work moves from the analysis of data from digital illiteracies as well as cognitive biases, deepening the specific criticalities of the phenomenon of the conversational decay, made pervasive by the diffusion of social networks - touching the topics of false news, fanaticism and online hate speech. In this context, even due to the algorithms’ filtering action, the user, being protagonist of the network and its contents, risks to be confined in large online structures, closed in echo chambers and finding only converging and polarized ideas. Deepening the theme of personal and collective narration, and how this is augmented and expanded in social media, the work explores a new digital aggregation object, called “Digital cluster”. These aggregations overcome and widen the phenomenon of “digital bubbles” described by Eli Pariser in 2011, and outline a digital context in which different subjects select contents to reinforce the choices and the common narratives. In these aggregations, there are also other elements, from the topology of the network to the presence of other distortions, which bring the phenomenon towards a wider scale magnitude, which is examined in rate and implications.

  8. Civility vs. Incivility in Online Social Interactions: An Evolutionary Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Antoci

    Full Text Available Evidence is growing that forms of incivility-e.g. aggressive and disrespectful behaviors, harassment, hate speech and outrageous claims-are spreading in the population of social networking sites' (SNS users. Online social networks such as Facebook allow users to regularly interact with known and unknown others, who can behave either politely or rudely. This leads individuals not only to learn and adopt successful strategies for using the site, but also to condition their own behavior on that of others. Using a mean field approach, we define anevolutionary game framework to analyse the dynamics of civil and uncivil ways of interaction in online social networks and their consequences for collective welfare. Agents can choose to interact with others-politely or rudely-in SNS, or to opt out from online social networks to protect themselves from incivility. We find that, when the initial share of the population of polite users reaches a critical level, civility becomes generalized if its payoff increases more than that of incivility with the spreading of politeness in online interactions. Otherwise, the spreading of self-protective behaviors to cope with online incivility can lead the economyto non-socially optimal stationary states. JEL Codes: C61, C73, D85, O33, Z13. PsycINFO Codes: 2240, 2750.

  9. Biological and Sociocultural Differences in Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity among 5th–7th Grade Urban Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Amber L.; Ling, Jiying; Voskuil, Vicki R.; Bakhoya, Marion; Wesolek, Stacey M.; Bourne, Kelly A.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Robbins, Lorraine B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate physical activity (PA) contributes to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescent girls. Barriers preventing adolescent girls from meeting PA guidelines have not been thoroughly examined. Objectives The threefold purpose of this study was to: (a) determine pubertal stage, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in ratings of interference of barriers to PA; (b) examine relationships between perceived barriers and age, body mass index (BMI), recreational screen time, sedentary activity, and PA; and (c) identify girls’ top-rated perceived barriers to PA. Methods Girls (N = 509) from eight Midwestern U.S. schools participated. Demographic, pubertal stage, perceived barriers, and recreational screen time data were collected via surveys. Height and weight were measured. Accelerometers measured sedentary activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and light plus MVPA. Results Girls of low SES reported greater interference of perceived barriers to PA than those who were not of low SES (1.16 vs. 0.97, p = .01). Girls in early/middle puberty had lower perceived barriers than those in late puberty (1.03 vs. 1.24, p barriers were negatively related to MVPA (r = −.10, p = .03) and light plus MVPA (r = −.11, p = .02). Girls’ top five perceived barriers included lack of skills, hating to sweat, difficulty finding programs, being tired, and having pain. Discussion Innovative interventions, particularly focusing on skill development, are needed to assist girls in overcoming their perceived barriers to PA. PMID:26325276

  10. Biological and Sociocultural Differences in Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity Among Fifth- to Seventh-Grade Urban Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Amber L; Ling, Jiying; Voskuil, Vicki R; Bakhoya, Marion; Wesolek, Stacey M; Bourne, Kelly A; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Robbins, Lorraine B

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate physical activity (PA) contributes to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescent girls. Barriers preventing adolescent girls from meeting PA guidelines have not been thoroughly examined. The threefold purpose of this study was to (a) determine pubertal stage, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in ratings of interference of barriers to PA; (b) examine relationships between perceived barriers and age, body mass index, recreational screen time, sedentary activity, and PA; and (c) identify girls' top-rated perceived barriers to PA. Girls (N = 509) from eight Midwestern U.S. schools participated. Demographic, pubertal stage, perceived barriers, and recreational screen time data were collected via surveys. Height and weight were measured. Accelerometers measured sedentary activity, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and light plus MVPA. Girls of low SES reported greater interference of perceived barriers to PA than those who were not of low SES (1.16 vs. 0.97, p = .01). Girls in early/middle puberty had lower perceived barriers than those in late puberty (1.03 vs. 1.24, p barriers were negatively related to MVPA (r = -.10, p = .03) and light plus MVPA (r = -.11, p = .02). Girls' top five perceived barriers included lack of skills, hating to sweat, difficulty finding programs, being tired, and having pain. Innovative interventions, particularly focusing on skill development, are needed to assist girls in overcoming their perceived barriers to PA.

  11. Believing What You're Told: Politeness and Scalar Inferences

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    Diana Mazzarella

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental pragmatics literature has extensively investigated the ways in which distinct contextual factors affect the computation of scalar inferences, whose most studied example is the one that allows “Some X-ed” to mean Not all X-ed. Recent studies from Bonnefon et al. (2009, 2011 investigate the effect of politeness on the interpretation of scalar utterances. They argue that when the scalar utterance is face-threatening (“Some people hated your speech” (i the scalar inference is less likely to be derived, and (ii the semantic interpretation of “some” (at least some is arrived at slowly and effortfully. This paper re-evaluates the role of politeness in the computation of scalar inferences by drawing on the distinction between “comprehension” and “epistemic assessment” of communicated information. In two experiments, we test the hypothesis that, in these face-threatening contexts, scalar inferences are largely derived but are less likely to be accepted as true. In line with our predictions, we find that slowdowns in the face-threatening condition are attributable to longer reaction times at the (latter epistemic assessment stage, but not at the comprehension stage.

  12. Termination of a fe/male transsexual patient's analysis: an example of general validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinodoz, Danielle

    2002-08-01

    The author describes the termination of an analysis, which, while relating to the particular case of a male-to-female transsexual patient, may be relevant to all analysts, particularly those whose patients need to integrate disavowed and split-off parts of themselves. The patient had undergone sex-change surgery at the age of 20. Having lived as a woman thereafter, she had asked for analysis some twenty years later. The author, who discussed the first three years of that analysis in an earlier paper, as well as her hesitation about undertaking it, considers that its termination after seven years illustrates not only the specific problems posed by transsexuals but also the general ones presented by "heterogeneous patients". To the best of her knowledge, this is the first published case history of a transsexual patient who has undergone surgery. In the author's view, the patient has acquired a new sense of internal unity based on a notion of sex differentiation in which mutual respect between the sexes has replaced confusion and mutual hate, and her quality of life has improved. On the general level, this termination shows how the reduction of paranoid-schizoid anxieties and the reintegration of split-off parts of the personality lead, as the depressive position is worked through, to a better toleration of internal contradictions, a new sense of cohesion of the self and a diminution of the fear of madness.

  13. Conformity visa-vi transformational conversion in mission: Towards a self-transcendental mission agenda

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    Selaelo T. Kgatla

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author discusses the concept of conversion as opposed to conformity to  a  religious tradition without internal self-assertiveness. A transcendental mission understanding as opposed to an immanent agenda for liberation is proposed as an alternative solution. He analyses the role played and the contributions made by missionary enterprise and the liberation theologies in South Africa as they shaped the path for liberation. The white churches and state theologies sought to produce black conformists to the system; liberation theologies resisted the conformity mentality and fought for an egalitarian and free society. Both movements failed to embrace a transcendental methodology that would go beyond the secular boundaries and bring about transformational and empowering spirituality. This article suggests new spirituality for life and affirmation that would work against self-hate among the previously oppressed and self-guilt among the previously oppressing ruling class. It seeks ways to heal broken relationships through authentic empowerment and transformation.

  14. Sexual minority-related victimization as a mediator of mental health disparities in sexual minority youth: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Chad M; Marshal, Michael P; Chisolm, Deena J; Sucato, Gina S; Friedman, Mark S

    2013-03-01

    Sexual minority youth (youth who are attracted to the same sex or endorse a gay/lesbian/bisexual identity) report significantly higher rates of depression and suicidality than heterosexual youth. The minority stress hypothesis contends that the stigma and discrimination experienced by sexual minority youth create a hostile social environment that can lead to chronic stress and mental health problems. The present study used longitudinal mediation models to directly test sexual minority-specific victimization as a potential explanatory mechanism of the mental health disparities of sexual minority youth. One hundred ninety-seven adolescents (14-19 years old; 70 % female; 29 % sexual minority) completed measures of sexual minority-specific victimization, depressive symptoms, and suicidality at two time points 6 months apart. Compared to heterosexual youth, sexual minority youth reported higher levels of sexual minority-specific victimization, depressive symptoms, and suicidality. Sexual minority-specific victimization significantly mediated the effect of sexual minority status on depressive symptoms and suicidality. The results support the minority stress hypothesis that targeted harassment and victimization are partly responsible for the higher levels of depressive symptoms and suicidality found in sexual minority youth. This research lends support to public policy initiatives that reduce bullying and hate crimes because reducing victimization can have a significant impact on the health and well-being of sexual minority youth.

  15. Aesthetic experience and the emotional content of paintings

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    Slobodan Marković

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the relationship between aesthetic experience and other emotional qualities judged in paintings. Aesthetic experience was defined as an exceptional state of mind in which a person is focused on a particular object, transcending its everyday uses and meanings and losing the awareness of surroundings and even of himself/herself. In this state a person has an exceptional emotional experience, that is a feeling of unity with the object. Our basic idea is that aesthetic experience is not reducible to pleasure or a positive hedonic tone, but a person can equally be fascinated with both pleasant and unpleasant objects. In preliminary studies we specified the stimulus set of figural and semi-figural paintings, and a set of descriptors of emotions, feelings and aesthetic experience. Participants judged the paintings on descriptors (seven-point scales. Factor analysis revealed two large factors: the bipolar factor Affective Tone (descriptors on the positive pole: lovely, charming, cheerful, etc; descriptors on the negative pole: scary, disgusting, hateful etc. and Aesthetic Experience (descriptors: exceptional, profound, unique, etc.. Additional analyses have shown no significant correlation between the two factors. These findings confirmed our idea that aesthetic experience is independent of pleasure or affective attraction, and that it can be induced by both pleasant and unpleasant paintings.

  16. Science at the supermarket: multiplication, personalization and consumption of science in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Luca

    2014-06-01

    Which is the kind science's psychological guidance upon everyday life? I will try to discuss some issues about the role that techno-scientific knowledge plays in sense-making and decision making about practical questions of life. This relation of both love and hate, antagonism and connivance is inscribable in a wider debate between a trend of science to intervene in fields that are traditionally prerogative of political, religious or ethical choices, and, on the other side, the position of those who aim at stemming "technocracy" and governing these processes. I argue that multiplication, personalization and consumption are the characteristics of the relationship between science, technology and society in the age of "multiculturalism" and "multi-scientism". This makes more difficult but intriguing the study and understanding of the processes through which scientific knowledge is socialized. Science topics, like biotech, climate change, etc. are today an unavoidable reference frame. It is not possible to not know them and to attach them to the most disparate questions. Like in the case of Moscovici's "Freud for all seasons", the fact itself that the members of a group or a society believe in science as a reference point for others, roots its social representation and the belief that it can solve everyday life problems.

  17. Heteronormatiwiteit, homofobie en homoseksualiteit – ’n roetekaart vir ’n inklusiewe kerk

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    Yolanda Dreyer

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the article is to indicate that heteronormativity has prevailed from pre-modern times to the modern world. The article argues that heteronormativity, embedded in a patriarchal mind-set, is central to the dynamics of belief patterns which determine, among others, gender roles, heterosexual marriage and sexual ethics which manifest in insider-outsider love-hate relationships. Aversion to sexual minorities (those who are not heterosexual is a conse-quence. The article explores the following: the interconnection of sexuality, marriage and religion; the connection between homo-phobia and heteronormativity, and how these influence the sexual ethics of the church. In light of the above, the article focuses on the hatred of gays as a consequence of heteronormativity. It explains how an approach to Scripture which uncritically accepts patriarchy, could lead to the justification of homophobia. The article proposes biblical theological perspectives for a postmodern church which is inclusive and loyal to the spirit of the Christian gospel.

  18. Tabus sexuais entre professores e alunos Sexual taboos among teachers and students

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    Antônio Zuin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O poder da sexualidade nas relações entre professores e alunos é tão intenso quanto o esforço feito pelos agentes educacionais em negá-lo. O termo tabu representa a exata designação do que tal terminologia suscita: algo misterioso e, principalmente, proibido. De fato, a questão sexual entre professores e alunos concerne a uma esfera tão proibitiva que sequer é mencionada, haja vista a escassez de pesquisas que versam a esse respeito. Daí o objetivo deste artigo, ou seja, analisar a ambivalência dos sentimentos de amor e de ódio que se objetivam na sexualidade existente entre professores e alunos.The power of sexuality in teacher-student relationships is as intense as the effort made by educational institutions to deny it. The term "taboo"represents the exact designation of what such terminology means: something mysterious and mainly forbidden. In fact, the sexual issue among teachers and students concerns such a forbidding sphere that it is hardly mentioned, which explains the little research that has been carried out in this field. Thus, this paper is aimed at analyzing the ambivalence of feelings of love and hate found in the teacher-student sexuality.

  19. How to Learn English Grammar?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖琳燃

    2017-01-01

    Grammar is an aspect of language about which learners have different opinions. Some learners are very interested in ifnding out or learning grammar rules and doing lots of grammar exercises. Others hate grammar and think it is the most boring part of learning a new language. Whatever opinion you have, however, you cannot escape from grammar; it is in every sentence you read or write, speak or hear. Grammar is simply the word for the rules that people follow when they use a language. We need those rules in the same way as we need the rules in a game. If there are no rules, or if everybody follows their own rules, the game would soon break down. It's the same with language; without rules we would not be able to communicate with other people. So you cannot escape from grammar, but the key question here is: what is the best way to learn grammar? You can learn the rules of a game by simply playing the game. You will certainly make mistakes; you may even get hurt. Eventually, however, you will know how to play. Of course, the rules of a language are very much more complicated than the rules of any game, but in fact this is exactly how you learned your own language. Nobody taught you the rules of your mother tongue as you were growing up but now you never make a grammar mistake.

  20. Integrating Conversations About Equity in "Whose Knowledge Counts" into Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Rosemary S.

    2017-09-01

    Each day we are confronted with news stories detailing the landscape of privilege and bias built into the cultural institutions of our nation. The elected representatives of Flint denied its people access to clean water. The legal system fails to hold police officers who shoot unarmed Black men criminally responsible for their actions. The government of North Carolina is attempting to prevent transgender people from using the bathroom for the gender with which they identify. A flagship university in the Midwest took five days to respond to a hate crime in which two fans at a football game enacted a scene, reminiscent of the lynching of African Americans, of Trump tying a noose around Obama's neck. Systemic inequity lies not in individual actions, but in how broader systems respond (or fail to respond) to those actions. These stories receive national attention, but there are other stories that make up the everyday lives of the oppressed in our society. Students on my campus created a Twitter hashtag #TheRealUW to expose the inequity they experience on a daily basis. And one Black student, frustrated by the culture of the university, painted the message "Racizm in the air. Don't breathe. - God" on campus in spring 2016.

  1. Infantile anorexia, co-excitation and co-mastery in the parent/baby cathexis: The contribution of Sigmund and Anna Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Recent epidemiological studies show that 2% of babies in ordinary paediatric clinics suffer from infantile anorexia. In the first part of this paper we present a case study from our hospital clinical activity. Our framework combines clinical psychoanalytic sessions and perinatal videos. In the second part, we will focus on the concepts of instinct and excitation proposed by Sigmund Freud and the concept of mastery proposed by Anna Freud. In the third part, we will examine these concepts in the light of the case study. The fourth part is devoted to clinical recommendations from our hospital psychoanalytic practice. In conclusion, unlike other clinical settings, the psychoanalytic setting allows for the elaboration of the parental hatred included in the libidinal cathexis. Our psychoanalytic setting (sessions/videos) makes it possible to decontaminate parental intrapsychic elements overloaded with excitement, saturated with hate elements, and rendered sterile by the instinct for mastery. An initial part of the treatment process involves working through the intersubjective elements observed in the video. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  2. Nationalism and Racism in the Patriotism of the Group "Here is Slovenia"

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    Veronika Bajt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article draws attention to the problem of self-proclaimed “patriotic” groups, which in Slovenia use patriotism to legitimize intolerant nationalist and racist as well as homophobic rhetoric and action. It is a case study of the “patriotic” groups entitled Here is Slovenia, which serves to highlight the connection between patriotism, nationalism and racism. This movement is characterized by its strong emphasis on young people, to whom Here is Slovenia speaks through a variety of programs, campaigns and socializing events. The article situates this case in discussions of nationalist and racist tendencies that enable the promotion of intolerant and hateful messages based on a primordial understanding of the nation as a homogeneous ethno-cultural community. Symbols, ideology, discourse and operation of the project Here is Slovenia are analyzed by examining the group's history and overview of its main activities, exposing the role of the Internet and social networks, in particular Facebook. The paper complements this with an analysis of interviews with (former members and supporters, whose narratives allow a rare insight into the thinking that otherwise remains outside dominant discursive practices.

  3. Valuing queer identity in Monster High doll fandom

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    Sara Mariel Austin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available According to Mattel, Monster High dolls topped $500 million in annual sales in 2014, quickly gaining on Barbie, whose $1.3 billion in annual revenue plummeted for the fourth quarter in a row. Monster High's recent ad campaign claims, "We are monsters. We are proud." Race, ethnicity, and disability are coded into the dolls as selling points. The allure of Monster High is, in part, that political identity and the celebration of difference become consumable. The female body, the racialized body, and the disabled body have long been coded as monstrous. Monster High reclaims this label, queering it. Using Jack Halberstam's work on children's culture and Richard Berger's and Rosalind Hanmer's work on fandom, this article explores the queer potential of Monster High. Fans rewrite the Mattel narrative through fan fiction, repainting the dolls, and embodying them through virtual avatars, makeup, and costume play. These fan practices both queer the dolls' identity politics and create communities of interest that act as safe spaces for expressing queer identity and generating fan activism. These fan practices have also influenced Mattel's branding of the dolls, specifically with the recent inclusion of activism campaigns such as WeStopHate and The Kind Campaign into the Monster High Webisodes and Web site. By exploring the queer politics of Monster High fandom, this paper explains how that queering generates social change.

  4. Examining the feasibility of implementing behavioural economics strategies that encourage home dinner vegetable intake among low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Tashara M; Swenson, Alison; Rendahl, Aaron; Vickers, Zata; Mykerezi, Elton; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Reicks, Marla

    2017-06-01

    To examine the feasibility of implementing nine behavioural economics-informed strategies, or 'nudges', that aimed to encourage home dinner vegetable intake among low-income children. Caregivers were assigned six of nine strategies and implemented one new strategy per week (i.e. 6 weeks) during three dinner meals. Caregivers recorded child dinner vegetable intake on the nights of strategy implementation and rated the level of difficulty for assigned strategies. Baseline data on home vegetable availability and child vegetable liking were collected to assess overall strategy feasibility. Participants' homes in a large Midwestern metropolitan area, USA. Low-income caregiver/child (aged 9-12 years) dyads (n 39). Pairwise comparisons showed that child dinner vegetable intake for the strategy 'Serve at least two vegetables with dinner meals' was greater than intake for each of two other strategies: 'Pair vegetables with other foods the child likes' and 'Eat dinner together with an adult(s) modelling vegetable consumption'. Overall, caregivers' mean rating of difficulty for implementing strategies was 2·6 (1='not difficult', 10='very difficult'). Households had a mean of ten different types of vegetables available. Children reported a rating ≥5 for seventeen types of vegetable on a labelled hedonic scale (1='hate it', 5-6='it's okay', 10='like it a lot'). Behavioural economics-informed strategies are feasible to implement during dinner meals, with some strategies differing by how much they influence vegetable intake among low-income children in the home.

  5. Challenge of goodness: twelve humanitarian proposals based on the experience of 1991-1995 wars in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S

    1998-03-01

    Based on the 1991-1995 war experience of peoples of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, I made twelve proposals regarding the following aspects of health, humanitarian work, and human rights: 1. Broadening of the WHO definition of health by including spiritual well-being (absence of hatred) in it, 2. Inclusion of the term genocide into the Index Medicus (MeSH), 3. Establishment of concepts of prevention of hate, 4. Right to a home, 5. Right of civilians to participate in defense and renewal, 6. Right to deliberation from enslavement and right to find out the fate of missing persons, 7. Global hospital, 8. Monitoring of prisoner-of-war camps, 9. Refugee camps, 10. Providing of care for the abandoned - a new category of people suffering in war, 11. Introduction of the Helping Hand concept, 12. Organization of the Red Cross Forum after the cessation of hostilities. The fundamental objective was to establish the legitimacy of honesty in practice, regulative social mechanisms, and science.

  6. That is Cool: the Nature Of Aesthetics in Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Aesthetics has historically been defined as the study of beauty and thus as a metric of art. More recently, psychologists are using the term to describe a spectrum of responses from ``I hate it'' to ``I love it.'' In the context of fluid physics, what is beautiful? What elicits a ``Wow! Awesome! Cool!'' response versus a snore? Can we use aesthetics to deepen or change students' or the public's perceptions of physics and/or the world around them? For example, students seem to appreciate the aesthetics of destruction: environmental fluid dynamics such as storms, tornadoes, floods and wildfires are often responsible for massive destruction, yet humans draw pleasure from watching such physics and the attendant destruction from a safe distance. Can this voyeurism be turned to our advantage in communicating science? Observations of student and Facebook Flow Visualization group choices for fluid physics that draw a positive aesthetic response are sorted into empirical categories; the aesthetics of beauty, power, destruction, and oddness. Each aesthetic will be illustrated with examples drawn from flow visualizations from both the Flow Visualization course (MCEN 4151) taught at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and sources on the web. This work is supported by NSF: EEC 1240294.

  7. Bullying, its effects on attitude towards class attendance and the contribution of physical and dentofacial features among adolescents in Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaodi, Oguchi; Abdulmanan, Yahaya; Emmanuel, Adeyemi Tope; Muhammad, Jibril; Mohammed, Modu Adam; Izegboya, Akpasa; Donald, Otuyemi Olayinka; Balarabe, Sani

    2017-07-21

    Background Bullying is a worldwide problem with varying consequences. Victims of school bullying may be targeted for many reasons including their appearance. They may also fear school and have difficulties in concentration. Objective This study aimed to determine the prevalence of bullying amongst adolescents in Kano, Northern Nigeria, the contribution of physical features and the perceived effect of bullying on their academic performance and school attendance. Subjects and methods Eight hundred and thirty-five students aged between 12 years and 17 years from eight randomly selected secondary schools in Kano, Nigeria took part in this study. Data collection was by self-administered questionnaires and analysis was by SPSS version 17. Results The pupils' mean age and standard deviation was 14.79 + 1.53 years. There were more male and private school pupils with 55.1% and 62%, respectively. About 43% of respondents reported being victims of bullying while about 32% had bullied someone else. There was more bullying in public schools than in private schools (p-value = 0.003). However, there was no significant gender difference (p > 0.05). More bullied pupils hated being in or outside the classroom (p bullied pupils played truant than non-bullied (p bullying felt it had consequences on their academic performance. Bullies frequently targeted general physical and dento-facial appearance. Conclusion The prevalence of bullying was high among the sampled population especially within public schools. This also had a significant negative effect on the students' academic performance.

  8. [The pharmaceutical industry in the industrial chemical group: the National Union of Chemical-Pharmaceutical Laboratories (1919-1936)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozal, Raúl Rodríquez

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry associations, as it happened with other businesses, had a significant rise during the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera and II Republic. The 'Cámara Nacional de Industrias Químicas', in Barcelona, represented the national chemical industry to its ultimate assimilation by the 'Organización Sindical' in 1939. In this association, matters relating to pharmaceutical products -- which we will especially deal with in this work -- were managed by the 'Unión Nacional de Laboratorios Químico-Farmacéuticos', which defended the interests of pharmaceutical companies in the presence of government authorities, using the resources and mechanisms also managed by business pressure groups. The inclusion of industrial pharmacy in the Chemical lobby separated the pharmaceutical industry from traditional exercise and its corporate environment. this created ups and downs, conflicts of interests and finally, love and hate relationships with their colleagues of the pharmacy work placement and, of course, with the association that represented them: the 'Unión Farmacéutica Nacional'.

  9. Religion-Based User Generated Content in Online Newspapers Covering the Colectiv Nightclub Fire

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    Radu Cristian Răileanu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high degree of interactivity of the Internet, combined with the almost ubiquitous presence of forums on online media publications, has offered everybody the possibility to express their opinions and beliefs on websites. This paper uses content analysis to examine the religion-based comments that were posted on 8 Romanian mainstream news websites in reply to articles regarding a fire that broke out during a rock concert in Bucharest, killing over 50 people and injuring more than 100. The analysis also included the answers to these comments. Among the findings, we have discovered that the highest percentage of religion-based comments made some type of reference to Satanism and that very few of them expressed compassion towards the victims. On the other hand, counter-speech strategies managed to halt hate speech in almost half of the cases where they were employed. However, personal attacks against religion-based commentators were the most commonly used form of counter-speech, contributing to an unfriendly climate on the forums.

  10. Silence or condemnation: The Orthodox Church on homosexuality in Serbia

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    Miloš Jovanović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the representation of the gay population in the discourse of the Serbian Orthodox Church. The declarations of Church bodies and officials, as well as unofficial public statements of prominent believers regarding gay persons are analysed. There is an ambivalent attitude towards gay people that is usually expressed in the ‘hate the sin, love the sinner’ formula. There is also a different kind of ambivalence: the Serbian Orthodox Church as well as its faithful either stick to the ‘policy of silence’ regarding LGBT(Q issues, or they resort to a very strong moralistic judgment and condemnation. This was particularly noticeable around the time of the gay parade taking place in Belgrade in 2010, as well as during the public discussion before the passing of the anti-discrimination law in the national assembly in 2009. The inclusion of philosophical and medical concepts in theological discourse can also be ascertained. As a result, besides the expected ‘sin’, the categories of ‘unnatural/contrary to nature’ and ‘(mental illness’ are often mentioned in the Church discourse, which is usually saturated with accentuated anti-Westernism.

  11. [Sigmund Freud's ambition and Alfred Adler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebzeltern, G

    1984-11-09

    Freud never admitted to himself that he possessed a greater-than-average sense of ambition, which manifested itself in dreams, malachievement and priority problems. A completely new picture of Freud arises from such a perspective. Freud experienced childhood trauma in the form of his relationship with his nephew, John, in whom both an intimate friend and hated enemy were incorporated. This experience left a life-long impression which predetermined the neurotic element in Freud's relationship with men. Freud's own interpretation being that he had been betrayed by Breuer, Fliess, Adler and Jung. That is why the sentencing of his Uncle Joseph to a term of imprisonment had such far-reaching consequences for Freud. A further noteworthy observation is the close connection between ambition and death wishes and also between ambition and guilt feelings. Who, after all, likes to admit to harbouring such feelings? It appeared necessary to investigate the extent to which Freud's excessive ambition influenced his relationships with Breuer, Fliess and Adler. Freud was never prepared to recognize that Adler's contribution consisted of revealing the importance of the natural laws governing those layers of the psyche nearer to the conscious. The picture of the whole person emerges only by a combination of psychoanalysis and individual psychology.

  12. Development, Validation and Summative Evaluation of Card Pairing Games for Selected Math 8 Topics

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    Ronald O. Ocampo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional classroom situation where students are taught predominantly of lecture-discussion method put the classroom in a mathophobic atmosphere. Oftentimes, students exposed to this classroom atmosphere lead to math anxiety and eventually hate the subject and the teacher. Addressing this, varied interactive strategies to create an atmosphere of discourse has been developed and promoted. The use of instructional games has been viewed as one strategy that promotes active learning inside the classroom. Instructional games support constructivist learning and social learning. This study is aimed at developing, validating and evaluating card pairing games for specific topics in Math 8. The Research and Development model ( R& D was used. The card pairing games was validated by subject experts and experts in developing games. In evaluating the card pairing games, the Quasi-Experimental Pretest-Posttest design was used. There are six card pairing games developed for specific topics in Math 8; the card pairing game is highly valid based on the result of the validation; Students exposed to card pairing game become more intact (homogeneous; Students exposed to card games enhance academic performance. It is recommended to test the effectiveness of card pairing games to other group of students; Encourage math teachers to use the developed math card pairing games for classroom instruction; Develop other card pairing game for specific topics in math.

  13. Leroy Clarke entre poésie et peinture, Chantre de la spiritualité et de la liberté Leroy Clarke: The double ritual of poetic and plastic creation, a way to freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Donatien-Yssa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Trinidadian painter Leroy Clarke is hungry for art, and every piece of paper becomes under his fingers a field of experimentation for his excessive and impressive style. This anti-colonialist activist is also a Shango Baptist priest and in his conception of writing and painting, art cannot be an individualist exercise but is a space for communication with his people.This famous Caribbean painter practices an art whose strong symbolism finds its origin in the Shango Baptist faith which is one the bases of his work. But Leroy Clarke hates limits and cannot conceive being restricted to only one form of art; for painting, poetry or dance are all only the vectors of messages from the spirits. Painting and writing are, for Clarke, ritual acts of sublimation of the original and historical suffering of the Caribbean peoples, which transform the unspeakable and the unbearable into aesthetic realizations.So, in Clarke’s works, signs, words, traces and colours are organised in an identical dynamic of accumulation, correspondence and swarming which place the observer in an interstice outside time and space where he can be immersed in an embracing plenitude.

  14. Incorporation of QCD effects in basic corrections of the electroweak theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fanchiotti, Sergio; Sirlin, Alberto; Fanchiotti, Sergio; Kniehl, Bernd; Sirlin, Alberto

    1993-01-01

    We study the incorporation of QCD effects in the basic electroweak corrections \\drcar, \\drcarw, and \\dr. They include perturbative \\Ord{\\alpha\\alpha_s} contributions and $t\\bar{t}$ threshold effects. The latter are studied in the resonance and Green-function approaches, in the framework of dispersion relations that automatically satisfy relevant Ward identities. Refinements in the treatment of the electroweak corrections, in both the \\ms\\ and the on-shell schemes of renormalization, are introduced, including the decoupling of the top quark in certain amplitudes, its effect on $\\hat{e}^2(\\mz)$ and \\sincarmz, the incorporation of recent results on the leading irreducible \\Ord{\\alpha^2} corrections, and simple expressions for the residual, i.e.\\ ``non-electromagnetic'', parts of \\drcar, \\drcarw, and \\dr. The results are used to obtain accurate values for \\mw\\ and \\sincarmz, as functions of \\mt\\ and \\mh. The higher-order effects induce shifts in these parameters comparable to the expected experimental accuracy, a...

  15. Art alone endures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedo, J E

    1992-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, a passionate collector of antiquities, often treated these objects as animate beings. He described such blurring of boundaries between persons and things in the protagonist of W. Jensen's novella, Gradiva. Freud began collecting when his father died, but his unusual attitude toward artefacts was established much earlier, presumably as a consequence of repeated early disappointments in human caretakers. It is postulated that this adaptive maneuver was not simply a displacement of love and hate, but a turning away from vulnerability in relationships, toward attachments over which he might retain effective control. The Freud Collection is largely focused on Greco-Roman and Egyptian objects. Freud's profound interest in classical civilization was established in childhood; he was particularly concerned with the struggle between Aryan Rome and Semitic Carthage, a conflict in which he identified with both sides. This ambivalence reflected growing up within a marginal Jewish family in a Germanic environment. Commitment to classical ideals represented an optimal manner of bridging these contrasting worlds. Egyptian artefacts were, for Freud, links to the prehistory of the Jewish people; they also represent an era when maternal deities found their proper place in man's pantheon--an echo of Freud's prehistoric past.

  16. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson’s Patients and Controls

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    Cleo Kritzinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD; in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. Objective. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. Methods. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment, and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD. Results. The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5% had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC the PD patients endorsed more “dissatisfaction” and “loss of appetite” but less “feelings of guilt,” “self-hate,” and “loss of libido.” Conclusion. Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  17. Xavier Herbert. Requiem for Genius

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    Russell McDougall

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global celebrity culture it’s hard to imagine a word more over-used and abused than ‘genius’. It is a slippery word with a long and contradictory conceptual history. Yet, in the Land of the Tall Poppy, self-confessions of genius invariably have paved a broad road to public ridicule and denigration. Xavier Herbert’s notion of genius was not static. It changed throughout his life and it evolved through his writing. He agreed with Carlyle that the first condition of genius must always be a ‘transcendent capacity of taking trouble’ and on this foundation he built his own concept of genius, as the unending ‘capacity for loving’. This article explores what genius meant to Xavier Herbert and how it translated into his fiction, before considering how our sense of genius today influences the way we respond to his most challenging fictions of love and hate, 'Capricornia' and 'Poor Fellow My Country'.

  18. Ideologies of Black churches in New York City and the public health crisis of HIV among Black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick A; Wittlin, Natalie M; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Parker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS in New York City (NYC). Black churches in NYC have a history of engaging in community mobilisation; however, research suggests that churches play a role in promoting stigma against Black MSM, which impedes prevention efforts. The goal of this study was to explore church ideologies surrounding sexuality and health, and the relationship of these ideologies to church mobilisation in response to HIV/AIDS among Black MSM. We conducted interviews and focus groups with pastors and parishioners at Black churches in NYC. Three prominent themes were identified: (1) 'Love the sinner, hate the sin'--distinguishing behaviour and identity; (2) 'Don't ask, don't tell'--keeping same-sex behaviour private; and (3) 'Your body is a temple'--connecting physical and spiritual health. We discuss the implications of these ideologies for church mobilisation and HIV prevention efforts. In doing so, we pay close attention to how ideologies may both impede and facilitate church dialogue around sexuality and heightened responses to the HIV crisis affecting Black MSM.

  19. Review of Perseus 2.0: Sources and Studies on Ancient Greek Culture [CD-ROM

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    Harrison Eiteljorg, II

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available I have a love-hate relationship with the Perseus Project. Since I first learned about it, when it was still a plan more than a project, I have been impressed by its audacious scope. I have also been very impressed by the far-sightedness of the project directors as they have made certain that the data they store - not necessarily the data they put out on the commercial CDs but the underlying data stored on disc at project headquarters - have been stored in the most sophisticated and neutral formats possible. They have, for instance, used SGML for text and complex databases for other information. They are also storing mapping information in GIS format. On the other hand, I have found myself unimpressed with the CDs produced, both the original one in 1992 and the most recent version, Perseus 2.0, which was released recently. There is much in the new version to admire, much that impresses. Unfortunately, though, there is also much that is worrisome or ineffective or simply not of good quality.

  20. Sibling Relationships and Adolescent Adjustment: Longitudinal Associations in Two-Parent African American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Shawn D; Solmeyer, Anna R; McHale, Susan M

    2015-11-01

    Sibling relationships have been described as love-hate relationships by virtue of their emotional intensity, but we know little about how sibling positivity and negativity operate together to affect youth adjustment. Accordingly, this study charted the course of sibling positivity and negativity from age 10 to 18 in African American sibling dyads and tested whether changes in relationship qualities were linked to changes in adolescents' internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Participants were consecutively-born siblings [at Time 1, older siblings averaged 14.03 (SD = 1.80) years of age, 48 % female; younger siblings averaged 10.39 (SD = 1.07) years of age, 52 % female] and two parents from 189 African American families. Data were collected via annual home interviews for 3 years. A series of multi-level models revealed that sibling positivity and sibling negativity declined across adolescence, with no significant differences by sibling dyad gender constellation. Controlling for age-related changes as well as time-varying parent-adolescent relationship qualities, changes in sibling negativity, but not positivity, were positively related to changes in adolescents' depressive symptoms and risky behaviors. Like parent-adolescent relationships, sibling relationships displayed some distancing across adolescence. Nevertheless, sibling negativity remained a uniquely important relational experience for African American adolescents' adjustment.