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Sample records for hat utah

  1. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  2. Environmental Assessment of Remedial Action at the Mexican Hat Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Department of Energy

    1987-01-01

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action at the Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Reservation in southern Utah. The site covers 235 acres and contains 69 acres of tailings and several of the original mill structures. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604 (PL95-604), authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated wit...

  3. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  4. Remedial Action Plan for the Codisposal and Stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat Uranium Mill Tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy

    1993-01-01

    The Mexican Hat tailings site is in the San Juan County, Utah, two road miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat on the Navajo Reservation. The Navajo community of Halchita is approximately 0.5 mile southwest of the site. The mill at the Mexican Hat site was operated from 1957 to 1965 by Texas-Zinc Minerals Corporation and the Atlas Corporation. Originally, two irregularly shaped tailings piles were located in the northeastern portion of the site. They occupied approximately 69 acres of...

  5. [Remedial action plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah]. Appendix F, Groundwater hydrology calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This document contains the ground water hydrology calculations for the remedial action plan for the codisposal and stabilization of uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. Included are calculations for the following: slug test analyses for monitor wells, analyses of packer tests, hydraulic gradients and ground water velocities, volume of released water, aquifer pumping test analysis, slug test analysis to determine hydraulic conductivity, and gradient calculations.

  6. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  7. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

  8. Assessment of the Radiological Impact of the Inactive Uranium-Mill Tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Haywood, F. F.; Goldsmith, W. A.; Ellis, B. S.; Hubbard Jr., H. M.; Fox, W. F.; Shinpaugh, W. H.; Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    1980-01-01

    High surface soil concentrations of 226Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health e...

  9. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

  10. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  11. Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    With its myriad of canyons, unusual rock formations and ancient lakebeds, Utah is a geologist's playground. This true-color image of Utah was acquired on June 20, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The dark aquamarine feature in the northern part of the state is the Great Salt Lake. Fourteen thousand years ago, the Great Salt Lake was part of Lake Bonneville, which covered much of northern and western Utah. The extent of the lakebed can be seen in light tan covering much of northern and western Utah and extending into Idaho. (Click for more details on the history of Lake Bonneville.) Other remnants of Lake Bonneville include the Great Salt Lake Desert (the white expanse to the left of the Great Salt Lake) and Lake Utah (the lake to the south of Salt Lake City). The white color of the Great Salt Lake Desert is due to the mineral deposits left by Lake Bonneville as it drained out into the Snake River and then proceeded to dry up. The dark bands running through the center and northeastern part of the state are the western edge of the Rockies. The dark color is likely due to the coniferous vegetation that grows along the range. The tallest mountains in the Utah Rockies are the Uinta Mountains, which can be seen in the northeastern corner of the state bordering Colorado and Wyoming. The white fishbone pattern in the center of the Uinta Mountains is snow that hadn't yet melted. To the southeast, one can see the reddish-orange rocks of the northernmost section of the Colorado Plateau. Utah's well-known desert attractions, including Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Glen Canyon, are located in this region. The long, narrow lake is Lake Powell, created after the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1950s. Image courtesy NASA MODIS Science Team

  12. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Mexican Hat site, Mexican Hat, Utah. [Environmental effects, health hazards, and options for stabilization of tailings and fencing or decontamination of sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-03-31

    An engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat millsite in Utah is presented. Topographic maps, data on core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions are presented. Radon gas release from the 2,200,000 tons of tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. T he six alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site, returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material, and consolidating the two piles into one pile and stabilizing it with cover material. Fencing around the site or the tailings and the decontamination of mill buildings is included in all options. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $4,390,000.

  13. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Mexican Hat site, Mexican Hat, Utah. [Environmental effects, health hazards, and options for stabilization of tailings and fencing or decontamination of sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-03-31

    An engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat millsite in Utah is presented. Topographic maps, data on core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions are presented. Radon gas release from the 2,200,000 tons of tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. T he six alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site, returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material, and consolidating the two piles into one pile and stabilizing it with cover material. Fencing around the site or the tailings and the decontamination of mill buildings is included in all options. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $4,390,000.

  14. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  15. The Three Hat Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the Three Hat Problem which appeared in Puzzle Corner of the Technology Review magazine. This puzzle gives a scenario in which three players wearing hats are sitting together and each hat can be seen by everyone except the player that is wearing that hat. Each player is told that all of the hats contain a positive integer and that two of the integers add to the third. In an ordered, turn-wise, modular fashion, each player truthfully states whether or not he knows his integer. We give a strategy which allows for one of the players to solve for his integer for all possible integer configurations of the puzzle and prove it is the optimal such strategy.

  16. Hard-hat day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will be organizing a special information day on Friday, 27th June, designed to promote the wearing of hard hats and ensure that they are worn correctly. A new prevention campaign will also be launched.The event will take place in the hall of the Main Building from 11.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m., when you will be able to come and try on various models of hard hat, including some of the very latest innovative designs, ask questions and pass on any comments and suggestions.

  17. Program Transformation in HATS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, V.L.

    1999-02-24

    HATS is a general purpose syntax derivation tree based transformation system in which transformation sequences are described in special purpose language. A powerful feature of this language is that unification is an explicit operation. By making unification explicit, an elegant framework arises in which to express complex application conditions which in turn enables refined control strategies to be realized. This paper gives an overview of HATS, focusing especially on the framework provided by the transformation language and its potential with respect to control and general purpose transformation.

  18. Rodent under the hat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, William B; Richmond, Lewys; George, K Joshi; Dardis, Ronan

    2011-10-01

    This report describes a case of neglected scalp basal cell carcinoma (BCC) resulting in total destruction of soft tissue and underlying cranium, with remarkably preserved dura and no parenchymal involvement. A 57-year-old woman presented with a 2-week history of lethargy. On removal of her hat, a large round ulcer was revealed. It transpired that the patient noticed a pruritic scalp lesion 9 months ago. As the lesion and wound enlarged, she was too embarrassed to inform her family and hid it under a hat at all time. She never experienced meningitic symptoms. Biopsy confirmed BCC. Subsequently, she underwent two free latissimus dorsi flap reconstructions to cover the wound and palliative radiotherapy. She responded well to treatment. This case provides a rare opportunity to observe the natural history of scalp BCC. The reasons for the rarity of this mode of presentation and the low incidence of intracranial infection are discussed.

  19. DIY teleport hats - the consolation of technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    This instructable describes how to make a set of teleport hats. A teleport hat is a crocheted hat which doubles as a device with which you can teleport yourself to a person wearing the same type of hat in case you miss oneanother and want to be together without the hassle of driving, jetting...

  20. DIY teleport hats - the consolation of technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    This instructable describes how to make a set of teleport hats. A teleport hat is a crocheted hat which doubles as a device with which you can teleport yourself to a person wearing the same type of hat in case you miss oneanother and want to be together without the hassle of driving, jetting or b...... but it works well as a gift for someone you miss or someone who misses another person madly as it provides an opportunity to take some kind of action when ordinary options like driving, jetting or biking are not feasible even if the action is only symbolic.......This instructable describes how to make a set of teleport hats. A teleport hat is a crocheted hat which doubles as a device with which you can teleport yourself to a person wearing the same type of hat in case you miss oneanother and want to be together without the hassle of driving, jetting...

  1. Woman Rider with Veiled Hat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    In ancient times, women who went outside had to cover their faces so that passersby would not see them. During the early days of the Tang Dynasty, women wore veiled hats with semi-transparent gauze covering their faces. The veiled hat was developed by the northwestern nationalities who wore them to protect their faces from wind and dust. But the Han women wore them to cover their faces. This yellow-glazed piece is 36.6cm high. The sturdy horse stands with shining eyes, cropped mane and tail. The rider wears a round, collarless, narrow-sleeved garment and high-waisted long skirt. She has a long nose and wide eyes and

  2. HAT-P-38h

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-38b, a Saturn-mass exoplanet, transiting the V = 12.56 dwarf star GSC 2314-00559 on a P = 4.6404 d circular orbit. The host star is a 0.89 M-circle dot late G dwarf, with solar metallicity and a radius of 0.92 R-circle dot. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.......27 M-J and a radius of 0.82 R-J. HAT-P-38b is one of the planets the mass and radius of which have ever been discovered to be the closest to those of Saturn....

  3. HAT-P-16b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    .04 M , radius of 1.24 ± 0.05 R , effective temperature 6158 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.17 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.193 ± 0.094 M J and radius of 1.289 ± 0.066 R J, yielding a mean density of 2.42 ± 0.35 g cm–3. Comparing these observed characteristics with recent...... theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-16b is consistent with a 1 Gyr H/He-dominated gas giant planet. HAT-P-16b resides in a sparsely populated region of the mass-radius diagram and has a non-zero eccentricity of e = 0.036 with a significance of 10s....

  4. HAT-P-25b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinn, S.N.; Bakos, G. 'A; Hartman, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-25b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 13.19 G5 dwarf star GSC 1788-01237, with a period P = 3.652836 +/- 0.000019 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455176.85173 +/- 0.00047 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1174 +/- 0.0017 days. The host star has mass of 1.01 +...

  5. HAT-P-38h

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-38b, a Saturn-mass exoplanet, transiting the V = 12.56 dwarf star GSC 2314-00559 on a P = 4.6404 d circular orbit. The host star is a 0.89 M-circle dot late G dwarf, with solar metallicity and a radius of 0.92 R-circle dot. The planetary companion has a mass of 0...

  6. HAT-P-38h

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar Á.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-38b, a Saturn-mass exoplanet, transiting the V = 12.56 dwarf star GSC 2314-00559 on a P = 4.6404 d circular orbit. The host star is a 0.89 M-circle dot late G dwarf, with solar metallicity and a radius of 0.92 R-circle dot. The planetary companion has a mass of...

  7. The HAT-P-7 and HAT-P-11 Star-Planet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jennifer; Manrique, Maria; van Hamme, Walter

    2016-03-01

    Radial velocities and KEPLER light curves of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-7b and HAT-P-11b are analyzed using a general binary star model. The HAT-P-7 system has been a subject of interest due to the irregular orbit of the HAT-P-7b exoplanet with respect to its parent star. HAT-P-7b's orbit has shed light on the diversity of systems that exist in our observable Universe. HAT-P-11 hosts a K type variable star which we were able to analyze with a fourier fit on the light curve data. It is also a host to exoplanet HAT-P-11b which has a slightly inclined orbit. Using our own software, we have calculated the parameters for star-planet pair of HAT-P-7 and HAT-P-11. This presents another way for astronomers to study these complex systems.

  8. HATS-19b, HATS-20b, HATS-21b: Three Transiting Hot-Saturns Discovered by the HATSouth Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatti, W; Hartman, J D; Zhou, G; Penev, K; Bayliss, D; Jordán, A; Brahm, R; Espinoza, N; Rabus, M; Mancini, L; de Val-Borro, M; Bento, J; Ciceri, S; Csubry, Z; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Arriagada, P; Butler, R P; Crane, J; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Tan, T G; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth exoplanet survey of three hot-Saturn transiting exoplanets: HATS-19b, HATS-20b, and HATS-21b. The planet host HATS-19 is a slightly evolved V = 13.0 G0 star with [Fe/H] = 0.240, a mass of 1.303 Msun, and a radius of 1.75 Rsun. HATS-19b is in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.30) around this star with an orbital period of 4.5697 days and has a mass of 0.427 Mjup and a highly inflated radius of 1.66 Rjup. The planet HATS-20b has a Saturn-like mass and radius of 0.273 Mjup and 0.776 Rjup respectively. It orbits the V = 13.8 G9V star HATS-20 (Ms = 0.910 Msun; Rs = 0.892 Rsun) with a period of 3.7993 days. Finally, HATS-21 is a V = 12.2 G4V star with [Fe/H] = 0.300, a mass of 1.080 Msun, and a radius of 1.021 Rsun. Its accompanying planet HATS-21b has a 3.5544-day orbital period, a mass of 0.332 Mjup, and a moderately inflated radius of 1.123 Rjup. With the addition of these three very different planets to the growing sample of hot-Saturns, we re-examine the relations between the ob...

  9. Migrants in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kerry D.

    Migration patterns, health standards, living conditions, and educational opportunities are the highlights of this report of migrant farm workers in Utah. A review of the migratory worker streams in the United States reveals that most migratory workers in Utah come from the Rio Grande valley area of southwest United States. Because most are Mexican…

  10. ERRATUM: Work smart, wear your hard hat

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An error appeared in the article «Work smart, wear your hard hat» published in Weekly Bulletin 27/2003, page 5. The impact which pierced a hole in the hard hat worn by Gerd Fetchenhauer was the equivalent of a box weighing 5 kg and not 50 kg.

  11. Flat hat glass diffractive optical beam shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Steffen; Petzold, Uwe; Biertuempfel, Ralf; Vogt, Helge

    2009-02-01

    Many laser applications need a homogeneous - so called flat hat - light distribution in the application area. However, many laser emit Gaussian shaped light. The technology of diffractive optical elements (DOE) can be used to shape the Gaussian beam into a flat hat beam at a compact length. SCHOTT presents a DOE design of a flat hat DOE beam shaper made out of optical glass. Here the material glass has the significant advantage of high laser durability, low scattering losses, high resistance to temperature, moisture, and chemicals compared to polymer DOEs. Simulations and measurements on different DOEs for different wavelength, laser beam width, and laser divergence are presented. Surprisingly the flat hat DOE beam shaper depends only weakly on wavelength and beam width but strongly on laser divergence. Based on the good agreement between simulation and measurement an improved flat hat DOE beam shaper is also presented.

  12. Rain Barrels in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Brian; Mesner, Nancy; Brain, Roslynn

    2015-01-01

    Rain barrels are an easy way to conserve rain water and help protect our environment. This fact sheet tells how to find out about the current regulations in Utah and how to build a rain barrel for your own home.

  13. HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b: Three new transiting Super-Jupiters from the HATSouth Project

    CERN Document Server

    Bento, Joao; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar; Ciceri, Simona; Brahm, Rafael; Bayliss, Daniel; Espinoza, Nestor; Zhou, George; Rabus, Markus; Bhatti, Waqas; Penev, Kaloyan; Csubry, Zoltan; Jordan, Andres; Mancini, Luigi; Henning, Thomas; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Tinney, Chris; Wright, Duncan; Suc, Vincent; Noyes, Robert; Lazar, Jozsef; Papp, Istvan; Sari, Pal

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of three moderately high-mass transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b. These planets add to the numbers of known planets in the ~2MJ regime. HATS-22b is a 2.74+/-0.11 MJ mass and 0.953+0.048/-0.029 RJ radius planet orbiting a V = 13.455 +/- 0.040 sub-silar mass (M_star = 0.759+/-0.019 M_sun; R_star = 0.759+/-0.019 R_sun) K-dwarf host star on an eccentric (e = 0.079 +/- 0.026) orbit. This planet's high planet-to-stellar mass ratio is further evidence that migration mechanisms for hot Jupiters may rely on exciting orbital eccentricities that bring planets closer to their parent stars followed by tidal circularisation. HATS-23b is a 1.478 +/- 0.080 MJ mass and 1.69 +/- 0.24 RJ radius planet on a grazing orbit around a V = 13.901 +/- 0.010 G-dwarf with properties very similar to those of the Sun (M_star = 1.115 +/- 0.054 M_sun; R_star = 1.145 +/- 0.070 R_sun). HATS-24b orbits a moderately bright V = 12.830 +/- 0.010 F-dwarf star (M_star = 1.218 +/-...

  14. "Work smart, wear your hard hat"

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Falling objects and collisions are frequent occurrences in work sites and hazardous areas. Hard hats can help prevent many types of accident and can even save lives. Just imagine an 800 g spanner falling from a 13 m high scaffold onto the head of someone standing below - a nightmare scenario! The impact to the head is equivalent to that of a 5 kg weight falling from 2 metres. That is just what happened to Gerd Fetchenhauer when he was working on the UA1 experiment. Fortunately, he was wearing a hard hat at the time. "That hat saved my life," he explains. "It punched a hole right through the hat and I was a bit dazed for a couple of hours but otherwise I was OK." Since that day, Gerd Fetchenhauer, now working on CMS, is never seen on a work site without his hard hat on. Work sites have proliferated at CERN with the construction of the LHC and its detectors, and the wearing of hard hats is compulsory (not to mention life-saving). In the underground caverns and experiment halls, where gantry cranes and other h...

  15. White or Black Hat? An Economic Analysis of Computer Hacking

    OpenAIRE

    Caitlin Brown

    2015-01-01

    Cyber attacks have increased sharply in recent years. This paper investigates the decision a profit-motivated hacker makes between working as a malicious hacker, called a black hat, and in cybersecurity as a white hat hacker. A key component of the model is the contest between white and black hats for some part of firm output that is vulnerable to attack. White and black hat earnings are increasing, nonlinear functions of the proportion of black hats. Multiple equilibria exist. Increasing the...

  16. On the hat problem, its variations, and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Piotr Krzywkowski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The topic of our paper is the hat problem in which each of n players is randomly fitted with a blue or red hat. Then everybody can try to guess simultaneously his own hat color by looking at the hat colors of the other players. The team wins if at least one player guesses his hat color correctly, and no one guesses his hat color wrong; otherwise the team loses. The aim is to maximize the probability of a win. There are known many variations of the hat problem. In this paper we give a comprehensive list of variations considered in the literature. We describe the applications of the hat problem and its variations, and their connections to different areas of science. We give the full bibliography of any papers, books, and electronic publications about the hat problem.

  17. HATS-31b Through HATS-35b: Five Transiting Hot Jupiters Discovered by the HATSouth Survey

    CERN Document Server

    de Val-Borro, M; Brahm, R; Hartman, J D; Espinoza, N; Penev, K; Ciceri, S; Jordán, A; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Bayliss, D; Bento, J; Zhou, G; Rabus, M; Mancini, L; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Tan, T G; Tinney, C G; Wright, D J; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Bailey, J; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of five new transiting hot Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey: HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range 11.9-14.4mag while the planets span a range of masses 0.88-1.22MJ, and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23-1.64RJ.These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of $1.64 \\pm 0.22$ RJ and 1.464+0.069-0.044RJ, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed circular orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from $1.8209993 \\pm 0.0000016$ day for HATS-35b) to $3.377960 \\pm 0.000012$ day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of $2.13 \\pm 0.51$ Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of wel...

  18. Utah Bouguer Gravity Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 2.5 kilometer Bouguer anomaly grid for the state of Utah. Number of columns is 196 and number of rows is 245. The order of the data is from the lower left to the...

  19. Hat problem on graphs with exactly three cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebe Balegh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to investigation of the hat problem on graphs with exactly three cycles. In the hat problem, each of $n$ players is randomly fitted with a blue or red hat. Everybody can try to guess simultaneously his own hat color by looking at the hat colors of the other players. The team wins if at least one player guesses his hat color correctly, and no one guesses his hat color wrong; otherwise the team loses. The aim is to maximize the probability of winning. Note that every player can see everybody excluding himself. This problem has been considered on a graph, where the vertices correspond to the players, and a player can see each player to whom he is connected by an edge. We show that the hat number of a graph with exactly three cycles is $\\frac{3}{4}$ if it contains a triangle, and $\\frac{1}{2}$ otherwise.

  20. Wer hat Angst vor Ayn Rand?

    OpenAIRE

    Brühwiler, Claudia Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Das Werk der amerikanischen Schriftstellerin Ayn Rand hat in den USA sowohl die Politik als auch die Populärkultur geprägt. Ihre Ideen finden sich im amerikanischen Kongress wie auch bei den Simpsons. Die neue Übersetzung ihres Hauptwerks macht sie nun auch im deutschsprachigen Raum wieder zugänglich.

  1. Libraries in Utah: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/utah.html Libraries in Utah To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Provo Utah Valley Hospital Medical Library ILL 1134 North 500 West Provo, UT 84604- ...

  2. James J. Gallagher: Man in the White Hat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Jennifer L.; Robinson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    In classic Western movies, the good guy could be frequently identified by his trademark white Stetson hat, whereas the bad guy always wore black. James J. Gallagher wore many hats during his career that spanned over six decades; he too would be known as the "man in the white hat,"--trusted to do the right thing. From 1967 to 1970,…

  3. HATS-13b and HATS-14b: two transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, L; Penev, K; Bakos, G A; Brahm, R; Ciceri, S; Henning, Th; Csubry, Z; Bayliss, D; Zhou, G; Rabus, M; de Val-Borro, M; Espinoza, N; Jordan, A; Suc, V; Bhatti, W; Schmidt, B; Sato, B; Tan, T G; Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Addison, B C; Noyes, R W; Lazar, J; Papp, I; Sari, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-13b and HATS-14b, two hot-Jupiter transiting planets discovered by the HATSouth survey. The host stars are quite similar to each other (HATS-13: V = 13.9 mag, M* = 0.96 Msun, R* = 0.89 Rsun, Teff = 5500 K, [Fe/H] = 0.05; HATS-14: V = 13.8 mag, M* = 0.97 Msun, R* = 0.93 Rsun, Teff = 5350 K, [Fe/H] = 0.33) and both the planets orbit around them with a period of roughly 3 days and a separation of roughly 0.04 au. However, even though they are irradiated in a similar way, the physical characteristics of the two planets are very different. HATS-13b, with a mass of Mp = 0.543 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.212 RJ, appears as an inflated planet, while HATS-14b, having a mass of Mp = 1.071 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.039 RJ, is only slightly larger in radius than Jupiter.

  4. Association with the origin recognition complex suggests a novel role for histone acetyltransferase Hat1p/Hat2p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenblatt Jack F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone modifications have been implicated in the regulation of transcription and, more recently, in DNA replication and repair. In yeast, a major conserved histone acetyltransferase, Hat1p, preferentially acetylates lysine residues 5 and 12 on histone H4. Results Here, we report that a nuclear sub-complex consisting of Hat1p and its partner Hat2p interacts physically and functionally with the origin recognition complex (ORC. While mutational inactivation of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT gene HAT1 alone does not compromise origin firing or initiation of DNA replication, a deletion in HAT1 (or HAT2 exacerbates the growth defects of conditional orc-ts mutants. Thus, the ORC-associated Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase activity suggests a novel linkage between histone modification and DNA replication. Additional genetic and biochemical evidence points to the existence of partly overlapping histone H3 acetyltransferase activities in addition to Hat1p/Hat2p for proper DNA replication efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated a dynamic association of Hat1p with chromatin during S-phase that suggests a role of this enzyme at the replication fork. Conclusion We have found an intriguing new association of the Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase in addition to its previously known role in nuclear chromatin assembly (Hat1p/Hat2p-Hif1p. The participation of a distinct Hat1p/Hat2p sub-complex suggests a linkage of histone H4 modification with ORC-dependent DNA replication.

  5. Warm Spitzer Photometry of Three Hot Jupiters: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Kamen O; Knutson, Heather A; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J; Lewis, Nikole K; Cowan, Nicolas B; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Sada, Pedro V; Charbonneau, David; Laughlin, Gregory; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are Jupiter-mass, objects orbiting an early K and an early G dwarf stars, respectively. For HAT-P-3b we find eclipse depths of 0.112%+0.015%-0.030% (3.6 micron) and 0.094%+0.016%-0.009% (4.5 micron). The HAT-P-4b values are 0.142%+0.014%-0.016% (3.6 micron) and 0.122%+0.012%-0.014% (4.5micron). The two planets' photometry is consistent with inefficient heat redistribution from their day to night sides (and low albedos), but it is inconclusive about possible temperature inversions in their atmospheres. HAT-P-12b is a Saturn-mass planet and is one of the coolest planets ever observed during secondary eclipse, along with hot Neptune GJ 436b and hot Saturn WASP-29b. We are able to place 3$\\sigma$ upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth of HAT-P-12b in both wavelengths: < 0.042% (3.6 micron) ...

  6. Europe BlackHat Briefings 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Boschini, Matteo

    2005-01-01

    Anche quest'anno si è svolta ad Amsterdam la conferenza BlackHat Briefings – Digital Self-Defense. E' una delle più importanti conferenze sulla sicurezza informatica, nella quale vengono presentate le novità tecniche sia per la difesa che per i penetration test od i vulnerability assessment. L'edizione di quest'anno ha dato particolare rilievo agli assessment di web Applications, senza tuttavia trascurare i più bassi livelli protocollari

  7. HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b: Two massive planets transiting old G dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ciceri, S; Henning, T; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Brahm, R; Zhou, G; Hartman, J D; Bayliss, D; Jordán, A; Csubry, Z; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Rabus, M; Espinoza, N; Suc, V; Schmidt, B; Noyes, R; Howard, A W; Fulton, B J; Isaacson, H; Marcy, G W; Butler, R P; Arriagada, P; Crane, J; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Tan, T G; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sari, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved ($\\sim 10$ Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9V star ($V=14.8$ mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of $2.17\\pm0.15\\, M_{\\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.105\\pm0.0.040\\, R_{\\mathrm{J}}$, and completes its orbit in nearly 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of $3.27\\pm0.19\\, M_{\\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.30\\pm0.15\\, R_{\\mathrm{J}}$; it orbits around its G3 V parent star ($V=13.8$ mag) in $\\sim2.7$ days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet.

  8. HATS-25b through HATS-30b: A Half-dozen New Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters from the HATSouth Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, N; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Jordán, A; Zhou, G; Mancini, L; Brahm, R; Ciceri, S; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Rabus, M; Penev, K; Bento, J; de Val-Borro, M; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Suc, V; Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Tan, T G; Noyes, R

    2016-01-01

    We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with $V$ magnitudes in the range $\\sim 12-14$ and have masses in the largely populated $0.5M_J-0.7M_J$ region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from $1.17R_J$ to $1.75 R_J$. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ($R_p = 1.17-1.26R_J$) orbiting G-type stars in short period ($P=3.2-4.6$ days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ($R_p = 1.75R_J$, $P = 3.3024$ days) and HATS-27b ($R_p=1.50R_J$, $P=4.6370$ days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn-off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of $0.153$ g cm$^{-3}$ and $0.180$ g cm$^{-3}$, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter-McL...

  9. HATS-31b through HATS-35b: Five Transiting Hot Jupiters Discovered By the HATSouth Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Hartman, J. D.; Espinoza, N.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Jordán, A.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Bailey, J.; Suc, V.; Durkan, S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of five new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey, HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range of 11.9-14.4 mag while the planets span a range of masses of 0.88-1.22 {M}{{J}} and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23 and 1.64 {R}{{J}}. These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of 1.64+/- 0.22 {R}{{J}} and {1.464}-0.044+0.069 {R}{{J}}, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed-circular-orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from 1.8209993+/- 0.0000016 day for HATS-35b) to 3.377960+/- 0.000012 day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of 2.13+/- 0.51 Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of well-characterized transiting hot Jupiters known to date. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m and Euler1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy and photometry for HAT-P-50--HAT-P-53 (Hartman+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bakos, G. A.; Bieryla, A.; Kovacs, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Sato, B.; Boisse, I.; Falco, E.; Everett, M. E.; Szklenar, T.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Kovacs, T.; Hansen, T.; Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-04-01

    The HATNet network consists of six identical fully automated instruments, with four at Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) in AZ, and two on the roof of the Submillimeter Array Hangar Building at Mauna Kea Observatory (MKO) in HI. The light-gathering elements of each instrument include an 11cm diameter telephoto lens, a Sloan r filter, and a 4K*4K front-side-illuminated CCD camera. Observations made in 2007 and early 2008 were carried out using a Cousins R filter. The instruments have a field of view of 10.6°*10.6° and a pixel scale of 9"/pixel at the center of an image. Additional time-series photometric measurements were obtained for all four of the systems using Keplercam on the FLWO 1.2m telescope. For HAT-P-50 we also obtained follow-up photometry with the CCD imager on the Byrne Observatory at Sedgwick (BOS) 0.8m telescope, located at Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Ynez Valley, CA, and operated by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope institute (LCOGT). HAT-P-50 was observed with HAT-10/G316 on 2008 Nov-2009 May, with HAT-5/G364 on 2009 May, with HAT-9/G364 on 2008 Dec-2009 May, with BOS on 2012 Feb 15, on 2012 Feb 21 and on 2012 Apr 08, and with Keplercam on 2012 Feb 18, on 2012 Nov 28, on 2012 Dec 23, on 2013 Jan 14, and on 2013 Jan 17. HAT-P-51 was observed with HAT-6/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-9/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-10/G165 on 2010 Sep-2011 Jan, with HAT-5/G165 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-8/G165 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-6/G209 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-9/G209 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-7/G210 on 2010 Nov-2011 Jan, and with Keplercam on 2011 Oct 21, on 2012 Jan 05, on 2012 Oct 05, on 2012 Oct 26, and on 2012 Nov 12. HAT-P-52 was observed with HAT-5/G212 on 2010 Sep-Nov, with HAT-8/G212 on 2010 Aug-Nov, and with Keplercam on 2010 Dec 23, on 2011 Sep 05, on 2011 Sep 27, on 2011 Nov 21, and on 2012 Jan 07. HAT-P-53 was observed with HAT-6/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-9/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with

  11. HAT-P-20b--HAT-P-23b: Four Massive Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G Á; Torres, G; Latham, D W; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R W; Fischer, D A; Johnson, J A; Marcy, G W; Howard, A W; Kipping, D; Esquerdo, G A; Shporer, A; Béky, B; Buchhave, L A; Perumpilly, G; Everett, M; Sasselov, D D; Stefanik, R P; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of four relatively massive (2-7MJ) transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-20b orbits a V=11.339 K3 dwarf star with a period P=2.875317+/-0.000004d. The host star has a mass of 0.760+/-0.03 Msun, radius of 0.690+/-0.02 Rsun, Teff=4595+/-80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H]=+0.35+/-0.08. HAT-P-20b has a mass of 7.246+/-0.187 MJ, and radius of 0.867+/-0.033 RJ yielding a mean density of 13.78+/-1.50 gcm^-3 , which is the second highest value among all known exoplanets. HAT-P-21b orbits a V=11.685 G3 dwarf on an eccentric (e=0.2280+/-0.016) orbit, with a period of P=4.1244810+/-000007d. The host star has a mass of 0.95+/-0.04Msun, radius of 1.10+/-0.08Rsun, Teff=5588+/-80K, and [Fe/H]=+0.01+/-0.08. HAT-P-21b has a mass of 4.063+/-0.161MJ, and radius of 1.024+/-0.092RJ. HAT-P-22b orbits the V=9.732 G5 dwarf HD233731, with P=3.2122200+/-0.000009d. The host star has a mass of 0.92+/-0.03Msun, radius of 1.04+/-0.04Rsun, Teff=5302+/-80K, and metallicity of +0.24+/-0.08. The planet has a mass of 2.147+/-0...

  12. The Lincoln Highway in Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This guidebook is on the Lincoln Highway in the state of Utah. Its purpose is to describe as closely as possible the original route of the Highway, the major changes...

  13. Annotated geothermal bibliography of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budding, K.E.; Bugden, M.H. (comps.)

    1986-01-01

    The bibliography includes all the Utah geothermal references through 1984. Some 1985 citations are listed. Geological, geophysical, and tectonic maps and reports are included if they cover a high-temperature thermal area. The references are indexed geographically either under (1) United States (national studies), (2) regional - western United States or physiographic province, (3) Utah - statewide and regional, or (4) county. Reports concerning a particular hot spring or thermal area are listed under both the thermal area and the county names.

  14. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  15. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THREE HOT JUPITERS: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b AND HAT-P-12b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, Kamen O. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Desert, Jean-Michel [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sada, Pedro V. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Monterrey, Monterrey (Mexico); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Langton, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Principia College, Elsah, IL 62028 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are Jupiter-mass objects orbiting an early K and an early G dwarf star, respectively. For HAT-P-3b we find eclipse depths of 0.112%+0.015%-0.030% (3.6 micron) and 0.094%+0.016%-0.009% (4.5 {mu}m). The HAT-P-4b values are 0.142%+0.014%-0.016% (3.6 micron) and 0.122%+0.012%-0.014% 4.5 {mu}m). The two planets' photometry is consistent with inefficient heat redistribution from their day to night sides (and low albedos), but it is inconclusive about possible temperature inversions in their atmospheres. HAT-P-12b is a Saturn-mass planet and is one of the coolest planets ever observed during secondary eclipse, along with the hot Neptune GJ 436b and the hot Saturn WASP-29b. We are able to place 3{sigma} upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth of HAT-P-12b in both wavelengths: <0.042% (3.6 {mu}m) and <0.085% (4.5 {mu}m). We discuss these results in the context of the Spitzer secondary eclipse measurements of GJ 436b and WASP-29b. It is possible that we do not detect the eclipses of HAT-P-12b due to high eccentricity, but find that weak planetary emission in these wavelengths is a more likely explanation. We place 3{sigma} upper limits on the |e cos {omega}| quantity (where e is eccentricity and {omega} is the argument of periapsis) for HAT-P-3b (<0.0081) and HAT-P-4b (<0.0042), based on the secondary eclipse timings.

  16. Spin-orbit inclinations of the exoplanetary systems HAT-P-8b, HAT-P-9b, HAT-P-16b, and HAT-P-23b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, C.; Díaz, R. F.; Udry, S.; Hébrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Santerne, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Eggenberger, A.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Martinez, P.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.; Ségransan, D.; Toublanc, D.; Troncin, J. P.; Vanhuysse, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2011-09-01

    We report the measurement of the spin-orbit angle of the extra-solar planets HAT-P-8 b, HAT-P-9 b, HAT-P-16 b, and HAT-P-23 b, based on spectroscopic observations performed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope. Radial velocity measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect show the detection of an apparent prograde, aligned orbit for all systems. The projected spin-orbit angles are found to be λ = -17°+9.2-11.5, -16° ± 8°, -10° ± 16°, and +15° ± 22° for HAT-P-8, HAT-P-9, HAT-P-16, and HAT-P-23, respectively, with corresponding projected rotational velocities of 14.5 ± 0.8, 12.5 ± 1.8, 3.9 ± 0.8, and 7.8 ± 1.6 km s-1. These new results increase to 37 the number of accurately measured spin-orbit angles in transiting extrasolar systems. We conclude by drawing a tentative picture of the global behaviour of orbital alignement, involving the complexity and diversity of possible mechanisms. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE Consortium (program 10A.PNP.CONS).

  17. Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) from Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, L.L.; Gates, M.W.; Graham, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We collected a Dirhinus texanus (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) in Salt Creek Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah. This is the first record for D. texanus in Utah. Copyright ?? 2011 BioOne All rights reserved.

  18. Spitzer Secondary Eclipses of HAT-P-13b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ryan A.; Harrington, J.; Hardin, M. R.; Madhusudhan, N.; Cubillos, P.; Blecic, J.; Bakos, G.; Hartman, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    HAT-P-13 b is a transiting hot Jupiter with a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.010) inhabiting a two-planet system. The two-planet arrangement provides an opportunity to probe the interior structure of HAT-P-13b. Under equilibrium-tide theory and confirmation that the apsides of planets b and c are in alignment, a measurement of the planet's eccentricity can be related to the planet's tidal Love number k2, which describes the central condensation of the planet's mass and its deformation under tidal effects. A measurement of k2 could constrain interior models of HAT-P-13b. HAT-P-13b's orbit is configured favorably for refinement of the eccentricity by secondary eclipse timing observations, which provide direct measurements of ecosω. In 2010, Spitzer observed two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b in the 3.6- and 4.5-μm IRAC bandpasses. We present secondary eclipse times and depths; joint models of the HAT-P-13 system that incorporate transit photometry and radial velocity data; and constraints on the atmospheric chemistry of HAT-P-13b that suggest solar-abundance composition without a thermal inversion. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA, which provided support for this work. This work was supported in part by NASA Planetary Atmospheres Grant NNX13AF38G.

  19. Vector Boson + Jets with BlackHat and Sherpa

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, C. F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L. J.; F. Febres Cordero; Forde, D.; T. Gleisberg; Ita, H.; Kosower, D. A.; Maître, D.

    2010-01-01

    We review recent NLO QCD results for W,Z + 3-jet production at hadron colliders, computed using BlackHat and SHERPA. We also include some new results for Z + 3-jet production at the LHC at 7 TeV. We report new progress towards the NLO cross section for W + 4-jet production. In particular, we show that the virtual matrix elements produced by BlackHat are numerically stable. We also show that with an improved integrator and tree-level matrix elements from BlackHat, SHERPA produces well-behaved ...

  20. The "Burgundian" hat from Herjolfsnes, Greenland: new discoveries, new dates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michèle Hayeur; Arneborg, Jette; Smith, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    of the Greenland Norse colony but also its enduring cultural links with continental European fashions, following a comment to this effect published by Nørlund himself. In 1996, the hat was dated to the early fourteenth century by Arneborg, a century earlier than Nørlund’s dating, based on stylistic comparisons...... with European examples. Recent research on North Atlantic textiles led to a re-examination of the hat, with different sections sampled and resubmitted for accelerated mass spectrometry dating. The results suggest that the body of the hat and its crown are of different periods with c. 100 years between them...

  1. Elliptic Deformed Superalgebra $u_{q,p}(\\hat{{sl}}(m|n))$

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the elliptic deformed superalgebra $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl}(M|N))$ as one parameter deformation of the quantum superalgebra $U_q(\\hat{sl}(M|N))$. We give bosonizations of the elliptic deformed superalgebra $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl}(1|2))$ and $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl}(2|1))$ for an arbitrary level $k$.

  2. HATS-25b through HATS-30b: A Half–dozen New Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters from the HATSouth Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, N.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Jordán, A.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Rabus, M.; Penev, K.; Bento, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Suc, V.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R.

    2016-10-01

    We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with V magnitudes in the range of ∼12–14 and have masses in the largely populated 0.5{M}J{--}0.7{M}J region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from 1.17{R}J to 1.75{R}J. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b, and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ({R}p=1.17{--}1.26{R}J) orbiting G–type stars in short period (P = 3.2-4.6 days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ({R}p=1.75{R}J, P=3.3024 days) and HATS-27b ({R}p=1.50{R}J, P=4.6370 days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn–off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of 0.153 {{g}} {{cm}}-3 and 0.180 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter—McLaughlin monitoring in order to determine its spin–orbit alignment given the brightness (V = 12.8) and stellar rotational velocity (v\\sin i≈ 9.3 km s‑1) of the host star. These discoveries significantly increase the number of inflated hot Jupiters known, contributing to our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for hot Jupiter inflation. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO

  3. 78 FR 35181 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Revisions to Utah...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... revisions contain new, amended and renumbered rules in Utah Administrative Code (UAC) Title R-307 that... Utah Administrative Code--Permit: New and Modified Sources AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Implementation Plan. (vii) The initials UAC mean or refer to the Utah Administrative Code. I. General...

  4. Lead Levels in Utah Eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michelle

    2006-10-01

    Lead is a health hazard to most animals, causing adverse effects to the nervous and reproductive systems if in sufficient quantity. Found in most fishing jigs and sinkers, as well as some ammunition used in hunting, this metal can poison wildlife such as eagles. Eagles are raptors, or predatory birds, and their lead exposure would most likely comes from their food -- a fish which has swallowed a sinker or lead shot in carrion (dead animal matter). As part of an ongoing project to investigate the environment lead levels in Utah, the bone lead levels in the wing bones of eagles have been measured for eagle carcasses found throughout Utah. The noninvasive technique of x-ray fluorescence was used, consisting of a Cd-109 radioactive source to activate lead atoms and a HPGe detector with digital electronics to collect the gamma spectra. Preliminary results for the eagles measured to date will be presented.

  5. HAT-P-39b-HAT-P-41b: Three Highly Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Béky, B.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Kovács, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Quinn, S. N.; Bieryla, A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-11-01

    We report the discovery of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 11.1, 11.7, and 12.4) F stars. The planets HAT-P-39b through HAT-P-41b have periods of P = 3.5439 days, 4.4572 days, and 2.6940 days, masses of 0.60 M J, 0.62 M J, and 0.80 M J, and radii of 1.57 R J, 1.73 R J, and 1.68 R J, respectively. They orbit stars with masses of 1.40 M ⊙, 1.51 M ⊙, and 1.51 M ⊙, respectively. The three planets are members of an emerging population of highly inflated Jupiters with 0.4 M J 1.5 R J. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A201Hr, A289Hr, and A284Hr), NASA (N049Hr, N018Hr, N167Hr, N029Hr, N108Hr, and N154Hr), and the NOAO Gemini/Keck time-exchange program (G329Hr). Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  6. HAT-P-20b-HAT-P-23b: Four Massive Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Kipping, D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Béky, B.; Buchhave, L. A.; Perumpilly, G.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of four relatively massive (2-7 M J) transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-20b orbits the moderately bright V = 11.339 K3 dwarf star GSC 1910-00239 on a circular orbit, with a period P = 2.875317 ± 0.000004 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455080.92661 ± 0.00021 (BJDUTC), and transit duration 0.0770 ± 0.0008 days. The host star has a mass of 0.76 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 0.69 ± 0.02 R ⊙, effective temperature 4595 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.35 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 7.246 ± 0.187 M J and a radius of 0.867 ± 0.033 R J yielding a mean density of 13.78 ± 1.50 g cm-3. HAT-P-21b orbits the V = 11.685 G3 dwarf star GSC 3013-01229 on an eccentric (e = 0.228 ± 0.016) orbit, with a period P = 4.124481 ± 0.000007 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454996.41312 ± 0.00069, and transit duration 0.1530 ± 0.0027 days. The host star has a mass of 0.95 ± 0.04 M ⊙, radius of 1.10 ± 0.08 R ⊙, effective temperature 5588 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.01 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.063 ± 0.161 M J and a radius of 1.024 ± 0.092 R J yielding a mean density of 4.68+1.59 - 0.99 g cm-3. HAT-P-21b is a borderline object between the pM and pL class planets, and the transits occur near apastron. HAT-P-22b orbits the bright V = 9.732 G5 dwarf star HD 233731 on a circular orbit, with a period P = 3.212220 ± 0.000009 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454930.22001 ± 0.00025, and transit duration 0.1196 ± 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.92 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 1.04 ± 0.04 R ⊙, effective temperature 5302 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.24 ± 0.08. The planet has a mass of 2.147 ± 0.061 M J and a compact radius of 1.080 ± 0.058 R J yielding a mean density of 2.11+0.40 - 0.29 g cm-3. The host star also harbors an M-dwarf companion at a wide separation. Finally, HAT-P-23b orbits the V = 12.432 G0 dwarf star GSC 1632-01396 on a close to circular orbit, with a period P = 1.212884 ± 0.000002 days

  7. Bedrock aquifers of eastern San Juan County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles

    1986-01-01

    This study is one of a series of studies appraising the waterbearing properties of the Navajo Sandstone and associated formations in southern Utah.  The study area is about 4,600 square miles, extending from the Utah-Arizona State line northward to the San Juan-Grand County line and westward from the Utah-Colorado State line to the longitude of about 109°50'.Some of the water-yielding formations are grouped into aquifer systems. The C aquifer is comprised of the DeChelly Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation.  The P aquifer is comprised of the Cedar Mesa Member of the Cutler Formation and the undifferentiated Cutler Formation. The N aquifer is comprised of the sedimentary section that includes the Wingate Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, Navajo Sandstone, Carmel Formation, and Entrada sandstone.  The M aquifer is comprised of the Bluff Sandstone Member and other sandstone units of the Morrison Formation.  The D aquifer is comprised of the Burro Canyon Formation and Dakota Sandstone.  Discharge from the ground-water reservoir to the San Juan River between gaging stations at Four Corners and Mexican Hat is about 66 cubic feet per second.The N aquifer is the main aquifer in the study area. Recharge by infiltration of precipitation is estimated to be 25,000 acre-feet per year.  A major ground-water divide exists under the broad area east of Monticello.  The thickness of the N aquifer, where the sedimentary section is fully preserved and saturated, generally is 750 to 1,250 feet.   Hydraulic conductivity values obtained from aquifer tests range from 0.02 to 0.34 foot per day.  The total volume of water in transient storage is about 11 million acre-feet. Well discharge somewhat exceeded 2,340 acre-feet during 1981.  Discharge to the San Juan River from the N aquifer is estimated to be 6.9 cubic feet per second. Water quality ranges from a calcium bicarbonate to sodium chloride type water

  8. The Manti, Utah, landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, R.B.; Schuster, R.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    PART A: The Manti landslide is in Manti Canyon on the west side of the Wasatch Plateau in central Utah. In early June 1974, coincident with the melting of a snowpack, a rock slump/debris flow occurred on the south rim of Manti Canyon. Part of the slumped material mixed with meltwater and mobilized into a series of debris flows that traveled down the slope a distance of as much as 1.2 km. Most of the flows were deposited either at the base of the steep rocks of the canyon rim or at the site of an old, silted reservoir. A small part of the debris flow deposit stopped on the head of the very large, relatively inactive Manti landslide. The upper part of the landslide began moving as cracks propagated downslope. A little more than a year later, August 1975, movement extended the full length of the old landslide, and about 19 million m 3 of debris about 3 km long and as much as 800 m wide threatened to block the canyon. The upper part of the landslide apparently had moved small amounts between 1939 and 1974. This part of the landslide, identifiable on pre-1974 aerial photographs, consisted of well-defined linears on the landslide flanks and two large internal toe bulges about 2 km downslope from the head. The abrupt reactivation in 1974 proceeded quickly after the debris flows had provided a surcharge in the head and crown area. Movement propagated downslope at 4-5 m/h for the first few days following reactivation. During 1974, the reactivation probably encompassed all the parts of the landslide that had moved small amounts between 1939 and 1974. Movement nearly or completely stopped during the winter of 1974-75, but began again in the spring of 1975. The landslide enlarged from the flanks of the internal toe bulges to Manti Creek at a rate of 2-3 m/h. Movement stopped again during the winter of 1975-76 and began again in the spring of 1976. Thereafter, the displacements have been small compared to earlier. The displacement rates for the landslide were variable depending

  9. Vector Boson + Jets with BlackHat and SHERPA

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, C F; Dixon, L J; Cordero Febres, F; Forde, D; Gleisberg, T; Ita, H; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D

    2010-01-01

    We review recent NLO QCD results for W,Z + 3-jet production at hadron colliders, computed using BlackHat and SHERPA. We also include some new results for Z + 3-jet production at the LHC at 7 TeV. We report new progress towards the NLO cross section for W + 4-jet production. In particular, we show that the virtual matrix elements produced by BlackHat are numerically stable. We also show that with an improved integrator and tree-level matrix elements from BlackHat, SHERPA produces well-behaved real-emission contributions. As an illustration, we present the real-emission contributions -- including dipole-subtraction terms -- to the p_T distribution of the fourth jet, for a single subprocess with the maximum number of gluons.

  10. Vector Boson Jets with BlackHat and Sherpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /Simon Bolivar U.; Forde, D.; /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2010-08-25

    We review recent NLO QCD results for W, Z + 3-jet production at hadron colliders, computing using BlackHat and SHERPA, and including also some new results for Z + 3-jet production for the LHC at 7 TeV. We report new progress towards the NLO cross section for W + 4-jet production. In particular, we show that the virtual matrix elements produced by BlackHat are numerically stable. We also show that with an improved integrator and tree-level matrix elements from BlackHat, SHERPA produces well-behaved real-emission contributions. As an illustration, we present the real-emission contributions - including dipole-subtraction terms - to the p{sub T} distribution of the fourth jet, for a single subprocess with the maximum number of gluons.

  11. Social factors in occupational health: a history of hard hats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Beth; Levenstein, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is the least desirable way to ensure workplace safety, and it is difficult to use consistently. Hard hats are different; they have cachet and are often worn even when they are not required. We investigated the history of this personal protective equipment to see if there were any lessons that could be applied to other forms of PPE. We learned that what makes hard hats special are social factors that are specific to a certain time and place. The importance of social factors illuminates the requirement that cultural and social norms of workers be included in any kind of worker safety and health training.

  12. HAT AVERAGE MULTIRESOLUTION WITH ERROR CONTROL IN 2-D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergio Amat

    2004-01-01

    Multiresolution representations of data are a powerful tool in data compression. For a proper adaptation to the singularities, it is crucial to develop nonlinear methods which are not based on tensor product. The hat average framework permets develop adapted schemes for all types of singularities. In contrast with the wavelet framework these representations cannot be considered as a change of basis, and the stability theory requires different considerations. In this paper, non separable two-dimensional hat average multiresolution processing algorithms that ensure stability are introduced. Explicit error bounds are presented.

  13. Orbital Orientations of Exoplanets: HAT-P-4b is Prograde and HAT-P-14b is Retrograde

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, Joshua N; Johnson, John Asher; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Shporer, Avi; Bakos, Gaspar A; Hartman, Joel D; Holman, Matthew J; Albrecht, Simon

    2010-01-01

    We present observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for two exoplanetary systems, revealing the orientations of their orbits relative to the rotation axes of their parent stars. HAT-P-4b is prograde, with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of lambda = -4.9 +/- 11.9 degrees. In contrast, HAT-P-14b is retrograde, with lambda = 187.8 +/- 4.4 degrees. These results conform with a previously noted pattern among the stellar hosts of close-in giant planets: hotter stars have a wide range of obliquities and cooler stars have low obliquities. This, in turn, suggests that three-body dynamics and tidal dissipation are responsible for the short-period orbits of many exoplanets. In addition, our data revealed a third body in the HAT-P-4 system, which could be a second planet or a companion star.

  14. 78 FR 9807 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ..., Internet address: kwalker@OSMRE.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background on the Utah Program II... borders by demonstrating that its State program includes, among other things, ``a State law which provides... Code (UAC) that Utah proposed to revise and/or add were: R645-100-200, Definition of Valid...

  15. 77 FR 61652 - Utah Disaster # UT-00015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00015 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of UTAH dated...

  16. Hats off to Problem-Solving with Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Sing; Lin, Yu-Fen; Nelson, Judy; Eckstein, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how counselors can use de Bono's Six Thinking Hats problem-solving technique in their work with couples. Part 1 of the article focuses on an introduction to the technique, including a theoretical rationale and supporting research. Following a detailed description of the process of using the model as a…

  17. Hard-Hat Detection for Construction Safety Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, 775 fatalities were recorded, and many more were injured at construction sites in the United States. Of these, 415 fatalities (54% were due to fall, slips, and trips as well as being struck by falling objects. In order to decrease fatalities at construction sites to these types of events, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA provides Fall Prevention and OSHA-10 trainings to construction workers. Moreover, safety personnel monitor whether the workers use personal protective equipment (PPE properly. Data shows that construction fatalities have decreased by 2% annually since 1994; however, the owners still are not satisfied with this result. Various studies have shown that fall is the biggest contributor for construction fatalities. One study showed that half of the fall fatalities were because the workers either had not used PPEs or had not used them properly. In addition, studies showed that, with proper use of hard hats, the fatalities due to fall, slips, trips, and being struck by falling objects could be reduced. This study developed and tested a hard-hat detection tool that uses image-processing techniques to identify whether workers are wearing hard hats. The tool dispatches warning messages if the workers do not use hard hats.

  18. Exoplanet Transits Registered at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. Part I: HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-23b and WASP-10b

    CERN Document Server

    Sada, Pedro V

    2016-01-01

    Forty transits of the exoplanets HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-23b and WASP-10b were recorded with the 0.36m telescope at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. The images were captured with a standard Johnson-Cousins Rc and Ic and Sloan z' filters and processed to obtain individual light curves of the events. These light curves were successfully combined for each system to obtain a resulting one of higher quality, but with a slightly larger time sampling rate. A reduction by a factor of about four in per-point scatter was typically achieved, resulting in combined light curves with a scatter of ~1 mmag. The noise characteristics of the combined light curves were verified by comparing Allan variance plots of the residuals. The combined light curves for each system, along with radial velocity measurements from the literature when available, were modeled using a Monte Carlo method to obtain the essential parameters that characterize the systems. Our results for all these systems confirm the derived t...

  19. The long duration flight of the TopHat experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Aguirre, J.; Bezaire, J.;

    2003-01-01

    The TopHat instrument was designed to operate on the top of a high altitude balloon. From this location, the experiment could efficiently observe using a clean beam with extremely low contamination from the far side lobes of the instrument beam. The experiment was designed to scan a large portion...

  20. Broad-band spectrophotometry of HAT-P-32 b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallonn, M.; Bernt, I.; Herrero, E.

    2016-01-01

    Multicolour broad-band transit observations offer the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet with small- to medium-sized telescopes. One of the most favourable targets is the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32 b. We combined 21 new transit observations of this planet with 36 previou...

  1. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  2. HATS: A Design Procedure for Routine Business Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching students a basic design process for routine business documents like memos, letters, and reports. Outlines the design principles of HATS (Headings, Access, Typography, and Spacing), how they apply in before-and-after fashion to various documents, and discusses an assignment in which students redesign an existing…

  3. HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Joel D; Bakos, Gáspár Á; Bieryla, Allyson; Kovács, Géza; Latham, David W; Csubry, Zoltan; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Penev, Kaloyan; Buchhave, Lars A; Torres, Guillermo; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoff W; Johnson, John A; Isaacson, Howard; Sato, Bun'ei; Boisse, Isabelle; Falco, Emilio; Everett, Mark E; Szklenar, Tamas; Fulton, Benjamin J; Shporer, Avi; Kovács, Tamas; Hansen, Terese; Béky, Bence; Noyes, Robert W; Lázár, József; Papp, Istvan; Sári, Pál

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery and characterization of four transiting exoplanets by the HATNet survey. The planet HAT-P-50b has a mass of 1.35 M_J and a radius of 1.29 R_J, and orbits a bright (V = 11.8 mag) M = 1.27 M_sun, R = 1.70 R_sun star every P = 3.1220 days. The planet HAT-P-51b has a mass of 0.31 M_J and a radius of 1.29 R_J, and orbits a V = 13.4 mag, M = 0.98 M_sun, R = 1.04 R_sun star with a period of P = 4.2180 days. The planet HAT-P-52b has a mass of 0.82 M_J and a radius of 1.01 R_J, and orbits a V = 14.1 mag, M = 0.89 M_sun, R = 0.89 R_sun star with a period of P = 2.7536 days. The planet HAT-P-53b has a mass of 1.48 M_J and a radius of 1.32 R_J, and orbits a V = 13.7 mag, M = 1.09 M_sun, R = 1.21 R_sun star with a period of P = 1.9616 days. All four planets are consistent with having circular orbits and have masses and radii measured to better than 10% precision. The low stellar jitter and favorable R_P/R_star ratio for HAT-P-51 make it a promising target for measuring the Rossiter-McLaughlin effec...

  4. Hydrology of Northern Utah Valley, Utah County, Utah, 1975-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Jay R.; Gardner, Philip M.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    The ground-water resources of northern Utah Valley, Utah, were assessed during 2003-05 to describe and quantify components of the hydrologic system, determine a hydrologic budget for the basin-fill aquifer, and evaluate changes to the system relative to previous studies. Northern Utah Valley is a horst and graben structure with ground water occurring in both the mountain-block uplands surrounding the valley and in the unconsolidated basin-fill sediments. The principal aquifer in northern Utah Valley occurs in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits where a deeper unconfined aquifer occurs near the mountain front and laterally grades into multiple confined aquifers near the center of the valley. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers occur predominantly as either infiltration of streamflow at or near the interface of the mountain front and valley or as subsurface inflow from the adjacent mountain blocks. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers were estimated to average 153,000 (+/- 31,500) acre-feet annually during 1975-2004 with subsurface inflow and infiltration of streamflow being the predominant sources. Discharge from the basin-fill aquifers occurs in the valley lowlands as flow to waterways, drains, ditches, springs, as diffuse seepage, and as discharge from flowing and pumping wells. Ground-water discharge from the basin-fill aquifers during 1975-2004 was estimated to average 166,700 (+/- 25,900) acre-feet/year where discharge to wells for consumptive use and discharge to waterways, drains, ditches, and springs were the principal sources. Measured water levels in wells in northern Utah Valley declined an average of 22 feet from 1981 to 2004. Water-level declines are consistent with a severe regional drought beginning in 1999 and continuing through 2004. Water samples were collected from 36 wells and springs throughout the study area along expected flowpaths. Water samples collected from 34 wells were analyzed for dissolved major ions, nutrients, and

  5. HATS-9b AND HATS-10b: TWO COMPACT HOT JUPITERS IN FIELD 7 OF THE K2 MISSION

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, R; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Bayliss, D; Penev, K; Zhou, G; Ciceri, S; Rabus, M; Espinoza, N; Mancini, L; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Sato, B; Tan, T G; Csubry, Z; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Suc, V; Noyes, R W; Papp, I; Lázár, J; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 $\\pm$ 1.5 Gyr) V=13.3 G dwarf star, with a period P = 1.9153 d. The host star has a mass of 1.03 M$_{\\odot}$, radius of 1.503 R$_\\odot$ and effective temperature 5366 $\\pm$ 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 M$_J$, and radius of 1.065 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.85 g cm$^{-3}$ . HATS-10b orbits a V=13.1 G dwarf star, with a period P = 3.3128 d. The host star has a mass of 1.1 M$_\\odot$, radius of 1.11 R$_\\odot$ and effective temperature 5880 $\\pm$ 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 M$_J$, and radius of 0.97 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.7 g cm$^{-3}$ . Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars, and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2 but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterisation of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provid...

  6. Warm Spitzer Photometry of XO-4b, HAT-P-6b and HAT-P-8b

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Kamen O; Knutson, Heather A; Burrows, Adam; Sada, Pedro V; Cowan, Nicolas B; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fortney, Jonathan J; Charbonneau, David; Laughlin, Gregory; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed Warm Spitzer/IRAC observations of the secondary eclipses of three planets, XO-4b, HAT-P-6b and HAT-P-8b. We measure secondary eclipse amplitudes at 3.6{\\mu}m and 4.5{\\mu}m for each target. XO-4b exhibits a stronger eclipse depth at 4.5{\\mu}m than at 3.6{\\mu}m, which is consistent with the presence of a temperature inversion. HAT-P-8b shows a stronger eclipse amplitude at 3.6{\\mu}m, and is best-described by models without a temperature inversion. The eclipse depths of HAT-P-6b can be fitted with models with a small or no temperature inversion. We consider our results in the context of a postulated relationship between stellar activity and temperature inversions and a relationship between irradiation level and planet dayside temperature, as discussed by Knutson et al. (2010) and Cowan & Agol (2011), respectively. Our results are consistent with these hypotheses, but do not significantly strengthen them. To measure accurate secondary eclipse central phases, we require accurate ephemerides. W...

  7. White Hats Chasing Black Hats: Careers in IT and the Skills Required to Get There. Advisory from Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Eric; Lawrence, Cameron; Clouse, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illuminate the exciting world in which "white hat crackers" operate and to suggest topics that can help prepare students to enter this high-demand field. While currently there is extraordinary demand for graduates to fill these positions that have relatively high starting salaries, employers find it difficult…

  8. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Birken, Adam S.; Derrick, V. Noah; Fisher, Martel J.; Holt, Christopher M.; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2013-01-01

    This is the fiftieth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2012. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water. usgs.gov/publications/GW2013.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2011 are reported in Burden and others (2012) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2012.pdf

  9. Einstein's $R^{\\hat{0} \\hat{0}}$ equation for non-relativistic sources derived from Einstein's inertial motion and the Newtonian law for relative acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    With Einstein's inertial motion (free-falling and non-rotating relative to gyroscopes), geodesics for non-relativistic particles can intersect repeatedly, allowing one to compute the space-time curvature $R^{\\hat{0} \\hat{0}}$ exactly. Einstein's $R^{\\hat{0} \\hat{0}}$ for strong gravitational fields and for relativistic source-matter is identical with the Newtonian expression for the relative radial acceleration of neighboring free-falling test-particles, spherically averaged.--- Einstein's field equations follow from Newtonian experiments, local Lorentz-covariance, and energy-momentum conservation combined with the Bianchi identity.

  10. Experimental studies on the axial crash behavior of aluminum foam-filled hat sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-chun; FAN Zi-jie; GUI Liang-jin; WANG Zheng-hong; FU Zi-lai

    2006-01-01

    Drop hammer tests were carried out to study the axial crash behavior of aluminum foam-filled hat sections.First,the axial crash tests of the empty hat sections,aluminum foam and the aluminum foam-filled hat sections were carried out;then,based upon the test results,the axial crash behavior of the aluminum foam-filled hat sections were analyzed.It was found that aluminum foam filling can increase the energy absorption capacities of the hat sections.Compared with the non-filled structures,aluminum foamfilled structures were much more stable and needed less mass to absorb the specified energy.

  11. Hydrologic Data Sites for Garfield County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Garfield County, Utah. The scope and...

  12. Hydrologic Data Sites for Wayne County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Wayne County, Utah. The scope and purpose...

  13. Utah trumpeter swan project update #1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of activities for the Utah swan project for the year of 1996. This summary discusses core sampling that took place at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and...

  14. Hydrologic Data Sites for Millard County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Millard County, Utah. The scope and purpose...

  15. Library outreach: addressing Utah's "Digital Divide".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, K M

    2000-10-01

    A "Digital Divide" in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-- Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Education Centers. In a circuit-rider approach, an outreach librarian offers classes and demonstrations throughout the state that teach information-access skills to health professionals. Provision of traditional library services to unaffiliated health professionals is integrated into the library's daily workload as a component of the outreach program. The paper describes the history, methodology, administration, funding, impact, and results of the program.

  16. Hydrologic Data Sites for Saltlake County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Salt Lake County, Utah. The scope and...

  17. Hydrologic Data Sites for Iron County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Iron County, Utah. The scope and purpose...

  18. Hydrologic Data Sites for Daggett County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Daggett County, Utah. The scope and...

  19. Hydrologic Data Sites for Cache County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Cache County, Utah. The scope and purpose...

  20. Hydrologic Data Sites for Sanpete County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Sanpete County, Utah. The scope and...

  1. Hydrologic Data Sites for Sanjuan County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for San Juan County, Utah. The scope and...

  2. Schrodinger's Hat: Electromagnetic, acoustic and quantum amplifiers via transformation optics

    CERN Document Server

    Greenleaf, Allan; Lassas, Matti; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    The advent of transformation optics and metamaterials has made possible devices producing extreme effects on wave propagation. Here we give theoretical designs for devices, Schr\\"odinger hats, acting as invisible concentrators of waves. These exist for any wave phenomenon modeled by either the Helmholtz or Schr\\"odinger equations, e.g., polarized waves in EM, pressure waves in acoustics and matter waves in QM, and occupy one part of a parameter space continuum of wave-manipulating structures which also contains standard transformation optics based cloaks, resonant cloaks and cloaked sensors. For EM and acoustic Schr\\"odinger hats, the resulting centralized wave is a localized excitation. In QM, the result is a new charged quasiparticle, a \\emph{quasmon}, which causes conditional probabilistic illusions. We discuss possible solid state implementations.

  3. Numerical cubature from Archimedes' hat-box theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Kuperberg, Greg

    2004-01-01

    Archimedes' hat-box theorem states that uniform measure on a sphere projects to uniform measure on an interval. This fact can be used to derive Simpson's rule. We present various constructions of, and lower bounds for, numerical cubature formulas using moment maps as a generalization of Archimedes' theorem. We realize some well-known cubature formulas on simplices as projections of spherical designs. We combine cubature formulas on simplices and tori to make new formulas on spheres. In partic...

  4. Note on contra delta hat g-continuous functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lellis Thivagar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce and investigate some classes of generalized functions called contra-delta hat g-continuous functions. We obtain several characterizations and some of their properties. Also we investigate its relationship with other types of functions. Finally we introduce two new spaces called deltahat g-Hausdorf spaces and deltahat g-normal spaces and obtain some new results.

  5. Time Dependent \\hat{q} from AdS/CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, W. A.

    2017-07-01

    We present the first ever AdS/CFT calculation of \\hat{q} for a light quark jet as a function of position or, equivalently, time. Our result does not suffer from the gamma factor blow up of the usual time-independent AdS/CFT heavy quark setup and is qualitatively similar to, but about a factor of 2/3 larger than, the light flavor result from Liu, Rajagopal, and Wiedemann. Our findings can be immediately implemented into any \\hat{q}-based energy loss model. Our \\hat{q} derivation relies on our calculation of the average distance squared, s 2(t), travelled by the endpoint of a string falling in an AdS3-Schwarzschild spacetime. The early time behavior is ballistic, s 2(t) ∼ t 2, but the late time behavior is the usual diffusive Brownian motion, s 2(t) ∼ t. These late time dynamics are universal and depend only on the near-horizon physics, which allows us to generalize our results to arbitrary dimensions and thus make contact with the physics explored by RHIC and LHC. Additionally, we find that AdS/CFT predicts angular ordering for radiation in a medium, just as in vacuum, and in contradistinction to weak-coupling. Finally, our results also imply, sensibly, that AdS/CFT predicts a smooth interpolation between the angular correlations of open heavy flavor and light flavor observables.

  6. Exoplanet HAT-P-11b Secondary Transit Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted secondary eclipse observations of exoplanet HAT--11b, recently discovered by proposal G. Bakos and his colleagues. HAT-P-11b is the smallest transiting extrasolar planet yet found and one of only two known exo-Neptunes. We have observed the system at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Once the secondary eclipse is located through analysis of the data, we will make a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-1lb has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. A precise determination of the orbit phase for the secondary eclipse will also be of great utility for Kepler observations of this system at visible wavelengths.

  7. Relative photometry of HAT-P-1b occultations

    CERN Document Server

    Béky, Bence; Gilliland, Ronald L; Bakos, Gáspár Á; Winn, Joshua N; Noyes, Robert W; Sasselov, Dimitar D

    2013-01-01

    We present HST STIS observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2 sigma upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b betwee...

  8. An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-07

    The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

  9. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-Planet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, J D; Torres, G; Kovács, G; Johnson, J A; Howard, A W; Marcy, G W; Latham, D W; Bieryla, A; Buchhave, L A; Bhatti, W; Béky, B; Csubry, Z; Penev, K; de Val-Borro, M; Noyes, R W; Fischer, D A; Esquerdo, G A; Everett, M; Szklenár, T; Zhou, G; Bayliss, D; Shporer, A; Fulton, B J; Sanchis-Ojeda, R; Falco, E; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V=13.2, 12.8 and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.39, 0.89, and 0.49 Mjup, and radii of 1.28, 1.43, and 1.28 Rjup. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 Msun. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 220 d and a minimum mass of 1.6 Mjup. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out an alternative solution for the outer planet having a period of 438 d and a minimum mass of 3.7 Mjup. For HAT-P-45 at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model, in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the ...

  10. Multiple roles for acetylation in the interaction of p300 HAT with ATF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Wang, Ling; Wang, Dongxia; Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen; Cotter, Robert; Cole, Philip A

    2007-07-17

    The transcriptional coactivator paralogues p300 and CBP contain acetyltransferase domains (HAT) and catalyze the lysine acetylation of histones and other proteins as an important aspect of their functions. Prior studies revealed that the basic leucine zipper domain (b-ZIP) of transcription factor ATF-2 (also called CRE-BP1) can interact with the CBP HAT domain. In this study, we have examined the ATF-2 b-ZIP interaction with the p300 HAT domain and shown that p300 HAT autoacetylation can enhance the binding affinity. Pull-down assays revealed that hyperacetylated p300 HAT is more efficiently retained by immobilized ATF-2 b-ZIP than hypoacetylated p300 HAT. Loop deleted p300 HAT lacking autoacetylation was retained about as well as hyperacetylated p300 HAT, suggesting that the loop and ATF-2 compete for p300 HAT binding. While ATF-2 b-ZIP is a weak inhibitor of hypoacetylated p300 HAT acetylation of a histone H4 peptide, hyperacetylated p300 HAT is much more potently inhibited by ATF-2 b-ZIP. Moreover, we showed that ATF-2 b-ZIP could serve as an acetyltransferase substrate for p300 HAT. Using mass spectrometry, two p300 HAT lysine acetylation sites were mapped in ATF-2 b-ZIP. Immunoprecipitation-Western blot analysis with anti-acetyl-lysine antibody revealed that ATF-2 can undergo reversible acetylation in vivo. Mutational analysis of the two ATF-2 b-ZIP acetylation sites revealed their potential contributions to ATF-2-mediated transcriptional activation. Taken together, these studies suggest multiple roles for protein acetylation in the regulation of transcription by p300/CBP and ATF-2.

  11. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Holt, Christopher M.; Fisher, Martel J.; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2012-01-01

    This is the forty-ninth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2011. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http:// www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs. gov/publications/GW2012.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2010 are reported in Burden and others (2011) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2011.pdf.

  12. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Marston, Thomas M.; Fisher, Martel J.; Balling, Ted J.; Downhour, Paul; Guzman, Manuel; Eacret, Robert J.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the forty-eighth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2010. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http:// www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs. gov/publications/GW2011.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2009 are reported in Burden and others (2010) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2010.pdf.

  13. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Birken, Adam S.; Gerner, Steven J.; Carricaburu, John P.; Derrick, V. Noah; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.; Fisher, Martel J.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fifty-first in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2013. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water. usgs.gov/publications/GW2014.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2012 are reported in Burden and others (2013) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs. gov/publications/GW2013.pdf

  14. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Cederberg, Jay R.; Fisher, Martel J.; Freeman, Michael L.; Downhour, Paul; Enright, Michael; Eacret, Robert J.; Guzman, Manuel; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    This is the forty-seventh in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2009. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www. waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2010.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2008 are reported in Burden and others (2009) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/ GW2009.pdf.

  15. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Birken, Adam S.; Carricaburu, John P.; Jones, Katherine K.; Derrick, V. Noah; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Freel, Andrew D.; Christiansen, Howard K.; Fisher, Martel J.

    2016-01-01

    This is the fifty-third in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to new wells constructed for withdrawal of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2015. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2016.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2014 are reported in Burden and others (2015) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2015.pdf

  16. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Birken, Adam S.; Carricaburu, John P.; Fisher, Martel J.; Derrick, V. Noah; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifty-second in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to new wells constructed for withdrawal of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2014. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2015.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2013 are reported in Burden and others (2014) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2014.pdf.

  17. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-planet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bhatti, W.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Falco, E.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M J, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R J. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M ⊙. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M J. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s-1 is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M J, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck

  18. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, AND HAT-P-46b: Three transiting hot Jupiters in possible multi-planet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; De Val-Borro, M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kovács, G. [Konkoly Observatory, Budapest (Hungary); Johnson, J. A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, A. W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Marcy, G. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Buchhave, L. A. [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Fischer, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Everett, M. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Szklenár, T., E-mail: jhartman@astro.princeton.edu [Hungarian Astronomical Association, 1461 Budapest (Hungary); and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M {sub J}, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R {sub J}. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M {sub ☉}. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M {sub J}. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s{sup –1} is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M {sub J}, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.

  19. Library outreach: addressing Utah's “Digital Divide”

    OpenAIRE

    McCloskey, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    A “Digital Divide” in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine—Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Ed...

  20. USING SIX THINKING HATS AS A TOOL FOR LATERAL THINKING IN ORGANIZATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. P. S. Aithal; Dr. P. M. Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Six thinking hats is recently introduced technique which outlines different thinking styles required by an individual while analysing a given problem in an effective way. The technique correlates different thinking styles used in a systematic problem-solving procedure with different coloured hats. Alternately, by conceptualizing each type of hat, the person focuses on the style of thinking associated with each colour so that the problem can be analysed from different angles and frame of refer...

  1. Utah Article Delivery: A New Model for Consortial Resource Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Carol A.; Lee, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the UTAD (Utah Article Delivery) Pilot Project, an innovative resource-sharing service that provides journal articles to the Utah higher education community, developed by the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC) in partnership with EBSCO Document Services. Highlights include goals, options considered, challenges, and evaluation. The…

  2. General survey of hAT transposon superfamily with highlight on hobo element in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladevèze, Véronique; Chaminade, Nicole; Lemeunier, Françoise; Periquet, Georges; Aulard, Sylvie

    2012-09-01

    The hAT transposons, very abundant in all kingdoms, have a common evolutionary origin probably predating the plant-fungi-animal divergence. In this paper we present their general characteristics. Members of this superfamily belong to Class II transposable elements. hAT elements share transposase, short terminal inverted repeats and eight base-pairs duplication of genomic target. We focus on hAT elements in Drosophila, especially hobo. Its distribution, dynamics and impact on genome restructuring in laboratory strains as well as in natural populations are reported. Finally, the evolutionary history of hAT elements, their domestication and use as transgenic tools are discussed.

  3. FACTORS & ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF SIX THINKING HATS TECHNIQUE USING ABCD FRAMEWORK

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. P. S. Aithal; V. T. Shailashree; Dr. P. M. Suresh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    De Bono's Six Thinking Hats technique suggests different types of thinking corresponding to six thinking roles for the analyst, associated with hats of six different colors. The technique correlates different thinking styles used in a systematic problem solving procedure with different coloured hats. Alternately, by conceptualizing each type of hat, the person focuses on the style of thinking associated with each colour so that the problem can be analysed from different angles and frame of re...

  4. Wie viel Kapazität hat ein Mobilfunknetz?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenblätter, Andreas; Geerdes, Hans-Florian

    Wer hat das noch nicht erlebt? Der Akku ist aufgeladen und reichlich Guthaben vorhanden, doch das Telefonieren mit dem Handy klappt trotzdem nicht. Meist liegt das daran, dass man sich in einem Funkloch befindet. Aber manchmal ist auch das Netz überlastet. Anders gesagt: das Funknetz des Mobilfunkanbieters, das viele Antennen auf Hausdächern oder Masten umfasst, bietet entweder nicht genügend Abdeckung oder nicht genügend Kapazität. Genau das will der Anbieter natürlich vermeiden. Mathematik hilft, diese Herausforderungen mit einer guten Planung des Mobilfunknetzes zu bewältigen.

  5. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  6. The History of SETI at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, J.

    2006-12-01

    Since the first SETI search in 1960, observations have encountered an exponentially growing problem with radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by our own communication, entertainment, and military technologies. The signal processing equipment that is used for SETI has gotten much faster and more capable, yet the fraction of the possible search space that has been explored remains very small. More than 100 searches have been reported in the literature. Tarter (2001) has summarized the various search strategies and the SETI Institute maintains an updated search archive at http://www.seti.org/searcharchive. The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) at Hat Creek Radio Observatory will be the first instrument designed with SETI as a goal, and its speed and flexibility will permit a significant exploration of our local region of the Milky Way Galaxy, targeting ˜1 million stars for weak signals, as well as surveying for stronger signals from ˜40 billion distant stars, located in the direction of the galactic center and the surrounding 20 square degrees. Just as Jack Welch has been responsible for many of the innovations in the ATA and the SETI observations it will soon undertake, he has been the key to enabling SETI at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the past three decades.

  7. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed

  8. The status of Utah coal in global resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbani, F.R. [Department of Natural Resources State Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Coal resources have had an historical effect on the development of Utah and has influenced the western expansion of the United States. Although Utah`s production is just over two percent of the total national production, the resource quality is higher than most other coal fields in the country. Coal production surpassed 25 million tons in 1995 and has increased in recent years. This paper discusses the specific properties of Utah`s various coal fields in terms of marketability, mining difficulty, and transport to markets. The broad spectrum of Utah`s coal production (past, present, and potential future growth) is reviewed through distribution and coal usage data spanning a ten-year period.

  9. A Bayesian Atmospheric Retrieval Performed on HAT-P-16b and WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Kathleen J.; Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan C.; Hardin, Matthew Ryan; Bowman, Oliver Oliver; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lenius, Maria; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Ariston Hardy, Ryan; Cameron, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    HAT-P-16b is a hot (equilibrium temperature 1626 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and efficient energy redistribution), 4.19 ± 0.09 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting an F8 star every 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days (Buchhave et al 2010). WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b is a cooler (1020 ± 17 K), 0.487 ± 0.018 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting a K3 star every 3.7224747 ± 0.0000065 days (Bakos et al. 2009, co-discovered by West et al. 2008). We observed secondary eclipses of both planets using the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels of the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (program ID 60003). We applied our Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code to constrain the temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric molecular abundances of the two planets. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  10. Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT System to Facilitate Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Finkelstein

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful patient self-management requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes regular patient assessment, disease-specific education, control of medication adherence, implementation of health behavior change models and social support. Existing systems for computer-assisted disease management do not provide this multidisciplinary patient support and do not address treatment compliance issues. We developed the Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT system for patients with different chronic health conditions to facilitate their self-care. The HAT system consists of a home unit, HAT server, and clinician units. Patients at home use a palmtop or a laptop connected with a disease monitor on a regular basis. Each HAT session consists of self-testing, feedback, and educational components. The self-reported symptom data and objective results obtained from disease-specific sensors are automatically sent from patient homes to the HAT server in the hospital. Any web-enabled device can serve as a clinician unit to review patient results. The HAT system monitors self-testing results and patient compliance. The HAT system has been implemented and tested in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, patients with asthma, COPD and other health conditions. Evaluation results indicated high level of acceptance of the HAT system by the patients and that the system has a positive impact on main clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with medical care.

  11. Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) a decade later : A brief update on science and politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Benedikt; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Blanken, Peter; Haasen, Christian; Rehm, Juergen; Schechter, Martin T.; Strang, John; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Since the initial Swiss heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) study conducted in the mid-1990s, several other jurisdictions in Europe and North America have implemented HAT trials. All of these studies embrace the same goal-investigating the utility of medical heroin prescribing for problematic opioid use

  12. Not Just Hats Anymore: Binomial Inversion and the Problem of Multiple Coincidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathout, Leith

    2007-01-01

    The well-known "hats" problem, in which a number of people enter a restaurant and check their hats, and then receive them back at random, is often used to illustrate the concept of derangements, that is, permutations with no fixed points. In this paper, the problem is extended to multiple items of clothing, and a general solution to the problem of…

  13. Free Field Realization of Quantum Superalgebra $U_q(\\hat{{sl}}(N|1))$

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    We construct a free field realization of the quantum superalgebra $U_q(\\hat{sl}(N|1))$ for an arbitrary level $k$, that we call $q$-Wakimoto realization. Using the dressing deformation, we construct a free field realization of the the elliptic deformed superalgebra $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl}(N|1))$ for an arbitrary level $k$.

  14. Giant Paperclip Necklaces, Soup-Can Rings and Cherry-Pie Hats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by the wearable sculpture art created by artist Marjorie Schick. Students used wallpaper paste and newspapers to create papier-mache for a mountain hat, a cherry-pie mask/hat, a "dress" shoe and a Cubistic mask. Cardboard was used in many of these things, in addition to being used as…

  15. Profiling Family Preservation Services in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Jerry P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Family Prevention Services projects operating in the largest service areas in Utah, which maintains (85 percent of) the most difficult-to-serve children and adolescents from troubled families in their homes, thus preventing out-of-home placements. A case study is presented. (Author/BB)

  16. Increased Gonorrhea Cases - Utah, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joanna; Carlile, Jerry; Dunn, Angela; Evans, Megan; Fratto, Erin; Hartsell, Joel; Meinor, Lynn; Mietchen, Matthew; Nakashima, Allyn

    2016-09-02

    Gonorrhea (caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae) is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States (1). Left untreated, gonorrhea is associated with serious long-term adverse health effects, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Infection also facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (2,3). Effective gonorrhea control relies upon early detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. To assess gonorrhea rate trends in Utah, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) analyzed Utah National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (UT-NEDSS) data for the state during 2009-2014. After declining during 2009-2011, the statewide gonorrhea rate increased fivefold to 49 cases per 100,000 population in 2014. During 2009-2014, the proportion of cases among women increased from 21% to 39% (decreasing among males from 79% to 61%). Among male patients, the proportion who identified as men who have sex with men (MSM) decreased from 67% to 42%. These demographic changes suggest that increased heterosexual transmission of gonorrhea in Utah might be occurring. Health departments need to work with providers to ensure populations at high risk are being screened and properly treated for gonorrhea. Clinicians need to be aware of increases in the risk for infection among women and non-MSM males when making screening and testing decisions and educate their patients regarding gonorrhea transmission and prevention practices.

  17. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  18. 77 FR 73966 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in accordance with the requirements of this Act... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 944 Utah Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; reopening and...

  19. Utah Governor's Mansion Library--Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinwand, Louis, Comp.

    This document begins with a statement of purpose for the Utah Governor's Mansion Library. Acknowledgments of individual contributors, institutional contributors, and the Governor's Mansion Foundation Library Committee members are acknowledged. An extensive bibliography lists the Library's holdings; entries are divided into sections for nonfiction,…

  20. 77 FR 34892 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule..., Title 78 of the Utah Code, that requires plaintiffs who obtain temporary relief (administrative stay or...Rulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov . This proposed rule has been assigned Docket ID: OSM-2012-0011....

  1. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  2. 76 FR 15357 - Utah Disaster #UT-00009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00009 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only...

  3. 76 FR 10081 - Utah Disaster #UT-00009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00009 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  4. 77 FR 7229 - Utah Disaster #UT-00011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  5. 76 FR 50807 - Utah Disaster #UT-00010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00010 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  6. 77 FR 67858 - Utah Disaster #UT-00021

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Utah Disaster UT-00021 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  7. The Starspots of HAT-P-11: Evidence for a Solar-like Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brett M.; Hebb, Leslie; Davenport, James R. A.; Rohn, Graeme; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2017-09-01

    We measure the starspot radii and latitude distribution on the K4 dwarf HAT-P-11 from Kepler short-cadence photometry. We take advantage of starspot occultations by HAT-P-11’s highly misaligned planet to compare the spot size and latitude distributions to those of sunspots. We find that HAT-P-11’s spots are distributed in latitude much like sunspots near the solar activity maximum, with a mean spot latitude of ≈16° ± 1°. The majority of HAT-P-11’s starspots have physical sizes that closely resemble the sizes of sunspots at solar maximum. We estimate the mean spotted area coverage on HAT-P-11 to be {3}-1+6 % , roughly two orders of magnitude greater than the typical solar spotted area.

  8. Incidence of Hospital Acquired Thrombosis (HAT) in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, MI

    2017-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In spite of guidelines, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilised, and hospital acquired thrombosis (HAT) continues to be a problem. This study was conducted to estimate the incidence of HAT in a tertiary referral centre and to examine whether VTE risk assessment and thromboprophylaxis (TP) were implemented. Patients 18 years and above, with a radiologically-confirmed acute VTE during the study period of 15 weeks were included. Acute VTE was diagnosed in 100 patients and HAT was diagnosed in 48. There were 12,024 admissions over the study period, therefore the incidence of HAT was 0.4%. TP was prescribed in only 35% of patients, and 65% did not receive any or appropriate TP. Hospitals without active implementation of a formal risk assessment tool and TP policy are likely to continue to have increased incidence of HAT.

  9. The man who mistook his wife for a hat

    CERN Document Server

    Sacks, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Oliver Sacks’s The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sacks’s splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine’s ultimate responsibility: “the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject.”

  10. Supernova 1987 A - The nebular loops and 'Napoleon's Hat'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Wampler, E. J.

    1992-08-01

    We discuss observations of the circumstellar environment of SN 1987A that were obtained between August 1989 and January 1992 at ESO's New Technology Telescope. We find that the angular dimensions of the two nebular loops (Wampler et al., 1990) have not changed during this period. Therefore these loops are confined to a small region. The expansion velocity of the loops is less than about 40 km/s if the loops expanded with a uniform velocity from a common origin. This structure and velocity is hard to reproduce with existing wind interaction models. Our observations further suggest that the Napoleon's Hat nebula does not originate from the general background LMC dust, but from a bow shock dust whose origins are closely related to the stellar winds from the progenitor star of SN 1987A.

  11. Secondary Eclipses of HAT-P-13b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ryan A.; Harrington, Joseph; Hardin, Matthew R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Loredo, Thomas J.; Challener, Ryan C.; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina

    2017-02-01

    We present Spitzer secondary-eclipse observations of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-13 b in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. HAT-P-13 b inhabits a two-planet system with a configuration that enables constraints on the planet’s second Love number, {k}2, from precise eccentricity measurements, which in turn constrains models of the planet’s interior structure. We exploit the direct measurements of e\\cos ω from our secondary-eclipse data and combine them with previously published radial velocity data to generate a refined model of the planet’s orbit and thus an improved estimate on the possible interval for {k}2. We report eclipse phases of 0.49154+/- 0.00080 and 0.49711+/- 0.00083 and corresponding e\\cos ω estimates of -0.0136+/- 0.0013 and -0.0048+/- 0.0013. Under the assumptions of previous work, our estimate of {k}2 of 0.81 ± 0.10 is consistent with the lower extremes of possible core masses found by previous models, including models with no solid core. This anomalous result challenges both interior models and the dynamical assumptions that enable them, including the essential assumption of apsidal alignment. We also report eclipse depths of 0.081% ± 0.008% in the 3.6 μm channel and 0.088% ± 0.028% in the 4.5 μm channel. These photometric results are non-uniquely consistent with solar-abundance composition without any thermal inversion.

  12. Monitoring of BTX by passive sampling in Hat Yai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proespichaya Kanatharana

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-built passive samplers were used for monitoring of trace benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX in Hat Yai from 28 July to 12 August, 2003. Sampler bottles contained activated Tenax TA 60/80 meshand a lab-built thermal well were developed and evaluated for the sampling and analysis of BTX. The sampling was carried out for two weeks before the passive samplers were thermally desorbed, trapped ina sampling loop by a laboratory built purge and trap system and analysed by gas chromatography (GC equipped with a flame ionization detector. After optimization and calibration, the developed method showed high selectivity, a good sensitivity with detection limits for BTX of 0.8, 1.1 and 13.0 µg/m3 respectively and an acceptable precision. Ambient BTX measurements were conducted at many monitoring site i.e. hot spots (high exposure, residential areas/work places (common exposure and park (low exposure. The concentration at hot spots range from 3.2 to 5.4 µg/m3 for benzene, 38.0 to 80.3 µg/m3 for toluene and 29.7 to 66.7 µg/m3 for xylene.The low BTX were found at the city periphery (Tesco-Lotus billboard sampling stations, roof level and in Hat Yai Municipal Park but no absolute background concentration could be defined. The monitoring results showed that at higher level from the street surface, the level of BTX tended to decrease and the BTX pollution built up along a street canyon (Sanehanuson Road according to the wind direction. The highest BTX were found at the underground parking, 23.5 725.1 and 267.9 µg/m3 respectively where both WHO guideline for Benzene (16.3 µg/m3 and Toluene (260 µg/m3 were exceeded.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Utah. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 Utah State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Utah.

  14. Dialing the Love Number of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Peter

    2015-05-01

    HAT-P-13b is Jupiter-mass transiting planet in a 0.04 AU orbit around its host star. It has an outer companion, HAT-P-13c, with a minimum mass of 14.7 MJup in a highly eccentric 1.2 AU orbit. These two companions form an isolated dynamical system with their host star [1]. The nature of this system allows the two bodies to settle into a fixed eccentricity state where the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is directly related to its oblateness as described by the Love number, k2 [2]. In order to constrain the eccentricity, and therefore k2, of HAT-P-13b, we use the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the timing of its secondary eclipses at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We then simultaneously fit our secondary eclipse data in conjunction with previously measured radial velocity and transit data. Finally, we apply the fact that, if the orbits of HAT-P-13b and HAT-P-13c are coplanar, then their apsides are aligned [3]. The apsidal orientation of HAT-P-13c is much better constrained because of its high eccentricity, which helps break the degeneracy between the eccentricity and apsidal orientation in interpreting the measured secondary eclipse time. Our analysis allows us to measure the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b’s orbit with a precision approximately ten times better than that of previously published values, in the coplanar case, and allows us to place the first meaningful constraints on the core mass of HAT-P-13b.[1] Becker & Batygin 2013, ApJ 778, 100 [2] Wu & Goldreich 2002, ApJ 564, 1024 [3] Batygin+ 2009, ApJ 704, L49

  15. HATS-11b AND HATS-12b: Two Transiting Hot Jupiters Orbiting Subsolar Metallicity Stars Selected for the K2 Campaign 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, M.; Jordán, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Mancini, L.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Csbury, Z.; Sato, B.; Tan, T.-G.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Bento, J.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V = 14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000+/- 0.060 {M}⊙ , a radius of 1.444+/- 0.057 {R}⊙ and an effective temperature of 6060+/- 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85+/- 0.12 {M}{{J}}, 1.510+/- 0.078 {R}{{J}} planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V = 12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489+/- 0.071 {M}⊙ , a radius of 2.21+/- 0.21 {R}⊙ , and an effective temperature of 6408+/- 75 K. For HATS-12b, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38+/- 0.11 {M}{{J}}, 1.35+/- 0.17 {R}{{J}} planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show subsolar metallicities of -0.390+/- 0.060 dex and -0.100+/- 0.040 dex, respectively, and are (slightly) evolved stars. In fact, HATS-11 is among the most metal-poor and, HATS-12, with a {log}{g}\\star of 3.923+/- 0.065, is among the most evolved stars hosting a hot-Jupiter planet. Importantly, HATS-11 and HATS-12 have been observed in long cadence by Kepler as part of K2 campaign 7 (EPIC216414930 and EPIC218131080 respectively). The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on

  16. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 2. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT)-Based, Mixed-Mode (Electron Transfer (ET)/HAT), and Lipid Peroxidation Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    Measuring the antioxidant activity/capacity levels of food extracts and biological fluids is useful for determining the nutritional value of foodstuffs and for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of numerous oxidative stress-related diseases. Biologically, antioxidants play their health-beneficial roles via transferring a hydrogen (H) atom or an electron (e(-)) to reactive species, thereby deactivating them. Antioxidant activity assays imitate this action; that is, antioxidants are measured by their H atom transfer (HAT) or e(-) transfer (ET) to probe molecules. Antioxidant activity/capacity can be monitored by a wide variety of assays with different mechanisms, including HAT, ET, and mixed-mode (ET/HAT) assays, generally without distinct boundaries between them. Understanding the principal mechanisms, advantages, and disadvantages of the measurement assays is important for proper selection of method for valid evaluation of antioxidant properties in desired applications. This work provides a general and up-to-date overview of HAT-based, mixed-mode (ET/HAT), and lipid peroxidation assays available for measuring antioxidant activity/capacity and the chemistry behind them, including a critical evaluation of their advantages and drawbacks.

  17. HATS-11b and HATS-12b: Two transiting Hot Jupiters orbiting sub-solar metallicity stars selected for the K2 Campaign 7

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, M; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Espinoza, N; Brahm, R; Penev, K; Ciceri, S; Zhou, G; Bayliss, D; Mancini, L; Bhatti, W; de Val-Borro, M; Csbury, Z; Sato, B; Tan, T -G; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Bento, J; Suc, V; Noyes, R; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V=14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000 $\\pm$ 0.060 M$_{\\odot}$, a radius of 1.444 $\\pm$ 0.057 M$_{\\odot}$ and an effective temperature of 6060 $\\pm$ 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85 $\\pm$ 0.12 M$_J$, 1.510 $\\pm$ 0.078 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V=12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489 $\\pm$ 0.071 M$_{\\odot}$, a radius of 2.21 $\\pm$ 0.21 R$_{\\odot}$, and an effective temperature of 6408 $\\pm$ 75 K. For HATS-12, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38 $\\pm$ 0.11 M$_J$, 1.35 $\\pm$ 0.17 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show sub-solar metallicity of -0.390 $\\pm$ 0.060 dex and -0.100 $\\pm$ 0.040 dex, respectively and are (slightly) evolved stars....

  18. Utah's Mobile Earth Science Outreach Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessow, F. S.; Christian, L.

    2016-12-01

    Students at Utah State University's College of Natural Resources have engineered the first mobile Earth Science outreach platform capable of delivering high-tech and interactive solar-powered educational resources to the traditionally-underserved, remote communities of rural Utah. By retrofitting and modifying an industrial box-truck, this project effectively created a highly mobile and energy independent "school in a box" which seeks to help change the way that Earth science is communicated, eliminate traditional barriers, and increase science accessibility - both physically and conceptually. The project's education platform is focused on developing a more effective, sustainable, and engaging platform for presenting Earth science outreach curricula to community members of all ages in an engaging fashion. Furthermore, this project affords university students the opportunity to demonstrate innovative science communication techniques, translating vital university research into educational outreach operations aimed at doing real, measurable good for local communities.

  19. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal

  20. Consumptive Use and Water Requirements for Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, A. Leon; Haws, Frank W.; Hughes, Trevor C.; Bagley, Jay M.

    1982-01-01

    Foreword: Studies on the meteorological determinants of evapotranspiration were initiated at least as long ago as the 1920s and by the late 1940s had produced the Blaney-Criddle method for estimating crop consumptive use. The resulting ability to estimate water requirements by both location and crop added a new scientific dimension to water rights administration that was first introduced into the courts of Utah d...

  1. Utah Bat Conservation Plan, 2008-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    has been reported. 1This species occurs from s. British Columbia to c. México ( Jalisco and Querétaro), east to w. Kansas, w. Oklahoma, and w. Texas...Wildlife Service. 25 pp. Oliver, G. V. 1997. Inventory of sensitive species and ecosystems in Utah. Inventory of sensitive vertebrate and...potential wind energy development sites are ranked. Riparian Area: The vegetation, habitats, or ecosystems that are associated with streams, rivers

  2. BOX-DEATH HOLLOW ROADLESS AREA, UTAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gordon W.; Lane, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, and a search for prospects and mineralized rock in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area, Utah indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Additional exploratory drilling by industry seems warranted if wells elsewhere in the region find oil or gas in strata as yet untested in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area.

  3. Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) a decade later: a brief update on science and politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Benedikt; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Blanken, Peter; Haasen, Christian; Rehm, Jürgen; Schechter, Martin T; Strang, John; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-07-01

    Since the initial Swiss heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) study conducted in the mid-1990s, several other jurisdictions in Europe and North America have implemented HAT trials. All of these studies embrace the same goal-investigating the utility of medical heroin prescribing for problematic opioid users-yet are distinct in various key details. This paper briefly reviews (initiated or completed) studies and their main parameters, including primary research objectives, design, target populations, outcome measures, current status and-where available-key results. We conclude this overview with some final observations on a decade of intensive HAT research in the jurisdictions examined, including the suggestion that there is a mounting onus on the realm of politics to translate the-largely positive-data from completed HAT science into corresponding policy and programming in order to expand effective treatment options for the high-risk population of illicit opioid users.

  4. Bosonization and vertex operator of supersymmetry $u_q(\\hat{sl}(n|1))$ for level $k$

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    We construct a bosonization of the quantum superalgebra $U_q(\\hat{sl}(N|1))$ for an arbitrary level $k$. We construct the screening that commutes with the quantum superalgebra for an arbitrary level $k \

  5. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduced Crew Operations (RCO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Air Force - NASA Bi-Annual Research Council Meeting, slides will be presented on recent Reduced Crew Operations (RCO) work. Unmanned aerial systems, robotics, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all examples of domains that are seeing dramatic increases in automation. While automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required, for the foreseeable future, to remain in the system. The collaboration with humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. A methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project is discussed.

  6. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduce Crew Operations (RCO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems, robotics, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all examples of domains that are seeing dramatic increases in automation. While automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required, for the foreseeable future, to remain in the system. The collaboration with humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. This paper applies a methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project.

  7. Midterm evaluation of hemodynamics of the Top Hat supraannular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Nissen, Henrik; Geha, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    The CarboMedics Top Hat supraannular aortic valve provides an orifice-to-annulus ratio of 1:1 in most patients, and enhances patient outcomes. This study compared the midterm echocardiographic parameters of 52 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a Top Hat valve with those in other...... measurements were compared in 38 patients with aortic valve stenosis. Hemodynamic data were comparable to those of other studies, but the Top Hat prosthesis implanted was significantly larger (by a mean of 3.29 mm) than the valve size indicated using an intraannular valve sizer in 48 patients. Mean effective...... orifice area improved significantly from 0.73 cm(2) preoperatively to 2.04 cm(2) postoperatively. In patients with preoperative aortic valve stenosis, postoperative mean peak gradient was significantly reduced. The larger orifice-to-annulus ratio of the Top Hat valve improved hemodynamic parameters...

  8. Parameters of Recent Transits of HAT-P-23b

    CERN Document Server

    Ramón-Fox, Felipe G

    2012-01-01

    Four transits of the exoplanet HAT-P-23b were recently observed with the 0.36m telescope at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. The four light curves were successfully combined to obtain a resulting one with reduced scattering per bin. This one was modeled using a Monte Carlo method to obtain the essential parameters that characterize the system. Assuming orbital parameters such as eccentricity, e, and longitude of periastron, w, from the discovery paper, we found values of Rp/R* = 0.1105 +0.0015-0.0013 for the planet-to-star radius ratio, a/R* = 4.23 +0.06-0.12 for the scaled semimajor axis, and an orbital inclination of the system of i = 87.9d +1.5-2.2. We also derive an improved orbital period of 1.2128868 +- 0.0000004 days (To = 2,454,852.26542 +- 0.00018 BJD_TDB) for the system.

  9. PARAMETERS OF RECENT TRANSITS OF HAT-P-23b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Ramón-Fox

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cuatro tránsitos del planeta extrasolar HAT-P-23b fueron observados recientemente con el telescopio de 0.36 m del Observatorio de la Universidad de Monterrey. Las cuatro curvas de luz fueron exitosamente combinadas para obtener una resultante de mayor calidad. Esta curva fue modelada utilizando un método de Monte Carlo para obtener los parámetros esenciales que caracterizan al sistema. Asumiendo parámetros orbitales como la excentricidad e y la longitud del periastro ! reportados en el artículo del descubrimiento, encontramos valores de Rp/R* = 0.1105+0.0015 −0.0013 para la razón del radio del planeta al radio estelar, a/R? = 4.23+0.06 −0.12 para el semieje mayor normalizado, y una inclinación orbital de i = 87.9?+1.5 −2.2. Obtenemos un período orbital de 1.2128868 ± 0.0000004 días (To = 2, 454, 852.26542 ± 0.00018 BJD TDB.

  10. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

    2003-07-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall

  11. Structural Behavior of H+Hat Combined Steel Sheet Pile%H+Hat 组合型钢板桩结构性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵海丰; 永津亮祐; 项伟; 桂树强

    2015-01-01

    H+Hat 组合型钢板桩构造简单、抗弯刚度大、可反复使用且经济性好,具有广泛的应用前景,但在国内尚未应用而缺乏验证。通过理论计算、室内试验、现场原位试验和数值模拟等手段对H+Hat 组合型钢板桩的截面抗弯、锁口抗拉及锁口止水等结构性能进行了研究。研究结果显示:H+Hat 组合型钢板桩具有比普通钢板桩更大的抗弯截面模量,且其抗弯工作性能良好;锁口抗拉容许强度远大于其实际运行的抗拉强度;锁口止水性能不差于普通钢板桩。研究为H+Hat 组合型钢板桩在基坑、码头、船坞、围堰、库岸等工程中的推广应用提供了依据。%H+Hat combined steel sheet pile has a broad prospect of application due to its simple structure,big ben-ding stiffness,repeated usage and cost effectiveness.However,it has not been applied in China yet and lack of verification.In view of this we carried out theoretical calculation,indoor experiment,in situ test and numerical simulation to research the sectional flexural performance,lock tensile performance and lock waterproof performance of H+Hat combined steel sheet pile.Results reveal that the sectional flexural modulus of H+Hat combined steel sheet pile is larger than that of ordinary steel sheet pile with good flexural performance;the allowable lock tensile strength is far greater than that in actual operation;and the lock waterproof performance is not worse than that of or-dinary steel sheet pile.The research could be a basis for the popularization and application of H+Hat combined steel sheet pile in foundation pit,piers,docks,cofferdam,and bank supporting structures.

  12. HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b. Two inflated transiting hot Jupiters from the HATNet Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisse, I.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Hansen, T.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Szklenár, T.; Falco, E.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Noyes, R. W.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We announce the discovery of two new transiting planets, and provide their accurate initial characterization. Methods: First identified from the HATNet wide-field photometric survey, these candidate transiting planets were then followed-up with a variety of photometric observations. Determining the planetary nature of the objects and characterizing the parameters of the systems were mainly done with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope at OHP and the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5 m telescope at FLWO. Results: HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b are typical hot Jupiters on circular orbits around early-G/late-F main sequence host stars, with periods of 4.641878 ± 0.000032 and 3.332687 ± 0.000015 days, masses of 1.044 ± 0.083 and 0.662 ± 0.060 MJ, and radii of 1.280 ± 0.153 and 1.28+0.062-0.033RJ, respectively. These discoveries increase the sample of planets with measured mean densities, which are needed to constrain theories of planetary interiors and atmospheres. Moreover, their hosts are relatively bright (V < 13.5), which facilitates further follow-up studies. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A86The photometric/spectroscopic data presented in this paper are based in part on observations carried out by the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network, using telescopes operated at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), and at the Submillimeter Array (SMA) of SAO, by the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by SAO at FLWO, by the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (runs DDT-Dec. 2011), by the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los

  13. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

    2003-09-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to

  14. No isomorphism between the affine $\\hat sl(2)$ algebra and the N=2 superconformal algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Since 1999 it became obvious that the would be `isomorphism' between the affine $\\hat sl(2)$ algebra and the N=2 superconformal algebras, proposed by some authors, simply does not work. However, this issue was never properly discussed in the literature and, as a result, some confusion still remains. In this article we finally settle down, clearly and unambiguously, the true facts: there is no isomorphism between the affine $\\hat sl(2)$ algebra and the N=2 superconformal algebras.

  15. HATS-17b: A Transiting Compact Warm Jupiter in a 16.3 Days Circular Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, R; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Espinoza, N; Rabus, M; Hartman, J D; Bayliss, D; Ciceri, S; Zhou, G; Mancini, L; Tan, T G; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Bento, J; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V=12.4) G-type (M$_{\\star}$=1.131 $\\pm$ 0.030 M$_{\\odot}$, R$_{\\star}$=1.091$^{+0.070}_{-0.046}$ R$_{\\star}$) metal-rich ([Fe/H]=+0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P=16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777 $\\pm$ 0.056 R$_J$ given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338 $\\pm$ 0.065 M$_J$. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17b will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet.

  16. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b: Two Low-density Saturn-mass Planets Transiting Metal-rich K Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Sato, B.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Füresz, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Béky, B.; Stefanik, R. P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Csubry, Z.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-18b orbits the V = 12.759 K2 dwarf star GSC 2594-00646, with a period P = 5.508023 ± 0.000006 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454715.02174 ± 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1131 ± 0.0009 days. The host star has a mass of 0.77 ± 0.03 M sun, radius of 0.75 ± 0.04 R sun, effective temperature 4803 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.10 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.197 ± 0.013 M J and radius of 0.995 ± 0.052 R J, yielding a mean density of 0.25 ± 0.04 g cm-3. HAT-P-19b orbits the V = 12.901 K1 dwarf star GSC 2283-00589, with a period P = 4.008778 ± 0.000006 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455091.53417 ± 0.00034 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1182 ± 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.84 ± 0.04 M sun, radius of 0.82 ± 0.05 R sun, effective temperature 4990 ± 130 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.23 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.292 ± 0.018 M J and radius of 1.132 ± 0.072 R J, yielding a mean density of 0.25 ± 0.04 g cm-3. The radial velocity residuals for HAT-P-19 exhibit a linear trend in time, which indicates the presence of a third body in the system. Comparing these observations with theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b are each consistent with a hydrogen-helium-dominated gas giant planet with negligible core mass. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b join HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b in an emerging group of low-density Saturn-mass planets, with negligible inferred core masses. However, unlike HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b, both HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b orbit stars with super-solar metallicity. This calls into question the heretofore suggestive correlation between the inferred core mass and host star metallicity for Saturn-mass planets. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A146Hr, A201Hr

  17. 78 FR 35956 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Conference Call. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and... Advisory Council (RAC) Subgroup will host a conference call. DATES: The Utah RAC Subgroup will host...

  18. Grasses and Grasslike Plants of Utah, A Field Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    This guide is meant to serve as a help in identifying many of the grasses and grass-like plants common to the rangelands, forests, and farmlands of Utah. It is not an exhaustive guide to the plants contained herein, nor is it a comprehensive summary of all the grasses and grass-like plants in Utah.

  19. The northern goshawk in Utah: Habitat assessment and management recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell T. Graham; Ronald L. Rodriguez; Kathleen M. Paulin; Rodney L. Player; Arlene P. Heap; Richard Williams

    1999-01-01

    This assessment describes northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) habitat in the State of Utah. Because of fire exclusion, insect and disease epidemics, timber harvest, livestock grazing, or a combination of these factors the forests and woodlands of Utah have changed drastically since the early 1900's. Forests are now dominated by mid- and late...

  20. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively

  1. Utah System of Higher Education Data Book (Supplement to Operating Budget Request) 1998-99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Board of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report provides detailed statistical data on the Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), including institution-specific data on the system's four universities and five community colleges. The institutions include the University of Utah, Utah State University, Weber State University, Southern Utah University, Snow College, Dixie College,…

  2. Utah System of Higher Education Data Book (Supplement to Operating Budget Request) 1997-98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Board of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report provides detailed statistical data on the Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), including institution-specific data on the system's four universities and five community colleges. The institutions include the University of Utah, Utah State University, Weber State University, Southern Utah University, Snow College, Dixie College,…

  3. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Danner, M.R.; Enright, Michael; Cillessen, J.L.; Gerner, S.J.; Eacret, Robert J.; Downhour, Paul; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.; Fisher, Martel J.

    2007-01-01

    This is the forty-fourth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2006. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is available online at http://www.waterrights.utah. gov/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/newUTAH/GW2007.pdf.

  4. Factorizing twists and R-matrices for representations of the quantum affine algebra U_q(\\hat sl_2)

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Hendryk

    2000-01-01

    We calculate factorizing twists in evaluation representations of the quantum affine algebra U_q(\\hat sl_2). From the factorizing twists we derive a representation independent expression of the R-matrices of U_q(\\hat sl_2). Comparing with the corresponding quantities for the Yangian Y(sl_2), it is shown that the U_q(\\hat sl_2) results can be obtained by `replacing numbers by q-numbers'. Conversely, the limit q -> 1 exists in representations of U_q(\\hat sl_2) and both the factorizing twists and...

  5. HATS-8b: A Low-Density Transiting Super-Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, D; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Zhou, G; Brahm, R; Rabus, M; Jordán, A; Mancini, L; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Espinoza, N; Csubry, Z; Howard, A W; Fulton, B J; Buchhave, L A; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Ciceri, S; Noyes, R W; Isaacson, H; Marcy, G W; Suc, V; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    HATS-8b is a low density transiting super-Neptune discovered as part of the HATSouth project. The planet orbits its solar-like G dwarf host (V=14.03 $\\pm$ 0.10 and T$_{eff}$ =5679 $\\pm$ 50 K) with a period of 3.5839 d. HATS-8b is the third lowest mass transiting exoplanet to be discovered from a wide-field ground based search, and with a mass of 0.138 $\\pm$ 0.019 M$_J$ it is approximately half-way between the masses of Neptune and Saturn. However HATS-8b has a radius of 0.873 (+0.123,-0.075) R$_J$, resulting in a bulk density of just 0.259 $\\pm$ 0.091 g.cm$^{-3}$. The metallicity of the host star is super-Solar ([Fe/H]=0.210 $\\pm$ 0.080), arguing against the idea that low density exoplanets form from metal-poor environments. The low density and large radius of HATS-8b results in an atmospheric scale height of almost 1000 km, and in addition to this there is an excellent reference star of near equal magnitude at just 19 arcsecond separation on the sky. These factors make HATS-8b an exciting target for future a...

  6. HATS-5b: A Transiting hot-Saturn from the HATSouth Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, G; Penev, K; Bakos, G Á; Hartman, J D; Jordán, A; Mancini, L; Mohler, M; Csubry, Z; Ciceri, S; Brahm, R; Rabus, M; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Suc, V; Espinoza, N; Béky, B; Noyes, R W; Schmidt, B; Butler, R P; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Crane, J; Sato, B; Csák, B; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P; Nikolov, N

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot-Saturn orbiting a G type star, by the HAT-South survey. HATS-5b has a mass of Mp=0.24 Mj, radius of Rp=0.91 Rj, and transits its host star with a period of P=4.7634d. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 Msun, and radius of 0.87 Rsun. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b, and the bright, photometrically quiet host star, make this planet a favourable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas-giants, and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas-giant population.

  7. An Elliptic Algebra $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_2})$ and the Fusion RSOS Model

    CERN Document Server

    Konno, H

    1997-01-01

    We introduce an elliptic algebra $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_2})$ with $p=q^{2r} (r\\in show that this algebra governs a structure of the space of states in the $k-$fusion RSOS model specified by a pair of positive integers $(r,k)$, or equivalently a $q-$deformation of the coset conformal field theory $SU(2)_k\\times SU(2)_{r-k-2}/SU(2)_{r-2}$. Extending the work by Lukyanov and Pugai corresponding to the case $k=1$, we gives a full set of screening operators for $k>1$. The algebra $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_2})$ has two interesting degeneration limits, $p\\to 0$ and $p\\to 1$. The former limit yields the quantum affine algebra $U_{q}(\\hat{sl_2})$ whereas the latter yields the algebra ${\\cal A}_{\\hbar,\\eta}(\\hat{sl_2})$, the scaling limit of the elliptic algebra ${\\cal A}_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_2})$. Using this correspondence, we also obtain the highest component of two types of vertex operators which can be regarded as $q-$deformations of the primary fields in the coset conformal field theory.

  8. Human histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) acetylates lysine 5 of histone H2A in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafrova, Juliana I; Tafrov, Stefan T

    2014-07-01

    The primary structure of Histone Acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) has been conserved throughout evolution; however, despite its ubiquity, its cellular function is not well characterized. To study its in vivo acetylation pattern and function, we utilized shRNAmir against Hat1 expressed in the well-substantiated HeLa (human cervical cancer) cell line. To reduce the interference by enzymes with similar HAT specificity, we used HeLa cells expressing histone acetyltransferase Tip60 with mutated acetyl-CoA binding site that abrogates its enzyme activity (mutant HeLa-tip60). Two shRNAmir were identified that reduced the expression of the cytoplasmic and nuclear forms of Hat1. Cytosolic protein preparations from these two clones showed decreased levels of acetylation of lysine 5 (K5) and K12 on histone H4, with the concomitant loss of the acetylation of histone H2A at K5. This pattern of decreased acetylation of H2AK5 was well defined in preparations of histone protein and insoluble nuclear-protein (INP) fractions as well. Abrogating the Hat1 expression caused a 74% decrease in colony-forming efficiency of mutant HeLa-tip60 cells, reduced the size of the colonies by 50%, and decreased the amounts of proteins with molecular weights below 35 kDa in the INP fractions.

  9. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    CERN Document Server

    Buhler, Peter; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, BJ; Fortney, Jonathan; Burrows, Adam; Wong, Ian

    2016-01-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit as a consequence of the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Due to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity ($e_b$) is in part dictated by its Love number ($k_{2_b}$), which is in turn a proxy for the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. Thus, the measurement of $e_b$ constrains $k_{2_b}$ and allows us to place otherwise elusive constraints on the mass of HAT-P-13b's core ($M_{\\rm{core,b}}$). In this study we derive new constraints on the value of $e_b$ by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the $\\textit{Spitzer Space Telescope}$. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that $e_b = 0.00700 \\pm 0.00100$. We then use octupole-order secular perturba...

  10. HATS-1b: The First Transiting Planet Discovered by the HATSouth Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Penev, K; Bayliss, D; Jordán, A; Mohler, M; Zhou, G; Suc, V; Rabus, M; Hartman, J D; Mancini, L; Béky, B; Csubry, Z; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Nikolov, N; Csák, B; Brahm, R; Espinoza, N; Conroy, P; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D D; Schmidt, B; Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Addison, B C; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V=12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period P~3.4465 d, mass Mp~1.86MJ, and radius Rp~1.30RJ. The host star has a mass of 0.99Msun, and radius of 1.04Rsun. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near continuous coverage over several multi-day periods, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets.

  11. Infinitely many commuting operators for the elliptic quantum group $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_N})$

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    We construct two classes of infinitely many commuting operators associated with the elliptic quantum group $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_N})$. We call one of them the integral of motion ${\\cal G}_m$, $(m \\in {\\mathbb N})$ and the other the boundary transfer matrix $T_B(z)$, $(z \\in {\\mathbb C})$. The integral of motion ${\\cal G}_m$ is related to elliptic deformation of the $N$-th KdV theory. The boundary transfer matrix $T_B(z)$ is related to the boundary $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_N})$ face model. We diagonalize the boundary transfer matrix $T_B(z)$ by using the free field realization of the elliptic quantum group, however diagonalization of the integral of motion ${\\cal G}_m$ is open problem even for the simplest case $U_{q,p}(\\hat{sl_2})$.

  12. [Usefulness of top-hat transform processing in whole body bone scintigraphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Akinobu; Sugimoto, Katsuya; Tsuchida, Tatsurou; Kishimoto, Takahiro; Toi, Akiko; Shimada, Masato; Adachi, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of top-hat transform processing in whole body bone scintigraphy, five radiological technicians interpreted both original and top-hat processed images to determine the improvement of lesion detectability and interpretation time. For the evaluation of detectability, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The area under the curve (AUC) calculated from the ROC curve was improved in all observers (from 0.786 to 0.864 in average), although no significant difference was observed. However, the interpretation time was improved significantly (from 24.5 to 16.2 s in average). Top-hat transform processing in whole body bone scintigraphy is thought to be useful for the improvement of lesion detectability and interpretation time.

  13. HATS-1b: THE FIRST TRANSITING PLANET DISCOVERED BY THE HATSouth SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penev, K.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Conroy, P. [Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Jordan, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Mohler, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csak, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Buchhave, L., E-mail: kpenev@astro.princeton.edu [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University (Denmark); and others

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period of P Almost-Equal-To 3.4465 days, mass of M{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.86 M{sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.30 R{sub J}. The host star has a mass of 0.99 M{sub Sun} and radius of 1.04 R{sub Sun }. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near-continuous coverage over several multi-day timespans, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets.

  14. Plug in to the Utah Library Network, Reach Out to the World. Utah Library Network and Internet Training Handbook [for DOS]. Information Forum Publication #7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinwand, Louis; And Others

    This manual is designed to assist public libraries in Utah in their use of the Internet. Many of the examples used were created specifically to explain the use of products that the Utah Library Network provides for public libraries in Utah. The introduction provides background history and general information about the Internet and general…

  15. Flexural fatigue life prediction of closed hat-section using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Zia

    1989-01-01

    Straight or curved hat-section members are often used as structural stiffeners in aircraft. For instance, they are employed as stiffeners for the dorsal skin as well as in the aerial refueling adjacent area structure in F-106 aircraft. The flanges of the hat-section are connected to the aircraft skin. Thus, the portion of the skin closing the hat-section interacts with the section itself when resisting the stresses due to service loads. The flexural fatigue life of such a closed section is estimated using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics. It should be recognized that when a structural shape is subjected to bending, the fatigue life at the neutral axis is infinity since the normal stresses are zero at that location. Conversely, the fatigue life at the extreme fibers where the normal bending stresses are maximum can be expected to be finite. Thus, different fatigue life estimates can be visualized at various distances from the neural axis. The problem becomes compounded further when significant portions away from the neutral axis are stressed into plastic range. A theoretical analysis of the closed hat-section subjected to flexural cyclic loading is first conducted. The axial fatigue characteristics together with the related axial fatigue life formula and its inverted form given by Manson and Muralidharan are adopted for an aluminum alloy used in aircraft construction. A closed-form expression for predicting the flexural fatigue life is then derived for the closed hat-section including materially nonlinear action. A computer program is written to conduct a study of the variables such as the thicknesses of the hat-section and the skin, and the type of alloy used. The study has provided a fundamental understanding of the flexural fatigue life characteristics of a practical structural component used in aircraft when materially nonlinear action is present.

  16. Targeting Specific HATs for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment: Translating Basic Biology to Therapeutic Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila K. Pirooznia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic epigenetic regulation of neurons is emerging as a fundamental mechanism by which neurons adapt their transcriptional responses to specific developmental and environmental cues. While defects within the neural epigenome have traditionally been studied in the context of early developmental and heritable cognitive disorders, recent studies point to aberrant histone acetylation status as a key mechanism underlying acquired inappropriate alterations of genome structure and function in post-mitotic neurons during the aging process. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the lifetime of neurons through mechanisms related to loss of function of histone acetyltransferase (HATs activity. Several HATs have been shown to participate in vital neuronal functions such as regulation of neuronal plasticity and memory formation. As such, dysregulation of such HATs has been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with age-associated neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline. In order to counteract the loss of HAT function in neurodegenerative diseases, the current therapeutic strategies involve the use of small molecules called histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors that antagonize HDAC activity and thus enhance acetylation levels. Although this strategy has displayed promising therapeutic effects, currently used HDAC inhibitors lack target specificity, raising concerns about their applicability. With rapidly evolving literature on HATs and their respective functions in mediating neuronal survival and higher order brain function such as learning and memory, modulating the function of specific HATs holds new promises as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the recent progress in research regarding epigenetic histone acetylation mechanisms underlying neuronal activity and cognitive function. We discuss the current understanding of specific HDACs and

  17. Mercury in Connecticut and Long Island Sound: Impact of Historic Hatting Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsther, R.; Welsh, P.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2004-05-01

    Wetlands in the northeastern region of the U.S.A. are mildly contaminated with Hg as a result of atmospheric deposition, with modern soil concentrations of several 100 ppb Hg. Connecticut was once considered the hat manufacturing capital of the world. A solution of Hg-nitrate was used in the felting process, and old hat factory sites have become point sources of Hg contamination. Surface soils in the former hatting town of Danbury have Hg soil concentration levels that well exceed Connecticut's residential soil remediation standard of 20 ppm. Sediments from the Still River, a small waterway that runs through Danbury and discharges into the Housatonic River, show locally Hg concentrations of several tens of ppm, Cores taken from marsh islands in the Housatonic River show elevated Hg concentrations as well, up to 5 ppm Hg. Sites in Norwalk, another former hatting town, and along the Norwalk River also show values of more than 5 ppm Hg. The old hat factory sites in both towns clearly serve as point sources for Hg contamination downstream. Cores taken from marshes in the Connecticut River, which drains no former hatting towns, had much lower Hg concentrations (up to ~500 ppb Hg). The Five Mile River marsh near Darien, CT has lower peak values than found in the sediments of the Housatonic and Norwalk River cores, but still slightly elevated (800 ppb Hg). The Hg from the hat-site point sources is ultimately entering Long Island Sound. High Hg levels are found in western Long Island Sound compared to the eastern section (up to 800 ppb Hg), which is the result of fine-grained sediment transport westwards in the Sound, and the release of Hg-bearing effluent from waste water treatment plants of New York City. The contaminated sediment output from the Housatonic and Norwalk Rivers also contributes to the elevated Hg levels in the western Sound and possibly the Five Mile River marshes. Cores taken from the Housatonic River and western Long Island Sound show also peak Hg

  18. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization - KVM-based infrastructure services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortijo, D.

    2011-06-14

    Over the past 18 months, BNL has moved a large percentage of its Linux-based servers and services into a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) environment. This presentation will address our approach to virtualization, critical decision points, and a discussion of our implementation. Specific topics will include an overview of hardware and software requirements, networking, and storage; discussion of the decision of Red Hat solution over competing products (VMWare, Xen, etc); details on some of the features of RHEV - both current and on their roadmap; Review of performance and reliability gains since deployment completion; path forward for RHEV at BNL and caveats and potential problems.

  19. Assessing approaches to manage Phragmites in Utah wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Given the extent of the Phragmites problem in Utah and elsewhere, managers are eager to understand what techniques are most effective for killing Phragmites while...

  20. Photographs of historical mining operations in Colorado and Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A collection of photographs of mine sites, mining operations, and tailings taken prior to 1980 at a variety of sites throughout Colorado and Utah. A database of...

  1. Utilities at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (utilpnt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents various types of utilities, including water- and power-related utilities, at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The utilities were...

  2. Footprints of Buildings at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (footprints)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/INFO coverage consisting of 10 polygons representing the buildings' footprints at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The footprints were collected...

  3. Springs at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (allsprgs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 151 points representing spring locations in and surrounding Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. This data originates...

  4. Library outreach: addressing Utah's “Digital Divide”

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    A “Digital Divide” in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine—Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Education Centers. In a circuit-rider approach, an outreach librarian offers classes and demonstrations throughout the state that teach information-access skills to health professionals. Provision of traditional library services to unaffiliated health professionals is integrated into the library's daily workload as a component of the outreach program. The paper describes the history, methodology, administration, funding, impact, and results of the program. PMID:11055305

  5. 75 FR 2154 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ...), Bonneville Unit, Central Utah Project (CUP). It would provide an opportunity for more effective and efficient management of water, make efficient use of recycled water, provide opportunities for stream and...

  6. 76 FR 39434 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... floor Monument Conference Room, Salt Lake City, Utah. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sherry Foot..., a business meeting will be held to discuss the ecological, social, and economic values that can...

  7. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  8. MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

    2003-11-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional

  9. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  10. US hydropower resource assessment for Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Utah.

  11. Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goode, Harry D.

    1978-11-01

    Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms

  12. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: Four Transiting Planets More Massive than Jupiter Orbiting Moderately Bright Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenár, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; Penev, K.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-07-01

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M J and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M J), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 ± 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 ± 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A289Hr) and NASA (N167Hr and N029Hr). Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  13. Characterization of the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab and the M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Ming; Wright, Jason T; Knutson, Heather A; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Johnathan; Ngo, Henry; Fulton, Benjamin J; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M; Muirhead, Philip S; Hinkley, Sasha; Showman, Adam P; Curtis, Jason; Burruss, Rick

    2014-01-01

    We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab, taken with Hale/WIRC in H and Ks bands and with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. We carried out adaptive optics imaging of the planet host star HAT-P-32A and its companion HAT-P-32B in the near-IR and the visible. We clearly resolve the two stars from each other and find a separation of 2.923" +/- 0. 004" and a position angle 110.64 deg +/- 0.12 deg. We measure the flux ratios of the binary in g' r' i' z' and H & Ks bands, and determine Teff = 3565 +/- 82 K for the companion star, corresponding to an M1.5 dwarf. We use PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models to correct the dilution of the secondary eclipse depths of the hot Jupiter due to the presence of the M1.5 companion. We also improve the secondary eclipse photometry by accounting for the non-classical, flux-dependent nonlinearity of the WIRC IR detector in the H band. We measure planet-to-star flux ratios of 0.090 +/- 0.033%, 0.178 +/- 0.057%, 0.364 +/- 0.016%, and 0.438 +/- 0.020% i...

  14. Boundary state of $U_q(\\hat{gl}(N|N))$ analog of half-infinite $t-J$ model

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The $U_q(\\hat{gl}(N|N))$-analog of the half-infinite $t-J$ model with a boundary is considered by using the vertex operator approach. We find explicit bosonic formula of the boundary state in the integrable highest-weight module over the quantum superalgebra $U_q(\\hat{gl}(N|N))$.

  15. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in

  16. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in

  17. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Fisher, Martel J.; Freeman, Michael L.; Downhour, Paul; Nielson, Ashley; Eacret, Robert J.; Myers, Andrew; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2009-01-01

    This is the forty-sixth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2008. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is available online at http://www.waterrights. utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/ GW2009.pdf.

  18. Assessment and use of drug information references in Utah pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Krystal L; Macdonald, Elyse A; Trovato, Anthony; Tak, Casey R

    2017-01-01

    To determine which drug references Utah pharmacists use most frequently. To determine which types of drug information questions are most commonly asked, and whether Utah pharmacists have access to adequate references to respond to these questions. A 19-question survey was created using Qualtrics, LLC (Provo, Utah) software. An electronic survey link was sent to 1,431 pharmacists with a valid e-mail address listed in the Department of Professional Licensing database. Questions focused on available references in the participant's pharmacy, how current the references are, and the participant's use of the references. Surveys were analyzed for participants practicing in either community or hospital pharmacies in the state of Utah. A total of 147 responses were included in the analysis. Approximately 44% of respondents practiced in the community, and 56% practiced in a hospital setting. The most commonly used references by Utah pharmacists are Micromedex, Lexicomp, UpToDate, Clinical Pharmacology, and Drug Facts & Comparisons. Pharmacists in the community frequently receive questions related to adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, and over-the-counter medications. Pharmacists in the hospital frequently receive questions relating to dosage and administration, drug interactions, and adverse drug reactions. About 89% of community pharmacists and 96% of hospital pharmacists feel available references are adequate to answer the questions they receive. Utah pharmacists generally use large reference suites to answer drug information questions. The majority of pharmacists consider the references available to them to be adequate to answer the questions they receive.

  19. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Danner, M.R.; Fisher, Martel J.; Freeman, Michael L.; Downhour, Paul; Wilkowske, C.D.; Eacret, Robert J.; Enright, Michael; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2008-01-01

    This is the forty-fifth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2007. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2008.pdf.

  20. Nonlinear $\\hat{W}_{\\infty}$ Current Algebra in the SL(2,R)/U(1) Coset Model

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, F; Yu, Feng; Wu, Yong-Shi

    1992-01-01

    Previously we have established that the second Hamiltonian structure of the KP hierarchy is a nonlinear deformation, called $\\hat{W}_{\\infty}$, of the linear, centerless $W_{\\infty}$ algebra. In this letter we present a free-field realization for all generators of $\\hat{W}_{\\infty}$ in terms of two scalars as well as an elegant generating function for the $\\hat{W}_{\\infty}$ currents in the classical conformal $SL(2,R)/U(1)$ coset model. After quantization, a quantum deformation of $\\hat{W}_{\\infty}$ appears as the hidden current algebra in this model. The $\\hat{W}_{\\infty}$ current algebra results in an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, which might give rise to $W$-hair for the 2d black hole arising in the corresponding string theory at level $k=9/4$.

  1. WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechter, Eric B.; Crepp, Justin R.; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Matthews, Christopher T.; Morton, Timothy D.

    2014-06-01

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate that WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary stars of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightnesses consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the hot Jupiter planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. and Crossfield et al. into two distinct sources separated by 84.3 ± 0.6 mas (21 ± 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al., is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3 ± 0.5 mas (15 ± 1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18 ± 0.02 M ⊙ using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.

  2. The Carnegie H.A.T. Project--History and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Sue

    1991-01-01

    Describes the History and Technology Project (HAT) at a model technology school. Offers suggestions of suitable hardware and software, and ideas for funding. Emphasizes the goal of integrating technology into all levels of history and social science. Calls for increasing teacher-student interaction and restructuring teaching methods to reach all…

  3. Comparison of Protein Acetyltransferase Action of CRTAase with the Prototypes of HAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prija Ponnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory is credited for the discovery of enzymatic acetylation of protein, a phenomenon unknown till we identified an enzyme termed acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase (TAase, catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from polyphenolic acetates to receptor proteins (RP. Later, TAase was identified as calreticulin (CR, an endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein. CR was termed calreticulin transacetylase (CRTAase. Our persistent study revealed that CR like other families of histone acetyltransferases (HATs such as p300, Rtt109, PCAF, and ESA1, undergoes autoacetylation. The autoacetylated CR was characterized as a stable intermediate in CRTAase catalyzed protein acetylation, and similar was the case with ESA1. The autoacetylation of CR like that of HATs was found to enhance protein-protein interaction. CR like HAT-1, CBP, and p300 mediated the acylation of RP utilizing acetyl CoA and propionyl CoA as the substrates. The similarities between CRTAase and HATs in mediating protein acylation are highlighted in this review.

  4. Towards top-hat spatial shaping of ultrafast laser beam based on Zernike polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauclair, Cyril; Faure, Nicolas; Houzet, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser micro machining of surfaces knows a gain of interest as it demonstrates efficient and precise processing with reduced side effects around the irradiated zone, and also because of the remarkable costs reduction and reliability improvements of nowadays commercially available sources. Controlling the intensity distribution spatially can offer a supplementary degree of flexibility and precision in achieving user-defined ablation spatial profile, drilling, cutting of materials or in-volume laser-induced modifications. In this scope, the possibility to generate a top-hat intensity distribution by spatially shaping the beam wavefront is studied in this work. An optimization of Zernike polynomials coefficients is conducted to numerically determine an adequate phase mask that shapes the laser intensity distribution following a targeted top hat distribution in the processing plane, usually at the focal length of a converging lens. The efficiency of the method is numerically investigated in the optimization by evaluation of the root mean square error (RMS) between the top-hat target and the calculated laser distribution in the far field. We numerically verify that acceptable top-hat beam shaping of various size can be achieved with a sufficient number of Zernike polynomials, opening the way to phase mask calculations adapted to the wavefront modulator ability to reproduce Zernike polynomials.

  5. HATS-5b: A TRANSITING HOT SATURN FROM THE HATSouth SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Schmidt, B. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Jordán, A.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Buchhave, L. [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University (Denmark); Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Butler, R. P., E-mail: george.zhou@anu.edu.au [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of M{sub p} ≈ 0.24 M {sub J}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 0.91 R {sub J}, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M {sub ☉}, and radius of 0.87 R {sub ☉}. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population.

  6. WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bechter, Eric B; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A; Batygin, Konstantin; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Phillip S; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Montet, Benjamin T; Matthews, Christopher T; Morton, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate the hot Jupiters WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary star of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightness consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. 2011 and Crossfield et al. 2012, into two distinct sources separated by 84.3+/-0.6 mas (21 +/- 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al. 2011, is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3+/-0.5 mas (15+/-1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper-motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18+/-0.02Msun using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well-studied pl...

  7. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area...

  8. The Mexican hat effect on the delamination buckling of a compressed thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Yun

    2014-12-01

    Because of the interaction between film and substrate, the film buckling stress can vary significantly, depending on the delamination geometry, the film and substrate mechanical properties. The Mexican hat effect indicates such interaction. An analytical method is presented, and related dimensional analysis shows that a single dimensionless parameter can effectively evaluate the effect.

  9. Planet-induced Stellar Pulsations in HAT-P-2's Eccentric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Fuller, Jim; Antoci, Victoria; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Deming, Drake; Shporer, Avi; Batygin, Konstantin; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Burrows, Adam S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    Extrasolar planets on eccentric short-period orbits provide a laboratory in which to study radiative and tidal interactions between a planet and its host star under extreme forcing conditions. Studying such systems probes how the planet’s atmosphere redistributes the time-varying heat flux from its host and how the host star responds to transient tidal distortion. Here, we report the insights into the planet–star interactions in HAT-P-2's eccentric planetary system gained from the analysis of ∼350 hr of 4.5 μm observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observations show no sign of orbit-to-orbit variability nor of orbital evolution of the eccentric planetary companion, HAT-P-2 b. The extensive coverage allows us to better differentiate instrumental systematics from the transient heating of HAT-P-2 b’s 4.5 μm photosphere and yields the detection of stellar pulsations with an amplitude of approximately 40 ppm. These pulsation modes correspond to exact harmonics of the planet’s orbital frequency, indicative of a tidal origin. Transient tidal effects can excite pulsation modes in the envelope of a star, but, to date, such pulsations had only been detected in highly eccentric stellar binaries. Current stellar models are unable to reproduce HAT-P-2's pulsations, suggesting that our understanding of the interactions at play in this system is incomplete.

  10. The TopHat experiment: A balloon-borne instrument for mapping millimeter and submillimeter emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silverberg, R.F.; Cheng, E.S.; Aguirre, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The TopHat experiment was designed to measure the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on angular scales from 0.degrees 3 to 30 degrees and the thermal emission from both Galactic and extragalactic dust. The balloon-borne instrument had five spectral bands spanning frequencies...

  11. Atmospheric circulation of eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marley, Mark S., E-mail: nklewis@mit.edu [NASA Ames Research Center 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b has become a prime target for Spitzer Space Telescope observations aimed at understanding the atmospheric response of exoplanets on highly eccentric orbits. Here we present a suite of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models for HAT-P-2b that investigate the effects of assumed atmospheric composition and rotation rate on global scale winds and thermal patterns. We compare and contrast atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b, which assume one and five times solar metallicity, both with and without TiO/VO as atmospheric constituents. Additionally we compare models that assume a rotation period of half, one, and two times the nominal pseudo-synchronous rotation period. We find that changes in assumed atmospheric metallicity and rotation rate do not significantly affect model predictions of the planetary flux as a function of orbital phase. However, models in which TiO/VO are present in the atmosphere develop a transient temperature inversion between the transit and secondary eclipse events that results in significant variations in the timing and magnitude of the peak of the planetary flux compared with models in which TiO/VO are omitted from the opacity tables. We find that no one single atmospheric model can reproduce the recently observed full orbit phase curves at 3.6, 4.5 and 8.0 μm, which is likely due to a chemical process not captured by our current atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b. Further modeling and observational efforts focused on understanding the chemistry of HAT-P-2b's atmosphere are needed and could provide key insights into the interplay between radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes in a wide range of exoplanet atmospheres.

  12. Alternating sequential operators from center-surround top-hat transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2013-06-01

    Constructing alternating sequential operators is the important way of improving the efficiency of morphological operations for image processing. And, the alternating sequential filters (ASFs), which are constructed by using the morphological opening and closing, have been the important alternating sequential operators of mathematical morphology. However, because the morphological opening and closing operations have the defect of image detail smoothing, ASFs could not perform very well for some detail preserving image processing applications. Center-surround top-hat transform has been proposed through reconstructing the used structuring elements following the properties of image regions, which ensures that the main operations in center-surround top-hat transform could protect some image details; and, the main operations in center-surround top-hat transform achieve the similar function as opening and closing for bright and black feature extraction. Therefore, based on center-surround top-hat transform, some new and effective alternating sequential operators may be constructed. In light of this, a new class of alternating sequential operators with improved performance based on the center-surround top-hat transform is proposed in this paper. The definition and properties of the new alternating sequential operators are given and analyzed. Also, an application of impulsive noise suppression is used to show the improved performance of the new alternating sequential operators comparing with ASFs. Moreover, because the new alternating sequential operators constructed in this paper have some superiorities over ASFs, they could be also widely used in different applications in which the ASFs perform well, which indicates that the new alternating sequential operators may be also a class of useful morphological operators for image analysis.

  13. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of Mexican hat bands in van-der-Waals materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Zahid, Ferdows; Lake, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Mexican hat dispersions are relatively common in few-layer two-dimensional materials. In one to four monolayers of the group-III chalcogenides (GaS, GaSe, InS, InSe) and Bi2Se3 the valence band undergoes a band inversion from a parabolic to an inverted Mexican hat dispersion as the film thickness is reduced from bulk to a single monolayer. The band inversion is robust against changes in stacking order, omission or inclusion of spin-orbit coupling and the choice of functional. The Mexican hat dispersion results in a 1/√{ E} singularity in the two-dimensional density of states and a step-function turn on in the density of modes. The largest radius of the ring of states occurs for a single monolayer of each material. The dispersion with the largest radius coincides with the maximum power factor and ZT for a material at room temperature. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations are used with a Landauer approach to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients. Analytical models of the Mexican hat and the parabolic dispersions are used for comparison and analysis. Vertically biased bilayer graphene could serve as an experimental test-bed for measuring this effect since the radius of the Mexican hat band edge increases linearly with vertical electric field. Support by the NSF and SRC-NRI Project 2204.001 (NSF-ECCS-1124733), FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and the use of XSEDE NSF Grant # OCI-1053575.

  14. 75 FR 80838 - Notice of Invitation to Participate In Coal Exploration License, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Mining Company, 1407 West North Temple, Suite 310, Salt Lake City, Utah 84116. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... States of America in Emery County, Utah. DATES: The notice of invitation to participate in this...

  15. 76 FR 46805 - Notice of Utah Adoption by Reference of the Pesticide Container Containment Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Notice of Utah Adoption by Reference of the Pesticide Container Containment Rule AGENCY... the State of Utah's adoption by reference of the federal Pesticide Container Containment (PCC)...

  16. Hydrogeology of the Markagunt Plateau, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet and is capped primarily by Quaternary-age basalt that overlies Eocene-age freshwater limestone of the Claron Formation. Over large parts of the Markagunt Plateau, dissolution of the Claron limestone and subsequent collapse of the overlying basalt have produced a terrain characterized by sinkholes as much as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Numerous large springs discharge from the basalt and underlying limestone on the plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest springs in Utah, with a discharge that can exceed 300 cubic feet per second. Discharge from Mammoth Spring is from the Claron Formation; however, recharge to the spring largely takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt that caps the limestone. Results of dye tracing to Mammoth Spring indicate that recharge originates largely southwest of the spring outside of the Mammoth Creek watershed, as well as from losing reaches along Mammoth Creek. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring from dye-tracer tests during the snowmelt runoff period was about 1 week. Specific conductance and water temperature data from the spring show an inverse relation to discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events, also indicating short groundwater residence times. Results of major-ion analyses for samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau indicate calcium-bicarbonate type water containing low (less than 200 mg/L) dissolved-solids concentrations. Investigations in the Navajo Lake area along the southern margin of the plateau have shown that water losing to sinkholes bifurcates and discharges to both Cascade and Duck Creek Springs, which subsequently flow into the Virgin and Sevier River basins, respectively. Groundwater travel times to these springs, on the basis of dye tracing, were about 8.5 and 53 hours, respectively. Similarly, groundwater travel time from Duck Creek

  17. Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Kimberly

    2012-04-30

    Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through

  18. Wolves in Utah: An analysis of potential impacts and recommendations for management

    OpenAIRE

    Switalski, T. Adam; Simmons, Trey; Duncan, Shiree L.; Chavez, Andreas S.; Schmidt, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    The historic range of gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Utah was essentially statewide. Although their presence cannot be disputed, the historic abundance of wolves in Utah is unknown. The release of gray wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995 established growing populations, and increasing dispersal is bringing these wolves closer to Utah. It seems likely that wolves will commingle with Utah's other native mammals in the near future. The potential presence of wolves in Ut...

  19. iUTAH Summer Research: Analyzing diel variations of MeHg in the Provo River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, G. L.; Packer, B. N.; Carling, G. T.; Checketts, H. N.; Shepherd Barkdull, N.

    2016-12-01

    iUTAH is an interdisciplinary research program aimed at strengthening science for Utah's water future and funded by the National Science Foundation. iUTAH is comprised of three research areas with an overarching goal of understanding how Utah's water system operates as an integrated physical, chemical, biological, and social system. During the Summer of 2016, I participated in the iUTAH (Innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-sustainability) iFellows undergraduate research program. iUTAH provided the opportunity to conduct research at Brigham Young University with graduate students studying trace metal dynamics in the Provo River, Utah, USA. This report presents the chemical system evaluation of methylmercury (MeHg) during diurnal variations from snowmelt runoff. Water samples were collected during peak discharge from Soapstone Basin, a site along the Upper Provo River watershed, every hour over a 24-hour (diel) period. Sampling began at 1200 hours on June 1 and ended at 1100 hours on June 2, 2016. The results of the Provo River MeHg analysis showed dissolved MeHg had a concentration variance of 0.027 ng/L and particulate MeHg had a concentration variance of 0.056 ng/L. The variances during the diel cycle represent more than a two-fold change in concentration. The hourly MeHg concentration levels demonstrated an inverse relationship with gage height indicative of dilution. The purpose of the study is to develop a more thorough understanding of short-term variances over time and the potential affect on long-term interpretations of MeHg fluctuations in the river. The Provo River flows through Jordanelle Reservoir where there is a mercury advisory for two fish species. MeHg is a bioaccumulative neurotoxin that humans are primarily exposed to by the consumption of contaminated fish. The strong correlation between the levels of MeHg in water and fish make the river concentrations an important factor.

  20. How a hat may affect 3-month-olds' recognition of a face: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulf, Hermann; Valenza, Eloisa; Turati, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that infants' face recognition rests on a robust face representation that is resilient to a variety of facial transformations such as rotations in depth, motion, occlusion or deprivation of inner/outer features. Here, we investigated whether 3-month-old infants' ability to represent the invariant aspects of a face is affected by the presence of an external add-on element, i.e. a hat. Using a visual habituation task, three experiments were carried out in which face recognition was investigated by manipulating the presence/absence of a hat during face encoding (i.e. habituation phase) and face recognition (i.e. test phase). An eye-tracker system was used to record the time infants spent looking at face-relevant information compared to the hat. The results showed that infants' face recognition was not affected by the presence of the external element when the type of the hat did not vary between the habituation and test phases, and when both the novel and the familiar face wore the same hat during the test phase (Experiment 1). Infants' ability to recognize the invariant aspects of a face was preserved also when the hat was absent in the habituation phase and the same hat was shown only during the test phase (Experiment 2). Conversely, when the novel face identity competed with a novel hat, the hat triggered the infants' attention, interfering with the recognition process and preventing the infants' preference for the novel face during the test phase (Experiment 3). Findings from the current study shed light on how faces and objects are processed when they are simultaneously presented in the same visual scene, contributing to an understanding of how infants respond to the multiple and composite information available in their surrounding environment.

  1. How a hat may affect 3-month-olds' recognition of a face: an eye-tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Bulf

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that infants' face recognition rests on a robust face representation that is resilient to a variety of facial transformations such as rotations in depth, motion, occlusion or deprivation of inner/outer features. Here, we investigated whether 3-month-old infants' ability to represent the invariant aspects of a face is affected by the presence of an external add-on element, i.e. a hat. Using a visual habituation task, three experiments were carried out in which face recognition was investigated by manipulating the presence/absence of a hat during face encoding (i.e. habituation phase and face recognition (i.e. test phase. An eye-tracker system was used to record the time infants spent looking at face-relevant information compared to the hat. The results showed that infants' face recognition was not affected by the presence of the external element when the type of the hat did not vary between the habituation and test phases, and when both the novel and the familiar face wore the same hat during the test phase (Experiment 1. Infants' ability to recognize the invariant aspects of a face was preserved also when the hat was absent in the habituation phase and the same hat was shown only during the test phase (Experiment 2. Conversely, when the novel face identity competed with a novel hat, the hat triggered the infants' attention, interfering with the recognition process and preventing the infants' preference for the novel face during the test phase (Experiment 3. Findings from the current study shed light on how faces and objects are processed when they are simultaneously presented in the same visual scene, contributing to an understanding of how infants respond to the multiple and composite information available in their surrounding environment.

  2. 78 FR 43225 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting/Conference Call SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land...) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will host a meeting/conference call. DATES: The Utah RAC will...

  3. 78 FR 5489 - Notice of Utah's Recreation Resource Advisory Council/Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... alternatives for regional planning through 2015 and interim guidance for Utah on Sage-grouse; an update on the draft strategic plan for Utah public lands within the BLM's National Landscape Conservation System; and... on the San Juan River in San Juan County, Utah; the BLM Red Cliffs National Conservation Area,...

  4. Natural vibration dynamics of Rainbow Bridge, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Wood, J. R.; Doyle, S.; Stanfield, E.; White, B.

    2015-12-01

    We measured resonant frequencies of Rainbow Bridge, Utah, one of the world's longest rock spans, during a field experiment recording ambient vibration data. Measurements were generated over 20 hours on March 23-24, 2015 using two broadband three-component seismometers placed on the bridge, and compared to concurrent data from nearby reference stations 20 and 220 m distant. We identified seven distinct modes of vibration for Rainbow Bridge between 1 and 6 Hz. Data for each resonant frequency was then analyzed to determine the frequency-dependent polarization vector in an attempt to clarify mode shapes; e.g. the fundamental mode represents out-of-plane horizontal flexure. We compared experimental data to results of 3D numerical modal analysis, using a new photogrammetric model of Rainbow Bridge generated in this study imported into COMSOL Multiphysics. Results compare well with measured data for seven of the first eight modeled modes, matching vibrational frequencies and polarization orientations generally within 10%. Only predicted mode 6 was not explicitly apparent in our experimental data. Large site-to-reference spectral ratios resolved from experimental data indicate high amplification on the bridge as compared to nearby bedrock.

  5. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considering for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  6. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

  7. HAT: Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays with application to promoter-GeneChip data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters Bas J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tiling-arrays are applicable to multiple types of biological research questions. Due to its advantages (high sensitivity, resolution, unbiased, the technology is often employed in genome-wide investigations. A major challenge in the analysis of tiling-array data is to define regions-of-interest, i.e., contiguous probes with increased signal intensity (as a result of hybridization of labeled DNA in a region. Currently, no standard criteria are available to define these regions-of-interest as there is no single probe intensity cut-off level, different regions-of-interest can contain various numbers of probes, and can vary in genomic width. Furthermore, the chromosomal distance between neighboring probes can vary across the genome among different arrays. Results We have developed Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays (HAT, and first evaluated its performance for tiling-array datasets from a Chromatin Immunoprecipitation study on chip (ChIP-on-chip for the identification of genome-wide DNA binding profiles of transcription factor Cebpa (used for method comparison. Using this assay, we can refine the detection of regions-of-interest by illustrating that regions detected by HAT are more highly enriched for expected motifs in comparison with an alternative detection method (MAT. Subsequently, data from a retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen were used to examine the performance of HAT among different applications of tiling-array datasets. In both studies, detected regions-of-interest have been validated with (qPCR. Conclusions We demonstrate that HAT has increased specificity for analysis of tiling-array data in comparison with the alternative method, and that it accurately detects regions-of-interest in two different applications of tiling-arrays. HAT has several advantages over previous methods: i as there is no single cut-off level for probe-intensity, HAT can detect regions-of-interest at various thresholds, ii it can

  8. 75 FR 57055 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan for Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... for Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document... availability of a draft revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is.... The Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens), found only in southwestern and central Utah, was listed...

  9. Assessment and use of drug information references in Utah pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorman KL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine which drug references Utah pharmacists use most frequently. To determine which types of drug information questions are most commonly asked, and whether Utah pharmacists have access to adequate references to respond to these questions. Methods: A 19-question survey was created using Qualtrics, LLC (Provo, Utah software. An electronic survey link was sent to 1,431 pharmacists with a valid e-mail address listed in the Department of Professional Licensing database. Questions focused on available references in the participant’s pharmacy, how current the references are, and the participant’s use of the references. Surveys were analyzed for participants practicing in either community or hospital pharmacies in the state of Utah. Results: A total of 147 responses were included in the analysis. Approximately 44% of respondents practiced in the community, and 56% practiced in a hospital setting. The most commonly used references by Utah pharmacists are Micromedex, Lexicomp, UpToDate, Clinical Pharmacology, and Drug Facts & Comparisons. Pharmacists in the community frequently receive questions related to adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, and over-the-counter medications. Pharmacists in the hospital frequently receive questions relating to dosage and administration, drug interactions, and adverse drug reactions. About 89% of community pharmacists and 96% of hospital pharmacists feel available references are adequate to answer the questions they receive. Conclusions: Utah pharmacists generally use large reference suites to answer drug information questions. The majority of pharmacists consider the references available to them to be adequate to answer the questions they receive.

  10. Physical and Functional HAT/HDAC Interplay Regulates Protein Acetylation Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Peserico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The balance between protein acetylation and deacetylation controls several physiological and pathological cellular processes, and the enzymes involved in the maintenance of this equilibrium—acetyltransferases (HATs and deacetylases (HDACs—have been widely studied. Presently, the evidences obtained in this field suggest that the dynamic acetylation equilibrium is mostly maintained through the physical and functional interplay between HAT and HDAC activities. This model overcomes the classical vision in which the epigenetic marks of acetylation have only an activating function whereas deacetylation marks have a repressing activity. Given the existence of several players involved in the preservation of this equilibrium, the identification of these complex networks of interacting proteins will likely foster our understanding of how cells regulate intracellular processes and respond to the extracellular environment and will offer the rationale for new therapeutic approaches based on epigenetic drugs in human diseases.

  11. HAT-P-7: A Retrograde or Polar Orbit, and a Third Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John Asher; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Crossfield, Ian J.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    We showed that the exoplanet HAT-P-7b has an extremely tilted orbit, with a true angle of at least 86 degrees with respect to its parent star's equatorial plane, and a strong possibility of retrograde motion. We also report evidence for an additional planet or companion star. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect was found to be a blueshift during the first half of the transit and a redshift during the second half, an inversion of the usual pattern, implying that the angle between the sky-projected orbital and stellar angular momentum vectors is 182.5 plus or minus 9.4 degrees. The third body is implicated by excess RV variation of the host star over 2 yr. Some possible explanations for the tilted orbit of HAT-P-7b are a close encounter with another planet, the Kozai effect, and resonant capture by an inward-migrating outer planet.

  12. Kepler's optical phase curve of the exoplanet HAT-P-7b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, W J; Koch, D; Jenkins, J; Sasselov, D; Gilliland, R; Batalha, N; Latham, D W; Caldwell, D; Basri, G; Brown, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Cochran, W D; DeVore, E; Dunham, E; Dupree, A K; Gautier, T; Geary, J; Gould, A; Howell, S; Kjeldsen, H; Lissauer, J; Marcy, G; Meibom, S; Morrison, D; Tarter, J

    2009-08-01

    Ten days of photometric data were obtained during the commissioning phase of the Kepler mission, including data for the previously known giant transiting exoplanet HAT-P-7b. The data for HAT-P-7b show a smooth rise and fall of light from the planet as it orbits its star, punctuated by a drop of 130 +/- 11 parts per million in flux when the planet passes behind its star. We interpret this as the phase variation of the dayside thermal emission plus reflected light from the planet as it orbits its star and is occulted. The depth of the occultation is similar in photometric precision to the detection of a transiting Earth-size planet for which the mission was designed.

  13. Potential ground water resources of Hat Yai Basin in Peninsular Thailand by gravity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warawutti Lohawijarn

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Residual gravity anomaly with a minimum of about -140 mm s-2 with approximately NS trend and a limited axial length was observed over Hat Yai Basin in Peninsular Thailand. The modeled Hat Yai basin is about 1 km deep at its deepest, 60 km long and 20 km wide. The porosity of basin sediment and the amount of potential ground water reserves within the basin are estimated to be 39% and 121.7±0.8 km3 respectively, assuming full saturation. Within the topmost 80 m of ground where the present extraction is concentrated, the estimated ground water reserve is 12.5±0.5 km3.

  14. High multiplicity processes at NLO with BlackHat and Sherpa

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J; Hoeche, Stefan; Cordero, Fernando Febres; Ita, Harald; Kosower, David; Maître, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we review recent progress with fixed-order QCD predictions for the production of a vector boson in association with jets at hadron colliders, using the programs BlackHat and SHERPA. We review general features of next-to-leading-order (NLO) predictions for the production of a massive vector boson in association with four jets. We also discuss how precise descriptions of vector-boson production can be applied to the determination of backgrounds to new physics signals. Here we focus on data-driven backgrounds to a missing-energy-plus-jets search performed by CMS. Finally, we review recent progress in developing theoretical tools for high-multiplicity loop-computation within the BlackHat-library. In particular, we discuss methods for handling the color degrees of freedom in multi-jet predictions at NLO.

  15. Study on the Kind and Character of Mongol Hats in Yuan Dynasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xi-zeng

    2007-01-01

    In the thirteenth century the Mongols created a vast, transcontinental empire that intensified cultural, art,craftwork, garment and commercial contact throughout Eurasia. Hats were so indispensable parts of formal Mongol dress that were seen as a symbol of Mongol traditional garment. Roughly Mongolian men's headgear can be divided into two groups, which are Li and Mao. In addition,Mongolian women's Gu-gu-gwan, a kind of bonnet, was the head-dress for the empress, concubines of the emperor, and wife of high ranking ministers. This study, based on the analysis of image resources and existing evidence, discusses the hats of Yuan period in the context of its group, origin, decoration and cultural influences.

  16. Origin of the Napoleon's hat nebula around SN1987A and implications for the progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Fabian, A. C.; Stevens, I. R.

    1991-11-01

    A simple geometrical model for the emission nebula around SN1987A, whose morphology has been likened to Napoleon's hat, is presented. The model consists of a ring and a truncated double cone. When the effects of light travel time are included, the model reproduces the important topological structures of the nebula and makes detailed quantitative predictions for its future appearance. In particular, the hat-shaped northern rim is simply explained as the interaction of the light front with the northern cone. To explain the origin of the double cone, it is argued that the progenitor of SN1987A was in a binary system: its strong wind, colliding with a weaker wind from the companion star, created an asymptotic shock surface that was spread out into the required geometry by the rotation of the binary.

  17. First Evidence of a Retrograde Orbit of Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-7b

    CERN Document Server

    Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Tamura, Motohide

    2009-01-01

    We present the first evidence of a retrograde orbit of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-7b. The discovery is based on a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with the Subaru HDS during a transit of HAT-P-7b, occured on UT 2008 May 30. Our model shows that the spin-orbit alignment angle of this planet is $\\lambda = -132.6^{\\circ} (+12.6^{\\circ}, -21.5^{\\circ})$. The existence of such a retrograde planet had been predicted by recent planetary migration models considering planet-planet scattering processes or the Kozai migration. Our finding provides an important milestone that supports such dynamic migration theories.

  18. HAT-P-6b: A Hot Jupiter transiting a bright F star

    CERN Document Server

    Noyes, R W; Torres, G; Pal, A; Kovacs, Geza; Latham, D W; Fernández, J M; Fischer, D A; Butler, R P; Marcy, G W; Sipocz, B; Esquerdo, G A; Kovacs, Gabor; Sasselov, D D; Sato, B; Stefanik, R; Holman, M; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sari, P

    2007-01-01

    In the ongoing HATNet survey we have detected a giant planet, with radius 1.33 +/- 0.06 RJup and mass 1.06 +/- 0.12 MJup, transiting the bright (V = 10.5) star GSC 03466-00819. The planet is in a circular orbit with period 3.852985 +/- 0.000005 days and mid-transit epoch 2,454,035.67575 +/- 0.00028 (HJD). The parent star is a late F star with mass 1.29 +/- 0.06 Msun, radius 1.46 +/- 0.06 Rsun, Teff ~ 6570 +/- 80 K, [Fe=H] = -0.13 +/- 0.08 and age ~ 2.3+/-^{0.5}_{0.7}Gy. With this radius and mass, HAT-P-6b has somewhat larger radius than theoretically expected. We describe the observations and their analysis to determine physical properties of the HAT-P-6 system, and briefly discuss some implications of this finding.

  19. High-power Er:YAG laser with quasi-top-hat output beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Mackenzie, J I; Hayes, J R; Clarkson, W A

    2012-05-01

    A simple method for simultaneously exciting the fundamental (TEM00) transverse mode and first order Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) donut mode in an end-pumped solid-state laser to yield a quasi-top-hat output beam is reported. This approach has been applied to an Er:YAG laser, in-band pumped by an Er,Yb fiber laser, yielding 9.6 W of continuous-wave output at 1645 nm in a top-hat-like beam with beam propagation factor (M2)<2.1 for 24 W of incident pump power at 1532 nm. The corresponding slope efficiency with respect to incident pump power was 49%. The prospects of further scaling of output power and improved overall efficiency are considered.

  20. Research on the Procedure for Computer-Aided Pattern Design of Uygur's Flowered Hats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Xinjiang Uygur’s flowered hats is famous all over the world, it leads the world of headwear of variou nationalities within China by the variety of styles, the various ways of how to emroider pattern design and exquisite manufacture. It is unusual even in national costumes art of the world. The poupose of this study is to analyze Uygur's headwear, study the rules of Uygur's headwear pattern, analyze the characteristic of the basic pattern, research on the procedure for computer-aided pattern design of Uygur's flowered hat, explore the application of computer-aided design in traditional costume's pattern design and to realize application exploration of computer-aided design in designing of costume and dress adornment.

  1. Utah Science Vol. 48 No. 3, Fall 1987

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    114 GROWING OLD IN NORTHERN UTAH: AN EVALUATION OF SOCIAL SERVICES FOR THE ELDERLY Y. Kim. M. Wilson and S. Chiba How elderly residents of Cache and Box Elder counties view available services. 117 WILL IT PAY TO PROCESS VEGETABLES IN UTAH? D. L. Snyder. T. F. Glover. L. K. Bond. D. Bailey. J. C. Andersen. W. C. Lewis and H. H. Fullerton Economists say a multi-commodity processing facility might be economically Feasible, but it involves considerable economic risk. 124 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUN...

  2. Stereo Pair, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This image pair provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  3. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 2. Appendix A: Resistance measurements. Appendix B: Lightning test data plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Resistance measurements are given in graphical for when a simulated lightning discharge strikes on an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was to measure the electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case.

  4. Conformal blocks related to the R-R states in the \\hat c =1 SCFT

    CERN Document Server

    Hadasz, Leszek; Suchanek, Paulina

    2007-01-01

    We derive an explicit form of a family of four-point Neveu-Schwarz blocks with $\\hat c =1,$ external weights $\\Delta_i = 1/8$ and arbitrary intermediate weight. The derivation is based on a set of identities obeyed in the free superscalar theory by correlation functions of fields satisfying Ramond condition with respect to the bosonic (dimension 1) and the fermionic (dimension 1/2) currents.

  5. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Hannah R.; Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Deming, Drake; Nikolov, Nikolay; Lopez, Eric; Tremblin, Pascal; Skalid Amundsen, David; Lewis, Nikole K.; Mandell, Avi; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Knutson, Heather; Benneke, Björn; Evans, Tom M.

    2017-01-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  6. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Hannah; Sing, David; Deming, Drake; Kataria, Tiffany; Lopez, Eric

    2016-10-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  7. Intensity and Pattern of Land Surface Temperature in Hat Yai City, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Poonyanuch RUTHIRAKO; Rotchanatch DARNSAWASDI; Wichien CHATUPOTE

    2014-01-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is an important factor in global climate. LST is governed by surface heat fluxes, which are affected by urbanization. In order to understand urban climate, LST needs to be examined. This study aimed to investigate the intensity and pattern of LST and examine the relationships between LST and the characteristics of urban land use, indices, and population density in Hat Yai City. Landsat 5TM images were used for interpretation of land use characteristics and deriv...

  8. Detection of Point Sources in Cosmic Ray Maps using the Mexican Hat Wavelet Family

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Daniel, Bruno; 10.1142/S0218301311040608

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the sensitivity of gaussian and mexican hat wavelet family filters to the detection of point sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays was performed. A source embedded in a background was simulated and the number of events and amplitude of this source was varied aiming to check the sensitivity of the method to detect faint sources with low statistic of events.

  9. The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. (Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1990-03-01

    Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.

  10. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has fond that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 181 figs., 175 tabs.

  11. A spin-orbit alignment for the hot Jupiter HATS-3b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addison, B. C.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J. [Exoplanetary Science Group, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Bayliss, D., E-mail: b.addison@unsw.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-09-10

    We have measured the alignment between the orbit of HATS-3b (a recently discovered, slightly inflated Hot Jupiter) and the spin axis of its host star. Data were obtained using the CYCLOPS2 optical-fiber bundle and its simultaneous calibration system feeding the UCLES spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The sky-projected spin-orbit angle of λ = 3° ± 25° was determined from spectroscopic measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This is the first exoplanet discovered through the HATSouth transit survey to have its spin-orbit angle measured. Our results indicate that the orbital plane of HATS-3b is consistent with being aligned to the spin axis of its host star. The low obliquity of the HATS-3 system, which has a relatively hot mid F-type host star, agrees with the general trend observed for Hot Jupiter host stars with effective temperatures >6250 K to have randomly distributed spin-orbit angles.

  12. HAT-P-25b: a Hot-Jupiter Transiting a Moderately Faint G Star

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, S N; Hartman, J; Torres, G; Kovács, G; Latham, D W; Noyes, R W; Fischer, D A; Johnson, J A; Marcy, G W; Howard, A W; Szentgyorgyi, A; Fürész, G; Buchhave, L A; Béky, B; Sasselov, D D; Stefanik, R P; Perumpilly, G; Everett, M; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-25b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 13.19 G5 dwarf star GSC 1788-01237, with a period P = 3.652836 +/- 0.000019 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455176.85173 +/- 0.00047 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1174 +/- 0.0017 days. The host star has mass of 1.01 +/- 0.03 M(Sun), radius of 0.96 +(0.05)-(0.04) R(Sun), effective temperature 5500 +/- 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.31 +/- 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.567 +/- 0.022 M(Jup), and radius of 1.190 +(0.081)-(0.056) R(Jup) yielding a mean density of 0.42 +/- 0.07 g cm-3. Comparing these observations with recent theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-25b is consistent with a hydrogen-helium dominated gas giant planet with negligible core mass and age 3.2 +/- 2.3 Gyr. The properties of HAT-P-25b support several previously observed correlations for planets in the mass range 0.4 < M < 0.7 M(Jup), including those of core mass vs. metallicity, planet radius vs. equilibrium temperature, and orbital perio...

  13. HATS-2b: A transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a K-type star showing starspot activity

    CERN Document Server

    Mohler-Fischer, M; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G B; Penev, K; Bayliss, D; Jordan, A; Csubry, Z; Zhou, G; Rabus, M; Nikolov, N; Brahm, R; Espinoza, N; Buchhave, L A; Beky, B; Suc, V; Csak, B; Henning, T; Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Addison, B C; Schmidt, B; Noyes, R W; Papp, I; Lazar, J; Sari, P; Conroy, P

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-2b, the second transiting extrasolar planet detected by the HATSouth survey. HATS-2b is moving on a circular orbit around a V=13.6 mag, K-type dwarf star (GSC 6665-00236), at a separation of 0.0230 \\pm 0.0003 AU and with a period of 1.3541 days. The planetary parameters have been robustly determined using a simultaneous fit of the HATSouth, MPG/ESO~2.2\\,m/GROND, Faulkes Telescope South/Spectral transit photometry and MPG/ESO~2.2\\,m/FEROS, Euler~1.2\\,m/CORALIE, AAT~3.9\\,m/CYCLOPS radial-velocity measurements. HATS-2b has a mass of 1.37 \\pm 0.16 M_J, a radius of 1.14 \\pm 0.03 R_J and an equilibrium temperature of 1567 \\pm 30 K. The host star has a mass of 0.88 \\pm 0.04 M_Sun, radius of 0.89 \\pm 0.02 R_Sun and shows starspot activity. We characterized the stellar activity by analysing two photometric follow-up transit light curves taken with the GROND instrument, both obtained simultaneously in four optical bands (covering the wavelength range of 3860-9520 \\AA). The two light curv...

  14. HATS-18 b: An Extreme Short--Period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star

    CERN Document Server

    Penev, Dr Kaloyan M; Bakos, Dr Gaspar A; Ciceri, Ms Simona; Brahm, Dr Rafael; Bayliss, Dr Daniel; Bento, Joao; Jord'an, Andr'es; Csubry, Mr Zoltan; Bhatti, W; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Espinoza, Mr Néstor; Zhou, Dr George; Mancini, Dr Luigi; Rabus, Dr Markus; Suc, Vincent; Henning, Thomas; Schmidt, Prof Brian P; Noyes, Dr Robert W; L'az'ar, J; Papp, Istvan; S'ari, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18 b: a 1.980 +/- 0.077 Mj, 1.337 +0.102 -0.049 Rj planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037 +/- 0.047 Msun, and radius 1.020 +0.057 -0.031 Rsun) with V=14.067 +/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range 6.5 <= lg(Q*/k_2) <= 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star--planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories.

  15. HATS-7b: A Hot Super Neptune Transiting a Quiet K Dwarf Star

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G Á; Bayliss, D; Hartman, J D; Zhou, G; Brahm, R; Mancini, L; deVal-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Jordán, A; Rabus, M; Espinoza, N; Csubry, Z; Howard, A W; Fulton, B J; Buchhave, L A; Ciceri, S; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Isaacson, H; Noyes, R W; Marcy, G W; Suc, V; Howe, A R; Burrows, A S; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-7b, a transiting Super-Neptune with a mass of 0.120+/-0.012 M_Jup, a radius of 0.563+0.046-0.034 R_Jup, and an orbital period of 3.1853 days. The host star is a moderately bright (V = 13.340+/-0.010 mag, K_S = 10.976+/-0.026 mag) K dwarf star with a mass of 0.849+/-0.027 M_Sun, a radius of 0.815+0.049-0.035 R_Sun, and a metallicity of [Fe/H]= +0.250+/-0.080. The star is photometrically quiet to within the precision of the HATSouth measurements, has low RV jitter, and shows no evidence for chromospheric activity in its spectrum. HATS-7b is the second smallest radius planet discovered by a wide-field ground-based transit survey, and one of only a handful of Neptune-size planets with mass and radius determined to 10% precision. Theoretical modeling of HATS-7b yields a hydrogen-helium fraction of 18+/-4% (rock-iron core and H2-He envelope), or 9+/-4% (ice core and H2-He envelope), i.e.it has a composition broadly similar to that of Uranus and Neptune, and ve...

  16. HATS-4b: A Dense Hot-Jupiter Transiting a Super Metal-Rich G Star

    CERN Document Server

    Jordán, A; Bakos, G Á; Bayliss, D; Penev, K; Hartman, J D; Zhou, G; Mancini, L; Mohler-Fischer, M; Ciceri, S; Sato, B; Csubry, Z; Rabus, M; Suc, V; Espinoza, N; Bhatti, W; Borro, M de Val; Buchhave, L; Csák, B; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Tan, T G; Noyes, R W; Béky, B; Butler, R P; Shectman, S; Crane, J; Thompson, I; Williams, A; Martin, R; Contreras, C; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V=13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P = 2.5167 d, mass of Mp = 1.32 Mj, radius of Rp = 1.02 Rj and density of rho_p = 1.55 +- 0.16 g/cm^3 ~ 1.24 rhoj. The host star has a mass of 1.00 Msun, a radius of 0.92 Rsun and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]= 0.43 +- 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1-2 Mj and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 Mearth. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurement and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique to estimate simultaneously vsini and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  17. iHAT: interactive Hierarchical Aggregation Table for Genetic Association Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Julian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the search for single-nucleotide polymorphisms which influence the observable phenotype, genome wide association studies have become an important technique for the identification of associations between genotype and phenotype of a diverse set of sequence-based data. We present a methodology for the visual assessment of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using interactive hierarchical aggregation techniques combined with methods known from traditional sequence browsers and cluster heatmaps. Our tool, the interactive Hierarchical Aggregation Table (iHAT, facilitates the visualization of multiple sequence alignments, associated metadata, and hierarchical clusterings. Different color maps and aggregation strategies as well as filtering options support the user in finding correlations between sequences and metadata. Similar to other visualizations such as parallel coordinates or heatmaps, iHAT relies on the human pattern-recognition ability for spotting patterns that might indicate correlation or anticorrelation. We demonstrate iHAT using artificial and real-world datasets for DNA and protein association studies as well as expression Quantitative Trait Locus data.

  18. On Variable Geometric Factor Systems for Top-Hat Electrostatic Space Plasma Analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Dhiren O.; Collinson, Glyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Even in the relatively small region of space that is the Earth's magnetosphere, ion and electron fluxes can vary by several orders of magnitude. Top-hat electrostatic analyzers currently do not possess the dynamic range required to sample plasma under all conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare, through computer simulation, three new electrostatic methods that would allow the sensitivity of a sensor to be varied through control of its geometric factor (GF) (much like an aperture on a camera). The methods studied were inner filter plates, split hemispherical analyzer (SHA) and top-cap electrode. This is the first discussion of the filter plate concept and also the first study where all three systems are studied within a common analyzer design, so that their relative merits could be fairly compared. Filter plates were found to have the important advantage that they facilitate the reduction in instrument sensitivity whilst keeping all other instrument parameters constant. However, it was discovered that filter plates have numerous disadvantages that make such a system impracticable for a top-hat electrostatic analyzer. It was found that both the top-cap electrode and SHA are promising variable geometric factor system (VGFS) concepts for implementation into a top-hat electrostatic analyzer, each with distinct advantages over the other.

  19. Formulating robust linear regression estimation as a one-class LDA criterion: discriminative hat matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrenois, F; Noyer, J C

    2013-02-01

    Linear discriminant analysis, such as Fisher's criterion, is a statistical learning tool traditionally devoted to separating a training dataset into two or even several classes by the way of linear decision boundaries. In this paper, we show that this tool can formalize the robust linear regression problem as a robust estimator will do. More precisely, we develop a one-class Fischer's criterion in which the maximization provides both the regression parameters and the separation of the data in two classes: typical data and atypical data or outliers. This new criterion is built on the statistical properties of the subspace decomposition of the hat matrix. From this angle, we improve the discriminative properties of the hat matrix which is traditionally used as outlier diagnostic measure in linear regression. Naturally, we call this new approach discriminative hat matrix. The proposed algorithm is fully nonsupervised and needs only the initialization of one parameter. Synthetic and real datasets are used to study the performance both in terms of regression and classification of the proposed approach. We also illustrate its potential application to image recognition and fundamental matrix estimation in computer vision.

  20. Infrared image enhancement through contrast enhancement by using multiscale new top-hat transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen; Xue, Bindang

    2011-03-01

    Infrared imaging sensor is sensitive to the variation of imaging environment, which may affect the quality of the obtained images and blur the regions of interest in infrared image. So, it is very important to enhance infrared image. In infrared image, the gray values of the regions of interest are bright or dim image regions, which are different from the surrounding regions. The new top-hat transform could extract image regions which are different from its surrounding regions. In light of this, an infrared image enhancement algorithm through contrast enhancement is proposed in this paper based on multiscale new top-hat transform. Firstly, the multiscale white and black new top-hat transforms are used to extract the multiscale light and dark infrared image regions. Then, the final light and dark infrared image regions for image enhancement are constructed by using the extracted multiscale light and dark infrared image regions. Finally, the contrast of the infrared image is enhanced through a power strategy. Experimental results on different infrared images show that the proposed algorithm could well enhance infrared image and make the possible interested targets brighter, which is very helpful for target detection and recognition.

  1. Asteroseismic inference on the spin-orbit misalignment and stellar parameters of HAT-P-7

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Mikkel N; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Houdek, Günter; Casagrande, Luca; Van Eylen, Vincent; Campante, Tiago L; Karoff, Christoffer; Kjeldsen, Hans; Albrecht, Simon; Chaplin, William J; Nielsen, Martin Bo; Degroote, Pieter; Davies, Guy R; Handberg, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of obliquities in star-planet systems is of great importance for the understanding of planet system formation and evolution. The bright and well studied HAT-P-7 system is intriguing as several Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) measurements found a large projected obliquity in this system, but it was so far not possible to determine if the orbit is polar and/or retrograde. The goal of this study is to measure the stellar inclination and hereby the full 3D obliquity of the HAT-P-7 system instead of only the 2D projection as measured by the RM effect. In addition we provide an updated set of stellar parameters for the star. We use the full set of available observations from Kepler spanning Q0-Q17 to produce the power spectrum of HAT-P-7. We extract oscillation mode frequencies via an MCMC peak-bagging routine, and use the results from this to estimate the stellar inclination angle. Combining this with the projected obliquity from RM and the inclination of the orbital plane allows us to determine the stell...

  2. Independent discovery and refined parameters of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-14b

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, E K; Brown, D J A; Cameron, A Collier; Pollacco, D; Skillen, I; Stempels, H C; Boisse, I; Faedi, F; Hebrard, G; McCormac, J; Sorensen, P; Street, R A; Bento, J; Bouchy, F; Butters, O W; Enoch, B; Haswell, C A; Hebb, L; Holmes, S; Horne, K; Keenan, F P; Lister, T A; Miller, G R M; Moulds, V; Moutou, C; Norton, A J; Parley, N; Santerne, A; Todd, I; Watson, C A; West, R G; Wheatley, P J

    2010-01-01

    We present SuperWASP observations of HAT-P-14b, a hot Jupiter discovered by Torres et al. The planet was found independently by the SuperWASP team and named WASP-27b after follow-up observations had secured the discovery, but prior to the publication by Torres et al. Our analysis of HAT-P-14/WASP-27 is in good agreement with the values found by Torres et al. and we refine the parameters by combining our datasets. We also provide additional evidence against astronomical false positives. Due to the brightness of the host star, V = 10, HAT-P-14 is an attractive candidate for further characterisation observations. The planet has a high impact parameter, b = 0.907 +/- 0.004, and the primary transit is close to grazing. This could readily reveal small deviations in the orbital parameters indicating the presence of a third body in the system, which may be causing the small but significant orbital eccentricity, e = 0.095 +/- 0.011. The system geometry suggests that the planet narrowly fails to undergo a secondary ecl...

  3. A Possible Tilted Orbit of the Super-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Shporer, Avi; Sato, Bun'ei; Aoki, Wako; Tamura, Motohide

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for the eccentric, super-Neptune exoplanet HAT-P-11b, based on radial velocity measurements taken with HDS mounted on the Subaru 8.2m telescope, and simultaneous photometry with the FTN 2.0m telescope, both located in Hawai'i. The observed radial velocities during a planetary transit of HAT-P-11b show a persistent blue-shift, suggesting a spin-orbit misalignment in the system. The best-fit value for the projected spin-orbit misalignment angle is $\\lambda= 103_{-19}^{+23}$ deg. Our result supports the notion that eccentric exoplanetary systems are likely to have significant spin-orbit misalignment (e.g., HD 80606, WASP-8, WASP-14, WASP-17, and XO-3). This fact suggests that not only hot-Jupiters but also super-Neptunes like HAT-P-11b had once experienced dynamical processes such as planet-planet scattering or the Kozai migration.

  4. Atmospheric Circulation of Eccentric Hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Nikole K; Fortney, Jonathan J; Knutson, Heather A; Marley, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    The hot-Jupiter HAT-P-2b has become a prime target for Spitzer Space Telescope observations aimed at understanding the atmospheric response of exoplanets on highly eccentric orbits. Here we present a suite of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models for HAT-P-2b that investigate the effects of assumed atmospheric composition and rotation rate on global scale winds and thermal patterns. We compare and contrast atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b, which assume one and five times solar metallicity, both with and without TiO/VO as atmospheric constituents. Additionally we compare models that assume a rotation period of half, one, and two times the nominal pseudo-synchronous rotation period. We find that changes in assumed atmospheric metallicity and rotation rate do not significantly affect model predictions of the planetary flux as a function of orbital phase. However, models in which TiO/VO are present in the atmosphere develop a transient temperature inversion between the transit and secondary eclipse even...

  5. Gaussian versus top-hat profile assumptions in integral plume models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, G. A.

    Numerous integral models describing the behaviour of buoyant plumes released into stratified crossflows have been presented in the literature. One of the differences between these models is the form assumed for the self-similar profile: some models assume a top-hat form while others assume a Gaussian. The differences between these two approaches are evaluated by (a) comparing the governing equations on which Gaussian and top-hat models are based; (b) comparing some typical plume predictions generated by each type of model over a range of model parameters. It is shown that, while the profile assumption does lead to differences in the equations which govern plume variables, the effects of these differences on actual plume predictions is small over the range of parameters of practical interest. Since the predictions of Gaussian and top-hat models are essentially equivalent, it can thus be concluded that the additional physical information incorporated into a Gaussian formulation plays only a minor role in mean plume behaviour, and that the tophat approach, which requires the numerical solution of a simpler set of equations, is adequate for most situations where an integral approach would be used.

  6. Detection of the Secondary Eclipse of Exoplanet HAT P-11b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, R. K.; Deming, L. D.; Bakos, G.; Harrington, J.; Madhusudhan, N.; Noyes, R.; Seager, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully conducted secondary eclipse observations of exoplanet HAT-P-11b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. HAT-P-11b was, until very recently, the smallest transiting extrasolar planet yet found and one of only two known exo-Neptunes. We observed the system at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Having detected the secondary eclipse, we are at present making a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-11b has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi-major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will serve to clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. A precise determination of the orbit phase for the secondary eclipse will also be of great utility for Kepler observations of this system at visible wavelengths.

  7. Image registration algorithm using Mexican hat function-based operator and grouped feature matching strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jin

    Full Text Available Feature detection and matching are crucial for robust and reliable image registration. Although many methods have been developed, they commonly focus on only one class of image features. The methods that combine two or more classes of features are still novel and significant. In this work, methods for feature detection and matching are proposed. A Mexican hat function-based operator is used for image feature detection, including the local area detection and the feature point detection. For the local area detection, we use the Mexican hat operator for image filtering, and then the zero-crossing points are extracted and merged into the area borders. For the feature point detection, the Mexican hat operator is performed in scale space to get the key points. After the feature detection, an image registration is achieved by using the two classes of image features. The feature points are grouped according to a standardized region that contains correspondence to the local area, precise registration is achieved eventually by the grouped points. An image transformation matrix is estimated by the feature points in a region and then the best one is chosen through competition of a set of the transformation matrices. This strategy has been named the Grouped Sample Consensus (GCS. The GCS has also ability for removing the outliers effectively. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has high registration accuracy and small computational volume.

  8. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G. [The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Sato, B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Buchhave, L. [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University (Denmark); and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  9. Follow-up Observations of the Neptune Mass Transiting Extrasolar Planet Hat-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Dittman, Jason A; Green, Elizabeth M; Scuderi, Louis J; Males, Jared R

    2009-01-01

    We have confirmed the existence of the transiting super Neptune extrasolar planet HAT-P-11b. On May 1, 2009 UT the transit of Hat-P-11b was detected at the University of Arizona's 1.55m Kuiper Telescope with 1.7 millimag rms accuracy. We find a central transit time of Tc = 2454952.92534+/-0.00060 BJD; this transit occurred 80+/-73 seconds sooner than previous measurements (71 orbits in the past) would have predicted. Hence, our transit timing rules out large deviations from the ephemeris of Bakos et al. (2009). We measure a slightly larger planetary radius of Rp=0.452+/-0.020 R_Jup (5.07+/-0.22 R_earth) compared to Bakos and co-workers' value of 0.422+/-0.014 R_Jup (4.73+/-0.16 R_earth). Our values confirm that Hat-P-11b is very similar to GJ 436b (the only other known transiting super Neptune) in radius and other bulk properties.

  10. The refined physical parameters of transiting exoplanet system HAT-P-24

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bin Wang; Sheng-Hong Gu; Andrew Collier Cameron; Hong-Bo Tan; Ho-Keung Hui; Chi-Tai Kwok; Bill Yeung

    2013-01-01

    The transiting exoplanet system HAT-P-24 was observed by using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatory and Hokoon Astronomical Centre,China in 2010 and 2012.In order to enhance the signal to noise ratio of transit events,the observed data are corrected for systematic errors according to Collier Cameron et al.'s coarse decorrelation and Tamuz et al.'s SYSREM algorithms.Three new complete transit light curves are analyzed by means of the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique,and the new physical parameters of the system are derived.They are consistent with the old ones from the discovered paper except for a new larger radius RP =1.364 RJ of HAT-P-24b,which confirms its inflated nature.By combining the five available epochs of mid-transit derived from complete transit light curves,the orbital period of HAT-P-24b is refined to P =3.3552479 d and no obvious transit timing variation signal can be found from these five transit events during 2010-2012.

  11. Reconstruction-by-Dilation and Top-Hat Algorithms for Contrast Enhancement and Segmentation of Microcalcifications in Digital Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Claudia C.

    2007-11-01

    I present some results of contrast enhancement and segmentation of microcalcifications in digital mammograms. These mammograms were obtained from MIAS-minidatabase and using a CR to digitize images. White-top-hat and black-top-hat transformations were used to improve the contrast of images, while reconstruction-by-dilation algorithm was used to emphasize the microcalcifications over the tissues. Segmentation was done using different gradient matrices. These algorithms intended to show some details which were not evident in original images.

  12. Spin-orbit alignment for KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b via Doppler tomography with TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, George; Latham, David W.; Bieryla, Allyson; Beatty, Thomas G.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We present Doppler tomographic analyses for the spectroscopic transits of KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b, two hot-Jupiters orbiting rapidly rotating F-dwarf host stars. These include analyses of archival Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) observations for KELT-7b, and a new TRES transit observation of HAT-P-56b. We report spin-orbit aligned geometries for KELT-7b (2.7° ± 0.6°) and HAT-P-56b (8° ± 2°). The host stars KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are among some of the most rapidly rotating planet-hosting stars known. We examine the tidal re-alignment model for the evolution of the spin-orbit angle in the context of the spin rates of these stars. We find no evidence that the rotation rates of KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 have been modified by star-planet tidal interactions, suggesting that the spin-orbit angle of systems around these hot stars may represent their primordial configuration. In fact, KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are two of three systems in supersynchronous, spin-orbit aligned states, where the rotation periods of the host stars are faster than the orbital periods of the planets.

  13. Spin orbit alignment for KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b via Doppler tomography with TRES

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, George; Bieryla, Allyson; Beatty, Thomas G; Buchhave, Lars A; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    We present Doppler tomographic analyses for the spectroscopic transits of KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b, two hot-Jupiters orbiting rapidly rotating F-dwarf host stars. These include analyses of archival TRES observations for KELT-7b, and a new TRES transit observation of HAT-P-56b. We report spin-orbit aligned geometries for KELT-7b (2.7 +/- 0.6 deg) and HAT-P-56b (8 +/- 2 deg). The host stars KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are among some of the most rapidly rotating planet-hosting stars known. We examine the tidal re-alignment model for the evolution of the spin-orbit angle in the context of the spin rates of these stars. We find no evidence that the rotation rates of KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 have been modified by star-planet tidal interactions, suggesting that the spin-orbit angle of systems around these hot stars may represent their primordial configuration. In fact, KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are two of three systems in super-synchronous, spin-orbit aligned states, where the rotation periods of the host stars are faster than the orbita...

  14. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling Analysis of Hypersonic Aircraft Hat-Stiffened Panels With Varying Face Sheet Geometry and Fiber Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal buckling behavior of monolithic and metal-matrix composite hat-stiffened panels were investigated. The panels have three types of face-sheet geometry: Flat face sheet, microdented face sheet, and microbulged face sheet. The metal-matrix composite panels have three types of face-sheet layups, each of which is combined with various types of hat composite layups. Finite-element method was used in the eigenvalue extractions for both mechanical and thermal buckling. The thermal buckling analysis required both eigenvalue and material property iterations. Graphical methods of the dual iterations are shown. The mechanical and thermal buckling strengths of the hat-stiffened panels with different face-sheet geometry are compared. It was found that by just microdenting or microbulging of the face sheet, the axial, shear, and thermal buckling strengths of both types of hat-stiffened panels could be enhanced considerably. This effect is more conspicuous for the monolithic panels. For the metal-matrix composite panels, the effect of fiber orientations on the panel buckling strengths was investigated in great detail, and various composite layup combinations offering, high panel buckling strengths are presented. The axial buckling strength of the metal-matrix panel was sensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation. However, the lateral, shear, and thermal buckling strengths were insensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation.

  15. Signatures of rocky planet engulfment in HAT-P-4. Implications for chemical tagging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffe, C.; Jofré, E.; Martioli, E.; Flores, M.; Petrucci, R.; Jaque Arancibia, M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to explore the possible chemical signature of planet formation in the binary system HAT-P-4 by studying the trends of abundance vs. condensation temperature Tc. The star HAT-P-4 hosts a planet detected by transits, while its stellar companion does not have any detected planet. We also study the lithium content, which might shed light on the problem of Li depletion in exoplanet host stars. Methods: We derived for the first time both stellar parameters and high-precision chemical abundances by applying a line-by-line full differential approach. The stellar parameters were determined by imposing ionization and excitation equilibrium of Fe lines, with an updated version of the FUNDPAR program, together with ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the MOOG code. We derived detailed abundances of different species with equivalent widths and spectral synthesis with the MOOG program. Results: The exoplanet host star HAT-P-4 is found to be 0.1 dex more metal rich than its companion, which is one of the highest differences in metallicity observed in similar systems. This could have important implications for chemical tagging studies. We rule out a possible peculiar composition for each star, such as is the case for λ Boötis and δ Scuti, and neither is this binary a blue straggler. The star HAT-P-4 is enhanced in refractory elements relative to volatile when compared to its stellar companion. Notably, the Li abundance in HAT-P-4 is greater than that of its companion by 0.3 dex, which is contrary to the model that explains the Li depletion by the presence of planets. We propose a scenario where at the time of planet formation, the star HAT-P-4 locked the inner refractory material in planetesimals and rocky planets, and formed the outer gas giant planet at a greater distance. The refractories were then accreted onto the star, possibly as a result of the migration of the giant planet. This explains the higher metallicity, the higher Li content, and the negative Tc trend we

  16. Prior Restraint of Utah High School Newspapers by Advisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, Cynthia Ford; Black, Jay

    Forty-seven high school newspaper advisers from Utah completed a questionnaire to determine their knowledge of First Amendment rights of student journalists, and to determine what variables may affect their publication decisions. Eight composite cases were developed from relevant First Amendment court decisions. Respondents were asked if they…

  17. A Look at Early Language Learning in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Houton, Jacque Bott

    2013-01-01

    The state of Utah is leading the nation in a surge of new elementary language immersion programs. Their unprecedented growth of programs, over a four-year span, has been both intentional and systemic, taking advantage of a supportive base and promoting language learning as a way to increase economic benefits for the state. While math and science…

  18. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  19. Pliocene diatoms from the Bryce Canyon Area, Utah

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A

    of northern Utah. Twelve genera showed that the lake was at first fresh but later became brackish as indicated by the presence of @iCocconeis lineata@@ Ehrenberg and @iSurirella craticula@@ (= @iStictodesmis craticula@@) which are characteristic of such a...

  20. 78 FR 2424 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the United... competitive sale by sealed bid, in accordance with the Federal regulations for competitive lease sale...

  1. 76 FR 63951 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of competitive coal lease sale. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that that certain... competitive lease by sealed bid in accordance with the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920,...

  2. Geology of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, D.L.; Sibbett, B.S.; McKinney, D.B.; Hulen, J.B.; Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

    1978-12-01

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is located on the western margin on the Mineral Mountains in Beaver County, Utah. The bedrock geology of the area is presented. It is dominated by metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Precambrian age as well as felsic plutonic phases of the Tertiary Mineral Mountains Pluton. Rhyolite flows, domes, and pyroclastics reflect igneous activity between 0.8 and 0.5 million years ago. All lithologies present in the map area are described in detail with an emphasis on characteristics which will allow them to be distinguished in drill cuttings. The geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is structurally controlled with reservoir rocks demonstrating little primary permeability. North to north-northeast trending faults are the youngest structures in the area, and they control present fumarolic activity and recent hot spring activity which has deposited opaline and chalcedonic sinters. It is proposed here that the geothermal reservoirs are controlled primarily by intersections of the principal zones of faulting. Logs from Thermal Power Utah State 72-16, Getty Oil Utah State 52-21, and six shallow thermal gradient holes drilled by the University of Utah are presented in this report and have been utilized in the construction of geologic cross sections of the geothermal field.

  3. Parental Attitudes Regarding School-Based Sexuality Education in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Mindy; Crookston, Benjamin; Page, Randy; Hall, Cougar

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education programs can be broadly categorized as either risk-avoidance or risk-reduction approaches. Health educators in Utah public schools must teach a state mandated risk-avoidance curriculum which prohibits the advocacy or encouragement of contraception. Multiple national surveys indicate that parents prefer a risk-reduction approach…

  4. Utah State Office of Education Fingertip Facts, 2013-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Fingertip Facts is a compendium of some of the most frequently requested data sets from the Utah State Office of Education. Data sets in this year's Fingertip Facts include: Core CRT Language Arts Testing, 2013; Core CRT Mathematics Testing, 2013; 2013 Public Education General Fund; 2012-13 Enrollment Demographics; Public Schools by Grade Level,…

  5. Utah State Office of Education Fingertip Facts, 2014-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Fingertip Facts is a compendium of some of the most frequently requested data sets from the Utah State Office of Education. Data sets in this year's Fingertip Facts include: SAGE Testing, 2014; 2013 Public Education General Fund; 2014-15 Public School Enrollment Demographics; Public Schools by Grade Level, 2013-14; Number of Licensed Educators;…

  6. Utah State Office of Education Fingertip Facts, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Fingertip Facts is a compendium of some of the most frequently requested data sets from the Utah State Office of Education. Data sets in this year's Fingertip Facts include: Core CRT Language Arts Testing, 2012; Core CRT Mathematics Testing, 2012; 2012 Public Education General Fund; 2011-2012 Enrollment Demographics; Public Schools by Grade Level,…

  7. Utah Public Library Service, 2001: An Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sandi

    This annual report of Utah public library services presents data useful for local library planning. This information is presented in two sections: core performance measures and general tables. Statewide summary data and breakouts by the populations of the library jurisdictions are provided for the following core performance measures: (1) visits…

  8. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  9. Parental Attitudes Regarding School-Based Sexuality Education in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Mindy; Crookston, Benjamin; Page, Randy; Hall, Cougar

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education programs can be broadly categorized as either risk-avoidance or risk-reduction approaches. Health educators in Utah public schools must teach a state mandated risk-avoidance curriculum which prohibits the advocacy or encouragement of contraception. Multiple national surveys indicate that parents prefer a risk-reduction approach…

  10. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W., E-mail: nklewis@mit.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long

  11. HATS-18b: An Extreme Short-period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18b: a 1.980+/- 0.077 {M}{{J}}, {1.337}-0.049+0.102 {R}{{J}} planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037+/- 0.047 {M}⊙ and radius {1.020}-0.031+0.057 {R}⊙ ) with V=14.067+/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range of 6.5≲ {{log}}10({Q}* /{k}2)≲ 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star-planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic, or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  12. Refined System Parameters and TTV Study of Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leilei; Gu, Shenghong; Wang, Xiaobin; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Cao, Dongtao; Wang, Yibo; Xiang, Yue; Hui, Ho-Keung; Kwok, Chi-Tai; Yeung, Bill; Ng, Eric; Grau Horta, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    We report new photometric observations of the transiting exoplanetary system HAT-P-20, obtained using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatories and Ho Koon Nature Education cum Astronomical Centre, China, from 2010 to 2013, and Observatori Ca l’Ou, Sant Marti Sesgueioles, Spain, from 2013 to 2015. The observed data are corrected for systematic errors according to the coarse de-correlation and SYSREM algorithms, so as to enhance the signal of the transit events. In order to consistently model the star spots and transits of this exoplanetary system, we develop a highly efficient tool STMT based on the analytic models of Mandel & Agol and Montalto et al. The physical parameters of HAT-P-20 are refined by homogeneously analyzing our new data, the radial velocity data, and the earlier photometric data in the literature with the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. New radii and masses of both host star and planet are larger than those in the discovery paper due to the discrepancy of the radius among K-dwarfs between predicted values by standard stellar models and empirical calibration from observations. Through the analysis of all available mid-transit times calculated with the normal model and spotted model, we conclude that the periodic transit timing variations in these transit events revealed by employing the normal model are probably induced by spot crossing events. From the analysis of the distribution of occulted spots by HAT-P-20b, we constrain the misaligned architecture between the planetary orbit and the spin of the host star.

  13. HATS-7b: A Hot Super Neptune Transiting a Quiet K Dwarf Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Brahm, R.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Jordán, A.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Isaacson, H.; Noyes, R. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-7b, a transiting Super-Neptune with a mass of 0.120 ± 0.012 {M}{{J}}, a radius of {0.563}-0.034+0.046 {R}{{J}}, and an orbital period of 3.1853 days. The host star is a moderately bright (V=13.340\\+/- 0.010 mag, {K}S=10.976\\+/- 0.026 mag) K dwarf star with a mass of 0.849 ± 0.027 {M}⊙ , a radius of {0.815}-0.035+0.049 {R}⊙ , and a metallicity of [{Fe}/{{H}}] =+0.250\\+/- 0.080. The star is photometrically quiet to within the precision of the HATSouth measurements, has low RV jitter, and shows no evidence for chromospheric activity in its spectrum. HATS-7b is the second smallest radius planet discovered by a wide-field ground-based transit survey, and one of only a handful of Neptune-size planets with mass and radius determined to 10% precision. Theoretical modeling of HATS-7b yields a hydrogen-helium fraction of 18 ± 4% (rock-iron core and H2-He envelope), or 9 ± 4% (ice core and H2-He envelope), i.e., it has a composition broadly similar to that of Uranus and Neptune, and very different from that of Saturn, which has 75% of its mass in H2-He. Based on a sample of transiting exoplanets with accurately (Mauna Kea, the MPG 2.2 m and ESO 3.6 m telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  14. On Application of the 3-Cornered Hat Technique to Radio Source Position Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Z.

    2013-08-01

    So called ``3-cornered hat'' method (3CH) was originally developed for estimation of the stability of frequency standards (Gray1974). It was then applied for investigation of the noise level of various data, in particular, astronomical and geodetic time series and radio source position catalogs. However, despite this method is widely used, its application is not straightforward because it requires a reliable estimate of the correlations between series under investigation. Neglecting correlations often produces unacceptable results, like negative variances. In this work, we investigate a new possibility to estimate correlations between radio source position catalogs (RSC) obtained from VLBI observations.

  15. On the weight distribution in level one Demazure modules of sl2hat

    CERN Document Server

    Bliem, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We compute the covariance of the weight distribution in level 1 Demazure modules of sl2hat. The crucial step is to compute the variance of the degree distribution. This also allows us to prove the weak law of large numbers for the degree and weight distribution using Chebyshev's inequality. We give two proofs of our main result, one by induction along Demazure's character formula, and one by using quantum calculus and the fact that Demazure characters are related to Macdonald and Rogers-Szego polynomials.

  16. Spherical "Top-Hat" Collapse in a Modified Chaplygin Gas Dominated Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Karbasi, S

    2015-01-01

    Considering perturbation growth in spherical Top-Hat model of structure formation in a generalized Chaplygin gas dominated universe, we want to study this scenario with modified Chaplygin gas model. Different parameters of this scenario for positive and negative values of A are computed. The evolution of background and collapsed region parameters are found for different cases. The stability of the model and the collapse time rate are considered in different cases. The turn-around redshifts for different values of alpha are computed; the results are in relatively good agreement with current observational data.

  17. Research on the Procedure for Computer-Aided Pattern Design of Uygur's Flowered Hats

    OpenAIRE

    Shuxian Liu; Xiaohua Li

    2013-01-01

    Xinjiang Uygur’s flowered hats is famous all over the world, it leads the world of headwear of variou nationalities within China by the variety of styles, the various ways of how to emroider pattern design and exquisite manufacture. It is unusual even in national costumes art of the world. The poupose of this study is to analyze Uygur's headwear, study the rules of Uygur's headwear pattern, analyze the characteristic of the basic pattern, research on the procedure for computer-aided pattern d...

  18. Inhibition of different histone acetyltransferases (HATs) uncovers transcription-dependent and -independent acetylation-mediated mechanisms in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-02-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied garcinol, an inhibitor of the HATs of the p300 (EP300 binding protein)/CBP (CREB-binding protein) family, and the HATs of the PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor) family. As comparative agent we applied C646, a specific inhibitor that selectively blocks HATS of the p300/CBP family. Immunochemical analysis reveals differences in histone H3 acetylation in the honeybee brain, in response to the injection of either C646 or garcinol. Behavioral assessment reveals that the two drugs cause memory impairment of different nature when injected after associative conditioning: processes disturbed by garcinol are annihilated by the established transcription blocker actinomycin D and thus seem to require transcription processes. Actions of C646 are unaltered by actinomycin D, and thus seem to be independent of transcription. The outcome of our different approaches as summarized suggests that distinct HATs contribute to different acetylation-mediated processes in memory formation. We further deduce that the acetylation-mediated processes in memory formation comprise transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms.

  19. A Needs Assessment of Marriage and Family Therapy Approved Supervision in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This research presents data gathered through a needs assessment regarding approved supervision in Utah. A sample of ISO therapists in Utah gave descriptive facts about the current need for supervision in Utah as well as the number of therapists that are willing to provide supervision. Additionally, therapists that are not currently approved supervisors indicated whether or not they would be willing to become approved supervisors, what would make the designation more appealing, and what would ...

  20. A Profile of Professional Activities and Practice Patterns for Marriage and Family Therapists in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    This research project presents data on practitioner profiles and practice patterns for marriage and family therapists living in Utah . A sample of 77 clinical members and six associate members of the American Association for Marriage and ramily Therapy living in Utah gave descriptive facts on their demographics , training , years of experience , and specific information about their practice of marriage and family therapy. The findings indicate tha t marriage and family therapists in Utah are ...

  1. Technical analysis of prospective photovoltaic systems in Utah.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2012-02-01

    This report explores the technical feasibility of prospective utility-scale photovoltaic system (PV) deployments in Utah. Sandia National Laboratories worked with Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), a division of PacifiCorp operating in Utah, to evaluate prospective 2-megawatt (MW) PV plants in different locations with respect to energy production and possible impact on the RMP system and customers. The study focused on 2-MW{sub AC} nameplate PV systems of different PV technologies and different tracking configurations. Technical feasibility was evaluated at three different potential locations in the RMP distribution system. An advanced distribution simulation tool was used to conduct detailed time-series analysis on each feeder and provide results on the impacts on voltage, demand, voltage regulation equipment operations, and flicker. Annual energy performance was estimated.

  2. The Transit Light Curve Project. VII. The Not-So-Bloated Exoplanet HAT-P-1b

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, Joshua N; Bakos, Gaspar A; Pal, Andras; Johnson, John Asher; Williams, Peter K G; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi; Fernandez, Jose; Latham, David W

    2007-01-01

    We present photometry of the G0 star HAT-P-1 during six transits of its close-in giant planet, and we refine the estimates of the system parameters. Relative to Jupiter's properties, HAT-P-1b is 1.20 +/- 0.05 times larger and its surface gravity is 2.7 +/- 0.2 times weaker. Although it remains the case that HAT-P-1b is among the least dense of the known sample of transiting exoplanets, its properties are in accord with previously published models of strongly irradiated, coreless, solar-composition giant planets. The times of the transits have a typical accuracy of 1 min and do not depart significantly from a constant period.

  3. Evidence for Water in the Atmosphere of HAT-P-26b Using LDSS-3C

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Seifahrt, Andreas; Gilbert, Greg; Line, Michael R; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of a physically-diverse set of transiting exoplanets is an important and necessary step towards establishing the physical properties linked to the production of obscuring clouds or hazes. Only planets with identifiable spectroscopic features can effectively enhance our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and metallicity. Using data acquired by the newly-commissioned LDSS-3C instrument on Magellan and the Spitzer Space Telescope, we find evidence for water in the transmission spectrum of the Neptune-mass planet HAT-P-26b. Surprisingly, we detect no trace of potassium. Our measured spectrum is best explained by either a high-metallicity, cloud-free atmosphere or a solar-metallicity atmosphere with a cloud deck at ~10 mbar. The presence of strong spectral features in our data suggests that future observations at higher precision could break this degeneracy and reveal the planet's atmospheric composition. We also update HAT-P-26b's transit ephemeris, t_0 = 2455304.65218(25) BJD_TDB, and or...

  4. Photometric observation of HAT-P-16b in the near-UV

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, Kyle A; Sagan, Thomas A G

    2014-01-01

    We present the first primary transit light curve of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-16b in the near-UV photometric band. We observed this object on December 29,2012 in order to update the transit ephemeris, constrain its planetary parameters and search for magnetic field interference. Vidotto et al. (2011a) postulate that the magnetic field of HAT-P-16b can be constrained if its near-UV light curve shows an early ingress compared to its optical light curve, while its egress remains unchanged. However, we did not detect an early ingress in our night of observing when using a cadence of 60 seconds and an average photometric precision of 2.26mmag. We find a near-UV planetary radius of Rp=1.274+-0.057RJup which is consistent with its near-IR radius of Rp=1.289+-0.066RJup (Buchhave et al., 2010). We developed an automated reduction pipeline and modeling package to process our data. The data reduction package synthesizes a set of IRAF scripts to calibrate images and perform aperture photometry. The modeling package utilizes ...

  5. Transmission spectroscopy of the inflated exo-Saturn HAT-P-19b

    CERN Document Server

    Mallonn, M; Weingrill, J; Strassmeier, K G; Ribas, I; Carroll, T A; Herrero, E; Granzer, T; Claret, A; Schwope, A

    2015-01-01

    We observed the Saturn-mass and Jupiter-sized exoplanet HAT-P-19b to refine its transit parameters and ephemeris as well as to shed first light on its transmission spectrum. We monitored the host star over one year to quantify its flux variability and to correct the transmission spectrum for a slope caused by starspots. A transit of HAT-P-19b was observed spectroscopically with OSIRIS at the Gran Telescopio Canarias in January 2012. The spectra of the target and the comparison star covered the wavelength range from 5600 to 7600 AA. One high-precision differential light curve was created by integrating the entire spectral flux. This white-light curve was used to derive absolute transit parameters. Furthermore, a set of light curves over wavelength was formed by a flux integration in 41 wavelength channels of 50 AA width. We analyzed these spectral light curves for chromatic variations of transit depth. The transit fit of the combined white-light curve yields a refined value of the planet-to-star radius ratio o...

  6. A Mexican Hat with holes: calculating low resolution power spectra from data with gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Arevalo, P; Zhuravleva, I; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Revnivtsev, M

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for calculating a low-resolution power spectrum from data with gaps is described. The method is a modification of the $\\Delta$-variance method previously described by Stutzki and Ossenkopf. A Mexican Hat filter is used to single out fluctuations at a given spatial scale and the variance of the convolved image is calculated. The gaps in the image, defined by the mask, are corrected for by representing the Mexican Hat filter as a difference between two Gaussian filters with slightly different widths, convolving the image and mask with these filters and dividing the results before calculating the final filtered image. This method cleanly compensates for data gaps even if these have complicated shapes and cover a significant fraction of the data. The method was developed to deal with problematic 2D images, where irregular detector edges and masking of contaminating sources compromise the power spectrum estimates, but it can also be straightforwardly applied to 1D timing analysis or 3D data cubes f...

  7. HATS-3b: An inflated hot Jupiter transiting an F-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, D; Penev, K; Bakos, G; Hartman, J; Jordán, A; Mancini, L; Mohler, M; Suc, V; Rabus, M; Béky, B; Csubry, Z; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Nikolov, N; Csák, B; Brahm, R; Espinoza, N; Noyes, R; Schmidt, B; Conroy, P; Wright, D; Tinney, C; Addison, B; Sackett, P; Sasselov, D; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V=12.4 F-dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479d, mass of Mp = 1.07MJ, and radius of Rp = 1.38RJ. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsini = 9.0km/s), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces logg and Teff parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km/s.

  8. A Bayesian analysis of HAT-P-7b using the EXONEST algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placek, Ben [Department of Physics, University at Albany (SUNY), Albany NY (United States); Knuth, Kevin H. [Department of Physics, University at Albany (SUNY), Albany NY, USA and Department of Informatics, University at Albany (SUNY), Albany NY (United States)

    2015-01-13

    The study of exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) is revolutionizing the way we view our universe. High-precision photometric data provided by the Kepler Space Telescope (Kepler) enables not only the detection of such planets, but also their characterization. This presents a unique opportunity to apply Bayesian methods to better characterize the multitude of previously confirmed exoplanets. This paper focuses on applying the EXONEST algorithm to characterize the transiting short-period-hot-Jupiter, HAT-P-7b (also referred to as Kepler-2b). EXONEST evaluates a suite of exoplanet photometric models by applying Bayesian Model Selection, which is implemented with the MultiNest algorithm. These models take into account planetary effects, such as reflected light and thermal emissions, as well as the effect of the planetary motion on the host star, such as Doppler beaming, or boosting, of light from the reflex motion of the host star, and photometric variations due to the planet-induced ellipsoidal shape of the host star. By calculating model evidences, one can determine which model best describes the observed data, thus identifying which effects dominate the planetary system. Presented are parameter estimates and model evidences for HAT-P-7b.

  9. A Bayesian analysis of HAT-P-7b using the EXONEST algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) is revolutionizing the way we view our universe. High-precision photometric data provided by the Kepler Space Telescope (Kepler) enables not only the detection of such planets, but also their characterization. This presents a unique opportunity to apply Bayesian methods to better characterize the multitude of previously confirmed exoplanets. This paper focuses on applying the EXONEST algorithm to characterize the transiting short-period-hot-Jupiter, HAT-P-7b (also referred to as Kepler-2b). EXONEST evaluates a suite of exoplanet photometric models by applying Bayesian Model Selection, which is implemented with the MultiNest algorithm. These models take into account planetary effects, such as reflected light and thermal emissions, as well as the effect of the planetary motion on the host star, such as Doppler beaming, or boosting, of light from the reflex motion of the host star, and photometric variations due to the planet-induced ellipsoidal shape of the host star. By calculating model evidences, one can determine which model best describes the observed data, thus identifying which effects dominate the planetary system. Presented are parameter estimates and model evidences for HAT-P-7b.

  10. Magic hat economics: counter-cultural ideals and practices of the Nordic Ting community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Juhana Rantala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The author's anthropological study concerns one of today’s communities with no shared belief system, but with a clear spiritualist orientation. The Nordic Ting Community does not have any defined or committing roles, specialized distribution of tasks, entrance fee to their two annual gatherings, membership or any formal hierarchy. This exiguity of structural differentiation could well be understood to represent ‘subjective spirituality’. This thesis refers to the decline of institutional forms of religion with, instead, an increase in subjective experience in spirituality. This presentation shows that at least in the author's field of study, there hardly exists any increase in emphasis on individualism in spirituality. Instead the material indicates a relatively long continuum of a self-organized type of communality which could be understood as neither individualistic nor collectivistic. The type of agency observed in the social action of the studied network-like field is intersubjective. This article focuses on the use of the magic hat and the combination of ideals and practices characteristic to the Ting Community, which the author calls the magic hat economics. It is argued that by looking at these kinds of intermediating objects, the problem of individualization can be seen much more clearly

  11. The nature of the Napoleon's Hat nebula of SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Dyson, J. E.; Kahn, F. D.

    1993-03-01

    The interstellar and circumstellar environment of SN 1987A is modeled. The geometries of Napoleon's Hat nebula and the dark bay suggest that there is relative motion between the SN progenitor and the surrounding ISM. Most of the dark bay can be identified with the bubble produced by the fast blue supergiant (BSG) wind before the red supergiant (RSG) stage. The relative motion between the star and the ISM is the primary reason for the star being at the edge of this bubble. After the first BSG stage, the star evolves to the RSG stage; the wind velocity is now typically 10 km/s and the mass loss rate is around 10 exp -5 solar mass/yr. The star eventually breaks through the bubble produced in the early BSG stage and starts to interact directly with the ISM outside, thus producing Napoleon's Hat. The success of this model is convincing proof of the BSG-RSG-BSG evolutionary model for the SN 1987A progenitors, and shows that is has moved from the site where it was formed.

  12. Infrared Secondary Eclipse Photometry of the Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-1b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Kamen; Deming, D.; Harrington, J.; Stevenson, K.; Bowman, W.; Nymeyer, S.; Fortney, J.; Bakos, G.

    2009-09-01

    We examine the secondary eclipse of the exoplanet HAT-P-1b using the IRAC instrument on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This planet is close to the boundary between the pM and pL classes of hot Jupiters, which makes it an important test case for theoretical models of temperature inversions in the atmospheres of this type of gas giants. Our analysis shows secondary eclipse depths for HAT-P-1b, as a fraction of the stellar flux, to be: 0.075% +/- 0.008% (3.6 micron), 0.128% +/- 0.022% (4.5 micron), 0.183% +/- 0.031% (5.8 micron) and 0.230% +/- 0.034% (8.0 micron). These values can be produced, within errors, by a 1500K black body, or alternatively by a hot Jupiter with a small temperature inversion in its atmosphere. In both cases, the planet must radiate a significant amount of the energy received from the star through its day side, which suggests that little energy is redistributed through atmospheric circulation to be emitted through the night side of the planet. It has been suggested that this planet is inflated through tidal dissipation, based on its large radius and non-zero eccentricity allowed by the radial velocity data. By timing the secondary transit, we are able to determine that the orbit is very close to circular. The leading author was funded by the NASA Astrobiology Institute SUIA program.

  13. Lightning as a possible source of the radio emission on HAT-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Hodosán, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Lightning induced radio emission has been observed on Solar System planets. There have been many attempts to observe exoplanets in the radio wavelength, however, no unequivocal detection has been reported. Lecavelier des Etangs et al. (2013, A&A, 552, A65) carried out radio transit observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b, and suggested that a small part of the radio flux can be attributed to the planet. In the current letter, we assume that this signal is real, and study if this radio emission could be caused by lightning in the atmosphere of the planet. We find that a lightning storm with 530 times larger flash densities than the Earth-storms with the largest lightning activity is needed to produce the observed signal from HAT-P-11b. The optical counterpart would nevertheless be undetectable with current technology. We show that HCN produced by lightning chemistry of such thunderstorms is observable 2-3 years after the storm, which produces signatures in the L ($3.0 \\mu{\\rm m}-4.0 \\mu$m) and N ($7.5 \\mu{...

  14. Kinetic features revealed by top-hat electrostatic analysers: numerical simulations and instrument response results

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Rossana; Marcucci, Maria Federica; Brienza, Daniele; Bruno, Roberto; Consolini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Denise; Valentini, Franceso; Servidio, Sergio; Stabile, Sara; Pezzi, Oreste; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Lavraud, Benoit; De Keyser, Johan; Retinò, Alessandro; Fazakerley, Andrew; Wicks, Robert; Vaivads, Andris; Salatti, Mario; Veltri, Pierliugi

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission devoted to study energization, acceleration and heating of turbulent space plasmas, and designed to perform field and particle measurements at kinetic scales in different near-Earth regions and in the solar wind. Solar Orbiter (SolO), together with Solar Probe Plus, will provide the first comprehensive remote and in situ measurements which are critical to establish the fundamental physical links between the Sun's dynamic atmosphere and the turbulent solar wind. The fundamental process of turbulent dissipation is mediated by physical mechanism that occur at a variety of temporal and spatial scales, and most efficiently at the kinetics scales. Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations of solar-wind turbulence show that kinetic effects manifest as particle beams, production of temperature anisotropies and ring-like modulations, preferential heating of heavy ions. We use a numerical code able to reproduce the response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical simulations. Here, we show how optimized particle measurements by top-hat analysers can capture the kinetic features injected by turbulence in the VDFs.

  15. Kepler and Ground-based Transits of the Exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A; Jennings, Donald E; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B-band) and near-IR (J-band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp=4.31 +/-0.06 Earth-radii, and Rs = 0.683 +/-0.009 solar radii, both about 3-sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler tr...

  16. Characterization of new hAT transposable elements in 12 Drosophila genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Ortiz, Mauro; Loreto, Elgion Lucio Silva

    2009-01-01

    In silico searches for sequences homologous to hAT elements in 12 Drosophila genomes have allowed us to identify 37 new hAT elements (8 in D. ananassae, 11 in D. mojavensis, 2 in D. sechellia, 1 in D. simulans, 2 in D. virilis, 3 in D. yakuba, 3 in D. persimilis, 1 in D. grimshawi, 5 in D. willistoni and 1 in D. pseudobscura). The size of these elements varies from 2,359 to 4,962 bp and the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) show lengths ranging from 10 to 24 bp. Several elements show intact transposase ORFs, suggesting that they are active. Conserved amino acid motifs were identified that correspond to those important for transposase activity. These elements are highly variable and phylogenetic analysis showed that they can be clustered into four different families. Incongruencies were observed between the phylogenies of the transposable elements and those of their hosts, suggesting that horizontal transfer may have occurred between some of the species.

  17. Design and Optimization of a Compact Wideband Hat-Fed Reflector Antenna for Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geterud, Erik G.; Yang, Jian; Ostling, Tomas; Bergmark, Pontus

    2013-01-01

    We present a new design of the hat-fed reflector antenna for satellite communications, where a low reflection coefficient, high gain, low sidelobes and low cross-polar level are required over a wide frequency band. The hat feed has been optimized by using the Genetic Algorithm through a commercial FDTD solver, QuickWave-V2D, together with an own developed optimization code. The Gaussian vertex plate has been applied at the center of the reflector in order to improve the reflection coefficient and reduce the far-out sidelobes. A parabolic reflector with a ring-shaped focus has been designed for obtaining nearly 100% phase efficiency. The antenna's reflection coefficient is below -17 dB and the radiation patterns satisfy the M-x standard co- and cross-polar sidelobe envelopes for satellite ground stations over a bandwidth of 30%. A low-cost monolayer radome has been designed for the antenna with satisfactory performance. The simulations have been verified by measurements; both of them are presented in the paper.

  18. Discovery of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, K F; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b, a Neptune-sized planet orbiting an active K4 dwarf. Using all available short-cadence data of the Kepler mission, we derive refined planetary ephemeris increasing their precision by more than an order of magnitude. Our simultaneous primary and secondary transit modeling results in improved transit and orbital parameters. In particular, the precise timing of the secondary eclipse allows to pin down the orbital eccentricity to $0.26459_{-0.00048}^{+0.00069}$. The secondary eclipse depth of $6.09_{-1.11}^{+1.12}$ ppm corresponds to a $5.5\\sigma$ detection and results in a geometric albedo of $0.39\\pm0.07$ for HAT-P-11 b, close to Neptune's value, which may indicate further resemblances between these two bodies. Due to the substantial orbital eccentricity, the planetary equilibrium temperature is expected to change significantly with orbital position and ought to vary between $630^\\circ$ K and $950^\\circ$ K, depending on the details of heat redistrib...

  19. Implications of the Secondary Eclipse of Exoplanet HAT-P-11b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Richard K.; Deming, L. D.; Bakos, G.; Harrington, J.; Madhusudhan, N.; Noyes, R.; Seager, S.

    2010-01-01

    We observed exoplanet HAT-P-11b and have successfully detected its secondary eclipse. We conducted observations using the Spitzer Space Telescope in the post-cryo mission at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Having detected the secondary eclipse, we are at present making a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-11b is one of only two known exo-Neptunes and has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi-major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will serve to clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. We discuss implications of these observations.

  20. HATS-3b: AN INFLATED HOT JUPITER TRANSITING AN F-TYPE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Schmidt, B. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Jordán, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Buchhave, L., E-mail: daniel@mso.anu.edu.au [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University (Denmark); and others

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of M{sub p} = 1.07 M {sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} = 1.38 R {sub J}. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s{sup –1}), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T {sub eff} parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s{sup –1}.

  1. Transmission Spectroscopy of HAT-P-32Ab with GTC/OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortmann, Lisa; Pallé, Enric; Murgas, Felipe; Dreizler, Stefan; Iro, Nicolas; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    I will present one of the latest results of our GTC exoplanet transit spectroscopy survey. Over the last years our group has obtained ground-based optical (538 nm - 918 nm) spectrophotometric transit observations for several hot Jupiters including HAT-P-32Ab using the OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy) instrument at the Spanish 10-meter telescope GTC.I will discuss the source, nature and proper correction of instrument specific systematic noise we found to affect our data. After its correction, we were able to yield high quality results with a precision between 482 and 1703 ppm depending on the wavelength channel. We measure a flat optical transmission spectrum for HAT-P-32Ab, consistent with the results of Gibson et al. (2013, MNRAS, 436, 2974) obtained with GMOS at Gemini-North. This independent reproduction of consistent results re-establishes faith in the reliability of ground-based transmission spectroscopy and emphasizes the high potential of OSIRIS at the GTC as a tool to complement current and future space-based observations.

  2. The G-HAT Search for Advanced Extraterrestrial Civilizations: The Reddest Extended WISE Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Jessica; Povich, Matthew S.; Wright, Jason; Griffith, Roger; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Mullan, Brendan L.

    2015-01-01

    Freeman Dyson (1960) theorized how to identify possible signatures of advanced extra-terrestrial civilizations by their waste heat, an inevitable byproduct of a civilization using a significant fraction of the luminosity from their host star. If a civilizations could tap the starlight throughout their host galaxy their waste heat would be easily detectable by recent infrared surveys. The Glimpsing Heat from Alien Technologies (G-HAT) pilot project aims to place limits on the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations at pan-galactic scales. We present results from the G-HAT cleaned catalog of 563 extremely red, extended high Galactic latitude (|b| ≥ 10) sources from the WISE All-Sky Catalog. Our catalog includes sources new to the scientific literature along with well-studied objects (e.g. starburst galaxies, AGN, and planetary nebulae) that exemplify extreme WISE colors. Objects of particular interest include a supergiant Be star (48 Librae) surrounded by a resolved, mid-infrared nebula, possibly indicating dust in the stellar wind ejecta, and a curious cluster of seven extremely red WISE sources (associated with IRAS 04287+6444) that have no optical counterparts.

  3. Synthesis of isothiazol-3-one derivatives as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Stephen; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Rowlands, Martin G; Aherne, G Wynne; Workman, Paul; Jarman, Michael; McDonald, Edward

    2009-01-15

    High-throughput screening led to the identification of isothiazolones 1 and 2 as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with IC50s of 3 microM and 5 microM, respectively. Analogues of these hit compounds with variations of the N-phenyl group, and with variety of substituents at C-4, C-5 of the thiazolone ring, were prepared and assayed for inhibition of the HAT enzyme PCAF. Potency is modestly favoured when the N-aryl group is electron deficient (4-pyridyl derivative 10 has IC(50)=1.5 microM); alkyl substitution at C-4 has little effect, whilst similar substitution at C-5 causes a significant drop in potency. The ring-fused compound 38 has activity (IC(50)=6.1 microM) to encourage further exploration of this bicyclic structure. The foregoing SAR is consistent with an inhibitory mechanism involving cleavage of the S-N bond of the isothiazolone ring by a catalytically important thiol residue.

  4. Valuation of improved air quality in Utah County, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C. Arden; Miner, F. Dean

    1988-05-01

    A contingent valuation approach was used to estimate maximum willingness-to-pay for improved air quality in Utah County. Respondents demonstrated a high rate of concern over poor air quality and averaged a willingness-to-pay of 37 per month per household. Noniterative openended questions were used successfully. No information bias was observed but benchmark values did influence bids. Willingness-to-pay for improved air quality was large for both sexes and across all income groups, ages, and occupations.

  5. Ringtail Distribution, Dermatoglyphics, and Diet in Zion National Park, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Current scientific knowledge of the ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is limited, thus impeding appropriate management decisions. Ringtails in Zion National Park, Utah, are rarely seen, but are involved in increasing occurrences of negative interactions with park visitors and employees such as food theft and denning in buildings, interactions which are harmful to both parties. To manage this conflict, an update to the general knowledge about the status of the population is required as the only p...

  6. Utah Science Vol. 51 No. 1, Spring 1990

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    2 Families: Social Stability Amidst Cultural Diversity 5 Delegating Decisions in Marriages 6 Helping Strangers Become Neighbors: Mitigating the Effects of Rapid Change 10 Economic Clout of Retirees May Spur Growth in Utah 13 The High Cost of Divorce 14 Families Remain Crucible of Change 20 Child Care: Pressing Needs Demand Innovative Solutions 23 Research in Brief 31 Neither Husbands Nor Gadgets Lighten Household Chores 34 Single Parents: More Work, Less Housewor...

  7. Climate effects on historical fires (1630-1900) in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter M. Brown; Emily K. Heyerdahl; Stanley G. Kitchen; Marc H. Weber

    2008-01-01

    We inferred climate effects on fire occurrence from 1630 to 1900 for a new set of crossdated fire-scar chronologies from 18 forested sites in Utah and one site in eastern Nevada. Years with regionally synchronous fires (31 years with fire at ≥20% of sites) occurred during drier than average summers and years with no fires at any site (100 years) were wetter...

  8. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Enright, Michael; Danner, M.R.; Fisher, M.J.; Haraden, Peter L.; Kenney, T.A.; Wilkowske, C.D.; Eacret, Robert J.; Downhour, Paul; Slaugh, B.A.; Swenson, R.L.; Howells, J.H.; Christiansen, H.K.

    2003-01-01

    This is the fortieth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2002. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights and Division of Water Resources.

  9. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Enright, Michael; Danner, M.R.; Fisher, M.J.; Haraden, Peter L.; Kenney, T.A.; Wilkowske, C.D.; Eacret, Robert J.; Downhour, Paul; Slaugh, B.A.; Swenson, R.L.; Howells, J.H.; Christiansen, H.K.

    2002-01-01

    This is the thirty-ninth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2001. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights and Division of Water Resources.

  10. Skin and Colon Cancer Media Campaigns in Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Broadwater

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The mission of the Utah Cancer Action Network is to reduce cancer incidence and mortality in Utah. Established in 2003, the network selected skin and colon cancers as the first priorities in its comprehensive plan. In its first year of operation, the network planned and implemented a cancer awareness campaign that was organized along two tracks: 1 marketing research, consisting of two telephone surveys, and 2 two advertising/awareness campaigns, one for colon cancer and one for skin cancer. The first telephone survey was conducted in January 2003 to obtain a baseline measurement of the Utah population’s knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The advertising campaigns were launched in April 2003, and the second telephone survey was conducted in May. In January 2003, 18% of survey respondents reported seeing or hearing skin cancer prevention or sun protection announcements; in May, this percentage increased to 76%. In January, 36% indicated they had seen, read, or heard colorectal cancer early detection announcements; in May, this percentage increased to 79%.

  11. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

  12. 亲历“黑客帝国”——2008 Black Hat USA大会纪实

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许舟平

    2008-01-01

    2008年8月6日,第12届Black Hat USA大会在美国内华达州拉斯维加斯揭开了帷幕。在为期2天的Black Hat Briefings会议中,共有来自全球的超过4500名参会者来到酷热的拉斯维加斯,这些人囊括了全世界最著名的软件安全厂商、独立安全研究人员和众多的黑客。

  13. Chaos in classical string dynamics in $\\hat{\\gamma}$ deformed $AdS_5 \\times T^{1,1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, Kamal L

    2016-01-01

    We consider a circular string in $\\hat{\\gamma}$ deformed $AdS_5 \\times T^{1,1}$ which is localized in the center of $AdS_5$ and winds around the two circles of deformed $T^{1,1}$. We observe chaos in the phase space of the circular string implying non-integrability of string dynamics. The chaotic behaviour in phase space is controlled by energy as well as the deforming parameter $\\hat{\\gamma}$. We further show that the point like object exhibits non-chaotic behaviour. Finally we calculate the Lyapunov exponent for both extended and point like object in support of our first result.

  14. Top-hat shaped corneal trephination for penetrating keratoplasty using the femtosecond laser: a histomorphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Daniel; Derhartunian, Victor; Bug, Reinhold; Kohnen, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate a novel technique for penetrating keratoplasty (PK) with the use of a new software algorithm for the femtosecond laser, designed to create penetrating cuts in a top hat configuration. Consecutive histomorphological case series. Twelve eyes of 12 patients underwent penetrating keratoplasty by means of a 60-kHz femtosecond laser (IntraLase, Irvine, California) with a software specifically developed for corneal surgery. Of the 12 patients, the reason for keratoplasty was keratoconus in 4 patients, bullous keratopathy in 6 patients, keratotorus in 1 patient, and status post chemical burn in 1 patient. A new software was used to create penetrating cuts in a top-hat-shaped configuration. In all cases, cutting parameters were identical in all donor and corresponding host corneas: 7.0 mm diameter of the anterior side cut, 8.5-8.7 mm diameter of the posterior side cut, and a depth of 300 microm for the lamellar cut. In all cases, a complete penetrating cut with the laser in the host cornea was not intended intraoperatively. Complete penetration was performed subsequently and manually with a diamond knife because of logistic conditions. Trephined corneoscleral rings and button corneas were analyzed macroscopically and histologically to determine cut quality. All procedures were performed without any complications. With application of appropriate combinations of pulse energy and spacing, trephination took less than 200 seconds. Macroscopic examination and histology of donor and recipient specimens showed a straight, smooth cut with perpendicular edges in all donor buttons. No corneal edema and no visible damage to the keratocyte nuclei were found. At the region of manual dissection, a small stromal tissue-tag was present in parts of the circumference in all donor buttons. No evidence of any cut complication was noted. Top-hat-shaped penetrating keratoplasty using the IntraLase femtosecond laser enables a quick and sufficient trephination of both human donor and

  15. 76 FR 34211 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Kennecott Utah Copper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... Proposed Kennecott Utah Copper LLC Tailings Expansion Project, Near Magna, Salt Lake County, UT, Permit... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Kennecott Utah Copper Tailings Expansion Project, an expansion of an active commercial mining operation near Magna, Salt Lake County, UT. Kennecott Utah Copper...

  16. 77 FR 24975 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability... recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is federally listed as threatened... preparation of the final revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog. The Service and other...

  17. 76 FR 68523 - Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC-Change in Operators Exemption-Iron Bull Railroad Company, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... near Iron Springs, Utah, and milepost 14.7 at or near Iron Mountain, Utah, a distance of 14.6 miles in... Surface Transportation Board Utah Southern Railroad Company, LLC--Change in Operators Exemption--Iron Bull... of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to change operators from Iron Bull Railroad Company (IBRC) to USRC...

  18. Development of Contingency Plans and Scientific Background Studies for Applying Weather Modification During Drought Periods in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, David S.; Frantz, Marjorie; Glover, Terry; Richardson, E. Arlo; Sutherland, Joe L.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary study of drought in utah was conducted as a part of the Bureau of Reclamation's Southwest Drought Research Program. The study was administered by the Utah Division of Water Resources. Utah drought was investigated from a variety of viewpoints, including drought climatology, drought meteorology, hydrologic effects of drought, and economic effects of drought. A stand-by wintertime cloud seeding ...

  19. 78 FR 70960 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Meeting/Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting/Conference Call. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land... host a meeting/conference call. DATES: The BLM-Utah RAC will host a meeting/conference call on...

  20. 78 FR 23290 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Conference Call Meeting. ] SUMMARY: In accordance... Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will host a conference call meeting....

  1. 76 FR 72969 - Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of... for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-(800) 877-8339 to... Utah RAC is hosting a call for nominations for a position in category three (description addressed...

  2. 77 FR 66480 - Final Environmental Impact Statement, Narrows Project, Sanpete County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... financing and located in part on Federal lands. The FEIS Analyzes Four Alternatives The FEIS describes and... published a Notice of Availability of the SDEIS in the Federal Register on March 29, 2010 (75 FR 15458). A... Eastern Utah, 451 East 400 North, Price, Utah 84501 Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University,...

  3. Implication of Agathic Acid from Utah Juniper Bark as an Abortifacient Compound in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshly ground Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little) bark was given via gavage at a dosage of 2.3 kg/cow twice daily to three pregnant cows starting on day 255 of gestation. All three cows aborted the calves after four, five and six days of treatment. A fourth cow was dosed Utah juni...

  4. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  5. Utah Public Education Funding: The Fiscal Impact of School Choice. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aud, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This study examines Utah's funding system for public education and provides an analysis of the fiscal impact of allowing parents to use a portion of their child's state education funding to attend a school of their choice, public or private. Like many states, Utah is facing pressure to improve its system of public education funding. The state's…

  6. Geology of the Capitol Reef area, Wayne and Garfield Counties, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Fred; Huff, Lyman C.; Hinrichs, E. Neal; Luedke, Robert G.

    1963-01-01

    The Capitol Reef area includes about 900 square miles in western Wayne and north-central Garfield Counties, Utah. It is along the border between the High Plateaus of Utah and the Canyon Lands sections of the Colorado' Plateaus province. Capitol Reef National Monument is in the eastern part of the mapped area.

  7. 76 FR 9770 - Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On February 1, 2011, the Utah Board of Water Resources filed an application for a successive...

  8. 76 FR 7845 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Utah AGENCY: Environmental... the State of Utah has revised its Public Water System Supervision (PWSS) Program by adopting...

  9. 76 FR 69673 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New... tart cherries grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. These... handling of tart cherries grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington,...

  10. 76 FR 77223 - PacifiCorp v. Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PacifiCorp v. Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on December 2, 2011, pursuant to sections 206 and 306 of the Federal Power Act (FPA... Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (Respondent) has failed to comply with the terms and...

  11. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  12. Utah geothermal commercialization planning. Semi-annual progress report, January 1, 1979--June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, S.; Wagstaff, L.W.

    1979-06-01

    The effects of the Utah geothermal planning project were concentrated on the Utah geothermal legislation, the Roosevelt Hot Springs time phased project plan and the Salt Lake County area development plan. Preliminary findings indicate a potential for heat pump utilization, based on market interest and the existence of suitable groundwater conditions. (MHR)

  13. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT... City, UT 84108, telephone (801) 581-3876. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance... Utah counties, UT. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's...

  14. Survey of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hAT transposons and MITE-like hATpin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Gerhard; Krebs, Carmen; Diez, Mercedes; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Genome-wide analyses of repetitive DNA suggest a significant impact particularly of transposable elements on genome size and evolution of virtually all eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of the hAT transposon superfamily of the sugar beet (B. vulgaris) genome, using molecular, bioinformatic and cytogenetic approaches. We identified 81 transposase-coding sequences, three of which are part of structurally intact but nonfunctional hAT transposons (BvhAT), in a B. vulgaris BAC library as well as in whole genome sequencing-derived data sets. Additionally, 116 complete and 497 truncated non-autonomous BvhAT derivatives lacking the transposase gene were in silico-detected. The 116 complete derivatives were subdivided into four BvhATpin groups each characterized by a distinct terminal inverted repeat motif. Both BvhAT and BvhATpin transposons are specific for species of the genus Beta and closely related species, showing a localization on B. vulgaris chromosomes predominantely in euchromatic regions. The lack of any BvhAT transposase function together with the high degree of degeneration observed for the BvhAT and the BvhATpin genomic fraction contrasts with the abundance and activity of autonomous and non-autonomous hAT transposons revealed in other plant species. This indicates a possible genus-specific structural and functional repression of the hAT transposon superfamily during Beta diversification and evolution.

  15. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  16. Partition functions of 3d $\\hat D$-quivers and their mirror duals from 1d free fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Assel, Benjamin; Felix, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We study the matrix models calculating the sphere partition functions of 3d gauge theories with $\\mathcal{N}=4$ supersymmetry and a quiver structure of a $\\hat D$ Dynkin diagram (where each node is a unitary gauge group). As in the case of necklace ($\\hat A $) quivers, we can map the problem to that of free fermion quantum mechanics whose complicated Hamiltonian we find explicitly. Many of these theories are conjectured to be dual under mirror symmetry to certain unitary linear quivers with extra Sp nodes or antisymmetric hypermultiplets. We show that the free fermion formulations of such mirror pairs are related by a linear symplectic transformation. We then study the large N expansion of the partition function, which as in the case of the $\\hat A$-quivers is given to all orders in 1/N by an Airy function. We simplify the algorithm to calculate the numerical coefficients appearing in the Airy function and evaluate them for a wide class of $\\hat D$-quiver theories.

  17. Diagonalization of transfer matrix of supersymmetry $u_q(\\hat{sl}(m+1|n+1))$ chain with a boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    We study the supersymmetry $U_q(\\hat{sl}(M+1|N+1))$ analogue of the supersymmetric t-J model with a boundary, in the framework of the algebraic analysis method. We diagonalize the commuting transfer matrix by using the bosonization of the vertex operator associated with the quantum affine supersymmetry.

  18. Energy level alignment at the interface of NPB/HAT-CN/graphene for flexible organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eonseok; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Kang, Seong Jun; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is highly promising as an electrode for flexible optoelectronic devices due to its excellent conductivity and transparency. However, it is necessary to tailor its work function with a charge injection layer in order to obtain favorable energy level alignment for efficient charge injection. An adequate charge injection layer can only be chosen with the understanding of the interfacial electronic structure between a charge transport layer and an electrode. In this study, we investigated the energy level alignment of N,N‧-diphenyl-1,1‧-biphenyl-4,4‧-diamine (NPB)/hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN)/graphene using in situ ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The effective work function of graphene was significantly increased by 0.94 eV by the HAT-CN hole injection layer (HIL) due to the interface dipole formation. In addition, the charge generation barrier (CGB) between NPB and HAT-CN, which plays a decisive role in charge injection efficiency with a charge generation HIL, was measured to be 0.66 eV. This CGB on graphene is the same as the CGBs on other electrodes, and smaller than that of the widely-used MoO3 HIL. Therefore, HAT-CN could be a promising HIL for efficient flexible organic light-emitting diodes with a graphene anode.

  19. BALTIMORE’S M.S. LEVY AND SONS: Straw Hat Makers to the World, 1870-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica I. Elfenbein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1860 to 1960, Baltimore was an important center of the men’s ready-to- wear clothing industries. German-speaking Jews created many businesses that manufactured and sold underwear, men’s suits, and specialty items like hats and umbrellas. The straw hat making firm started by M.S. Levy is an interesting example of a Baltimore-based, family-owned niche business that existedfor 90 years, through three generations ofa singlefamily. The M.S. Levy and Sons story has two main chapters. The first covers the period from its founding by Michael Simon Levy in the 1870s through his son Julius’ death in 1926. This is the story of ascension. A premonition about the coming popularity of straw hats, together with a small but important technological breakthrough, positioned a family and a small industry for significant expansion. The second period began in 1930 with the introduction of wool felt hats and the death of William, M.S. Levy’s oldest son, and includes the Great Depression, unionization, merger, third generation leadership, and finally, in 1959, the family’s withdrawal from the industry. This later period, as told by grandsons of the founder, is the story of struggle followed by decline.

  20. Next-to-Leading Order Jet Physics with BlackHat

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, C F; Dixon, L J; Cordero, F Febres; Forde, D; Gleisberg, T; Ita, H; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D

    2009-01-01

    We present several results obtained using the BlackHat next-to-leading order QCD program library, in conjunction with SHERPA. In particular, we present distributions for vector boson plus 1,2,3-jet production at the Tevatron and at the asymptotic running energy of the Large Hadron Collider, including new Z+3-jet distributions. The Z+2-jet predictions for the second-jet P_T distribution are compared to CDF data. We present the jet-emission probability at NLO in W+2-jet events at the LHC, where the tagging jets are taken to be the ones furthest apart in pseudorapidity. We analyze further the large left-handed W polarization, identified in our previous study, for W bosons produced at high P_T at the LHC.

  1. Rayleigh scattering in the transmission spectrum of HAT-P-18b

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, J; Louden, T; Doyle, A P; Skillen, I; McCormac, J; Irwin, P G J; Karjalainen, R

    2016-01-01

    We have performed low-resolution ground-based transmission spectroscopy of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-18b using the ACAM instrument on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). We detect a bluewards slope extending across our optical transmission spectrum which runs from 4750 Ang to 9250 Ang. The slope is consistent with Rayleigh scattering at the equilibrium temperature of the planet. We do not detect enhanced sodium absorption, which indicates a high altitude haze is masking the feature and giving rise to the Rayleigh slope. Our detection of an opacity source within a hot Jupiter atmosphere demonstrates that ground-based observations can provide transmission spectra with precision comparable to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).

  2. A Near-Infrared Transmission Spectrum for the Warm Saturn HAT-P-12b

    CERN Document Server

    Line, Michael R; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee; Desert, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    We present a HST WFC3 transmission spectrum for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-12b. This warm (1000 K) sub-Saturn-mass planet has a smaller mass and a lower temperature than the hot-Jupiters that have been studied so far. We find that the planet's measured transmission spectrum lacks the expected water absorption feature for a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere, and is instead best-described by a model with high-altitude clouds. Using a frequentist hypothesis testing procedure, we can rule out a hydrogen-dominated cloud free atmosphere to 4.9$\\sigma$. When combined with other recent WFC3 studies, our observations suggest that clouds may be common in exo-planetary atmospheres.

  3. 3D spin-orbit angle of Kepler-25 and HAT-P-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benomar Othman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of discovered exoplanets now exceeds 1500, mostly due to the Kepler space instrument observations. Many of these planet orbit in less than a week around their host stars. This implies that the inward migration of those planets is a basic ingredient of successful theories of planet formation and evolution. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed periods, which lead to different orbit eccentricity and obliquity distributions. Here we summarise and discuss the results of obliquities for two Kepler stars: HAT-P-7 and Kepler-25. These are interesting stellar systems as we could carry out a joint analysis using asteroseismology, transit lightcurve and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in order to measure the three dimensional obliquity.

  4. Self-assembled ordered structures in thin films of HAT5 discotic liquid crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Morales

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of the discotic liquid crystal hexapentyloxytriphenylene (HAT5, prepared from solution via casting or spin-coating, were investigated by atomic force microscopy and polarizing optical microscopy, revealing large-scale ordered structures substantially different from those typically observed in standard samples of the same material. Thin and very long fibrils of planar-aligned liquid crystal were found, possibly formed as a result of an intermediate lyotropic nematic state arising during the solvent evaporation process. Moreover, in sufficiently thin films the crystallization seems to be suppressed, extending the uniform order of the liquid crystal phase down to room temperature. This should be compared to the bulk situation, where the same material crystallizes into a polymorphic structure at 68 °C.

  5. A cohort study of workers compensated for mercury intoxication following employment in the fur hat industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merler, E; Boffetta, P; Masala, G; Monechi, V; Bani, F

    1994-11-01

    This article presents the preliminary results of a follow-up study (1950-1992) of 1,146 subjects (person-years = 30,954; 23,055 for women) receiving compensation for mercury poisoning. In a province of Tuscany in central Italy, severe exposure to mercury occurred during fur hat production. A deficit in all causes of mortality was observed in both sexes, whereas mortality due to cancer was slightly higher than expected. Mortality from stomach cancer was significantly elevated for men and women. A significant excess of lung cancer was observed in women only. Whereas the excess of stomach cancer probably reflects elevated rates in the study area rather than exposure to mercury, the excess of lung cancer mortality does appear to be related to mercury exposure. Smoking habits or other exposures at work do not seem to explain the excess of lung cancer.

  6. Successful Asteroseismology for a Better Characterization of the Exoplanet HAT-P-7b

    CERN Document Server

    Oshagh, M; Benomar, O; Dupret, M -A; Monteiro, M J P F G; Scuflaire, R; Santos, N C

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that asteroseismology is the unique technique permitting the study of the internal structure of pulsating stars using their pulsational frequencies, which is per se very important. It acquires an additional value when the star turns out to be a planet host. In this case, the asteroseismic study output may be a very important input for the study of the planetary system. With this in mind, we use the large time-span of the Kepler public data obtained for the star system HAT-P-7, first to perform an asteroseismic study of the pulsating star using Time-Dependent-Convection (TDC) models. Secondly, we make a revision of the planet properties in the light of the asteroseismic study.

  7. HAT-P-55b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Juncher, D; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Bieryla, A; Kovács, T; Boisse, I; Latham, D W; Kovács, G; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Penev, K; de Val-Borro, M; Falco, E; Torres, G; Noyes, R W; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new transiting extrasolar planet, HAT-P-55b. The planet orbits a V = 13.207 +/- 0.039 sun-like star with a mass of 1.013 +/- 0.037 solar masses, a radius of 1.011 +/- 0.036 solar radii and a metallicity of -0.03 +/- 0.08. The planet itself is a typical hot Jupiter with a period of 3.5852467 +/- 0.0000064 days, a mass of 0.582 +/- 0.056 Jupiter masses and a radius of 1.182 +/- 0.055 Jupiter radii. This discovery adds to the increasing sample of transiting planets with measured bulk densities, which is needed to put constraints on models of planetary structure and formation theories.

  8. Wave turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave Turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well-suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wavenumber, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bo...

  9. "It's your badge of inclusion": the Red Hat Society as a gendered subculture of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E; Pai, Manacy; Redmond, Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    Although studies document the health-enhancing effects of social engagement, they reveal little about the underlying mechanisms operating within specific organizational contexts. Limited attention is given to the role of inequality--particularly age and gender--in shaping either the organizations to which we belong or their consequences for our well-being. We address this issue by examining the Red Hat Society, a social organization for middle-aged and older women. Interviews with members (n=52) illustrate how age and gender inequality interact to shape the organization, which can be viewed as a gendered subculture of aging. Drawing on this framework, we discuss four processes through which participation generates benefits for older women involved in age- and gender-segregated organizations: enhancing social networks, countering invisibility, creating positive frames for aging experiences, and promoting youthful identities.

  10. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  11. High-harmonic and terahertz wave spectroscopy (HATS) for aligned molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yindong; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Lü, Zhihui; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-01-01

    We present the experimental and theoretical details of our recent published letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115. 123002] on synchronized high-harmonic and terahertz-wave spectroscopy (HATS) from nonadiabatically aligned nitrogen molecules in dual-color laser fields. Associating the alignment-angle dependent terahertz wave generation with the synchronizing high-harmonic signal, the angular differential photoionization cross section (PICS) for molecules can be reconstructed, and the minima of the angle on PICS show great convergence between the theoretical predictions and the experimental deduced results. We also show the optimal relative phase between the dual-color laser fields for terahertz wave generation dose not change with the alignment angle at a precision of $50$ attoseconds. This all-optical method provides an alternative for investigating molecular structures and dynamics.

  12. Viscous Chaplygin Gas Models as a Spherical Top-Hat Collapsing Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Jawad, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We study the spherical top-hat collapse in Einstein gravity and loop quantum cosmology by taking the non-linear evolution of viscous modified variable chaplygin gas and viscous generalized cosmic chaplygin gas. We calculate the equation of state parameter, square speed of sound, perturbed equation of state parameter, perturbed square speed of sound, density contrast and divergence of peculiar velocity in perturbed region and discussed their behavior. It is observed that both chaplygin gas models support the spherical collapse in Einstein as well as loop quantum cosmology because density contrast remains positive in both cases and the perturbed equation of state parameter remains positive at the present epoch as well as near future. It is remarked here that these parameters provide the consistence results for both chaplygin gas models in both gravities.

  13. Neues in der Varizenchirurgie: Welche Bedeutung hat die Chirurgie in Zeiten von Laser, Schaum und Radiofrequenz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assadian A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Therapie der Stammvarikose der Vena saphena magna und parva hat in den vergangenen 10 Jahren einen Innovationsschub erlebt. Mehrere neue – mehrheitlich der Crossektomie und Stripping gegenüber als überlegen dargestellte – ausschließlich endoluminale Therapieoptionen haben den Markt erobert. Die Operation ist sicher nicht mehr für alle Patienten und alle Indikationen die optimale Therapie, die derzeitige Evidenz steht jedoch im krassen Gegensatz zur mehrheitlich aus merkantilen Absichten geführten Diskussion. Aus der derzeitigen Evidenzlage und Erfahrung sind sehr großlumige ( 10 mm, geschlängelte Stammvarizen mit ausgeprägten Seitenästen weiterhin chirurgisch besser versorgt. Auch ist ein BMI 27 als Risikofaktor für Rekanalisation nach endoluminalem Verfahren zu sehen.

  14. HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Reinflation of Close-in Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Penev, K.; Bieryla, A.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Torres, G.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Buchhave, L.; Kovács, T.; Quinn, S.; Howard, A. W.; Isaacson, H.; Fulton, B. J.; Everett, M. E.; Esquerdo, G.; Béky, B.; Szklenar, T.; Falco, E.; Santerne, A.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Burrows, A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 and 2.9721 days, masses of 0.527+/- 0.083 {M}{{J}} and 0.783+/- 0.057 {M}{{J}}, and inflated radii of 1.89+/- 0.13 {R}{{J}} and {1.59}-0.10+0.16 {R}{{J}}, respectively. They orbit moderately bright (V=13.145+/- 0.029 and V=12.993+/- 0.052) stars of mass 1.212+/- 0.050 {M}⊙ and {1.255}-0.054+0.107 {M}⊙ . The stars are at the main-sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false-alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correlation between the radii of planets and the fractional ages of their hosts is fully explained by the known correlation between planetary radii and their present-day equilibrium temperatures; however, if the zero-age main-sequence equilibrium temperature is used in place of the present-day equilibrium temperature, then a correlation with age must also be included to explain the planetary radii. This suggests that, after contracting during the pre-main-sequence, close-in giant planets are reinflated over time due to the increasing level of irradiation received from their host stars. Prior theoretical work indicates that such a dynamic response to irradiation requires a significant fraction of the incident energy to be deposited deep within the planetary interiors. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology

  15. Kepler and Ground-Based Transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro V.; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W.; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Haase, Plynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp = 4.31 R xor 0.06 R xor and Rs = 0.683 R solar mass 0.009 R solar mass, both about 3 sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases 0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12 deg 5 deg to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  16. TCUP: A Novel hAT Transposon Active in Maize Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan M; Hansey, Candice N; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are capable of inducing heritable de novo genetic variation. The sequences capable of reactivation, and environmental factors that induce mobilization, remain poorly defined even in well-studied genomes such as maize. We treated maize tissue culture with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2-deoxcytidine and examined long-term tissue culture lines to discover silenced TEs that have the potential to induce heritable genetic variation. Through these screens we have identified a novel low copy number hAT transposon, Tissue Culture Up-Regulated (TCUP), which is transcribed at high levels in long-term maize black Mexican sweet (BMS) tissue culture and is transcribed in response to treatment with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine. Analysis of the TIGR Maize Gene Index revealed that this element is the most frequently represented EST from the BMS cell culture library and is not represented in other tissue libraries, which is the basis for its name. A full-length sequence was assembled in inbred B73 that contains the putative functional motifs required for autonomous movement of a hAT transposon. Transposon display detected novel TCUP insertions in two long-term tissue-cultured cell lines of the genotype Hi-II A × B and BMS. This research implicates TCUP as a transposon that is capable of reactivation and which may also be particularly sensitive to the stress of the tissue culture environment. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that epigenetic alterations potentiate genomic responses to stress during clonal propagation of plants.

  17. TCUP: A novel hAT transposon active in maize tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eSmith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are capable of inducing heritable de novo genetic variation. The sequences capable of reactivation, and environmental factors that induce mobilization, remain poorly defined even in well-studied genomes such as maize. We treated maize tissue culture with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2-deoxcytidine and examined long-term tissue culture lines to discover silenced transposable elements that have the potential to induce heritable genetic variation. Through these screens we have identified a novel low copy number hAT transposon, Tissue Culture Up-Regulated (TCUP, which is transcribed at high levels in long-term maize Black Mexican Sweet (BMS tissue culture and up-regulated in response to treatment with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine. Analysis of the TIGR Maize Gene Index revealed that this element is the most frequently represented EST from the BMS cell culture library and is not represented in other tissue libraries, which is the basis for its name. A full-length sequence was assembled in inbred B73 that contains the putative functional motifs required for autonomous movement of a hAT transposon. Transposon display detected movement of TCUP in two long-term tissue cultured cell lines of the genotype Hi-II AxB and BMS. This research implicates TCUP as a transposon that is capable of reactivation and which may also be particularly sensitive to the stress of the tissue culture environment. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that epigenetic alterations potentiate genomic responses to stress during clonal propagation of plants.

  18. HATS-3b: An Inflated Hot Jupiter Transiting an F-type Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Conroy, P.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D. D.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of Mp = 1.07 M J, and radius of Rp = 1.38 R J. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s-1), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T eff parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s-1. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU.

  19. Hermitian hat wavelet design for singularity detection in the Paraguay river-level data analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.; Sa, Leonardo D.; Li, Weigang

    1997-04-01

    The direct differentiation of a noisy signal ds/dt is known to be inaccurate. Differentiation can be improved by employing the Dirac (delta) -function introduced into a convolution product denoted by (direct product) and then integrated by parts: ds/dt equals ds/dt (direct product) (delta) equals - s (direct product) d(delta) /dt. The Schwartz Gaussian representation of the delta function is then explicitly used in the differentiation. It turns out that such a convolution approach to the first and the second derivatives produces a pair of mother wavelets the combination of which is the complex generalization of the Mexican hat called a Hermitian hat wavelet. It is shown that the Hermitian filter is a single oscillation wavelet having much lower frequency bandwidth than the Mortlet or Gabor wavelet. As a result of Nyquist theorem, a fewer number of grid points would be needed for the discrete convolution operation. Therefore, the singularity characteristic will not be overly smeared and the noise can be smoothed away. The phase plot of the Hermitian wavelet transform in terms of the time scale and frequency domains reveal a bifurcation discontinuity of a noisy cusp singularity at the precise location of the singularity as well as the scale nature of the underlying dynamics. This phase plot is defined as (theta) (t/a) equals tan-1 [(ds/dt)/(-d2s/dt2] equals tan-1 [((d(delta) (t/a)dt) (direct product) s)/((d2(delta) (t/a)/dt2) (direct product) s)] applied to a real world data of the Paraguay river levels.

  20. Paleomagnetic dating of burial diagenesis in Mississippian carbonates, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumstein, Angela M.; Elmore, R. Douglas; Engel, Michael H.; Elliot, Crawford; Basu, Ankan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study is to test models for the origin of widespread secondary magnetizations in the Mississippian Deseret Limestone. The Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone is a source rock for hydrocarbons, and modeling studies indicate that it entered the oil window in the Early Cretaceous during the Sevier orogeny. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Deseret Limestone and the stratigraphically equivalent Chainman Shale in central and western Utah indicate that the units contain two ancient magnetizations residing in magnetite. Burial temperatures are too low for the magnetizations to be thermoviscous in origin, and they are interpreted to be chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs). Fold tests from western Utah indicate the presence of a prefolding Triassic to Jurassic CRM. Geochemical (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, and δ18O) and petrographic analyses suggest that externally derived fluids did not alter these rocks. This CRM was acquired at the beginning of the oil window and is interpreted to be the result of burial diagenesis of organic matter. A second younger CRM in western central Utah is apparently postfolding and is probably Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary in age. On the basis of the thermal modeling, the timing overlaps with the oil window. These results are consistent with a connection between organic matter maturation and remagnetization. Modeling of the smectite-to-illite transformation in the Deseret Limestone suggests a mean age prior to acquisition of both CRMs, although the range for illitization overlaps with the Triassic to Jurassic CRM. The results of this study support the hypothesis that pervasive CRMs can be related to burial diagenetic processes. In addition, paleomagnetism can be used to determine the timing of such processes, which can benefit hydrocarbon exploration efforts.

  1. General Investigation Reconnaissance Report Provo and Vicinity, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Provo River from mid-May through mid-July ( Mizzi 1996 pers. com.). No fish species are known to occur in the eastside drainages due to the ephemeral...on cliffs or rocky places.1 Counties, Utah. 1 Zeiner et al. 1990 7 Peterson 1996 pers. com. Ŗ Nunn 1996 pers. com. s Mizzi 1996 pers. com. 3 60...riparian habitats of the Great Basin region: a community profile. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Biological Report 85(7.24). Mizzi , J. October 24, 1996

  2. Source Analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, Mine Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Douglas S.; Ford, Sean R.; Walter, William R.

    2008-07-01

    Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on 6 August 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show that the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional noncollapse source component that represents either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine.

  3. University of Utah Oil Sand Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the Oil Sand Research and Development Program at the University of Utah will be presented. It will include resource characterization of the Uinta Basin oils and deposits and bitumens and bitumen-derived liquid recovery and upgrading technology and product utilization. The characterization studies will include the Whiterocks and Asphalt Ridge oil sands. The discussion of recovery and upgrading technologies will include aqueous separation, thermal recovery processes; solvent extraction, and thermal and catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen-derived heavy oils. Product evaluation studies will include jet fuels, diesel fuel, asphalt and specialty chemicals. Plans for the future of the project will be discussed.

  4. Imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities in the PBMCs of patients with ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis and influence of HDAC inhibitors on TNF alpha production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Toussirot

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Acetylation or deacetylation of histone proteins may modulate cytokine gene transcription such as TNF alpha (TNF. We evaluated the balance between histone deacetytlase (HDAC and histone acetyltransferase (HAT in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA or ankylosing spondylitis (AS compared to healthy controls (HC and determined the influence of HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A -TSA- or Sirtinol -Sirt- on these enzymatic activities and on the PBMC production of TNF. METHODS: 52 patients with RA, 21 with AS and 38 HC were evaluated. HAT and HDAC activities were measured on nuclear extracts from PBMC using colorimetric assays. Enzymatic activities were determined prior to and after ex vivo treatment of PBMC by TSA or Sirt. TNF levels were evaluated in PBMC culture supernatants in the absence or presence of TSA or Sirt. RESULTS: HAT and HDAC activities were significantly reduced in AS, while these activities reached similar levels in RA and HC. Ex vivo treatment of PBMC by HDACi tended to decrease HDAC expression in HC, but Sirt significantly reduced HAT in RA. TNF production by PBMC was significantly down-regulated by Sirt in HC and AS patients. CONCLUSION: HAT and HDAC were disturbed in AS while no major changes were found in RA. HDACi may modulate HDAC and HAT PBMC expression, especially Sirt in RA. Sirtinol was able to down regulate TNF production by PBMC in HC and AS. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities might provide the rationale for the development of HDACi in the therapeutic approach to inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  5. A randomized phase 2 study exploring the role of bevacizumab and a chemotherapy-free approach in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer: The HAT study (BOOG 2008-2003), a Dutch Breast Cancer Research Group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drooger, Jan C; van Tinteren, Harm; de Groot, Steffen M; Ten Tije, Albert J; de Graaf, Hiltje; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Jager, Agnes; Honkoop, Aafke; Linn, Sabine C; Kroep, Judith R; Erdkamp, Frans L G; Hamberg, Paul; Imholz, Alex L T; van Rossum-Schornagel, Quirine C; Heijns, Joan B; van Leeuwen-Stok, A Elise; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    To explore the role of bevacizumab and a chemotherapy-free approach, the authors evaluated the combination of bevacizumab, trastuzumab, and paclitaxel (HAT) and the regimen of trastuzumab and bevacizumab (HA) with the addition of paclitaxel after progression (HA-HAT) as first-line treatment for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer. In a noncomparative phase 2 trial, patients were randomized between HAT and HA-HAT. The primary endpoint was the progression-free rate at 1 year (1-year PFR). In the HA-HAT group, progression-free survival (PFS) was separately established for HA (PFS1) and HAT (PFS2). Eighty-four patients received HAT (n = 39) or HA-HAT (n = 45). The 1-year PFR was 74.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.8%-89.4%) and 62.2% (95% CI, 49.6%-89.4%) in the HAT and HA-HAT arms, respectively. The median PFS was 19.8 months (95% CI, 14.9-25.6 months) in the HAT arm and 19.6 months (95% CI, 12.0-32.0 months) in the HA-HAT arm. In the HA-HAT arm, the median PFS1 was 10.4 months (95% CI, 6.2-15.0 months), and the median PFS2 was 8.2 months (95% CI, 7.0-12.6 months). The number and severity of adverse events were comparable between the arms. Both HAT and HA-HAT have promising activity in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. In particular, starting with only targeted agents and delaying chemotherapy is worth further exploration. Cancer 2016;122:2961-2970. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Perceptions and realities: progressive reform and Utah coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of the Hepburn Act by the United States Congress in 1906 led to intensive federal trust busting aimed particularly at railroad monopolies. As part of this effort, the Gould-owned Rio Grande Western Railroad (later the Denver and Rio Grande) came under fire for its coal monopoly in Utah. The government was continually at a disadvantage during the eleven years of litigation for a variety of reasons and could not win its suit. The antagonists finally reached a negotiated settlement. It was not only very unpopular with the public but destroyed local hopes for widespread change connected with concurrent development of independently-owned mines. Unfortunately, many of the new independent developers also faced federal attack for coal lands irregularities. When America entered the Great War, the United States government demanded that businesses cooperate, not compete. Wartime nationalization of industries improved production and recognized independent ascendancy in Utah coal. Once the mines returned to private ownership at war's end, owners actively combined to combat recession. An oligopoly replaced the old railroad monopoly. Little alteration in corporate structure has resulted since. Energy companies replaced the old independents in the late 1970s and early 1980s, but the pattern of ownership established during the Progressive Era still remains.

  7. Drug Poisoning Deaths according to Ethnicity in Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray M. Merrill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes drug-related deaths according to ethnicity in Utah during 2005–2010, based on data from the Utah Violent Death Reporting System (UTVDRS. Hispanics made up 12.1% (12.5% male and 11.7% female of deaths. The most frequently identified drugs among decedents were opiates, then illicit drugs, benzodiazepines, over-the-counter medication, and antidepressants. Death rates for each drug were significantly greater in non-Hispanics than Hispanics. Most decedents used a combination of drugs. For each combination, rates were significantly greater for non-Hispanics than Hispanics, with an exception for opiates and illicit drugs combined, where there was no significant difference. Approximately 79% of non-Hispanics and 65% of Hispanics had one or more of the selected problems (e.g., mental, physical, or crisis related. Rates for each combination of problems were significantly greater in non-Hispanics, with the exception of crisis. Hispanics were less affected by the rise in prescription drug abuse. Hispanic decedents had a greater proportion of illegal drugs, consistent with it being more difficult to obtain prescription drugs. Hispanic decedents were less likely to have physical and mental health problems, which may be related to a smaller chance of diagnosis of such problems through the healthcare system.

  8. Practitioner profiles and practice patterns for marriage and family therapists in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T S; Palmer, T R

    2001-07-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of practitioner profiles and practice patterns for marriage and family therapists (MFTs) in Utah. A sample of 77 clinical members of the Utah Association for Marriage and Family Therapy provided descriptive information on their demographics, training, years of experience, and specific information about their practice of MFT. The findings indicate that clinical members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy in Utah are a mostly male, white, and highly educated group of practitioners who hold primary licensure in MFT and identify themselves primarily as MFTs. Similarities and differences with practice patterns research in Minnesota and 15 other states are discussed.

  9. Structure of the Hat Creek graben region: Implications for the structure of the Hat Creek graben and transfer of right-lateral shear from the Walker Lane north of Lassen Peak, northern California, from gravity and magnetic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, Victoria; Jachens, Robert C.; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of magnetic and new gravity data provides constraints on the geometry of the Hat Creek Fault, the amount of right-lateral offset in the area between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak, and confirmation of the influence of pre-existing structure on Quaternary faulting. Neogene volcanic rocks coincide with short-wavelength magnetic anomalies of both normal and reversed polarity, whereas a markedly smoother magnetic field occurs over the Klamath Mountains and its Paleogene cover. Although the magnetic field over the Neogene volcanic rocks is complex, the Hat Creek Fault, which is one of the most prominent normal faults in the region and forms the eastern margin of the Hat Creek Valley, is marked by the eastern edge of a north-trending magnetic and gravity high 20-30 km long. Modeling of these anomalies indicates that the fault is a steeply dipping (~75-85°) structure. The spatial relationship of the fault as modeled by the potential-field data, the youngest strand of the fault, and relocated seismicity suggests that deformation continues to step westward across the valley, consistent with a component of right-lateral slip in an extensional environment. Filtered aeromagnetic data highlight a concealed magnetic body of Mesozoic or older age north of Hat Creek Valley. The body’s northwest margin strikes northeast and is linear over a distance of ~40 km. Within the resolution of the aeromagnetic data (1-2 km), we discern no right-lateral offset of this body. Furthermore, Quaternary faults change strike or appear to end, as if to avoid this concealed magnetic body and to pass along its southeast edge, suggesting that pre-existing crustal structure influenced younger faulting, as previously proposed based on gravity data.

  10. Red Hat Linux 9.0中的磁盘配额设计与实现%The Design and Realization of the Magnetic - Dise quota of Red Hat Linux 9.0

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李维仙; 赵京涛; 李国锋

    2005-01-01

    文章介绍了在Red Hat Linux 9.0中实施磁盘配额的必要性,实现磁盘配额的条件,以及如何实施磁盘配额和配额管理,从而能够实现对用户空间的限制,避免了硬盘空间的浪费.

  11. A model for the postcollapse equilibrium of cosmological structure truncated isothermal spheres from top-hat density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, P R; Raga, A C; Shapiro, Paul R.; Iliev, Ilian; Raga, Alejandro C.

    1998-01-01

    The postcollapse structure of objects which form by gravitational condensation out of the expanding cosmological background universe is a key element in the theory of galaxy formation. Towards this end, we have reconsidered the outcome of the nonlinear growth of a uniform, spherical density perturbation in an unperturbed background universe - the cosmological ``top-hat'' problem. We adopt the usual assumption that the collapse to infinite density at a finite time predicted by the top-hat solution is interrupted by a rapid virialization caused by the growth of small-scale inhomogeneities in the initial perturbation. We replace the standard description of the postcollapse object as a uniform sphere in virial equilibrium by a more self-consistent one as a truncated, nonsingular, isothermal sphere in virial and hydrostatic equilibrium, including for the first time a proper treatment of the finite-pressure boundary condition on the sphere. The results differ significantly from both the uniform sphere and the singu...

  12. Detection of DNA Hypomethylation Mediated Floral Induction in Longan and Spinach Using the HAT-RAPD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anuntalabhochai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the HAT-RAPD technique was used to detect DNA methylation in the four plant species, rice (Oryza sativa, petunia (Petunia hybrida, spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. and longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour., which were treated using 5-azacytidine, potassium chlorate (KClO3 and a low temperature induction. Rice and petunia were chosen to be induced because in these species it is known that 5-azacytidine is able to induce hypomethylation in their genomes leading to morphological changes, in particular floral induction, in the developing plants. Using the HAT-RAPD technique, DNA methylation was detected using the restriction enzymes HpaII and MspI in rice and petunia (as expected and in spinach, but was found to be absent in longan, which suggests that floral induction in longan is undetectable in longan.

  13. Broad-band spectrophotometry of HAT-P-32 b: search for a scattering signature in the planetary spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallonn, M.; Bernt, I.; Herrero, E.; Hoyer, S.; Kirk, J.; Wheatley, P. J.; Seeliger, M.; Mackebrandt, F.; von Essen, C.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Granzer, T.; Künstler, A.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Gaitan, J.

    2016-11-01

    Multicolour broad-band transit observations offer the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet with small- to medium-sized telescopes. One of the most favourable targets is the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32 b. We combined 21 new transit observations of this planet with 36 previously published light curves for a homogeneous analysis of the broad-band transmission spectrum from the Sloan u' band to the Sloan z' band. Our results rule out cloud-free planetary atmosphere models of solar metallicity. Furthermore, a discrepancy at reddest wavelengths to previously published results makes a recent tentative detection of a scattering feature less likely. Instead, the available spectral measurements of HAT-P-32 b favour a completely flat spectrum from the near-UV to the near-IR. A plausible interpretation is a thick cloud cover at high altitudes.

  14. Broad-band spectrophotometry of HAT-P-32 b: Search for a scattering signature in the planetary spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Mallonn, M; Herrero, E; Hoyer, S; Kirk, J; Wheatley, P J; Seeliger, M; Mackebrandt, F; von Essen, C; Strassmeier, K G; Granzer, T; Künstler, A; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Gaitan, J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-colour broad-band transit observations offer the opportunity to characterise the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet with small- to medium-sized telescopes. One of the most favourable targets is the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32 b. We combined 21 new transit observations of this planet with 36 previously published light curves for a homogeneous analysis of the broad-band transmission spectrum from the Sloan u' band to the Sloan z' band. Our results rule out cloud-free planetary atmosphere models of solar metallicity. Furthermore, a discrepancy at reddest wavelengths to previously published results makes a recent tentative detection of a scattering feature less likely. Instead, the available spectral measurements of HAT-P-32 b favour a completely flat spectrum from the near-UV to the near-IR. A plausible interpretation is a thick cloud cover at high altitudes.

  15. A Damage Tolerance Comparison of Composite Hat-Stiffened and Honeycomb Sandwich Structure for Launch Vehicle Interstage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a direct comparison of the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of impact-damaged, hat-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich structure for launch vehicle use was made. The specimens used consisted of small substructure designed to carry a line load of approx..3,000 lb/in. Damage was inflicted upon the specimens via drop weight impact. Infrared thermography was used to examine the extent of planar damage in the specimens. The specimens were prepared for compression testing to obtain residual compression strength versus damage severity curves. Results show that when weight of the structure is factored in, both types of structure had about the same CAI strength for a given damage level. The main difference was that the hat-stiffened specimens exhibited a multiphase failure whereas the honeycomb sandwich structure failed catastrophically.

  16. HAT-P-2b: A Super-Massive Planet in an Eccentric Orbit Transiting a Bright Star

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G A; Torres, G; Fischer, D A; Latham, D W; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D D; Mazeh, T; Shporer, A; Butler, R P; Stefanik, R P; Fernández, J M; Sozzetti, A; Pal, A; Johnson, J; Marcy, G W; Sipocz, B; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sari, P

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-2b, a massive (Mp=8.17+/-0.72 M_Jup) planet transiting the bright (V=8.7) F8 star HD 147506, with an orbital period of 5.63 days and an eccentricity of e=0.5. From the transit light curve we determine that the radius of the planet is Rp = 1.18+/-0.16 R_Jup. HAT-P-2b has a mass about 9 times the average mass of previously-known transiting exoplanets, and a density of rho = 6.6gcm^-3, similar to that of rocky planets like the Earth. Nevertheless, its mass and radius are in accord with theories of structure of massive giant planets composed of pure H and He. The high eccentricity causes a 9-fold variation of insolation of the planet between peri- and apastron.

  17. Standard Model evaluation of $\\varepsilon_K$ using lattice QCD inputs for $\\hat{B}_K$ and $V_{cb}$

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Jon A; Lee, Weonjong; Park, Sungwoo

    2015-01-01

    We report the Standard Model evaluation of the indirect CP violation parameter $\\varepsilon_K$ using inputs from lattice QCD: the kaon bag parameter $\\hat{B}_K$, $\\xi_0$, $|V_{us}|$ from the $K_{\\ell 3}$ and $K_{\\mu 2}$ decays, and $|V_{cb}|$ from the axial current form factor for the exclusive decay $\\bar{B} \\to D^* \\ell \\bar{\

  18. Occurrence and HAT-RAPD analysis of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Preeyaporn Butboonchoo; Chalobol Wongsawad

    2015-01-01

    The present study determined the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred and twenty domestic chickens were purchased from villages in four districts of Phayao province; Mae Chai, Dok Khamtai, Chun and Chiang Kham. Morphological differences were used to identify the helminth species, and HAT-RAPD technique was used to differentiate among closely related species. The results reve...

  19. Top Hat HELLISH (Hot electron light emitting and lasing in heterostructures)

    CERN Document Server

    Wah, J Y

    2003-01-01

    Hot electron light emitting and lasing in semiconductor heterostructures (HELLISH) is a longitudinal transport structure comprising of a GaAs Quantum Well within an Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As pn junction. The light emission from the HELLISH device was previously believed to be merely due to hot electron effects. In the current work, we showed, however, that the device can be operated even at low applied electric fields where the hot electron effects are essentially negligible. Thus, a novel model for operation with the new concept of 'quasi-flatband condition' is introduced. In order to investigate new functionalities of the HELLISH devices, a new structure with longer p-channel, nicknamed Top Hat HELLISH (THH), is also fabricated and demonstrated. In terms of the energy band profile, the HELLISH device has a monotonic build-in potential barrier along the heterojunction. The operation is through tilting the bands and hence allowing carrier diffusion into the active region under the quasi-flatband condit...

  20. Bayesian estimation inherent in a Mexican-hat-type neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Brain functions, such as perception, motor control and learning, and decision making, have been explained based on a Bayesian framework, i.e., to decrease the effects of noise inherent in the human nervous system or external environment, our brain integrates sensory and a priori information in a Bayesian optimal manner. However, it remains unclear how Bayesian computations are implemented in the brain. Herein, I address this issue by analyzing a Mexican-hat-type neural network, which was used as a model of the visual cortex, motor cortex, and prefrontal cortex. I analytically demonstrate that the dynamics of an order parameter in the model corresponds exactly to a variational inference of a linear Gaussian state-space model, a Bayesian estimation, when the strength of recurrent synaptic connectivity is appropriately stronger than that of an external stimulus, a plausible condition in the brain. This exact correspondence can reveal the relationship between the parameters in the Bayesian estimation and those in the neural network, providing insight for understanding brain functions.

  1. Stellar rotation-planetary orbit period commensurability in the HAT-P-11 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Béky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Kipping, David M., E-mail: bbeky@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    A number of planet host stars have been observed to rotate with a period equal to an integer multiple of the orbital period of their close planet. We expand this list by analyzing Kepler data of HAT-P-11 and finding a period ratio of 6:1. In particular, we present evidence for a long-lived spot on the stellar surface that is eclipsed by the planet in the same position four times, every sixth transit. We also identify minima in the out-of-transit light curve and confirm that their phase with respect to the stellar rotation is mostly stationary for the 48 month time frame of the observations, confirming the proposed rotation period. For comparison, we apply our methods to Kepler-17 and confirm the findings of Bonomo and Lanza that the period ratio is not exactly 8:1 in that system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis on how interactions between a star and its planet could possibly result in an observed commensurability for systems where the stellar differential rotation profile happens to include a period at some latitude that is commensurable to the planetary orbit.

  2. Intensity and Pattern of Land Surface Temperature in Hat Yai City, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonyanuch RUTHIRAKO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Land Surface Temperature (LST is an important factor in global climate. LST is governed by surface heat fluxes, which are affected by urbanization. In order to understand urban climate, LST needs to be examined. This study aimed to investigate the intensity and pattern of LST and examine the relationships between LST and the characteristics of urban land use, indices, and population density in Hat Yai City. Landsat 5TM images were used for interpretation of land use characteristics and derivation of LST, normalized difference built-up index (NDBI and normalized vegetation index (NDVI. The characteristics of land use were classified into 4 types: commercial/high density residential, medium density residential, minimum density residential and vegetation cover/park. The average maximum and minimum LST derived from Landsat 5TM were 25.9, 33.7 and 15.8 °C, respectively. The areas with high LST were located principally in central built-up areas, slightly northwest-southeast of the study area, including the commercial center and the newly expanded residential areas. The LST pattern was well related to land use types and population density. The relationship between LST and NDVI however portrayed negative correlation, while that between LST and NDBI highlighted a positive correlation. It is concluded that NDVI and NDBI can be used to evaluate the risk of Urban Heat Island (UHI and may help city managers better prepare for possible impacts of climate change.

  3. Stellar rotation--planetary orbit period commensurability in the HAT-P-11 system

    CERN Document Server

    Béky, Bence; Kipping, David M; Noyes, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    A number of planet-host stars have been observed to rotate with a period equal to an integer multiple of the orbital period of their close planet. We expand this list by analyzing Kepler data of HAT-P-11 and finding a period ratio of 6:1. In particular, we present evidence for a long-lived spot on the stellar surface that is eclipsed by the planet in the same position four times, every sixth transit. We also identify minima in the out-of-transit lightcurve and confirm that their phase with respect to the stellar rotation is mostly stationary for the 48-month timeframe of the observations, confirming the proposed rotation period. For comparison, we apply our methods to Kepler-17 and confirm the findings of Bonomo & Lanza (2012) that the period ratio is not exactly 8:1 in that system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis on how interactions between a star and its planet could possibly result in an observed commensurability for systems where the stellar differential rotation profile happens to include a period a...

  4. HAT-P-7: A Retrograde or Polar Orbit, and a Second Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, Joshua N; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Crossfield, Ian J; Holman, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    We show that the exoplanet HAT-P-7b has an extremely tilted orbit, with a true angle of at least 86 degrees with respect to its parent star's equatorial plane, and a strong possibility of retrograde motion. We also report evidence for a second planet in a more distant orbit. The evidence for the unparalleled orbit and the additional planet is based on precise observations of the star's apparent radial velocity. The anomalous radial velocity due to rotation (the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect) was found to be a blueshift during the first half of the transit and a redshift during the second half, an inversion of the usual effect, implying that the angle between the sky-projected orbital and stellar angular momentum vectors is 182.5 +/- 9.4 deg. The second planet is implicated by excess radial-velocity variation of the host star over 2 yr. Possibly, the second planet tilted the orbit of the inner planet through a close encounter or the Kozai effect.

  5. Improvement and evaluation of polymer-matrix composite panels with hat stiffeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hat-stiffened composite panels fabricated by co-curing technologies are widely used in the fuselage panel due to the good structural stability and high efficiency of axial load transferring. The bonding capability between the stiffener and skin is a primary criterion to assess the co-curing quality. In this paper, two reinforcement technologies of filling filler in the triangle region and adding split-stopping tape between the stiffener and skin were employed to improve the bonding capability. Effect of filler and split-stopping tape on the interface strength was analyzed, and the optimal size range of the filler and split-stopping tape were obtained. To improve the universality of application for the two reinforcement techniques, the filling coefficient of 0.62~0.77 and the split-stopping tape width coefficient of 0.56~0.67 were obtained by calculation. Results of the study can be used to develop other kinds of stiffened panels and will ultimately lead to optimized skin/stiffener designs.

  6. Hospital Acquired Thrombosis (HAT) Prevention in an Acute Hospital; A Single Centre Cross-Sectional Study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, MI

    2017-04-01

    Evidence based guidelines are effective in reducing incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) which is associated with morbidly, mortality and economic burden. This study aimed to identify the proportion of inpatients who had a VTE risk assessment (RA) performed and who received thromboprophylaxis (TP), in Cork University Hospital. There was no structured RA tool at the time; information was obtained from medical and drug charts to ascertain if a RA was performed. Patients were then RA by researchers and stratified as per NICE guidelines and the proportion who received TP was calculated. One thousand and nineteen inpatients were screened. Risk was documented in 24% of cases. TP was prescribed in 43.2% of inpatients. Following application of a RA tool >80% were at high risk of VTE with low risk of bleeding with TP prescription in 46.3% of inpatients. A national collaborative effort should be encouraged to develop a standardized approach for safe RA of inpatients and prescription of TP for prevention of HAT

  7. The retrograde orbit of the HAT-P-6b exoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébrard, G.; Ehrenreich, D.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Moutou, C.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Díaz, R. F.; Eggenberger, A.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2011-03-01

    We observed the transit of the HAT-P-6b exoplanet across its host star with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France). The resulting stellar radial velocities display the Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly and reveal a retrograde orbit: the planetary orbital spin and the stellar rotational spin point in approximately opposite directions. A fit to the anomaly measures a sky-projected angle λ = 166° ± 10° between these two spin axes. All seven known retrograde planets are hot Jupiters with masses Mp 4 MJup) are prograde but misaligned. Different mechanisms may therefore be responsible for planetary obliquities above and below ~3.5 MJup. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE Consortium (program 10A.PNP.CONS).SOPHIE radial velocities are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/527/L11

  8. Further constraints on the optical transmission spectrum of HAT-P-1b

    CERN Document Server

    Montalto, M; Santos, N C; Desidera, S; Martins, J H C; Figueira, P; Alonso, R; .,

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting Hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to $\\rm R_p/R_{\\star}$=(0.1159$\\pm$0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near infrared measurements of this object but differs from previously reported optical measurements being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over 5 different spectral bins 600\\AA$\\,$ wide we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 $\\rm\\sigma$ level) with a blue cut-off corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in between 6180-7400\\AA. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower t...

  9. Bayesian estimation inherent in a Mexican-hat-type neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Brain functions, such as perception, motor control and learning, and decision making, have been explained based on a Bayesian framework, i.e., to decrease the effects of noise inherent in the human nervous system or external environment, our brain integrates sensory and a priori information in a Bayesian optimal manner. However, it remains unclear how Bayesian computations are implemented in the brain. Herein, I address this issue by analyzing a Mexican-hat-type neural network, which was used as a model of the visual cortex, motor cortex, and prefrontal cortex. I analytically demonstrate that the dynamics of an order parameter in the model corresponds exactly to a variational inference of a linear Gaussian state-space model, a Bayesian estimation, when the strength of recurrent synaptic connectivity is appropriately stronger than that of an external stimulus, a plausible condition in the brain. This exact correspondence can reveal the relationship between the parameters in the Bayesian estimation and those in the neural network, providing insight for understanding brain functions.

  10. Point Source Detection using the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelet on simulated all-sky Planck maps

    CERN Document Server

    Vielva, P; Gallegos, J E; Toffolatti, L; Sanz, J L

    2003-01-01

    We present an estimation of the point source (PS) catalogue that could be extracted from the forthcoming ESA Planck mission data. We have applied the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelet in simulated all-sky maps that include CMB, Galactic emission, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and PS emission, as well as instrumental white noise. We have developed an algorithm focused on a fast optimal scale determination, that is crucial to achieve a PS catologue with a large number of detections and a low flux limit. An important effort has been also done to reduce the CPU time processor for spherical harmonic trans formation, in order to perform the PS detection in a reasonable time. The presented algorithm is able to provide a PS catalogue above fluxes: 1.39 Jy (857 GHz), 0.84 Jy (545 GHz), 0.30 Jy (353 GHz), 0.16 Jy (217 GHz), 0.17 Jy (143 GHz), 0.19 Jy (100 GHz HFI), 0.22 Jy (100 GHz LFI), 0.28 Jy (70 GHz), 0.33 Jy (44 GHz) and 0.37 Jy (30 GHz). We detect around 36700 PS at the highest frequency Planck channel and 2200 a...

  11. Space Radar Image of Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image of Salt Lake City, Utah, illustrates the different land use patterns that are present in the Utah Valley. Salt Lake City lies between the shores of the Great Salt Lake (the dark area on the left side of the image) and the Wasatch Front Range (the mountains in the upper half of the image). The Salt Lake City area is of great interest to urban planners because of the combination of lake, valley and alpine environments that coexist in the region. Much of the southern shore of the Great Salt Lake is a waterfowl management area. The green grid pattern in the right center of the image is Salt Lake City and its surrounding communities. The Salt Lake City airport is visible as the brown rectangle near the center of the image. Interstate Highway 15 runs from the middle right edge to the upper left of the image. The bright white patch east of Interstate 15 is the downtown area, including Temple Square and the state capitol. The University of Utah campus is the yellowish area that lies at the base of the mountains, east of Temple Square. The large reservoir in the lower left center is a mine tailings pond. The semi-circular feature in the mountains at the bottom edge of the image is the Kennecott Copper Mine. The area shown is 60 kilometers by 40 kilometers (37 miles by 25 miles) and is centered at 40.6 degrees north latitude, 112.0 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10, 1994. The colors in this image represent the following radar channels and polarizations: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  12. Anion-π recognition between [M(CN)6](3-) complexes and HAT(CN)6: structural matching and electronic charge density modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylarczyk, Jedrzej; Pinkowicz, Dawid; Srebro-Hooper, Monika; Hooper, James; Podgajny, Robert

    2017-03-14

    Hexacyanidometalates (M = Fe(III), Co(III)) and multisite anion receptor HAT(CN)6 (1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylenehexacarbonitrile) recognize each other in acetonitrile solution and self-assemble into the novel molecular networks (PPh4)3[M(CN)6][HAT(CN)6] (M = Fe, 1; Co, 2) and (AsPh4)3[M(CN)6][HAT(CN)6]·2MeCN·H2O (M = Fe, 3; Co, 4). 1-4 contain the stacked columns {[M(CN)6](3-);[HAT(CN)6]}∞ separated by the organic cations. All of the M-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N vectors point collectively towards the centroids of pyrazine rings on neighboring HAT(CN)6 molecules, with Ncyanidecentroidpyrazine distances that are under 3 Å. The directional character and structural parameters of the new supramolecular synthons correspond to collective triple anion-π interactions between the CN(-) ligands of the metal complexes and the π-deficient areas of HAT(CN)6. Physicochemical characterisation (IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry) and dispersion-corrected DFT studies reveal the dominating charge-transfer (CT) and polarisation characters of the interactions. The electronic density flow occurs from the CN(-) ligands of [M(CN)6](3-) to the HAT(CN)6 orbital systems and further, toward the peripheral -CN groups of HAT(CN)6. Solid-state DFT calculations determined the total interaction energy of HAT(CN)6 to be ca. -125 kcal mol(-1), which gives ca. -15 kcal mol(-1) per one CN(-)HAT(CN)6 contact after subtraction of the interaction with organic cations. The UV-Vis electronic absorption measurements prove that the intermolecular interactions persist in solution and suggest a 1 : 1 composition of the anion-π {[M(CN)6](3-);[HAT(CN)6]} chromophore, with the formation constant Kadd = (5.8 ± 6) × 10(2) dm(3) mol(-1) and the molar absorption coefficient εadd = 180 ± 9 cm(-1) dm(3) mol(-1) at 600 nm, as estimated from concentration-dependent studies.

  13. HAT-P-11b: A Super-Neptune Planet Transiting a Bright K Star in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G Á; Pál, A; Hartman, J; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R W; Latham, D W; Sasselov, D D; Sipőcz, B; Esquerdo, G A; Fischer, D A; Johnson, J A; Marcy, G W; Butler, R P; Isaacson, H; Howard, A; Vogt, S; Kovács, Gábor; Fernández, J; Moór, A; Stefanik, R P; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2009-01-01

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-11b, the smallest radius transiting extrasolar planet (TEP), and the first hot Neptune discovered to date by transit searches. HAT-P-11b orbits the bright (V=9.59) and metal rich ([Fe=H] = +0.31 +/- 0.05) K4 dwarf star GSC 03561-02092 with P = 4.8878162 +/- 0.0000071 days and produces a transit signal with depth of 4.2 mmag; the shallowest found by transit searches that is due to a confirmed planet. We present a global analysis of the available photometric and radial-velocity data that result in stellar and planetary parameters, with simultaneous treatment of systematic variations. The planet, like its near-twin GJ 436b, is somewhat larger than Neptune (17 Mearth, 3.8 Rearth) both in mass Mp = 0.081 +/- 0.009 MJup (25.8 +/- 2.9 Mearth) and radius Rp = 0.422 +/- 0.014 RJup (4.73 +/- 0.16 Rearth). HAT-P-11b orbits in an eccentric orbit with e = 0.198 +/- 0.046 and omega = 355.2 +/- 17.3 deg, causing a reflex motion of its parent star with amplitude 11.6 +/- 1.2 m/s, a challen...

  14. HST hot Jupiter Transmission Spectral Survey: A detection of Na and strong optical absorption in HAT-P-1b

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolov, N; Pont, F; Burrows, A S; Fortney, J J; Ballester, G E; Evans, T M; Huitson, C M; Wakeford, H R; Wilson, P A; Aigrain, S; Deming, D; Gibson, N P; Henry, G W; Knutson, H; Etangs, A Lecavelier des; Showman, A P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Zahnle, K

    2013-01-01

    We present an optical to near-infrared transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-1b, based on HST observations, covering the spectral regime from 0.29 to 1.027{\\mu}m with STIS, which is coupled with a recent WFC3 transit (1.087 to 1.687{\\mu}m). We derive refined physical parameters of the HAT-P-1 system, including an improved orbital ephemeris. The transmission spectrum shows a strong absorption signature shortward of 0.55{\\mu}m, with a strong blueward slope into the near-ultraviolet. We detect atmospheric sodium absorption at a 3.3{\\sigma} significance level, but find no evidence for the potassium feature. The red data implies a marginally flat spectrum with a tentative absorption enhancement at wavelength longer than ~0.85{\\mu}m. The STIS and WFC3 spectra differ significantly in absolute radius level (4.3 +/- 1.6 pressure scale heights), implying strong optical absorption in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b. The optical to near-infrared difference cannot be explained by stellar activity, as simulta- neous st...

  15. Fluctuations of hi-hat timing and dynamics in a virtuoso drum track of a popular music recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esa Räsänen

    Full Text Available Long-range correlated temporal fluctuations in the beats of musical rhythms are an inevitable consequence of human action. According to recent studies, such fluctuations also lead to a favored listening experience. The scaling laws of amplitude variations in rhythms, however, are widely unknown. Here we use highly sensitive onset detection and time series analysis to study the amplitude and temporal fluctuations of Jeff Porcaro's one-handed hi-hat pattern in "I Keep Forgettin'"-one of the most renowned 16th note patterns in modern drumming. We show that fluctuations of hi-hat amplitudes and interbeat intervals (times between hits have clear long-range correlations and short-range anticorrelations separated by a characteristic time scale. In addition, we detect subtle features in Porcaro's drumming such as small drifts in the 16th note pulse and non-trivial periodic two-bar patterns in both hi-hat amplitudes and intervals. Through this investigation we introduce a step towards statistical studies of the 20th and 21st century music recordings in the framework of complex systems. Our analysis has direct applications to the development of drum machines and to drumming pedagogy.

  16. Self adaptive multi-scale morphology AVG-Hat filter and its application to fault feature extraction for wheel bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feiyue; Yang, Shaopu; Tang, Guiji; Hao, Rujiang; Zhang, Mingliang

    2017-04-01

    Wheel bearings are essential mechanical components of trains, and fault detection of the wheel bearing is of great significant to avoid economic loss and casualty effectively. However, considering the operating conditions, detection and extraction of the fault features hidden in the heavy noise of the vibration signal have become a challenging task. Therefore, a novel method called adaptive multi-scale AVG-Hat morphology filter (MF) is proposed to solve it. The morphology AVG-Hat operator not only can suppress the interference of the strong background noise greatly, but also enhance the ability of extracting fault features. The improved envelope spectrum sparsity (IESS), as a new evaluation index, is proposed to select the optimal filtering signal processed by the multi-scale AVG-Hat MF. It can present a comprehensive evaluation about the intensity of fault impulse to the background noise. The weighted coefficients of the different scale structural elements (SEs) in the multi-scale MF are adaptively determined by the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The effectiveness of the method is validated by analyzing the real wheel bearing fault vibration signal (e.g. outer race fault, inner race fault and rolling element fault). The results show that the proposed method could improve the performance in the extraction of fault features effectively compared with the multi-scale combined morphological filter (CMF) and multi-scale morphology gradient filter (MGF) methods.

  17. Occurrence and HAT-RAPD analysis of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Phayao province, northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butboonchoo, Preeyaporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol

    2017-01-01

    The present study determined the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred and twenty domestic chickens were purchased from villages in four districts of Phayao province; Mae Chai, Dok Khamtai, Chun and Chiang Kham. Morphological differences were used to identify the helminth species, and HAT-RAPD technique was used to differentiate among closely related species. The results revealed that the total prevalence of infection was 99.2%. Cestode and nematode infections showed the highest prevalence in rainy season, while trematode infections were low and only found in hot season. The species and their prevalence were: Ascaridia galli (50.8%), Heterakis gallinarum (86.7%), Prosthogonimus macrorchis (1.7%), Echinostoma revolutum (0.8%), Raillietina echinobothrida (48.3%), Raillietina tetragona (57.5%), Raillietina cesticillus (12.5%), Raillietina sp. (35.8%), Cotugnia chiangmaii (14.2%) and Cotugnia sp. (32.5%). The prevalence of helminth infections did not differ significantly between male and female chickens. HAT-RAPD analysis, the specific fragment of 400 and 250 bp indicated that Raillietina sp. and Cotugnia sp. found, respectively, differ from other closely related species. This study has confirmed that HAT-RAPD technique can be used to differentiate among related species combined with morphological observations.

  18. Occurrence and HAT-RAPD analysis of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus in Phayao province, northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeyaporn Butboonchoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study determined the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus between November 2012 and August 2013. One hundred and twenty domestic chickens were purchased from villages in four districts of Phayao province; Mae Chai, Dok Khamtai, Chun and Chiang Kham. Morphological differences were used to identify the helminth species, and HAT-RAPD technique was used to differentiate among closely related species. The results revealed that the total prevalence of infection was 99.2%. Cestode and nematode infections showed the highest prevalence in rainy season, while trematode infections were low and only found in hot season. The species and their prevalence were: Ascaridia galli (50.8%, Heterakis gallinarum (86.7%, Prosthogonimus macrorchis (1.7%, Echinostoma revolutum (0.8%, Raillietina echinobothrida (48.3%, Raillietina tetragona (57.5%, Raillietina cesticillus (12.5%, Raillietina sp. (35.8%, Cotugnia chiangmaii (14.2% and Cotugnia sp. (32.5%. The prevalence of helminth infections did not differ significantly between male and female chickens. HAT-RAPD analysis, the specific fragment of 400 and 250 bp indicated that Raillietina sp. and Cotugnia sp. found, respectively, differ from other closely related species. This study has confirmed that HAT-RAPD technique can be used to differentiate among related species combined with morphological observations.

  19. Widefield imaging of upconverting nanoparticles on epifluorescence microscopes adapted for laser illumination with top-hat profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Jiri; Pospisilova, Martina; Svozil, Vit; Cadek, Ondrej; Nesporova, Kristina; Sulakova, Romana; Brandejsova, Martina; Vranova, Jana; Velebny, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We describe a modification of epifluorescence microscopes that allows quantitative widefield imaging of samples labeled by upconverting nanoparticles (UCNP). A top-hat illumination profile on the sample was achieved with a 980-nm laser diode by using tandem microlens arrays, a moving diffuser and a telescope, which adjusts the top-hat area to the field of view. Illumination homogeneity is a critical factor for imaging of UCNP since the intensity of their luminescence typically scales with the second power of the excitation intensity. Our illuminator is combined with the epifluorescence attachment of the microscope, allowing easy switching between observation of UCNP and traditional fluorescent dyes. Illumination profile homogeneity of about 98% was measured for objectives with magnification from 4× to 100×, and the top-hat profile was also obtained with phase contrast objectives. We demonstrate capability of the illuminator by evaluating in vitro uptake of UCNP encapsulated in oleyl-hyaluronan micelles into breast cancer cells. Micelles bearing the targeting peptide were about an order of magnitude more efficient than nontargeted micelles.

  20. Ideologiekritik des E-Learnings. Welchen Nutzen hat die Einführung von E-Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Kaiser-Müller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vor etwa sieben Jahren hat das damalige Bundesministerium für Unterricht, Kunst und Kultur (bm:ukk, das seit 2014 Bundesministerium für Bildung und Frauen (BMBF genannt wird, verschiedene Maßnahmen im Blick auf neuen Medien – insbesondere im Blick auf das E-Learning – gesetzt, um einen Beitrag zur Vorbereitung der Lernenden auf eine Informations- und Wissensgesellschaft zu leisten. E-Learning wurde als Erfolgsfaktor für die Zukunft gesehen und mit der Begründung, es fördere das individuelle und selbst gesteuerte Lernen, gefördert. Die zentrale Frage ist dabei: Welchen Nutzen hat die Einführung von E-Learning? In diesem Artikel wird dahingehend aufgezeigt, dass E-Learning nicht wegen pädagogischem Bedarf, sondern durch ministeriell gesetzte Maßnahmen eingeführt wurde und dadurch – wenn auch nicht bewusst und schon gar nicht als solches kommuniziert – neoliberale Strukturen durchgesetzt wurden. Die Einführung von E-Learning hat somit für deren Akzeptanz gesorgt.

  1. Energy versus centrality dependence of the jet quenching parameter hat{q} at RHIC and LHC: a new puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Carlota; Armesto, Néstor; Luzum, Matthew; Salgado, Carlos A.; Zurita, Pía

    2016-09-01

    The central goal of jet quenching studies in high-energy nuclear collisions is the characterization of those QCD medium properties that are accessible by these probes. Most of the discussion in the last years has been focused on the determination of the jet quenching parameter, hat{q}. We present here an extraction of this parameter using data of inclusive particle suppression at RHIC and LHC energies for different centralities. Our approach consists in fitting a K factor that quantifies the departure of this parameter from an ideal estimate, K≡ hat{q}/(2ɛ ^{3/4}), where hat{q} is determined by the local medium quantities as provided by hydrodynamical calculations. We find that this K factor is larger at RHIC than at the LHC, as obtained already in previous analyses, but, surprisingly, it is almost independent of the centrality of the collision. Taken at face value, the K factor would not depend on the local properties of the medium as energy density or temperature, but on global collision quantities such as the center of mass energy. This is a very intriguing, unexpected possibility for which we cannot yet provide a clear interpretation. We also comment on the limitations of the formalism that may affect this conclusion.

  2. Energy versus centrality dependence of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q$ at RHIC and LHC: a new puzzle?

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Carlota; Luzum, Matthew; Salgado, Carlos A; Zurita, Pía

    2016-01-01

    The central goal of jet quenching studies in high-energy nuclear collisions is the characterization of those QCD medium properties that are accessible by these probes. Most of the discussion in the last years has been focused on the determination of the jet quenching parameter, $\\hat q$. We present here an extraction of this parameter using data of inclusive particle suppression at RHIC and LHC energies for different centralities. Our approach consists of fitting a $K$ factor that quantifies the departure of this parameter from an ideal estimate, $K\\equiv \\hat q/(2\\epsilon^{3/4})$, where $\\hat q$ is determined by the local medium quantities as provided by hydrodynamical calculations. We find that this $K$ factor is larger at RHIC than at the LHC, as obtained already in previous analyses, but, surprisingly, it is almost independent of the centrality of the collision. Taken at face value, the $K$ factor would not depend on the local properties of the medium as energy density or temperature, but on global collis...

  3. An Improved Top-Hat Filter with Sloped Brim for Extracting Ground Points from Airborne Lidar Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar has become a powerful support for acquiring geospatial data in numerous geospatial applications and analyses. However, the process of extracting ground points accurately and effectively from raw point clouds remains a big challenge. This study presents an improved top-hat filter with a sloped brim to enhance the robustness of ground point extraction for complex objects and terrains. The top-hat transformation is executed and the elevation change intensity of the transitions between the obtained top-hats and outer brims is inspected to suppress the omission error caused by protruding terrain features. Finally, the nonground objects of complex structures, such as multilayer buildings, are identified by the brim filter that is extended outward. The performance of the proposed filter in various environments is evaluated using diverse datasets with difficult cases. The comparison of the proposed filter with the commercial software Terrasolid TerraScan and other popular filtering algorithms demonstrates the applicability and effectiveness of this filter. Experimental results show that the proposed filter has great promise in terms of its application in various types of landscapes. Abrupt terrain features with dramatic elevation changes are well preserved, and diverse objects with complicated shapes are effectively removed. This filter has minimal omission and commission error oscillation for different test areas and thus demonstrates a stable and reliable performance in diverse landscapes. In addition, the proposed algorithm has high computational efficiency because of its simple and efficient data structure and implementation.

  4. The GTC exoplanet transit spectroscopy survey. IV. Confirmation of the flat transmission spectrum of HAT-P-32b

    CERN Document Server

    Nortmann, L; Murgas, F; Dreizler, S; Iro, N; Cabrera-Lavers, A

    2016-01-01

    We observed the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32b (also known as HAT-P-32Ab) to determine its optical transmission spectrum by measuring the wavelength-dependent planet-to-star radius ratios in the region between 518 - 918 nm. We used the OSIRIS instrument at the GTC in long slit spectroscopy mode, placing HAT-P-32 and a reference star in the same slit and obtaining a time series of spectra covering two transit events. Using the best quality data set, we were able to yield 20 narrow-band transit light curves, with each passband spanning a 20 nm wide interval. After removal of all systematic noise signals and light curve modeling the uncertainties for the resulting radius ratios lie between 337 and 972 ppm. The radius ratios show little variation with wavelength suggesting a high altitude cloud layer masking any atmospheric features. Alternatively, a strong depletion in alkali metals or a much smaller than expected planetary atmospheric scale height could be responsible for the lack of atmospheric features. Our result of ...

  5. Western spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) distribution in the Bonneville Basin of western Utah: Research in progress

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides information on the western spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) which occurs in Tule Valley, Utah. The following topics are discussed; general...

  6. Irrigation Wells from the Utah Division of Water Rights Point of Diversion Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are derived from a point shapefile created nightly from data in the Utah Division of Water Rights Database. The source data were acquired on October 26,...

  7. Muskrat population estimates for Fish Springs NWR, Utah : An assessment of techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Completion report for a study of muskrat population dynamics and vegetation utilization, being led by Utah State University for a doctorate dissertation. The study...

  8. TIN Dataset Model of the Mahogany Bed Structure in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI TIN data model of the Mahogany bed structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of a 2009 National...

  9. Raster Dataset Model of the Mahogany Bed Structure in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the Mahogany bed structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of a 2009...

  10. Raster Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Bed in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany bed was needed to perform calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of...

  11. TIN Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Bed in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI TIN data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany bed was needed to perform calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of a 2009...

  12. 14,097 acre Utah withdrawl approved for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a news release from the Department of the Interior concerning the approval to purchase 14,097 acres of public lands in Utah for the Fish Springs National...

  13. Supplementary report on Pony Express-Overland Stage sites in western Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following report is a description by site of Pony Express and Overland Stage stations between Rush Valley and Deep Creek, Utah. Descriptions, including...

  14. Limitations On Canada Goose Production at Fish springs National Wildlife Refuge, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We studied the western Canada goose (B. c. moffitti) population at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge in western Utah from March to July in 1996 and 1997 to...

  15. Lead shot: its settlement, oxidation, and general availability to waterfowl in Utah marshes.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In an attempt to further knowledge in the area of lead poisoning of waterfowl from spent shot pellets, students from the Utah Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit...

  16. Utah State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    The Utah State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Utah. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Utah. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Utah.

  17. Institutional support for the Utah Consortium for Energy Research and Education. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The Utah Consortium for Energy Research and Education is made up of three colleges and universities in Utah. The scope of the Consortium plan is the marshalling of the academic research resources, as well as the appropriate non-academic resources within Utah to pursue, as appropriate, energy-related research activities. The heart of this effort has been the institutional contract between DOE and the University of Utah, acting as fiscal agent for the Consortium. Sixteen programs are currently being funded, but only ten of the projects are described in this report. Three projects are on fission/fusion; three on environment and safety; four on fossil energy; three on basic energy sciences; one each on conservation, geothermal, and solar.

  18. Origin of Theater-headed Tributaries to Escalante and Glen Canyons, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R. P.; Fortezzo, C. M.; Tooth, S. E.; Howard, A. D.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Barnhart, C. J.; Benthem, A. J.; Brown, C. C.; Parsons, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Theater-headed tributaries to Glen Canyon, Utah, are important analogs to martian valley networks. Our field study suggests a hybrid model involving seepage weathering of Navajo sandstone, sheet fracturing, and transport of debris by flash floods.

  19. Spread and genetic relatedness of native vs. introduced Phragmites australis in Utah wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Utah is experiencing a dramatic invasion of an aggressive European subspecies of the common reed (Phragmites australis subsp. australis). This invasion is...

  20. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (Jurassic) age for this impact.

  1. A survey of locally endemic mollusca of Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a culmination of field, laboratory, and bibliographic work begun in August, 1974. The project as originally contracted called for a survey of Utah and...

  2. The status of utah coal in global resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbani, F. R.

    1998-12-01

    Coal resources have had a historical effect on the development of Utah and a far-reaching influence in the western expansion of the United States. Although Utah’s production is just more than two percent of the total national production, the resource quality is higher than most other coal fields in the United States. Coal production surpassed 25 million tons in 1995 and has increased in recent years. In this article, the specific properties of Utah’s various coal fields are discussed in terms of marketability, mining difficulty, and transport to markets. The broad spectrum of Utah’s coal production—past, present, and potential future growth—is reviewed through distribution and coal usage data spanning a ten-year period.

  3. Summary of space imagery studies in Utah and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An enhanced enlargement of a S190B color image at a scale of 1/19,200 of the Bingham porphyry copper deposit has compared a geological map of the area with the space imagery map as fair for the intrusion boundaries and total lack of quality for mapping the sediments. Hydrothermal alteration is only slightly evident on space imagery at Bingham, but in the Tintic mining district and the volcanic piles of the Keg and Thomas ranges, Utah, hydrothermal alteration is readily mapped on color enlargements of S190B. Several sites of calderas were recognized and new ones located on space imagery. One of the tools developed is a mercury soil-gas analyzer that is becoming significant as an aid in locating hidden mineralized zones which were suggested from space imagery. In addition, this tool is a prime aid in locating and better delineating geothermal sites.

  4. Ground-water resources of Pavant Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, R.W.

    1965-01-01

    Pavant Valley, in eastern Millard County in west-central Utah, is in the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range province. The area of investigation is 34 miles long from north to south and 9 miles wide from east to west and comprises about 300 square miles. Agriculture, tourist trade, and mining are the principal industries. The population of the valley is about 3,500, of which about half live in Fillmore, the county seat of Millard County. The climate is semiarid and temperatures are moderate. Average normal annual precipitation in the lowlands is estimated to range from 10 to 14 inches. Precipitation is heaviest during the late winter and spring, January through May. The average monthly temperature at Fillmore ranges from 29?F in January to 76?F in July; the average annual temperature is 52?F. Because of the aridity, most crops cannot be grown successfully without irrigation. Irrigation requirements were satisfied for about 60 years after the valley was settled by diverting streams tributary to the valley. Artesian water was discovered near Flowell in 1915. By 1920 flowing artesian wells supplied about 10 percent of the irrigation water used in the valley, not including water from the Central Utah Canal. The Central Utah Canal was constructed in 1916 to convey water to the Pavant Valley from the Sevier River. Especially since 1916, the quantity of surface water available each year for irrigation has changed with the vagaries of nature. The total percentage of irrigation water contributed by ground water, on the other hand, gradually increased to about 15 percent in 1945 and then increased rapidly to 45 percent in 1960; it will probably stabilize at about 50 percent. Sand and gravel deposits of Recent and Pleistocene age are the principal aquifers in Pavant Valley. These deposits are coarser, more extensive, and more permeable near the mountains and become progressively finer .and less .permeable westward away from the mountains. As ground water moves westward

  5. Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colordao, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW). NPOSR-CUW consists of Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR-3) located near Casper, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 1 (NOSR-1) and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 3 (NOSR-3) located near Rifle, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 2 (NOSR-2) located near Vernal, Utah, which was not examined as part of this assessment.

  6. Observational and Synoptic Analyses of the Winter Precipitation Regime Change over Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Gillies, Robert R.; Wang, Shih-Yu; Booth, Marty R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated a widespread decline in snowpack over Utah accompanied by a decline in the snow–precipitation ratio while anecdotal evidence claims have been put forward that measured changes in Utah’s snowpack are spurious and do not reflect actual change. Using two distinct lines of investigation, this paper further analyzes the winter precipitation regime in the state of Utah. First, by means of observation-based, gridded daily temperature, precipitation, and remotely sense...

  7. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  8. The University of Utah Urban Undertaking (U4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Bares, R.; Mendoza, D. L.; Fasoli, B.; Bowling, D. R.; Garcia, M. A.; Buchert, M.; Pataki, D. E.; Crosman, E.; Horel, J.; Catharine, D.; Strong, C.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Utah is leading efforts to understand the spatiotemporal patterns in both emissions and concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria pollutants within urban systems. The urbanized corridor in northern Utah along the Wasatch Front, anchored by Salt Lake City, is undergoing rapid population growth that is projected to double in the next few decades. The Wasatch Front offers multiple advantages as an unique "urban laboratory": urban regions in multiple valleys spanning numerous orders of magnitude in population, each with unique airsheds, well-defined boundary conditions along deserts and tall mountains, strong signals during cold air pool events, seasonal contrasts in pollution, and a legacy of productive partnerships with local stakeholders and governments. We will show results from GHG measurements from the Wasatch Front, including one of the longest running continuous CO2 records in urban areas. Complementing this record are comprehensive meteorological observations and GHG/pollutant concentrations on mobile platforms: light rail, helicopter, and research vans. Variations in the GHG and pollutant observations illustrate human behavior and the resulting "urban metabolism" taking place on hourly, weekly, and seasonal cycles, resulting in a coupling between GHG and criteria pollutants. Moreover, these observations illustrate systematic spatial gradients in GHG and pollutant distributions between and within urban areas, traced to underlying gradients in population, energy use, terrain, and land use. Over decadal time scales the observations reveal growth of the "urban dome" due to expanding urban development. Using numerical models of the atmosphere, we further link concentrations of GHG and air quality-relevant pollutants to underlying emissions at the neighborhood scale as well as urban planning considerations.

  9. PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  10. A model for the post-collapse equilibrium of cosmological structure: truncated isothermal spheres from top-hat density perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Iliev, Ilian T.; Raga, Alejandro C.

    1999-07-01

    The post-collapse structure of objects that form by gravitational condensation out of the expanding cosmological background universe is a key element in the theory of galaxy formation. Towards this end, we have reconsidered the outcome of the non-linear growth of a uniform, spherical density perturbation in an unperturbed background universe - the cosmological `top-hat' problem. We adopt the usual assumption that the collapse to infinite density at a finite time predicted by the top-hat solution is interrupted by a rapid virialization caused by the growth of small-scale inhomogeneities in the initial perturbation. We replace the standard description of the post-collapse object as a uniform sphere in virial equilibrium by a more self-consistent one as a truncated, non-singular, isothermal sphere in virial and hydrostatic equilibrium, including for the first time a proper treatment of the finite-pressure boundary condition on the sphere. The results differ significantly from both the uniform sphere and the singular isothermal sphere approximations for the post-collapse objects. The virial temperature that results is more than twice the previously used `standard value' of the post-collapse uniform sphere approximation, but 1.4 times smaller than that of the singular, truncated isothermal sphere approximation. The truncation radius is 0.554 times the radius of the top-hat at maximum expansion, and the ratio of the truncation radius to the core radius is 29.4, yielding a central density that is 514 times greater than at the surface and 1.8x10^4 times greater than that of the unperturbed background density at the epoch of infinite collapse predicted by the top-hat solution. For the top-hat fractional overdensity delta_L predicted by extrapolating the linear solution into the non-linear regime, the standard top-hat model assumes that virialization is instantaneous at delta_Ldelta_c=1.686 i.e. the epoch at which the non-linear top-hat reaches infinite density. The surface

  11. Transmission spectroscopy of the inflated exo-Saturn HAT-P-19b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallonn, M.; von Essen, C.; Weingrill, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Ribas, I.; Carroll, T. A.; Herrero, E.; Granzer, T.; Claret, A.; Schwope, A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Transiting highly inflated giant planets offer the possibility of characterizing their atmospheres. A fraction of the starlight passes through the high-altitude layers of the planetary atmosphere during transit. The resulting absorption is expected to be wavelength dependent for cloud-free atmospheres with an amplitude of up to 10-3 of the stellar flux, while a high-altitude cloud deck would cause a gray opacity. Aims: We observed the Saturn-mass and Jupiter-sized exoplanet HAT-P-19b to refine its transit parameters and ephemeris as well as to shed first light on its transmission spectrum. We monitored the host star over one year to quantify its flux variability and to correct the transmission spectrum for a slope caused by starspots. Methods: A transit of HAT-P-19b was observed spectroscopically with OSIRIS at the Gran Telescopio Canarias in January 2012. The spectra of the target and the comparison star covered the wavelength range from 5600 to 7600 Å. One high-precision differential light curve was created by integrating the entire spectral flux. This white-light curve was used to derive absolute transit parameters. Furthermore, a set of light curves over wavelength was formed by a flux integration in 41 wavelength channels of 50 Å width. We analyzed these spectral light curves for chromatic variations of transit depth. Results: The transit fit of the combined white-light curve yields a refined value of the planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.1390 ± 0.0012 and an inclination of 88.89 ± 0.32 deg. After a re-analysis of published data, we refine the orbital period to 4.0087844 ± 0.0000015 days. We obtain a flat transmission spectrum without significant additional absorption at any wavelength or any slope. However, our accuracy is not sufficient to significantly rule out the presence of a pressure-broadened sodium feature. Our photometric monitoring campaign allowed for an estimate of the stellar rotation period of 35.5 ± 2.5 days and an improved age

  12. Sanitation conditions of clean food good taste restaurants in Hat Yai City Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanitation conditions and microbiological quality of 52 “Clean Food Good Taste” restaurants in Hat Yai city municipality were examined using a standard food sanitation survey checklist based on the Department of Health and Department of Medical Science, Ministry of Public Health. Coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli (E. coli were investigated in samples of foods and drinking water, whereas total bacterial count (TBC was carried out in samples of foods, plates, spoons, glasses and food handlers. The methods of investigation were the Most Probable Number (MPN method for coliform bacteria, E. coli and the standard plate count method for TBC. The SI-2 field test kit was used to indicate microbiological contamination, particularly coliform bacteria. It was found that 38/52 (73.1% restaurants passed all items of food sanitation standard. The food sanitation condition with the lowest number passing was the dressing of food handlers (45/52, 86.5% followed by the area for eating, preparing and cooking (47/52, 90.4%. Microbiological quality of food samples based on both MPN of coliform bacteria and E. coli was at an acceptable level in 190/202 samples (94.1%. However, in samples of drinking water only 19/52 (36.5% passed the MPN standard for coliform bacteria and 45/52 (86.5% that for E. coli. Moreover, among the 52 restaurants, the numbers (percentages passing the standard TBC in samples of plate, spoon, glass, cooker handlers and server handlers were 32 (61.5%, 27(51.9%, 20 (38.5%, 2 (3.9% and 1 (1.9%, respectively. Comparison of microbiological quality between the SI-2 test kit and MPN coliform/TBC showed no significant differences for samples of foods, but significant differences for the rest of the samples (p<0.05, t-test.

  13. Shaping the PSF to nearly top-hat profile: CHEOPS laboratory results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, Demetrio; Farinato, Jacopo; Umbriaco, Gabriele; Kumar Radhakrishnan Santhakumari, Kalyan; Bergomi, Maria; Dima, Marco; Greggio, Davide; Marafatto, Luca; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Munari, Matteo; Pagano, Isabella; Scandariato, Gaetano; Scuderi, Salvatore; Piotto, Giampaolo; Beck, Thomas; Benz, Willy; Broeg, Christopher; Cessa, Virginie; Fortier, Andrea; Piazza, Daniele

    2014-08-01

    Spreading the PSF over a quite large amount of pixels is an increasingly used observing technique in order to reach extremely precise photometry, such as in the case of exoplanets searching and characterization via transits observations. A PSF top-hat profile helps to minimize the errors contribution due to the uncertainty on the knowledge of the detector flat field. This work has been carried out during the recent design study in the framework of the ESA small mission CHEOPS. Because of lack of perfect flat-fielding information, in the CHEOPS optics it is required to spread the light of a source into a well defined angular area, in a manner as uniform as possible. Furthermore this should be accomplished still retaining the features of a true focal plane onto the detector. In this way, for instance, the angular displacement on the focal plane is fully retained and in case of several stars in a field these look as separated as their distance is larger than the spreading size. An obvious way is to apply a defocus, while the presence of an intermediate pupil plane in the Back End Optics makes attractive to introduce here an optical device that is able to spread the light in a well defined manner, still retaining the direction of the chief ray hitting it. This can be accomplished through an holographic diffuser or through a lenslet array. Both techniques implement the concept of segmenting the pupil into several sub-zones where light is spread to a well defined angle. We present experimental results on how to deliver such PSF profile by mean of holographic diffuser and lenslet array. Both the devices are located in an intermediate pupil plane of a properly scaled laboratory setup mimicking the CHEOPS optical design configuration.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Vibrio cholerae isolates from seafood in Hat Yai City, Songkhla, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preeprem, Sutima; Mittraparp-arthorn, Pimonsri; Bhoopong, Phuangthip; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2014-11-01

    Seafood has been identified as an important source of Vibrio cholerae in Thailand, especially in the Southern coastal region. In this study, we isolated and characterized V. cholerae from seafood obtained from several markets in Hat Yai city, Southern Thailand. A total of 100 V. cholerae isolates were obtained from 55 of 125 seafood samples. The dominant serotype was non-O1/non-O139. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used to detect the presence of pathogenesis-related genes. The stn/sto and hlyA El Tor virulence genes were detected in 20% and 96% of the isolates, respectively. None of the isolates were positive for the ctxA, tcpA, zot, and ace genes. Only 6% of the isolates carried the T3SS gene (vcsV2); however, the majority of the isolates (96%) carried the T6SS gene (vasH). Representative isolates (n=35) that exhibited various virulence gene patterns were randomly selected and analyzed for their hemolytic activity, antibiotic susceptibility, biofilm formation, and genotype. Hemolytic activity using sheep red blood cells was detected in only one of the hlyA-negative isolates. Apart from ampicillin, all isolates were pansusceptible to five test antibiotics. Biofilm production was observed in most of the isolates, and there was no difference in the presence of a biofilm between the smooth and rugose isolates. Using the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR method, clonal relationships were observed among the isolates that exhibited identical virulence gene patterns.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy and photometry of HATS-17 (Brahm+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, R.; Jordan, A.; Bakos, G. A.; Penev, K.; Espinoza, N.; Rabus, M.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Ciceri, S.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Tan, T. G.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bento, J.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Rojas, F.; Suc, V.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-07-01

    The star HATS-17 was observed by HATSouth instruments between UT 2011 April 26 and UT 2012 July 31 using the HS-2 (on 2011 Apr-2012 Jul with r filter), HS-4 (on 2011 Jul-2012 Jul with r filter), and HS-6 (on 2011 May-2012 Jul with r filter) units at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile, the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site in Namibia, and Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in Australia, respectively. The first photometric follow-up light curve of this system was obtained with the 0.3m Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope (PEST) located near Perth on 2015 Apr 26 with a RC filter. Another two partial transits were then acquired with the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) 1m telescope network, specifically with the telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) on 2015 May 13 with i filter, and with the Swope 1m coupled with the e2v camera at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) on 2015 May 29 with i filter. Finally, two partial transits of the same event were measured with high photometric precision (~1mmag). The observations were performed with the same two telescopes that registered the previous partial transits (Swope 1m/e2v (LCO) on 2015 Jul 17 with i filter, and LCOGT 1 m/sinistro (CTIO) on 2015 Jul 17 with i filter). Several high resolution spectra were acquired with three spectrographs installed in the ESO La Silla observatory. We obtained 11 spectra using HARPS at the ESO 3.6m telescope, 8 spectra using CORALIE, at the Euler 1.2m telescope and 2 spectra with FEROS at the MPG 2.2m telescope. Table2 provides the light curve data. Radial velocity and bisector span values are presented in Table3 with their corresponding uncertainties. (2 data files).

  16. HAT-P-25b: A Hot-Jupiter Transiting a Moderately Faint G Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, S. N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Fűrész, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Béky, B.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Perumpilly, G.; Everett, M.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-25b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 13.19 G5 dwarf star GSC 1788-01237, with a period P = 3.652836 ± 0.000019 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455176.85173 ± 0.00047 (BJD—barycentric Julian dates throughout the paper are calculated from Coordinated Universal Time, UTC), and transit duration 0.1174 ± 0.0017 days. The host star has a mass of 1.01 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 0.96+0.05 - 0.04 R ⊙, effective temperature 5500 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.31 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.567 ± 0.022 M J and radius of 1.190+0.081 - 0.056 R J yielding a mean density of 0.42 ± 0.07 g cm-3. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A201Hr), NASA (N018Hr and N167Hr), and the NASA Gemini-Keck time-exchange program (G329Hr). Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  17. A Progressive Black Top Hat Transformation Algorithm for Estimating Valley Volumes from DEM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Pingel, T.; Heo, J.; Howard, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The amount of valley incision and valley volume are important parameters in geomorphology and hydrology research, because they are related to the amount erosion (and thus the volume of sediments) and the amount of water needed to create the valley. This is not only the case for terrestrial research but also for planetary research as such figuring out how much water was on Mars. With readily available digital elevation model (DEM) data, the Black Top Hat (BTH) transformation, an image processing technique for extracting dark features on a variable background, has been applied to DEM data to extract valley depth and estimate valley volume. However, previous studies typically use one single structuring element size for extracting the valley feature and one single threshold value for removing noise, resulting in some finer features such as tributaries not being extracted and underestimation of valley volume. Inspired by similar algorithms used in LiDAR data analysis to separate above ground features and bare earth topography, here we propose a progressive BTH (PBTH) transformation algorithm, where the structuring elements size is progressively increased to extract valleys of different orders. In addition, a slope based threshold was introduced to automatically adjust the threshold values for structuring elements with different sizes. Connectivity and shape parameters of the masked regions were used to keep the long linear valleys while removing other smaller non-connected regions. Preliminary application of the PBTH to Grand Canyon and two sites on Mars has produced promising results. More testing and fine-tuning is in progress. The ultimate goal of the project is to apply the algorithm to estimate the volume of valley networks on Mars and the volume of water needed to form the valleys we observe today and thus infer the nature of the hydrologic cycle on early Mars. The project is funded by NASA's Mars Data Analysis program.

  18. A progressive black top hat transformation algorithm for estimating valley volumes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Pingel, Thomas; Heo, Joon; Howard, Alan; Jung, Jaehoon

    2015-02-01

    The depth of valley incision and valley volume are important parameters in understanding the geologic history of early Mars, because they are related to the amount sediments eroded and the quantity of water needed to create the valley networks (VNs). With readily available digital elevation model (DEM) data, the Black Top Hat (BTH) transformation, an image processing technique for extracting dark features on a variable background, has been applied to DEM data to extract valley depth and estimate valley volume. Previous studies typically use a single window size for extracting the valley features and a single threshold value for removing noise, resulting in finer features such as tributaries not being extracted and underestimation of valley volume. Inspired by similar algorithms used in LiDAR data analysis to remove above-ground features to obtain bare-earth topography, here we propose a progressive BTH (PBTH) transformation algorithm, where the window size is progressively increased to extract valleys of different orders. In addition, a slope factor is introduced so that the noise threshold can be automatically adjusted for windows with different sizes. Independently derived VN lines were used to select mask polygons that spatially overlap the VN lines. Volume is calculated as the sum of valley depth within the selected mask multiplied by cell area. Application of the PBTH to a simulated landform (for which the amount of erosion is known) achieved an overall relative accuracy of 96%, in comparison with only 78% for BTH. Application of PBTH to Ma'adim Vallies on Mars not only produced total volume estimates consistent with previous studies, but also revealed the detailed spatial distribution of valley depth. The highly automated PBTH algorithm shows great promise for estimating the volume of VN on Mars on global scale, which is important for understanding its early hydrologic cycle.

  19. Characterization of intrabasin faulting and deformation for earthquake hazards in southern Utah Valley, Utah, from high-resolution seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; McBride, John H.; Tomlinson, Iris

    2012-01-01

    We conducted active and passive seismic imaging investigations along a 5.6-km-long, east–west transect ending at the mapped trace of the Wasatch fault in southern Utah Valley. Using two-dimensional (2D) P-wave seismic reflection data, we imaged basin deformation and faulting to a depth of 1.4 km and developed a detailed interval velocity model for prestack depth migration and 2D ground-motion simulations. Passive-source microtremor data acquired at two sites along the seismic reflection transect resolve S-wave velocities of approximately 200 m/s at the surface to about 900 m/s at 160 m depth and confirm a substantial thickening of low-velocity material westward into the valley. From the P-wave reflection profile, we interpret shallow (100–600 m) bedrock deformation extending from the surface trace of the Wasatch fault to roughly 1.5 km west into the valley. The bedrock deformation is caused by multiple interpreted fault splays displacing fault blocks downward to the west of the range front. Further west in the valley, the P-wave data reveal subhorizontal horizons from approximately 90 to 900 m depth that vary in thickness and whose dip increases with depth eastward toward the Wasatch fault. Another inferred fault about 4 km west of the mapped Wasatch fault displaces horizons within the valley to as shallow as 100 m depth. The overall deformational pattern imaged in our data is consistent with the Wasatch fault migrating eastward through time and with the abandonment of earlier synextensional faults, as part of the evolution of an inferred 20-km-wide half-graben structure within Utah Valley. Finite-difference 2D modeling suggests the imaged subsurface basin geometry can cause fourfold variation in peak ground velocity over distances of 300 m.

  20. Groundwater evolution beneath Hat Yai, a rapidly developing city in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A. R.; Gooddy, D. C.; Kanatharana, P.; Meesilp, W.; Ramnarong, V.

    2000-09-01

    Many cities and towns in South and Southeast Asia are unsewered, and urban wastewaters are often discharged either directly to the ground or to surface-water canals and channels. This practice can result in widespread contamination of the shallow groundwater. In Hat Yai, southern Thailand, seepage of urban wastewaters has produced substantial deterioration in the quality of the shallow groundwater directly beneath the city. For this reason, the majority of the potable water supply is obtained from groundwater in deeper semi-confined aquifers 30-50 m below the surface. However, downward leakage of shallow groundwater from beneath the city is a significant component of recharge to the deeper aquifer, which has long-term implications for water quality. Results from cored boreholes and shallow nested piezometers are presented. The combination of high organic content of the urban recharge and the shallow depth to the water table has produced strongly reducing conditions in the upper layer and the mobilisation of arsenic. A simple analytical model shows that time scales for downward leakage, from the surface through the upper aquitard to the semi-confined aquifer, are of the order of several decades. Résumé. De nombreuses villes du sud et du sud-est de l'Asie ne possèdent pas de réseaux d'égouts et les eaux usées domestiques s'écoulent souvent directement sur le sol ou dans des canaux et des cours d'eau de surface. Ces pratiques peuvent provoquer une contamination dispersée de la nappe phréatique. A Hat Yai (sud de la Thaïlande), les infiltrations d'eaux usées domestiques sont responsables d'une détérioration notable de la qualité de la nappe phréatique directement sous la ville. Pour cette raison, la majorité de l'eau potable est prélevée dans des aquifères semi-captifs plus profonds, situés entre 30 et 50 m sous la surface. Cependant, une drainance à partir de la nappe phréatique sous la ville constitue une composante significative de la recharge

  1. Miscellaneous High-Resolution Seismic Imaging Investigations in Salt Lake and Utah Valleys for Earthquake Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies by researchers at the Utah Geological Survey, University of Utah, Utah State University, Brigham Young University, and San Diego State University, the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Hazards Team Intermountain West Project conducted three high-resolution seismic imaging investigations along the Wasatch Front between September 2003 and September 2005. These three investigations include: (1) a proof-of-concept P-wave minivib reflection imaging profile in south-central Salt Lake Valley, (2) a series of seven deep (as deep as 400 m) S-wave reflection/refraction soundings using an S-wave minivib in both Salt Lake and Utah Valleys, and (3) an S-wave (and P-wave) investigation to 30 m at four sites in Utah Valley and at two previously investigated S-wave (Vs) minivib sites. In addition, we present results from a previously unpublished downhole S-wave investigation conducted at four sites in Utah Valley. The locations for each of these investigations are shown in figure 1. Coordinates for the investigation sites are listed in Table 1. With the exception of the P-wave common mid-point (CMP) reflection profile, whose end points are listed, these coordinates are for the midpoint of each velocity sounding. Vs30 and Vs100, also shown in Table 1, are defined as the average shear-wave velocities to depths of 30 and 100 m, respectively, and details of their calculation can be found in Stephenson and others (2005). The information from these studies will be incorporated into components of the urban hazards maps along the Wasatch Front being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Utah Geological Survey, and numerous collaborating research institutions.

  2. A Review of the Coordination of Utah's Employment and Training Programs. Report to Utah State Legislature. Report Number 92-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of the Legislative Auditor General, Salt Lake City.

    A strategic planning process for work force development has been proposed as the best way to improve the coordination of Utah's many employment and training programs. At both the state and federal level, it is widely recognized that employment and training issues have not been addressed in a very coherent way. Both the federal and state…

  3. Conservation planning for the Colorado River in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Rasmussen,; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2016-01-01

    Strategic planning is increasingly recognized as necessary for providing the greatest possible conservation benefits for restoration efforts. Rigorous, science-based resource assessment, combined with acknowledgement of broader basin trends, provides a solid foundation for determining effective projects. It is equally important that methods used to prioritize conservation investments are simple and practical enough that they can be implemented in a timely manner and by a variety of resource managers. With the help of local and regional natural resource professionals, we have developed a broad-scale, spatially-explicit assessment of 146 miles (~20,000 acres) of the Colorado River mainstem in Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah that will function as the basis for a systematic, practical approach to conservation planning and riparian restoration prioritization. For the assessment we have: 1) acquired, modified or created spatial datasets of Colorado River bottomland conditions; 2) synthesized those datasets into habitat suitability models and estimates of natural recovery potential, fire risk and relative cost; 3) investigated and described dominant ecosystem trends and human uses, and; 4) suggested site selection and prioritization approaches. Partner organizations (The Nature Conservancy, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and Utah Forestry Fire and State Lands) are using the assessment and datasets to identify and prioritize a suite of restoration actions to increase ecosystem resilience and improve habitat for bottomland species. Primary datasets include maps of bottomland cover types, bottomland extent, maps of areas inundated during high and low flow events, as well as locations of campgrounds, roads, fires, invasive vegetation treatment areas and other features. Assessment of conditions and trends in the project area entailed: 1) assemblage of existing data on geology, changes in stream flow, and predictions of future conditions; 2) identification

  4. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Most of the population of Utah lives just west of the Wasatch Mountains in the north central part of the state. This broad east-northeastward view shows that region with the cities of Ogden, Salt Lake City, and Provo seen from left to right. The Great Salt Lake (left) and Utah Lake (right) are quite shallow and appear greenish in this enhanced natural color view. Thousands of years ago ancient Lake Bonneville covered all of the lowlands seen here. Its former shoreline is clearly seen as a wave-cut bench and/or light colored 'bathtub ring' at several places along the base of the mountain front - evidence seen from space of our ever-changing planet.This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat 5 satellite image mosaic, and a false sky. Topographic expression is exaggerated four times.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif

  5. HAT-P-16b: A 4 M J Planet Transiting a Bright Star on an Eccentric Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, L. A.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Andersen, J.; Fűrész, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Béky, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-16b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 10.8 mag F8 dwarf GSC 2792-01700, with a period P = 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455027.59293 ± 0.00031 (BJD10), and transit duration 0.1276 ± 0.0013 days. The host star has a mass of 1.22 ± 0.04 M sun, radius of 1.24 ± 0.05 R sun, effective temperature 6158 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.17 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.193 ± 0.094 M J and radius of 1.289 ± 0.066 R J, yielding a mean density of 2.42 ± 0.35 g cm-3. Comparing these observed characteristics with recent theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-16b is consistent with a 1 Gyr H/He-dominated gas giant planet. HAT-P-16b resides in a sparsely populated region of the mass-radius diagram and has a non-zero eccentricity of e = 0.036 with a significance of 10σ. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NASA (N018Hr).

  6. The GTC exoplanet transit spectroscopy survey. IV. Confirmation of the flat transmission spectrum of HAT-P-32b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortmann, L.; Pallé, E.; Murgas, F.; Dreizler, S.; Iro, N.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2016-10-01

    We observed the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32b (also known as HAT-P-32Ab) to determine its optical transmission spectrum by measuring the wavelength-dependent, planet-to-star radius ratios in the region between 518-918 nm. We used the OSIRIS instrument at the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) in long-slit spectroscopy mode, placing HAT-P-32 and a reference star in the same slit and obtaining a time series of spectra covering two transit events. Using the best quality data set, we were able to yield 20 narrowband transit light curves, with each passband spanning a 20 nm wide interval. After removal of all systematic noise signals and light curve modeling, the uncertainties for the resulting radius ratios lie between 337 and 972 ppm. The radius ratios show little variation with wavelength, suggesting a high altitude cloud layer masking any atmospheric features. Alternatively, a strong depletion in alkali metals or a much smaller than expected planetary atmospheric scale height could be responsible for the lack of atmospheric features. Our result of a flat transmission spectrum is consistent with a previous ground-based study of the optical spectrum of this planet. This agreement between independent results demonstrates that ground-based measurements of exoplanet atmospheres can give reliable and reproducible results despite the fact that the data often is heavily affected by systematic noise as long as the noise source is well understood and properly corrected. We also extract an optical spectrum of the M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B. Using PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models we determine an effective temperature of Teff = 3187+60-71 K, which is slightly colder than previous studies relying only on broadband infrared data. The 20 narrowband and white light curves are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A65

  7. Convolutional Neural Networks with Batch Normalization for Classifying Hi-hat, Snare, and Bass Percussion Sound Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajhede, Nicolai; Beck, Oliver; Purwins, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    After having revolutionized image and speech processing, convolu- tional neural networks (CNN) are now starting to become more and more successful in music information retrieval as well. We compare four CNN types for classifying a dataset of more than 3000 acoustic and synthesized samples...... of the most prominent drum set instru- ments (bass, snare, hi-hat). We use the Mel scale log magnitudes (MLS) as a representation for the input of the CNN. We compare the classification results of 1) a CNN (3 conv/max-pool layers and 2 fully connected layers) without drop-out and batch normalization vs. three...

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sloan i follow-up light curves of HATS-18 (Penev+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Jordan, A.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2017-02-01

    The star HATS-18 was observed by HATSouth instruments between UT 2011 April 18 and UT 2013 July 21 using the HS-2, HS-4, and HS-6 units at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site in Namibia, and Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in Australia, respectively. A total of 5372, 3758, and 4008 images of HATS-18 were obtained with HS-2, HS-4, and HS-6, respectively. The observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter with an exposure time of 240s. We obtained follow-up light curves of HATS-18 using the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) 1m telescope network. An ingress was observed on UT 2015 July 18 with the SBIG camera and a Sloan i filter on the 1m at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO). A total of 33 images were collected at a median cadence of 201s. A full transit was observed on UT 2016 January 22 with the sinistro camera and a Sloan i filter on the 1m at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. A total of 61 images were collected at a median cadence of 219s. For the record, we also note that a full transit was observed on UT 2016 January 3 with the SBIG camera on the 1m at SAAO; however, due to tracking and weather problems, we were unable to extract high-precision photometry from these images, and therefore do not include these data in our analysis. The data are available in Table1. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of HATS-18 were carried out with WiFeS on the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3m telescope and with the Fiber-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS) on the MPG 2.2m. A total of three spectra were obtained with WiFeS between UT 2015 February 28 and UT 2015 March 2, two at a resolution of R=Δλ/λ=7000, and one at R=3000. We obtained six R=48000 spectra with FEROS between UT 2015 June 12 and UT 2015 June 20. The data are provided in Table2. (2 data files).

  9. Treatment efficiency in wastewater treatment plant of Hat Yai Municipality by quantitative removal of microbial indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangporn Kantachote

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of treatment in a wastewater treatment plant of Hat Yai Municipality through stabilization ponds and constructed wetlands was monitored by using the bacterial indicators, total coliforms (TC, fecal coliforms (FC, Escherichia coli and fecal streptococci (FS, and photosynthetic microbes. The sequence of water flow in the wastewater treatment plant is as follows: primary or anaerobic pond (P, facultative pond (F, maturation pond (M, constructed wetlands (W1, W2 and W3, and an effluent storage pond (S for the treated wastewater. The wastewater treatment plant has an approximate area of 3,264,000 m2 (2,040 rai and its dry weather flow was running at only 40,000 m3/ day. There were 10 sampling times used for all the 7 ponds during July-October, 2006.Statistical analysis using a Two-Factorial Design model, indicated that pond types significantly affected temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO, and pH (p<0.05, whereas the time of sampling during the day had a significant effect (p<0.05 only on the temperature and light intensity available to the ponds. There were also significant different removal efficiencies of the different bacterial indicator groups tested (p<0.05. The overall performance of the wastewater treatment plant effectively removed TC, FC, E. coli, and FS as follows, 99.8%, 99.8%, 75.8% and 98.8%, respectively. The amounts of bacterial indicators, except for E. coli, showed a negative correlation with levels of light intensity and DO, whereas there was no correlation between the pH and the different indicator bacteria. There was a positive middle level correlation between pHand chlorophyll a.There were five different divisions of photosynthetic organisms detected throughout the plant as follows, Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyta, Euglenophyta, and Pyrrhophyta. The least diversity was found in the anaerobic pond (P as there were only 15 genera. Euglena, an indicator of dirty water, was detected only in this pond. The

  10. Assessment of efficiency of water supply system in Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaivisit, P.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of efficiency of water production system in Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai Campus, was conducted in this study. Topics covered include 1 quality and quantity of raw water, 2 water productionprocess, 3 management and maintenance of water production system, and 4 quality of finished water. Totally, 494 water samples were collected during the study. All water samples were analyzed for turbidity,pH, temperature, conductivity, TDS, total coliforms, fecal coliforms and residual chlorine. In addition to the mentioned parameters, 30 of these water samples were also analyzed for hardness, chloride, nitratenitrogen,sulfate and heavy metals (manganese, copper, zinc, iron, chromium, cadmium, lead and mercury. All water samples were collected during November, 2004 (rainy season and March, 2005 (summer season.It was found that the quality of the water in the Sritrang reservoir fell into Class 2 of Thailand Surface Water Quality Standard that requires ordinary water treatment processes prior to consumptions.Cadmium, lead and mercury were not detected by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP method. There are 2 sets of water production system. The first set consists of 4 pressure filters which could reduce turbidity atvarying efficiencies: 33.83%, 18.26%, 42.76% and 65.67% depending mainly on the extent of chemical dosing control and the maintenance of the filter media. Another system employed sedimentation tank andrapid sand filter, which could remove turbidity at 89.28%. When combined finished water from both systems were analyzed, it was found that removals of manganese, copper, zinc, iron and chromium were 42.65%,30.02%, 19.54%, 56.82% and 15.12%, respectively. Residual chlorine concentration of the finished water was not more than 0.2 mg/L and no total coliforms or fecal coliforms were detected. The plant had sufficientand competent personnel to carry out their normal tasks but occasional negligence and lack of specific water testing or

  11. HAT-P-57b: A Short-Period Giant Planet Transiting A Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, J D; Buchhave, L A; Torres, G; Latham, D W; Kovács, G; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; de Val-Borro, M; Penev, K; Huang, C X; Béky, B; Bieryla, A; Quinn, S N; Howard, A W; Marcy, G W; Johnson, J A; Isaacson, H; Fischer, D A; Noyes, R W; Falco, E; Esquerdo, G A; Knox, R P; Hinz, P; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V = 10.465 +- 0.029 mag, Teff = 7500 +- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v sin i = 102.1 +- 1.3 km s^-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R = 1.413 +- 0.054 R_J and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M < 1.85 M_J . Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47 +- 0.12 M_sun, and 1.500 +- 0.050 R_sun, respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P- 57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16.7 deg &l...

  12. HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Re-Inflation of Close-In Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Joel D; Bhatti, Waqas; Penev, Kaloyan; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W; Kovács, Géza; Torres, Guillermo; Csubry, Zoltan; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Buchhave, Lars; Kovács, Tamás; Quinn, Samuel; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Fulton, Benjamin J; Everett, Mark E; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Béky, Bence; Szklenar, Tamás; Falco, Emilio; Santerne, Alexandre; Boisse, Isabelle; Hébrard, Guillaume; Burrows, Adam; Lázár, Jozsef; Papp, István; Sári, Pál

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 d and 2.9721 d, masses of $0.527 \\pm 0.083$ M$_{J}$ and $0.783 \\pm 0.057$ M$_{J}$ and inflated radii of $1.89 \\pm 0.13$ R$_{J}$ and $1.59^{+0.16}_{-0.10}$ R$_{J}$, respectively. They orbit moderately bright ($V=13.145 \\pm 0.029$, and $V=12.993 \\pm 0.052$) stars of mass $1.212 \\pm 0.050$ M$_{\\odot}$ and $1.255^{+0.107}_{-0.054}$ M$_{\\odot}$. The stars are at the main sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correla...

  13. Water availability for development of major tar sands areas in Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefer, T.N.; McQuivey, R.S.

    1979-05-01

    The Sutron Corporation, under contract with Colorado State University, has conducted a study for the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) to determine the availability of water for future extraction of viscous petroleum (bitumen) from the six major tar sands deposits in Utah. Specifically, the areas are: Asphalt Ridge and Whiterocks, which lie immediately west of Vernal, Utah; P.R. Spring, a large area extending from the Colorado River to the White River along Utah's eastern border; Hill Creek, adjacent to P.R. Spring to the west; Sunnyside, immediately across the Green River from Hill Creek between the Price and Green Rivers; and Tar Sand Triangle, near the confluence of the Colorado and Dirty Devil Rivers. The study, conducted between September and December of 1978, was a fact-finding effort involving the compilation of information from publications of the US Geological Survey (USGS), Utah State Engineer, Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other federal and state agencies. The information covers the general physiographic and geologic features of the total area, the estimated water requirements for tar sands development, the availability of water in each of the six areas, and the legal and sociological restraints and impacts. The conclusions regarding water availability for tar sands development in each of the six areas and specific recommendations related to the development of each area are presented also.

  14. A Review of Two Higher Education Accountability Issues: Student Assessment and Faculty Workload. Report to Utah State Legislature. Report Number 91-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of the Legislative Auditor General, Salt Lake City.

    This report, in examining higher education accountability, reviews how student assessment is used nationally and in Utah to improve higher education accountability, and reviews the methods used in Utah to monitor faculty workload. Student assessments do provide a direct method of evaluating higher education effectiveness, and Utah's institutions…

  15. Oil shale resources of the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a comprehensive assessment of in-place oil in oil shales of the Eocene Green River Formation of the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah and western Colorado. The oil shale interval was subdivided into eighteen roughly time-stratigraphic intervals, and each interval was assessed for variations in gallons per ton, barrels per acre, and total barrels in each township. The Radial Basis Function extrapolation method was used to generate isopach and isoresource maps, and to calculate resources. The total inplace resource for the Uinta Basin is estimated at 1.32 trillion barrels. This is only slightly lower than the estimated 1.53 trillion barrels for the adjacent Piceance Basin, Colorado, to the east, which is thought to be the richest oil shale deposit in the world. However, the area underlain by oil shale in the Uinta Basin is much larger than that of the Piceance Basin, and the average gallons per ton and barrels per acre values for each of the assessed oil shale zones are significantly lower in the depocenter in the Uinta Basin when compared to the Piceance Basin. These relations indicate that the oil shale resources in the Uinta Basin are of lower grade and are more dispersed than the oil shale resources of the Piceance Basin.

  16. Late Cretaceous fluvial systems and inferred tectonic history, central Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, T.F.

    1983-08-01

    Upper Campanian nonmarine sedimentary rocks exposed between the Wasatch Plateau and the Green River in central Utah record a tectonic transition from thin-skinned deformation in the thrust belt to basement-cored uplift in the foreland region. Sandstones within the section consist of two distinct compositional suites, a lower quartzose petrofacies and an upper lithic petrofacies. The volcanic lithic grains of the Farrer and Tuscher Formations were derived from more distal arc sources to the southwest, and transported through the thrust belt somewhere west of the Kaiparowits region, where time-equivalent sedimentary rocks are also rich in volcanic lithic fragments. Disappearance of volcanic lithics and appearance of pebbles at the top of the Tuscher Formation is interpreted to reflect a latest Campanian reorganization of drainage patterns that marked initial growth of the San Rafael swell and similar basement uplifts to the south of the swell. Contemporaneous fluvial systems that deposited the uppermost part of the Price River Formation in the Wasatch Plateau were apparently unaffected by the uplift and continued to flow northeast. Depositional patterns thus indicate that initial growth of the San Rafael swell was probably concurrent with late deformation in the thrust belt. Depositional onlap across the Mesaverde Group by a largely post-tectonic assemblage of fluvial and lacustrine strata (North Horn Formation) indicates a minimum late Paleocene age for growth of the San Rafael swell and deformation within the thrust belt.

  17. Extinct mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni) in Southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Jim I.; Agenbroad, Larry D.; Phillips, Arthur M.; Middleton, Larry T.

    1987-05-01

    The extinct Harrington's mountain goat ( Oreamnos harringtoni Stock) is predominantly known from dry cave localities in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, in addition to two sites in the Great Basin, Nevada, and from San Josecito Cave, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. A dry shelter in Natural Bridges National Monument, on the central Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah, preserves numerous remains of the extinct mountain goat in addition to pack rat middens. Remains from a 100-cm stratigraphic profile indicate that O. harringtoni lived on the plateau >39,800 yr B.P., the oldest directly dated find of extinct mountain goat. Plant macrofossils indicate that Engelmann's spruce ( Picea engelmannii), limber pine ( Pinus flexilis), rose ( Rosa cf. woodsii), and Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) grew during the late Pleistocene where a riparian and a pinyon-juniper ( Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) community now predominates; Douglas fir are found only in mesic, protected, north-facing areas. Limber pine, Douglas fir, bark, and grasses were the major dietary components in the dung. A springtime diet of birch ( Betula) is determined from pollen clumps in dung pellets.

  18. Data flows and water woes: The Utah Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mél Hogan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a new materialist line of questioning that looks at the agential potentialities of water and its entanglements with Big Data and surveillance, this article explores how the recent Snowden revelations about the National Security Agency (NSA have reignited media scholars to engage with the infrastructures that enable intercepting, hosting, and processing immeasurable amounts of data. Focusing on the expansive architecture, location, and resource dependence of the NSA’s Utah Data Center, I demonstrate how surveillance and privacy can never be disconnected from the material infrastructures that allow and render natural the epistemological state of mass surveillance. Specifically, I explore the NSA’s infrastructure and the million of gallons of water it requires daily to cool its servers, while located in one of the driest states in the US. Complicating surveillance beyond the NSA, as also already imbricated with various social media companies, this article questions the emplacement and impact of corporate data centers more generally, and the changes they are causing to the landscape and local economies. I look at how water is an intriguing and politically relevant part of the surveillance infrastructure and how it has been constructed as the main tool for activism in this case, and how it may eventually help transform the public’s conceptualization of Big Data, as deeply material.

  19. Data flows and water woes: The Utah Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mél Hogan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a new materialist line of questioning that looks at the agential potentialities of water and its entanglements with Big Data and surveillance, this article explores how the recent Snowden revelations about the National Security Agency (NSA have reignited media scholars to engage with the infrastructures that enable intercepting, hosting, and processing immeasurable amounts of data. Focusing on the expansive architecture, location, and resource dependence of the NSA’s Utah Data Center, I demonstrate how surveillance and privacy can never be disconnected from the material infrastructures that allow and render natural the epistemological state of mass surveillance. Specifically, I explore the NSA’s infrastructure and the million of gallons of water it requires daily to cool its servers, while located in one of the driest states in the US. Complicating surveillance beyond the NSA, as also already imbricated with various social media companies, this article questions the emplacement and impact of corporate data centers more generally, and the changes they are causing to the landscape and local economies. I look at how water is an intriguing and politically relevant part of the surveillance infrastructure and how it has been constructed as the main tool for activism in this case, and how it may eventually help transform the public’s conceptualization of Big Data, as deeply material.

  20. THE QUALIFICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF VOCATIONAL DIRECTORS AT THE LOCAL DISTRICT LEVEL IN THE STATE OF UTAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDMUNDS, NIEL A.

    BECAUSE UTAH REQUIRES LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS TO EMPLOY VOCATIONAL DIRECTORS, A STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DETERMINE THEIR QUALIFICATIONS, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DUTIES. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM PERSONNEL IN 37 OF THE 40 SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN UTAH, 37 OF 50 STATE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORS, 48 TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTIONS IN THE NATION, THE U.S.…