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Sample records for harwell pluto reactor

  1. Operational trials of single- and multi-element CR-39 dosemeters for the DIDO and PLUTO reactors at the Harwell Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallacher, G.G.; Perks, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Single- and multi-element CR-39 dosemeters, developed at the Harwell Laboratory, and a commercially available multi-element CR-39 dosemeter (obtained from Track Analysis Systems Ltd), were evaluated for their potential as neutron dosemeters for personnel working at Harwell Laboratory's research reactors. Owing to the angular dependence of the CR-39 (processed using electrochemical etching), the single-element dosemeter was found to be impractical. Consequently, a multi-element dosemeter was developed, which consisted of a cube of side 36 mm with CR-39 elements (also processed using electrochemical etching) attached to each of the sides. Although this dosemeter was technically suitable for this type of dosimetry, it was considered to be unacceptably bulky in personnel trials. The commercially available CR-39 dosemeter tested was much smaller (the CR-39 was only chemically etched) and this was considered to be acceptable as a personnel dosemeter. In addition, trials with personnel working at active handling glove boxes indicated that single-element dosemeters might be adequate, but further work would be needed to verify this. (author)

  2. Estimate of the induced activity in the fixed structure of the Pluto Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodill, D.R.; Moore, D.C.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents an inventory of neutron-induced activity in the main components of a Materials Testing Reactor at the end of reactor life. The calculations were carried out for the PLUTO reactor at Harwell which is taken to be typical of all MTRs. The results were derived by using the FISPIN computer code, taking into account the geometry and construction of the reactor components. (author)

  3. Review of electricity supply failures and plant improvements over 25 years operation of the Harwell materials test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of the on-site electrical power sources is described, operational experience is reported and shortcomings are identified. Disturbances in the external power supplies to the reactors are listed for the past 25 years and failure probabilities are derived from this historical data. The 132 kV overhead supply to the Harwell site is identified as the source of nearly 90% of the disturbances. (author)

  4. Review of electricity supply failures and plant improvements over 25 years operation of the Harwell materials test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D. J. [UKAEA Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1986-02-15

    The evolution of the on-site electrical power sources is described, operational experience is reported and shortcomings are identified. Disturbances in the external power supplies to the reactors are listed for the past 25 years and failure probabilities are derived from this historical data. The 132 kV overhead supply to the Harwell site is identified as the source of nearly 90% of the disturbances. (author)

  5. Neutron beam instruments at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, A.H.; Harris, D.H.C.

    1978-11-01

    A list and brief descriptions are given of the neutron beam facilities for U.K. scientists at Harwell and in academic institutions, available under an agreement between the Science Research Council and AERE (Harwell). The list falls under the following headings: reactor instruments (single crystal diffractometers, powder diffractometers, triple axis spectrometers, time-of-flight cold neutron twin rotor spectrometer, beryllium filter spectrometer, MARX spectrometer, Harwell small-angle scattering spectrometer); LINAC instruments (total scattering spectrometer, back scattering spectrometer, active sample spectrometer, inelastic rotor spectrometer, constant Q spectrometer); ancillary equipment (cryostats, superconducting magnets, electromagnets, furnaces). (U.K.)

  6. Neutronic modelling of the Harwell MTR's: some recent problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Use of the Harwell Materials Testing Reactors for the irradiation of experimental rigs gives rise to a number of requirements for calculations of neutron fluxes. In addition photon fluxes are required for estimates of nuclear heating rates. A range of calculational methods are employed, from simple cell to whole reactor models, and the latter have been extended for preliminary design studies for the next generation of MTR to replace DIDO and PLUTO. The technique used for these various models are described in this note, with emphasis on the areas in which modelling problems are encountered. The applications divide into three distinct areas: calculations concerning rigs irradiated within the reactor core, those for rigs positioned in the D 2 O reflector surrounding the core, and design studies for a replacement reactor. (Auth.)

  7. Proceedings of the specialists' workshop on iodine chemistry in reactor safety, September 11th and 12th, 1985 at AERE, Harwell, England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deane, A.M.; Potter, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The iodine workshop, held at Harwell in Sept. 1985, provided a forum to study the chemistry of iodine under reactor accident conditions. The major issues discussed were iodine equilibrium and kinetics in aqueous solutions, radiolysis of iodine in aqueous solutions, iodine/boric acid reactions, organic iodine compounds and partition measurements. Other factors must be identified before a complete model of iodine behaviour during reactor accidents can be established. (U.K.)

  8. Specialists' meeting on heat and mass transfer in the reactor cover gas, Harwell, England, 8-10 October 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The specialists' meeting on ''Heat and Mass Transfer in the Reactor Cover Gas'' was held at Harwell, the United Kingdom, on 8-10 October 1985. It was attended by 24 participants from all IWGFR member-countries: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom and the United States. The meeting was presided over by Dr K. Eickhoff of the United Kingdom. The following topical areas were reviewed and discussed during the meeting: 1. National review presentations on the status of activities on heat and mass transfer in the reactor cover gas - 2 papers; 2. Aerosol dynamics - 4 papers; 3. Aerosol trapping - 2 papers; 4. Heat and mass transfer through cover gas in annuli - 3 papers; 5. Radiative properties - 4 papers; 6. Modelling of cover gas - 4 papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. On the basis of papers presented and discussed by participants, session summaries and conclusions were drafted on the above topical areas. These summaries, as well as general conclusions and recommendations of the meeting were reviewed and agreed upon by consensus at the end of the meeting

  9. The DIDO-reactor at Harwell, U.K. and ancillary hot cell facilities. Information sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, P. von der; Roettger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Technical information is given on the DIDO reactor and associated hot cell facilities, with the main emphasis on experimental irradiation facilities, specialized irradiation devices (loops and capsules) and possibilities for post-irradiation examinations of samples. The information is presented in the form of eight information sheets under the headings: main characteristics of the reactor; utilization and specialization of the reactor; experimental facilities; neutron spectra; main characteristics of specialized irradiation devices; main characteristics of hot cell facilities; equipment and techniques available for post-irradiation examinations; utilization and specialization of the hot cell facilities

  10. The possible use of cermet fuel in the DIDO and PLUTO heavy-water research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, T.D.A.

    1981-08-01

    As part of a study of the feasibility of using low-enrichment fuels in DIDO and PLUTO reactors the heat transfer and safety aspects involved in replacing the present U/AL-alloy (75% w/w U 235 ) fuel plates with U/AL-cermet (20% w/w U 235 ) plates, having the same outside dimensions to retain the same hydraulic characteristics, have been investigated. (U.K.)

  11. Harwell directory of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-02-01

    The Directory of Technology series of leaflets (10 in this folder) provides comprehensive information on the research and development facilities and expertise available at the Harwell laboratory of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. Each leaflet covers a field of technology and lists the Business Centres and related customer services offered. The leaflets are Process and Chemical Engineering Technology, Materials Technology, Evaluation and Monitoring Techniques and Instrumentation, Computing Science and Applications, Environmental, Medical and Analytical Sciences, Nuclear Engineering, Reactor Materials Behaviour and Safety Research, Radioactive Waste Management and Disposal, Nuclear Fuels Processing and Isotopes, Major Nuclear research and development facilities. There is a cross-referenced index which provides information to enable contact to be made with the appropriate business centre manager. (U.K.)

  12. Probabilistic safety assessment of the PLUTO Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, J.F.; Coates, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary finding of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) carried out in support of a licensing submission are presented. The research reactor, a 25 MW highly enriched thermal reactor moderated and cooled by D 2 O, is housed in a steel containment building equipped with an active extract system to mitigate any possible release. A full PSA (to level 3) was performed based on the current operational plant making as much use of the plant operational records as possible. A medium sized event tree-fault tree approach was used to allow realistic modelling of operator actions. For reasons of practicality only plant damage states of core melt, fuel damage, and tritium release were defined, all release accident sequences being assigned to one of these states. Prior to discharge to the environment the releases were further sub-divided dependent upon the success of the active extract system. The individual and societal risks were calculated taking account of meterological and demographic conditions. The provisional results indicate that the core melt frequency is in the region of 1 x 10 -4 /yr, the dominant contributor being an unisolatable gross leakage beyond the capabilities of the recovery systems. The core melt frequency is comparable with those of power reactors of a similar age; however, the core inventory and hence release is much smaller; therefore the consequences are much reduced. The risk to an individual at any fixed location 100 m from the plant is assessed as 1 x 10 -6 ; the societal risk is estimated as 6 x 10 -4 . The main contributor to the dose received is from the released iodine. Additional benefit is being obtained from the PSA in several ways: the insights obtained into the function and operation are being incorporated into the operational safety document, whilst the source term results are being used to assist in the refurbishment/improvement of the active extract system

  13. Harwell emergency handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Harwell Laboratory Emergency Handbook 1987 contains emergency procedures to deal with any incident which might occur at AERE Harwell involving radioactive or toxic material releases. The Handbook gives details of the duties of members of the Site Emergency Organization and other key members of staff, the methods by which incidents are controlled, the communication links and liaison arrangements with other organizations and the possible consequences and actions that may be needed following an emergency. (UK)

  14. Enrichment reduction calculations for the DIDO reactor. App. B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantine, G.; Javadi, M.; Thick, E.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility has been raised that DIDO/PLUTO type heavy water moderated reactors can be operated with fuel of lower than the 75% enrichment material currently in use with the object of increasing the proliferation resistance of the fuel cycle. This paper sets out to examine the reactor physics aspects of enrichment reductions to 45% and 20% for Harwell's MTR's as part of an IAEA collaborative exercise currently being conducted to examine the topic in a more general way for the whole class of heavy water moderated reactors. The reactor physics tool used at Harwell is WIMSE, the Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme, a suite of linked reactor physics codes which has been used extensively for light water, heavy water and graphite moderated thermal reactors. The course of the calculations and the WIMSE modules involved in this study are described briefly

  15. Harwell hardens Staeubli Puma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Remote Handling and Robotics Department at Harwell, has argued that it ought to be possible to combine all the advantages of the industrial robot - its off-the-shelf availability, low cost and high reliability - with the specific requirements of the nuclear industry, by subjecting an industrial robot to a programme of ''nuclear engineering''. After a careful evaluation, they selected the Staubli Unimation Puma 760 robot as the first candidate for this programme. Three years, and several Pound 100,000s later, they have launched on the market the world's first Nuclear Engineered Advanced Telerobot, or NEATER, as it is called. The device is manufactured by Staubli Unimation, to the same mechanical and QA standards as a standard PUMA, but with all the non-metallic components replaced by radiation tolerant materials. These were chosen by Harwell, after extensive radiation testing and design work, to ensure that the whole robot can tolerate up to 100 MRads - i.e. the highest radiation dose that a robot is likely to experience in a normal nuclear facility. It is controlled, like a normal PUMA, by a VAL 2 industrial robot controller, but this is ''front-ended'' by the Harwell Telerobotic Controller, a PC-based controller, which takes human commands from mechanical ''Input Device'' and translates these into VAL commands, which can then be interpreted by the VAL 2 controller in the normal way. (Author)

  16. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, J.L.; Dunham, E.W.; Bosh, A.S.; Slivan, S.M.; Young, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  17. Stratigraphy of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallois, R.W.; Worssam, B.C.

    1983-12-01

    Seven boreholes, five of them partially cored, were drilled at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell as part of a general investigation to assess the feasibility of storing low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in underground cavities. Two of the deeper boreholes were almost wholly cored to provide samples for hydrogeological, hydrochemical, mineralogical, geochemical, geotechnical, sedimentological and stratigraphical studies to enable variations in lithology and rock properties to be assessed, both vertically and laterally, and related to their regional geological setting. This report describes the lithologies, main faunal elements and stratigraphy of the Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic and Carboniferous sequences proved in the boreholes. More detailed stratigraphical accounts of the late Jurassic and Cretaceous sequences will be prepared when current studies of the faunal assemblages are complete. (author)

  18. AEA Technology, Harwell site emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This plan, describes the site arrangements and facilities for dealing with an emergency at Harwell. These arrangements consist of amongst other things provision of suitably qualified, experienced and trained staff to take up posts, provision of suitable facilities and equipment, arrangements to alert and protect persons on and off the site, liaison and contact arrangements with external agencies and organisations and supply of information before and during any emergency. Other organisations have their own arrangements for dealing with an emergency at AEA Technology Harwell. The arrangements for dealing with any off-site consequences are drawn together in the ''Oxfordshire County Council Essential Services Emergency Plan (Off-Site) for AEA Technology, Harwell''. Prior information for members of the public who may be affected in the event of an emergency at Harwell is issued in the form of leaflets. (author)

  19. Geophysical logging of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    A comprehensive geophysical borehole logging survey was carried out on each of three deep boreholes drilled at the Harwell research site. KOALA and PETRA computer programs were used to analyse and interpret the logs to obtain continuous quantitative estimates of the geological and hydrogeological properties of the sequences penetrated at the Harwell site. Quantitative estimates of the mineral composition and porosity of the cores samples were made. (UK)

  20. The Harwell TAILS computer program user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, K.D.; Cooper, M.J.

    1980-11-01

    The Harwell TAILS computer program is a versatile program for crystal structure refinement through the analysis of neutron or X-ray diffraction data from single crystals or powders. The main features of the program are described and details are given of the data input and output specifications. (author)

  1. Effluent and water treatment at AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The treatment of liquid wastes at Harwell is based on two main principles: separation of surface water, domestic sewage, trade wastes and radioactive effluents at source, and a system of holding tanks which are sampled so that the appropriate treatment can be given to any batch. All discharges are subject to independent monitoring by the authorising departments and the Thames Water Inspectors. (author)

  2. The new AEA EB plant at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.; Coates, M.S.; Down, J.; Findlay, D.J.S.; Leatham, A.M.; Sene, M.R.; Venard, R.E.; Webb, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    A new electron beam irradiation plant is at present being commissioned at AEA Technology's Harwell site. The principal components of the plant are a single-section travelling wave L-band linac, an energy analysis and beam scanning system, a product conveyor system and a large warehouse. The design of the new linac is based on the first section of the Harwell electron linear accelerator HELIOS originally used for nuclear research. The beam transport system on the new linac incorporates energy analysis, beam focusing and a dual magnet scanning system which ensures that the electron beam is always normal to the surface of the product under irradiation as it passes directly beneath the beam exit windows. The product conveyor system is based on an inverted ''power and free'' chain conveyor. The speed of the section of conveyor beneath the scanned beam is servo-controlled by the linac output, which is measured with a non-intercepting toroidal beam monitor. Dosimetry is based on Far West film for product validation, Harwell 4034 red perspex for routine dosimetry and Riso polystyrene calorimeters for direct electron beam monitoring. The design and first stages of plant commissioning are described. (author)

  3. Clues From Pluto's Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Nearly a year ago, in July 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft passed by the Pluto system. The wealth of data amassed from that flyby is still being analyzed including data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument. Recent examination of this data has revealedinteresting new information about Plutos atmosphere and how the solar wind interacts with it.A Heavy Ion TailThe solar wind is a constant stream of charged particles released by the Sun at speeds of around 400 km/s (thats 1 million mph!). This wind travels out to the far reaches of the solar system, interacting with the bodies it encounters along the way.By modeling the SWAP detections, the authors determine the directions of the IMF that could produce the heavy ions detected. Red pixels represent IMF directions permitted. No possible IMF could reproduce the detections if the ions are nitrogen (bottom panels), and only retrograde IMF directions can produce the detections if the ions are methane. [Adapted from Zirnstein et al. 2016]New Horizons data has revealed that Plutos atmosphere leaks neutral nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide molecules that sometimes escape its weak gravitational pull. These molecules become ionized and are subsequently picked up by the passing solar wind, forming a tail of heavy ions behind Pluto. The details of the geometry and composition of this tail, however, had not yet been determined.Escaping MethaneIn a recent study led by Eric Zirnstein (Southwest Research Institute), the latest analysis of data from the SWAP instrument on board New Horizons is reported. The team used SWAPs ion detections from just after New Horizons closest approach to Pluto to better understand how the heavy ions around Pluto behave, and how the solar wind interacts with Plutos atmosphere.In the process of analyzing the SWAP data, Zirnstein and collaborators first establish what the majority of the heavy ions picked up by the solar wind are. Models of the SWAP detections indicate they are unlikely

  4. Pluto's Nonvolatile Chemical Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, Richard; Cook, Jason C.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Earle, Alissa M.; Ennico, Kimberly; Jennings, Donald; Howett, Carly; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Linscott, Ivan; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Parker, Alex Harrison; Parker, Joel Wm.; Philippe, Sylvain; Protopapa, Silvia; Quirico, Eric; Reuter, D. C.; Schmitt, Bernard; Singer, Kelsi N.; Spencer, John R.; Stansberry, John A.; Stern, S. Alan; Tsang, Constantine; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Weaver, Harold A.; Weigle, G. E.; Young, Leslie

    2016-10-01

    Despite the migration of Pluto's volatile ices (N2, CO, and CH4) around the surface on seasonal timescales, the planet's non-volatile materials are not completely hidden from view. They occur in a variety of provinces formed over a wide range of timescales, including rugged mountains and chasms, the floors of mid-latitude craters, and an equatorial belt of especially dark and reddish material typified by the informally named Cthulhu Regio. NASA's New Horizons probe observed several of these regions at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 km/pixel with its LEISA imaging spectrometer, covering wavelengths from 1.25 to 2.5 microns. Various compounds that are much lighter than the tholin-like macromolecules responsible for the reddish coloration, but that are not volatile at Pluto surface temperatures such as methanol (CH3OH) and ethane (C2H6) have characteristic absorption bands within LEISA's wavelength range. This presentation will describe their geographic distributions and attempt to constrain their origins. Possibilities include an inheritance from Pluto's primordial composition (the likely source of H2O ice seen on Pluto's surface) or ongoing production from volatile precursors through photochemistry in Pluto's atmosphere or through radiolysis on Pluto's surface. New laboratory data inform the analysis.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  5. Dynamics of Pluto and Charon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovolskis, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of the Pluto-Charon system are reviewed from a historical perspective. Although Pluto's orbit crosses Neptune's, an intricate system of nested resonances keeps these planets apart. Pluto's orbit is apparently chaotic as well. Pluto always keeps the same face turned toward Charon, and vice versa. Tides also damp Charon's orbital eccentricity and inclination. Precession of Pluto's orbital plane causes Pluto's obliquity to vary periodically from formally prograde to retrograde. Pluto is probably an original member of the Solar system, but not an escape satellite of Neptune. The Voyager II encounter with Neptune, the final Pluto-Charon mutual events, and the next generation of telescopes are bound to reveal some surprises

  6. Pluto's Volatile Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leslie

    2012-10-01

    Pluto's varying subsolar latitude and heliocentric distance leads to large variations in the surface volatile distribution and surface pressure. I present results of new volatile transport models (Young 2012a, b). The models include insolation, thermal emission, subsurface conduction, heating of a volatile slab, internal heat flux, latent heat of sublimation, and strict global mass balance. Numeric advances include initial conditions that allow for rapid convergence, efficient computation with matrix arithmetic, and stable Crank-Nicholson timesteps for both bare and volatile-covered areas. Runs of the model show six distinct seasons on Pluto. (1) As Pluto approaches perihelion, the volatiles on the old winter pole (the Rotational North Pole, RNP) becomes more directly illuminated , and the pressure and albedo rise rapidly. (2) When a new ice cap forms on the Rotational South Pole, RSP, volatiles are exchanged between poles. The pressure and albedo change more slowly. (3) When all volatiles have sublimed from the RNP, the albedo and pressure drop rapidly. (4-6) A similar pattern is repeated near aphelion with a reversal of the roles and the poles. I will compare results with earlier Pluto models of Hansen and Paige (1996), show the dependence on parameters such as substrate inertia, and make predictions for the New Horizons flyby of Pluto in 2015. This work was supported, in part, by funding from NASA Planetary Atmospheres Grant NNG06GF32G and the Spitzer project (JPL research support Agreement 1368573). Hansen, C. J. and D. A. Paige 1996. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto. Icarus 120, 247-265. Young, L. A. 2012a. Volatile transport on inhomogeneous surfaces: I - Analytic expressions, with application to Pluto’s day. Icarus, in press Young, L. A. 2012b. Volatile transport on inhomogeneous surfaces: II. Numerical calculations, with application to Pluto's season. In preparation.

  7. The groundwater regime of the Harwell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.

    1983-12-01

    A regional hydrogeological assessment has been undertaken in the Harwell area utilizing currently available geological information and water level data. Since the dissolution and transport of any disposed waste would be controlled by the rate and direction of groundwater movement through a potential repository, a detailed knowledge of regional and local hydrogeology is essential. This study is based on the tenet that very slow groundwater movement, through a sequence of clay lithologies, is measurable at widely separated points within intervening high permeability systems. The analysis of available data from high permeability units within a regional groundwater flow-system provides a general flow model which takes into account inter-lithology water movement in general and vertical water movement across low permeability formations in particular. Groundwater contour maps have been constructed for the Chalk, Upper Greensand, Corallian and Great Oolite lithologies. These show that in the Cretaceous and Jurassic formations of the Harwell area, groundwater movement is predominantly in the horizontal direction with a smaller proportion of vertical flow taking place between adjacent formations. The potential for vertical movement, both upwards and downwards through intervening low permeability clay lithologies is evident. The results are discussed. (author)

  8. XMM observations of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C.; McNutt, R.; Dennerl, K.

    2017-10-01

    We have used XMM to observe the Pluto system in late March 2017. Following up on the reported detection of 7 photons representing X-ray emission by Chandra (Lisse et al., Icarus 287, 103), XMM searched for emission from the system, expecting approximately 10 times as many photons in 1/3 the observing time. If the results of the XMM measurements are as expected, then detections of other large KBOs with lossy atmospheres should be possible, ushering in the era of XMM KBO X-ray astronomy. In this talk we describe the preliminary results of our March 2017 XMM Pluto observations.

  9. Temperature profiles in the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robins, N.S.

    1983-03-01

    Heat flow at Harwell is estimated at 45 mWm -2 (milli Watt per metre squared is the unit of heat flow). Thermal conductivity values for the formations penetrated range from 1.0 to 4.6 Wm -1 K -1 . The temperature profiles recorded in the boreholes enable the vertical groundwater flow patterns within two poorly permeable mudrock units to be evaluated. The two mudrock units act as leaky barriers each separating a pair of aquifer units which induce a vertical hydraulic gradient across the mudrocks. The flow velocity results for the upper mudrock units derived from the temperature profile are compatible with values for groundwater potential derived from hydraulic data (10 -9 ms -1 from the temperature profile and 10 -12 ms -1 from the hydraulic observations). The results from the lower mudrock sequence are incompatible and this may be due to some other overiding influence upon the temperature profile. (author)

  10. Advanced facilities for radiochemistry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The leaflets in this folder describe the latest addition to Harwell's active handling capability. This is a high level alpha, beta, gamma facility designed specifically for undertaking chemical research and development work. It is based on using high integrity containment boxes which are housed in concrete shielded enclosures. The active boxes can be removed and transferred remotely to a support area where they, and any associated equipment, can be decontaminated and serviced whilst a new fully commissioned box can be readily brought into service. The facility fulfills the principle of ALARA and is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a wide range of active handling requirements. It is supported by a suite of medium active handling cells, radiochemical laboratories and, as necessary, facilities of other scientific and engineering disciplines. The leaflets are: report on conceptual aspects; Techsheet 'Remote handling facility - Salient information'; Techsheet 'Project capabilities'; and 4 sheets of diagrams showing details of the facility. (U.K.)

  11. The Harwell back-scattering spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Bunce, L.J.; Borcherds, P.H.; Cole, I.; Fitzmaurice, M.; Johnson, D.A.G.; Sinclair, R.N.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron diffraction spectra in which both high resolution (Δ Q/Q approximately equal to 0.003) and high intensity are maintained up to scattering vectors as high as 30A -1 (sin theta/lambda = 2.5) have been obtained with the back-scattering spectrometer (BSS) recently installed on the Harwell electron linac. The theory behind the spectrometer design is described, and it is shown how the above resolution requirement leads to its basic features of a 12m incident flight path, a 2m scattering flight path and a scattering angle (2theta) acceptance from 165 0 to 175 0 . Examples of the resolution, intensity and background are given. It is shown that the problem of frame overlap may be overcome by using an absorbing filter. (author)

  12. World beyond Pluto

    CERN Document Server

    Marlowe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    What happens when a hardened criminal on the run for his life gets mixed up with an all-girl symphony traveling between lesser-populated planets in a futile attempt to bring culture to their rowdy inhabitants? Well, to put it mildly, hijinks ensue. Read Stephen Marlowe's thoroughly entertaining World Beyond Pluto to find out the rest.

  13. Nuclear electronic instrument systems using the Harwell 6000 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, F.D.; Snelling, G.F.; Hawthorn, I.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes some of the more recent equipment designed by the Systems Instrumentation Unit (AERE, Harwell), in the Harwell 6000 modular format. The units include: Laboratory Instruments (alpha monitors, beta-gamma detectors, spectrometers, automatic sample changer systems, automated counting laboratory systems, low power systems). Environmental Monitors (nuclear plant monitor, air monitor, sea bed monitor). Process Instruments (plutonium waste control, x-ray fluorescence monitor, process monitor, beam current monitor, effluent monitors). (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear accident dosimetry measurements at the fourth IAEA intercomparison, Harwell, United Kingdom, April 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.

    1975-11-01

    During the fourth IAEA intercomparison at Harwell, teams from several countries compared their systems for assessing doses in criticality accidents. The dosimeters were exposed to mixed pulses of neutron and gamma radiation produced by the VIPER reactor at AWRE, Aldermaston. Risoe participated in this intercomparison with the routine personnel dosimeters employed in 'criticality areas' at Risoe. These include the UKAEA criticality dosimeter for the measurement of neutron doses and the Risoe TLD badge for the measurement of gamma doses. The final results of the Risoe measurements are presented in this report in a form designed for ease of comparison with results of other pparticipants. (author)

  15. Beam developments for the Harwell microprobe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, P.M.; Cookson, J.A.; Alton, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A consequence of the rapid development of micron and submicron size electronic devices is the diminished applicability of high energy ion microprobes with their present resolution limitations to the study of such components. Although submicron beams have been reported the available beam current is barely sufficiently for PIXE and is not adequate for RBS. This lack of lateral resolution is due to low beam brightness at the microprobe object and aberrations in the focusing elements. As part of a program to address these problems the Harwell microprobe lens has been relocated on a new 5 MV Laddertron accelerator. The increased brightness and improved stability of this facility has so far led to a reduction in beam size from 3 x 3 μm 2 to about 2 x 2 μm 2 . The feasibility of using a liquid metal ion source has been examined with a view to achieving more substantial increases in brightness. While such sources have brightness approximately 10 5 times greater than conventional gaseous sources the highly divergent nature of the beam presents problems for the beam transport system. The use of a liquid metal source on the accelerator has been successfully demonstrated but it indicates the need for a special low aberration injection lens if brightness is to be maintained

  16. Short-lived medical isotopes at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuninghame, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the small program of medical isotope commercial production and research and development on the Harwell Variable Energy Cyclotron. Because of its complexity, this nuclear research machine is extremely expensive to run, and so the program must be restricted to those isotopes which cannot be more cheaply produced elsewhere in the United Kingdom. At present these are 123 I (in full commercial production), the /sup 195m/Hg → /sup 195m/Au generator (about to go into commercial production), and 211 At (under development). Iodine-123 is produced once or twice a week at a level of 300 to 400 mCi per batch and is sold to an average of 30 customers all over the United Kingdom and Europe. The gold generator is being developed for first-pass heart angiography and is undergoing clinical trials at three U.K. hospitals. A research program in conjunction with the U.K. Medical Research Council is directed to the labeling of monoclonal antibodies with 211 At as a possible agent for cancer therapy

  17. Cryovolcanic Resurfacing on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, K. N.; Schenk, P.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Grundy, W. M.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Cook, J. C.; Nimmo, F.; Howard, A. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Beyer, R. A.; Umurhan, O. M.; Lauer, T.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2017-12-01

    Pluto displays several different young geologic terrains with few-to-no identifiable impact craters. Distinct terrains to the southwest of the informally named Sputnik Planitia may have been resurfaced by cryovolcanic processes, of a type and scale so far unique to Pluto [1,2]. The most prominent structures are two very large mounds with deep central depressions. The informally named Wright Mons stands 4 km high and the main mound spans 150 km and Piccard Mons is 7 km high and 225 km wide. Hummocky terrain with a characteristic wavelength of 8-12 km covers the flanks of Wright Mons and much of the surrounding terrain. Smaller boulders, blocks, slabs, or ridges on the order of a few km are superimposed on the hummocks. The large-scale slopes across the broad flanks of the Wright Mons are 3-5°. The central depression walls are typically 10°, but reach 20° in some locations. A number of other cavi or irregular depressions of various sizes (a few to 30 km) are scattered throughout the terrain and do not appear to be impact craters. There are few signs of potential individual flows but the large-scale hummocky texture is suggestive of viscous flow. We will explore a number of potential mechanisms for creation of Wright and Piccard Mons and the nearby terrains. These unique terrains present modeling challenges for building relatively young, large cryovolcanic constructs on outer solar system bodies. Tidal heating is thought to end early in Pluto-system history [3] and radiogenic heating levels are relatively low [4], although a subsurface ocean may still persist into the present day [5]. We will discuss the possible volcanic materials on Pluto and their mobility under different heating scenarios, as well as other possible emplacement processes. [1] Moore et al., (2016) Science 351, 1284-1293. [2] Singer et al. (2016) LPSC absract 47, 2276. [3] Cheng et al. (2014) Icarus 233, 242-258. [4] McKinnon et al. (1997) In: Stern, S.A., Tholen, D.J. (Eds.), Pluto and Charon

  18. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model was used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters. Volatile transport was confirmed to have a significant effect on Pluto's climate as nitrogen moved around on a seasonal time scale between hemispheres, and sublimed into and condensed out of the atmosphere. Pluto's high obliquity was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of frost on its surface. Conditions that would lead to permanent polar caps on Triton were found to lead to permanent zonal frost bands on Pluto. In some instances, frost sublimed from the middle of a seasonal cap outward, resulting in a "polar bald spot". Frost which was darker than the substrate did not satisfy observables on Pluto, in contrast to our findings for Triton. Bright frost (brighter than the substrate) came closer to matching observables. Atmospheric pressure varied seasonally. The amplitudes, and to a lesser extent the phase, of the variation depended significantly on frost and substrate properties. Atmospheric pressure was found to be determined both by Pluto's distance from the sun and by the subsolar latitude. In most cases two peaks in atmospheric pressure were observed annually: a greater one associated with the sublimation of the north polar cap just as Pluto receded from perihelion, and a lesser one associated with the sublimation of the south polar cap as Pluto approached perihelion. Our model predicted frost-free dark substrate surface temperatures in the 50 to 60 K range, while frost temperatures typically ranged between 30 to 40 K. Temporal changes in frost coverage illustrated by our results, and changes in the viewing geometry of Pluto from the Earth, may be important for interpretation of ground-based measurements of Pluto's thermal emission.

  19. The development of automatic neutron diffractometry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.W.

    1978-08-01

    Neutron diffractometry contributes substantially to studies of the structure of materials. Scientists at Harwell were among the first to make the collection of diffractometer data automatic and have continued to contribute to this field. This paper outlines the development of automatic neutron diffractometers at Harwell from 1960, and considers the various ANDROMACHE systems up to a hierarchical computer system that is anticipated for 1979. Appendices provide examples of the documentation provided for users of the ANDROMACHE Mark 6 neutron diffractometer system and give brief descriptions of the elements of the programs. (author)

  20. The Pluto-Charon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Will

    2018-05-01

    Pluto orbits the Sun at a mean distance of 39 AU, with an orbital period of 248 Earth years. Its orbit is just eccentric enough to cross that of Neptune. They never collide thanks to a 2:3 mean-motion resonance: Pluto completes two orbits of the Sun for every three by Neptune. The Pluto system consists of Pluto and its large satellite Charon, plus four small satellites: Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra. Pluto and Charon are spherical bodies, with diameters of 2377 and 1212 km, respectively. They are tidally locked to one another such that each spins about its axis with the same 6.39 day period as their mutual orbit about their common barycenter. Pluto's surface is dominated by frozen volatiles nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide. Their vapor pressure supports an atmosphere with multiple layers of photochemical hazes. Pluto's equator is marked by a belt of dark red maculae, where the photochemical haze has accumulated over time. Some regions are ancient and cratered, while others are geologically active via processes including sublimation and condensation, glaciation, and eruption of material from the subsurface. The surfaces of the satellites are dominated by water ice. Charon has dark red polar stains produced from chemistry fed by Pluto's escaping atmosphere. The existence of a planet beyond Neptune had been postulated by Percival Lowell and William Pickering in the early 20th century, to account for supposed clustering in comet aphelia and perturbations of the orbit of Uranus. Both lines of evidence turned out to be spurious, but they motivated a series of searches that culminated in Clyde Tombaugh's discovery of Pluto in 1930, at the observatory Lowell had founded in Arizona. Over subsequent decades, basic facts about Pluto were hard-won through application of technological advances in astronomical instrumentation. The progression from photographic plates, through photoelectric photometers, to digital array detectors, space-based telescopes, and ultimately

  1. Pore fluids from the argillaceous rocks of the Harwell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.; Bath, A.H.; Cave, M.R.; Darling, W.G.

    1985-06-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain samples of pore water from argillaceous formations in the Harwell area for chemical analysis to provide a background for radionuclide migration studies and regional groundwater flow pattern. This report describes the samples, development of a pore-water squeezing cell and its operation. Chemical and analytical studies are summarized. (UK)

  2. Diagnostic techniques used in controlled thermonuclear research at Harwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, G N; Dellis, A N; Gibson, A; Jones, B; Lees, D J; McWhirter, R W.P.; Ramsden, S A; Ward, S [UK Atomic Energy Authority, AERE, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1958-07-01

    This paper is a general survey of the lines along which diagnostic methods (spectroscopy, electrical measurements, and the study of high energy radiations) are developing at Harwell, and indicates the results which have been obtained so far. Many of the techniques are in a rudimentary state, and most of the Zeta experiments are incomplete.

  3. Contributions to the NDT literature from Harwell since 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, J.

    1983-05-01

    This is a chronological listing of 276 reports, papers and other available publications written or edited by Harwell staff on nondestructive testing subjects. The period covered is from 1977 to May 1983. Among the methods described are the following: acoustic testing; industrial radiography; positron annihilation; aerial thermography; image processing; neutron diffraction; eddy current testing; tomography. (U.K.)

  4. Harwell's atomic, molecular and solid state computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, A.H.

    1976-02-01

    This document is intended to introduce the computational facilities available in the fields of atomic, molecular the solid state theory on the IBM370/165 at Harwell. The programs have all been implemented and thoroughly tested by the Theory of Solid State Materials Group. (author)

  5. Detailed Astrometric Analysis of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSSI, GUSTAVO B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I.; Assafin, M.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Pluto is the main representant of the transneptunian objects (TNO's), presenting some peculiarities such as an atmosphere and a satellite system with 5 known moons: Charon, discovered in 1978, Nix and Hydra, in 2006, P4 in 2011 and P5 in 2012. Until the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft to this system (july 2015), stellar occultations are the most efficient method, from the ground, to know physical and dinamical properties of this system. In 2010, it was evident a drift in declinations (about 20 mas/year) comparing to the ephemerides. This fact motivated us to remake the reductions and analysis of a great set of our observations at OPD/LNA, in a total of 15 years. The ephemerides and occultations results was then compared with the astrometric and photometric reductions of CCD images of Pluto (around 6500 images). Two corrections were used for a refinement of the data set: diferential chromatic refraction and photocenter. The first is due to the mean color of background stars beeing redder than the color of Pluto, resulting in a slightly different path of light through the atmosphere (that may cause a difference in position of 0.1”). It became more evident because Pluto is crossing the region of the galactic plane. The photocenter correction is based on two gaussians curves overlapped, with different hights and non-coincident centers, corresponding to Pluto and Charon (since they have less than 1” of angular separation). The objective is to separate these two gaussian curves from the observed one and find the right position of Pluto. The method is strongly dependent of the hight of each of the gaussian curves, related to the respective albedos of charon and Pluto. A detailed analysis of the astrometric results, as well a comparison with occultation results was made. Since Pluto has an orbital period of 248,9 years and our interval of observation is about 15 years, we have around 12% of its observed orbit and also, our

  6. The application of the Harwell neutron absorptiometer to the analysis of U-235 in nuclear fuel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.L.; Watson, J.; Taylor, T.A.H.

    1979-05-01

    This paper describes the application of the Harwell Neutron Absorptiometer to routine analysis of the U-235 content of fuel element inserts manufactured at the Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment for the use in Materials Testing Reactors. The instrument response, which is principally dependent on the 235 U closely follows a logarithmic relationship. Neutron attenuation due to the aluminium matrix and the presence of 238 U is less than 2% of the total attenuation. The absorptiometer can be used to estimate the weight of 235 U in a single insert with a total error in the range 1 to 1.6%. (author)

  7. List of unclassified documents by the staff of Metallurgy Division AERE Harwell from August 1980 to July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkless, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The contents of the report have been provided by the following groups at AERE Harwell: Fast Reactor Fuels Group, Advanced Systems Group, Fracture Studies Group, Core Components and Structural Materials Group, radiation Effects Group, Composite Materials Group, High Voltage Microscope Group, Fabrication Technology Group and Management and Administration. AERE reports and memoranda are listed first followed by other literature; papers in periodicals, conference and symposia papers and lectures, books, articles and patent specifications. The information given is document type, title, author and date of publication (for papers). A total of 189 documents are listed. (U.K.)

  8. A concise review of Harwell modelling of fission gas behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.H.; Hayns, M.R.

    1976-07-01

    A review is presented of recent theoretical studies, performed at AERE Harwell, of fission gas behaviour in nuclear fuels. This includes a brief description of the rather sophisticated model approach and a discussion of the application of these models to predicting fission gas release and swelling in both normal operational and transient regimes. These studies have resulted in the derivation of more computationally efficient models which are also described. (author)

  9. Hydrochemistry of the groundwater flow systems in the Harwell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.

    1984-12-01

    A comprehensive range of geochemical and isotopic parameters were analysed in the groundwater samples taken from the high permeability formations in the Harwell region. These analyses were undertaken as part of a hydro-chemical validation of groundwater circulation patterns derived from potentiometric data. Hydro-chemical investigations were concentrated upon the Corallian and Great Oolite formations since these respectively overlie and underlie the Oxford Clay. (author)

  10. A liquid nitrogen cooled polyethylene moderator for the Harwell Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, B.C.; Hey, P.D.; Houzego, P.J.; Mack, B.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Sinclair, R.N.

    1978-09-01

    A 40 mm thick polyethylene block has been maintained at a temperature close to 80 K by using a liquid nitrogen cryostat, and used to moderate neutrons from pulsed source. The assembly has been tested with a dummy heat load of 400W. The cryostat and cooling system was installed on the Harwell 45 MeV electron linac, and enabled the production of sharper pulses in the thermal neutron energy range. The design, safety considerations and performance are described. (author)

  11. Nuclear robotics and remote handling at Harwell Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, E.; Brown, M.H.; Fischer, P.J.; Garlick, D.R.; Hanna, T.T.; Siva, K.V.

    1988-01-01

    After reviewing robotics technology and its possible application in nuclear remote handling systems of the future, six main research topics were identified where particular effort should be made. The Harwell Nuclear Robotics Programme is currently establishing sets of demonstration hardware which will allow generic research to be carried out on telerobotics, systems integration, the man machine interface, communications, servo systems and radiation tolerance. The objectives of the demonstrators are to allow validation of the techniques required for successful active facility applications such as decommissioning, decontamination, refurbishment, maintenance and repair, and to act as training aids to encourage plant designers and operators to adopt developments in new technology. (author)

  12. Radiation protection at UKAEA's solid waste plant at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallacher, G.; Tierney, T.

    2006-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the solid waste plant at Harwell ( United Kingdom)Examples of waste streams, processes and the supporting health physics measures have been briefly described. It is clear that all waste operations involve close team work between staff from U.K.A.E.A. (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority) operations and health physics staff from both U.K.A.E.A. and RWE NUKEM (RWE NUKEM is one of the health physics support contractors). Work must be planned carefully, and radiological conditions monitored to ensure that the job is progressing smoothly and workplace exposure remains as low as reasonably practicable. (authors)

  13. Electrostatic field distributions in the Harwell Tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, P.M.

    1981-11-01

    The electrostatic field distributions in the Harwell Tandem accelerator have been precisely calculated using the electrostatics program FINALE. The results indicate that the accelerator which presently has an upper voltage limit of 6.5 MV has the potential to operate at 8 MV. Such an upgrade could be achieved by a modification to the high voltage terminal. Replacement of the existing accelerator tubes with accelerator tubes capable of a gradient of 1.8 MV/m would also be required. The existing stack may also require replacement. The terminal modification itself would reduce the terminal to tank breakdown frequency. (author)

  14. Decommissioning of the Hermes facility at AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The contract for decommissioning the HERMES (Heavy Element and Radioactive Materials Electromagnetic Separator) Facility at AERE Harwell was the first contract of its type awarded to Private Industry by the Public Sector. The work required operatives to work in pressure suits for extended periods in decommissioning a heavily alpha contaminated facility. The work required the setting up of a temporary changeroom, waste posting facilities, air suit supplies and controls and temporary ventilation for a completely self-contained site set-up. The Contractor had to provide and train his own operatives, provide all health physics supervision and control and take full responsibility for all technical matters. (author)

  15. Fundamental physics research at Harwell in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    This paper describes the work during the 1950s of a Group in the Nuclear Physics Division which was particularly free to pursue its own chosen lines of research. The academic achievements and the spin-off in practical terms which derived from this Group are discussed, with some assessments of their value to Harwell and the British scientific community. The topics covered include the exploitation of proportional counters for low energy X- and #betta#-ray spectroscopy, mesonic atoms, and ionization energy loss; cosmic-ray showers; Cherenkov radiation; transition radiation; and fission physics. (author)

  16. The Control of Criticality Hazards at Harwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson-Loveday, D. W. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1966-05-15

    The paper describes the methods of criticality control in use at a large research establishment and looks at some of the technical and administrative problems involved in the day-to-day control. Criticality advice is given formally by an establishment committee, reinforced by specialist consultants from other U.K.A.E.A. establishments and the Authority Health and Safety Branch, with a special provision for dealing with urgent matters. The advantages of a local part-time committee in a research establishment with rapidly changing requirements are discussed together with the positive steps necessary to ensure that part-time officers and members of the committee are able to keep up to date. The total amount of fissile material in use is about 150 kg and examples are given of some of the forms and conditions of use for which there were often no published criticality precedents. To avoid unnecessary restrictions, work with small quantities is considered to be exempt from any form of criticality control. The exempt quantities are stated. Examples are given of the controls recommended for larger amounts, from hundreds of grams in physics experiments to kilograms in chemical and metallurgical operations and the handling of reactor fuel elements. The problem of providing a technical argument for safety is described in examples where lack of information has required obviously restrictive recommendations to be made. The question of inspection of operations is discussed with the view that more is to be gained by careful inspection and consultation before operations commence, as this is often an educative process for the staff involved. Methods of ensuring continued adherence to the approved conditions are examined. Some of the more difficult problems for a research establishment arise in storage of fissile material in its varied forms including fissile waste. Typical stores are described with the criticality safety controls. The aspects, which have been taken into account in

  17. The Dragon reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The concept on which the Dragon Reactor Experiment was based was evolved at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in 1956, and in February of that year a High Temperature Gas- cooled Reactor Project Group was set up to study the feasibility of a helium-cooled reactor with a graphite or beryllium moderator, and with the emphasis on the thorium fuel cycle [af

  18. Pluto's Paleoglaciation: Processes and Bounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umurhan, O. M.; Howard, A. D.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.; Grundy, W. M.; Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Lauer, T.; Cheng, A. F.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2017-12-01

    New Horizons imaging of Pluto's surface shows eroded landscapes reminiscent of assorted glaciated terrains found on the Earth such as alpine valleys, dendritic networks and others. For example, LORRI imaging of fluted craters show radially oriented ridging which also resembles Pluto's washboard terrain. Digital elevation modeling indicates that these down-gradient oriented ridges are about 3-4 km spaced apart with depths ranging from 0.2-0.5 km. Present day glaciation on Pluto is characterized by moving N2 ice blocks presumably riding over a H2O ice bedrock substrate. Assuming Pluto's ancient surface was sculpted by N2 glaciation, what remains a mystery is the specific nature of the glacial erosion mechanism(s) responsible for the observed features. To better resolve this puzzle, we perform landform evolution modeling of several glacial erosion processes known from terrestrial H2O ice glaciation studies. These terrestrial processes, which depend upon whether or not the glacier's base is wet or dry, include quarrying/plucking and fluvial erosion. We also consider new erosional processes (to be described in this presentation) which are unique to the highly insulating character of solid N2 including both phase change induced hydrofracture and geothermally driven basal melt. Until improvements in our knowledge of solid N2's rheology are made available (including its mechanical behavior as a binary/trinary mixture of CH4 and CO), it is difficult to assess with high precision which of the aforementioned erosion mechanisms are responsible for the observed surface etchings. Nevertheless, we consider a model crater surface and examine its erosional development due to flowing N2 glacial ice as built up over time according to N2 deposition rates based on GCM modeling of Pluto's ancient atmosphere. For given erosional mechanism our aim is to determine the permissible ranges of model input parameters (e.g., ice strength, flow rates, grain sizes, quarrying rates, etc.) that best

  19. Effects of interruption of irradiation on Harwell Red Perspex (PMMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayet Tebourbi, Mohamed anouar abdelaziz

    2010-01-01

    Harwell Red Perspex PMMA (Polymethylmethacrylate) is a dosimeter very much used in the industrial treatments by Radiations ionizing. The purpose of this work is to test the response of this dosimeter for radiation processes having undergone one or more interruptions. This experimental study based on the development of a factorial experimental design on two levels showed that the response of this dosimeter increases for the interrupted treatments. The value of the estimated amount of response increase is all the more significant as the temperature during the interruption is high. Also it made possible to determine a mathematical model binding the value of the amount posted to the factors of influence: Temperature, target amount, a number of interruptions and duration of each interruption.

  20. Development of active neutron interrogation techniques at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, B.H.; Chard, P.M.J.; Packer, T.W.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Syme, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Active neutron interrogation techniques capable of measuring the fissile content of a range of waste drum sizes and contents have been developed at Harwell. This paper describes measurements which have been made to investigate the behaviour of these assay systems for the difficult case of concreted waste in a heterogeneous matrix. The drums have been measured using a Cf shuffler and a differential die-away system, with supporting information obtained from a segmented gamma-scanner. Good correspondence has been observed between the two different neutron interrogation techniques. It was concluded that the measurement of highly heterogeneous wastes is likely to be more effective if calibration can be undertaken with representative artificial matrices. Further measurement and analysis remains to be undertaken

  1. Waste retrieval machine for the Harwell ILW tube store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R.; Sherliker, St.; Blanc, B.

    2008-01-01

    Harwell was established as a centre for UK atomic energy development in 1946 and ceased operation in the early 1990. During the period of its operation, intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) that was generated by the site research activities was stored on site in purpose-built stores. UKAEA, under contract to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) are now committed to retrieval of this historic waste, and repackaging it to modern standards in stainless steel drums. The contents are then to be encapsulated in grout and transferred for safe, long-term storage. A key objective of the site clean-up programme is to complete retrieval and encapsulation of all the ILW waste by 2015. (authors)

  2. Discussion forum on electron beam instruments AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bainbridge, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this catalogue is to provide a source of information on the equipment available at AERE Harwell, to the nuclear and non-nuclear scientist. The original aim, that is, is to provide data on electron/proton beam instruments has been revised to include optical devices and ancillary preparatory equipment. The intention is to enable prospective users to have a contact who can provide further detailed information, although it must be recognised that work on certain projects completely fills the time available. This publication has been updated, first catalogue published in January 1975, to August 1980 and it is the intention that it should form part of a similar publication which incorporates details of similar equipment available throughout the UKAEA. (author)

  3. Pluto's surface composition and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. A.; Gladstone, R.; Summers, M. E.; Strobel, D. F.; Kammer, J.; Hinson, D. P.; Grundy, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Protopapa, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2017-12-01

    New Horizons studied Pluto's N2-dominated neutral atmosphere through radio (at 4.2 cm with the REX radio experiment), solar and stellar occultations and airglow (at 52-187 nm with the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph), and imaging (with the LORRI and MVIC visible-wavelength cameras). It studied the plasma environment and solar wind interaction with in situ instruments (PEPPSI and SWAP). Contemporaneous observations of Pluto's atmosphere from Earth included a ground-based stellar occultation and ALMA observations of gaseous CO and HCN. Joint analysis of these datasets reveal a variable boundary layer; a stable lower atmosphere; radiative heating and cooling; haze production and hydrocarbon chemistry; diffusive equilibrium; and slower-than-expected escape. New Horizons studied Pluto's surface composition with the LEISA near-infrared spectral imager from 1.25 to 2.5 micron. Additional compositional information at higher spatial resolution came from the MVIC 4-channel color imager, which included a channel centered at 0.89 micron specifically designed to detect solid CH4. These instruments allow mapping of the volatiles N2, CO, and CH4, the surface expression of the H2O bedrock, and the dark, reddish material presumed to be tholins. These observations reveal a large equatorial basin (informally named Sptunik Planitia), filled with N2 ice with minor amounts of CO and CH4, surrounded by hills of CH4 and H2O ice. Broadly speaking, composition outside of Sptunik Planitia follows latitudinal banding, with dark, mainly volatile free terrains near the equator, with N2, CO, and CH4 at mid-northern latitudes, and mainly CH4 at high northern latitudes. Deviations from these broad trends are seen, and point to complex surface-atmosphere interactions at diurnal, seasonal, perennial, and million-year timescales.

  4. Pluto/Charon exploration utilizing a bi-modal PBR nuclear propulsion/power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetoklis, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a Pluto/Charon orbiter utilizing a bi-modal nuclear propulsion and power system based on the Particle Bed Reactor. The orbiter is sized for launch to Nuclear-Safe orbit atop a Titan IV or equivalent launch veicle. The bi-modal system provides thermal propulsion for Earth orbital departure and Pluto orbital capture, and 10 kWe of electric power for payload functions and for in-system maneuvering with ion thrusters. Ion thrusters are used to perform inclination changes about Pluto, a transfer from low Pluto orbit to low Charon orbit, and inclination changes about charon. A nominal payload can be deliverd in as little as 15 years, 1000 kg in 17 years, and close to 2000 kg in 20 years. Scientific return is enormously aided by the availability of up to 10 kWe, due to greater data transfer rates and more/better instruments. The bi-modal system can provide power at Pluto/Charon for 10 or more years, enabling an extremely robust, scientifically rewarding, and cost-effective exploration mission.

  5. Volatile Transport in Pluto's Super Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Weaver, Harold A.; NASA New Horizons Composition Team, The NASA New Horizons GGI Team

    2016-10-01

    The data returned from NASA's New Horizons' reconnaissance of the Pluto system shows striking albedo variations from polar to equatorial latitudes as well as sharp boundaries for longitudinal variations. Pluto has a high obliquity (currently around 119 degrees) which varies by more than 23 degrees (between roughly 103 and 127 degrees) over a period of less than 3 million years. These obliquity properties, combined with Pluto's orbital regression in longitude of perihelion (360 degrees over 3.7 million years), create epochs of "Super Seasons" on Pluto. A "Super Season" occurs, for example, when Pluto happens to be pole-on towards the Sun at the same time as perihelion. In such a case, one pole experiences a short, intense summer (relative to its long-term average) followed by a longer than average period of winter darkness. By complement, the other pole experiences a much longer, but less intense summer and short winter season. We explore the relationship between albedo variations and volatile transport for the current epoch as well as historical epochs during which Pluto experienced these "Super Seasons". Our investigation suggests Pluto's orbit creates the potential for runaway albedo variations, particularly in the equatorial region, which would create and support stark longitudinal contrasts like the ones we see between the informally named Tombaugh and Cthulhu Regios.This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons mission.

  6. Software information sorting code 'PLUTO-R'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunematsu, Toshihide; Naraoka, Kenitsu; Adachi, Masao; Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1984-10-01

    A software information sorting code PLUTO-R is developed as one of the supporting codes of the TRITON system for the fusion plasma analysis. The objective of the PLUTO-R code is to sort reference materials of the codes in the TRITON code system. The easiness in the registration of information is especially pursued. As experience and skill in the data registration are not required, this code is usable for construction of general small-scale information system. This report gives an overall description and the user's manual of the PLUTO-R code. (author)

  7. Consolidation properties of the mudstones from the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.J.; Hobbs, P.; Horseman, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    Long term high stress consolidation tests have been performed on samples of Oxford Clay, Gault clay, Kimmeridge clay and Lower Lias clay from beneath the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, Oxfordshire. In addition to calculating the modulus of volume change and the coefficient of consolidation for each sample, reconstruction of the true one-dimensional consolidation behaviour has been attempted. One dimensional vertical permeabilities have been calculated for samples of Oxford Clay and are compared with those measured by hydraulic testing. Tests were performed in a specially modified oedometer cell using an adapted Denison dead weight loading system in order to produce the required high consolidation stresses. Only one sample, that of Kimmeridge Clay, gave a classical and easily interpretable, consolidation curve, and because of this the OCR (Overconsolidation Ratio) values from other curves have been corrected with respect to this one. This discrepancy between laboratory derived OCRs (OCRLAB) and those calculated from geological information (OCRGEOL) is interesting and is ascribed in this report to apparent overconsolidation caused by secondary compression. Hydraulic conductivities calculated from the oedometer tests at the in situ stresses expected in the Oxford Clay at 273 m depth lie in the range from 4.6 to 5.4 x 10 -12 ms -1 . (author)

  8. The local groundwater regime at the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.; Holmes, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Three deep and two shallow boreholes have been drilled at the Harwell Research Site as part of a national research programme into the feasibility of disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes to geologic formations. Various hydrogeological and geochemical techniques have been employed in these boreholes, each of which samples a separate formation of interest, to determine the pattern of groundwater movement under the research site. Significant vertical hydraulic gradients have been identified which produce vertically downwards groundwater movement from the surface to a depth of 200 m (Corallian aquifer). Groundwater moves vertically upwards, from greater depths, through the Oxford Clay to the Corallian aquifer. However,the apparently very low hydraulic conductivity of the Oxford Clay results in extremely low flow velocities and long transit times. Groundwaters from the Corallian formation possess higher salinities than those of the characteristic regional groundwaters, and preliminary isotopic data suggest that some groundwater mixing with connate waters has occurred. The chemical nature of groundwaters from the Great Oolite Group, suggest that contamination due to the drilling and completion procedure has taken place. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity in this formation clearance of contaminants will require the implementation of a long-term abstraction programme. (author)

  9. Highly integrated Pluto payload system (HIPPS): a sciencecraft instrument for the Pluto mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan; Slater, David C.; Gibson, William; Reitsema, Harold J.; Delamere, W. Alan; Jennings, Donald E.; Reuter, D. C.; Clarke, John T.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Spencer, John R.

    1995-09-01

    We describe the design concept for the highly integrated Pluto payload system (HIPPS): a highly integrated, low-cost, light-weight, low-power instrument payload designed to fly aboard the proposed NASA Pluto flyby spacecraft destined for the Pluto/Charon system. The HIPPS payload is designed to accomplish all of the Pluto flyby prime (IA) science objectives, except radio science, set forth by NASA's Outer Planets Science Working Group (OPSWG) and the Pluto Express Science Definition Team (SDT). HIPPS contains a complement of three instrument components within one common infrastructure; these are: (1) a visible/near UV CCD imaging camera; (2) an infrared spectrograph; and (3) an ultraviolet spectrograph. A detailed description of each instrument is presented along with how they will meet the IA science requirements.

  10. Geology Before Pluto: Pre-encounter Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Pluto, its large satellite Charon, and its four small known satellites represent the first trans-Neptunian Kuiper Belt objects populating the outer-most solar system beyond the gas giant planets to be studied in detail from a spacecraft (New Horizons). A complete picture of the solar nebula and solar system formation cannot be confidently formulated until representatives of this group of bodies at the edge of solar space have been examined. The Pluto system is composed of unique, lunar- and intermediate-sized objects that can tell us much about how objects with volatile icy compositions evolve. Modeling of the interior suggests that geologic activity may have been significant to some degree, and observations of frost on the surface could imply the need for a geologic reservoir for the replenishment of these phases. However, these putative indicators of Pluto's geologic history are inconclusive and unspecific. Detailed examination of Pluto's geologic record is the only plausible means of bridging the gap between theory and observation. In this talk I will examine the potential importance of these tentative indications of geologic activity and how specific spacecraft observations have been designed and used to constrain the Pluto system's geologic history. The cameras of New Horizons will provide robust data sets that should be immanently amenable to geological analysis of the Pluto system's landscapes. In this talk, we begin with a brief discussion of the planned observations by the New Horizons cameras that will bear most directly on geological interpretability. Then I will broadly review major geological processes that could potentially operate on the surfaces of Pluto and its moons. I will first survey exogenic processes (i.e., those for which energy for surface modification is supplied externally to the planetary surface): impact cratering, sedimentary processes (including volatile migration), and the work of wind. I will conclude with an assessment of the

  11. Geology Before Pluto: Pre-Encounter Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Pluto, its large satellite Charon, and its four known satellites represent the first trans-Neptunian Kuiper Belt objects populating the outer-most solar system beyond the gas giant planets to be studied in detail from a spacecraft (New Horizons). A complete picture of the solar nebula, and solar system formation cannot be confidently formulated until representatives of this group of bodies at the edge of solar space have been examined. The Pluto system is composed of unique lunar- and intermediate-sized objects that can tell us much about how objects with volatile icy compositions evolve. Modeling of the interior suggests that geologic activity may have been to some degree, and observations of frost on the surface could imply the need for a geologic reservoir for the replenishment of these phases. However, the putative indicators of Pluto's geologic history are inconclusive and unspecific. Detailed examination of Pluto's geologic record is the only plausible means of bridging the gap between theory and observations. In this talk I will examine the potential importance of these tentative indications of geologic activity and how specific spacecraft observations have been designed and used to constrain the Pluto system's geologic history. The cameras of New Horizons will provide robust data sets that should be immanently amenable to geological analysis of the Pluto System's landscapes. In this talk, we begin with a brief discussion of the planned observations by New Horizons' cameras that will bear most directly on geological interpretability. Then I will broadly review major geological processes that could potentially operate of the surfaces of Pluto and its moons. I will first survey exogenic processes (i.e., those for which energy for surface modification is supplied externally to the planetary surface): impact cratering, sedimentary processes (including volatile migration) and the work of wind. I will conclude with an assessment of prospects for endogenic activity

  12. Is Pluto a planet? Student powered video rap ';battle' over tiny Pluto's embattled planetary standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisser, K.; Cruikshank, D. P.; McFadden, T.

    2013-12-01

    Is Pluto a planet? Some creative low income Bay-area middle-schoolers put a musical spin on this hot science debate with a video rap ';battle' over tiny Pluto's embattled planetary standing. The students' timing was perfect, with NASA's New Horizons mission set to conduct the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moons in July 2015. Pluto - the last of the nine original planets to be explored by spacecraft - has been the subject of scientific study and speculation since Clyde Tombaugh discovered it in 1930, orbiting the Sun far beyond Neptune. Produced by the students and a very creative educator, the video features students 'battling' back and forth over the idea of Pluto being a planet. The group collaborated with actual space scientists to gather information and shot their video before a 'green screen' that was eventually filled with animations and visuals supplied by the New Horizons mission team. The video debuted at the Pluto Science Conference in Maryland in July 2013 - to a rousing response from researchers in attendance. The video marks a nontraditional approach to the ongoing 'great planet debate' while educating viewers on a recently discovered region of the solar system. By the 1990s, researchers had learned that Pluto possessed multiple exotic ices on its surface, a complex atmosphere and seasonal cycles, and a large moon (Charon) that likely resulted from a giant impact on Pluto itself. It also became clear that Pluto was no misfit among the planets - as had long been thought - but the largest and brightest body in a newly discovered 'third zone' of our planetary system called the Kuiper Belt. More recent observations have revealed that Pluto has a rich system of satellites - five known moons - and a surface that changes over time. Scientists even speculate that Pluto may possess an internal ocean. For these and other reasons, the 2003 Planetary Decadal Survey ranked a Pluto/Kuiper Belt mission as the highest priority mission for NASA's newly created

  13. The HARWELL version of the computer code E-DEP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, M.D.

    1983-03-01

    This document describes the modified HARWELL version of the computer program EDEP-1 which has been in use on the IBM Central Computer for some years. The program can be used to calculate heavy ion ranges and/or profiles of energy deposited into nuclear processes for a wide variety of ion/target combinations. The initial setting up of this program on the IBM Central Computer has been described in an earlier report. A second report was later issued to bring the first report up to date following changes to this code required to suit the needs of workers at HARWELL. This later report described in particular the provision of new electronic stopping powers and an alternative method for calculating the energy straggle of beam ions with depth in a target. This new report describes further extensions to the electronic stopping powers available in the HARWELL version of this program and, for the first time, gives details of alternative nuclear stopping powers now available. This new document is intended as a reference manual for the use of the HARWELL version of EDEP-1. In this respect this document should be the final report on the status of this program. (author)

  14. Practical guide to the PLUTO small angle scattering spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, D.I.

    1980-08-01

    A schematic diagram of the S.A.N.S. instrument is given. Neutrons from a thermal source in the PLUTO reactor pass successively through a cooled beryllium filter, a helical velocity selector and a flight tube with collimating apertures into a specimen chamber. Monitor fission chambers allow measurements of the transmission of the selector and the flux of neutrons incident on the specimen. The neutrons emerging in the forward direction from the specimen enter the detector box where the unscattered ones are stopped by a beam stop and the scattered ones impinge on a 2-dimensional detector which measures their spatial distribution. The output from the detector is fed into a PDP 11/10 computer where the data is collected, manipulated and displayed on a visual display unit. Performance data and practical operating procedure are given. (author)

  15. NOVA - Official Website | The Pluto Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    committees were assembled to come up with a new definition, the last of which was headed by my friend from . Under this definition, Pluto would remain a planet; Mike Brown's discovery would be one too. And as new doing this would bring scores of planets. NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Into the accounting of the planets in the

  16. Possible occultation by Pluto from US East Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-06-01

    We have been asked to help disseminate the news of a possible occultation by Pluto visible to observers on the US East coast. Although the AAVSO does not ordinarily issue announcements of upcoming occultations, in this case the object is Pluto and the NASA New Horizons mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html) will be visiting Pluto in 2015. The information below has been supplied by Dr. Leslie Young (Southwest Research Institute), who is coordinating this observing campaign on Pluto. Dr. Young is also Deputy Project Scientist for the New Horizons mission. ALERT: Possible Pluto occultation Wednesday night (2012/06/14 03:28 UT) from US East coast. CONTACT: Leslie Young (layoung@boulder.swri.edu; work: 303-546-6057; skype: drpluto). Also see our planning pages in progress at http://wiki.boulder.swri.edu/mediawiki/index.php/2012-06-14_Pluto_occultation. Pluto's thin, nitrogen atmosphere is in vapor-pressure equilibrium with the surface ice, and changes seasonally. We've seen it double since 1988, and now we measure its pressure once or twice a year. The technique we use is stellar occultation, when a star passes behind Pluto's atmosphere. The atmosphere defocuses the starlight. By the timing of the fading of the star, we measure the pressure and temperature in Pluto's atmosphere at ~10 km resolution. MORE INFORMATION: See http://wiki.boulder.swri.edu/mediawiki/index.php/2012-06-14_Pluto_occultation.

  17. Radiation damage simulation studies in the Harwell VEC of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazey, D J; Walters, G P; Buckley, S N; Hanks, W; Bolster, D E.J.; Murphy, S M

    1988-07-01

    Three austenitic (316 L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb); four high-nickel (IN 625, IN 706, PE 16, Fe-25Ni-8Cr) and four ferritic (CRM 12, FV 448, FV 607, FI) alloys have been irradiated with 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions in the Harwell VEC to simulated fusion-reactor doses up to 110 dpa (proportional to 10 MW-yr m/sup -2/) at temperatures from 425 to 625/sup 0/C. Gas production rates appropriate to fusion were obtained from a mixed beam of He+H/sub 2/ in the ratio 1:4 He:H with gas/dpa ratios of 13 appm He/dpa and 52 appm H/dpa. The 316 alloys showed irradiation-induced precipitation and swelling as high as 40% in ST 316-Ti after 110 dpa at 625/sup 0/C. Low swelling (e.g. <2% at 110 dpa) was observed in the high-nickel alloys. The ferritic/martensitic alloys showed negligible swelling (e.g. <0.2% in FV 607 after 100 dpa at 475/sup 0/C). The results demonstrate the high swelling behaviour of 316 alloys and the better swelling resistance of high-nickel and ferritic alloys under simulated fusion conditions.

  18. Report on the second uranium-series intercomparison project workshop, Harwell, 23 to 24, June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Warchal, R.M.

    1981-03-01

    The second Uranium-series Intercomparison Project Workshop was held on June 23 and 24, 1980 at Harwell. The aim of the Workshop was to analyse the results of Phase III of the Project and to define the future aims of the Project, if any. This report is an account of the matters raised and discussed during the two day workshop. A detailed report of a statistical analysis of USIP results - Phases I, II, and III is included. A final report submitted to USIP by CBNM, Euratom Laboratory, Geel, on the determination of the alpha activity ratio 228 Th/ 232 U in the Harwell spike solution used in USIP Phase III is reproduced in full. An account of an investigation into suitability of a limestone specimen for a geologic standard carried out at Koeln University is also given. (author)

  19. The data acquisition system for diffraction experiments on the Harwell Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.A.G.

    1975-12-01

    A suite of programs has been developed for the on-line accumulation of data from the Total Scattering Spectrometer on the Harwell Linac. Facilities are provided for defining the experimental parameters and controlling the sample-changer. There is also provision for users to examine their data and to perform some preliminary data reduction. The data can be sent to the IBM 370/168 Central computer for further processing. (author)

  20. The Harwell fallout monitoring programme and its response to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambray, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Harwell laboratory operates a worldwide network of air and rain sampling stations for radioactivity in the atmosphere. In the months after the Chernobyl accident of 29 April 1986 the network was used to study the distribution and behaviour of radioactive debris from that source. An estimate of 5 x 10 16 Bq of caesium-137 has been deduced for the global distribution from Chernobyl

  1. Implementation of GNASH and auxiliary codes on the Harwell CRAY-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    The report describes a version of the preequilibrium, statistical nuclear-model code GNASH which has been implemented, along with a set of small auxiliary codes, on the CRAY-1 at AERE Harwell. GNASH provides a flexible tool for calculating cross sections, isomer ratios and emission spectra. A detailed description of the current user input is provided along with a full listing of the actual FORTRAN code, as modified for this implementation. (author)

  2. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  3. PLUTO'S SEASONS: NEW PREDICTIONS FOR NEW HORIZONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the last Pluto volatile transport models were published in 1996, we have (1) new stellar occultation data from 2002 and 2006-2012 that show roughly twice the pressure as the first definitive occultation from 1988, (2) new information about the surface properties of Pluto, (3) a spacecraft due to arrive at Pluto in 2015, and (4) a new volatile transport model that is rapid enough to allow a large parameter-space search. Such a parameter-space search coarsely constrained by occultation results reveals three broad solutions: a high-thermal inertia, large volatile inventory solution with permanent northern volatiles (PNVs; using the rotational north pole convention); a lower thermal-inertia, smaller volatile inventory solution with exchanges of volatiles between hemispheres and a pressure plateau beyond 2015 (exchange with pressure plateau, EPP); and solutions with still smaller volatile inventories, with exchanges of volatiles between hemispheres and an early collapse of the atmosphere prior to 2015 (exchange with early collapse, EEC). PNV and EPP are favored by stellar occultation data, but EEC cannot yet be definitively ruled out without more atmospheric modeling or additional occultation observations and analysis.

  4. Spectrophotometry of Pluto-Charon mutual events - Individual spectra of Pluto and Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, S. R.; Barker, E. S.; Cochran, A. L.; Cochran, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra of the March 3 and April 4, 1987 mutual events of Pluto and Charon, obtained with spectral coverage from 5500 to 10,000 A with 25-A spectral resolution, are discussed. Charon has a featureless reflectance spectrum, with no evidence of methane absorption. Charon's reflectance appears neutral in color and corresponds to a geometric albedo of about 0.37 at 6000 A. The Pluto reflectance spectrum displays methane absorption bands at 7300, 7900, 8400, 8600, and 8900 A and is red in color, with a geometric albedo of about 0.56 at 6000 A.

  5. The development of fabrication techniques for europia/iron cermet tips for coarse-control arms in DIDO and PLUTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.A.; Tarrant, E.A.

    1980-11-01

    The applicability of cermet-fabrication techniques to the production of europia/iron cermets for use as coarse-control arm tips in the materials test reactors DIDO and PLUTO has been investigated. Spheroids of europia were prepared by a dry agglomeration process. These were sintered, dispersed in iron powder and pressed into plates; the plates were then sintered to densify the iron matrix. These stages were optimised to produce a strong cermet with a europia density of >= 2.75 g/cm 3 . The uniformity of distribution of the absorber particles was confirmed by radiography, and adequate neutron-absorption worth by measurements carried out in the GLEEP reactor. An outline flow sheet has been prepared for the manufacture of europia/iron cermet plates suitable for use in the tips of DIDO and PLUTO coarse-control arms. (author)

  6. Review of progress on fusion materials technology, Harwell, December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    The programme has been aimed specifically at investigating and furthering an understanding of: (a) the evolution of the radiation damage structure, void and gas bubble swelling and surface blistering effects in both model and potential first wall materials for a D-T fusion reactor system of the TOKAMAK type. (b) Radiation effects in inorganic insulator materials. In addition, investigations were carried out into the effects of irradiation on organic insulators and on the performance of rubber seals. The principal achievements to date are summarised and a list of 50 references is given. (author)

  7. Pluto's atmosphere in 2015 from high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Henry G.; Cook, Jason C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Holler, Bryan J.; Young, Leslie A.; McLane, Jacob N.; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2015-11-01

    Pluto's thin N2/CH4 atmosphere is in vapor-pressure equilibrium with ices on its surface. The atmosphere evolves seasonally with the varying insolation pattern on Pluto's heterogenous surface, perhaps even largely freezing out to the surface during the coldest portion of Pluto's year. We use high-resolution (R≈25,000-50,000) near-infrared spectroscopy to resolve atmospheric methane absorption lines from Pluto's continuum spectra, as well as separate Pluto's atmospheric lines from the telluric spectrum. In addition to measuring the abundance and temperature of Pluto's atmospheric CH4, with broad wavelength coverage we are able to search for the inevitable products of N2/CH4 photochemistry. In 2015 we are undertaking an intensive campaign using NIRSPEC at Keck Observatory and IGRINS (Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer) at McDonald Observatory to coincide with the New Horizons Pluto encounter. We will report initial results from this 2015 campaign and compare the state of Pluto's atmosphere at the time of the New Horizons encounter with earlier years.

  8. Pluto confidential an insider account of the ongoing battles over the status of Pluto

    CERN Document Server

    Maran, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    When the International Astronomical Union (IAU) adopted a new definition of a "planet" in August 2006, Pluto became a dwarf planet, drawing a divisive line in science and public opinions. The controversy of whether Pluto is a planet continues years later, and passion about the decision remains, pitting scientist against scientist and invoking sentiments and nostalgia from the rest of the world. With the IAU definition, the future of space objects is forever changed. Learn how this resolution came to be and what it means for astronomy, who implemented it and who is against it, and whether it's the first or millionth time the world's view of astronomy has rotated on its axis. Written by an astronomer and educator who voted for the IAU resolution—Laurence A. Marschall—and a NASA scientist who supported the opposing petition that resulted—Stephen P. Maran—Pluto Confidential leaves no perspective out and no asteroid unturned in the Pluto debate. A telescopic look inside the book: History of planetary disputes,...

  9. The Cosmochemistry of Pluto: A Primordial Origin of Volatiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, C. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Pluto is a wonderland of volatiles. Nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide are the principal volatiles that maintain its tenuous atmosphere, and they have also created a mesmerizing landscape of icy geological features, including Pluto's iconic "heart". Recent data, particularly those returned by the New Horizons mission [1-3], allow us to begin testing hypotheses for the cosmochemical origins of these world-shaping species on Pluto. Here, we investigate if Pluto's volatiles could have been accreted in its building blocks. We take both bottom-up and top-down approaches in testing this hypothesis in terms of mass balance. We estimate Pluto's primordial inventory of volatiles by scaling a range of cometary abundances up to the ice mass fraction of Pluto. We also make estimates of the present and lost inventories of volatiles based on surface observations and interpretations, as well as different scenarios of atmospheric photochemistry and escape. We find that, if primordial Pluto resembled a giant comet with respect to volatile abundances, then the initial volatile inventory would have been sufficient to account for the estimated present and lost inventories. This consistency supports a primordial origin for Pluto's volatiles. However, the observed ratio of CO/N2 in Pluto's atmosphere [4] is several orders of magnitude lower than the nominal cometary value. We are currently using phase equilibrium and rate models to explore if volatile layering in Sputnik Planitia, or the destruction of CO in a past or present subsurface ocean of liquid water could explain the apparent depletion of CO on Pluto. References: [1] Moore et al. (2016) Science 351, 1284. [2] Grundy et al. (2016) Science 351, aad9189. [3] Gladstone et al. (2016) Science 351, aad8866. [4] Lellouch et al. (2017) Icarus 286, 289.

  10. Solid-phase equilibria on Pluto's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sugata P.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    2018-03-01

    Pluto's surface is covered by volatile ices that are in equilibrium with the atmosphere. Multicomponent phase equilibria may be calculated using a thermodynamic equation of state and, without additional assumptions, result in methane-rich and nitrogen-rich solid phases. The former is formed at temperature range between the atmospheric pressure-dependent sublimation and condensation points, while the latter is formed at temperatures lower than the sublimation point. The results, calculated for the observed 11 μbar atmospheric pressure and composition, are consistent with recent work derived from observations by New Horizons.

  11. Research and development studies into isotope production using the Harwell Variable Energy Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Bett, R.; Cuninghame, J.G.; Goodall, J.A.B.; Hill, J.I.S.; Sims, H.E.; Willis, H.H.

    1979-11-01

    Many useful radioisotopes can be produced by means of the Harwell Chemistry Division's Variable Energy Cyclotron. This report describes the preliminary preparation of a number of these neutron deficient isotopes (i.e. F18, S38, Fe52, Sr82-Rb82, Nb92m, Rh99, I123, Xe125, Tl201, Pu236, Pu237). Recently a targetry development programme has been initiated to optimise isotope yields. Gas, liquid and solid targets have been designed that can be quickly and safely removed from the cyclotron beam-line so that the target activity can be rapidly processed after the irradiation, if necessary. (author)

  12. Optimization calculations for slow neutron production with the 136 MeV Harwell electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, J.; Sinclair, R.N.

    1978-10-01

    The new 136 MeV Harwell electron linac is to be used to produce pulsed beams of slow neutrons for condensed matter research. Design details and performance of the two types of moderator which will be available have been optimised using a Monte Carlo neutronics code (TIMOC). The choice of reflector, the necessary decoupling energy to prevent pulse broadening and the influence of γ shields and moderator shape have been investigated. The predicted yield of leakage neutrons of energy 1 eV is compared to published values for comparable facilities. (author)

  13. Radiation protection at UKAEA's solid waste plant at Harwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallacher, G. [RWE NUKEM, Harwell (United Kingdom); Tierney, T. [UKAEA, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The paper provides an overview of the solid waste plant at Harwell ( United Kingdom)Examples of waste streams, processes and the supporting health physics measures have been briefly described. It is clear that all waste operations involve close team work between staff from U.K.A.E.A. (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority) operations and health physics staff from both U.K.A.E.A. and RWE NUKEM (RWE NUKEM is one of the health physics support contractors). Work must be planned carefully, and radiological conditions monitored to ensure that the job is progressing smoothly and workplace exposure remains as low as reasonably practicable. (authors)

  14. Sources of series resistance in the Harwell solid state alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    The metal-semiconductor contacts to the Harwell solid state alpha detector have been characterized and the effect of the contact geometry has been assessed. To a reasonable approximation the latter gives rise to an emitter series resistance with an expected range of 20 +- 8 ohms. The contacts behave like parallel RC networks which become noticeably frequency dependent above ca. 100 kHz. Up to this frequency the emitter contact is likely to add 6 +- 4 ohms to the series resistance and the contribution from the base contact varies inversely with the square of the diode's diameter, being 5 +- 3 ohms for a diode with a diameter of 30 mm. (author)

  15. Pluto and Charon: Surface Colors and Compositions - A Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The surface of Pluto displays an array of colors ranging from yellow to red to brown, while the surface of Charon is largely gray with a north polar zone of red color similar to regions on Pluto. Pluto's surface shows layers of intensely colored material in tilted and transported blocks, and fractured geo-graphical units. This arrangement suggests episodes of formation or deposition of that material interspersed with episodes of emplacement of ices having little or no color. The ices identified on the surfaces of these two bodies (N2, CH4, CO, C2H6, H2O on Pluto, and H2O and NH3 on Charon) are colorless, as are nearly all ices in a powdery state. The colors on Pluto probably arise from the in situ formation of a macro-molecular carbonaceous material generated by energetic processing of the ices on the surface. Laboratory experiments producing refractory tholins particularly relevant to Pluto explored the chemistry of both UV and low-energy electron bombardment of a mix of Pluto ices (N2:CH4:CO = 100:1:1). We can term this Pluto ice tholin PIT. Water ice in the crystalline state characterizes Charon's surface, and while most of Charon's surface is neutral in color, with geometric albedo approximately 0.38, the polar zone and a light cover of fainter but similar reddish color over some surface regions suggest a common origin with the colored material on Pluto. NH3 or NH3 x nH2O was identified from disk-integrated Earth-based spectra, and a few concentrated NH3 exposures have been found in the New Horizons spectral images.

  16. Geology of Pluto and Charon Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Pluto's surface was found to be remarkably diverse in terms of its range of landforms, terrain ages, and inferred geological processes. There is a latitudinal zonation of albedo. The conspicuous bright albedo heart-shaped feature informally named Tombaugh Regio is comprised of several terrain types. Most striking is Texas-sized Sputnik Planum, which is apparently level, has no observable craters, and is divided by polygons and ovoids bounded by shallow troughs. Small smooth hills are seen in some of the polygon-bounding troughs. These hills could either be extruded or exposed by erosion. Sputnik Planum polygon/ovoid formation hypotheses range from convection to contraction, but convection is currently favored. There is evidence of flow of plains material around obstacles. Mountains, especially those seen south of Sputnik Planum, exhibit too much relief to be made of CH4, CO, or N2, and thus are probably composed of H2O-ice basement material. The north contact of Sputnik Planum abuts a scarp, above which is heavily modified cratered terrain. Pluto's large moon Charon is generally heavily to moderately cratered. There is a mysterious structure in the arctic. Charon's surface is crossed by an extensive system of rift faults and graben. Some regions are smoother and less cratered, reminiscent of lunar maria. On such a plain are large isolated block mountains surrounded by moats. At this conference we will present highlights of the latest observations and analysis. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project

  17. Effects of the interruption of the irradiation process on PMMA Harwell Industry Dosimetry Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Paulo S.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S., E-mail: psantos@ipen.br, E-mail: pavsalva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, the use of dyed-polymethylmethacrylate dosimetry systems in measurements at industrial irradiations has been broadly, despite the use of alanine dosimeters. Accurate dosimetry measurements are essential for the sterilization applications of medical products as well as the preservation of food by ionizing radiation. Regulations in many countries require in-plant dosimetry to ensure that the specified radiation dose has been delivered to the product. Harwell commercial dosimeters commonly are built to work with measurements between 1 kGy to 50 kGy, this means that a same dosimeter could be used until reach these values. Radiation processing demands partial measurements of the absorbed dose to guarantee the final desired applied absorbed dose depending to the dose rate. In this sense, the total absorbed dose corresponds to the cumulative partial values. In this study, several dosimeters were irradiated at the Multipurpose Gamma Irradiation Facility at IPEN - CNEN/SP to evaluate the response to the interruption of the irradiation process in the total cumulative absorbed dose values considering statistical changes and some processing parameters. When studied the Harwell dyed-polymethylmethacrylate dosimeters Red 4034 and Amber 3042, applying processing interruptions, results shown a coefficient of variation under 7% for industrial irradiation conditions to the total cumulative absorbed dose. (author)

  18. Uranium series disequilibrium: application to studies of the groundwater regime of the Harwell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Alexander, J.

    1985-03-01

    Regional groundwater systems incorporating argillaceous formations beneath the Harwell site have been studied as part of a national research programme of investigation into the feasibility of disposal of low and intermediate radioactive wastes into argillaceous rocks. The principal aim of the programme is to establish the groundwater flow patterns using hydrogeological and geochemical methods in association with isotope contents and uranium series disequilibrium and thus provide an independent approach to the study of effective permeabilities of clay lithologies in a sedimentary sequence. Thirty four groundwater samples derived from the high permeability formations in the Harwell region have been analysed for uranium and thorium content and 234 U/ 238 U, 230 Th/ 234 U and 230 Th/ 232 Th activity ratios. The uranium isotopic signatures have been interpreted in terms of the regional groundwater circulation and mixing patterns. The most significant zones of groundwater mixing determined from uranium isotopic data are situated just beneath the edge of the confined strata. These zones coincide with the locations of hydraulic lows in the Great Oolite and the Corallian formations towards which the regional groundwaters move. It is concluded that the uranium isotopic signatures can be used to identify water masses and to evaluate mixing of groundwaters in a sedimentary sequence on a regional scale. (author)

  19. Management of scientific staff at the Harwell Laboratory of the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.G.E.

    1982-01-01

    The primary role of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell is to serve as the main research laboratory supporting the U.K. nuclear power development programme; in addition it undertakes research and development outside of the nuclear field for Government and industrial customers. Overall, there is the need to manage a very large number of separate and often disparate items of work and to ensure effective communication with senior managers of the nuclear power programme and with commercial customers on allocation of resources and technical progress. This is done through a version of 'matrix management'. A large proportion of the technical, commercial and staff management decisions are devolved within Harwell's matrix organisation where teams of staff required for particular items of R and D are formed by arrangements agreed locally between the two axes of the matrix. The smaller groupings of staff created in the matrix are important in providing environments where good staff management practices can be established and where a team spirit aids motivation and technical initiative. (author)

  20. The atmosphere of Pluto as observed by New Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, G Randall; Stern, S Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B; Weaver, Harold A; Young, Leslie A; Summers, Michael E; Strobel, Darrell F; Hinson, David P; Kammer, Joshua A; Parker, Alex H; Steffl, Andrew J; Linscott, Ivan R; Parker, Joel Wm; Cheng, Andrew F; Slater, David C; Versteeg, Maarten H; Greathouse, Thomas K; Retherford, Kurt D; Throop, Henry; Cunningham, Nathaniel J; Woods, William W; Singer, Kelsi N; Tsang, Constantine C C; Schindhelm, Eric; Lisse, Carey M; Wong, Michael L; Yung, Yuk L; Zhu, Xun; Curdt, Werner; Lavvas, Panayotis; Young, Eliot F; Tyler, G Leonard

    2016-03-18

    Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. Whereas the lower atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 200 kilometers) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N2) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 1800 kilometers or so), whereas methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), and ethane (C2H6) are abundant minor species and likely feed the production of an extensive haze that encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state--over seasonal or geologic time scales. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Pluto behaving badly: false beliefs and their consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Shari R; Laney, Cara; Morris, Erin K; Garry, Maryanne; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-01-01

    We exposed college students to suggestive materials in order to lead them to believe that, as children, they had a negative experience at Disneyland involving the Pluto character. A sizable minority of subjects developed a false belief or memory that Pluto had uncomfortably licked their ear. Suggestions about a positive experience with Pluto led to even greater acceptance of a lovable ear-licking episode. False beliefs and memories had repercussions; those seduced by the bad suggestions were not willing to pay as much for a Pluto souvenir. These findings are among the first to demonstrate that false beliefs can have repercussions for people, meaning that they can influence their later thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors.

  2. The Pluto Case and the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega de Albuquerque, Vanessa; Leite, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Pluto had its classification changed in 2006, from planet to “dwarf planet”. This change had great impact in the media. Pluto returned to the news due to the arrival of New Horizons probe to Pluto in July 2015. Whereas the understanding of the complexity involved in the definition of celestial bodies could help us to show science as a historic, social, collective, non-linear and non-neutral process, it is presented a historical survey of the episodes involving the various definitions for planet, since the first observations of the sky made by our ancestors until the resolutions that defined which are the attributes of a "planet " made at the 26th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union, meeting at which it was decided to reclassify Pluto. In order contribute to help perform discussions about the nature of science involving Astronomy themes, it is explained which features of scientific knowledge become evident during the study of the mentioned episodes.

  3. Operation of the Harwell UK 14C Data Base and its Expansion through Data Exchange with Other Laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, A.J.; Otlet, R.L.; Housley, R.A.; Plicht, Johannes van der

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer data bases for storage and retrieval of 14C data is a logical application for the rapidly expanding numbers of 14C determinations. Harwell has established a data base for all samples originating from sites in the United Kingdom and Eire. The core of the data is the Council for

  4. Dynamical and observational constraints on satellites in the inner Pluto-Charon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan; Parker, Joel William; Duncan, Martin J.; Snowdall, J. Clark, Jr.; Levison, Harold F.

    1994-01-01

    It is not known if Pluto has other satellites besides its massive partner Charon. In the past, searches for additional satellites in the Pluto-Charon system have extended from the solar-tidal stability boundary (approximately 90 arcsec from Pluto) inward to about 1 arcsec from Pluto. Here we further explore the inner (i.e., less than 10 arcsec) region of the Pluto-Charon system to determine where additional satellites might lie. In particular, we report on (1) dynamical simulations to delineate the region where unstable orbits lie around Charon, (2) dynamical simulations which use the low orbital eccentricity of Charon to constrain the mass of any third body near Pluto, and (3) analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival images to search for satellites in the inner Pluto-Charon system. Although no objects were found, significant new constraints on bodies orbiting in the inner Pluto-Charon system were obtained.

  5. The production of iodine-123 on the Harwell variable energy cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuninghame, J.G.; Hill, J.I.S.; Nichols, A.L.; Taylor, N.K.

    1978-01-01

    123 I has often been called the isotope of choice for dynamic body function studies in nuclear medicine. There has therefore, been a keen interest in the possibility of regular supply of high purity 123 I produced by the Harwell Variable Energy Cyclotron (VEC) and Synchrocyclotron (SC). This report describes a three year research and development programme on the VEC which has resulted in a method for the safe and reliable large scale production of 123 I by irradiation of di-iodomethane with 58 MeV protons. The quality of the product, and the medical trials which have been carried out with it, are also discussed. The processing and handling of the hundreds of millicuries produced during a run presents serious handling problems. These have been solved and the methods and equipment developed are described. (author)

  6. Mineralogical and lithochemical studies of strata beneath the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Morgan, D.J.

    1982-11-01

    Determinations have been made of the mineralogy and lithochemistry of the principal lithological units of the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic rocks penetrated by boreholes at the Harwell Research Site. Samples were taken at approximately 9m intervals from the Upper Greensand to the Coal Measures, together with a number from the Chalk. Mineralogical analyses were carried out using X-ray diffraction, with thermal analysis and surface area measurements aiding quantification. Major and trace element determinations were made using direct electron excitation X-ray spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence respectively. Other chemical determinations included organic carbon, sulphate and 'exchangeable' cations. The mineralogical and lithochemical variations within and between the major litho-stratigraphic units are discussed and compared with published data for other localities. (author)

  7. Observational Constraints on a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Smith, H. T.; Bagenal, F.; Brown, L. E.; Elliott, H. A.; Haggerty, D. K.; Horanyi, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; McComas, D. J.; Piquette, M. R.; Sidrow, E. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Zirnstein, E.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto's orbit, and place observational constraints based primarily on comparison of New Horizons (NH) measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, should result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto's exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets closer to the Sun, neutrals escape Pluto readily owing, e.g., to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity. Importantly, escaped neutrals have a long lifetime due to the great distance from the Sun, ~100 years for photoionization of N2 and ~180 years for photoionization of N, which results from disassociated N2. Despite the lengthy 248-year orbit, these long e-folding lifetimes may allow an enhanced neutral population to form an extended gas cloud that modifies the N2 spatial profile near Pluto. These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but once ionized N2+ or N+ are picked up by the solar wind, reaching ~50 keV, making these pickup ions (PUIs) detectable by NH's Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument. PEPSSI observations analyzed to date may constrain the N2 density; the remaining ~95% of the encounter data, scheduled for downlink in August along with similarly anticipated data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) experiment, should help determine the Pluto outgassing rates. Measurements from SWAP include the solar wind speed, a quantity that greatly enhances PUI studies by enabling us to directly account for the PUI distribution's sensitive dependence on plasma speed. Note that anomalous cosmic ray Si observed at Voyager is overabundant by a factor of ~3000 relative to interstellar composition. This might be related to "outer source" PUIs, but the fact that N2 and Si are indistinguishable in many instruments could mean that N2 is actually driving this apparent Si discrepancy.

  8. Ductile austenitic steel for fuel cans and core components of sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, L.

    1995-01-01

    Two austenitic steel melts of a new composition have been studied after irradiation in the PFR fast neutron flux, in the BR2 reactor, and in the Harwell V.E. Cyclotron. The investigations were focussed on helium embrittlement and irradiation induced swelling. (orig.)

  9. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  10. Heterogeneous and Evolving Distributions of Pluto's Volatile Surface Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, William M.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Buie, M. W.; Young, E. F.

    2013-10-01

    We report observations of Pluto's 0.8 to 2.4 µm reflectance spectrum with IRTF/SpeX on 70 nights over the 13 years from 2001 to 2013. The spectra show numerous vibrational absorption features of simple molecules CH4, CO, and N2 condensed as ices on Pluto's surface. These absorptions are modulated by the planet's 6.39 day rotation period, enabling us to constrain the longitudinal distributions of the three ices. Absorptions of CO and N2 are concentrated on Pluto's anti-Charon hemisphere, unlike absorptions of less volatile CH4 ice that are offset by roughly 90° from the longitude of maximum CO and N2 absorption. In addition to the diurnal/longitudinal variations, the spectra show longer term trends. On decadal timescales, Pluto's stronger CH4 absorption bands have deepened, while the amplitude of their diurnal variation has diminished, consistent with additional CH4 absorption by high northern latitude regions rotating into view as the sub-Earth latitude moves north (as defined by the system's angular momentum vector). Unlike the CH4 absorptions, Pluto's CO and N2 absorptions are declining over time, suggesting more equatorial or southerly distributions of those species. The authors gratefully thank the staff of IRTF for their tremendous assistance over the dozen+ years of this project. The work was funded in part by NSF grants AST-0407214 and AST-0085614 and NASA grants NAG5-4210 and NAG5-12516.

  11. Haze heats Pluto's atmosphere yet explains its cold temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Strobel, Darrell F; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2017-11-15

    Pluto's atmosphere is cold and hazy. Recent observations have shown it to be much colder than predicted theoretically, suggesting an unknown cooling mechanism. Atmospheric gas molecules, particularly water vapour, have been proposed as a coolant; however, because Pluto's thermal structure is expected to be in radiative-conductive equilibrium, the required water vapour would need to be supersaturated by many orders of magnitude under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Here we report that atmospheric hazes, rather than gases, can explain Pluto's temperature profile. We find that haze particles have substantially larger solar heating and thermal cooling rates than gas molecules, dominating the atmospheric radiative balance from the ground to an altitude of 700 kilometres, above which heat conduction maintains an isothermal atmosphere. We conclude that Pluto's atmosphere is unique among Solar System planetary atmospheres, as its radiative energy equilibrium is controlled primarily by haze particles instead of gas molecules. We predict that Pluto is therefore several orders of magnitude brighter at mid-infrared wavelengths than previously thought-a brightness that could be detected by future telescopes.

  12. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  13. High Resolution HST Images of Pluto and Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    At the Edge of the Solar System Click here to jump to photo. The remote planet Pluto and its moon Charon orbit the Sun at a mean distance of almost 6,000 million kilometres, or nearly fourty times farther out than the Earth. During a recent investigation by an international group of astronomers [1], the best picture ever of Pluto and Charon [2] was secured with the European Space Agency's Faint Object Camera at the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). It shows the two objects as individual disks, and it is likely that further image enhancement will allow us to see surface features on Pluto. A Very Special Pair of Celestial Objects Almost all the known facts about these two bodies show that they are quite unusual: Pluto's orbit around the Sun is much more elongated and more inclined to the main plane of the Solar System than that of any other major planet; Charon's orbit around Pluto is nearly perpendicular to this plane; their mutual distance is amazingly small when compared to their size; Charon is half the size of Pluto and the ratio of their masses is much closer to unity than is the case for all other planets and their moons. Moreover, both are small and solid bodies, in contrast to the other, large and gaseous planets in the outer Solar System. We do not know why this is so. But there is another important aspect which makes Pluto and Charon even more interesting: at this very large distance from the Sun, any evolutionary changes happen very slowly. It is therefore likely that Pluto and Charon hold important clues to the conditions that prevailed in the early Solar System and thus to the origin and the evolution of the Solar System as a whole. Long and Difficult Analysis Ahead The present image shows that the overall quality of the new data obtained with the ESA Faint Object Camera on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope is extremely good. However, such an image represents only the first step of a subsequent, detailed analysis with the ultimate goal of determining

  14. Pushing back the frontier - A mission to the Pluto-Charon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, R.; Stern, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    A flyby mission to Pluto is proposed. The size, orbit, atmosphere, and surface of Pluto, and the Pluto-Charon system are described. The benefits of a planetary flyby compared to ground observations are discussed in terms of imaging capabilities. Planned payloads include a plasma science package, a UV spectrometer, and a thermal mapper. The advantages of a dual launch to Mars and the need for a Jupiter-Pluto transfer are considered. A diagram of a spacecraft for a flyby study of Pluto is provided

  15. Pushing back the frontier - A mission to the Pluto-Charon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Robert; Stern, S. Alan

    1990-01-01

    A flyby mission to Pluto is proposed. The size, orbit, atmosphere, and surface of Pluto, and the Pluto-Charon system are described. The benefits of a planetary flyby compared to ground observations are discussed in terms of imaging capabilities. Planned payloads include a plasma science package, a UV spectrometer, and a thermal mapper. The advantages of a dual launch to Mars and the need for a Jupiter-Pluto transfer are considered. A diagram of a spacecraft for a flyby study of Pluto is provided.

  16. Hydrogeological investigations in the Harwell region: the use of environmental isotopes, inert gas contents, and the uranium decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.; Andrews, J.N.

    1984-12-01

    A comprehensive range of environmental isotopes, radioelement and dissolved gas contents have been measured in groundwaters from the high permeability formations of the Harwell area. These analyses were undertaken as part of a hydrochemical validation of groundwater circulation patterns derived from potentiometric data. These investigations have focused upon the Corallian and Great Oolite formations since these sandwich the Oxford Clay. Geochemical, isotopic, radioelement and inert gas studies have demonstrated consistent trends which substantiate fluid migration patterns derived from hydraulic considerations. Groundwaters at downdip localities in both the Corallian and Great Oolite formations are the oldest waters sampled from the region. Variations in trends in parameters can be attributed to cross-formational flow and subsequent mixing of groundwaters. Individually these techniques can only provide limited information, but the combination of methods used have provided corroborative evidence concerning the direction of fluid circulation in the Harwell region. (author)

  17. PFERD Mission: Pluto Flyby Exploration/Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Gary; Zayed, Husni; Herring, Jason; Fuehne, Doug; Sutton, Kevin; Sharkey, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The Pluto Flyby Exploration/Research Design (PFERD) mission will consist of a flyby spacecraft to Pluto and its satellite, Charon. The mission lifetime is expected to be 18 years. The Titan 4 with a Centaur upper stage will be utilized to launch the craft into the transfer orbit. The proposal was divided into six main subsystems: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) command, communications, and control: (3) altitude and articulation control; (4) power and propulsion; (5) structures and thermal control; and (6) mission management and costing. Tradeoff studies were performed to optimize all factors of design, including survivability, performance, cost, and weight. Problems encountered in the design are also presented.

  18. Influence of Bulk Carbonaceous Matter on Pluto's Structure and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Spencer, J. R.; Moore, J. M.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.

    2017-12-01

    The rock/ice mass ratio of the Pluto system is about 2/1 (McKinnon et al., Icarus 287, 2017) [1], though this neglects the potential role of bulk carbonaceous matter ("CHON"), an important cometary component and one likely important in the ancestral Kuiper belt. The wealth of measurements at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (a Jupiter-family comet and thus one formed in the same region of the outer Solar System as Pluto) by Rosetta are particularly instructive. E.g., Davidsson et al. (A&A 592, 2016) [2] propose in their "composition A" that 67P/Ch-G is 25% metal/sulfides, 42% rock/organics, and 32% ice by mass. For their assumed component densities, the overall grain density is 1820 kg/m3. Fulle et al. (MNRAS 462, 2016) [3] posit 5 ± 2 volume % Fe-sulfides of density 4600 kg/m3, 28 ± 5% Mg,Fe-olivines and -pyroxenes of density 3200 kg/m3, 52 ± 12% hydrocarbons of density 1200 kg/m3, and 15 ± 6% ices of 917 kg/m3. This composition yields a primordial grain density (dust + ice) of 1885 ± 240 kg/m3. Both of these cometary density estimates [2,3] are consistent with Pluto-Charon, especially as Pluto's uncompressed (STP) density is close to 1820 kg/m3 and that of the system as a whole is close to 1800 kg/m3 [1]. We consider the potential compositional and structural implications of these proposed 67P/Ch-G compositions when applied to Pluto and Charon. The amount of ice in model A of [2] is a good match to Pluto structural models. Their rock/organics component, however, is taken to be half graphite (2000 kg/m3) by volume. The composition in [3] is more divergent: very ice poor, and on the order of 50% light hydrocarbons by volume. Regardless of the differences between [2] and [3], the possibility of massive internal graphite or carbonaceous layers within Pluto is real. We discuss the possible consequences for Pluto's structure, rock/ice ratio, thermal and chemical evolution, and even interpretation of its gravity field from tectonics. For example, radiogenic heat

  19. Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and the outer solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    Unlike all the planets closer to the Sun, known since antiquity, the farthest reaches are the discoveries of the modern world. Uranus was discovered in 1781, Neptune in 1846, Pluto in 1930, the Kuiper belt group of objects in 1992, and though the Oort cloud has been theorized since 1950, its first member was found in 2004. The discovery of the outer planets made such an impression on the minds of mankind that they were immortalized in the names of the newly discovered elements: uranium, neptunium, and plutonium, an astonishingly deadly constituent of atomic bombs. Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and t

  20. The visible spectrum of Pluto: secular and longitudinal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Vania; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemí; Emery, Joshua P.; Licandro, Javier; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Grundy, Will; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Continuous near-infrared spectroscopic observations during the last 30 years enabled the characterization of the Pluto's surface and the study of its variability. Nevertheless, only few data are available in the visible range, where the nature of the complex-organics can be studied.For this reason, we started an observational campaign to obtain the Pluto's relative reflectance in the visible range, with the aim of characterizing the different components of its surface, and providing ground based observations in support of the New Horizons mission. We observed Pluto on six nights in 2014, with the imager/spectrograph ACAM@WHT (La Palma, Spain). We obtained six spectra in the 0.40 - 0.93 µm range, that covered a whole Pluto's rotational period (6.4 days).To study longitudinal variations, we computed for all the spectra the spectral slope, and the position and the depth of the methane ice absorption bands. Also, to search for secular or seasonal variations we compared our data with previously published results.All the spectra present a red slope, indicating the presence of complex organics on Pluto's surface, and show the methane ice absorption bands between 0.73 and 0.90 μm. We also report the detection of the CH4 absorption band at 0.62 μm, already detected in the spectra of Makemake and Eris. The measurement of the band depth at 0.62 μm in the new spectra of Pluto, and in the spectra of Makemake and Eris, permits us to estimate the Lambert coefficient, not measured yet at this wavelength, at a temperature of 30 K and 40 K.We find that all the CH4 bands present a blue shift. This shift is minimum at the Charon-facing hemisphere, where the CH4 is also more abundant, indicating a higher degree of saturation of CH4 in the CH4:N2 dilution at this hemisphere.Comparing with data in the literature, we found that the longitudinal and secular variations of the parameters measured in our spectra are in accordance with previous results and with the distribution of the dark

  1. Albedo matters: Understanding runaway albedo variations on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. A.; Ennico, K.; Grundy, W.; Olkin, C. B.; Weaver, H. A.; New Horizons Surface Composition Theme

    2018-03-01

    The data returned from NASA's New Horizons reconnaissance of the Pluto system show striking albedo variations from polar to equatorial latitudes as well as sharp longitudinal boundaries. Pluto has a high obliquity (currently 119°) that varies by 23° over a period of less than 3 million years. This variation, combined with its regressing longitude of perihelion (360° over 3.7 million years), creates epochs of "Super Seasons" where one pole is pointed at the Sun at perihelion, thereby experiencing a short, relatively warm summer followed by its longest possible period of winter darkness. In contrast, the other pole experiences a much longer, less intense summer and a short winter season. We use a simple volatile sublimation and deposition model to explore the relationship between albedo variations, latitude, and volatile sublimation and deposition for the current epoch as well as historical epochs during which Pluto experienced these "Super Seasons." Our investigation quantitatively shows that Pluto's geometry creates the potential for runaway albedo and volatile variations, particularly in the equatorial region, which can sustain stark longitudinal contrasts like the ones we see between Tombaugh Regio and the informally named Cthulhu Regio.

  2. Mineralogy and petrography of Caithness Flagstones used in sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloodworth, A.J.; Kemp, S.J.; Inglethorpe, S.D.J.; Morgan, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    The mineralogy and petrography of a suite of samples taken from the Caithness Flagstones are described. Samples were collected from core material obtained from a borehole beneath DNE Dounreay, Highland Region, and are duplicates of those used in sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratories. The geological background of the samples is described, with particular emphasis on the development of lithologically distinct facies within the laminated lacustrine sediments examined in this study. Optical examination reveals distinctive sedimentary structures and petrofabrics associated with different lithofacies. Lithofacies type is also reflected in mineralogical variation within the sequence. Highly-laminated, deeper-water facies rocks are typified by the presence of ferroan-dolomite cement, with relatively high clay and organic matter contents. Detrital quartz and feldspar are more abundant in the shallow water facies and the carbonate assemblage in these rocks is dominated by calcite. Though total clay content varies with facies, the distribution of clay mineral species remains largely identical. There is a complex pattern of carbonate and pyrite diagenesis within these sediments. (author)

  3. Radiation doses to members of the public around AWRE, Aldermaston, ROF, Burghfield and AERE, Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionian, J.; Wan, S.L.; Wrixon, A.D.

    1987-07-01

    All significant sources of radiation exposure are considered. (Natural radiation, fallout from nuclear weapons testing, medical procedures and reported atmospheric discharges). Discharges to the Thames are also made from the three sites, but the water downstream of the discharge points is not used for drinking, although consideration is given to doses that might be received by a few hypothetical individuals from a number of possible exposure pathways resulting from these liquid discharges. The peak annual dose equivalents to the red bone marrow of 1-year-old children at 5 km from the sites are many orders of magnitude below that received from natural radiation. The factors are 34,000, 190,000,000 and 1,600 for AWRE, Aldermaston, ROF, Burghfield and AERE, Harwell, respectively. Similar factors apply to other population groups considered. Even at 0.5 km from the sites, the doses from the discharges are only a factor of about 20 higher than those at 5 km. The conclusion is that reported discharges make negligible contribution to total radiation doses received by the population living around the sites and are in no way responsible for increased incidence of leukaemia amongst children, if an increased incidence is shown to exist. (author)

  4. Empirical evaluation of lung solubilities of airborne contamination at Harwell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, R. K.; Wilson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Lung solubility is the key parameter in determining intakes and doses from inhalation of airborne contamination. However, information on lung solubility can be difficult to acquire, particularly for the historical exposures that are of relevance to lifetime-dose reconstruction. In this study, an empirical approach has been made in which over 200 dose assessments, mainly for Pu and Am, from the period 1986 to 2005 were re-evaluated and the solubility mix required for the best fit to the data was determined. The average of these solubility mixtures for any building or facility can be used as the default solubility for retrospective dose assessments for that facility. Results are presented for a radiochemistry facility, a materials development facility and a waste-storage/handling building at Harwell. The latter two areas are characterised by aerosols that are predominantly insoluble (type S), whereas the radiochemistry facility has a heterogeneous mixture of insoluble and soluble aerosols. The implications of these results for dose reconstruction are discussed in the paper. (authors)

  5. Reactivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) grout and various lithologies from the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; George, I.A.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Robins, N.S.

    1985-08-01

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian Beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC. (author)

  6. Determination of the geotechnical properties of mudrocks from geophysical logging of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horseman, S.T.; McCann, D.M.; McEwen, T.J.; Brightman, M.A.

    1984-11-01

    The geotechnical properties of mainly argillaceous strata at depth in borehole HW3 at Harwell, Oxfordshire have been determined using a variety of borehole geophysical logging techniques. The aim of this work was to assess the usefulness of such techniques for the indirect measurement of the geotechnical properties of the rocks and the subsequent bearing that such knowledge would have on the design of a site investigation programme for the deep disposal of non heat emitting radioactive waste. The borehole was logged by Seismograph Services Ltd over the interval from 165 - 551 m., whilst open and mud filled. Seven different geophysical logs were run: caliper, formation density, neutron-neutron, natural-gamma, 3D velocity, spontaneous potential, single point resistance and 16''/64'' normal resistivity. The logs that were of any use in determining geotechnical properties were the neutron-neutron, the formation density and the sonic log. It is suggested that in these types of formation the sonic log, once calibrated for the particular circumstances, could be used to provide a useful downhole strength log. (author)

  7. Spectroscopy of Pluto, 380-930 Nm at Six Longitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Lorenzi, V.; Grundy, William; Licandro, J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution approx..450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical path-length through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 microns) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical path-length through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 microns. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto's spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto's surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  8. A search for temporal changes on Pluto and Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Buratti, B. J.; Devins, S. L.; Beyer, R. A.; Schenk, P.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Cheng, A.; Ennico, K.; Lauer, T. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J.; Young, L. A.; New Horizons Science Team

    2018-03-01

    A search for temporal changes on Pluto and Charon was motivated by (1) the discovery of young surfaces in the Pluto system that imply ongoing or recent geologic activity, (2) the detection of active plumes on Triton during the Voyager 2 flyby, and (3) the abundant and detailed information that observing geologic processes in action provides about the processes. A thorough search for temporal changes using New Horizons images was completed. Images that covered the same region were blinked and manually inspected for any differences in appearance. The search included full-disk images such that all illuminated regions of both bodies were investigated and higher resolution images such that parts of the encounter hemispheres were investigated at finer spatial scales. Changes of appearance between different images were observed but in all cases were attributed to variability of the imaging parameters (especially geometry) or artifacts. No differences of appearance that are strongly indicative of a temporal change were found on the surface or in the atmosphere of either Pluto or Charon. Limits on temporal changes as a function of spatial scale and temporal interval during the New Horizons encounter are determined. The longest time interval constraint is one Pluto/Charon rotation period (∼6.4 Earth days). Contrast reversal and high-phase bright features that change in appearance with solar phase angle are identified. The change of appearance of these features is most likely due to the change in phase angle rather than a temporal change. Had active plumes analogous to the plumes discovered on Triton been present on the encounter hemispheres of either Pluto or Charon, they would have been detected. The absence of active plumes may be due to temporal variability (i.e., plumes do occur but none were active on the encounter hemispheres during the epoch of the New Horizons encounter) or because plumes do not occur. Several dark streak features that may be deposits from past

  9. An improved computer controlled triple-axis neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.J.; Hall, J.W.; Hutchings, M.T.

    1975-07-01

    A description is given of the computer-controlled triple-axis neutron spectrometer installed at the PLUTO reactor at Harwell. The reasons for an nature of recent major improvements are discussed. Following a general description of the spectrometer, details are then given of the new computerised control system, including the functions of the various programs which are now available to the user. (author)

  10. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  11. Young surface of Pluto's Sputnik Planitia caused by viscous relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Q.; Hu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Lin, D. N. C.; Yang, J.; Showman, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The young surface of Pluto's Sputnik Planitia (SP) is one of the most prominent features observed by the New Horizon mission (Moore et al., 2016; Stern et al., 2015). No crater has been confirmed on the heart-shaped SP basin, in contrast to more than 5000 identified over comparable areas elsewhere (Robbins et al., 2016). The SP basin is filled with mostly N2 ice and small amount of CH4 and CO ice (Protopapa et al., 2017). Previous studies suggested that the SP surface might be renewed through vigorous thermal convection (McKinnon et al., 2016), and that the surface age may be as young as 500,000 years. In this paper, we present numerical simulations demonstrating that craters can be removed by rapid viscous relaxation of N2 ice over much shorter timescales. The crater retention age is less than 1000 years if the N2-ice thickness is several kilometers. McKinnon, W. B., Nimmo, F., Wong, T., Schenk, P. M., White, O. L., Roberts, J., . . . Umurhan, O. (2016). Convection in a volatile nitrogen-ice-rich layer drives Pluto's geological vigour. Nature, 534(7605), 82-85. Moore, J. M., McKinnon, W. B., Spencer, J. R., Howard, A. D., Schenk, P. M., Beyer, R. A., . . . White, O. L. (2016). The geology of Pluto and Charon through the eyes of New Horizons. Science, 351(6279), 1284-1293. Protopapa, S., Grundy, W. M., Reuter, D. C., Hamilton, D. P., Dalle Ore, C. M., Cook, J. C., . . . Young, L. A. (2017). Pluto's global surface composition through pixel-by-pixel Hapke modeling of New Horizons Ralph/LEISA data. Icarus, Volume 287, 218-228. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2016.11.028Robbins, S. J., Singer, K. N., Bray, V. J., Schenk, P., Lauer, T. R., Weaver, H. A., . . . Porter, S. (2016). Craters of the Pluto-Charon system. Icarus. Stern, S. A., Bagenal, F., Ennico, K., Gladstone, G. R., Grundy, W. M., McKinnon, W. B., . . . Zirnstein, E. (2015). The Pluto system: Initial results from its exploration by New Horizons. Science, 350(6258), aad1815.

  12. SEM/TIMS analysis trials on hotswipe samples taken from a shielded cell at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushingham, J.; Vatter, I.; Cooke, R.

    1998-09-01

    The IAEA require advanced techniques and procedures for the detection of traces of actinides to be applied to their environmental sampling programme for nuclear safeguards as a means to detect undeclared activities. 'Swipe' samples taken from within nuclear facilities by IAEA inspectors require analysis to determine their actinide content and composition by bulk and particle measurements. The use of analytical equipment capable of analysing individual particles, particularly of actinides, is essential to optimise the IAEA's aim to monitor Member State's nuclear activities more proficiently. A trial has been undertaken at the Harwell Laboratory of AEA Technology to establish the efficacy of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) for the particle and bulk characterisation, respectively, of actinides on samples taken from within a shielded cell. These measurements were supported by γ-spectrometry and α-spectrometry. 'Hotswipe' samples taken from within a shielded cell with a well-known recent history have been prepared for particle and bulk analysis. SEM has been used to characterise individual particles from the swipe samples and the results have been related to known cell activities. Samples were prepared for SEM using a simple procedure to minimise the potential for sample contamination. The method proved to be capable of identifying 1 μm particles that contained U, Pu, Pa and Np. The measurement of U/Pu ratios was limited to particles that contained >2% Pu in U by weight. TIMS, together with alpha spectrometry, has been used to determine the bulk actinide composition of the samples whilst gamma spectrometry has been used to determine the fission product composition. Further work to improve the potential of SEM, and also secondary ionisation mass spectrometry (SIMS), for the measurement of hotswipe samples has been proposed. (author)

  13. Ductile austenitic steel for fuel cans and core components of sodium cooled reactors; Ein duktiler austenitischer Stahl fuer Huellrohre und Kernkomponenten natriumgekuehlter Brueter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, L.

    1995-08-01

    Two austenitic steel melts of a new composition have been studied after irradiation in the PFR fast neutron flux, in the BR2 reactor, and in the Harwell V.E. Cyclotron. The investigations were focussed on helium embrittlement and irradiation induced swelling. (orig.)

  14. Plutos Services: Lead Generation System for the Hotel Advertising Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a business model of Plutos Services and the implementation of a digital concierge service within the hotel advertising industry. The model contains a basic company overview, external analysis, internal analysis and a final recommendation of the business strategy it should use to succeed. I researched the business environment in Canada to determine its position in the current market. I evaluated different strategic alternatives and sub-recommendations for implementing its s...

  15. Bladed Terrain on Pluto: Possible origins and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; White, Oliver L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnon, William B.; Spencer, John R.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Grundy, William M.; Earle, Alissa M.; Schmitt, Bernard; Protopapa, Silvia; Nimmo, Francis; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Hinson, David P.; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Collins, Geoffrey; Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François; Scipioni, Francesca; New Horizons Science Team

    2018-01-01

    Bladed Terrain on Pluto consists of deposits of massive CH4, which are observed to occur within latitudes 30° of the equator and are found almost exclusively at the highest elevations (> 2 km above the mean radius). Our analysis indicates that these deposits of CH4 preferentially precipitate at low latitudes where net annual solar energy input is lowest. CH4 and N2 will both precipitate at low elevations. However, since there is much more N2 in the atmosphere than CH4, the N2 ice will dominate at these low elevations. At high elevations the atmosphere is too warm for N2 to precipitate so only CH4 can do so. We conclude that following the time of massive CH4 emplacement; there have been sufficient excursions in Pluto's climate to partially erode these deposits via sublimation into the blades we see today. Blades composed of massive CH4 ice implies that the mechanical behavior of CH4 can support at least several hundred meters of relief at Pluto surface conditions. Bladed Terrain deposits may be widespread in the low latitudes of the poorly seen sub-Charon hemisphere, based on spectral observations. If these locations are indeed Bladed Terrain deposits, they may mark heretofore unrecognized regions of high elevation.

  16. Sublimation as a landform-shaping process on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; White, Oliver L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnon, William B.; Spencer, John R.; Grundy, Will M.; Lauer, Tod R.; Nimmo, Francis; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-05-01

    Fields of pits, both large and small, in Tombaugh Regio (Sputnik Planitia, and the Pitted Uplands to the east), and along the scarp of Piri Rupes, are examples of landscapes on Pluto where we conclude that sublimation drives their formation and evolution. Our heuristic modeling closely mimics the form, spacing, and arrangement of a variety of Tombaugh Regio's pits. Pluto's sublimation modified landforms appear to require a significant role for (diffusive) mass wasting as suggested by our modeling. In our models, the temporal evolution of pitted surfaces is such that initially lots of time passes with little happening, then eventually, very rapid development of relief and rapid sublimation. Small pits on Sputnik Planitia are consistent with their formation in N2-dominated materials. As N2-ice readily flows, some other ``stiffer'' volatile ice may play a role in supporting the relief of sublimation degraded landforms that exhibit several hundred meters of relief. A strong candidate is CH4, which is spectroscopically observed to be associated with these features, but the current state of rheological knowledge for CH4 ice at Pluto conditions is insufficient for a firm assessment.

  17. PLUTO collaboration: e+e- interactions at PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.Y.; Glasser, R.G.; Kellogg, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Maryland HEP Group has been involved with the PLUTO collaboration investigating e + e - interactions at PETRA since 1977. For the final data taking period the PLUTO detector was modified to include small angle spectrometers to make it sensitive to particles produced at small angles in γγ interactions. Data was taken in this configuration from September of 1981 to July of 1982. The integrated luminosity for this period was about the integral of Ldt = 50 pb -1 . That was the last data taking period for PLUTO and many of the collaborators have joined other PETRA experiments. Data analysis has continued since that time, culminating in many publications in 1984, especially in the area of two photon interactions via the process e + e - → e + e - + γγ → X, where X can consist of hadrons or leptons. The major data analysis effort of the collaboration was spent in understanding the interaction γγ → hadrons. The work was carried out from these different points of view: total cross sections as a function of the center of mass energy of the γγ system, the photon structure function as a function of Q 2 and the Bjorken scaling variable X, and the topological properties of final state hadrons, especially as to whether high transverse momenta particle jets can be observed

  18. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  19. The Pluto system: Initial results from its exploration by New Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S A; Bagenal, F; Ennico, K; Gladstone, G R; Grundy, W M; McKinnon, W B; Moore, J M; Olkin, C B; Spencer, J R; Weaver, H A; Young, L A; Andert, T; Andrews, J; Banks, M; Bauer, B; Bauman, J; Barnouin, O S; Bedini, P; Beisser, K; Beyer, R A; Bhaskaran, S; Binzel, R P; Birath, E; Bird, M; Bogan, D J; Bowman, A; Bray, V J; Brozovic, M; Bryan, C; Buckley, M R; Buie, M W; Buratti, B J; Bushman, S S; Calloway, A; Carcich, B; Cheng, A F; Conard, S; Conrad, C A; Cook, J C; Cruikshank, D P; Custodio, O S; Dalle Ore, C M; Deboy, C; Dischner, Z J B; Dumont, P; Earle, A M; Elliott, H A; Ercol, J; Ernst, C M; Finley, T; Flanigan, S H; Fountain, G; Freeze, M J; Greathouse, T; Green, J L; Guo, Y; Hahn, M; Hamilton, D P; Hamilton, S A; Hanley, J; Harch, A; Hart, H M; Hersman, C B; Hill, A; Hill, M E; Hinson, D P; Holdridge, M E; Horanyi, M; Howard, A D; Howett, C J A; Jackman, C; Jacobson, R A; Jennings, D E; Kammer, J A; Kang, H K; Kaufmann, D E; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusnierkiewicz, D; Lauer, T R; Lee, J E; Lindstrom, K L; Linscott, I R; Lisse, C M; Lunsford, A W; Mallder, V A; Martin, N; McComas, D J; McNutt, R L; Mehoke, D; Mehoke, T; Melin, E D; Mutchler, M; Nelson, D; Nimmo, F; Nunez, J I; Ocampo, A; Owen, W M; Paetzold, M; Page, B; Parker, A H; Parker, J W; Pelletier, F; Peterson, J; Pinkine, N; Piquette, M; Porter, S B; Protopapa, S; Redfern, J; Reitsema, H J; Reuter, D C; Roberts, J H; Robbins, S J; Rogers, G; Rose, D; Runyon, K; Retherford, K D; Ryschkewitsch, M G; Schenk, P; Schindhelm, E; Sepan, B; Showalter, M R; Singer, K N; Soluri, M; Stanbridge, D; Steffl, A J; Strobel, D F; Stryk, T; Summers, M E; Szalay, J R; Tapley, M; Taylor, A; Taylor, H; Throop, H B; Tsang, C C C; Tyler, G L; Umurhan, O M; Verbiscer, A J; Versteeg, M H; Vincent, M; Webbert, R; Weidner, S; Weigle, G E; White, O L; Whittenburg, K; Williams, B G; Williams, K; Williams, S; Woods, W W; Zangari, A M; Zirnstein, E

    2015-10-16

    The Pluto system was recently explored by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, making closest approach on 14 July 2015. Pluto's surface displays diverse landforms, terrain ages, albedos, colors, and composition gradients. Evidence is found for a water-ice crust, geologically young surface units, surface ice convection, wind streaks, volatile transport, and glacial flow. Pluto's atmosphere is highly extended, with trace hydrocarbons, a global haze layer, and a surface pressure near 10 microbars. Pluto's diverse surface geology and long-term activity raise fundamental questions about how small planets remain active many billions of years after formation. Pluto's large moon Charon displays tectonics and evidence for a heterogeneous crustal composition; its north pole displays puzzling dark terrain. Small satellites Hydra and Nix have higher albedos than expected. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Mapping Pluto's Temperature Distribution Through Twenty Years of Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangari, Amanda; Binzel, R. P.; Person, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    Multi-chord, high signal-to-noise Pluto occultations have been observed several times over the past two decades, including events in 1988, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2010 and 2011 (Elliot et al. 1989, 2003, 2007; Person et al. 2008, 2010, 2011). We fit separate immersion and emersion occultation light-curve models to each of the individual light curves obtained from these efforts. Asymmetries in the light curves result in the half-light temperatures for opposite sides of a single chord to differ by up to 20 Kelvin in the largest case. The temperature difference for each chord is consistent using both isothermal (b=0) and non-isothermal (e.g. b=-2.2) models based on the methodology described by Elliot & Young (1992). We examine the relationship between the location of immersion and emersion points on Pluto and these temperatures at the half-light radius and will present results for correlations between these location/temperature data and surface composition maps, Pluto geometry, and accumulated insolation patterns. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy Grant to MIT (NNX10AB27G), and NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Grant to MIT (0707609). The authors would like to acknowledge the late Professor James L. Elliot for his efforts in beginning this work. References: Elliot, J. L., Dunham, E. W., Bosh, A. S., et al. 1989, Icarus, 77,148 Elliot, J. L., Ates, A., Babcock, B. A., et al. 2003, Nature, 424,165 Elliot, J. L., Person, M. J., Gulbis, A. A. S., et al. 2007, AJ, 134, 1 Elliot, J. L., & Young, L. A. 1992, AJ, 103, 991. Person, M. J., Elliot, J. L., Gulbis, A. A. S., et al. 2008, AJ, 136, 1510 Person, M. J., Elliot, J. L., Bosh, A. S., et al. 2010, Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 42, 983 Person, M. J., Dunham, E. W., Bida, T., et al. 2011, EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, 1374.

  1. Earth, Meet Pluto: The New Horizons Education and Communications Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M.

    2015-12-01

    The unique partnership between the NASA New Horizons education/communications and public affairs programs tapped into the excitement of visiting an unexplored planet in a new region of the solar system - resulting in unprecedented public participation in and coverage of a planetary mission. With a range of hands-on learning experiences, Web materials and online , the program provided opportunities for students, educators, museums, science centers, the media, Web surfers and other members of the public to ride along on the first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. The programs leveraged resources, materials and expertise to address a wide range of traditional and nontraditional audiences while providing consistent messages and information on this historic NASA endeavor. The E/C program included a variety of formal lesson plans and learning materials — based on New Horizons science and engineering goals, and aligned with National Research Council's National Science Education Standards — that continue to help students in grades K-12 learn more about science, technology, engineering and mathematics. College students designed and built an actual flight instrument on New Horizons and held internships with the spacecraft integration and test team. New Horizons E/C programs went well beyond the classroom, from a chance for people to send their names to Pluto on board the New Horizons spacecraft before launch, to opportunities for the public to access milestone events and the first-ever close-up views of Pluto in places such as museums, science centers and libraries, TV and the Web — as well as thousands who attended interactive "Plutopalooza" road shows across the country. Teamed with E/C was the public affairs strategy to communicate New Horizons news and messages to media, mission stakeholders, the scientific community and the public. These messages include various aspects of New Horizons, including the progress of the mission and key milestones and achievements

  2. Effects of elevated temperatures during interruption of irradiation on Harwell Red 4034 PMMA and Kodak Biomax alanine film dosimetry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidereas, P.; Patil, D. S.; Garcia, R.; Tracy, R. P.; Holzman, J. M.

    2007-11-01

    In the industrial setting it is not uncommon for a process interruption to occur during irradiation. In this event, dosimeters may be exposed to prolonged periods of elevated temperature without exposure to ionizing radiation. Once the process is restarted, the same dosimeters are exposed to ionizing radiation in order to achieve target dose. The goal of this experiment was to simulate a process interruption within limits and quantify the effects of a combination of factors (heat, time, and fractionation) on dosimeter response. We present an in-depth experimental study on the response of dosimeters that have been irradiated, stored for a fixed period of time at several temperatures, and then re-irradiated. This study was performed using Harwell Red 4034 polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and Kodak BioMax alanine film dosimeters.

  3. Development of a methodology for post closure radiological risk analysis of underground waste repositories. Illustrative assessment of the Harwell site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralewski, Z.A.; Kane, P.; Nicholls, D.B.

    1987-06-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis (pra) is demonstrated for a number of ground water mediated release scenarios at the Harwell Site for a hypothetical repository at a depth of about 150 metres. This is the second stage of development of an overall risk assessment methodology. A procedure for carrying out multi-scenario assessment using available probabilistic risk assessment (pra) models is presented and a general methodology for combining risk contributions is outlined. Appropriate levels of model complexity in pra are discussed. Modelling requirements for the treatment of multiple simultaneous pathways and of site evolution are outlined. Further developments of pra systems are required to increase the realism of both the models and their mode of application, and hence to improve estimates of risk. (author)

  4. Pluto's interaction with its space environment: Solar wind, energetic particles, and dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, F; Horányi, M; McComas, D J; McNutt, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-03-18

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The region's surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate, as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. Observations from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument suggest that ions are accelerated and/or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region, PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes equal to about 1/10 of the flux in the interplanetary medium and increasing with distance downstream. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, which measures grains with radii larger than 1.4 micrometers, detected one candidate impact in ±5 days around New Horizons' closest approach, indicating an upper limit of <4.6 kilometers(-3) for the dust density in the Pluto system. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Origin of the Pluto-Charon system: Constraints from the New Horizons flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Grundy, W. M.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Parker, A. H.; Moore, J. M.; Spencer, J. R.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico Smith, K.; New Horizons Geology, Geophysics; Imaging; Composition Theme Teams

    2017-05-01

    New Horizon's accurate determination of the sizes and densities of Pluto and Charon now permit precise internal models of both bodies to be constructed. Assuming differentiated rock-ice structures, we find that Pluto is close to 2/3 solar-composition anhydrous rock by mass and Charon 3/5 solar-composition anhydrous rock by mass. Pluto and Charon are closer to each other in density than to other large (≳1000-km diameter) Kuiper belt bodies. Despite this, we show that neither the possible presence of an ocean under Pluto's water ice shell (and no ocean within Charon), nor enhanced porosity at depth in Charon's icy crust compared with that of Pluto, are sufficient to make Pluto and Charon's rock mass fractions match. All four small satellites (Styx, Nix, Kerberos, Hydra) appear much icier in comparison with either Pluto or Charon. In terms of a giant impact origin, both these inferences are most consistent with the relatively slow collision of partly differentiated precursor bodies (Canup, Astrophys. J. 141, 35, 2011). This is in turn consistent with dynamical conditions in the ancestral Kuiper belt, but implies that the impact precursors themselves accreted relatively late and slowly (to limit 26Al and accretional heating). The iciness of the small satellites is not consistent with direct formation of the Pluto-Charon system from a streaming instability in the solar nebula followed by prompt collapse of gravitationally bound ;pebble piles,; a proposed formation mechanism for Kuiper belt binaries (Nesvorný et al., Astron. J. 140, 785-793, 2010). Growth of Pluto-scale bodies by accretion of pebbles in the ancestral Kuiper belt is not ruled out, however, and may be needed to prevent the precursor bodies from fully differentiating, due to buried accretional heat, prior to the Charon-forming impact.

  6. Volatile Transport on Pluto: First Results from the 2013 Observing Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Dalba, P. A.; Hicks, M.; Chu, D.; O'Neill, A.; Chesley, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    With the New Horizons spacecraft due to encounter Pluto in slightly less than two years, close scrutiny of this dwarf ice planet has begun in earnest. Ground-based observations are especially critical for context and for a larger temporal excursion. Seasonal transport of volatiles should occur on Pluto, and this transport should be detectable through changes in its rotational light curve, once all variations due to viewing geometry have been modeled. Giving the steady increase observed in Pluto's atmospheric pressure over the past two decades, associated sublimation of frost from the surface has likely occurred, as predicted by volatile transport models. Rotational light curves of Pluto through time have been created for static frost models based on images from the Hubble Space Telescope. These models, which account for changes in viewing geometry, have been compared with observed light curves obtained between 1950 and 2013. No evidence for transport was evident prior to 2000. Observations from 2002 (Buie et al., 2010, Astron. J. 139, 1128) and 2007-2008 (Hicks et al. 2008, B.A.A.S. 40, 460) suggest changes in the frost pattern on Pluto's surface. New observations of Pluto's light curve from the 2013 season from Table Mountain Observatory show no evidence for the large transport of volatiles on Pluto's surface. Our data are the first measurement of a large opposition surge on Pluto similar to that seen on other icy bodies. Both Buie et al. (2010) and our observations from the 2012-2013 seasons show that Pluto is becoming more red in color. This observation makes sense if nitrogen is being removed from the surface to uncover a red, photolyzed substrate of methane. Funded by NASA.

  7. Vigorous convection as the explanation for Pluto's polygonal terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, A J; Melosh, H J; Steckloff, J K; Freed, A M

    2016-06-02

    Pluto's surface is surprisingly young and geologically active. One of its youngest terrains is the near-equatorial region informally named Sputnik Planum, which is a topographic basin filled by nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with minor amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Nearly the entire surface of the region is divided into irregular polygons about 20-30 kilometres in diameter, whose centres rise tens of metres above their sides. The edges of this region exhibit bulk flow features without polygons. Both thermal contraction and convection have been proposed to explain this terrain, but polygons formed from thermal contraction (analogous to ice-wedges or mud-crack networks) of N2 are inconsistent with the observations on Pluto of non-brittle deformation within the N2-ice sheet. Here we report a parameterized convection model to compute the Rayleigh number of the N2 ice and show that it is vigorously convecting, making Rayleigh-Bénard convection the most likely explanation for these polygons. The diameter of Sputnik Planum's polygons and the dimensions of the 'floating mountains' (the hills of of water ice along the edges of the polygons) suggest that its N2 ice is about ten kilometres thick. The estimated convection velocity of 1.5 centimetres a year indicates a surface age of only around a million years.

  8. Advanced radioisotope power source options for Pluto Express

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    In the drive to reduce mass and cost, Pluto Express is investigating using an advanced power conversion technology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RPS) to deliver the required mission power of 74 W(electric) at end of mission. Until this year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). This RTG would be a scaled down GPHS RTG with an inventory of 6 General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) and a mass of 17.8 kg. High efficiency, advanced technology conversion options are being examined to lower the power source mass and to reduce the amount of radioisotope needed. Three technologies are being considered as the advanced converter technology: the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters, and Stirling Engines. Conceptual designs for each of these options have been prepared. Each converter would require only 2 GPHSs to provide the mission power and would have a mass of 6.1, 7.2, and 12.4 kg for AMTEC, TPV, and Stirling Engines respectively. This paper reviews the status of each technology and the projected performance of an advanced RPS based on each technology. Based on the projected performance and spacecraft integration issues, Pluto Express would prefer to use the AMTEC based RPS. However, in addition to technical performance, selection of a power technology will be based on many other factors

  9. CVF spectrophotometry of Pluto - Correlation of composition with albedo. [circularly variable filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcialis, Robert L.; Lebofsky, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    The present time-resolved, 0.96-2.65-micron spectrophotometry for the Pluto-Charon system indicates night-to-night variations in the depths of the methane absorptions such that the bands' equivalent width is near minimum light. The interpretation of these data in terms of a depletion of methane in dark regions of the planet, relative to bright ones, is consistent with the Buie and Fink (1987) observations. The near-IR spectrum of Pluto seems to be dominated by surface frost. It is suggested that the dark equatorial regions of Pluto are redder than those of moderate albedo.

  10. Is Pluto a planet? A historical journey through the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Weintraub, David A

    2007-01-01

    A Note from the Author: On August 24, 2006, at the 26th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in Prague, by a majority vote of only the 424 members present, the IAU (an organization of over 10,000 members) passed a resolution defining planet in such a way as to exclude Pluto and established a new class of objects in the solar system to be called ""dwarf planets,"" which was deliberately designed to include Pluto. With the discovery of Eris (2003 UB313)--an outer solar system object thought to be both slightly larger than Pluto and twice as far from the Sun--astrono

  11. Compaction-Driven Evolution of Pluto's Rocky Core: Implications for Water-Rock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabasova, L. R.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.

    2018-05-01

    We model the compaction of Pluto's rocky core after accretion and explore the potential for hydrothermal circulation within the porous layer, as well as examine its effect on core cooling and the persistence of a liquid internal ocean.

  12. The puzzling detection of x-rays from Pluto by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; McNutt, R. L.; Wolk, S. J.; Bagenal, F.; Stern, S. A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Cravens, T. E.; Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; Weaver, H. A.; Strobel, D. F.; Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Binzel, R. P.; Snios, B. T.; Bhardwaj, A.; Chutjian, A.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K. A.

    2017-05-01

    Using Chandra ACIS-S, we have obtained low-resolution imaging X-ray spectrophotometry of the Pluto system in support of the New Horizons flyby on 14 July 2015. Observations were obtained in a trial ;seed; campaign conducted in one visit on 24 Feb 2014, and a follow-up campaign conducted soon after the New Horizons flyby that consisted of 3 visits spanning 26 Jul to 03 Aug 2015. In a total of 174 ksec of on-target time, in the 0.31 to 0.60 keV passband, we measured 8 total photons in a co-moving 11 × 11 pixel2 box (the 90% flux aperture determined by observations of fixed background sources in the field) measuring ∼121,000 × 121,000 km2 (or ∼100 × 100 RPluto) at Pluto. No photons were detected from 0.60 to 1.0 keV in this box during the same exposures. Allowing for background, we find a net signal of 6.8 counts and a statistical noise level of 1.2 counts, for a detection of Pluto in this passband at > 99.95% confidence. The Pluto photons do not have the spectral shape of the background, are coincident with a 90% flux aperture co-moving with Pluto, and are not confused with any background source, so we consider them as sourced from the Pluto system. The mean 0.31 - 0.60 keV X-ray power from Pluto is 200 +200/-100 MW, in the middle range of X-ray power levels seen for other known Solar System emission sources: auroral precipitation, solar X-ray scattering, and charge exchange (CXE) between solar wind (SW) ions and atmospheric neutrals. We eliminate auroral effects as a source, as Pluto has no known magnetic field and the New Horizons Alice UV spectrometer detected no airglow from Pluto during the flyby. Nano-scale atmospheric haze particles could lead to enhanced resonant scattering of solar X-rays from Pluto, but the energy signature of the detected photons does not match the solar spectrum and estimates of Pluto's scattered X-ray emission are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude below the 3.9 ± 0.7 × 10-5cps found in our observations. Charge-exchange-driven emission

  13. Solid methane on Triton and Pluto - 3- to 4-micron spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John R.; Buie, Marc W.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    Methane has been identified in the Pluto/Charon system on the basis of absorption features in the reflectance spectrum at 1.5 and 2.3 microns; attention is presently given to observations of a 3.25 micron-centered deep absorption feature in Triton and Pluto/Charon system reflectance spectra. This absorption may indicate the presence of solid methane, constituting either the dominant surface species or a mixture with a highly transparent substance, such as N2 frost.

  14. New Insights into the Structure, Origin, and Evolution of Pluto and Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Spencer, J. R.; Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Buie, M. W.; Porter, S.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The July 2015 New Horizons flyby has removed a long-standing obstacle to understanding the cosmogony of the Pluto-Charon system: the uncertain radius of Pluto. Combined with precise astrometric fits to the barycenter of the Pluto-Charon binary from HST observations of the more distant, small satellites (M. Brozović et al., Icarus 246, 317-329, 2015), the densities of both Pluto and Charon are now known. At the 10% level, the densities of Pluto and Charon are rather similar, as opposed to the more divergent density estimates of years past in which Charon was thought to be substantially icier. In the context of a giant impact origin for binaries, a rock-poor Charon corresponds to an iron-poor Moon in the terrestrial case, with differentiated precursors being implied in both cases. A rock-rich Charon, however, implies that the precursor impacting bodies were at most only partially differentiated — possessing relatively thin ice shells (R.M. Canup, Astron. J. 141, 35, 2011). This suggests some combination of relatively slow and/or late accretion in the ancestral Kuiper belt. A more rock-rich Charon also implies a more vigorous geological history, all other things being equal. For Pluto, the evolution to the surface of a substantial mass of supervolatile ices increases the likelihood that internal volatiles such as ammonia and methanol have been sequestered in an internal, aqueous layer (or ocean).

  15. New Horizons: The Exploration of the Pluto System and The Kuiper Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    New Horizons is NASA's mission to explore the Pluto system and the Kuiper Belt (KB). New Horizons launched on 19 January 2006. It made the first exploration of the Pluto system in July 2015 and is now on a five year long extended mission to explore the Kuiper Belt and objects in it. The spacecraft carries a sophisticated payload of imagers, spectrometers, and other scientific instruments that have been used to study Pluto, its five moons, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), and the heliosphere. The flyby of the Pluto system by New Horizons revealed a complex planet and satellite system. Beyond providing rich geological, compositional, and atmospheric datasets, New Horizons demonstrated that Pluto has been surprisingly geologically and climatologically active throughout 4+ Gyr, and that it exhibits a surprisingly complex range of phenomenology and geologic expression that rivals Mars in its richness. I will describe the mission's objectives, the capabilities of the payload, the flyby of the planet, and some major and some recent scientific discoveries made to date. Chief among the results I will discuss will be the evidence for various kinds of internal/geological/atmospheric/volatile transport activity at Pluto. I will close by briefly also outlining the extended mission flyby of KBO 2014 MU69 on 1 Jan 2019 and the cruise science studies of dozens of KBOs being performed en route to and after that flyby.

  16. The petrography of the Jurassic core from the Harwell research site. Part 1: Kimmeridge Clay, Corallian Beds and Oxford Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.

    1983-06-01

    Detailed examination by mineralogical and petrological techniques has enabled a detailed characterisation of the lithologies of the Oxford Clay, Corallian Beds and the Kimmeridge Clay beneath the Harwell Research Site. Information obtained has revealed the nature of the bulk mineralogy, pore-types, pore-surface mineralogy and post-depositional alteration of the rocks. Diagenesis has played an important part in determining the mineralogy, porosity and fabric of the rocks and has had the greatest variation of effects in the Corallian Beds, determining the phases now in contact with groundwater. It is these authigenic phases that are of key interest in assessing the behaviour of radionuclides which may be released into the local groundwater systems. The importance of the different pore-types characterised during this investigation and of the mineral phases lining these potential pathways for groundwater movement are discussed in detail at the end of this report. Diagenesis has reduced primary porosity in many of the Corallian rocks by calcite precipitation. In such rocks where a cohesive cement is present, groundwater flow must occur along large-scale fractures and more slowly along intercrystalline grain-boundary cracks. (author)

  17. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M. Joanne; Mö hlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz

  18. Tholins as Coloring Agents on Pluto and Other Icy Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale

    2016-01-01

    Tholins are refractory organic solids of complex structure and high molecular weight, with a wide range of color ranging from yellow and orange to dark red, and through tan to black. They are made in the laboratory by energy deposition (photons or charged particles) in gases and ices containing the simple molecules (e.g., N2, CH4, CO) found in planetary atmospheres or condensed on planetary surfaces. They are widely implicated in providing the colors and albedos, particularly in the region 0.3-1.0 microns, of several outer Solar System bodies, including Pluto, as well as aerosols in planetary atmospheres such as Titan. Recent color images of Pluto with the New Horizons spacecraft show concentrations of coloring agent(s) in some regions of the surface, and apparent near-absence in other regions. Tholins that may to some degree represent surface chemistry on Pluto have been synthesized in the laboratory by energetic processing of mixtures of the ices (N2, CH4, CO) known on Pluto's surface, or the same molecules in the gas phase. Details of the composition and yield vary with experimental conditions. Chemical analysis of Pluto ice tholins shows evidence of amides, carboxylic acids, urea, carbodiimides, and nitriles. Aromatic/olefinic, amide, and other functional groups are identified in XANES analysis. The ice tholins produced by e- irradiation have a higher concentration of N than UV ice tholins, with N/C approx. 0.9 (versus approx. 0.5 for UV tholins) and O/C approx.0.2. Raman spectra of the electron tholin show a high degree of structural disorder, while strong UV fluorescence indicates a large aromatic content. EUV photolysis of a Pluto gaseous atmosphere analog yields pale yellow solids relatively transparent in the visual, and with aliphatic CH bonds prominent in IR spectra. This or similar material may be responsible for Pluto's hazes.

  19. Note on current position regarding the development by the UKAEA of Reduced Enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, B.

    1983-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority have an MTR fuel fabrication plant located at Dounreay on the north coast of Scotland. The prime function of the plant is to manufacture fuel elements for the UKAEA's own DIDO and PLUTO heavy water reactors located at their research establishment at Harwell. The plant, which has a capacity of about 1000 fuel elements per annum, also manufactures fuel elements, on a commercial basis, for university reactors in the United Kingdom and for a number of customers in overseas countries. The UKAEA have been manufacturing MTR fuel elements of a wide range of designs for over twenty-five years. Following the initiative of the US Government's RERTR programme, the UKAEA have embarked on a modest programme of MTR fuel manufacturing development., irradiation and post-irradiation examination to establish the techniques required to manufacture fuel elements containing uranium of a significantly lower enrichment than that in the fuel elements they currently manufacture. In the first instance this work is being directed towards the production of fuel elements containing uranium of 45% enrichment. After an initial analysis it was recognised that although a satisfactory 45% enriched version of certain of the designs of fuel elements currently manufactured could probably be produced using established U/Al alloy technology, it would be necessary to utilise powder technology for other elements in order to achieve the higher uranium density required. Studies of published information and consideration of the technology and facilities already available at Dounreay prompted the decision to concentrate on the development Of U 3 O 8 /Al cermet type fuel elements of similar geometry to those currently manufactured. Some of the fuel element designs currently manufactured by the UKAEA are listed: Concentric (Extruded) 74% enriched; Concentric Plates 80% enriched with densities 0.60 and 0.53 g U/ cm 3 ; Flat Plate (Swaged) 80% enriched and Flat Plate

  20. The New Horizons Bistatic Radio Science Experiment to Measure Pluto's Surface Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.; Vincent, M.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for principally occultation and radiometric measurement of Pluto and Charon during the flyby in July 2015. The REX subsystem is contained, together with the NH X-Band radio, in the Integrated Electronics Module (IEM) in the New Horizons spacecraft. REX samples and records in two polarizations both total RF power in a 4.5 MHz bandwidth, and radio signal waveforms in a narrow, 1.25 kHz band. During the encounter, and at closest approach to Pluto, the spacecraft's high gain antenna (HGA) will scan Pluto's equatorial latitudes, intercepting the specular zone, a region near Pluto's limb that geometrically favors reflection from the earth's direction. At the same time, a powerful 80 kW uplink beacon will have been transmitted from earth by the DSN to arrive at Pluto during spacecraft closest approach. Reflection from the specular zone is expected to be sufficiently strong to observe the bistatic uplink in the REX narrowband record. Measurements in both polarizations will then be combined to yield surface reflectivity, roughness and limits on the dielectric constant in the specular zone.

  1. Radio Thermal Emission from Pluto and Charon during the New Horizons Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Michael; Linscott, Ivan; Hinson, David; Tyler, G. L.; Strobel, Darrell F.; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-10-01

    As part of the New Horizons Radio-Science Experiment REX, radio thermal emission from Pluto and Charon (wavelength: 4.2 cm) was observed during the encounter on 14 July 2015. The primary REX measurement, a determination of the atmospheric height profile from the surface up to about 100 km, was conducted during an uplink radio occultation at both ingress and egress (Hinson et al., Icarus 290, 96-111, 2017). During the interval between ingress and egress, when the Earth and the REX uplink signals were occulted by the Pluto disk, the spacecraft antenna continued to point toward Earth and thus scanned diametrically across the Pluto nightside. The average diameter of the HGA 3 dB beam was ≈1100 km at the surface during this opportunity, thereby providing crudely resolved measurements of the radio brightness temperature across Pluto. The best resolution for the REX radiometry observations occurred shortly after closest approach, when the HGA was scanned twice across Pluto. These observations will be reported elsewhere (Linscott et al., Icarus, submitted, 2017). In addition to the resolved observations, full disk brightness temperature measurements of both bodies were performed during the approach (dayside) and departure (nightside) phases of the encounter. We present the results of these observations and provide a preliminary interpretation of the measured brightness temperatures.

  2. Pluto-Charon Stellar Occultation Candidates: 1990-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, E. W.; McDonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    We have carried out a search to identify stars that might be occulted by Pluto or Charon during the period 1990-1995 and part of 1996. This search was made with an unfiltered CCD camera operated in the strip scanning mode, and it reaches an R magnitude of approximately 17.5-about 1.5 mag fainter than previous searches. Circumstances for each of the 162 potential occultations are given, including an approximate R magnitude of the star, which allows estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for observation of each occultation. The faintest stars in our list would yield an S/N of about 20 for a 1 S integration when observed with a CCD detector on an 8 m telescope under a dark sky. Our astrometric precision (+/- 0.2 arcsec, with larger systematic errors possible for individual cases) is insufficient to serve as a final prediction for these potential occultations, but is sufficient to identify stars deserving of further, more accurate, astrometric observations. Statistically, we expect about 32 of these events to be observable somewhere on Earth. The number of events actually observed will be substantially smaller because of clouds and the sparse distribution of large telescopes. Finder charts for each of the 91 stars involved are presented.

  3. Spectrophotometry of Pluto from 3500 to 7350 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, E.S.; Cochran, W.D.; Cochran, A.L.; Texas, University, Austin, Tex.)

    1980-01-01

    Spectra of Pluto have been obtained on six nights during February 1979 by the use of the Cassegrain Digicon spectrograph on the 2.1-m Struve reflector and the IDS spectrograph on the 2.7-m reflector of McDonald Observatory. These spectra, with nominal resolution of 6-7 A, have been reduced to relative fluxes. Relative albedos were then calculated using the solar irradiances of Arvesen et al. (1969). The spectra taken in the blue show no indication of the upturn in albedo at wavelengths less than 3800 A previously reported by Fix, et al. (1970). The lack of a UV upturn cannot be interpreted in terms of a Rayleigh scattering atmosphere unless the albedo of the underlying surface is known. From the lack of methane absorption at the wavelength of the 6190- or 7270-A methane bands, an upper limit of 1-3 m-am of gaseous CH4 is derived. The albedo curve has a constant slope between 3500 and 7300 A. The only other solar system body which has this feature is an S-type asteroid

  4. What We Know Now: Synthesis for Understanding the Origin of the Pluto System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Buie, M. W.; Porter, S. B.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Ennico, K.

    2015-11-01

    The July 2015 New Horizons flyby has removed a long-standing obstacle to understanding the cosmogony of the Pluto-Charon system: the uncertain radius of Pluto. Combined with precise astrometric fits to the barycenter of the Pluto-Charon binary from HST observations of the more distant, small satellites (Brozovic et al., Icarus 246, 317-329, 2015), the densities of both Pluto and Charon are now known. At the 10% level, these densities are rather similar, as opposed to the more divergent density estimates of years past in which Charon was thought to be substantially icier. In the context of a “giant impact” origin, a rock-rich Charon implies that the precursor impacting bodies were at most only partially differentiated — possessing relatively thin ice shells (Canup, Astron. J. 141, 35, 2011). This suggests some combination of relatively slow and/or late accretion in the ancestral Kuiper belt. New Horizons has also shown that Nix and Hydra possess high albedos, consistent with ice-dominated compositions. Such compositions are consistent with a giant impact origin in which one or both precursor impacting bodies were partially differentiated, so that the small satellites ultimately formed from material ejected from ice-dominated surface layers (Peale and Canup, Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Ed., chapter 10.17, 2015). We examine whether Pluto and Charon could actually possess the same bulk rock/ice ratio and whether this would allow for an alternate, non-giant-impact origin for the Pluto system.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  5. Resolved, Time-Series Observations of Pluto-Charon with the Magellan Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; Adams, E. R.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Kramer, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    In support of prediction refinements at MIT for stellar occultations by Pluto and Charon, resolved photometric observations of Pluto and Charon at optical wavelengths have been carried out with the Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory for each apparition since 2001. Both Sloan and Johnson-Kron-Cousins filters have been used. The median natural image quality for the site is about 0.7 arcsec (with some nights better than 0.3 arcsec). These data yield accurate light ratios for the two bodies as a function of: (1) wavelength, (2) Charon's orbital phase, and (3) the sub-Earth latitude for Pluto and Charon. This information is needed to interpret the location of their center of light, relative to their center of mass, for unresolved images of Pluto and Charon taken with wide-field astrometric instruments. The Raymond and Beverly Magellan Instant Camera ("MagIC") -- the instrument used for these observations -- has a focal-plane scale of 0.069 arcsec/pix and a field of 2.3 arcmin. This field is large enough so that many of our Pluto-Charon frames can be tied to the International Coordinate Reference Frame (ICRF) with stars in the UCAC2 catalog. Initial results for this program have been reported by Clancy et al. (Highlights of Astr. vol. 13, in press), who found a strong trend in the Charon to Pluto light ratio over the wavelength range spanned by the Sloan filters. Further results from this program used to predict the 2005 July 11 stellar occultation by Charon will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA Grant NNG04GF25G from the Planetary Astronomy program.

  6. Radioactive Waste Control at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell; Traitement des Dechets Radioactifs au Centre de Recherche sur l'Energie Atomique de Harwell; 041a 041e 041d 0422 0420 041e 041b 042c 0417 0410 0423 0414 ; Control de Desechos Radiactivos en el A.E.R.E., Harwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, R. H. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (United Kingdom)

    1960-07-01

    The paper outlines the present practices in the control and treatment of radioactive wastes at Harwell. The large-volume, low-level active liquid effluent is treated by phosphate coagulation methods and, eventually, discharged to the River Thames. The medium-level wastes are segregated and undergo a two-stage chemical treatment followed by passage through columns of Vermiculite. The latter process has been found to be effective in removing radoicaesium, which is not dealt with efficiently by the precipitation methods used. Liquid wastes with a high- activity content are stored and a new plant, incorporating chemical treatment, ion exchange and evaporation, is being installed. The chemical sludges formed in the treatment processes are dumped at sea after de-watering by filtration. The contaminated solid waste is either stored or disposed of at sea. It is important to reduce the volume as much as possible and the methods employed include pressure baling, melting and incineration of combustible matter. Small quantities of activity are discharged to the atmosphere through exhaust stacks. The cleaning of this discharge air is commonly achieved by the use of high-efficiency filters or liquid scrubbing systems. Regular stack monitoring is carried out and this is backed up by a comprehensive district sampling programme. (author) [French] L'auteur decrit les methodes de controle et de traitement des dechets radioactifs qui sont appliquees au Centre de Harwell. Le volume considerable des effluents liquides de faible activite est traite par des methodes de coagulation au moyen des phosphates, puis evacue dans la Tamise. Apres separation, les dechets d'activite moyenne sont soumis a un traitement chimique en deux temps, avant de traverser des colonnes de Vermiculite. On a constate que ce dernier processus eliminait le radio- cesium, ce que les methodes de precipitation utilisees ne permettent pas de faire de maniere efficace. Les dechets liquides d'activite intense sont

  7. Latest Results from and Plans for the New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Harold; Stern, Alan

    2016-07-01

    On 2015 July 14 NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew 12,500 km above the surface of Pluto revealing a world of remarkable complexity and diversity. A giant basin filled with nitrogen ice dominated the encounter hemisphere and is the site of vigorous ongoing solid state convection that generates glacier-like transport along the surface. Giant mountains of water ice appear to be floating in the nitrogen ice. The periphery of the basin has a wide variety of landforms, including ice flow channels and chaotically arranged blocks of water ice. Extensive sublimation pitting is observed within the nitrogen ice sheet, testifying to active volatile transport. Peculiar bladed terrain to the east of the nitrogen ice sheet appears to be coated by methane ice. Pluto's equatorial region is dominated by an ancient dark red belt of material, probably tholins created either by irradiation of surface ices or by haze precipitation from the atmosphere. Pluto sports a wide variety of surface craters with some terrains dating back approximately 4 billion years while some terrains are geologically young. New Horizons discovered trace hydrocarbons in Pluto's atmosphere, multiple global haze layers, and a surface pressure near 10 microbars. Charon, Pluto's largest moon, displays tectonics, evidence for a heterogeneous crustal composition, and a puzzling giant hood of dark material covering its North Pole. Crater density statistics for Charon's surface give a crater retention age of 4-4.5 Ga, indicating that Charon's geological evolution largely ceased early in its history. All of Pluto's four small moons (Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra) have high albedos, highly elongated shapes, and are rotating much faster then synchronous with their orbital periods, with rotational poles clustered near the Pluto-Charon orbital plane. The surfaces of Nix and Hydra are coated with nearly pristine crystalline water ice, despite having crater retention ages greater than 4 billion years. The New Horizons

  8. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Performance and Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Bird, M. K.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft payload contained the Radio Science Experiment (REX) for determining key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the July 14, 2015, flyby of the Pluto/Charon system. The REX flight equipment augments the NH X-band radio transceiver by providing a high precision, narrow band recording of high power uplink transmissions from Earth stations, as well as a record of broadband radiometric power. This presentation will review the performance and initial results of two high- priority observations. First, REX received two pair of 20-kW signals, one pair per polarization, transmitted from the DSN at 4.2-cm wavelength during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. REX recorded these uplink signals and determined precise measurement of the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius of Pluto. The ingress portion of one polarization was played back from the spacecraft in July and processed to obtain the pressure and temperature structure of Pluto's atmosphere. Second, REX measured the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2- cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the night side are visible. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of one-tenth Pluto's disk and temperature resolution of 0.1 K. Occultation and radiometric temperature results presented here will encompass additional data scheduled for playback in September.

  9. Trio of Stellar Occultations by Pluto One Year Prior to New Horizons’ Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-02

    stellar signal, both with 20 s exposures with our frame-transfer Portable Occultation, Eclipse, and Transit System. Since Pluto had a geocentric velocity...and for New Horizons’s 2015 approach . For the July 31 event, though for our atmospheric studies we are glad to have detected the occultation of this

  10. The geology of Pluto and Charon through the eyes of New Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M; McKinnon, William B; Spencer, John R; Howard, Alan D; Schenk, Paul M; Beyer, Ross A; Nimmo, Francis; Singer, Kelsi N; Umurhan, Orkan M; White, Oliver L; Stern, S Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B; Weaver, Harold A; Young, Leslie A; Binzel, Richard P; Buie, Marc W; Buratti, Bonnie J; Cheng, Andrew F; Cruikshank, Dale P; Grundy, Will M; Linscott, Ivan R; Reitsema, Harold J; Reuter, Dennis C; Showalter, Mark R; Bray, Veronica J; Chavez, Carrie L; Howett, Carly J A; Lauer, Tod R; Lisse, Carey M; Parker, Alex Harrison; Porter, S B; Robbins, Stuart J; Runyon, Kirby; Stryk, Ted; Throop, Henry B; Tsang, Constantine C C; Verbiscer, Anne J; Zangari, Amanda M; Chaikin, Andrew L; Wilhelms, Don E

    2016-03-18

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has revealed the complex geology of Pluto and Charon. Pluto's encounter hemisphere shows ongoing surface geological activity centered on a vast basin containing a thick layer of volatile ices that appears to be involved in convection and advection, with a crater retention age no greater than ~10 million years. Surrounding terrains show active glacial flow, apparent transport and rotation of large buoyant water-ice crustal blocks, and pitting, the latter likely caused by sublimation erosion and/or collapse. More enigmatic features include tall mounds with central depressions that are conceivably cryovolcanic and ridges with complex bladed textures. Pluto also has ancient cratered terrains up to ~4 billion years old that are extensionally faulted and extensively mantled and perhaps eroded by glacial or other processes. Charon does not appear to be currently active, but experienced major extensional tectonism and resurfacing (probably cryovolcanic) nearly 4 billion years ago. Impact crater populations on Pluto and Charon are not consistent with the steepest impactor size-frequency distributions proposed for the Kuiper belt. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. The Geology of Pluto and Charon Through the Eyes of New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; McKinnon, William B.; Spencer, John R.; Howard, Alan D.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; Nimmo, Francis; Singer, Kelsi N.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; White, Oliver L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has revealed the complex geology of Pluto and Charon. Pluto's encounter hemisphere shows ongoing surface geological activity centered on a vast basin containing a thick layer of volatile ices that appears to be involved in convection and advection, with a crater retention age no greater than approximately 10 million years. Surrounding terrains show active glacial flow, apparent transport and rotation of large buoyant water-ice crustal blocks, and pitting, the latter likely caused by sublimation erosion and/or collapse. More enigmatic features include tall mounds with central depressions that are conceivably cryovolcanic and ridges with complex bladed textures. Pluto also has ancient cratered terrains up to approximately 4 billion years old that are extensionally faulted and extensively mantled and perhaps eroded by glacial or other processes. Charon does not appear to be currently active, but experienced major extensional tectonism and resurfacing (probably cryovolcanic) nearly 4 billion years ago. Impact crater populations on Pluto and Charon are not consistent with the steepest impactor size-frequency distributions proposed for the Kuiper belt.

  12. Photometry of Pluto-Charon mutual events and Hirayama family asteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzel, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Once every 124 years, nature provides earth-bound astronomers with the opportunity to observe occultation and transit phenomena between Pluto and its satellite, Charon. Ground-based observations of these events will allow precise physical parameters for the Pluto-Charon system to be derived which are unlikely to be improved upon until in situ spacecraft observations are obtained. The proposed program will continue to support photometry observations from McDonald Observatory, a critical location in an international Pluto Campaign network. Knowledge of the diameters, masses, densities, and compositions derived from these observations will augment our understanding of Pluto's origin and its context within the problem of solar system formation. A second task will continue to research the evolutionary processes which have occurred in the asteroid belt by measuring the physical properties of specific Hirayama family members. Photoelectric lightcurve observations of Koronis and Themis family members will be used to investigate the individual catastrophic collision events which formed each family. By comparing these properties with results of laboratory and numerical experiments, the outcomes of catastrophic disruptions and collisional evolution may be more precisely determined

  13. The formation of Pluto's low-mass satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, Scott J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bromley, Benjamin C., E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the New Horizons mission, we consider how Pluto's small satellites—currently Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra—grow in debris from the giant impact that forms the Pluto-Charon binary. After the impact, Pluto and Charon accrete some of the debris and eject the rest from the binary orbit. During the ejection, high-velocity collisions among debris particles produce a collisional cascade, leading to the ejection of some debris from the system and enabling the remaining debris particles to find stable orbits around the binary. Our numerical simulations of coagulation and migration show that collisional evolution within a ring or a disk of debris leads to a few small satellites orbiting Pluto-Charon. These simulations are the first to demonstrate migration-induced mergers within a particle disk. The final satellite masses correlate with the initial disk mass. More massive disks tend to produce fewer satellites. For the current properties of the satellites, our results strongly favor initial debris masses of 3-10 × 10{sup 19} g and current satellite albedos A ≈ 0.4-1. We also predict an ensemble of smaller satellites, R ≲ 1-3 km, and very small particles, R ≈ 1-100 cm and optical depth τ ≲ 10{sup –10}. These objects should have semimajor axes outside the current orbit of Hydra.

  14. Mass Determination of Pluto and Charon from New Horizon REX Radio Science Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, Martin; Andert, T. P.; Tyler, G.; Bird, M. K.; Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I. R.

    2013-10-01

    The anticipated 14 July 2015 New Horizons fly-through of the Pluto system provides the first opportunity to determine both the total system mass and the individual masses of Pluto and Charon by direct observation. This will be accomplished by use of: i) two-way Doppler radio frequency tracking data during intervals along the fly-in and -out trajectory, and ii) one-way uplink Doppler frequency recorded by the on-board radio science instrument, REX, during the day of closest approaches to Pluto and Charon. Continuous tracking is not feasible as a result of pointing sharing with the instruments during the encounter phase. Needed radio tracking will be obtained during time slots shared with i) two-way Doppler tracking for navigation, ii) 'plasma rolls' with the spacecraft antenna pointing to Earth, and iii) during the ingress and egress phases of the occultations. Simulations of the NH encounter indicate the potential accuracies of the combined and individual mass determinations of Pluto and Charon in the order of 0.1%.

  15. On-line data acquisition and reduction at the magnetic detector PLUTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, G.; Schmitz, R.

    1976-12-01

    We present a method for reducing cosmic ray background in a set of cylindrical proportional wire chambers. Data taking and reduction is done by a PDP 11/45 computer. The method is applied in e + e - storage ring experiments with the superconductive solenoid magnet PLUTO. A reduction of about 50% of the incoming events is achieved. (orig.) [de

  16. Characterization of nitrogen ice on Pluto's surface from 1-4 micron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E.; Olkin, C.; Grundy, W.; Young, L.; Schmitt, B.; Tokunaga, A.; Owen, T.; Roush, T.; Terada, H.

    Nitrogen ice is the predominant ice on Pluto's surface. Methane and CO have also been identified (e.g., Grundy & Buie 2001), but they are thought to be trace consituents relative to N2 , mainly because of the strength of nitrogen's 2.147 µm feature. It is assumed that the temperature of the surface N2 frost controls the column abundance of Pluto's atmosphere through vapor pressure equilibrium. The vapor pressures of CO and CH4 are about 5 and 10,000 times less than that of N2 at a typical temperature for Pluto's surface. There is spectroscopic evidence that CH4 ice exists as a dissolved constituent in a predominantly nitrogen ice matrix as well as separate, pure CH4 ice. It would be interesting to know what fraction of N2 ice is pure for purposes of modeling the surface/atmosphere interactions on Pluto. We present spectroscopic modeling to show that the fraction of pure N2 ice on Pluto is very small indeed - conservatively less than 6% by area. We will present spectral observations and modeling results from the IRTF1 , W.M. Keck2 and Subaru3 Observatories spanning 1.0 to 4.0 µm. We have implemented a Hapke model (Hapke 1993) to constrain the abundance and states of N2 ice and CH4 ice. The depth of the Pluto spectrum at 3.3 µm effectively limits the amount of pure N2 ice that can be present on Pluto. Grundy, W. M. & Buie, M. W. 2001, Icarus, 153, 248. Hapke, B. 1993, Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy, Cambridge Univ. Press, New York. 1 Based in part on data obtained at the Infrared Telescope Facility, which is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. 2 The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The 1

  17. Coordinated Ground-Based Observations and the New Horizons Fly-by of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot; Young, Leslie; Parker, Joel; Binzel, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft is scheduled to make its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015. NH carries seven scientific instruments, including separate UV and Visible-IR spectrographs, a long-focal-length imager, two plasma-sensing instruments and a dust counter. There are three arenas in particular in which ground-based observations should augment the NH instrument suite in synergistic ways: IR spectra at wavelengths longer than 2.5 µm (i.e., longer than the NH Ralph spectrograph), stellar occultation observations near the time of the fly-by, and thermal surface maps and atmospheric CO abundances based on ALMA observations - we discuss the first two of these. IR spectra in the 3 - 5 µm range cover the CH4 absorption band near 3.3 µm. This band can be an important constraint on the state and areal extent of nitrogen frost on Pluto's surface. If this band depth is close to zero (as was observed by Olkin et al. 2007), it limits the area of nitrogen frost, which is bright at that wavelength. Combined with the NH observations of nitrogen frost at 2.15 µm, the ground-based spectra will determine how much nitrogen frost is diluted with methane, which is a basic constraint on the seasonal cycle of sublimation and condensation that takes place on Pluto (and similar objects like Triton and Eris). There is a fortuitous stellar occultation by Pluto on 29-JUN-2015, only two weeks before the NH closest approach. The occulted star will be the brightest ever observed in a Pluto event, about 2 magnitudes brighter than Pluto itself. The track of the event is predicted to cover parts of Australia and New Zealand. Thanks to HST and ground based campaigns to find a TNO target reachable by NH, the position of the shadow path will be known at the +/-100 km level, allowing SOFIA and mobile ground-based observers to reliably cover the central flash region. Ground-based & SOFIA observations in visible and IR wavelengths will characterize the haze opacity and vertical

  18. The PLUTO experiment at DORIS (DESY) and the discovery of the gluon (A recollection)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, Bruno R. [Rome-3 Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Meyer, Hans-Juergen

    2010-08-15

    With the aim of determining the contribution of the PLUTO experiment at the DORIS e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring to the discovery of the gluon, as members of this former collaboration we have reconsidered all the scientific material produced by PLUTO in 1978 and the first half of 1979. It is clear that the experiment demonstrated the main decay of the Y(9.46 GeV) resonance to be mediated by 3 gluons, by providing evidence for the agreement of this hypothesis with average values and differential distributions of all possible experimental variables and by excluding all other possible alternative models. Moreover PLUTO measured in June 1979 the matrix element of the 3-gluon decay to be quantitatively as expected by QCD (even after hadronization) and, having checked the possibility to correctly trace the gluons' directions, demonstrated the spin 1 nature of the gluon by excluding spin 0 and spin 1/2. The hadronization of the gluon like a quark jet, hypothesized in the 3-gluon jet Monte Carlo simulation, was compatible with the topological data at this energy and was shown to be an approximation at 10% level for the multiplicity ({approx} < p {sub vertical} {sub stroke} {sub vertical} {sub stroke} {sub >}{sup -1}); the right expected gluon fragmentation was needed for the inclusive distributions; this was the first experimental study of (identified) gluon jets. In the following measurements at the PETRA storage ring, these results were confirmed by PLUTO and by three contemporaneous experiments by evidencing at higher energies the gluon radiation (''bremsstrahlung''), the softer one, by jet broadening, and the hard one, by the emission of (now clearly visible) gluon jets by quarks. The gluon's spin 1 particle nature was also confirmed. The PLUTO results on Y decays had been confirmed both by contemporaneous experiments at DORIS (partially) and later (also partially) were confirmed by more sophisticated detectors. (orig.)

  19. The PLUTO experiment at DORIS (DESY) and the discovery of the gluon (A recollection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stella, Bruno R.; Meyer, Hans-Juergen

    2010-08-01

    With the aim of determining the contribution of the PLUTO experiment at the DORIS e + e - storage ring to the discovery of the gluon, as members of this former collaboration we have reconsidered all the scientific material produced by PLUTO in 1978 and the first half of 1979. It is clear that the experiment demonstrated the main decay of the Y(9.46 GeV) resonance to be mediated by 3 gluons, by providing evidence for the agreement of this hypothesis with average values and differential distributions of all possible experimental variables and by excluding all other possible alternative models. Moreover PLUTO measured in June 1979 the matrix element of the 3-gluon decay to be quantitatively as expected by QCD (even after hadronization) and, having checked the possibility to correctly trace the gluons' directions, demonstrated the spin 1 nature of the gluon by excluding spin 0 and spin 1/2. The hadronization of the gluon like a quark jet, hypothesized in the 3-gluon jet Monte Carlo simulation, was compatible with the topological data at this energy and was shown to be an approximation at 10% level for the multiplicity (∼ vertical stroke vertical stroke > -1 ); the right expected gluon fragmentation was needed for the inclusive distributions; this was the first experimental study of (identified) gluon jets. In the following measurements at the PETRA storage ring, these results were confirmed by PLUTO and by three contemporaneous experiments by evidencing at higher energies the gluon radiation (''bremsstrahlung''), the softer one, by jet broadening, and the hard one, by the emission of (now clearly visible) gluon jets by quarks. The gluon's spin 1 particle nature was also confirmed. The PLUTO results on Y decays had been confirmed both by contemporaneous experiments at DORIS (partially) and later (also partially) were confirmed by more sophisticated detectors. (orig.)

  20. Implications of the Detection of X-rays From Pluto by Chandra for Its Solar Wind - Neutral Atmosphere Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we have obtained low-resolution imaging X-ray spectrophotometry of the Pluto system in support of the New Horizons (NH) flyby. In a total of 174 ksec of on-target time, we measured 8 photons from 0.31 to 0.60 keV in a co-moving 11 x 11 pixel2 box (the 90% flux aperture for fixed background sources in the field) measuring 121,000 x 121,000 km2 (or 100 x 100 RPluto) at Pluto. The Pluto photons do not have the spectral shape of the background, are coincident with a 90% flux aperture co-moving with Pluto, and are not confused with any background source, so we consider them as sourced from the Pluto system. Allowing for background, we find a net signal of 6.8 counts and a statistical noise level of 1.2 counts, for a detection of Pluto at > 99.95%. The mean 0.31 - 0.60 keV X-ray power from Pluto is 200 +200/-100 MW, in the middle range of X-ray power levels seen for other known solar system emission sources: auroral precipitation, solar X-ray scattering, and charge exchange (CXE) between solar wind (SW) ions and atmospheric neutrals. We eliminate auroral effects as a source, as Pluto has no known magnetic field and the NH/Alice UV spectrometer detected no airglow from Pluto during the flyby. Atmospheric haze particles could produce resonant scattering of solar X-rays from Pluto, but the energy signature of the detected photons does not match the solar spectrum and estimates of Pluto's scattered X-ray emission are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than seen in our observations. CXE-driven emission from hydrogenic and heliogenic SW carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ions can produce the energy signature seen, and the 6 x 1025 neutral gas escape rate from Pluto deduced from NH data (Gladstone et al. 2016) can support the 3.0 +3.0/-1.5 x 1024 X-ray photons/s emission rate required by our observations. Using the SW proton density and speed measured by the NH/SWAP instrument in the vicinity of Pluto at the time of the photon emissions, we find a

  1. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  2. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Expected Performance in Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Woods, W. W.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for investigating key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the upcoming flyby in July 2015. REX flight equipment augments the NH radio transceiver used for spacecraft communications and tracking. The REX hardware implementation requires 1.6 W and 160 g. This presentation will focus on the final design and the predicted performance of two high-priority observations. First, REX will receive signals from a pair of 70-m antennas on Earth - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. The data recorded by REX will reveal the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius. Second, REX will measure the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2-cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the nightside are visible, allowing the surface temperature and its spatial variations to be determined. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of about 10 pixels; one bisects Pluto whereas the second crosses the winter pole. We will illustrate the capabilities of REX by reviewing the method of analysis and the precision achieved in a lunar occultation observed by New Horizons in May 2011. Re-analysis of radio occultation measurements by Voyager 2 at Triton is also under way. More generally, REX objectives include a radio occultation search for Pluto's ionosphere; examination of Charon through both radio occultation and radiometry; a search for a radar echo from Pluto's surface; and improved knowledge of the Pluto system mass and the Pluto-Charon mass ratio from a combination of two-way and one-way Doppler frequency measurements.

  3. Determination of the System Mass and the Individual Masses of Pluto and Charon from New Horizons Radio Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, M.; Paetzold, M.; Andert, T.; Bird, M. K.; Tyler, G. L.; Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2016-12-01

    One objective of the New Horizons Radio Science Experiment REX is the direct determination of the system mass and the individual masses of Pluto and Charon. About four weeks of two-way radio tracking centered around the closest approach of New Horizons to the Pluto system were processed. Major problems during the processing were the changes in spacecraft attitude by thrusters which applied extra Δv to the spacecraft motion masking partially the continuously perturbed motion caused by the attracting forces of the Pluto system members. The times of the spacecraft thruster activity are known but the applied Δv magnitude needed to be specifically adjusted. No two-way tracking was available during the flyby day on 14th July but slots of the REX one-way uplink observations cover the most important time near closest approach, these are for example the Pluto and Charon Earth occultation entries and exits. The REX data during the flyby day allowed to extract the individual masses of Pluto and Charon from the system mass at high precision. The relative errors of the mass determinations are below 0.02% and 0.2%, respectively. The masses of the 4 small satellites in the Pluto system could not be resolved.

  4. Development of a methodology for post closure radiological risk analysis of underground waste repositories. Illustrative assessment of the Harwell site. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralewski, Z.A.; Kane, P.; Nicholls, D.B.

    1987-06-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis (pra) is demonstrated for a number of ground water mediated release scenarios at the Harwell Site for a hypothetical repository at a depth of about 150 metres. This is the second stage of development of an overall risk assessment methodology. A procedure for carrying out multi-scenario assessment using available probabilistic risk assessment (pra) models is presented and a general methodology for combining risk contributions is outlined. Appropriate levels of model complexity in pra are discussed. Modelling requirements for the treatment of multiple simultaneous pathways and of site evolution are outlined. Further developments of pra systems are required to increase the realism of both the models and their mode of application, and hence to improve estimates of risk. (author)

  5. List of unclassified documents by the staff of Metallurgy Division, AERE Harwell from January 1972 to July 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, V.

    1977-11-01

    This list constitutes unclassified material published or presented between January 1972 and July 1977 by the staff of Metallurgy Division. It covers reports, memoranda, bibliographies, articles in periodicals, conference papers, books, theses and patent specifications. It is planned to issue a list annually. The publications are listed under the following titles of the research teams concerned: fast reactor fuels, advanced reactor systems, fracture studies, structural materials, radiation effects, composite materials, high voltage microscope and metals fabrication, management and administration. (U.K.)

  6. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-01-01

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments

  7. Chandra Observations of Pluto's Escaping Atmosphere in Support of the New Horizons Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph, Jr.

    2013-09-01

    Current models of Pluto's extended N2+CH4 atmosphere are still very uncertain, causing numerous difficulties in optimizing the New Horizons fast flyby operations plan for the dwarf planet. Applying knowledge gained from studying cometary X-ray emission, Chandra ACIS-S photometric imaging of X-rays produced by CXE between the solar wind and Pluto's atmosphere will address both the run of atmospheric density and the interaction of the solar wind with the extended Plutonian atmosphere. Determining the atmosphere's extent and amount of free molecular escape will aid the atmospheric sounding measurements of the NH ALICE instrument, while determining the x-ray luminosity will help the NH PEPSI instrument characterize the solar wind particle environment.

  8. Review of e+e- experiments with PLUTO from 3 to 31 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criegee, L.; Knies, G.

    1981-07-01

    The contributions of the PLUTO experiment to e + e - physics at collision energies in the range of 3-31 GeV are reviewed. The review briefly sketches the storage rings DORIS and PETRA at DESY, and describes the most important features of the PLUTO detector, of data processing, and of the analysis methods. It covers the physics results in the fields of electroweak interactions, of the heavy lepton tau and the search for still heavier leptons, of hadron production with evidence for quark and gluon jets, as well as multiparton effects, of UPSILON decays and their relation to QCD, and concludes with first results in high-energy photon-photon interactions. (orig.)

  9. VACUUM ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOABSORPTION SPECTRA OF NITRILE ICES FOR THEIR IDENTIFICATION ON PLUTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, B.; Pavithraa, S.; Lo, J.-I.; Cheng, B.-M.; Sekhar, B. N. Raja; Hill, H.; Mason, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Icy bodies, such as Pluto, are known to harbor simple and complex molecules. The recent New Horizons flyby of Pluto has revealed a complex surface composed of bright and dark ice surfaces, indicating a rich chemistry based on nitrogen (N 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), and carbon monoxide (CO). Nitrile (CN) containing molecules such as acetonitrile (CH 3 CN), propionitrile (CH 3 CH 2 CN), butyronitrile (CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 CN), and isobutyronitrile ((CH 3 ) 2 CHCN) are some of the nitrile molecules that are known to be synthesized by radiative processing of such simple ices. Through the provision of a spectral atlas for such compounds we propose that such nitriles may be identified from the ALICE payload on board New Horizons .

  10. Penitentes as the Origin of the Bladed Terrain of Tartarus Dorsa on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, John E.; Smith, Christina L.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Guzewich, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Penitentes are snow and ice features formed by erosion that, on Earth, are characterized by bowl-shaped depressions several tens of centimetres across, whose edges grade into spires up to several metres tall. Penitentes have been suggested as an explanation for anomalous radar data on Europa, but until now no penitentes have been identified conclusively on planetary bodies other than Earth. Regular ridges with spacings of 3,000 to 5,000 metres and depths of about 500 metres with morphologies that resemble penitentes have been observed by the New Horizons spacecraft in the Tartarus Dorsa region of Pluto (220 deg -250 deg E, 0 deg -20 deg N). Here we report simulations, based upon a recent model representing conditions on Pluto in which deepening penitentes reproduce both the tri-modal (north-south, east-west and northeast-southwest) orientation and the spacing of the ridges of this bladed terrain. At present, these penitentes deepen by approximately one centimetre per orbital cycle and grow only during periods of relatively high atmospheric pressure, suggesting a formation timescale of several tens of millions of years, consistent with crater ages. This timescale implies that the penitentes formed from initial topographic variations of no more than a few tens of metres, consistent with Plutos youngest terrains.

  11. The Geology of Pluto and Charon as Revealed by New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Spencer, John R.; McKinnon, William B.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie A.; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kim

    2016-01-01

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has revealed that Pluto and Charon exhibit strikingly different surface appearances, despite their similar densities and presumed bulk compositions. Much of Pluto's surface can be attributed to surface-atmosphere interactions and the mobilization of volatile ices by insolation. Many valley systems appear to be the consequence of glaciation involving nitrogen ice. Other geological activity requires or required internal heating. The convection and advection of volatile ices in Sputnik Planum can be powered by present-day radiogenic heat loss. On the other hand, the prominent mountains at the western margin of Sputnik Planum, and the strange, multi-km-high mound features to the south, probably composed of H2O, are young geologically as inferred by light cratering and superposition relationships. Their origin, and what drove their formation so late in Solar System history, is under investigation. The dynamic remolding of landscapes by volatile transport seen on Pluto is not unambiguously evident on Charon. Charon does, however, display a large resurfaced plain and globally engirdling extensional tectonic network attesting to its early endogenic vigor.

  12. Ground and space-based separate PSF photometry of Pluto and Charon from New Horizons and Magellan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangari, Amanda M.; Stern, S. A.; Young, L. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C.; Buratti, B. J.; Spencer, J.; Ennico, K.

    2013-10-01

    While Pluto and Charon are easily resolvable in some space-based telescopes, ground-based imaging of Pluto and Charon can yield separate PSF photometry in excellent seeing. We present B and Sloan g', r', i', and z' separate photometry of Pluto and Charon taken at the Magellan Clay telescope using LDSS-3. In 2011, observations were made on 7, 8, 9, 19, and 20 March, at 9:00 UT, covering sub-Earth longitudes 130°, 74°, 17°, 175° and 118°. The solar phase angle ranged from 1.66-1.68° to 1.76-1.77°. In 2012, observations were made on February 28, 29 and March 1 at 9:00 UT covering longitudes 342°, 110° and 53° and on May 30 and 31 at 9:30 UT and 7:00 UT, covering longitudes 358° and 272°. Solar phase angles were 1.53-1.56° and 0.89°-0.90° degrees. All longitudes use the convention of zero at the sub-Charon longitude and decrease in time. Seeing ranged from 0.46 to 1.26 arcsecond. We find that the mean rotationally-averaged Charon-to-Pluto light ratio is 0.142±0.003 for Sloan r',i' and z'. Charon is brighter in B and g', with a light ratio of 0.182±0.003 and 0.178±0.002 respectively. Additionally, we present separate PSF photometry of Pluto and Charon from New Horizons images taken by the LORRI instrument on 1 and 3 July 2013 at 17:00 UT and 23:00 UT, sub-Earth longitude 251° and 125°. We find that the rotation-dependent variations in the light ratio are consistent with earlier estimates such as those from Buie et al. 2010, AJ 139, 1117-1127. However, at a solar phase angle of 10.9°, Charon appears 0.25 magnitudes fainter relative to Pluto at the same rotational phase than measurements from the ground with the largest possible solar phase angle. Thus we provide the first estimate of a Pluto phase curve beyond 2°. These results represent some of the first Pluto science from New Horizons. This work has been funded in part by NASA Planetary Astronomy Grant NNX10AB27G and NSF Award 0707609 to MIT and by NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto.

  13. Pluto occultation on 2015 June 29 UTC with central flash and atmospheric spikes just before the New Horizons flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Babcock, Bryce A.; Durst, Rebecca F.; Seeger, Christina H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Bosh, Amanda S.; Person, Michael J.; Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Zuluaga, Carlos A.; Kosiarek, Molly R.; Abe, Fumio; Nagakane, Masayuki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Tristram, Paul J.; Arredondo, Anicia

    2017-11-01

    We observed the occultation by Pluto of a 12th magnitude star, one of the two brightest occultation stars ever in our dozen years of continual monitoring of Pluto's atmosphere through such studies, on 2015 June 29 UTC. At the Univ. of Canterbury Mt. John Observatory (New Zealand), under clear skies throughout, we used a POETS frame-transfer CCD at 10 Hz with GPS timing on the 1-m McLellan telescope as well as an infrared camera on an 0.6-m telescope and three-color photometry at a slower cadence on a second 0.6-m telescope. At the Auckland Observatory, we used a POETS and a PICO on 0.5-m and 0.4-m telescopes, with 0.4 s and 2 s cadences, respectively, obtaining ingress observations before clouds moved in. The Mt. John light curves show a central flash, indicating that we were close to the center of the occultation path. Analysis of our light curves show that Pluto's atmosphere remains robust. The presence of spikes at both sites in the egress and ingress shows atmospheric layering. We coordinated our observations with aircraft observations (Bosh et al., 2017) with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Our chords helped constrain the path across Pluto that SOFIA saw. Our ground-based and airborne stellar-occultation effort came only just over two weeks of Earth days and two Pluto days before the flyby of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft.

  14. Fixation of Radioactive Waste in Glass. Part I. Pilot-Plant Experience at Harwell; Fixation des Dechets Radioactifs dans le Verre, Premiere Partie: L'Usine Pilote de Harwell; 0424 0418 041a 0421 0410 0426 0418 042f 0420 0410 0414 0418 041e 0410 041a 0422 0418 0412 041d 042b 0425 041e 0422 0425 041e 0414 041e 0412 0412 0421 0422 0415 041a 041b 0415 ; Fijacion de Desechos Radiactivos en Vidrio. Parte I: Experiencia Adquirida en la Instalacion Piloto de Harwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, M. N.; Gayler, R.; Grover, J. R.; Hardwick, W. H. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1963-02-15

    The reasons for incorporating fission-product wastes into glass for long-term storage are outlined. The flow-sheet and operating cycle of the fixation process which has been developed at Harwell are described. Two years of operation of an inactive pilot plant are surveyed to show how the present operating conditions have been evolved. Full-length runs under these conditions have confirmed the reliability and reproducibility of the process. Engineering components suitable for an active plant have been developed and tested and the layout of die 1000-c pilot plant being commissioned at Harwell is illustrated in sketch form. Factors that affect the scale-up of the process are discussed in relation to the needs of the developing United Kingdom power programme. (author) [French] Les auteurs exposent les raisons pour lesquelles on incorpore les dechets de produits de fission dans le verre en vue d'un stockage de longue duree. Ils donnent le diagramme d'operations et le cycle du procede de fixation mis au point a Harwell. Ils decrivent les deux annees de fonctionnment de l'usine pilote, sans produits radioactifs, pour montrer comment les conditions actuelles d'operations ont ete mises au point. Des cycles complets realises dans ces conditions ont confirme la securite et la reproductibilite du processus. L'appareillage approprie pour une usine de haute activite a ete mis au point et essaye; les auteurs de crivent les grandes lignes de l'usine pilote (activite de 1000 c) en construction a Harwell. Les auteurs discutent les facteurs qui peuvent affecter le developpement de ce processus a plus grande echelle, eu egard aux besoins du programme energetique du Royaume-Uni. (author) [Spanish] Los autores exponen las razones que aconsejan incorporar los desechos y productos de fision a materiales vitreos para almacenarlos por tiempo largo. Describen el diagrama de circu- lacion y el ciclo de operaciones que integran el proceso de fijacion perfeccionado en Harwell. Examinan luego

  15. The New Horizons and Hubble Space Telescope search for rings, dust, and debris in the Pluto-Charon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark R.; Weaver, Harold A.; Stern, S. Alan; Spencer, John R.; Buie, Marc W.; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Porter, Simon B.; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; New Horizons Science Team

    2018-02-01

    We conducted an extensive search for dust or debris rings in the Pluto-Charon system before, during, and after the New Horizons encounter in July 2015. Methodologies included attempting to detect features by back-scattered light during the approach to Pluto (phase angle α ∼ 15°), in situ detection of impacting particles, a search for stellar occultations near the time of closest approach, and by forward-scattered light imaging during departure (α ∼ 165°). An extensive search using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) prior to the encounter also contributed to the final ring limits. No rings, debris, or dust features were observed, but our new detection limits provide a substantially improved picture of the environment throughout the Pluto-Charon system. Searches for rings in back-scattered light covered the range 35,000-250,000 km from the system barycenter, a zone that starts interior to the orbit of Styx, the innermost minor satellite, and extends out to four times the orbital radius of Hydra, the outermost known satellite. We obtained our firmest limits using data from the New Horizons LORRI camera in the inner half of this region. Our limits on the normal I/F of an unseen ring depends on the radial scale of the rings: 2 ×10-8 (3σ) for 1500 km wide rings, 1 ×10-8 for 6000 km rings, and 7 ×10-9 for 12,000 km rings. Beyond ∼ 100, 000 km from Pluto, HST observations limit normal I/F to ∼ 8 ×10-8 . Searches for dust features from forward-scattered light extended from the surface of Pluto to the Pluto-Charon Hill sphere (rHill = 6.4 ×106 km). No evidence for rings or dust clouds was detected to normal I/F limits of ∼ 8.9 ×10-7 on ∼ 104 km scales. Four stellar occulation observations also probed the space interior to Hydra, but again no dust or debris was detected. The Student Dust Counter detected one particle impact 3.6 × 106 km from Pluto, but this is consistent with the interplanetary space environment established during the cruise of New

  16. Design philosophy for the new harwell α,β/γ ILW facility and associated NDA instrumentation with regard to criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chard, P.M.J.; Cooper, T.J.; Croft, S.; Lambert, K.P.; Syme, D.B.; Wilkins, C.G.

    1995-01-01

    A new Alpha Beta/Gamma Waste Facility is currently being commissioned at Harwell. The facility provides for the assay and re-packing of existing Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) cans and future ILW arisings into 400 litre drums which are then stored in an integral vault prior to ultimate disposal. Paramount to the design philosophy for the plant was the safe retrieval and movement of radioactive material throughout the treatment process and the avoidance of criticality and other hazards. This required sound managerial controls underpinned by state-of-the-art non destructive assay (NDA) measurements. These consist primarily of a gamma spectrometer and a passive/active neutron interrogator. Their prime role is to confirm can identity against plant records and enable a fissile inventory to be developed for each can for criticality assessment. An expert system aids interpretation of assay results and the reconciliation of discrepancies. This paper describes the design philosophy with emphasis on the control measures used and the operation of the expert system. (author)

  17. Sealing of exploratory boreholes in clay reactivity of ordinary portland cement (OPC) grouts and various lithologies from the Harwell research site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; George, I.A.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Robins, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a research programme on the disposal of radioactive wastes in clay, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC

  18. Some problems in interpretation of the New Horizons observations of Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2018-02-01

    Here I briefly discuss the following problems related to Pluto's atmosphere: (1) restrictions to LTE in the rotational lines of H2O and HCN above 700 km that affect thermal balance of the atmosphere; (2) contradictions in the estimates of H2O influx from ablation of the interplanetary dust; (3) great difference between the haze volume surface area in the LORRI and MVIC observations and that in the UV solar occultations and the models, including significant corrections to sticking coefficients of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, and HCN in condensation, and (4) Triton's thermosphere during the Voyager 2 flyby.

  19. The Pluto debate: Influence of emotions on belief, attitude, and knowledge change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Suzanne H.

    In line with the "warming trend" (Sinatra, 2005), this study examined the influence of emotions during controversial conceptual change. Issues in science may trigger highly emotional responses (e.g., evolutionary theory). However, it is unclear whether these emotions facilitate or inhibit change. I investigated the nature of emotions engendered when learning about a controversial science topic, Pluto's reclassification, including the valence (positive/negative) and activation (activating/deactivating) of emotions (Pekrun et al., 2002). I also investigated whether belief, attitude, and/or conceptual change could be facilitated through rereading a refutation text and/or rereading during small group discussions. Refutation texts directly state a common misconception, refute it, and provide the scientific explanation as a plausible alternative (Hynd, 2001). Participants were randomly assigned to a group (reread text; reread text plus small group discussions). Participants in both groups read the same refutational text regarding the recent change in the definition of planet and Pluto's reclassification. The findings show that students' experienced a range of emotions towards Pluto's reclassification. Students reported experiencing more negative than positive emotions. Both positive and negative emotions were shown to be predictive of student's attitudes and attitude change. Emotions were also predictive of students' knowledge of planets and conceptual change. This suggests that emotions may have promoted deep engagement and critical thinking. Negative emotions may also be linked with resistance to attitude and conceptual change. The refutation text was effective in promoting belief change, attitude change, and conceptual change across both conditions. Students in both conditions reported more constructivist nature of science beliefs after rereading the text. Students also reported a greater level of acceptance about Pluto's reclassification. Conceptual change was

  20. THE 2011 JUNE 23 STELLAR OCCULTATION BY PLUTO: AIRBORNE AND GROUND OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S. E.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Sallum, S. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Dunham, E. W.; Collins, P.; Bida, T.; Bright, L. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Pandey, S.; Amrhein, D. [Williams College-Hopkins Observatory, Williamstown, MA (United States); Tholen, D. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Taylor, B. [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Wolf, J.; Pfueller, E. [Deutsches SOFIA Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 29, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Meyer, A., E-mail: mjperson@mit.edu [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); and others

    2013-10-01

    On 2011 June 23, stellar occultations by both Pluto (this work) and Charon (future analysis) were observed from numerous ground stations as well as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This first airborne occultation observation since 1995 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory resulted in the best occultation chords recorded for the event, in three visible wavelength bands. The data obtained from SOFIA are combined with chords obtained from the ground at the IRTF, the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, and Leeward Community College to give the detailed state of the Pluto-Charon system at the time of the event with a focus on Pluto's atmosphere. The data show a return to the distinct upper and lower atmospheric regions with a knee or kink in the light curve separating them as was observed in 1988, rather than the smoothly transitioning bowl-shaped light curves of recent years. The upper atmosphere is analyzed by fitting a model to all of the light curves, resulting in a half-light radius of 1288 {+-} 1 km. The lower atmosphere is analyzed using two different methods to provide results under the differing assumptions of particulate haze and a strong thermal gradient as causes for the lower atmospheric diminution of flux. These results are compared with those from past occultations to provide a picture of Pluto's evolving atmosphere. Regardless of which lower atmospheric structure is assumed, results indicate that this part of the atmosphere evolves on short timescales with results changing the light curve structures between 1988 and 2006, and then reverting these changes in 2011 though at significantly higher pressures. Throughout these changes, the upper atmosphere remains remarkably stable in structure, again except for the overall pressure changes. No evidence of onset of atmospheric collapse predicted by frost migration models is seen, and the atmosphere appears to be remaining at a stable pressure level, suggesting it

  1. New Horizons Reconnaissance of the Pluto-Charon System and the Kuiper Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, C. T

    2009-01-01

    The New Horizons mission provides the first in situ reconnaissance of the Pluto-Charon System and the Kuiper belt, arguably the last frontier of solar system exploration. This book describes the mission, its objectives, expected results, and instruments in articles written by the scientists and engineers most closely involved. The New Horizons mission is expected to return unique observations and discoveries, which will revolutionize our understanding of the formation of the solar system. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in planetary science and space exploration, and all other potential users of data obtained by the instruments on board the New Horizons mission.

  2. CIRCUMBINARY CHAOS: USING PLUTO'S NEWEST MOON TO CONSTRAIN THE MASSES OF NIX AND HYDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    The Pluto system provides a unique local laboratory for the study of binaries with multiple low-mass companions. In this paper, we study the orbital stability of P4, the most recently discovered moon in the Pluto system. This newfound companion orbits near the plane of the Pluto-Charon (PC) binary, roughly halfway between the two minor moons Nix and Hydra. We use a suite of few body integrations to constrain the masses of Nix and Hydra, and the orbital parameters of P4. For the system to remain stable over the age of the solar system, the masses of Nix and Hydra likely do not exceed 5 × 10 16 kg and 9 × 10 16 kg, respectively. These upper limits assume a fixed mass ratio between Nix and Hydra at the value implied by their median optical brightness. Our study finds that stability is more sensitive to their total mass and that a downward revision of Charon's eccentricity (from our adopted value of 0.0035) is unlikely to significantly affect our conclusions. Our upper limits are an order of magnitude below existing astrometric limits on the masses of Nix and Hydra. For a density at least that of ice, the albedos of Nix and Hydra would exceed 0.3. This constraint implies they are icy, as predicted by giant impact models. Even with these low masses, P4 only remains stable if its eccentricity e ∼< 0.02. The 5:1 commensurability with Charon is particularly unstable, combining stability constraints with the observed mean motion places the preferred orbit for P4 just exterior to the 5:1 resonance. These predictions will be tested when the New Horizons satellite visits Pluto. Based on the results for the PC system, we expect that circumbinary, multi-planet systems will be more widely spaced than their singleton counterparts. Further, circumbinary exoplanets close to the three-body stability boundary, such as those found by Kepler, are less likely to have other companions nearby.

  3. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  4. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  5. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that 137 Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of 137 Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions

  6. THE PLUTO CODE FOR ADAPTIVE MESH COMPUTATIONS IN ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignone, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Zanni, C.; Bodo, G.; Van Straalen, B.; Colella, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a description of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of the PLUTO code for solving the equations of classical and special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD and RMHD). The current release exploits, in addition to the static grid version of the code, the distributed infrastructure of the CHOMBO library for multidimensional parallel computations over block-structured, adaptively refined grids. We employ a conservative finite-volume approach where primary flow quantities are discretized at the cell center in a dimensionally unsplit fashion using the Corner Transport Upwind method. Time stepping relies on a characteristic tracing step where piecewise parabolic method, weighted essentially non-oscillatory, or slope-limited linear interpolation schemes can be handily adopted. A characteristic decomposition-free version of the scheme is also illustrated. The solenoidal condition of the magnetic field is enforced by augmenting the equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier providing propagation and damping of divergence errors through a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic explicit cleaning step. Among the novel features, we describe an extension of the scheme to include non-ideal dissipative processes, such as viscosity, resistivity, and anisotropic thermal conduction without operator splitting. Finally, we illustrate an efficient treatment of point-local, potentially stiff source terms over hierarchical nested grids by taking advantage of the adaptivity in time. Several multidimensional benchmarks and applications to problems of astrophysical relevance assess the potentiality of the AMR version of PLUTO in resolving flow features separated by large spatial and temporal disparities.

  7. Application of PLUTO Test Facility for U. S. NRC Licensing of a Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongseok; Shin, Changhwan; Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The fuel assembly of the PLUS-7 loaded in the APR-1400 follows the same schedule. Meanwhile, In July 1998, the U.S. NRC adopted a research plan to address the effects of high burnup from a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). From these programs, several important technical findings for rule revision were obtained. Based on the technical findings, the U. S. NRC has amended the 10 CFR 50.46 which will be proclaimed sooner or later. Through the amendment, a LOCA analysis on the fuel assembly has to show the safety at both a fresh and End of Life (EOL) state. The U. S. NRC has already required EOL effects on seismic/LOCA performance for a fuel assembly since 1998. To obtain U.S NRC licensing of a fuel assembly, based on the amendment of 10CFR50.46, a LOCA analysis of the fuel assembly has to show safety both fresh and EOL states. The proper damping factor of the fuel assembly measured at the hydraulic test loop for a dynamic model in a LOCA and a seismic analysis code are at least required. In this paper, we have examined the damping technologies and compared the test facility of PLUTO with others in terms of performance. PLUTO has a better performance on the operating conditions than any others.

  8. Development of the design of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockett, G.E.; Huddle, R.A.U.

    1960-01-01

    Early in 1956 a small team was formed at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, to investigate the possibilities of the High Temperature Gas Cooled (H.T.G.C.) Reactor System. Although the primary objective of this team was to carry out a feasibility study of the system as a whole, it soon became apparent that, in addition to design studies and economic surveys of power producing reactors, the most appropriate approach to such a novel system was to carry out a design study of a relatively small (10 to 20 M.W.) Reactor Experiment, together with the necessary research and development work associated with such a reactor. This work proceeded within the U.K.A.E.A. during the three following years, and it was felt that realistic design proposals could be put forward with sufficient confidence to justify the detailed design and construction of a 20 M.W. Reactor Experiment. In April 1959 responsibility for this Reactor Experiment was taken over by the O.E.E.C. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Project, the DRAGON Project, at the Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorset. In this Paper the research, development, and design work is reviewed, and the proposals for the Reactor Experiment are summarised. (author)

  9. Dynamic Universe Model Predicts the Trajectory of New Horizons Satellite Going to Pluto.......

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2012-07-01

    New Horizons is NASA's artificial satellite now going towards to the dwarf planet Pluto. It has crossed Jupiter. It is expected to be the rst spacecraft to go near and study Pluto and its moons, Charon, Nix, and Hydra. These are the predictions for New Horizons (NH) space craft as on A.D. 2009-Aug-09 00:00:00.0000 hrs. The behavior of NH is similar to Pioneer Space craft as NH traveling is alike to Pioneer. NH is supposed to reach Pluto in 2015 AD. There was a gravity assist taken at Jupiter about a year back. As Dynamic universe model explains Pioneer anomaly and the higher gravitational attraction forces experienced towards SUN, It can explain NH also in a similar fashion. I am giving the predictions for NH by Dynamic Universe Model in the following Table 4. Here first two rows give Dynamic Universe Model predictions based on 02-01-2009 00:00 hrs data with Daily time step and hourly time step. Third row gives Ephemeris from Jet propulsion lab.Dynamic Universe Model can predict further to 9-Aug-2009. These Ephemeris data is from their web as on 28th June 2009 Any new data can be calculated..... For finding trajectories of Pioneer satellite (Anomaly), New Horizons satellite going to Pluto, the Calculations of Dynamic Universe model can be successfully applied. No dark matter is assumed within solar system radius. The effect on the masses around SUN shows as though there is extra gravitation pull toward SUN. It solves the Dynamics of Extra-solar planets like Planet X, satellite like Pioneer and NH for 3-Position, 3-velocity 3-acceleration for their masses,considering the complex situation of Multiple planets, Stars, Galaxy parts and Galaxy center and other Galaxies Using simple Newtonian Physics. It already solved problems Missing mass in Galaxies observed by galaxy circular velocity curves successfully. `SITA Simulations' software was developed about 18 years back for Dynamic Universe Model of Cosmology. It is based on Newtonian physics. It is Classical singularity

  10. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.; Pearson, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors

  11. Thermal convection as a possible mechanism for the origin of polygonal structures on Pluto's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Kenny; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution pictures of Pluto's surface obtained by the New Horizons spacecraft revealed, among other surface features, a large nitrogen ice glacier informally named Sputnik Planitia. The surface of this glacier is separated into a network of polygonal cells with a wavelength of ˜20-40 km. This network is similar to the convective patterns obtained under certain conditions by laboratory experiments, suggesting that it is the surface expression of thermal convection. Here we investigate the surface planform obtained for different convective systems in 3-D Cartesian geometry with different modes of heating and rheologies. We find that bottom heated systems, as assumed by previous studies, do not produce surface planforms consistent with the observed pattern. Alternatively, for a certain range of Rayleigh-Roberts number, RaH, a volumetrically heated system produces a surface planform similar to this pattern. We then combine scaling laws with values of RaH within its possible range to establish relationships between the critical parameters of Sputnik Planitia. In particular, our calculations indicate that the glacier thickness and the surface heat flux are in the ranges 2-10 km and 0.1-10 mW m-2, respectively. However, a difficulty is to identify a proper source of internal heating. We propose that the long-term variations of surface temperature caused by variations in Pluto's orbit over millions of years produces secular cooling equivalent to internal heating. We find that this source of heating is sufficient to trigger thermal convection, but additional investigations are needed to determine under which conditions it can produce surface patterns similar to those of Sputnik Planitia.

  12. Constraints on the properties of Pluto's nitrogen-ice rich layer from convection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto's Sputnik Planum basin (informally named) displays regular cellular patterns strongly suggesting that solid-state convection is occurring in a several-kilometers-deep nitrogen-ice rich layer (McKinnon et al., Convection in a volatile nitrogen-ice-rich layer drives Pluto's geological vigour, Nature 534, 82-85, 2016). We investigate the behavior of thermal convection in 2-D that covers a range of parameters applicable to the nitrogen ice layer to constrain its properties such that these long-wavelength surface features can be explained. We perform a suite of numerical simulations of convection with basal heating and temperature-dependent viscosity in either exponential form or Arrhenius form. For a plausible range of Rayleigh numbers and viscosity contrasts for solid nitrogen, convection can occur in all possible regimes: sluggish lid, transitional, or stagnant lid, or the layer could be purely conducting. We suggest the range of depth and temperature difference across the layer for convection to occur. We observe that the plume dynamics can be widely different in terms of the aspect ratio of convecting cells, or the width and spacing of plumes, and also in the lateral movement of plumes. These differences depend on the regime of convection determined by the Rayleigh number and the actual viscosity contrast across the layer, but is not sensitive to whether the viscosity is in Arrhenius or exponential form. The variations in plume dynamics result in different types of dynamic topography, which can be compared with the observed horizontal and vertical scales of the cells in Sputnik Planum. Based on these simulations we suggest several different possibilities for the formation and evolution of Sputnik Planum, which may be a consequence of the time-dependent behavior of thermal convection.

  13. Chairmanship of the Neptune/Pluto outer planets science working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1993-11-01

    The Outer Planets Science Working Group (OPSWG) is the NASA Solar System Exploration Division (SSED) scientific steering committee for the Outer Solar System missions. OPSWG consists of 19 members and is chaired by Dr. S. Alan Stern. This proposal summarizes the FY93 activities of OPSWG, describes a set of objectives for OPSWG in FY94, and outlines the SWG's activities for FY95. As chair of OPSWG, Dr. Stern will be responsible for: organizing priorities, setting agendas, conducting meetings of the Outer Planets SWG; reporting the results of OPSWG's work to SSED; supporting those activities relating to OPSWG work, such as briefings to the SSES, COMPLEX, and OSS; supporting the JPL/SAIC Pluto study team; and other tasks requested by SSED. As the Scientific Working Group (SWG) for Jupiter and the planets beyond, OPSWG is the SSED SWG chartered to study and develop mission plans for all missions to the giant planets, Pluto, and other distant objects in the remote outer solar system. In that role, OPSWG is responsible for: defining and prioritizing scientific objectives for missions to these bodies; defining and documenting the scientific goals and rationale behind such missions; defining and prioritizing the datasets to be obtained in these missions; defining and prioritizing measurement objectives for these missions; defining and documenting the scientific rationale for strawman instrument payloads; defining and prioritizing the scientific requirements for orbital tour and flyby encounter trajectories; defining cruise science opportunities plan; providing technical feedback to JPL and SSED on the scientific capabilities of engineering studies for these missions; providing documentation to SSED concerning the scientific goals, objectives, and rationale for the mission; interfacing with other SSED and OSS committees at the request of SSED's Director or those committee chairs; providing input to SSED concerning the structure and content of the Announcement of Opportunity

  14. Migration of Frosts from High-Albedo Regions of Pluto: what New Horizons Reveals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, Hal A.; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Binzel, Richard P.; Zangari, Amanda; Earle, Alissa M.

    2015-11-01

    With its high eccentricity and obliquity, Pluto should exhibit seasonal volatile transport on its surface. Several lines of evidence support this transport: doubling of Pluto’s atmospheric pressure over the past two decades (Young et al., 2013, Ap. J. 766, L22; Olkin et al., 2015, Icarus 246, 230); changes in its historical rotational light curve, once all variations due to viewing geometry have been modelled (Buratti et al., 2015; Ap. J. 804, L6); and changes in HST albedo maps (Buie et al., 2010, Astron. J. 139, 1128). New Horizons LORRI images reveal that the region of greatest albedo change is not the polar cap(s) of Pluto, but the feature informally named Tombaugh Regio (TR). This feature has a normal reflectance as high as ~0.8 in some places, and it is superposed on older, lower-albedo pre-existing terrain with an albedo of only ~0.10. This contrast is larger than any other body in the Solar System, except for Iapetus. This albedo dichotomy leads to a complicated system of cold-trapping and thermal segregation, beyond the simple picture of seasonal volatile transport. Whatever the origin of TR, it initially acted as a cold trap, as the temperature differential between the high and low albedo regions could be enormous, possibly approaching 20K, based on their albedo differences and assuming their normalized phase curves are similar. This latter assumption will be refined as the full New Horizons data set is returned.Over six decades of ground-based photometry suggest that TR has been decreasing in albedo over the last 25 years. Possible causes include changing insolation angles, or sublimation from the edges where the high-albedo material impinges on a much warmer substrate.Funding by the NASA New Horizons Project acknowledged.

  15. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  16. The removal of Pluto from the class of planets and homosexuality from the class of psychiatric disorders: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachar, Peter; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2012-01-13

    We compare astronomers' removal of Pluto from the listing of planets and psychiatrists' removal of homosexuality from the listing of mental disorders. Although the political maneuverings that emerged in both controversies are less than scientifically ideal, we argue that competition for "scientific authority" among competing groups is a normal part of scientific progress. In both cases, a complicated relationship between abstract constructs and evidence made the classification problem thorny.

  17. The removal of pluto from the class of planets and homosexuality from the class of psychiatric disorders: a comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Zachar, Peter; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We compare astronomers' removal of Pluto from the listing of planets and psychiatrists' removal of homosexuality from the listing of mental disorders. Although the political maneuverings that emerged in both controversies are less than scientifically ideal, we argue that competition for "scientific authority" among competing groups is a normal part of scientific progress. In both cases, a complicated relationship between abstract constructs and evidence made the classification proble...

  18. The removal of pluto from the class of planets and homosexuality from the class of psychiatric disorders: a comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachar Peter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We compare astronomers' removal of Pluto from the listing of planets and psychiatrists' removal of homosexuality from the listing of mental disorders. Although the political maneuverings that emerged in both controversies are less than scientifically ideal, we argue that competition for "scientific authority" among competing groups is a normal part of scientific progress. In both cases, a complicated relationship between abstract constructs and evidence made the classification problem thorny.

  19. THE NEW HORIZONS SOLAR WIND AROUND PLUTO (SWAP) OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM 11–33 au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Nicolaou, G., E-mail: helliott@swri.edu [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE-98128, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T–V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T–V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun.

  20. THE NEW HORIZONS SOLAR WIND AROUND PLUTO (SWAP) OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM 11–33 au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Livadiotis, G.; Nicolaou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on National Aeronautics and Space Administration's New Horizons Pluto mission has collected solar wind observations en route from Earth to Pluto, and these observations continue beyond Pluto. Few missions have explored the solar wind in the outer heliosphere making this dataset a critical addition to the field. We created a forward model of SWAP count rates, which includes a comprehensive instrument response function based on laboratory and flight calibrations. By fitting the count rates with this model, the proton density (n), speed (V), and temperature (T) parameters are determined. Comparisons between SWAP parameters and both propagated 1 au observations and prior Voyager 2 observations indicate consistency in both the range and mean wind values. These comparisons as well as our additional findings confirm that small and midsized solar wind structures are worn down with increasing distance due to dynamic interaction of parcels of wind with different speed. For instance, the T–V relationship steepens, as the range in V is limited more than the range in T with distance. At times the T–V correlation clearly breaks down beyond 20 au, which may indicate wind currently expanding and cooling may have an elevated T reflecting prior heating and compression in the inner heliosphere. The power of wind parameters at shorter periodicities decreases with distance as the longer periodicities strengthen. The solar rotation periodicity is present in temperature beyond 20 au indicating the observed parcel temperature may reflect not only current heating or cooling, but also heating occurring closer to the Sun

  1. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  2. Investigation of particle sizes in Pluto's atmosphere from the 29 June 2015 occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Bosh, A. S.; Person, M. J.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Levine, S. E.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Dunham, E. W.; McLean, I.; Wolf, J.; Abe, F.; Bida, T. A.; Bright, L. P.; Brothers, T.; Christie, G.; Collins, P. L.; Durst, R. F.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hamilton, R.; Harris, H. C.; Johnson, C.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kosiarek, M. R.; Leppik, K.; Logsdon, S.; Lucas, R.; Mathers, S.; Morley, C. J. K.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, P.; Ngan, H.; Pfüller, E.; de, H.-P.; Sallum, S.; Savage, M.; Seeger, C. H.; Siu, H.; Stockdale, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thanathibodee, T.; Tilleman, T.; Tristam, P. J.; Van Cleve, J.; Varughese, C.; Weisenbach, L. W.; Widen, E.; Wiedemann, M.

    2015-11-01

    The 29 June 2015 observations of a stellar occultation by Pluto, from SOFIA and ground-based sites in New Zealand, indicate that haze was present in the lower atmosphere (Bosh et al., this conference). Previously, slope changes in the occultation light curve profile of Pluto’s lower atmosphere have been attributed to haze, a steep thermal gradient, and/or a combination of the two. The most useful diagnostic for differentiating between these effects has been observing occultations over a range of wavelengths: haze scattering and absorption are functions of particle size and are wavelength dependent, whereas effects due to a temperature gradient should be largely independent of observational wavelength. The SOFIA and Mt. John data from this event exhibit obvious central flashes, from multiple telescopes observing over a range of wavelengths at each site (Person et al. and Pasachoff et al., this conference). SOFIA data include Red and Blue observations from the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO, at ~ 500 and 850 nm), First Light Infrared Test Camera (FLITECAM, at ~1800 nm), and the Focal Plan Imager (FPI+, at ~ 600 nm). Mt. John data include open filter, g', r', i', and near infrared. Here, we analyze the flux at the bottom of the light curves versus observed wavelength. We find that there is a distinct trend in flux versus wavelength, and we discuss applicable Mie scattering models for different particle size distributions and compositions (as were used to characterize haze in Pluto's lower atmosphere in Gulbis et al. 2015).SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart. Support for this work was provided by the National Research Foundation of South Africa, NASA SSO grants NNX15AJ82G (Lowell Observatory), PA NNX10AB27G (MIT), and PA NNX12AJ29G (Williams College), and the NASA

  3. Global Correlation and Non-Correlation of Topography with Color and Reflectance on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Young, Leslie; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine; Weaver, Harold A.; Stern, S. Alan; New Horizons Geology and Geophysics Team

    2017-10-01

    A key objective of the New Horizons mission at Pluto in July 2015 was completion of global maps of surface brightness and color patterns (covering 78% of surface) and topography (covering ~42%) of Pluto and its large moon Charon. The first calibrated and registered versions of these maps have now been completed for posting in the PDS this fall (with a peer-reviewed report on these products to be submitted). Rich in detail, investigation into the roles of local topography and insolation are ongoing (e.g., Lewis et al., 2017). Here we focus on the data sets and links between elevation and global color and brightness patterns and the global mapping revealed by them. In the “north,” yellowish deposits correlate with non-depressed portions of an eroded polar topographic dome ~600 km wide & 2-3 km high (e.g., Young et al., 2017). The broad dark band along the equator forming Cthulhu Macula to the west of Sputnik Planitia is topographically indistinguishable from the vast smooth lightly cratered plains to the north, indicating that latitude is the primary control, not topography. The curious lack of dark material along the equatorial band east of Sputnik Planitia may be partly due to topography of Eastern Tombaugh Regio, which is ~500 m above eroded plains the north and Cthulhu Macula itself. To the south of Cthulhu Macula, plains are slightly brighter, which correlates with a modest rise in topography of Macula, however, an abrupt increase in reflectance correlates with the edge of elevated plateau that rises 2-3 km above the plains. The areas with the strongest signature in the CH4-band are associated with bladed terrain, the highest standing geologic unit in absolute elevation. Similar colored amoeboid-shaped units are evident along the equator in the low-resolution mapping areas, indicating their probable occurrence elsewhere. Thus, while many of Pluto’s major color and albedo features correlate well with topography and are thus controlled by it, some

  4. The determination of boron and carbon in reactor grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, D.; Wood, A.J.; McInnes, C.A.J.; Jones, I.G.

    1978-09-01

    The sealed tube method of dissolution at high temperature and pressure has been successfully applied in the analysis of reactor grade boron carbide for the determination of boron. A 50 mg sample of boron carbide is completely dissolved by heating with concentrated nitric acid in a sealed tube at 300 0 C. The boron content of the resultant sample solution is determined by the mannitol potentiometric titration method. The precision of the method for the determination of 2.5 mg of boron using the Harwell automatic potentiometric titrator is 0.2% (coefficient of variation). The carbon content of a boron carbide sample is determined by combustion of the sample at 1050 0 C in a stream of oxygen using vanadium pentoxide to ensure the complete oxidation of the sample. The carbon dioxide produced from the sample is measured manometrically and the precision of the method for the determination of 4 mg of carbon is 0.4% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  5. The Hunt for Planet X New Worlds and the Fate of Pluto

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2009-01-01

    "The Hunt for Planet X is a fascinating tale by one of the world's premier astronomy writers. Govert Schilling is not only scrupulously accurate, he writes beautifully as well." Stephen P. Maran, Author of "Astronomy for Dummies" and Press Officer, American Astronomical Society "The Hunt for Planet X is an adventure story or, more accurately, a series of adventure stories. Schilling tells them well, capturing both the science and the people involved. It starts with the classics: Uranus, Neptune and Pluto; and moves all over the solar system as ground-based astronomers and space scientists pour over measurements and observations to try to understand the worlds around us. Current debates about the Pioneer Anomaly and the definition of what is a planet make the book current as well as a good history." Dr. Louis Friedman, Executive Director, The Planetary Society "This exciting tale of the centuries-old search for new planets in the solar system reads like a thriller. It is an adventure packed with fierce competi...

  6. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  7. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  8. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  9. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  10. UKAEA fast reactor project research and development programme on fuel element cladding and sub-assembly wrapper materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Research and development work on fuel element component (cladding, subassembly wrappers, etc.) materials for the U.K. sodium cooled fast reactor programme has been conducted at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) establishments at Dounreay, Harwell, Risley, and Springfields during the past fifteen years or so. This work has formed an integral part of, and has been co-ordinated by, the UKAEA Fast Reactor Project and has involved close liaison with the Nuclear Power Company (NPC) and the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). The research and development were initially related to the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) but the scope has now been extended to cover the first Civil Fast Reactor (CFR1), which has recently been re-designated the Civil Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR). The paper outlines the present status of the development of sodium cooled fast reactors in the U.K. and proceeds to summarize the principal PFR and CDFR core and fuel element parameters which have determined the planning and direction of the fuel element materials programme. The current position on the fuel element cladding and wrapper research and development programme is reviewed, and the facilities and future irradiation programme to be carried out in PFR are described

  11. CIRCUMBINARY CHAOS: USING PLUTO'S NEWEST MOON TO CONSTRAIN THE MASSES OF NIX AND HYDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Pluto system provides a unique local laboratory for the study of binaries with multiple low-mass companions. In this paper, we study the orbital stability of P4, the most recently discovered moon in the Pluto system. This newfound companion orbits near the plane of the Pluto-Charon (PC) binary, roughly halfway between the two minor moons Nix and Hydra. We use a suite of few body integrations to constrain the masses of Nix and Hydra, and the orbital parameters of P4. For the system to remain stable over the age of the solar system, the masses of Nix and Hydra likely do not exceed 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} kg and 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} kg, respectively. These upper limits assume a fixed mass ratio between Nix and Hydra at the value implied by their median optical brightness. Our study finds that stability is more sensitive to their total mass and that a downward revision of Charon's eccentricity (from our adopted value of 0.0035) is unlikely to significantly affect our conclusions. Our upper limits are an order of magnitude below existing astrometric limits on the masses of Nix and Hydra. For a density at least that of ice, the albedos of Nix and Hydra would exceed 0.3. This constraint implies they are icy, as predicted by giant impact models. Even with these low masses, P4 only remains stable if its eccentricity e {approx}< 0.02. The 5:1 commensurability with Charon is particularly unstable, combining stability constraints with the observed mean motion places the preferred orbit for P4 just exterior to the 5:1 resonance. These predictions will be tested when the New Horizons satellite visits Pluto. Based on the results for the PC system, we expect that circumbinary, multi-planet systems will be more widely spaced than their singleton counterparts. Further, circumbinary exoplanets close to the three-body stability boundary, such as those found by Kepler, are less likely to have other companions nearby.

  12. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  13. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  14. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  15. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  16. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  17. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  19. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  20. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  1. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  2. Physical State and Distribution of Materials at the Surface of Pluto from New Horizons LEISA Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, B.; Philippe, S.; Grundy, W. M.; Reuter, D. C.; Cote, R.; Quirico, E.; Protopappa, S.; Young, L. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    From Earth based observations Pluto is known to be the host of N2, CH4 and CO ices and also a dark red material. Very limited spatial distribution information is available from rotational visible and near-infrared spectral curves obtained from hemispheric measurements. In July 2015 the New Horizons spacecraft reached Pluto and its satellite system and recorded a large set of data. The LEISA spectro-imager of the RALPH instruments are dedicated to the study of the composition and physical state of the materials composing the surface. In this paper we report a study of the distribution and physical state of the ices and non-ice materials on Pluto's illuminated surface and their mode and degree of mixing. Principal Component analysis as well as various specific spectral indicators and correlation plots are used on the first set of 2 high resolution spectro-images from the LEISA instrument covering the whole illuminated face of Pluto at the time of the New Horizons encounter. Qualitative distribution maps have been obtained for the 4 main condensed molecules, N2, CH4, CO, H2O as well as for the visible-dark red material. Based on specific spectral indicators, using either the strength or the position of absorption bands, these 4 molecules are found to indicate the presence of 3 different types of ices: N2-rich:CH4:CO ices, CH4-rich(:CO:N2?) ices and H2O ice. The mixing lines between these ices and with the dark red material are studied using scatter plots between the various spectral indicators. CH4 is mixed at the molecular level with N2, most probably also with CO, thus forming a ternary molecular mixture that follows its phase diagram with low solubility limits. The occurrence of a N2-rich - CH4-rich ices mixing line associated with a progressive decrease of the CO/CH4 ratio tells us that a fractionation sublimation sequence transforms one type of ice to the other forming either a N2-rich - CH4-rich binary mixture at the surface or an upper CH4-rich ice crust that

  3. Physical state and distribution of materials at the surface of Pluto from New Horizons LEISA imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, B.; Philippe, S.; Grundy, W. M.; Reuter, D. C.; Côte, R.; Quirico, E.; Protopapa, S.; Young, L. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Howett, C. J. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-05-01

    From Earth based observations Pluto is known to be the host of N2, CH4 and CO ices and also a dark red material. Very limited spatial distribution information is available from rotational visible and near-infrared spectral curves obtained from hemispheric measurements. In July 2015 the New Horizons spacecraft reached Pluto and its satellite system and recorded a large set of data. The LEISA spectro-imager of the RALPH instruments are dedicated to the study of the composition and physical state of the materials composing the surface. In this paper we report a study of the distribution and physical state of the ices and non-ice materials on Pluto's illuminated surface and their mode and degree of mixing. Principal Component analysis as well as various specific spectral indicators and correlation plots are used on the first set of 2 high resolution spectro-images from the LEISA instrument covering the whole illuminated face of Pluto at the time of the New Horizons encounter. Qualitative distribution maps have been obtained for the 4 main condensed molecules, N2, CH4, CO, H2O as well as for the visible-dark red material. Based on specific spectral indicators, using either the strength or the position of absorption bands, these 4 molecules are found to indicate the presence of 3 different types of ices: N2-rich:CH4:CO ices, CH4-rich(:CO:N2?) ices and H2O ice. The mixing lines between these ices and with the dark red material are studied using scatter plots between the various spectral indicators. CH4 is mixed at the molecular level with N2, most probably also with CO, thus forming a ternary molecular mixture that follows its phase diagram with low solubility limits. The occurrence of a N2-rich - CH4-rich ices mixing line associated with a progressive decrease of the CO/CH4 ratio tells us that a fractionation sublimation sequence transforms one type of ice to the other forming either a N2-rich - CH4-rich binary mixture at the surface or an upper CH4-rich ice crust that

  4. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  5. Topography of Sputnik Planitia Basin on Pluto: What We Know and Don't Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Moore, J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2017-12-01

    Pluto's topography is complex and reflects a diversity of geologic processes throughout its history. The most dominant feature is the deep 1200-by-2000-km-wide topographic depression enclosing the Sputnik Planitia nitrogen-rich ice sheet. Centered in the encounter hemisphere this large basin is ideally suited for topographic analysis. Despite this, considerable effort is required to constrain the true depth of this giant feature due to the uncertainties in controlling MVIC line-scan images, our primary source for long-wavelength information. Here we will summarize the current state of knowledge of this feature, as processing continues. Current estimates are that the floor of the observed basin (i.e., the top of the ice sheet) is 2-2.5 km depressed below the mean elevation of the surface. There is a highly eroded annular raised arched-ridge surrounding most of the basin that rises up to 1 km above mean surface. The surface of most of the ice sheet appears to be remarkably level within the limits of measurement ( 125 m). Comparison to other similar-sized depressions on Mars and the Moon support the interpretation that this is a large ancient impact structure. The outer 20-40- km of the ice sheet can be either depressed or raised several hundred meters, with the depressed moat forming north of 30° latitude or so, the raised portions forming south of this and corresponding to areas where glacier-like flow of material from the elevated rim regions meets the ice sheet. This suggests that the equatorial areas are areas of net accumulation of ice and the areas to the north are net deflation or lateral flow. The ice sheet is also characterized by polygonal and ovoid `cells' diagnostic of convection. These have shading patterns consistent with cell centers being raised in elevation. Preliminary shape-from-shading measurements suggest elevations of 100-200 m, consistent with weak stereo observations, though much more work is required on all these topics. Interpolation of d

  6. Closing the uplink/downlink loop on the new Horizons Mission to Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph G.; Birath, Emma; Carcich, Brian; Harch, Ann

    Commanding the payload on a spacecraft (“ uplink” sequencing and command generation) and processing the instrument data returned (“ downlink” data processing) are two primary functions of Science Operations on a mission. While vitally important, it is sometimes surprisingly difficult to connect data returned from a spacecraft to the corresponding commanding and sequencing information that created the data, especially when data processing is done via an automated science data pipeline and not via a manual process with humans in the loop. For a variety of reasons it is necessary to make such a connection and close this loop. Perhaps the most important reason is to ensure that all data asked for has arrived safely on the ground. This is especially critical when the mission must erase parts of the spacecraft memory to make room for new data; mistakes here can result in permanent loss of data. Additionally, there are often key pieces of information (such as intended observation target or certain instrument modes that are not included in housekeeping, etc.) that are known only at the time of commanding and never makes it down in the telemetry. Because missions like New Horizons strive to be frugal with how much telemetry is sent back to Earth, and the telemetry may not include unambiguous identifiers (like observation ids, etc.), connecting downlinked data with uplink command information in an automated way can require creative approaches and heuristics. In this paper, we describe how these challenges were overcome on the New Horizons Mission to Pluto. The system developed involves ingesting uplink information into a database and automatically correlating it with downlinked data products. This allows for more useful data searches and the ability to attach the original intent of each observation to the processed science data. Also a new data tracking tool is now being developed to help in planning data playback from the spacecraft and to ensu- e data is verified

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  8. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  10. Development of pulsed plate columns for fast reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J.A.; Logsdail, D.H.; Lyall, E.; Myers, P.E.; Partridge, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority has undertaken a development programme on solvent extraction equipment for reprocessing fast reactor fuels. As part of this programme a solvent extraction pilot plant has been built at Harwell in which a variety of flowsheet conditions can be simulated using the system uranyl nitrate/nitric acid (UN/HNO 3 ) - 20% tri-n-butyl phosphate in odourless kerosene (TBP/OK). The main purpose of present pilot plant operations is to study the performance of pulsed plate columns, with the following specific objectives: to measure the volumetric throughput capacity of the columns, - to study the effect of scale-up of column diameter on U mass transfer performance, - to provide hydraulic and mass transfer data for a dynamic simulation model of pulsed column operation, - to develop and test instruments and ancillary equipment. This poster describes the pilot plant and is illustrated by experimental data, with particular reference to an external settler for controlling the removal of aqueous phase from columns operated with the aqueous phase dispersed

  11. UK fast reactor components. Sodium removal decontamination and requalification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, D.M.; Bray, J.A.; Newson, I.H.

    1978-01-01

    Extensive experience gained at the U.K.A.E.A. Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment is being applied to form the basis of the plant to be provided for sodium removal, decontamination, and requalification of components in future commercial fast reactors. In the first part of a three part paper, the factors to be taken into account, showing the UK philosophy and approach to maintenance and repair operations are discussed. In the second part, PFR facilities for sodium removal and decontamination are described and some examples are given of cleaning components such as pumps, charge machine, cold trap baskets, and steam generator units. Similar facilities at DFR are briefly described. In the third part of the paper a short description is given of the Harwell mass transfer loop, currently used to study the deposition of activated stainless steel corrosion products. Decontamination method for pipework specimens cut from the loop are described and results of first screening tests of various chemical decontaminants are presented. (U.K.)

  12. Meeting of Specialists on the Reliability of Decay Heat Removal Systems for Fast Reactors. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Reliability of Decay Heat Removal Systems proposed for Fast Reactors was sponsored by the UKAEA Safety & Reliability Directorate and held at Harwell between 28th April and 1st May, 1975. The meeting was attended by delegates from six countries - (USA, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, USSR and the UK). A list of participants is included in an Appendix to this report. The subject matter of the meeting was concerned with the degree to which the ability to maintain decay heat removal from a fast reactor after shutdown in normal and abnormal circumstances could be guaranteed by design provisions and substantiated by reliability analysis techniques, operational testing etc. Consideration of conditions prevailing after a hypothetical core melt down incident were not included in the subject matter. The deliberations of the meeting were focussed at each working session on a defined theme and its dependant topics as shown in the detailed Agenda included in this report. Although provision had been made in the Agenda for a limited amount of discussion of the decay heat rejection problems of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors, delegates had no contributions to offer on this subject. During each session a Recording Secretary prepared a summary of the main points made by national delegates and of the resulting recommendations and conclusions. These draft summaries were made available to delegates during subsequent sessions of the meeting and approved by them for inclusion in the Summary, General Conclusions and Recommendations provided under Table of Contents (item 3 and 4)

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  15. Annual report and accounts 1989-1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    AEA Technology, the trading name for the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority was formally launched in 1990. A summary of each of its services and activities is given. These are: thermal reactor services, fast reactors, fusion, fuel services, decommissioning and radioactive waste, safety and reliability, petroleum services, environment and energy and industrial technology. Other business activities include an underlying research programme, nuclear assessments, corporate business development, overseas relations and Information Technology. Highlights of the year include the good performance of the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and the arrangement of several major research contracts. The closure of both Harwell reactors, DIDO and PLUTO, was a less successful feature of the year. Accounts for the year are presented. (UK).

  16. Annual report and accounts 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    AEA Technology, the trading name for the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority was formally launched in 1990. A summary of each of its services and activities is given. These are: thermal reactor services, fast reactors, fusion, fuel services, decommissioning and radioactive waste, safety and reliability, petroleum services, environment and energy and industrial technology. Other business activities include an underlying research programme, nuclear assessments, corporate business development, overseas relations and Information Technology. Highlights of the year include the good performance of the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and the arrangement of several major research contracts. The closure of both Harwell reactors, DIDO and PLUTO, was a less successful feature of the year. Accounts for the year are presented. (UK)

  17. The spectrum of Pluto, 0.40-0.93 μm. I. Secular and longitudinal distribution of ices and complex organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, V.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Licandro, J.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Grundy, W. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Emery, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Context. During the past 30 years the surface of Pluto has been characterized and its variability monitored through continuous near-infrared spectroscopic observations. But in the visible range only a few data are available. Aims: The aim of this work is to define Pluto's relative reflectance in the visible range to characterize the different components of its surface, and to provide ground based observations in support of the New Horizons mission. Methods: We observed Pluto on six nights between May and July 2014 with the imager/spectrograph ACAM at the William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain). The six spectra obtained cover a whole rotation of Pluto (Prot = 6.4 days). For all the spectra, we computed the spectral slope and the depth of the absorption bands of methane ice between 0.62 and 0.90 μm. To search for shifts in the center of the methane bands, which are associated with dilution of CH4 in N2, we compared the bands with reflectances of pure methane ice. Results: All the new spectra show the methane ice absorption bands between 0.62 and 0.90 μm. Computation of the depth of the band at 0.62 μm in the new spectra of Pluto and in the spectra of Makemake and Eris from the literature, allowed us to estimate the Lambert coefficient at this wavelength at temperatures of 30 K and 40 K, which has never been measured before. All the detected bands are blueshifted with respect to the position for pure methane ice, with minimum shifts correlated to the regions where the abundance of methane is higher. This could be indicative of a dilution of CH4:N2 that is more saturated in CH4. The longitudinal and secular variations in the parameters measured in the spectra are in accordance with results previously reported in the literature and with the distribution of the dark and bright materials that show the Pluto's color maps from New Horizons.

  18. Slurry reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  19. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  1. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masami; Nishio, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the rupture of the dry well even when the melted reactor core drops into a reactor pedestal cavity. Constitution: In a reactor container in which a dry well disposed above the reactor pedestal cavity for containing the reactor pressure vessel and a torus type suppression chamber for containing pressure suppression water are connected with each other, the pedestal cavity and the suppression chamber are disposed such that the flow level of the pedestal cavity is lower than the level of the pressure suppression water. Further, a pressure suppression water introduction pipeway for introducing the pressure suppression water into the reactor pedestal cavity is disposed by way of an ON-OFF valve. In case if the melted reactor core should fall into the pedestal cavity, the ON-OFF valve for the pressure suppression water introduction pipeway is opened to introduce the pressure suppression water in the suppression chamber into the pedestal cavity to cool the melted reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This chapter includes the following: General description of the RA reactor, organization of work, responsibilities of leadership and operators team, regulations concerning operation and behaviour in the reactor building, regulations for performing experiments, regulations and instructions for inserting samples into experimental channels [sr

  3. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  4. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  5. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A system for controlling combustible gases, it has been constituted at present such that the combustible gases are controlled by exhausting them to the wet well of a reactor container. In this system, however, there has been a problem, in a reactor container having plenums in addition to the wet well and the dry well, that the combustible gases in such plenums can not be controlled. In view of the above, in the present invention, suction ports or exhaust ports of the combustible gas control system are disposed to the wet well, the dry well and the plenums to control the combustible gases in the reactor container. Since this can control the combustible gases in the entire reactor container, the integrity of the reactor container can be ensured. (T.M.)

  6. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hosomi, Kenji; Otonari, Jun-ichiro.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen to be disposed in a reactor container upon rupture of pipelines of a reactor primary coolant system is prevented from deposition of water droplets formed from a reactor container spray to suppress elevation of hydrogen concentration in the reactor container. Namely, a catalytic combustion gas concentration control system comprises a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen and a support thereof. In addition, there is also disposed a water droplet deposition-preventing means for preventing deposition of water droplets in a reactor pressure vessel on the catalyst. Then, the effect of the catalyst upon catalytic oxidation reaction of hydrogen can be kept high. The local elevation of hydrogen concentration can be prevented even upon occurrence of such a phenomenon that various kinds of mobile forces in the container such as dry well cooling system are lost. (I.S.)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  8. Optimization of neutronic characteristics of U3Si2 low enrichment fuel elements for a new design of IEA-R1 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.A.; Maiorino, J.R.; Gouvea, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    This work shows a study of neutronic optimization of U 3 Si 2 -Al low enrichment fuel element. This study has a goal to propose a optimized Core to be used in the research reactor IEA-R1. The external dimensions of the fuel element were maintained as constraints and the loss of reactivity along fuel life-time was defined as 'objective function', and it has been minimized by varying the fuel element dimensions. Cell calculations were made with HAMMER-TECH /3/ Code, for burnups up to 50% of U-235 initial mass. The Computer values of the objective function for several combinations of fuel element dimensions were fitted by a surface using the SAS system /9/, and it has been minimized by a Harwell subroutine /10/. (author) [pt

  9. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  10. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Satoru; Kawashima, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the temperature distribution of the reactor container so as to moderate the thermal stress distribution on the reactor wall of LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: A good heat conductor (made of Al or Cu) is appended on the outer side of the reactor container wall from below the liquid level to the lower face of a deck plate. Further, heat insulators are disposed to the outside of the good heat conductor. Furthermore, a gas-cooling duct is circumferentially disposed at the contact portion between the good heat conductor and the deck plate around the reactor container. This enables to flow the cold heat from the liquid metal rapidly through the good heat conductor to the cooling duct and allows to maintain the temperature distribution on the reactor wall substantially linear even with the abrupt temperature change in the liquid metal. Further, by appending the good heat conductor covered with inactive metals not only on the outer side but also on the inside of the reactor wall to introduce the heat near the liquid level to the upper portion and escape the same to the cooling layer below the roof slab, the effect can be improved further. (Ikeda, J.)

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  12. Irradiation Experiments on Plutonium Fuels for Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, B. R.T.; Wait, E. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment Harwell, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    An assessment carried out some years ago indicated that cermet fuels might provide the high burn-up and integrity required for fast reactors. An irradiation programme was started at Harwell on (U, Pu)O{sub 2} -SS cermet plates and rods, mainly In thermal neutron fluxes, to gain experience of dimensional stability at temperatures typical of modern sodium-cooled fast reactor designs (600-650 Degree-Sign C). A subsequent assessment showed that cermets carried a large penalty as far as breeding was concerned and (U, Pu)C was chosen by Harwell for long-term study as an alternative, economic, fast reactor fuel. However, the results from the cermet experiments were of sufficient promise to proceed with parallel irradiation programmes on cermets and carbide. The studies of cermets showed that dimensional instability (swelling and cladding rupture) were caused by the pressures exerted on the steel matrix by the fuel particles, and that the initial density of the fuel particles was important in determining the burn-up at which failure occurred. Further, it was shown that cermets provided a useful vehicle for studying the changes occurring in oxide fuel particles with increasing burn-up. The disappearance of initial porosity and its replacement by fission gas bubbles and segregated solid fission products was studied in some detaiL No significant differences were observed between UO{sub 2} and(U,Pu)O{sub 2} particles. The initial studies of (U, Pu)C were concerned with the effect of varying composition and structure on swelling and fission gas release. A tantalum-lined nickel alloy cladding material was used to contain both pellet and powder specimens In an irradiation experiment in the core of the Dounreay fast reactor. This showed that the presence of a metal phase in the fuel led to a high swelling rate, that fission gas release was low up to {approx} 3% bum-up, and that a low density powder accommodated the swelling without excessive straining of the can. A subsequent

  13. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  15. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshihito; Sano, Tamotsu; Ueda, Sabuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the liquid surface disturbance in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A horizontal flow suppressing mechanism mainly comprising vertical members is suspended near the free liquid surface of coolants in the upper plenum. The horizontal flow of coolants near the free liquid surface is reduced by the suppressing mechanism to effectively reduce the surface disturbance. The reduction in the liquid surface disturbance further prevails to the entire surface region with no particular vertical variations to the free liquid surface to remarkably improve the preventive performance for the liquid surface disturbance. Accordingly, it is also possible to attain the advantageous effects such as prevention for the thermal fatigue in reactor vessel walls, reactor upper mechanisms, etc. and prevention of burning damage to the reactor core due to the reduction of envolved Ar gas. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  18. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollion, H.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components [fr

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  20. Reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdoes, P.

    1977-01-01

    This is one of a series of articles discussing aspects of nuclear engineering ranging from a survey of various reactor types for static and mobile use to mention of atomic thermo-electric batteries of atomic thermo-electric batteries for cardiac pacemakers. Various statistics are presented on power generation in Europe and U.S.A. and economics are discussed in some detail. Molten salt reactors and research machines are also described. (G.M.E.)

  1. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  2. Fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fast reactors have capacities to spare uranium natural resources by their breeding property and to propose solutions to the management of radioactive wastes by limiting the inventory of heavy nuclei. This article highlights the role that fast reactors could play for reducing the radiotoxicity of wastes. The conversion of 238 U into 239 Pu by neutron capture is more efficient in fast reactors than in light water reactors. In fast reactors multi-recycling of U + Pu leads to fissioning up to 95% of the initial fuel ( 238 U + 235 U). 2 strategies have been studied to burn actinides: - the multi-recycling of heavy nuclei is made inside the fuel element (homogeneous option); - the unique recycling is made in special irradiation targets placed inside the core or at its surroundings (heterogeneous option). Simulations have shown that, for the same amount of energy produced (400 TWhe), the mass of transuranium elements (Pu + Np + Am + Cm) sent to waste disposal is 60,9 Kg in the homogeneous option and 204.4 Kg in the heterogeneous option. Experimental programs are carried out in Phenix and BOR60 reactors in order to study the feasibility of such strategies. (A.C.)

  3. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  4. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Fission product release from UO2 during irradiation. Diffusion data and their application to reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, J.R.; Johnson, F.A.; Turnbull, J.A.; Friskney, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Release of fission product species from UO 2 , and to a limited extent from (U, Pu)0 2 was studied using small scale in-reactor experiments in which these interacting variables may be separated, as far as is possible, and their influences assessed. Experiments were at fuel ratings appropriate to water reactor fuel elements and both single crystal and poly-crystalline specimens were used. They employed highly enriched uranium such that the relative number of fissions occurring in plutonium formed by neutron capture was small. The surface to volume ratio (S/V) of the specimens was well defined thus reducing the uncertainties in the derivation of diffusion coefficients. These experiments demonstrate many of the important characteristics of fission product behaviour in UO 2 during irradiation. The samples used for these experiments were small being always less than 1g with a fissile content usually between 2 and 5mg. Polycrystalline materials were taken from batches of production fuel prepared by conventional pressing and sintering techniques. The enriched single crystals were grown from a melt of sodium and potassium chloride doped with UO 2 powder 20% 235 U content. The irradiations were performed in the DIDO reactor at Harwell. The neutron flux at the specimen was 4x10 16 neutrons m -2 s -1 providing a heat rating within the samples of 34.5 MW/teU

  6. Fast reactor fuel pin behaviour modelling in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.R.; Hughes, H.

    1979-01-01

    Two fuel behaviour codes have been applied extensively to fast reactor problems; SLEUTH developed at Sprlngfields Nuclear Laboratory and FRUMP at A.E.R.E. Harwell. The SLEUTH fuel pin endurance code was originally developed to define a programme of power cycling and power ramp experiments In Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs) where, because of the very soft cladding, pellet clad interaction is severe. The code was required to define accelerated test conditions to generalise from the observed endurance to that under other power histories and to select for investigation the most significant design, material and operational variables. The weak clad and low coolant pressure combine to make fission gas swelling a major contributor to clad deformation while the high clad ductility renders the distribution of strain readily observable. This has led to a detailed study of strain concentrations using the SEER code. SLEUTH and SEER have subsequently been used to specify power cycling and power ramp 112 experiments in water cooled, fast and materials testing reactors with the aim of developing a unified quantitative model of pellet-clad interaction whatever the reactor system. The FRUMP fuel behaviour code was developed specifically for the interpretation of fast reactor fuel pin behaviour. Experience with earlier models was valuable In its development. Originally the model was developed to describe behaviour during normal operation, but subsequently the code has been used extensively in the field of accident studies. Much of the effort in FRUMP development has been devoted to the production of physical models of the various effects of irradiation and the temperature gradients on the structure of the fuel and clad. Each process is modelled as well as is permitted by current knowledge and the limitations of computing costs. Each sub-model has a form which reflects the underlying mechanisms, where quantities are unknown values are assigned semi-empirically, i.e. coefficients

  7. Fast reactor fuel pin behaviour modelling in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J R [UKAEA, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hughes, H [Springfields Nuclear Power Development Laboratories, Springfields, Salwick, Preston (United Kingdom)

    1979-12-01

    Two fuel behaviour codes have been applied extensively to fast reactor problems; SLEUTH developed at Sprlngfields Nuclear Laboratory and FRUMP at A.E.R.E. Harwell. The SLEUTH fuel pin endurance code was originally developed to define a programme of power cycling and power ramp experiments In Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs) where, because of the very soft cladding, pellet clad interaction is severe. The code was required to define accelerated test conditions to generalise from the observed endurance to that under other power histories and to select for investigation the most significant design, material and operational variables. The weak clad and low coolant pressure combine to make fission gas swelling a major contributor to clad deformation while the high clad ductility renders the distribution of strain readily observable. This has led to a detailed study of strain concentrations using the SEER code. SLEUTH and SEER have subsequently been used to specify power cycling and power ramp 112 experiments in water cooled, fast and materials testing reactors with the aim of developing a unified quantitative model of pellet-clad interaction whatever the reactor system. The FRUMP fuel behaviour code was developed specifically for the interpretation of fast reactor fuel pin behaviour. Experience with earlier models was valuable In its development. Originally the model was developed to describe behaviour during normal operation, but subsequently the code has been used extensively in the field of accident studies. Much of the effort in FRUMP development has been devoted to the production of physical models of the various effects of irradiation and the temperature gradients on the structure of the fuel and clad. Each process is modelled as well as is permitted by current knowledge and the limitations of computing costs. Each sub-model has a form which reflects the underlying mechanisms, where quantities are unknown values are assigned semi-empirically, i.e. coefficients

  8. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  10. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  13. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  14. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  15. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  17. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Narabayashi, Naoshi.

    1990-01-01

    The represent invention concerns a reactor system with improved water injection means to a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. A steam pump is connected to a heat removing system pipeline, a high pressure water injection system pipeline and a low pressure water injection system pipeline for injecting water into the pressure vessel. A pump actuation pipeline is disposed being branched from a main steam pump or a steam relieaf pipeline system, through which steams are supplied to actuate the steam pump and supply cooling water into the pressure vessel thereby cooling the reactor core. The steam pump converts the heat energy into the kinetic energy and elevates the pressure of water to a level higher than the pressure of the steams supplied by way of a pressure-elevating diffuser. Cooling water can be supplied to the pressure vessel by the pressure elevation. This can surely inject cooling water into the pressure vessel upon loss of coolant accident or in a case if reactor scram is necessary, without using an additional power source. (I.N.)

  20. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  1. New about research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorenkov, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The multi-purpose research reactor MAPLE (Canada) and concept of new reactor MAPLE-CNF as will substitute the known Canadian research reactor NRU are described. New reactor will be used as contributor for investigations into materials, neutron beams and further developments for the CANDU type reactor. The Budapest research reactor (BRR) and its application after the last reconstruction are considered also [ru

  2. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Osamu; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the position of an intermediate slab within a reactor container and fitting a heat insulating material to the inner wall of said intermediate slab, whereby a space for a control rod exchanging device and thermal stresses of the inner peripheral wall are lowered. Constitution: In the pedestal at the lower part of a reactor pressure vessel there is formed an intermediate slab at a position lower than diaphragm floor slab of the outer periphery of the pedestal thereby to secure a space for providing automatic exchanging device of a control rod driving device. Futhermore, a heat insulating material is fitted to the inner peripheral wall at the upper side of the intermediate slab part, and the temperature gradient in the wall thickness direction at the time of a piping rupture trouble is made gentle, and thermal stresses at the inner peripheral wall are lowered. (Sekiya, K.)

  9. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  11. Development and verifications of fast reactor fuel design code ''Ceptar''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, T.; Nakazawa, H.; Abe, T.

    2001-01-01

    The annular fuel is very beneficial for fast reactors, because it is available for both high power and high burn-up. Concerning the irradiation behavior of the annular fuel, most of annular pellets irradiated up to high burn-up showed shrinkage of the central hole due to deformation and restructuring of the pellets. It is needed to predict precisely the shrinkage of the central hole during irradiation, because it has a great influence on power-to-melt. In this paper, outline of CEPTAR code (Calculation code to Evaluate fuel pin stability for annular fuel design) developed to meet this need is presented. In this code, the radial profile of fuel density can be computed by using the void migration model, and law of conservation of mass defines the inner diameter. For the mechanical analysis, the fuel and cladding deformation caused by the thermal expansion, swelling and creep is computed by the stress-strain analysis using the approximation of plane-strain. In addition, CEPTAR can also take into account the effect of Joint-Oxide-Gain (JOG) which is observed in fuel-cladding gap of high burn-up fuel. JOG has an effect to decrease the fuel swelling and to improve the gap conductance due to deposition of solid fission product. Based on post-irradiation data on PFR annular fuel, we developed an empirical model for JOG. For code verifications, the thermal and mechanical data obtained from various irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations were compared with the predictions of this code. In this study, INTA (instrumented test assembly) test in JOYO, PTM (power-to-melt) test in JOYO, EBR-II, FFTF and MTR in Harwell laboratory, and post-irradiation examinations on a number of PFR fuels, were used as verification data. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  13. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Sakae.

    1990-01-01

    At least one valve rack is disposed in a reactor building, on which pipeways to a main closure valve, valves and bypasses of turbines are placed and contained. The valve rack is fixed to the main body of the building or to a base mat. Since the reactor building is designed as class A earthquake-proofness and for maintaining the S 1 function, the valve rack can be fixed to the building main body or to the base mat. With such a constitution, the portions for maintaining the S 1 function are concentrated to the reactor building. As a result, the dispersion of structures of earthquake-proof portion corresponding to the reference earthquake vibration S 1 can be prevented. Accordingly, the conditions for the earthquake-proof design of the turbine building and the turbine/electric generator supporting rack are defined as only the class B earthquake-proof design conditions. In view of the above, the amount of building materials can be saved and the time for construction can be shortened. (I.S.)

  14. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. MLR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.; Smimov, A.M.; Taliev, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Kousin, V.V.; Lantsov, M.N.; Radchenko, V.P.; Sharapov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The Material Testing Loop Reactor (MLR) development was commenced in 1991 with the aim of updating and widening Russia's experimental base to validate the selected directions of further progress of the nuclear power industry in Russia and to enhance its reliability and safety. The MLR reactor is the pool-type one. As coolant it applies light water and as side reflector beryllium. The direction of water circulation in the core is upward. The core comprises 30 FA arranged as hexagonal lattice with the 90-95 mm pitch. The central materials channel and six loop channels are sited in the core. The reflector includes up to 11 loop channels. The reactor power is 100 MW. The average power density of the core is 0.4 MW/I (maximal value 1.0 MW/l). The maximum neutron flux density is 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the core (E>0.1 MeV), and 5.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector (E<0.625 eV). In 1995 due to the lack of funding the MLR designing was suspended. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Hatamiya, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Terufumi; Fukui, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Ryuhei; Murase, Michio; Naito, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    In order to suppress the pressure elevation in a reactor container due to high temperature and high pressure steams jetted out upon pipeway rupture accidents in the reactor container, the steams are introduced to a pressure suppression chamber for condensating them in stored coolants. However, the ability for suppressing the pressure elevation and steam coagulation are deteriorated due to the presence of inactive incondensible gases. Then, there are disposed a vent channel for introducing the steams in a dry well to a pressure suppression chamber in the reactor pressure vessel, a closed space disposed at the position lower than a usual liquid level, a first channel having an inlet in the pressure suppression chamber and an exit in the closed space and a second means connected by way of a backflow checking means for preventing the flow directing to the closed space. The first paths are present by plurality, a portion of which constitutes a syphon. The incondensible gases and the steams are discharged to the dry well at high pressure by using the difference of the water head for a long cooling time after the pipeway rupture accident. Then, safety can be improved without using dynamic equipments as driving source. (N.H.)

  18. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  19. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwin, Jeremy; Frenette, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or ''clean,'' building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, ''Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201'') was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one

  20. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  1. Increased SRP reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAfee, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    Major changes in the current reactor hydraulic systems could be made to achieve a total of about 1500 MW increase of reactor power for P, K, and C reactors. The changes would be to install new, larger heat exchangers in the reactor buildings to increase heat transfer area about 24%, to increase H 2 O flow about 30% per reactor, to increase D 2 O flow 15 to 18% per reactor, and increase reactor blanket gas pressure from 5 psig to 10 psig. The increased reactor power is possible because of reduced inlet temperature of reactor coolant, increased heat removal capacity, and increased operating pressure (larger margin from boiling). The 23% reactor power increase, after adjustment for increased off-line time for reactor reloading, will provide a 15% increase of production from P, K, and C reactors. Restart of L Reactor would increase SRP production 33%

  2. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  6. Notes on the Harwell Carbon Meter (HCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, R.C.; Kirstein, T.B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The sensor of the HCM is an iron membrane, generally in the form of a helically wound tube, the inner surface of which has been oxidised to form an iron oxide film. When immersed in the liquid sodium, preferably in the temperature range 500-650 deg. C, the outer surface of the membrane will rapidly achieve the same carbon activity (α C ) as the sodium and carbon will diffuse through the iron. When the carbon reaches the inner surface it reacts with the iron oxide to form CO and CO 2 which are swept away by a flow of inert carrier gas. Thus, at the inner surface of the membrane is maintained close to zero. In this way there is produced across the membrane a carbon activity gradient. The rate of diffusion of carbon through the membrane and the resulting flux of CO+CO 2 are directly proportional to α C the membrane outer surface and, by the same token, directly proportional to α C in the sodium. The rate of production of CO+CO 2 is measured continuously by passing the carrier gas through an analytical unit

  7. Remeasurement of early Harwell personnel film dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.; McGuinness, E.A.

    1981-05-01

    The A.E.A. epidemiological study depends for its radiation dose data on records of film badge doses which have been stored continuously since 1947. The records were originally kept to assist in the control of radiation hazard to the individual and for that purpose doses below the measurement threshold were unimportant. The epidemiological study could consider these doses to be either zero or equal to the measurement threshold, but both assumptions risk introducing a bias. Samples of old films worn in 1955 and 1960 were therefore remeasured using the present-day lower threshold of 0.005 rems to aid the choice of the most correct estimate. It was found that there had been little change in the blackening on the films or in the assessed radiation dose for 238 films above the original threshold of 0.05 rems, confirming that remeasurement was possible. The 2426 films previously recorded as ''<0.05 rems'' were found on remeasurement to give an average dose of 0.009 rems. A similar epidemiological study of radiation workers at Hanford took threshold doses as equal to zero and considered only positive measured doses. The errors possible with this approach are discussed. (author)

  8. Notes on the Harwell Carbon Meter (HCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asher, R C; Kirstein, T B.A. [AERE, Harwell, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1980-05-01

    The sensor of the HCM is an iron membrane, generally in the form of a helically wound tube, the inner surface of which has been oxidised to form an iron oxide film. When immersed in the liquid sodium, preferably in the temperature range 500-650 deg. C, the outer surface of the membrane will rapidly achieve the same carbon activity ({alpha}{sub C}) as the sodium and carbon will diffuse through the iron. When the carbon reaches the inner surface it reacts with the iron oxide to form CO and CO{sub 2} which are swept away by a flow of inert carrier gas. Thus, at the inner surface of the membrane is maintained close to zero. In this way there is produced across the membrane a carbon activity gradient. The rate of diffusion of carbon through the membrane and the resulting flux of CO+CO{sub 2} are directly proportional to {alpha}{sub C} the membrane outer surface and, by the same token, directly proportional to {alpha}{sub C} in the sodium. The rate of production of CO+CO{sub 2} is measured continuously by passing the carrier gas through an analytical unit.

  9. Inelastic rotor spectrometer at the Harwell Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, B.C.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrometer is designed to measure energy transfer from 50 MeV to 400 MeV covering a range of Q values from 1 to 15 A - 1 . Particular emphasis has been placed on the low Q counter banks where measurements at low Q reduce multiphonon contributions in vibrational spectra, diffusional broadening in liquids and allow measurements to be made on magnetic excitations. All indications are that the energy resolution is as predicted and is certainly twice as good as that of any other spectrometer presently available to the UK users at these energy transfers. Backgrounds on the high angle banks 24 0 to 94 0 are excellent but at the low angles are too high at present for anything but hydrogenous samples. Tests have shown that much of this background comes from the main beam in the area of the collimation between the chopper and the sample, and steps are being taken to improve this area

  10. Power-Law Scaling of the Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto: A Preliminary Analysis Based on First Images from New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholkmann F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent (14 th July 2015 flyby of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft of the dwarf planet Pluto resulted in the first high-resolution images of the geological surface- features of Pluto. Since previous studies showed that the impact crater size-frequency distribution (SFD of different celestial objects of our solar system follows power-laws, the aim of the present analysis was to determine, for the first time, the power-law scaling behavior for Pluto’s crater SFD based on the first images available in mid-September 2015. The analysis was based on a high-resolution image covering parts of Pluto’s re- gions Sputnik Planum , Al-Idrisi Montes and Voyager Terra . 83 impact craters could be identified in these regions and their diameter ( D was determined. The analysis re- vealed that the crater diameter SFD shows a statistically significant power-law scaling ( α = 2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest determined D value in this data set of 37.77 km. The value obtained for the scaling coefficient α is similar to the coefficient determined for the power-law scaling of the crater SFDs from the other celestial objects in our solar system. Further analysis of Pluto’s crater SFD is warranted as soon as new images are received from the spacecraft.

  11. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  12. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-01-01

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.)

  13. Reactor monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tamotsu.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors a reactor so that each of the operations for the relocation of fuel assemblies and the withdrawal and the insertion of control rods upon exchange of fuel assemblies and control rods in the reactor. That is, when an operator conducts relocating operation by way of a fuel assembly operation section, the device of the present invention judges whether the operation indication is adequate or not, based on the information of control rod arrangement in a control rod memory section. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to a fuel assembly relocating device. Further, when the operator conducts control rod operation by way of a control rod operation section, the device of the present invention judges in the control rod withdrawal judging section, as to whether the operation indication given by the operator is adequate or not by comparing it with fuel assembly arrangement information. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to control rod drives. With such procedures, increase of nuclear heating upon occurrence of erroneous operation can be prevented. (I.S.)

  14. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  15. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  16. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  17. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-11-01

    This single page document is the November 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the production reactor.

  18. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-01

    This single page document is the October 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  19. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-10-15

    This single page document is the October 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  20. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-09-15

    This single page document is the September 15, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production Reactor.

  1. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-15

    This single page document is the December 16, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  2. Reactor outage schedule (tentative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, R.P.

    1969-12-01

    This single page document is the December 1, 1969 reactor refueling outage schedule for the Hanford Production Reactor. It also contains data on the amounts and types of fuels to be loaded and relocated in the Production reactor.

  3. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  4. The CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Two main research reactors, specifically designed, PEGASE reactor and Laue-Langevin high flux reactor, are presented. The PEGASE reactor was designed at the end of the 50s for the study of the gas cooled reactor fuel element behaviour under irradiation; the HFR reactor, was designed in the late 60s to serve as a high yield and high level neutron source. Historical backgrounds, core and fuel characteristics and design, flux characteristics, etc., are presented. 5 figs

  5. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  6. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Sublimation pit distribution indicates convection cell surface velocities of ∼10 cm per year in Sputnik Planitia, Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2018-01-01

    The ∼106 km2 Sputnik Planitia, Pluto is the upper surface of a vast basin of nitrogen ice. Cellular landforms in Sputnik Planitia with areas in the range of a few × 102-103 km2 are likely the surface manifestation of convective overturn in the nitrogen ice. The cells have sublimation pits on them, with smaller pits near their centers and larger pits near their edges. We map pits on seven cells and find that the pit radii increase by between 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10-3 and 5.9 ± 0.8 × 10-3 m m-1 away from the cell center, depending on the cell. This is a lower bound on the size increase because of the finite resolution of the data. Accounting for resolution yields upper bounds on the size vs. distance distribution of between 4.2 ± 0.2 × 10-3 and 23.4 ± 1.5 × 10-3 m m-1. We then use an analytic model to calculate that pit radii grow via sublimation at a rate of 3.6-0.6+2.1 ×10-4 m yr-1, which allows us to convert the pit size vs. distance distribution into a pit age vs. distance distribution. This yields surface velocities between 1.5-0.2+1.0 and 6.2-1.4+3.4 cm yr-1 for the slowest cell and surface velocities between 8.1-1.0+5.5 and 17.9-5.1+8.9 cm yr-1 for the fastest cell. These convection rates imply that the surface ages at the edge of cells reach ∼4.2-8.9 × 105 yr. The rates are comparable to rates of ∼6 cm yr-1 that were previously obtained from modeling of the convective overturn in Sputnik Planitia (McKinnon et al., 2016). Finally, we investigate the surface rheology of the convection cells and estimate that the minimum ice viscosity necessary to support the geometry of the observed pits is of order 1016-1017 Pa s, based on the argument that pits would relax away before growing to their observed radii of several hundred meters if the viscosity were lower than this value.

  8. Reflections of ions in electrostatic analyzers: A case study with New Horizons/Solar Wind Around Pluto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randol, B. M.; Ebert, R. W.; Allegrini, F.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic analyzers (ESAs), in various forms, are used to measure plasma in a range of applications. In this article, we describe how ions reflect from the interior surfaces of an ESA, the detection of which constitutes a fundamentally nonideal response of ESAs. We demonstrate this effect by comparing laboratory data from a real ESA-based space instrument, the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument, aboard the NASA New Horizons spacecraft, to results from a model based on quantum mechanical simulations of particles reflected from the instrument's surfaces combined with simulations of particle trajectories through the instrument's applied electrostatic fields. Thus, we show, for the first time, how reflected ions in ESAs lead to nonideal effects that have important implications for understanding the data returned by these instruments, as well as for designing new low-background ESA-based instruments. Specifically, we show that the response of SWAP widens considerably below a level of 10 -3 of the peak response. Thus, a direct measurement of a plasma distribution with SWAP will have an energy-dependent background on the order of ≤10 -3 of the peak of the signal due to that distribution. We predict that this order of magnitude estimate for the background applies to a large number of ESA-based instruments because ESAs operate using a common principle. However, the exact shape of the energy-dependent response will be different for different instruments. The principle of operation is that ions outside the ideal range of energy-per-charge are deflected into the walls of the ESA. Therefore, we propose that a new design paradigm is necessary to mitigate the effect of ion reflections and thus accurately and directly measure the energy spectrum of a plasma using ESAs. In this article, we build a framework for minimizing the effect of ion reflections in the design of new ESAs. Through the use of existing computer simulation software, a design team can use our method

  9. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  12. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Hideyasu; Oyamada, Osamu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a container for a reactor provided with a pressure suppressing chamber pool which can prevent bubble vibrating load, particularly negative pressure generated at the time of starting to release exhaust from a main steam escape-safety valve from being transmitted to a lower liner plate of the container. Constitution: This arrangement is characterized in that a safety valve exhaust pool for main steam escape, in which a pressure suppressing chamber pool is separated and intercepted from pool water in the pressure suppressing chamber pool, a safety valve exhaust pipe is open into said safety valve exhaust pool, and an isolator member, which isolates the bottom liner plate in the pressure suppressing chamber pool from the pool water, is disposed on the bottom of the safety valve exhaust pool. (Nakamura, S.)

  13. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  15. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kimitaka; Fukuie, Ken; Iijima, Tooru; Shimpo, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    In an FBR type reactor for exchanging fuels by pulling up reactor core upper mechanisms, a connection mechanism is disposed for connecting the top of the reactor core and the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms. In addition, a cylindrical body is disposed surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, and a support member is disposed to the cylindrical body for supporting an intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms. Then, the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is connected to the top of the reactor core. Same displacements are caused to both of them upon occurrence of earthquakes and, as a result, it is possible to eliminate mutual horizontal displacement between a control rod guide hole of the reactor core upper mechanisms and a control rod insertion hole of the reactor core. In addition, since the intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms is supported by the support member disposed to the cylindrical body surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, deformation caused to the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is reduced, so that the mutual horizontal displacement with respect to the control rod insertion hole of the reactor core can be reduced. As a result, performance of control rod insertion upon occurrence of the earthquakes is improved, so that reactor shutdown is conducted more reliably to improve reactor safety. (N.H.)

  16. The prototype fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), which is a liquid metal cooled fast reactor power station, situated at Dounreay, Scotland. The principal design features of a Fast Reactor and the PFR are given, along with key points of operating history, and health and safety features. The role of the PFR in the development programme for commercial reactors is discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  18. NCSU Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities

  19. Reactor safety method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature

  20. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  1. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  2. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  3. Thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutomi, Yoshiyuki; Nakagawa, Moroo; Sawai, Yuichi; Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon composited with reinforcing metals is used for a divertor cooling substrate having an effect as a cooling tube to provide a silicon base composite material having increased electric resistance and toughness. The blending ratio of reinforcing materials in the form of granules, whiskers or long fibers is controlled in order to control heat conductivity, electric resistivity and mechanical performances. The divertor cooling substrate comprising the silicon base composite material is integrated with a plasma facing material. The production method therefor includes ordinary metal matrix composite forming methods such as powder metallurgy, melting penetration method, high pressure solidification casting method, centrifugal casting method and vacuum casting method. Since the cooling plate is constituted with the light metal and highly electric resistant metal base composite material, sharing force due to eddy current can be reduced, and radiation exposure can be minimized. Accordingly, a cooling structure for a thermonuclear reactor effective for the improvement of environmental problems caused by waste disposal can be attained. (N.H.)

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  7. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1975-01-01

    The author gives a survey of 'fast breeder reactors'. In detail the process of breeding, the reasons for the development of fast breeders, the possible breeder reactors, the design criteria, fuels, cladding, coolant, and safety aspects are reported on. Design data of some experimental reactors already in operation are summarized in stabular form. 300 MWe Prototype-Reactors SNR-300 and PFR are explained in detail and data of KWU helium-cooled fast breeder reactors are given. (HR) [de

  8. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  9. Radiation damage simulation studies of selected austenitic and ferritic/martensitic alloys for fusion reactor structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazey, D.J.; Walters, G.P.; Buckley, S.N.; Bullough, R.; Hanks, W.; Bolster, D.E.J.; Sowden, B.C.; Lurcook, D.; Murphy, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    Results are given of an investigation of the radiation damage stability of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys following ion bombardment in the Harwell VEC to simulate fusion-reactor exposures up to 110 dpa at temperatures from 425 deg to 625 deg C. Gas production rates appropriate to CTR conditions were simulated using a mixed beam of (4 MeV He + 2 MeV H 2 ) in the ratio 1:4 He:H. A beam of 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions was used in sequence with the mixed gas beam to provide a gas/damage ratio of 13 appm He/dpa at a damage rate of approx. 1 dpa/hr. The materials were investigated using TEM and comprised three austenitic alloys: European reference 316L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb; four high-nickel alloys: Fe/25 Ni/8Cr, Inconel 625, Inconel 706 and Nimonic PE16, and four ferritic/martensitic alloys: FV 448, FV 607, CRM 12 and FI. Some data were obtained for a non-magnetic structural alloy Nonmagne-30. The swelling behaviour is reported. The overall results of the study indicate that on a comparative basis the ferritic alloys are the most swelling-resistant, whilst the high-nickel alloys have an acceptable low swelling response up to 110 dpa. The 316 alloys tested have shown an unfavourable swelling response. (author)

  10. The fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments for and against the fast breeder reactor are debated. The case for the fast reactor is that the world energy demand will increase due to increasing population over the next forty years and that the damage to the global environment from burning fossil fuels which contribute to the greenhouse effect. Nuclear fission is the only large scale energy source which can achieve a cut in the use of carbon based fuels although energy conservation and renewable sources will also be important. Fast reactors produce more energy from uranium than other types of (thermal) reactors such as AGRs and PWRs. Fast reactors would be important from about 2020 onwards especially as by then many thermal reactors will need to be replaced. Fast reactors are also safer than normal reactors. The arguments against fast reactors are largely economic. The cost, especially the capital cost is very high. The viability of the technology is also questioned. (UK)

  11. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  12. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  13. Guide to power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    The IAEA's major first scientific publication is the Directory of Power Reactors now in operation or under construction in various parts of the world. The purpose of the directory is to present important details of various power projects in such a way as to provide a source of easy reference for anyone interested in the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy, either at the technical or management level. Six pages have been devoted to each reactor the first of which contains general information, reactor physics data and information about the core. The second and third contain sketches of the fuel element or of the fuel element assembly, and of the horizontal and vertical sections of the reactor. On the fourth page information is grouped under the following heads: fuel element, core heat transfer, control, reactor vessel and over-all dimensions, and fluid flow. The fifth page shows a simplified flow diagram, while the sixth provides information on reflector and shielding, containment and turbo generator. Some information has also been given, when available, on cost estimates and operating staff requirements. Remarks and a bibliography constitute the last part of the description of each reactor. Reactor projects included in this directory are pressurized light water cooled power reactors. Boiling light water cooled power reactors, heavy water cooled power reactors, gas cooled power reactors, organic cooled power reactors liquid metal cooled power reactors and liquid metal cooled power reactors

  14. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  15. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features

  17. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Raedt, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  18. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  19. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M.

    1992-01-01

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  20. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, S. K.; Kim, G. K.; Yeo, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  1. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  2. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  3. Control for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, E.B.; Bernath, L.; Facha, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided with several hydraulically-supported spherical bodies having a high neutron absorption cross section, which fall by gravity into the core region of the reactor when the flow of supporting fluid is shut off. (auth)

  4. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelevkin, V. M., E-mail: lelevkin44@mail.ru; Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2015-04-15

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  5. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  6. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  7. continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and the small and large intestines as plug flow reactor (PFR) ... from the two equations are used for the reactor sizing of the modeled reactors.

  8. Reactor physics aspects of CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1980-01-01

    These four lectures are being given at the Winter Course on Nuclear Physics at Trieste during 1978 February. They constitute part of the third week's lectures in Part II: Reactor Theory and Power Reactors. A physical description of CANDU reactors is given, followed by an overview of CANDU characteristics and some of the design options. Basic lattice physics is discussed in terms of zero energy lattice experiments, irradiation effects and analytical methods. Start-up and commissioning experiments in CANDU reactors are reviewed, and some of the more interesting aspects of operation discussed - fuel management, flux mapping and control of the power distribution. Finally, some of the characteristics of advanced fuel cycles that have been proposed for CANDU reactors are summarized. (author)

  9. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    MSBR Study Group formed in October 1974 has studied molten salt breeder reactor and its various aspects. Usage of a molten salt fuel, extremely interesting as reactor chemistry, is a great feature to MSBR; there is no need for separate fuel making, reprocessing, waste storage facilities. The group studied the following, and these results are presented: molten salt technology, molten salt fuel chemistry and reprocessing, reactor characteristics, economy, reactor structural materials, etc. (Mori, K.)

  10. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, D; Takac, S; Markovic, H; Raisic, N; Zdravkovic, Z; Radanovic, Lj [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1959-03-15

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  11. Reactor utilization, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Stanic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Reactor was operated until August 1984 due to prohibition issued by the Ministry since the reactor does not have the emergency cooling system nor special filters in the ventilation system yet. This means that the operation plan was fulfilled by 69%. This annex includes detailed tables containing data about utilization of reactor experimental channels, irradiated samples, as well as interruptions of operation. Detailed data about reactor power during this period are shown as well

  12. PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor is the only research reactor in Malaysia. This 1 MW TRIGA Mk II reactor first reached criticality on 28 June 1982 and is located at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency premise in Bangi, Malaysia. This reactor has been mainly utilised for research, training and education and isotope production. Over the years several systems have been refurbished or modernised to overcome ageing and obsolescence problems. Major achievements and milestones will also be elaborated in this paper. (author)

  13. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  14. The fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: brief description of fast reactors; advantage in conserving uranium resources; experience, in UK and elsewhere, in fast reactor design, construction and operation; safety; production of plutonium, security aspects; consideration of future UK fast reactor programme. (U.K.)

  15. Mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  16. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  17. Rotating reactors : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, F.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.; Schouten, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    This review-perspective paper describes the current state-of-the-art in the field of rotating reactors. The paper has a focus on rotating reactor technology with applications at lab scale, pilot scale and industrial scale. Rotating reactors are classified and discussed according to their geometry:

  18. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  19. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Seki, Eiji; Yoshida, Toshifumi; Ito, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  20. Ulysse, mentor reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouquin, B.; Rio, I.; Safieh, J.

    1997-01-01

    On July 23, 1961, the ULYSSE reactor began its first power rise. Designed at that time to train nuclear engineering students and reactor operators, this reactor still remains an indispensable tool for nuclear teaching and a choice instrument for scientists. (author)

  1. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drivemechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displayer rods through the reactor vessel

  2. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drive mechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displacer rods through the reactor vessel. (author)

  3. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant)

  4. Reactor as furnace and reactor as lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldanskii, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    There are presented general characteristics of the following ways of transforming of nuclear energy released in reactors into chemical : ordinary way (i.e. trough the heat, mechanical energy and electricity); chemonuclear synthesis ; use of high-temperature fuel elements (reactor as furnace); use of the mixed nγ-radiation of reactors; use of the radiation loops; radiation - photochemical synthesis (reactor as lamp). Advantage and disadvantages of all above variants are compared. The yield of the primary product of fixation of nitrogen (nitric oxide NO) in reactor with the high-temperature (above ca. 1900degC) fuel elements (reactor-furnace) can exceed W ∼ 200 kg per gram of burned uranium. For the latter variant (reactor-lamp) the yield of chemical products can reach W ∼ 60 kg. per gram of uranium. Such values of W are close to or even strongly exceed the yields of chemical products for other abovementioned variants and - what is particularly important - are not connected to the necessity of archscrupulous removal of radioactive contamination of products. (author)

  5. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  6. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  7. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1981-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  8. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO 2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPR TM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1 TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENA TM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENA TM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  9. The fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.A.; Baker, M.A.W.; Hall, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Following submission of written evidence, the Energy Committee members asked questions of three witnesses from the Central Electricity Generating Board and Nuclear Electric (which will be the government owned company running nuclear power stations after privatisation). Both questions and answers are reported verbatim. The points raised include where the responsibility for the future fast reactor programme should lie, with government only or with private enterprise or both and the viability of fast breeder reactors in the future. The case for the fast reactor was stated as essentially strategic not economic. This raised the issue of nuclear cost which has both a construction and a decommissioning element. There was considerable discussion as to the cost of building a European Fast reactor and the cost of the electricity it would generate compared with PWR type reactors. The likely demand for fast reactors will not arrive for 20-30 years and the need to build a fast reactor now is questioned. (UK)

  10. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, Wei-Min; Wang, Song-Feng

    1993-01-01

    The strategy of Taiwan Research Reactor Renewal plan is to remove the old reactor block with One Piece Reactor Removal (OPRR) method for installing a new research reactor in original building. In this paper, the engineering design of each transportation works including the work method, the major equipments, the design policy and design criteria is described and discussed. In addition, to ensure the reactor block is safety transported for storage and to guarantee the integrity of reactor base mat is maintained for new reactor, operation safety is drawn special attention, particularly under seismic condition, to warrant safe operation of OPRR. ALARA principle and Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) practice were also incorporated in the planning to minimize the collective dose and the total amount of radioactive wastes. All these activities are introduced in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  11. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Arita, Setsuo; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fukazawa, Yukihisa; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor power control device capable of enhancing an operation efficiency while keeping high reliability and safety in a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for inputting a set value of a generator power and a set value of a reactor power, (2) a means for controlling the reactor power to either smaller one of the reactor power corresponding to the set value of the generator power and the set value of the reactor power. With such procedures, even if the nuclear power plant is set so as to operate it to make the reactor power 100%, when the generator power reaches the upper limit, the reactor power is controlled with a preference given to the upper limit value of the generator power. Accordingly, safety and reliability are not deteriorated. The operation efficiency of the plant can be improved. (I.S.)

  12. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogen, Ayumi; Ozawa, Michihiro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the working efficiency of a nuclear reactor by reflecting the control rod history effect on thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation. Constitution: An incore power distribution calculation section reads the incore neutron fluxes detected by neutron detectors disposed in the reactor to calculate the incore power distribution. A burnup degree distribution calculation section calculates the burnup degree distribution in the reactor based on the thus calculated incore power distribution. A control rod history date store device supplied with the burnup degree distribution renews the stored control rod history data based on the present control rod pattern and the burnup degree distribution. Then, thermal variants of the nuclear reactor are calculated based on the thus renewed control rod history data. Since the control rod history effect is reflected on the thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation, the working efficiency of the nuclear reactor can be improved significantly. (Seki, T.)

  13. The Maple reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Labrie, J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  14. Fission reactors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions

  15. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  16. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Ruben Calabrese

    1999-01-01

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  17. Siting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop criteria for siting and the site-related design basis for research reactors. The concepts presented in this document are intended as recommendations for new reactors and are not suggested for backfitting purposes for facilities already in existence. In siting research reactors serious consideration is given to minimizing the effects of the site on the reactor and the reactor on the site and the potential impact of the reactor on the environment. In this document guidance is first provided on the evaluation of the radiological impact of the installation under normal reactor operation and accident conditions. A classification of research reactors in groups is then proposed, together with a different approach for each group, to take into account the relevant safety problems associated with facilities of different characteristics. Guidance is also provided for both extreme natural events and for man-induced external events which could affect the safe operation of the reactor. Extreme natural events include earthquakes, flooding for river or coastal sites and extreme meteorological phenomena. The feasibility of emergency planning is finally considered for each group of reactors

  18. Reactor core for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hisao; Kasai, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Tsugio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi.

    1996-01-01

    In a gas-sealed assembly for a FBR type reactor, two or more kinds of assemblies having different eigen frequency and a structure for suppressing oscillation of liquid surface are disposed in a reactor core. Coolant introduction channels for introducing coolants from inside and outside are disposed in the inside of structural members of an upper shielding member to form a shielding member-cooling structure in the reactor core. A structure for promoting heat conduction between a sealed gas in the assembly and coolants at the inner side or the outside of the assembly is disposed in the reactor core. A material which generates heat by neutron irradiation is disposed in the assembly to heat the sealed gases positively by radiation heat from the heat generation member also upon occurrence of power elevation-type event to cause temperature expansion. Namely, the coolants flown out from or into the gas sealed-assemblies cause differential fluctuation on the liquid surface, and the change of the capacity of a gas region is also different on every gas-sealed assemblies thereby enabling to suppress fluctuation of the reactor power. Pressure loss is increased by a baffle plate or the like to lower the liquid surface of the sodium coolants or decrease the elevating speed thereof thereby suppressing fluctuation of the reactor power. (N.H.)

  19. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  20. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  1. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.) [pt

  2. 2011 HM{sub 102}: DISCOVERY OF A HIGH-INCLINATION L5 NEPTUNE TROJAN IN THE SEARCH FOR A POST-PLUTO NEW HORIZONS TARGET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Alex H.; Holman, Matthew J.; McLeod, Brian A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buie, Marc W.; Borncamp, David M.; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Osip, David J. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Fabbro, Sebastian; Kavelaars, J. J. [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Benecchi, Susan D.; Sheppard, Scott S. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, S San Francisco St, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Gay, Pamela L. [Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Research, Education, and Outreach, Southern Illinois University, 1220 Lincoln Dr, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Petit, Jean-Marc [CNRS, UTINAM, Universite de Franche Comte, Route de Gray, F-25030 Besancon Cedex, (France); Tholen, David J., E-mail: aparker@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2013-04-15

    We present the discovery of a long-term stable L5 (trailing) Neptune Trojan in data acquired to search for candidate trans-Neptunian objects for the New Horizons spacecraft to fly by during an extended post-Pluto mission. This Neptune Trojan, 2011 HM{sub 102}, has the highest inclination (29. Degree-Sign 4) of any known member of this population. It is intrinsically brighter than any single L5 Jupiter Trojan at H{sub V} {approx} 8.18. We have determined its gri colors (a first for any L5 Neptune Trojan), which we find to be similar to the moderately red colors of the L4 Neptune Trojans, suggesting similar surface properties for members of both Trojan clouds. We also present colors derived from archival data for two L4 Neptune Trojans (2006 RJ{sub 103} and 2007 VL{sub 305}), better refining the overall color distribution of the population. In this document we describe the discovery circumstances, our physical characterization of 2011 HM{sub 102}, and this object's implications for the Neptune Trojan population overall. Finally, we discuss the prospects for detecting 2011 HM{sub 102} from the New Horizons spacecraft during its close approach in mid- to late-2013.

  3. 2011 HM102: DISCOVERY OF A HIGH-INCLINATION L5 NEPTUNE TROJAN IN THE SEARCH FOR A POST-PLUTO NEW HORIZONS TARGET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Alex H.; Holman, Matthew J.; McLeod, Brian A.; Buie, Marc W.; Borncamp, David M.; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan; Osip, David J.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Fabbro, Sébastian; Kavelaars, J. J.; Benecchi, Susan D.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E.; Gay, Pamela L.; Petit, Jean-Marc; Tholen, David J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a long-term stable L5 (trailing) Neptune Trojan in data acquired to search for candidate trans-Neptunian objects for the New Horizons spacecraft to fly by during an extended post-Pluto mission. This Neptune Trojan, 2011 HM 102 , has the highest inclination (29.°4) of any known member of this population. It is intrinsically brighter than any single L5 Jupiter Trojan at H V ∼ 8.18. We have determined its gri colors (a first for any L5 Neptune Trojan), which we find to be similar to the moderately red colors of the L4 Neptune Trojans, suggesting similar surface properties for members of both Trojan clouds. We also present colors derived from archival data for two L4 Neptune Trojans (2006 RJ 103 and 2007 VL 305 ), better refining the overall color distribution of the population. In this document we describe the discovery circumstances, our physical characterization of 2011 HM 102 , and this object's implications for the Neptune Trojan population overall. Finally, we discuss the prospects for detecting 2011 HM 102 from the New Horizons spacecraft during its close approach in mid- to late-2013.

  4. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  6. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  7. Upgradation of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammen, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Bhatnagar, A.; Sasidharan, K.; Raina, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Apsara is a 1 MW swimming pool type research reactor using high enriched uranium as fuel with light water as coolant and moderator. The reactor is in operation for more than five decades and has been extensively used for basic research, radioisotope production, neutron radiography, detector testing, shielding experiments etc. In view of its long service period, it is planned to carry out refurbishment of the reactor to extend its useful life. During refurbishment, it is also planned to upgrade the reactor to a 2 MW reactor to improve its utilization and to upgrade the structure, system and components in line with the current safety standards. This paper gives a brief account of the design features and safety aspects of the upgraded Apsara reactor. (author)

  8. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  9. Spectral shift reactor control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method of operating a nuclear reactor having a core and coolant displacer elements arranged in the core wherein is established a reator coolant temperature set point at which it is desired to operate said reactor and first reactor coolant temperature band limits are provided within which said set point is located and it is desired to operate said reactor charactrized in that said reactor coolant displacer elements are moved relative to the reactor core for adjusting the volume of reactor coolant in said core as said reactor coolant temperature approaches said first band limits thereby to maintain said reactor coolant temperature near said set point and within said first band limits

  10. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  11. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shojiro; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Takano, Hideki

    1982-09-01

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  12. Power reactors operational diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.; Pecinka, L.

    1976-01-01

    The definition of reactor operational diagnostics is presented and the fundamental trends of research are determined. The possible sources of power reactor malfunctions, the methods of defect detection, the data evaluation and the analysis of the results are discussed in detail. In view of scarcity of a theoretical basis and of insufficient in-core instrumentation, operational diagnostics cannot be as yet incorporated in a computer-aided reactor control system. (author)

  13. Fast reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.S.; Vignon, D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the evolution of fast reactors over the past 30 years, and their present status. Fast reactor development in different countries is described, and the present position, with emphasis on cost reduction and collaboration, is examined. The French development of the fast breeder type reactor is reviewed, and includes: the acquisition of technical skills, the search for competitive costs and the spx2 project, and more advanced designs. Future prospects are also discussed. (U.K.)

  14. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  15. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  16. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  17. Reactor BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2000-07-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  18. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    1999-01-01

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  19. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  20. Integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics

  1. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  2. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  4. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  5. Australian research reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.

    1978-01-01

    The Australian AEC has two research reactors at the Lucas Heights Research Establishment, a 10 HW DIDO class materials testing reactor, HIFAR, and a smaller 100kW reactor MOATA, which was recently upgraded from 10kW power level. Because of the HIFAR being some 20 years old, major renewal and repair programmes are necessary to keep it operational. To enable meeting projected increases in demand for radioisotopes, plans for a new reactor to replace the HIFAR have been made and the design criteria are described in the paper. (author)

  6. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  7. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikabe, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to prevent thermal stresses of a core of PWR type reactor, described has been a method for feeding heated recirculating water to the core in the case of the reactor start-up or shut-down. Constitution: A recirculating water is degassed, cleaned up and heated in the steam condensers, and then feeds the water to the reactor, characterized in that heaters are provided in the bypasses of the turbine, so that heated water is constantly supplied to the reactor. (Nakamura, S.)

  8. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dazeley, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobie, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sumner, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sweany, Melinda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  9. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  10. Trench reactor: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.; Rohach, A.F.; Razzaque, M.M.; Sankoorikal, J.T.; Schmidt, R.S.; Lofshult, J.; Ramin, T.; Sokmen, N.; Lin, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent fast, sodium-cooled reactor designs reflect new conditions. In nuclear energy these conditions are (a) emphasis on maintainability and operability, (b) design for more transparent safety, and (c) a surplus of uranium and enrichment availability that eases concerns about light water reactor fueling costs. In utility practice the demand is for less capital exposure, short construction time, smaller new unit sizes, and low capital cost. The PRISM, SAFR, and integral fast reactor (IFR) concepts are responses to these conditions. Fast reactors will not soon be deployed commercially, so more radical designs can be considered. The trench reactor is the product of such thinking. Its concepts are intended as contributions to the literature, which may be picked up by one of the existing programs or used in a new experimental project. The trench reactor is a thin-slab, pool-type reactor operated at very low power density and- for sodium-modest temperature. The thin slab is repeated in the sodium tank and the reactor core. The low power density permits a longer than conventional core height and a large-diameter fuel pin. Control is by borated steel slabs that can be lowered between the core and lateral sodium reflector. Shutdown is by semaphore slabs that can be swung into place just outside the control slabs. The paper presents major characteristics of the trench reactor that have been changed since the last report

  11. New reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, G.; Govaerts, P.; Baugnet, J.-M.; Delbrassine, A.

    1998-11-01

    The document gives a summary of new nuclear reactor concepts from a technological point of view. Belgium supports the development of the European Pressurized-Water Reactor, which is an evolutionary concept based on the European experience in Pressurized-Water Reactors. A reorientation of the Belgian choice for this evolutionary concept may be required in case that a decision is taken to burn plutonium, when the need for flexible nuclear power plants arises or when new reactor concepts can demonstrate proved benefits in terms of safety and cost

  12. Advanced CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, J.T.; Finlay, R.B.; Olmstead, R.A.

    1988-12-01

    AECL has undertaken the design and development of a series of advanced CANDU reactors in the 700-1150 MW(e) size range. These advanced reactor designs are the product of ongoing generic research and development programs on CANDU technology and design studies for advanced CANDU reactors. The prime objective is to create a series of advanced CANDU reactors which are cost competitive with coal-fired plants in the market for large electricity generating stations. Specific plant designs in the advanced CANDU series will be ready for project commitment in the early 1990s and will be capable of further development to remain competitive well into the next century

  13. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.; George, R.A.; Dollard, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift arrangement for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a plurality of reactor coolant displacer members which are inserted into a reactor core at the beginning of the core life to reduce the volume of reactor coolant-moderator in the core at start-up. However, as the reactivity of the core declines with fuel depletion, selected displacer members are withdrawn from the core at selected time intervals to increase core moderation at a time when fuel reactivity is declining. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  15. RA Reactor; Reaktor RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-02-15

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation. [Serbo-Croat] Pored osnovnih karakeristika reaktora RA, organizacije rada i finansijskih pokazatelja, razmatra se stanje opreme reaktora nakon 18 godina rada, pitanja dozvole za rad sa 80% obogacenim gorivom, problem skladistenja isluzenog goriva u bazenu zgrade reaktora i potreba za obnavljanjem komponenti opreme, pre svega elektronske.

  16. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  17. Multi purpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, V.K.; Sasidharan, K.; Sengupta, Samiran; Singh, Tej

    2006-01-01

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor

  18. FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Akira; Yamakawa, Masanori.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety and reliable after-heat removal from a reactor core. Constitution: During ordinary operation of a FBR type reactor, sodium coolants heated to a high temperature in a reactor core are exhausted therefrom, collide against the reactor core upper mechanisms to radially change the flowing direction and then enter between each of the guide vanes. In the case if a main recycling pump is failed and stopped during reactor operation and the recycling force is eliminated, the swirling stream of sodium that has been resulted by the flow guide mechanism during normal reactor operation is continuously maintained within a plenum at a high temperature. Accordingly, the sodium recycling force in the coolant flow channels within the reactor vessel can surely be maintained for a long period of time due to the centrifugal force of the sodium swirling stream. In this way, since the reactor core recycling flow rate can be secured even after the stopping of the main recycling pump, after-heat from the reactor core can safely and surely be removed. (Seki, T.)

  19. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayase, Tamotsu.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns an FBR type reactor in which transuranium elements are eliminated by nuclear conversion. There are loaded reactor core fuels being charged with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium, and blanket fuels mainly comprising depleted uranium. Further, liquid sodium is used as coolants. As transuranium elements, isotope elements of neptunium, americium and curium contained in wastes taken out from light water reactors or the composition thereof are used. The reactor core comprises a region with a greater mixing ratio and a region with a less mixing ratio of the transuranium elements. The mixing ratio of the transuranium elements is made greater for the fuels in the reactor core region at the boundary with the blanket of great neutron leakage. With such a constitution, since the positive reactivity value at the reactor core central portion is small in the Na void reactivity distribution in the reactor core, the positive reactivity is small upon Na boiling in the reactor core central region upon occurrence of imaginable accident, to attain reactor safety. (I.N.)

  20. Farewell to a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Denmark's second reactor, DR 2, whose first criticality took place the night of 18/19 December 1958 was shut down for the last time on 31 October 1975. It was a light-water moderrated and cooled reactor of swimming-pool type with a thermal power of 5 MW, using 90% enriched uranium. The operation is described. The reactor and auxiliary equipment are now being put 'in store' - all fuel elements sent for reprocessing, the reactor tank and cooling circuits emptied, and a lead shielding placed over the tank opening. The rest of the equipment will remain in place. (B.P.)

  1. Indian advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of important issues like safety, waste management, economics etc. are to be addressed. To do this, a number of advanced reactor designs as well as fuel cycle technologies are being pursued worldwide. The advanced reactors being developed in India are the AHWR and the CHTR. Both the reactors use thorium based fuel and have many passive features. This paper describes the Indian advanced reactors and gives a brief account of the international initiatives for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (author)

  2. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Zaetta, A.; Johner, J.; Mathoniere, G.

    2000-01-01

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  3. RB Research nuclear reactor RB reactor, Annual report for 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    2000-12-01

    Report on RB reactor operation during 2000 contains 3 parts. Part one contains a brief description of reactor operation and reactor components, relevant dosimetry data and radiation protection issues, personnel and financial data. Part two is devoted to maintenance of the reactor components, namely, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, absorption rods and heavy water level-meters, maintenance of electronic, mechanical, electrical and auxiliary equipment. Part three contains data concerned with reactor operation and utilization with a comprehensive list of publications resulting from experiments done at the RB reactor. It contains data about reactor operation during previous 14 years, i.e. from 1986 - 2000

  4. FFTF reactor assembly system technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelsdorf, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the FFTF reactor and plant together with descriptions of core components, core internals, core system, primary and secondary control rod system, reactor instrumentation, reactor vessel and closure head, and supporting test programs

  5. Reactor building for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidlen, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the design of a liner, supported by a latticed steel girder structure and destined for guaranteeing a gastight closure for the plant compartments in the reactor building of a pressurized water reactor. It is intended to provide the steel girder structure on their top side with grates, being suited for walking upon, and to hang on their lower side diaphragms in modular construction as a liner. At the edges they may be sealed with bellows in order to avoid thermal stresses. The steel girder structure may at the same time serve as supports for parts of the steam pipe. (RW) [de

  6. Revitalization of reactor usage through reactor sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to renew interest in using the University Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) for educational and training purposes outside the Nuclear Engineering Sciences (NES) and Environmental Engineering Sciences (EES) Departments at the University of Florida and for research by others outside the NES Department. The availability of the UFTR made possible through a US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Grant provided the mechanism to pursue generation of renewed interest at all levels both within the University of Florida and from other educational and corporate institutions

  7. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  8. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  9. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  10. The heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudermueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    This is a survey of the development so far of this reactor line which is in operation all over the world in various types (e.g. BHWR, PHWR). MZFR and the CANDU-type reactors are discussed in more detail. (UA) [de

  11. BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To flatten the radial power distribution in the reactor core thereby improve the thermal performance of the reactor core by making the moderator-fuel ratio of fuel assemblies different depending on their position in the reactor core. Constitution : The volume of fuels disposed in the peripheral area of the reactor core is decreased by the increase of the volume of moderators in fuel assemblies disposed in the peripheral area of the reactor core to thereby make the moderator-fuel volume greater in the peripheral area than that in the central area. The moderator-fuel ratio adjustment is attained by making the number of water rods greater, decreasing the diameter of fuel pellets or decreasing the number of fuel pins in fuel assemblies disposed at the peripheral area of the reactor core as compared with fuel assemblies disposed at the central area of the reactor core. In this way, the infinite multiplication factors of fuels can be increased to thereby improve the reactor core performance. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Osiris reactor descriptive report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    OSIRIS is a swimming pool reactor of 70 MW thermal power. Its main purpose is the irradiation of reactor materials in high neutron flux. A description is given of the air conditioning, ventilation, and radioactive gas removal system. (R.L.)

  13. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  14. Mirror hybrid reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    The hybrid reactor studies are reviewed. The optimization of the point design and work on a reference design are described. The status of the nuclear analysis of fast spectrum blankets, systems studies for fissile fuel producing hybrid reactor, and the mechanical design of the machine are reviewed

  15. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  16. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs

  17. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  18. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  19. International thermal reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    The worldwide development of nuclear power plants is reviewed. Charts are presented which show the commitment to light-water reactor capacity construction with breakdown by region and country. Additional charts show the major nuclear research centers which have substantial scope in light water reactor development and extensive international activities

  20. Thermal reactor strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This statement sets down briefly the CEGB's views on the requirement for nuclear power and outlines current progress in the implementation of the CEGB's thermal reactor strategy. The programme is traced historically, together with statements of Government policy. The place of Magnox, AGR, SGHWR, PWR and fast breeder reactors is discussed. Advantages and problems associated with the various types are outlined. (U.K.)

  1. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  2. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  3. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  4. Reactor cost driving items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Assuming that the design solutions presently perceived for NET can be extrapolated for use in a power reactor, and using costing experience with present day fusion experiments and with fission power plants, the major components of the cost of a tokamak fusion power reactor are described. The analysis shows the emphasis worth placing on various areas of plant design to reduce costs

  5. Tank type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Fumio.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a tank type reactor capable of securing reactor core integrity by preventing incorporation of gases to an intermediate heat exchanger, thgereby improving the reliability. In a conventional tank type reactor, since vortex flows are easily caused near the inlet of an intermediate heat exchanger, there is a fear that cover gases are involved into the coolant main streams to induce fetal accidents. In the present invention, a reactor core is suspended by way of a suspending body to the inside of a reactor vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger and a pump are disposed between the suspending body and the reactor vessel, in which a vortex current preventive plate is attached at the outside near the coolant inlet on the primary circuit of the intermediate heat exchanger. In this way vortex or turbulence near the inlet of the intermediate heata exchanger or near the surface of coolants can be prevented. Accordingly, the cover gases are no more involved, to insure the reactor core integrity and obtain a tank type nuclear reactor of high reliability. (I.S.)

  6. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  7. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  8. Reactor dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.; Lefvert, T.; Stankiewiez, J.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter deals with the work done in reactor dynamics within the Coordinated Research Program on Transport Theory and Advanced Reactor Calculations by three groups in Belgium, Poland, Sweden and Italy. Discretization methods in diffusion theory, collision probability methods in time-dependent neutron transport and singular perturbation method are represented in this paper

  9. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  10. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R 0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R 0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  11. Iris reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.E.; Petrovic, B.; Paramonov, D.V.; Galvin, M.; Todreas, N.E.; Lombardi, C.V.; Maldari, F.; Ricotti, M.E.; Cinotti, L.

    2001-01-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  12. The secure heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pind, C.

    1987-01-01

    The SECURE heating reactor was designed by ASEA-ATOM as a realistic alternative for district heating in urban areas and for supplying heat to process industries. SECURE has unique safety characteristics, that are based on fundamental laws of physics. The safety does not depend on active components or operator intervention for shutdown and cooling of the reactor. The inherent safety characteristics of the plant cannot be affected by operator errors. Due to its very low environment impact, it can be sited close to heat consumers. The SECURE heating reactor has been shown to be competitive in comparison with other alternatives for heating Helsinki and Seoul. The SECURE heating reactor forms a basis for the power-producing SECURE-P reactor known as PIUS (Process Inherent Ultimate Safety), which is based on the same inherent safety principles. The thermohydraulic function and transient response have been demonstrated in a large electrically heated loop at the ASEA-ATOM laboratories

  13. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  14. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  15. Reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukami, Haruo; Morimoto, Yoshinori.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To operate a reactor always with safety operation while eliminating the danger of tripping. Constitution: In a reactor control device adapted to detect the process variants of a reactor, control a control rod drive controlling system based on the detected signal to thereby control the driving the control rods, control the reactor power and control the electric power generated from an electric generator by the output from the reactor, detection means is provided for the detection of the electric power from said electric generator, and a compensation device is provided for outputting control rod driving compensation signals to the control rod driving controlling system in accordance with the amount of variation in the detected value. (Seki, T.)

  16. Reactor feedwater device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress soluble radioactive corrosion products in a feedwater device. Method: In a light water cooled nuclear reactor, an iron injection system is connected to feedwater pipeways and the iron concentration in the feedwater or reactor coolant is adjusted between twice and ten times of the nickel concentration. When the nickel/iron ratio in the reactor coolant or feedwater goes nearer to 1/2, iron ions are injected together with iron particles to the reactor coolant to suppress the leaching of stainless steels, decrease the nickel in water and increase the iron concentration. As a result, it is possible to suppress the intrusion of nickel as one of parent nuclide of radioactive nuclides. Further, since the iron particles intruded into the reactor constitute nuclei for capturing the radioactive nuclides to reduce the soluble radioactive corrosion products, the radioactive nuclides deposited uniformly to the inside of the pipeways in each of the coolant circuits can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeraraghaven, N.

    1990-01-01

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  18. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Akira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent misoperation in a control system for the adjustment of core coolant flow rate, and the increase in the neutron flux density caused from the misoperation in BWR type reactors. Constitution: In a reactor power control system adapted to control the reactor power by the adjustment of core flow rate, average neutron flux signals of a reactor core, entire core flow rate signals and operation state signals for coolant recycling system are inputted to a microcomputer. The outputs from the computer are sent to a recycling MG set speed controller to control the reactor core flow rate. The computer calculates the change ratio with time in the average neutron flux signals, correlation between the average neutron flux signals and the entire core flow rate signals, change ratio with time in the operation state signals for the coolant recycling system and the like and judges the abnormality in the coolant recycling system based on the calculated results. (Ikeda, J.)

  19. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser is described comprising: a toroidal fusion reactor, the reactor generating energetic neutrons; an annular gas cell disposed around the outer periphery of the reactor, the cell including an annular reflecting mirror disposed at the bottom of the cell and an annular output window disposed at the top of the cell; a gas lasing medium disposed within the annular cell for generating output laser radiation; neutron reflector material means disposed around the annular cell for reflecting neutrons incident thereon back into the gas cell; neutron moderator material means disposed between the reactor and the gas cell and between the gas cell and the neutron reflector material for moderating the energy of energetic neutrons from the reactor; converting means for converting energy from the moderated neutrons to energy pumping means for pumping the gas lasing medium; and beam compactor means for receiving output laser radiation from the annular output window and generating a single output laser beam therefrom

  20. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)