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Sample records for harrisburg-hershey pennsylvania 10-14

  1. Res Oct 2014 Cover Tp 01.10.14.cdr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    340/2012-2014 *. Licenced to Pöst without prepayment No.6. Posted at MBC, GPO, Bangalore 560 001, 12.10.14 º º. Regists red with Registrar of Newspapers in India vide Regn. No. Bears. º. º º º º.

  2. Pennsylvania Historical Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tabular monthly and annual weather data for Pennsylvania stations. Data produced by the climatological service of the U.S. Weather Bureau. Images are in full color....

  3. Pennsylvania forests 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Albright; William H. McWilliams; Richard H. Widmann; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Shawn Lehman; Tonya W. Lister; Patrick D. Miles; Randall S. Morin; Rachel Riemann; James E. Smith

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes the third cycle of annualized inventory of Pennsylvania with field data collected from 2009 through 2014. Pennsylvania has 16.9 million acres of forest land dominated by sawtimber stands of oak/hickory and maple/beech/birch forest-type groups. Volumes continue to increase as the forests age with an average of 2,244 cubic feet per acre on...

  4. Brightside Academy: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Brightside Academy has been providing quality care to children six weeks to 12 years old. Operating 49 locations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New York, the company is committed to strengthening learners and respecting families. Currently, the organization provides early education for 6,700 children on a daily basis. 90%…

  5. Pennsylvania's Retrenchment Battle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Kenneth P.

    1981-01-01

    The retrenchment experience of Pennsylvania's state college system is described. The specter of retrenchment scared the campuses into finding new nonpersonnel cuts to make; a policy of intrasystem faculty transfer was finally adopted; and although campus presidents opposed retrenchment, by 1979-80 they were convinced of its necessity. (MLW)

  6. Pennsylvania's Forests, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    George L. McCaskill; William H. McWilliams; Carol A. Alerich; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Grant M. Domke; Doug Griffith; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Shawn Lehman; Tonya W. Lister; Randall S. Morin; W. Keith Moser; Paul Roth; Rachel Riemann; James A. Westfall

    2013-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Pennsylvania's forests reports a stable base of 16.7 million acres of forest land. Northern hardwoods and mixed-oak forest-type groups account for 54 and 32 percent of the forest land, respectively. The State's forest land averages about 61 dry tons of wood per acre and almost 6,500 board feet (International ¼-inch...

  7. A survey of the physical health status of pupils aged 10 - 14 years in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although adolescence is most commonly associated with risk-taking behaviour, mortality due to poverty-related conditions is high among black African children aged. 10 - 14 years. This paper describes a study carried out in. October 1991 to assess the physical health status of 860 underprivileged pupils aged 10 - 14 years ...

  8. Perelman Quadrangle, University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates a large campus renovation and expansion project at the University of Pennsylvania, whose quadrangle preserves the school's historical buildings and student union as the center of student activity. Includes nine photographs, a site plan, and project data. (GR)

  9. Libraries in Pennsylvania: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/pennsylvania.html Libraries in Pennsylvania To use the sharing features on ... Altoona James E. Van Zandt VA Medical Center Library Service 12E-L 2907 Pleasant Valley Boulevard Altoona, ...

  10. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Pennsylvania single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  11. An overview of Pennsylvania`s experience with NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusko, J.G. [Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Although Pennsylvania may be thought of as the state who brought you indoor radon, courtesy of a discovery of a residence with radon concentrations in excess of a few thousand picocuries per liter, this is not the states only claim to NORM fame. In the early years of the twentieth century, Pennsylvania was the largest producer of radium, utilizing its industrial base to produce large quantities of this {open_quotes}miracle cure{close_quotes} from ores mined in the West, and transported to a separation and purification facility in Western Pennsylvania. The company successfully held off foreign and political pressure, and generated large quantities of uranium tailings as well, until a fire one New Year`s Eve destroyed the separation plant, and the company faded from view. The tailings were remediated as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings, Remedial Action Project, on the only site east of the Mississippi River. This article goes on to discuss the states experiences with NORM in various projects, coming in contact with human populations from different sources.

  12. The forest-land owners of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W. Birch; Donald F. Dennis

    1980-01-01

    Seventy-eight percent of Pennsylvania's 15.9 million acres of commercial forest land is in the hands of 490,100 private owners. Landowner information is, therefore, an essential component in obtaining a thorough understanding of Pennsylvania's forest resources. Eighty-six percent of these owners are individuals. A large majority, 63 percent of these owners,...

  13. Analysis of 85Kr: a comparison at the 10 -14 level using micro-liter samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G-M; Cheng, C-F; Jiang, W; Lu, Z-T; Purtschert, R; Sun, Y-R; Tu, L-Y; Hu, S-M

    2013-01-01

    The isotopic abundance of (85)Kr in the atmosphere, currently at the level of 10(-11), has increased by orders of magnitude since the dawn of nuclear age. With a half-life of 10.76 years, (85)Kr is of great interest as tracers for environmental samples such as air, groundwater and ice. Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) is an emerging method for the analysis of rare krypton isotopes at isotopic abundance levels as low as 10(-14) using krypton gas samples of a few micro-liters. Both the reliability and reproducibility of the method are examined in the present study by an inter-comparison among different instruments. The (85)Kr/Kr ratios of 12 samples, in the range of 10(-13) to 10(-10), are measured independently in three laboratories: a low-level counting laboratory in Bern, Switzerland, and two ATTA laboratories, one in Hefei, China, and another in Argonne, USA. The results are in agreement at the precision level of 5%.

  14. American Fisheries Society 136th Annual Meeting Lake Placid, NY 10-14 September, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhouse, D.; Walsh, M.G.; Keeler, S.; Long, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The New York Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation invite you to experience the beauty of New York's famous Adirondack Park as the American Fisheries Society (AFS) convenes its 136th Annual Meeting in the legendary Olympic Village of Lake Placid, NY, 10-14 September 2006. Our meeting theme "Fish in the Balance" will explore the interrelation between fish, aquatic habitats, and man, highlighting the challenges facing aquatic resource professionals and the methods that have been employed to resolve conflicts between those that use or have an interest in our aquatic resources. As fragile as it is beautiful, the Adirondack Region is the perfect location to explore this theme. Bordered by Mirror Lake and its namesake, Lake Placid, the Village of Lake Placid has small town charm, but all of the conveniences that a big city would provide. Whether its reliving the magic of the 1980 hockey team's "Miracle on Ice" at the Lake Placid Olympic Center, getting a panoramic view of the Adirondack high peaks from the top of the 90 meter ski jumps, fishing or kayaking in adjacent Mirror Lake, hiking a mountain trail, or enjoying a quiet dinner or shopping excursion in the various shops and restaurants that line Main Street, Lake Placid has something for everyone.

  15. Pennsylvania safe routes to school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    In October 2007, the Center for Nutrition and Activity promotion at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital (Center) began working under contract with the Pennsylvania Deaprtment of Transportation )PennDOT) to develop, coordinate, and administer the n...

  16. 78 FR 13002 - Pennsylvania Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... finance the costs of review of the applications. Further, Pennsylvania proposes to increase the permit..., and coal mining activity facilities will be deposited in the Surface Mining Conservation and...

  17. The ORSER LANDSAT Data Base of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, B. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A mosaicked LANDSAT data base for Pennsylvania, installed at the computation center of the Pennsylvania State University is described. Initially constructed by Penn State's Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources (ORSER) for the purpose of assisting in state-wide mapping of gypsy moth defoliation, the data base will be available to a variety of potential users. It will provide geometrically correct LANDSAT data accessible by political, jurisdictional, or arbitrary boundaries.

  18. Visual impairment among 10-14-year school children in Puducherry: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnuprasad, R; Bazroy, Joy; Madhanraj, K; Prashanth, Hannah Ranjee; Singh, Zile; Samuel, Abel K; Muthukumar, T

    2017-01-01

    According to the 2010 estimates by the World Health Organization, nearly 285 million (4.24% of total population) people of all ages worldwide are visually impaired. Almost 18.9 million children under 15 years of age are visually impaired globally. In developing countries, 7%-31% of childhood blindness and visual impairment is avoidable. The study was conducted as a cross-sectional study among 1884 school students in Puducherry, in the age group of 10-14 years. A child with presenting maximum vision ≤6/12 Snellen equivalent in the better eye is considered visually impaired. Data were entered in Microsoft Excel 2013 and analyzed using the statistical software SPSS version 21.0. Chi-square test was applied for testing difference in proportion and a P visual impairment (vision ≤6/12) among the study participants was 6.37% (95% confidence interval = 5.27-7.47). The prevalence of visual impairment increased with age and it was found to be high among male students (6.6%) when compared to female students (6%). Presenting vision of 6/6 was observed in 79.8% of the children while with pinhole correction, the proportion increased to 94.6%. The prevalence of visual impairment in our study population was found to be 6.37% and the prevalence was even higher among children who belonged to schools of urban region or private schools. Children with a positive family history of spectacle use were more likely to have visual impairment.

  19. Challenges in establishing LLW disposal capacity: Pennsylvania`s perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornsife, W.P.; Saraka, L.J.

    1989-11-01

    Even though Pennsylvania is host state for the Compact, state implementing legislation was non-existent until early 1988. In February of 1998 Governor Casey signed the Los-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Act) into law. The Act incorporates three years of Departmental work and interaction with the legislature, a Public Advisory Committee on Low-Level Waste, many interest groups and the general public. It is a comprehensive Act that: provides the Department with broad powers and duties to manage, license and regulate a low-level waste disposal program; requires development phase; and establishes benefits and guarantees for communities affected by the establishment and operation of a low-level waste site. The Department considers that its powers and duties to manage, license and regulate a low-level waste disposal program begins with interpreting the provisions established by the Act. Interpretation will establish how the Department intends to implement its authority. The Department is communicating interpretations through various methods such as regulation, policy, and written or verbal guidance. Interpretations typically require a mix of technical, policy, and social solutions to clarify concepts established by law. This paper identifies select items established by law that require technical solutions. Its purpose is to share some creative approaches for solving unmanageable legislature requirements.

  20. Sexism in Education: Pennsylvania Response to the Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstyn, Joan N.

    1974-01-01

    A Joint Task Force on Sexism in Education represented by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, Pennsylvanians for Women's Rights, and the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission outlined a broad program for combatting sexism in educational structures and educational personnel. (JC)

  1. IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, 10-14 March 2013, Fukuoka, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-06-01

    This special issue of Fluid Dynamics Research contains the first of a two-part publication of the papers presented at the IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, held at the Centennial Hall, Kyushu University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan, during the week of 10-14 March 2013. Vortices are ubiquitous structures in fluid mechanics spanning the range of scales from nanofluidics and microfluidics to geophysical and astrophysical flows. Vortices are the key to understanding many different phenomena. As a result, the subject of vortex dynamics continues to evolve and to constantly find new applications in biology, biotechnology, industrial and environmental problems. Vortices can be created by the separation of a flow from the surface of a body or at a density interface, and evolve into coherent structures. Once formed, a vortex acquires a function, depending on its individual structure. In this way, for example, insects gain lift and fish gain thrust. Surprisingly, despite the long history of vortex dynamics, only recently has knowledge about formation, structure and function of vortices been combined to yield new perspectives in the subject, thereby helping to solve outstanding problems brought about by modern advances in computer technology and improved experimental techniques. This symposium is a continuation, five years on, of the IUTAM Symposium '50 Years of Vortex Dynamics', Lyngby, Denmark that took place between 12-16 October 2008, organized by the late Professor Hassan Aref. Originally, Professor Aref was a member of the International Scientific Committee of this symposium and offered his enthusiasm and great expertise, to support its organization. To our shock, he suddenly passed away on 9 September 2011. Furthermore, Professor Slava Meleshko, a leading scientist of fluid and solid mechanics and an intimate friend of Professor Aref, was expected to make an eminent contribution to the symposium. Soon after this sad loss

  2. 76 FR 68381 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania Clean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... a backstop to NLEV) on December 28, 1999 (64 FR 72564). On December 9, 2006, Pennsylvania amended... requirements of Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272...

  3. 40 CFR 81.339 - Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pennsylvania. 81.339 Section 81.339 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Franklin Boro X East Taylor Twp X Middle Taylor Twp X West Taylor Twp X (B) Blair County: City of Altoona X...

  4. 76 FR 16714 - Pennsylvania Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... discharges under the influence of identified precipitation events. Pennsylvania is requesting approval of the... precipitation events less than or equal to the 10 year/24 hour storm event. The addition of 87.102(e); 88.92(e..., manganese is always less than 18mg/l, and flow is always less than 3 gpm; and where net acidity is always...

  5. 77 FR 58975 - Pennsylvania Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 938 Pennsylvania Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), Interior. ] ACTION: Proposed rule... Citizens Coal Council and the Environmental Integrity Project. We are also notifying the public of the date...

  6. Approaching K-12 Online Education in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadell, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how K-12 schools are addressing the need to accommodate online learners in Pennsylvania. It is built upon a review of literature focusing on educational legislation, the personalization of online learning and online learning solutions. The study posed 21 questions utilizing a mixed methods approach to…

  7. Rural Leaders and Leadership Development in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lee L.; Lindsey, Maria Julietta

    2011-01-01

    Throughout Pennsylvania, rural residents have taken on leadership roles to support and promote their communities and their residents. The challenges these leaders face continue to become more complex, as economic, political, social, cultural and even global forces influence local events. This research was conducted to understand how a sample of…

  8. Enriching the Curriculum with Pennsylvania German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The German classroom should prepare students for the linguistic diversity of the target culture, including regional varieties and German spoken outside of the D-A-CH region. Because textbooks do not often include materials on regional varieties, this article presents a model to incorporate Pennsylvania German (PG) into the curriculum. The model…

  9. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an...: Dr. Richard Hodges, Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

  10. ICORG 10-14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, J V; Preston, S R; O'Neill, Blair J

    2017-01-01

    survival, recurrence rates, clinical and pathological response rates, toxicities of induction regimens, post-operative pathology and tumour regression grade, operative in-hospital complications, and health-related quality of life. The trial also affords opportunities for establishing a bio-resource of pre......-treatment and resected tumour, and translational research. DISCUSSION: This RCT directly compares two established treatment regimens, and addresses whether radiation therapy positively impacts on overall survival compared with a standard perioperative chemotherapy regimen Sponsor: Irish Clinical Research Group (ICORG...

  11. Wackenhut Services, Incorporated: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite review, August 10--14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of Wackenhut Services, Inc. (WSI) at Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted August 10-14, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five DOE-VPP tenets. The Team determined that WSI has met in varying degrees, all the tenets of the DOE-VPP. In every case, WSI programs and procedures exceed the level or degree necessary for compliance with existing standards, DOE Orders, and guidelines. In addition, WSI has systematically integrated their occupational safety and health (OSH) program into management and work practices at all levels. WSI`s efforts toward implementing the five major DOE-VPP tenets are summarized.

  12. Keeping current with the evolving makeup of the Pennsylvania population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H Barry

    2010-01-01

    The changing residential population of the Pennsylvania requires continued monitoring if health practitioners are to maintain an awareness of the individuals in their community. A review of federal agency reports provides a general overview of Pennsylvania and national demographic and health factor characteristics.

  13. Measuring Music Education: Music Teacher Evaluation in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emert, Dennis; Sheehan, Scott; Deitz, O. David

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge currently facing Pennsylvania music educators (and many music educators across the country) is change to the evaluation process of teachers in Non-Tested Grades and Subjects (NTGS). The law directing this change is known as Act 82 and comes from the Pennsylvania legislature, authorized through House Bill 1901. The Pennsylvania…

  14. Elk viewing in Pennsylvania: an evolving eco-tourism system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce E. Lord; Charles H. Strauss; Michael J. Powell

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the Pennsylvania Game Commission established an Elk Viewing Area within Pennsylvania's elk range. The viewing area has become the focus for a developing eco-tourism system. During the four years of operation, a research team from Penn State has measured the number of visitors, their expenditure patterns, and other parameters of their visit. The trends...

  15. Water resources of southeastern Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jack B.; Mangan, John W.; White, Walter F.

    1951-01-01

    This report has been prepared as a contribution to the development of southeastern Bucks County, Pa. It summarizes available information on the water resources of this 90-square mile area and evaluates current supplies. Future development of the area may change both the available quantity and the quality of the water supply. The effective development of the area demands a continuing knowledge of the water used and the potential quantity and quality of water available from both underground and surface sources. The area is strategically important to a great industrial section of the Bast. Its eastern boundary is a 26-mile segment of the Delaware River along the extreme southeastern border of Bucks County, Pa. (fig. 1). The present.population of the area is about 40,000, including 24,800 in Bristol Borough and Township and 6,770 in Morrisville. The area is traversed by both the Pennsylvania and the Reading Railroads and also by U.S. Highways 1 and 13. These are main transportation routes connecting the great market outlets of Philadelphia and New York. The Delaware River'is navigable from Morrisville to the sea. The area is only a short distance upstream from the Port of Philadelphia, which ranks second only to New York as the most important seaport in the United States. The area is mostly flat, open land 10 to 60 feet above mean sea level. It contains several large Industries, concentrated chiefly in the Bristol area (pi. 1). There are also scattered industries in the Morrisville, Langhorne, and Bensalem areas. However, Bucks County retains some of the characteristics of a farming region. Truck farming and gardening are still carried on to a considerable extent. Along Delaware River below Morrisville the mining of sand and gravel is an Important industry. The facts summarized in this report have been accumulated over a period of 25 years or more by Federal, State, and local agencies in connection with Investigations for other purposes. Most of the data used in this

  16. All Pennsylvanians Prospering (APP) Together: A Pennsylvania Economic Development Strategy for the Long Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzenberg, Stephen; McAuliff, John

    2015-01-01

    State efforts to boost the economy--economic development--first came to Pennsylvania in the 1950s with the establishment of the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA) low interest loan program used to recruit manufacturers to Pennsylvania, including devastated coal regions. Since that time, economic development in Pennsylvania and…

  17. 30 CFR 938.20 - Approval of Pennsylvania abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PENNSYLVANIA § 938.20 Approval of Pennsylvania abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Pennsylvania Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan as submitted on November 3, 1980, is approved. Copies of the approved Plan... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Pennsylvania abandoned mine land...

  18. 76 FR 53369 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Adhesives and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... Pennsylvania. The SIP revision pertains to amendments to 25 Pennsylvania Code (Pa. Code) Chapters 121, 129, and... definitions. This action is being taken under the Clean Air Act (CAA). DATES: Written comments must be... revision to the Pennsylvania SIP. The SIP revision consists of Pennsylvania's amendments to 25 Pa. Code...

  19. Correlation of Lipid Profile and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in 10-14 Year Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrath M. Habiba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The role of lipid profile in predicting the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in children is not clearly established. Our aim is to screen non-diabetic children aged 10-14 years for risk of developing T2DM and evaluate the association of abnormal lipids and socioeconomic status (SES. Methods: Data on race/ethnicity, family history, body mass index percentile, blood pressure and presence of neck pigmentation (acanthosis nigricans were collected from 149 non-diabetic children. Using these factors, children were classified into low risk (3 risk factors groups. Logistic regression model and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association of blood lipid profile and demographic variables. Independent t-test was used to compare the ratio of Total Cholesterol (TC and High Density Lipids (HDL with T2DM risk. Results: 60% of children were at high risk for developing T2DM. HDL (pp=0.02 and TC/HDL ratio (pConclusions: The significant determinants associated with high risk group were modifiable factors providing an opportunity for early intervention and prevention.

  20. Correlation of Lipid Profile and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in 10-14 Year Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiba, Nusrath M; Fulda, Kimberly G; Basha, Riyaz; Shah, Deep; Fernando, Shane; Nguyen, Bao; Xiong, Yi; Franks, Susan F; Matches, Sarah J; Magie, Richard D; Bowman, W Paul

    2016-01-01

    The role of lipid profile in predicting the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children is not clearly established. Our aim is to screen non-diabetic children aged 10-14 years for risk of developing T2DM and evaluate the association of abnormal lipids and socioeconomic status (SES). Data on race/ethnicity, family history, body mass index percentile, blood pressure and presence of neck pigmentation (acanthosis nigricans) were collected from 149 non-diabetic children. Using these factors, children were classified into low risk (3 risk factors) groups. Logistic regression model and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association of blood lipid profile and demographic variables. Independent t-test was used to compare the ratio of Total Cholesterol (TC) and High Density Lipids (HDL) with T2DM risk. 60% of children were at high risk for developing T2DM. HDL (p<0.001), triglycerides (p=0.02) and TC/HDL ratio (p<.001) were significantly abnormal in high risk group. Low SES showed a marginal association with high risk group. There were no gender or age differences between high and low risk groups. The significant determinants associated with high risk group were modifiable factors providing an opportunity for early intervention and prevention. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Temporal patterns of physical activity and sedentary behavior in 10-14 year-old children on weekdays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baere, Stijn; Lefevre, Johan; De Martelaer, Kristine; Philippaerts, Renaat; Seghers, Jan

    2015-08-19

    An important but often ignored aspect of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) is the chronological succession of activities, or temporal pattern. The main purposes of this study were (1) to investigate when certain types of PA and SB compete against each other during the course of the day and (2) compare intensity- and domain-specific activity levels during different day-segments. The study sample consists of 211 children aged 10-14, recruited from 15 primary and 15 secondary schools. PA was assessed combining the SenseWear Mini Armband (SWM) with an electronic activity diary. The intensity- and domain-specific temporal patterns were plotted and PA differences between different day-segments (i.e., morning, school, early evening and late evening) were examined using repeated-measures ANCOVA models. Physical activity level (PAL) was highest during the early evening (2.51 METSWM) and school hours (2.49 METSWM); the late evening segment was significantly less active (2.21 METSWM) and showed the highest proportion of sedentary time (54 % of total time-use). Throughout the different day-segments, several domains of PA and SB competed with each other. During the critical early-evening segment, screentime (12 % of time-use) and homework (10 %) were dominant compared to activity domains of sports (4 %) and active leisure (3 %). The domain of active travel competed directly with motor travel during the morning (5 % and 6 % respectively) and early-evening segment (both 8 %). Throughout the day, different aspects of PA and SB go in competition with each other, especially during the time period immediately after school. Detailed information on the temporal patterns of PA and SB of children could help health professionals to develop more effective PA interventions and promotion strategies. By making adaptations to the typical day schedule of children (e.g., through the introduction of extra-curricular PA after school hours), their daily activity levels might

  2. Utility of ultrasound examination at 10-14 weeks prior to cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, N L; Robinson, S; Hardisty, E E; Stamilio, D M

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the frequency of unexpected first-trimester ultrasound findings that would alter prenatal management in pregnant women eligible for cell-free (cf) DNA screening because of advanced maternal age (AMA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all AMA women at a tertiary care center who had a 10-14-week ultrasound examination between 1 January 2012 and 27 April 2015. Information on pregnancy dating, obstetric ultrasound examination, prenatal screening and genetic testing were collected from a perinatal database. The primary outcome was an unexpected ultrasound finding in the first trimester that would alter the prenatal screening/testing strategy. In total, 2337 women met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 2462 fetuses. Sixty-eight (2.9%) women had an anomalous fetus, of which 44 (64.7%) had diagnostic testing. In the entire cohort, a non-viable pregnancy was identified in 153 (6.5%) women. Multiple gestation was identified in 32 (1.4%) women; five had a cotwin demise. Gestational dating was revised for 126 (5.4%) women. Among those who opted for aneuploidy screening (n = 1806), 68.5% had cfDNA screening and 31.5% had first-trimester screening by analysis of maternal serum biomarkers and nuchal translucency thickness. Among those eligible for cfDNA screening, 16.1% (95% CI, 15.0-18.0%; 377/2337) had an ultrasound finding (anomaly, incorrect dating, multiple gestation, non-viable pregnancy) at the time of testing that would have altered the provider's counseling regarding the prenatal screening/testing strategy. A substantial proportion of AMA women eligible for cfDNA screening have fetal ultrasound findings that could alter genetic testing strategy and clinical management. This study recommends ultrasound examination prior to cfDNA screening in AMA women. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Women Administrators in Pennsylvania's Public Schools: Profiles, Problems, and Pleasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Barbara Nelson; Rometo, Lorraine

    Pennsylvania's public school women administrators and their respective superintendents were surveyed by mailed questionnaires, which gathered information about their childhood, families, educational preparation, job recruitment, professional experiences, and future plans. The superintendents rated their work performance. Findings were compared…

  4. Allegheny County Pennsylvania House of Representatives District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the Pennsylvania House of Representatives district boundaries within Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western...

  5. Allegheny County Pennsylvania U.S. Legislative Congressional District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the U.S. Legislative Congressional district boundaries within Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania...

  6. Math Science Partnership of Southwest Pennsylvania: Measuring Progress Toward Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    PSSA Pennsylvania System of School Assessment STEM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics TF teacher fellow TIMSS Trends in International...Study ( TIMSS ). In addition, 2 The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics produced the Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics in...Pennsylvania: Measuring Progress Toward Goals the region was one of 26 jurisdictions that participated in the 1999 TIMSS Benchmarking Study (Tananis et al

  7. Pediatric palliative and hospice care: Pennsylvania's model of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    In the state of Pennsylvania, a collaborative model has been developed for improving pediatric palliative care and end-of-life care services to children with life-limiting conditions and their families. The inspiration and efforts of several bereaved parents provided the initial impetus for this encouraging model. Pennsylvania's model involves cooperation and collaboration among several groups and initiatives across the state, as well as the integration of parent-professional collaboration at all levels and in each initiative. The collaborating groups include 1) a volunteer grassroots resource and education initiative, Helping Hands-Healing Hearts; 2) the Pittsburgh Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition, a coalition of concerned parents and experienced palliative and hospice care providers working together to improve service availability; and 3) the Pennsylvania Children's Hospice and Palliative Care Coalition, which developed as an outcome of a state-level Pennsylvania Pediatric Hospice Care Task Force, and which, among other activities, works with the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare and several Pennsylvania legislators on pertinent policy and legislative initiatives.

  8. 2017-10-14T20:00:52Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/88096 2017-10-14T20:00:52Z wsa:ART Technical note: An inorganic water chemistry dataset (1972–2011) of rivers, dams and lakes in South Africa Huizenga, JM Silberbauer, M Dennis, R Dennis, I national data set, inorganic water ...

  9. 2017-10-14T21:50:38Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/75611 2017-10-14T21:50:38Z ajfand:ART Effect of Moringa oleifera lam. leaves ... The deficiency corrected by M. oleifera leaves powder administration into daily meal of HIV positive and negative patients has been determined during 14 ...

  10. Methods to control the response of the cardiovascular system of young volleyball players 10 - 14 years on the impact of physical activity of speed-power orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vertel A.V

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The questions of control of the functional state and reaction of the cardiovascular system of players organism under the influence of experimental technology increase level of speed, speed-power training and technical and tactical training of young volleyball players of 10-14 years old are considered.

  11. 2017-10-14T14:13:48Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/41765 2017-10-14T14:13:48Z jolte:ART Towards a Multilingual learner software for African languages Iraki, FK Maroa, CR Kenyan universities, in particular the University of Nairobi, have been for the last five or so years been a beehive of ...

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Pennsylvania. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Pennsylvania.

  13. 76 FR 9049 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice... of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA, that meet the definitions... patrimony. Officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology have...

  14. Eesti president Toomas H. Ilves Pennsylvania ülikooli ajakirjas / Airi Vaga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaga, Airi, 1940-

    2008-01-01

    University of Pennsylvania ajakirjas "The Pennsylvania Gazette" ilmunud artiklist "From Estonian Exile to Executive Office", autor Susan Frith - järjekordsest võimalusest tutvustada Eestit ja eestlasi USA ülikoolide kaudu

  15. Making ITS/CVO happen : Pennsylvania's ITS/CVO business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This business plan will be used to coordinate the deployment of CVO technologies in Pennsylvania. It provides a 'roadmap' for Pennsylvania's ITS/CVO program by defining broad goals and objectives, as well as specific projects, milestones, responsibil...

  16. 78 FR 22843 - Foreign-Trade Zone 33-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Authorization of Export Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 33--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Authorization of Export Production Activity, Tsudis Chocolate Company (Chocolate Confectionery Bars), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania On...

  17. Local Property Tax Limitations vs. School District Employee Pension Costs in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, William T.; Shrom, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    In Pennsylvania as in many other states, employee pension costs are a significant source of financial pressure for school districts (Zeehandelaar and Northern 2013, Pennsylvania Public Employees' Retirement Commission 2013). In order to gain greater insight into the nature of Pennsylvania school districts' financial burden related to pension…

  18. 78 FR 19301 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and... of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains... Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2027 - Approval status of Pennsylvania's Generic NOX and VOC RACT Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval status of Pennsylvania's Generic NOX and VOC RACT Rules. 52.2027 Section 52.2027 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Pennsylvania § 52.2027 Approval status of Pennsylvania's Generic NOX and VOC RACT Rules. (a) Effective November...

  20. 30 CFR 938.25 - Approval of Pennsylvania abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE PENNSYLVANIA § 938.25 Approval of Pennsylvania abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Pennsylvania abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 938.25 Section 938.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND...

  1. Rivers and valleys of Pennsylvania, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisawa, Marie

    1989-09-01

    The 1889 paper by William Morris Davis on the "Rivers and Valleys of Pennsylvania" is a landmark in the history of geomorphology. It was in this manuscript that he set forth what came to be known as the Davisian system of landscape. It is important to understand that Davis' interpretation of landforms was restricted by the geologic paradigms of his day. Uniformitarianism was strongly entrenched and Darwin's theory of evolution had become popularly accepted. The concept of the landmass Appalachia and then current theories on mountain building affected the approach that Davis took in hypothesizing the origin and development of the Folded Appalachian drainage. All of these geologic precepts influenced the formulation and explanation of his theories. In his exposition he adapted, synthesized and embellished on ideas he derived from fellow geologists such as Gilbert, Dutton, Powell, and McGee. A number of the concepts he proposed in the 1889 paper quickly became the bases for geomorphic studies by others: the cycles of river erosion and landscape evolution and the peneplain (here called base level erosion). The cycle of erosion became the model for subsequent geomorphic analyses, and peneplain hunting became a popular sport for geomorphologists. Davis' hypothesis of the origin and development of Pennsylvanian drainage stimulated subsequent discussion and further hypotheses by others. In fact, many of the later theories were refinements and/or elaborations of ideas mentioned in this paper of Davis. He proposed the origin of the drainage as consequent streams, then antecedence, superposition, headward extension of divides by piracy, erosion along lines of weaknesses (faults, easily erodible beds) through resistant ridges and normal fluvial erosion. Thus, the hypotheses of regional superposition (Johnson), extended consequents (Ruedemann), consequents and local superposition (Meyerhoff and Olmstead), the utilization of structural weaknesses in development of transverse

  2. A study of Dental Manpower Demand and Supply in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Frank M.

    This study attempted to examine dental manpower and variables related to it in Pennsylvania in the context of the national dental manpower. Findings include: (1) Optimum demand, based on dental care for all in the next decade, would require 2,495 additional dentists. (2) Women find a career in dentistry to be very satisfactory but only one-half…

  3. Certified But Not Hired: Women Administrators in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Barbara Nelson

    In this study, the percentage of certificates issued and jobs held by women in Pennsylvania from 1970 through 1984 for the positions of superintendent, assistant superintendent, secondary principal, and elementary principal were compared. Findings reveal that the percentage of women being certified each year is increasing in much greater…

  4. Measuring Tree Seedlings and Associated Understory Vegetation in Pennsylvania's Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Todd W. Bowersox; Patrick H. Brose; Daniel A. Devlin; James C. Finley; Kurt W. Gottschalk; Steve Horsley; Susan L. King; Brian M. LaPoint; Tonya W. Lister; Larry H. McCormick; Gary W. Miller; Charles T. Scott; Harry Steele; Kim C. Steiner; Susan L. Stout; James A. Westfall; Robert L. White

    2005-01-01

    The Northeastern Research Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (NE-FIA) unit is conducting the Pennsylvania Regeneration Study (PRS) to evaluate composition and abundance of tree seedlings and associated vegetation. Sampling methods for the PRS were tested and developed in a pilot study to determine the appropriate number of 2-m microplots needed to capture...

  5. Factors associated with rapid mortality of sugar maple in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Hall; James D. Unger; Thomas C. Bast; Bradley S. Regester

    1999-01-01

    Mortality of sugar maple and red maple was observed throughout Pennsylvania in 1995 following an outbreak in 1994 by forest tent caterpillar and elm spanworm on sugar maple and red maple, respectively. Symptoms of leaf anthracnose caused by Discula campestris (Pass.) were observed during the refoliation period from July through September 1994: the...

  6. Sustainability of corn stover harvest strategies in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul R. Adler; Benjamin M. Rau; Gregory W. Roth

    2015-01-01

    Pennsylvania farmers have a long history of harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover after grain harvest for animal bedding and feed or as a component of mushroom compost, or as silage for dairy cattle feed. With the shallow soils and rolling topography, soil erosion and carbon losses have been minimized through extensive use of cover crops, no-till, and...

  7. Pennsylvania Principals' Perceptions of Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrom, Sean E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine Pennsylvania principals' perceptions and understanding of the physical and psychosocial impact of childhood obesity, whether they believe schools should be addressing the issue, who they feel should be leading efforts within schools, what actions they believe are taking place to address the issue within…

  8. Performance of Ponderosa Pine on Bituminous Mine Spoils in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter H. Davidson

    1977-01-01

    Seedlings from 40 seed sources of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) were planted on a strip-mine spoil in central Pennsylvania in 1969. Survival of seedlings from different sources ranged from 23 to 90 percent after six growing seasons. The average height of the seedlings ranged from 67 to 140 cm for the same period. Eight sources produced...

  9. Opinions of elk viewers on a proposed Pennsylvania elk hunt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce E. Lord; Charles H. Strauss; Walter M. Tzilkowski

    2001-01-01

    The Pennsylvania elk herd has grown to the size where a hunting season is being considered. Visitors to the principal elk viewing areas were asked their opinions about an elk hunt. Their responses were analyzed with respect to their personal profile and the characteristics of their visit. While roughly half the public supports a hunt, specific subgroups were found to...

  10. Salmonella serovars in the herpetofauna of Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David L; Hulse, Arthur C

    2006-05-01

    Herpetofaunal Salmonella enterica serovars have not been fully examined in any U.S. region. Thirty-three Salmonella serovars were isolated from 156 samples from 34 species, all within Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Results suggest that herpetofaunas could potentially pose a threat to humans. Further understanding of Salmonella in herpetofaunas may prevent future human cases.

  11. Developing GAP Training for Growers: Perspectives from Pennsylvania Supermarkets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Daniel; Thomson, Joan; LaBorde, Luke; Bagdonis, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Major supermarket chains increasingly are requiring their produce suppliers to provide evidence of compliance with on-farm food safety standards, known as Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs). To develop a relevant GAP training curriculum that meets the needs of Pennsylvania growers, supermarkets that operate in the state were surveyed to determine…

  12. Timber volumes of old Pennsylvania surface mine reclamation plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter H. Davidson

    1981-01-01

    Surface mine reclamation plantings established in Pennsylvania from 1919 to 1934 were evaluated to determine merchantable volume, presence and volume of volunteer species, and soil development since planting. The evaluation showed that planted conifers had a total volume of 744 M bm on the 150 acres of reclaimed surface mines. In addition, there were 356 M bm of...

  13. Promising Practices: The PRIDE Program at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary; Wheeler, Mary Alice

    1997-01-01

    Describes the PRIDE Program, a partnership between the Harrisburg School District (Pennsylvania) and Bloomsburg University to provide urban, poverty-level sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students at risk of dropping out with an opportunity to spend a week on campus each summer. Program evaluation shows improved student attitudes and…

  14. Pennsylvania Village to Get Safe, Reliable Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Pennsylvania village whose unfiltered, contaminated water source made it the top violator of federal and state drinking water laws will be connected to a public water system in 2015 with $2.2 million from EPA’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund

  15. International students' image of rural Pennsylvania as a travel destination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po-Ju Chen; Deborah L. Kerstetter

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the image international students at Penn State have of rural travel destinations in the state of Pennsylvania. In addition, this study investigated whether destination image differed depending upon travel behavior and socio-demographic variables. Four distinct image dimensions, "tourism infrastructure," "...

  16. Coalbed methane resource potential and current prospects in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    Coalbed methane gas content analyses from exploratory coal cores and existing data indicate that gas content generally increases with increasing depth and rank. The coal beds studied are from the Main Bituminous field of Pennsylvania (which currently contains 24 coalbed methane pools) and the Northern and Southern Anthracite coal fields. They range from the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group to the Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian Dunkard Group. Previous US Bureau of Mines studies revealed gas contents from 0.4 to 13.8 cm3/g at depths of 99 to 432 m for the bituminous coal beds of the Allegheny Group. More recent core data from the Allegheny Group yielded gas contents from 2.2 to 8.9 cm3/g at depths from 167 to 387 m. In the Anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania, the little data that are available show that gas content is anomalously high or low. Gas yields from test holes in eastern Pennsylvania are low with or without artificial stimulation mainly due to the lack of a good cleat system. Overall estimates of coalbed methane resources indicate there may be 1.7 Tm3 (61 Tcf) of gas-in-place contained in the Northern Appalachian coal basin. The amount of technically recoverable coalbed methane resources is projected by the US Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Team [US Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Team, 1996. 1995 National assessment of United States oil and gas resources-results, methodology, and supporting data, US Geological Survey Digital Data Series DDS-30, CD-ROM, Denver, CO, 80 pp.] and Lyons [Lyons, P.C., 1997. Central-northern Appalachian coalbed methane flow grows. Oil and Gas Journal 95 (27) 76-79] at 0.3 Tm3 (11.48 Tcf). This includes portions of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, and a small part of Maryland. Consequently, a mapping investigation was conducted to evaluate the regional geology of the bituminous coal-bearing intervals in southwestern Pennsylvania and its influence on coalbed

  17. An Examination of Pennsylvania's Classroom Diagnostic Testing as a Predictive Model of Pennsylvania System of School Assessment Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsanka, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental quantitative study was to investigate the relationship between Pennsylvania's Classroom Diagnostic Tools (CDT) interim assessments and the state-mandated Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) and to create linear regression equations that could be used as models to predict student performance on the…

  18. Effective Strategies for Achieving Scope of Practice Reform in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthon, J Margo Brooks; Wiltse Nicely, Kelly; Altares Sarik, Danielle; Fairman, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Current regulatory impediments prohibit advanced practice registered nurses from practicing to their full capacity. To examine the process of successful removal of scope of practice barriers in Pennsylvania under the Rx4PA legislation introduced in 2007. We used qualitative research techniques, including purposeful sampling of participants. Twelve stakeholder informed interviews were conducted between October 2013 and May 2014. Participants were closely involved with the development of the Rx4PA legislation. Thematic content analysis was performed to analyze our interviews. Interviews identified overarching themes, including the importance of leveraging years of grass roots advocacy, identifying political allies, and recognizing mutually beneficial compromises. The combination of timing, careful political maneuvering, and compromise were key to scope of practice reform in Pennsylvania and may be useful strategies for other states seeking similar practice changes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. LOCATIONAL EFFECTS OF URBANIZATION ON AGRICULTURE IN SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Janelle M.; Findeis, Jill L; Smith, Stephen M

    2000-01-01

    Most agricultural output in the northeastern United States comes from counties that have experienced significant development. A mail survey, with 300 responses, was conducted in southeastern Pennsylvania to determine farmer adaptation to urbanization in this region. Despite development, traditional agriculture still predominates. Changes in land use were examined using multinomial logit models. Results show that changes in population density and farm preservation policies have an influence, a...

  20. Summary of groundwater-recharge estimates for Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart O. Reese,; Risser, Dennis W.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater recharge is water that infiltrates through the subsurface to the zone of saturation beneath the water table. Because recharge is a difficult parameter to quantify, it is typically estimated from measurements of other parameters like streamflow and precipitation. This report provides a general overview of processes affecting recharge in Pennsylvania and presents estimates of recharge rates from studies at various scales.The most common method for estimating recharge in Pennsylvania has been to estimate base flow from measurements of streamflow and assume that base flow (expressed in inches over the basin) approximates recharge. Statewide estimates of mean annual groundwater recharge were developed by relating base flow to basin characteristics of HUC10 watersheds (a fifth-level classification that uses 10 digits to define unique hydrologic units) using a regression equation. The regression analysis indicated that mean annual precipitation, average daily maximum temperature, percent of sand in soil, percent of carbonate rock in the watershed, and average stream-channel slope were significant factors in the explaining the variability of groundwater recharge across the Commonwealth.Several maps are included in this report to illustrate the principal factors affecting recharge and provide additional information about the spatial distribution of recharge in Pennsylvania. The maps portray the patterns of precipitation, temperature, prevailing winds across Pennsylvania’s varied physiography; illustrate the error associated with recharge estimates; and show the spatial variability of recharge as a percent of precipitation. National, statewide, regional, and local values of recharge, based on numerous studies, are compiled to allow comparison of estimates from various sources. Together these plates provide a synopsis of groundwater-recharge estimations and factors in Pennsylvania.Areas that receive the most recharge are typically those that get the most

  1. Water resources of the Lake Erie shore region in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, John William; Van Tuyl, Donald W.; White, Walter F.

    1952-01-01

    An abundant supply of water is available to the Lake Erie Shore region in Pennsylvania. Lake i£rie furnishes an almost inexhaustible supply of water of satisfactory chemical quality. Small quantities of water are available from small streams in the area and from the ground. A satisfactory water supply is one of the factors that affect the economic growth of a region. Cities and towns must have adequate amounts of pure water for human consumption. Industries must have suitable water ih sufficient quantities for all purposes. In order to assure. success and economy, the development of water resources should be based on adequate knowledge of the quantity and quality of the water. As a nation, we can not afford to run the risk of dissipating our resources, especially in times of national emergency, by building projects that are not founded on sound engineering and adequate water-resources information. The purpose of this report is to summarize and interpret all available water-resources information for the Lake Erie Shore region in Pennsylvania. The report will be useful for initial guidance in the location or expansion of water facilities for defense and nondefense industries and the municipalities upon which they are dependent. It will also be useful in evaluating the adequacy of the Geological Survey's part of the basic research necessary to plan the orderly development of the water resources of the Lake Erie Shore region. Most of the data contained inthis report have been obtained'by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters, the Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs, and the Pennsylvania State Planning Board, Department of Commerce. The Pennsylv~nia Department of Health furnished information on water pollution. The report was prepared in the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey b:y John W. Mangan (Surface Water). Donald W. VanTuyl (Ground Water). and Walter F. White, Jr. (Quality of

  2. New Energy Landscapes of Pennsylvania: Forests to Farms to Fracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Deborah A.

    This dissertation adds to the literature on energy needed by industry, government, and citizens for decision-making. The pursuit to access or create new energy resources spawns new landscapes of energy in the early 21st century. The combination of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies---popularly called "fracking"---enables entry into previously inaccessible natural gas reserves such as the Marcellus shale much of which lies beneath Pennsylvania. Although this unconventional method offers a promising source of domestic energy and job growth, the potential for negative impacts raises concerns and questions. The questions include: What is the controversy about fracking in Pennsylvania? What are the impacts of fracking? What costs is Pennsylvania paying as it shifts to shale gas extraction? Are there activities taking place or material signs that point to the emerging new landscapes? Are the individuals and organizations that resist shale gas extraction---the so-called "Green Forces"---and others who live within the region of development more or less attuned to these costs? A mixed methods approach consists of landscape and stakeholder analyses including visual examination of GIS-generated maps, satellite images, and photos taken in the field specifically from four counties: Washington, Warren, McKean, and Bradford. Research captures stakeholders' voices across the public, government, and private sectors at different scales. A stakeholder matrix facilitates data organization and analysis. Data include 114 individual statements from an EPA Public Meeting, texts from 40 online-newspaper articles or blogs, and face-to-face interviews or focus group participation of 36 individuals. Further data come from a public health conference, industry convention, and public protest. The new energy landscape covers spaces in Pennsylvania where oil and gas development previously had not been present. It obscures as well as exposes the legacy of past energy

  3. Highlighting High Performance: Clearview Elementary School, Hanover, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-08-01

    Case study on high performance building features of Clearview Elementary School in Hanover, Pennsylvania. Clearview Elementary School in Hanover, Pennsylvania, is filled with natural light, not only in classrooms but also in unexpected, and traditionally dark, places like stairwells and hallways. The result is enhanced learning. Recent scientific studies conducted by the California Board for Energy Efficiency, involving 21,000 students, show test scores were 15% to 26% higher in classrooms with daylighting. Clearview's ventilation system also helps students and teachers stay healthy, alert, and focused on learning. The school's superior learning environment comes with annual average energy savings of about 40% over a conventional school. For example, with so much daylight, the school requires about a third less energy for electric lighting than a typical school. The school's innovative geothermal heating and cooling system uses the constant temperature of the Earth to cool and heat the building. The building and landscape designs work together to enhance solar heating in the winter, summer cooling, and daylighting all year long. Students and teachers have the opportunity to learn about high-performance design by studying their own school. At Clearview, the Hanover Public School District has shown that designing a school to save energy is affordable. Even with its many innovative features, the school's $6.35 million price tag is just $150,000 higher than average for elementary schools in Pennsylvania. Projected annual energy cost savings of approximately $18,000 mean a payback in 9 years. Reasonable construction costs demonstrate that other school districts can build schools that conserve energy, protect natural resources, and provide the educational and health benefits that come with high-performance buildings.

  4. Collaboration in Pennsylvania: Rapidly Spreading Improved Chronic Care for Patients to Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Patricia L.; Baron, Richard J.; Scheirer, Jorge J.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Derrickson, John; Yunghans, Suzanne; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Pennsylvania's Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) program is administered by the Pennsylvania (PA) chapters of the American Academy of Family Physicians, American College of Physicians, and American Academy of Pediatrics. The project has provided coaching, monthly measurement, and patient registry support for 155 primary-care…

  5. 75 FR 74711 - Planet Energy (Pennsylvania) Corp.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Planet Energy (Pennsylvania) Corp.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Planet Energy (Pennsylvania) Corp.'s application for..., 2010. The Commission encourages electronic submission of protests and interventions in lieu of paper...

  6. 75 FR 11228 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers Indemnity Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Pennsylvania Manufacturers Indemnity Company....C. 9305 to the following company: Pennsylvania Manufacturers Indemnity Company (NAIC 41424... renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223). A list of qualified companies is...

  7. 76 FR 28072 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and... Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA. The human remains were removed from St. Mary Parish (formerly... assessment of the human remains was made by University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

  8. Educational Equity, Adequacy, and Equal Opportunity in the Commonwealth: An Evaluation of Pennsylvania's School Finance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bruce; Levin, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Pennsylvania has historically operated one of the nation's least equitable state school finance systems, and within that system exist some of the nation's most fiscally disadvantaged public school districts. The persistent inequalities of Pennsylvania's school finance system are not entirely a result of simple lack of effort, as policies intended…

  9. 77 FR 63205 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Montgomery, Pennsylvania, as a Nonappropriated Fund...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... RIN 3206-AM62 Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Montgomery, Pennsylvania, as a Nonappropriated.... SUMMARY: The U.S. Office of Personnel Management is issuing a final rule to abolish the Montgomery, Pennsylvania, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage System (FWS) wage area and redefine Chester, Montgomery...

  10. 78 FR 17634 - Foreign-Trade Zone 35-Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Application for Subzone; Teva Pharmaceuticals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 35--Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Application for Subzone; Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc.; North Wales, Chalfont, Kutztown and Sellersville, Pennsylvania An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, grantee...

  11. Camper attitudes and perceptions concerning the presence of pets in ten Pennsylvania state park campgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Lisco; Ryan Sauder

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine camper opinion on whether or not furred pets should be permitted in state park campgrounds within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The study was commissioned so that Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks administrators could make informed decisions regarding the direction of pet policy. Surveys were taken at 10 state parks...

  12. 76 FR 45741 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Diesel-Powered Motor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Diesel-Powered Motor Vehicle Idling Act AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the purpose of incorporating the Commonwealth's Diesel-Powered Motor Vehicle...

  13. Is Opportunity Knocking or Slipping Away? Racial Diversity and Segregation in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotok, Stephen; Reed, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Historically, Pennsylvania has struggled to integrate its public schools, especially with much of the racial diversity concentrated in urban regions. Starting in the 1960s, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission (PHRC) was the state's enforcing body to combat school desegregation, but since the early 1980s, when it comes to education, the…

  14. Installation Restoration Program Site Final Assessment Report, Volume 1: 111th Fighter Group Willow Grove Air Reserve Station, Pennsylvania Air National Guard, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ...) at Willow Grove Air Reserve Station (WGARS) in Pennsylvania. The site assessment, as presented herein, has been supplemented by additional Site Characterization work accomplished by PEER Consultants, P.C. in 1997...

  15. Remote sensing to monitor cover crop adoption in southeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Wells; Sjoerd Duiker,; Greg McCarty,; Prabhakara, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    In the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, winter cereal cover crops are often planted in rotation with summer crops to reduce the loss of nutrients and sediment from agricultural systems. Cover crops can also improve soil health, control weeds and pests, supplement forage needs, and support resilient cropping systems. In southeastern Pennsylvania, cover crops can be successfully established following corn (Zea mays L.) silage harvest and are strongly promoted for use in this niche. They are also planted following corn grain, soybean (Glycine max L.), and vegetable harvest. In Pennsylvania, the use of winter cover crops for agricultural conservation has been supported through a combination of outreach, regulation, and incentives. On-farm implementation is thought to be increasing, but the actual extent of cover crops is not well quantified. Satellite imagery can be used to map green winter cover crop vegetation on agricultural fields and, when integrated with additional remote sensing data products, can be used to evaluate wintertime vegetative groundcover following specific summer crops. This study used Landsat and SPOT (System Probatoire d’ Observation de la Terre) satellite imagery, in combination with the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer, to evaluate the extent and amount of green wintertime vegetation on agricultural fields in four Pennsylvania counties (Berks, Lebanon, Lancaster, and York) from 2010 to 2013. In December of 2010, a windshield survey was conducted to collect baseline data on winter cover crop implementation, with particular focus on identifying corn harvested for silage (expected earlier harvest date and lower levels of crop residue), versus for grain (expected later harvest date and higher levels of crop residue). Satellite spectral indices were successfully used to detect both the amount of green vegetative groundcover and the amount of crop residue on the surveyed fields. Analysis of wintertime satellite imagery

  16. Hydrogeology of the carbonate rocks of the Lebanon Valley, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, Harold

    1963-01-01

    The Lebanon Valley, which is part of the Great Valley in southeastern Pennsylvania, is underlain by carbonate rocks in the southern part and by shale in the northern part. The carbonate rocks consist of alternating beds of limestone and dolomite of Cambrian and Ordovician age. Although the beds generally dip to the south, progressively younger beds crop out to the north, because the rocks are overturned. The stratigraphic units, from oldest to youngest, are: the Buffalo Springs Formation, Snitz Creek, Schaefferstown, Millbach, and Richland Formations of the Conococheague Group; the Stonehenge, Rickenbach, Epler, and Ontelaunee Formations of the Beekmantown Group; and the Annville, Myerstown, and Hershey Limestones.

  17. Water quality investigation of Francis Slocum Lake, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James L.

    1978-01-01

    This report summarizes water-quality data collected in the Francis Slocum Lake drainage basin, Pennsylvania, during an assessment from October 1976 to September 1977. Data were collected for nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon, and fecal coliform and fecal streptococcal bacteria.Results of the restricted sampling indicate that nutrient recycling within the lake is sufficient to support the periodic luxurient growth of algae and aquatic weeds. Inflows are not contributing high concentrations of nutrients to the ecosystem. Sampling for enteric bacteria indicate the sanitary quality is sufficiently high for water-contact recreation.

  18. EKSTRAK DAUN COCOR BEBEK (Kalanchoe pinnata UNTUK TERAPI PREVENTIF LUPUS PADA MENCIT YANG DIINDUKSI DENGAN 2,6,10,14 TETRAMETHYLPENTADECANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Indriyanti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cocor bebek Plants (Kalanchoe pinnata has been observed to have a potent immunosuppressant compounds in BALB/c mice with Delayed Type Hypersensitivity test (DTH. Compounds are efficacious immunosuppression can be used for treatment of autoimmune diseases such as lupus. The purpose of this study was knowing the class of compounds in leaf extracts cocor bebek and test whether the extract can prevent the occurrence of lupus in test animals. Methods: In this study the identification of classes of compounds present in Cocor bebek leaf extracts and testing imunnosupression activities from test animals BALB/c mice induced lupus using 2,6,10,14 tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD. Parameters measured lupus glomerulonephritis which was known by the presence of proteinuria using a test strip supported by data on changes in weight. Results: Extracts of cocor bebek leaves positive contain tannins, flavonoids, saponins and steroid / triterpene. Mice given the extract of Cocor bebek leaves every day until the 3rd month after not having induced proteinuria, while untreated mice had proteinuria up to +2 (proteinuria levels> 30 mg / dL. Key words : Cocor bebek, BALB/c mice, lupus, TMPD, glomerulonefritis   ABSTRAK Tanaman cocor bebek (Kalanchoe pinnata telah diteliti memiliki senyawa yang berkhasiat immunosupresan pada mencit BALB/c dengan uji Delayed Type Hypersensitivity (DTH. Senyawa yang berkhasiat imunosupresan dapat digunakan untuk penanganan penyakit autoimun, misalnya lupus. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah Mengetahui golongan senyawa dalam ekstrak daun cocor bebek dan menguji apakah ekstrak tersebut dapat mencegah terjadinya lupus pada hewan uji. Metode : Pada penelitian ini dilakukan identifikasi golongan senyawa yang ada dalam ekstrak daun cocor bebek dan pengujian aktivitas imunosupresannya terhadap hewan uji mencit BALB/c yang diinduksi lupus menggunakan 2,6,10,14 tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD. Parameter lupus yang diukur adalah glomerulonefritis yang

  19. Alternative Education for At-Risk Youth: An Analysis of Specific Legislation from 1995-1999 in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Susan

    This paper analyzes Pennsylvania's Safe Schools Act of 1995 and 1997, discussing decisions that led to its adoption and its impact on Pennsylvania schools from 1995 to 2001. It presents a history of media reports on school violence, and discusses the national experience, zero tolerance and its effects, and Pennsylvania's answer to school violence.…

  20. Value-Added Estimates for Phase 1 of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation Pilot. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Stephen; Chiang, Hanley; Gill, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plans to develop a new statewide evaluation system for teachers and principals in its public schools by school year 2013-2014. To inform the development of this evaluation system, the Team Pennsylvania Foundation (Team PA) undertook the first phase of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation…

  1. Value-Added Estimates for Phase 1 of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation Pilot. Full Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Stephen; Chiang, Hanley; Gill, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plans to develop a new statewide evaluation system for teachers and principals in its public schools by school year 2013-2014. To inform the development of this evaluation system, the Team Pennsylvania Foundation (Team PA) undertook the first phase of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation…

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27 (NODC Accession 0115607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115607 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27...

  3. Associations between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children: The HAPPY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel P; Charman, Sarah J; Ploetz, Thomas; Savory, Louise A; Kerr, Catherine J

    2017-11-01

    This study examines the association between prolonged sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with cardiometabolic risk in 10-14-year-old children. This cross-sectional design study analysed accelerometry-determined sedentary behaviour and physical activity collected over 7 days from 111 (66 girls) UK schoolchildren. Objective outcome measures included waist circumference, fasting lipids, fasting glucose, blood pressure, and cardiorespiratory fitness. Logistic regression was used for the main data analysis. After adjustment for confounders, the odds of having hypertriglyceridaemia (P = 0.03) and an increased clustered cardiometabolic risk score (P = 0.05) were significantly higher in children who engaged in more prolonged sedentary bouts per day. The number of breaks in sedentary time per day was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor, but longer mean duration of daily breaks in sedentary time were associated with a lower odds of having abdominal adiposity (P = 0.04) and elevated diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01). These associations may be mediated by engagement in light activity. This study provides evidence that avoiding periods of prolonged uninterrupted sedentary time may be important for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk in children.

  4. Central treating location solves logistics and environmental problems. [Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, D.; Miller, D.; Bonner, H.W.

    1980-12-01

    Use of a central treating location, or pad, has provided a method for economic development of leases in a densely wooded, hilly area near Titusville and Oil City in W. Pennsylvania. The pad concept makes it possible to stimulate more than 100 shallow wells in the area from a single location at a savings of nearly $3000 and 2 to 3 days of time per well. The pad eliminates the time required for hooking up, tearing down, and transporting stimulation equipment to each individual well site. It eliminates the added cost of clearing a suitable work area at each well site, as well as the use of a bulldozer to pull in all the various pieces of equipment during harsh weather. The concept also is endorsed by the Pennsylvania State Game Commission, since it conserves valuable forest area. There are 2 pads in the area, one on the Jeanerett lease and one on the Masters lease. Both leases are new production and each will contain more than 100 wells when development is complete.

  5. Occupational health characteristics of women on dairy farms in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Ginger D; Brasier, Kathryn J; Henning, George F; Radhakrishna, Rama B; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2010-01-01

    Women play a significant role in Pennsylvania production agriculture, thereby exposing themselves to occupational health risks. The goal of this cross-sectional study was to assess the incidence of health conditions with a possible zoonotic origin in this underserved population. A written survey was sent to a stratified, random sample of dairy farms in Pennsylvania (n = 3709) using a modified version of the Dillman method. In addition to demographic data, the survey was used to collect information on the occurrence of zoonotic diseases, gastrointestinal illnesses, respiratory problems, dermatoses, and women's reproductive health issues. Of the 624 respondents, 10.4% (n = 65) reported that they had contracted a disease from an animal. Interestingly, only 9 respondents indicated that they had suffered from foodborne illnesses in the past year including salmonellosis (n = 1), campylobacteriosis (n = 1), and gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli (n = 1). A risk factor associated with difficulty breathing was the lack of use of a breathing mask, whereas ventilation in the free stall area appeared to offer a protective effect. Difficulty breathing was reported by 9.8% (n = 61) of the respondents. Risk factors associated with skin disorders included raising fruits and/or vegetables, raising swine, and not wearing gloves when milking. The findings of the study suggest that many of the illnesses and conditions could have been acquired by working with dairy animals and their environment. Based on the findings of this study, additional investigations on the causes and prevention of these illnesses are warranted.

  6. Shale gas development and cancer incidence in southwest Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, M L

    2016-12-01

    To what extent does unconventional gas development lead to an increase in cancer incidence in heavily drilled Southwest Pennsylvania? Ecological study. Data for urinary bladder, thyroid and leukaemia were abstracted from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry (PCR). Cancer incidence among counties with high, moderate and minimal number of producing wells is compared before drilling activity and thereafter. Observed vs expected cases, standardized incidence ratio and 95% confidence intervals are presented. Data are presented by county, diagnosis and sex for the years 2000-2004, 2004-2008 and 2008-2012. The percent difference between the observed cases from 2000 to 2004 and 2008-2012 was calculated. The observed number of urinary bladder cases was higher than expected in both sexes in counties with shale gas activity. In counties with the fewest number of producing wells, the increase was essentially non-existent. The number of observed cases of thyroid cancer increased substantially among both sexes over the time period in all counties regardless of the number of wells drilled. The pattern for leukaemia was mixed among males and females and among the counties regardless of the extent of shale gas development activities. Potential risk factors other than shale gas development must be taken into account to explain the higher than expected cancer cases in counties with and without shale gas wells before and during unconventional shale gas activity. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature of ground water at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1979- 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulachok, Gary N.

    1986-01-01

    Anthropogenic heat production has undoubtedly caused increased ground-water temperatures in many parts of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as shown by temperatures of 98 samples and logs of 40 wells measured during 1979-81. Most sample temperatures were higher than 12.6 degrees Celsius (the local mean annual air temperature), and many logs depict cooling trends with depth (anomalous gradients). Heating of surface and shallow-subsurface materials has likely caused the elevated temperatures and anomalous gradients. Solar radiation on widespread concrete and asphalt surfaces, fossil-fuel combustion, and radiant losses from buried pipelines containing steam and process chemicals are believed to be the chief sources of heat. Some heat from these and other sources is transferred to deeper zones, mainly by conduction. Temperatures in densely urbanized areas are commonly highest directly beneath the land surface and decrease progressively with depth. Temperatures in sparsely urbanized areas generally follow the natural geothermal gradient and increase downward at about that same rate.

  8. Erosion in the juniata river drainage basin, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevon, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Previously calculated erosion rates througouth the Appalachians range from 1.2 to 203 m Myr-1. Calculation of erosion rates has been accomplished by: (1) evaluation of riverine solute and sediment load in either large or small drainage basins; (2) estimation from the volume of derived sediments; and (3) methods involving either 10Be or fission-track dating. Values of specific conductance and suspended sediment collected at the Juniata River gauging station at Newport, Pennsylvania are used, with corrections, along with a bedload estimate to determine the total amount eroded from the 8687 km2 drainage basin during the water years 1965-1986. The amount eroded is used to calculate a present erosion rate of 27 m Myr-1. ?? 1989.

  9. Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  10. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, elevation data are critical for natural resources conservation (including the effects of drilling for oil and natural gas), agriculture and precision farming, flood risk management, infrastructure and construction management, water supply and quality, geologic resource assessment and hazard mitigation, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to replace data that are older and of lower quality. A joint goal of Commonwealth and Federal partners is to provide a temporal and density refresh of the current statewide coverage in order to support existing and emerging applications enabled by improved lidar data.

  11. Evaluation of Methane Sources in Groundwater in Northeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molofsky, Lisa J; Connor, John A; Wylie, Albert S; Wagner, Tom; Farhat, Shahla K

    2013-01-01

    Testing of 1701 water wells in northeastern Pennsylvania shows that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater, with higher concentrations observed in valleys vs. upland areas and in association with calcium-sodium-bicarbonate, sodium-bicarbonate, and sodium-chloride rich waters—indicating that, on a regional scale, methane concentrations are best correlated to topographic and hydrogeologic features, rather than shale-gas extraction. In addition, our assessment of isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbon gases in the Dimock Township suggest that gases present in local water wells are most consistent with Middle and Upper Devonian gases sampled in the annular spaces of local gas wells, as opposed to Marcellus Production gas. Combined, these findings suggest that the methane concentrations in Susquehanna County water wells can be explained without the migration of Marcellus shale gas through fractures, an observation that has important implications for understanding the nature of risks associated with shale-gas extraction. PMID:23560830

  12. Chemical analysis of sediments and fish from the Mahoning River, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In July, 1988, the Ohio Department of Health issued a swimming, wading and fish consumption advisory for the Mahoning River between Warren, Ohio and the Pennsylvania...

  13. The Pennsylvania quality initiative : a synthesis of customer satisfaction and additional research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-29

    Customer satisfaction is at the heart of the Pennsylvania Quality Initiative (PQI), which was created in 1994 to build a more effective partnership among all the stakeholders involved in the process of designing, building, operating, and maintaining ...

  14. 77 FR 3386 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Clean Vehicles Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    .... Pennsylvania had adopted California LEV program as a ``backstop'' to its NLEV program, to take effect upon the... Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272 note) because application of those...

  15. Optimization Evaluation, North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site (NPA6 Site) addresses multiple sources of contamination and a broad contaminant plume that underlies a large portion of Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and associated....

  16. CMS: LiDAR-derived Tree Canopy Cover for Pennsylvania, USA, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides estimated high-resolution (1-m) tree canopy cover for the state of Pennsylvania, USA, in 2008. The data were derived from 2006-2008...

  17. 75 FR 43563 - Dow Jones & Company, Sharon Pennsylvania Print Plant a Subsidiary of News Corporation, West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... News Corporation, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated June 21, 2010, a petitioner requested administrative... facts not previously considered; or (3) If in the opinion of the Certifying Officer, a mis...

  18. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Pennsylvania based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Pennsylvania census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  19. 77 FR 21908 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Streamlining...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... submitting comments. ] B. Email: cox[email protected] . C. Mail: EPA-R03-OAR-2009-0882, Kathleen Cox... Quality Control, P.O. Box 8468, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17105. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  20. 76 FR 42558 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Portland Cement Kilns AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... submitted by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The SIP revisions pertain to the control of nitrogen oxides..., Incorporation by reference, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Particulate matter, Reporting and recordkeeping...

  1. Pennsylvania State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    The Pennsylvania State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Pennsylvania. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Pennsylvania. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Pennsylvania.

  2. 78 FR 28626 - Te Connectivity, Industrial Division, Middletown, Pennsylvania; Te Connectivity, Corporate Shared...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ..., Corporate Shared Services Group 100 & 200 Amp Drive, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Te Connectivity Corporate Shared Services Group, 3700 Reidsville Road, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Te Connectivity, Corporate Shared Services Group, 1187 Park Place, Shakopee, Minnesota; Te Connectivity, Corporate Shared Services...

  3. A Study of the Relationship between Building Conditions and Student Academic Achievement in Pennsylvania's High School

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Sean

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school building conditions and student academic achievement in Pennsylvania's high schools. Research questions analyzed by step-wise multiple regression were: (a) Is there a relationship between overall school building conditions and student academic achievement in Pennsylvania's high schools when socio-economic status (SES) is held constant?; (b) Is there a relationship between the cosmetic conditions of school facilities and student academic ...

  4. Evaluation of the streamgage network for estimating streamflow statistics at ungaged sites in Pennsylvania and the Susquehanna River Basin in Pennsylvania and New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Stuckey, Marla H.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2017-05-10

    The current (2015) streamgage network in Pennsylvania and the Susquehanna River Basin in Pennsylvania and New York was evaluated in order to design a network that would meet the hydrologic needs of many partners and serve a variety of purposes and interests, including estimation of streamflow statistics at ungaged sites. This study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the Susquehanna River Basin Commission. The study area includes the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Susquehanna River Basin in Pennsylvania and New York. For this study, 229 streamgages were identified as reference streamgages that could be used to represent ungaged watersheds. Criteria for a reference streamgage are a minimum of 10 years of continuous record, minimally altered streamflow, and a drainage area less than 1,500 square miles. Some of the reference streamgages have been discontinued but provide historical hydrologic information valuable in the determination of streamflow characteristics of ungaged watersheds. Watersheds in the study area not adequately represented by a reference streamgage were identified by examining a range of basin characteristics, the extent of geographic coverage, and the strength of estimated streamflow correlations between gaged and ungaged sites.Basin characteristics were determined for the reference streamgage watersheds and the 1,662 12-digit hydrologic unit code (HUC12) subwatersheds in Pennsylvania and the Susquehanna River Basin using a geographic information system (GIS) spatial analysis and nationally available GIS datasets. Basin characteristics selected for this study include drainage area, mean basin elevation, mean basin slope, percentage of urbanized area, percentage of forested area, percentage of carbonate bedrock, mean annual precipitation, and soil thickness. A GIS spatial analysis was used to identify HUC12 subwatersheds outside the range of basin

  5. An Assessment of Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Facilities in Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Ferguson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 715 Holstein dairy farms in Pennsylvania was used to construct demographics for the average Holstein dairy farm. The average Holstein dairy farm was composed of 69 lactating cows; 11 nonlactating, pregnant cows; 44 heifers; and 18 calves. Milk production averaged 27.3 kg (60.0 lb. Crop area averaged 73.6 ha. Milk production, crop area and type, average county yields, and herd animal groups were used to construct a typical feeding program for these farms. Typical rations were constructed for six feeding groups (three milk production groups, one nonlactating group, two heifer groups to meet milk production, pregnancy, and growth requirements. Rations were constructed based on three forage qualities (excellent, average, and poor typically observed on Pennsylvania dairy farms. Data for animal description (milk production, body weight, growth, and pregnancy status and ration components and amounts consumed for each animal group were input into the excretion model of the Dairy Nutrient Planner computer program (DNP. Excretion of fecal N and dry matter (DM, urinary N, and total P and K were produced for each animal group and used to assess potential volatile losses of N. Work at the Marshak Dairy, New Bolton Center, indicates the majority of urinary N is rapidly lost as ammonia from dairy facilities. Based on this observation, the losses of N as ammonia were estimated to be 4.63, 4.62, and 4.28�tonne/year for the farm with excellent, average, and poor quality forages, respectively. Volatile losses of N may be reduced most by controlling levels of urea in urine. Urinary N may be reduced through dietary manipulation of protein and carbohydrate sources. Conversion of urea to ammonia may be reduced by altering the pH of barn floors and gutters. Entrapment of ammonia may be accomplished by acidification of manure slurry. Atmospheric ammonia contributes to acid rain, eutrophication of estuaries and lakes, and particulate air pollution

  6. Atmospheric Impacts of Marcellus Shale Gas Activities in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presto, A. A.; Lipsky, E. M.; Saleh, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Pittsburgh and the surrounding regions of southwestern Pennsylvania are subject to intensive natural gas exploration, drilling, and extraction associated with the Marcellus Shale formation. Gas extraction from the shale formation uses techniques of horizontal drilling followed by hydraulic fracturing. There are significant concerns about air pollutant emissions from the development and production of shale gas, especially methane emissions. We have deployed a mobile monitoring unit to investigate the atmospheric impacts of Marcellus Shale gas activities. The mobile sampling platform is a van with an on-board generator, a high-resolution GPS unit, cameras, and instrumentation for measuring methane, criteria gases (SO2, NOx, CO, O3), PM size distributions (scanning mobility particle sizer), black carbon mass (multi-angle absorption photometer), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (gas chromatograph with flame ionization detection), and meteorological data. A major advantage of the mobile sampling unit over traditional, stationary monitors is that it allows us to rapidly visit a variety of sites. Sampling at multiple sites allows us to characterize the spatial variability of pollutant concentrations related to Marcellus activity, particularly methane. Data collected from the mobile sampling unit are combined with GIS techniques and dispersion models to map pollutants related to Marcellus Shale operations. The Marcellus Shale gas activities are a major and variable source of methane. The background methane concentration in Pittsburgh is 2.1 +/- 0.2 ppm. However, two southwestern Pennsylvania counties with the highest density of Marcellus Shale wells, Washington and Greene Counties, have many areas of elevated methane concentration. Approximately 11% of the sampled sites in Washington County and nearly 50% of the sampled sites in Greene County have elevated (>2.3 ppm) methane concentrations, compared to 1.5% of sites with elevated

  7. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenlue, Kenan [The Pennsylvania State University, Radiation Science and Engineering Center, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  8. Tectonics of the Maryland Piedmont along the Potomac River; insight since 1960 and potential transfer to the Pennsylvania Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, C. Scott; Wise, Donald U.; Fleeger, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    This is a summary of a half century of research in the Mary land Piedmont and how it may or may not have implications for the Piedmont of Pennsylvania. Much of the field mapping and all of the isotopic analyses of rocks and minerals of the Maryland Piedmont have been conducted since the 1960 Field Conference of Pennsylvania Geologists “Some tectonic and structural problems of the Appalachian Piedmont along the Susquehanna River”. The Piedmont rocks of Maryland and Pennsylvania occur in a critical place within the central Appalachian Pennsylvania embayment (Thomas, 1977), which likely contributed to the distribution of lithologies and structures.

  9. Proceedings of the Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium (21st, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 22-23, 1997). University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 4, Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Alexis, Ed.; Siegel, Laura, Ed.; Surek-Clark, Clarissa, Ed.; Williams, Alexander, Ed.

    This issue contains the following articles: "The Pragmatics of Wh-Question Intonation in English" (Christine Bartels); "The Nature of Object Agreement in Hungarian" (Huba Bartos); "Voah Mei Daett Sei Deitsh: Developments in the Vowel System of Pennsylvania German" (David Bowie); "Event Time Properties"…

  10. Hydraulic fracturing and infant health: New evidence from Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Greenstone, Michael; Meckel, Katherine

    2017-12-01

    The development of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") is considered the biggest change to the global energy production system in the last half-century. However, several communities have banned fracking because of unresolved concerns about the impact of this process on human health. To evaluate the potential health impacts of fracking, we analyzed records of more than 1.1 million births in Pennsylvania from 2004 to 2013, comparing infants born to mothers living at different distances from active fracking sites and those born both before and after fracking was initiated at each site. We adjusted for fixed maternal determinants of infant health by comparing siblings who were and were not exposed to fracking sites in utero. We found evidence for negative health effects of in utero exposure to fracking sites within 3 km of a mother's residence, with the largest health impacts seen for in utero exposure within 1 km of fracking sites. Negative health impacts include a greater incidence of low-birth weight babies as well as significant declines in average birth weight and in several other measures of infant health. There is little evidence for health effects at distances beyond 3 km, suggesting that health impacts of fracking are highly local. Informal estimates suggest that about 29,000 of the nearly 4 million annual U.S. births occur within 1 km of an active fracking site and that these births therefore may be at higher risk of poor birth outcomes.

  11. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Sheila M; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J

    2013-03-26

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl(-)) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl(-) concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl(-) concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases.

  12. Effects of temperature and snowfall on mortality in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjanc, M L; Flanders, W D; VanDerslice, J; Hersh, J; Malilay, J

    1999-06-15

    The relation between exposure to severe cold weather and mortality is examined in a retrospective study of deaths occurring during the month of January from 1991 to 1996 in Pennsylvania. Using division-days as units of observation (n = 1,560) aggregated from death certificates and geographic divisions, the authors estimated mortality rates for total deaths and deaths due to ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases by analyses based on generalized estimating equations. Total mortality increased on days of "extreme" climatic conditions, that is, when snowfall was greater than 3 cm and when temperatures were below -7 degrees C (rate ratio (RR) = 1.27, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.44). On days of extreme conditions, mortality due to ischemic heart diseases tripled among males aged 35-49 years (RR = 3.54, 95 percent CI 2.35-5.35), increased for men aged 50-64 years (RR = 1.77, 95 percent CI 1.32-2.38), and rose for males aged 65 years and older (RR = 1.58, 95 percent CI 1.37-1.82), when compared with milder conditions. Among females, mortality for those aged 65 years and older increased for respiratory causes (RR = 1.68, 95 percent CI 1.28-2.21) and cerebrovascular causes (RR = 1.47, 95 percent CI 1.13-1.91). Cold and snow exposure may be hazardous among men as young as 35 years.

  13. Comparison of rural and urban ambulance crashes in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Adam M; Kupas, Douglas F

    2007-01-01

    To describe and compare the characteristics of, and associated injuries caused by, ambulance crashes that occur in rural versus urban areas. Crash data collected by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation were obtained for ambulance crashes from 1997 to 2001. Crash demographics (e.g., location of crash, road conditions, and intersection type) and injuries reported by police were analyzed to determine differences, if any, between crashes occurring in rural and urban areas. 311 rural and 1,434 urban ambulance crashes were identified. Day and time of crash, light conditions, and road type were similar. Rural crashes were more likely to occur on snowy roads (13% vs. 5%) and at nighttime without street lighting (25% vs. 4%). Operator error was the most common cause of crashes (75% for rural; 93% for urban), whereas vehicle or environmental conditions more frequently affected rural drivers (25% vs. 7%). Urban crashes were more likely to involve angled collisions with other vehicles (54% vs. 19%), intersections (67% vs. 26%), and occur at a stop sign or signal (53% vs, 14%). Rural crashes often involved striking a fixed object (33% vs. 7%). Urban crashes more often involved more than one vehicle (88% vs. 56%) and more than four people total (35% vs. 23%). Pedestrian involvement was rare in both groups (traffic signals. Although more people and vehicles are often involved in urban ambulance crashes, the severity of injuries sustained are similar.

  14. A Heat Vulnerability Index and Adaptation Solutions for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, K.; Abrahams, L.; Bradford, K.; Hegglin, M.

    2015-12-01

    With increasing evidence of global warming, many cities have focused attention on response plans to address their populations' vulnerabilities. Despite expected increased frequency and intensity of heat waves, the health impacts of such events in urban areas can be minimized with careful policy and economic investments. We focus on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and ask two questions. First, what are the top factors contributing to heat vulnerability and how do these characteristics manifest geospatially throughout Pittsburgh? Second, assuming the City wishes to deploy additional cooling centers, what placement will optimally address the vulnerability of the at risk populations? We use national census data, ArcGIS geospatial modeling, and statistical analysis to determine a range of heat vulnerability indices and optimal cooling center placement. We find that while different studies use different data and statistical calculations, all methods tested locate additional cooling centers at the confluence of the three rivers (Downtown), the northeast side of Pittsburgh (Shadyside/ Highland Park), and the southeast side of Pittsburgh (Squirrel Hill). This suggests that for Pittsburgh, a researcher could apply the same factor analysis procedure to compare datasets for different locations and times; factor analyses for heat vulnerability are more robust than previously thought.

  15. Acid-rock drainage at Skytop, Centre County, Pennsylvania, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Brady, Keith; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent construction for Interstate Highway 99 (I?99) exposed pyrite and associated Zn-Pb sulfide minerals beneath a >10-m thick gossan to oxidative weathering along a 40-60-m deep roadcut through a 270-m long section of the Ordovician Bald Eagle Formation at Skytop, near State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Nearby Zn-Pb deposits hosted in associated sandstone and limestone in Blair and Centre Counties were prospected in the past; however, these deposits generally were not viable as commercial mines. The pyritic sandstone from the roadcut was crushed and used locally as road base and fill for adjoining segments of I?99. Within months, acidic (pH1,000 mg/L), seep waters at the base of the cut contain >100 mg/L dissolved Zn and >1 mg/L As, Co, Cu, and Ni. Lead is relatively immobile (salts sequester metals and acidity between rainfall events. Episodic salt dissolution then contributes pulses of contamination including acid to surface runoff and ground water. The Skytop experience highlights the need to understand dynamic interactions of mineralogy and hydrology in order to avoid potentially negative environmental impacts associated with excavation in sulfidic rocks.

  16. Perinatal outcomes and unconventional natural gas operations in Southwest Pennsylvania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaina L Stacy

    Full Text Available Unconventional gas drilling (UGD has enabled extraordinarily rapid growth in the extraction of natural gas. Despite frequently expressed public concern, human health studies have not kept pace. We investigated the association of proximity to UGD in the Marcellus Shale formation and perinatal outcomes in a retrospective cohort study of 15,451 live births in Southwest Pennsylvania from 2007-2010. Mothers were categorized into exposure quartiles based on inverse distance weighted (IDW well count; least exposed mothers (first quartile had an IDW well count less than 0.87 wells per mile, while the most exposed (fourth quartile had 6.00 wells or greater per mile. Multivariate linear (birth weight or logistical (small for gestational age (SGA and prematurity regression analyses, accounting for differences in maternal and child risk factors, were performed. There was no significant association of proximity and density of UGD with prematurity. Comparison of the most to least exposed, however, revealed lower birth weight (3323 ± 558 vs 3344 ± 544 g and a higher incidence of SGA (6.5 vs 4.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 1.34; 95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.63. While the clinical significance of the differences in birth weight among the exposure groups is unclear, the present findings further emphasize the need for larger studies, in regio-specific fashion, with more precise characterization of exposure over an extended period of time to evaluate the potential public health significance of UGD.

  17. Non-equilibrium plasma experiments at The Pennsylvania State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The authors have recently established the capability at The Pennsylvania State University to generate non-equilibrium plasma in atmospheric-pressure air and liquids such as water and saline. The plasma is generated using a high-voltage pulser (Pacific-Electronics PT-55), which is capable of voltage pulses of 75-ns width, peak voltage >50 kV, with rise-times on the order of nanoseconds. The electrodes are tungsten wires of various diameters (50 μm, 175 μm, 254 μm) insulated with nylon tubing. The spacing of the electrodes is controlled with translating mounts with resolution of tens of microns. Spectroscopy (Ocean Optics Model HR2000) is presently used for line identification only. Current and voltage vs. time will be measured with a 500-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope, a high-voltage probe and a shunt resistor connected to the ground side of the circuit. Research directions presently being pursued include the effects of solution electrical conductivity on plasma production and propellant ignition studies. Data from several types of experiments will be presented.

  18. Greenness and Birth Outcomes in a Range of Pennsylvania Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan A. Casey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Living in communities with more vegetation during pregnancy has been associated with higher birth weights, but fewer studies have evaluated other birth outcomes, and only one has been conducted in the Eastern United States, in regions with a broad range, including high levels, of greenness. We evaluated associations between prenatal residential greenness and birth outcomes (term birth weight, small for gestational age, preterm birth, and low 5 min Apgar score across a range of community types using electronic health record data from 2006–2013 from the Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania. We assigned greenness based on mother’s geocoded address using the normalized difference vegetation index from satellite imagery. We used propensity scores to restrict the study population to comparable groups among those living in green vs. less-green areas. Analyses were adjusted for demographic, clinical, and environmental covariates, and stratified by community type (city, borough, and township. In cities, higher greenness (tertiles 2–3 vs. 1 was protective for both preterm (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99 and small for gestational age birth (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.58–0.97, but not birth weight or Apgar score. We did not observe associations between greenness and birth outcomes in adjusted models in boroughs or townships. These results add to the evidence that greener cities might be healthier cities.

  19. Pennsylvania's domiciliary care experiment: II. Cost-benefit implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchlin, H S; Morris, J N

    1983-01-01

    A pilot program based on the substitution of domiciliary care for traditional institutional care was established by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to provide community-based care for individuals who could no longer live independently (aging, mentally retarded, mentally ill). To ascertain the cost saving potential of this program, 190 participants and a comparable pool of non-participants were followed for an average 10-month follow-up period. Within each subgroup, participants were disaggregated into two categories: those residing in a community setting at pretest, and those residing in an institutional setting. An analysis of medical care and social support service utilization profiles indicated that program savings exceeded program cost for five of the six study subsamples; the one exception was the mental retardation cohort residing in a community setting at pretest. Net savings were greatest for the three subsamples residing in an institutional setting at pretest. For all the subsamples, over 90 per cent of the program saving stemmed from a lower use of institutional placements. PMID:6405642

  20. Health Needs Assessment of Plain Populations in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kirk; Yost, Berwood; Abbott, Christina; Thompson, Scottie; Dlugi, Emily; Adams, Zachary; Schulman, Meryl; Strauss, Nicole

    2017-02-01

    We performed a health needs assessment for three Plain communities in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania from a random sample of households. Compared with the general population of adults, Plain respondents were more likely to be married, to have children, and they had large families; they were more likely to drink well water, to eat fruit and vegetables, to drink raw milk, and to live on a farm. Plain respondents had better physical and mental health and were less likely to have been diagnosed with various medical conditions compared with the general population of adults in Lancaster County but Old Order Mennonite respondents were more likely to have been diagnosed compared with Old Order Amish respondents. Plain respondents usually have a regular doctor and often receive preventive care but Old Order Mennonite respondents were more likely to have a regular doctor, to receive preventive care, to have had their children vaccinated, and to receive routine dental care compared with Old Order Amish respondents. Despite their relative geographic and genetic isolation, and despite the small, relative differences noted, the health of Plain communities in Lancaster County is similar to that of other adults in the County.

  1. Developer handbook for Section 210 of PURPA for Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-30

    The essential element of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) for developers is a reordering by Congress of the relationship between electric utilities and small power producers. The goal of PURPA is to encourage development of alternative sources of electricity by helping small power production become economically viable. The strategy adopted by Congress for encouraging development has two main components. First, the utility must purchase the power produced by a project meeting certain definitional requirements; and second, the utility must pay a price for the power, determined in accordance with guidelines set out in the FERC regulations. This handbook is designed to explain to developers in Pennsylvania the requirements of PURPA, including: who may qualify for treatment as a facility that may invoke the mandates of PURPA; the impact of PURPA on the state; the role of the state utility commission and the impact of state laws on the developer. Thus, the primary goal of the handbook is to provide potential small producers with a working understanding of their status and rights vis a vis the state utility commissions and electric utilities, and to aid the potential developer in obtaining the information needed to stimulate further research and development.

  2. Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Salmonella Infections in the Pennsylvania Raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Very, K J; Kirchner, M K; Shariat, N; Cottrell, W; Sandt, C H; Dudley, E G; Kariyawasam, S; Jayarao, B M

    2016-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence and spatial distribution of Salmonella infection in Pennsylvania raccoons (Procyon lotor), common wildlife mammals known to occupy overlapping habitats with humans and domestic food animals. The Pennsylvania Game Commission provided a total of 371 raccoon intestinal samples from trapped and road-killed raccoons collected between May and November 2011. Salmonella was isolated from the faeces of 56 (15.1%) of 371 raccoons in 35 (54%) of 65 counties across Pennsylvania. The five most frequently isolated serotypes were Newport (28.6%), Enteritidis (19.6%), Typhimurium (10.7%), Braenderup (8.9%) and Bareilly (7.1%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the Salmonella isolates and subsequent comparison to the Pennsylvania Department of Health human Salmonella PFGE database revealed 16 different pulsetypes in Salmonella isolates recovered from raccoons that were indistinguishable from pulsetypes of Salmonella collected from clinically ill humans during the study period. The pulsetypes of seven raccoon Salmonella isolates matched those of 56 human Salmonella isolates by month and geographical region of sample collection. Results from Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Multi-Virulence Locus Sequence Typing (CRISPR-MVLST) analysis corroborated the PFGE and serotyping data. The findings of this study show that several PFGE pulsetypes of Salmonella were shared between humans and raccoons in Pennsylvania, indicating that raccoons and humans might share the same source of Salmonella. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Molecular, ultrastructural, and biological characterization of Pennsylvania isolates of Plum pox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, William L; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Gildow, Fred E; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Levy, Laurene E; Mavrodieva, Vessela; Richwine, Nancy; Welliver, Ruth; Luster, Douglas G

    2011-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) was identified in Pennsylvania in 1999. The outbreak was limited to a four-county region in southern Pennsylvania. Initial serological and molecular characterization indicated that the isolates in Pennsylvania belong to the D strain of PPV. The Pennsylvania isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, electron microscopy, host range, and vector transmission to determine how these isolates related to their previously studied European counterparts. Genetically, Pennsylvania (PPV-Penn) isolates were more closely related to each other than to any other PPV-D strains, and isolates from the United States, Canada, and Chile were more closely related to each other than to European isolates. The PPV-Penn isolates exist as two clades, suggesting the possibility of multiple introductions. Electron microscopy analysis of PPV-Penn isolates, including cytopathological studies, indicated that the virions were similar to other Potyvirus spp. PPV-Penn isolates had a herbaceous host range similar to that of European D isolates. There were distinct differences in the transmission efficiencies of the two PPV-Penn isolates using Myzus persicae and Aphis spiraecola as vectors; however, both PPV-Penn isolates were transmitted by M. persicae more efficiently than a European D isolate but less efficiently than a European M isolate.

  4. Abandoned Mine Detection in Western Pennsylvania Using Surface Wave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abandoned mines throughout the Appalachian region of the United States have been recognized as problematic. Resource extraction from these mines has long ceased and few, if any, documents pertaining to these operations exist. Over time support structures internal to the mines may collapse and lead to subsidence, potentially damaging surface structures. A non-invasive, surface deployed seismic method to detect undisclosed, abandoned near-surface mines would be beneficial as a first step to remediation. The use of seismic surface waves to analyze the upper several tens of meters of the subsurface has become an important technique for near-surface investigations and may provide a method for detection of near-surface, abandoned mine shafts. While there are many undocumented abandoned mines throughout the Appalachians one known example exists within Butler County, Pennsylvania. Although little is known about the overall operation there is limited documentation which provides information as to the location of the mine tunnels. Currently there is no recognized surface subsidence associated with the mine however documents indicate that the abandoned mining operations have an estimated depth ranging from twenty to fifty feet. To assist with acquisition a seismic land streamer was constructed. Use of a land streamer increases the speed, ease and efficiency required to perform a seismic survey. Additionally the land streamer allows for the acquisition of seismic surface waves which were analyzed using the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method. Data were acquired by conducting multiple, adjacent surveys perpendicular to the suspected location of abandoned mine tunnels. Throughout the survey area to a depth of approximately 15 meters, shear wave velocities range between approximately 200-1200 m/s. Based upon shear wave velocity changes within the profile anomalies have been identified corresponding to the contrast between the suspected mined, and unmined, areas.

  5. An application of Extended Normalisation Process Theory in a randomised controlled trial of a complex social intervention: Process evaluation of the Strengthening Families Programme (10-14) in Wales, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrott, Jeremy; Murphy, Simon; Rothwell, Heather; Scourfield, Jonathan; Foxcroft, David; Gillespie, David; Holliday, Jo; Hood, Kerenza; Hurlow, Claire; Morgan-Trimmer, Sarah; Phillips, Ceri; Reed, Hayley; Roberts, Zoe; Moore, Laurence

    2017-12-01

    Process evaluations generate important data on the extent to which interventions are delivered as intended. However, the tendency to focus only on assessment of pre-specified structural aspects of fidelity has been criticised for paying insufficient attention to implementation processes and how intervention-context interactions influence programme delivery. This paper reports findings from a process evaluation nested within a randomised controlled trial of the Strengthening Families Programme 10-14 (SFP 10-14) in Wales, UK. It uses Extended Normalisation Process Theory to theorise how interaction between SFP 10-14 and local delivery systems - particularly practitioner commitment/capability and organisational capacity - influenced delivery of intended programme activities: fidelity (adherence to SFP 10-14 content and implementation requirements); dose delivered; dose received (participant engagement); participant recruitment and reach (intervention attendance). A mixed methods design was utilised. Fidelity assessment sheets (completed by practitioners), structured observation by researchers, and routine data were used to assess: adherence to programme content; staffing numbers and consistency; recruitment/retention; and group size and composition. Interviews with practitioners explored implementation processes and context. Adherence to programme content was high - with some variation, linked to practitioner commitment to, and understanding of, the intervention's content and mechanisms. Variation in adherence rates was associated with the extent to which multi-agency delivery team planning meetings were held. Recruitment challenges meant that targets for group size/composition were not always met, but did not affect adherence levels or family engagement. Targets for staffing numbers and consistency were achieved, though capacity within multi-agency networks reduced over time. Extended Normalisation Process Theory provided a useful framework for assessing

  6. Accountability and Pennsylvania High Schools: Using a Value-Added Model to Identify, Quantify, and Track School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Todd Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the prevailing No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandate as an effective platform to improve schools. The data compiled for use in this study represented 426 high schools in Pennsylvania and were retrieved from publicly accessible, state-sponsored sources. The statistical methodologies from the Pennsylvania Value-Added…

  7. 77 FR 30588 - R.J. Corman Railroad Company/Pennsylvania Lines Inc.-Construction and Operation Exemption-In...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board R.J. Corman Railroad Company/Pennsylvania Lines Inc.-- Construction and... prior approval requirements of 49 U.S.C. 10901 for R.J. Corman Railroad Company/Pennsylvania Lines Inc...

  8. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among English Language Learner Students in Pennsylvania. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 127

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes English language learner (ELL) student enrollment and achievement trends in Pennsylvania public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. Two research questions guide this study: (1) How did the enrollment of ELL students in Pennsylvania public schools change between 2002/03 and 2008/09?; and (2) How did performance (the percentage…

  9. Seed storage and testing at Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Penn Nursery and Wood Shop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Kozar

    2008-01-01

    Planting tree seeds at the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Penn Nursery, Spring Mills, Pennsylvania occurs in spring and fall. Seeds acquired for these plantings come from 3 sources. The first source is our own orchards, which were developed to provide “improved” seeds. Improved seeds are produced from scion material collected from trees...

  10. Radar research at The Pennsylvania State University Radar and Communications Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-05-01

    The Radar and Communications Laboratory (RCL) at The Pennsylvania State University is at the forefront of radar technology and is engaged in cutting edge research in all aspects of radar, including modeling and simulation studies of novel radar paradigms, design and development of new types of radar architectures, and extensive field measurements in realistic scenarios. This paper summarizes the research at The Pennsylvania State University's Radar and Communications Laboratory and relevant collaborative research with several groups over the past 15 years in the field of radar and related technologies, including communications, radio frequency identification (RFID), and spectrum sensing.

  11. Distributed usability evaluation of the Pennsylvania Cancer Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacEachren Alan M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pennsylvania Cancer Atlas (PA-CA is an interactive online atlas to help policy-makers, program managers, and epidemiologists with tasks related to cancer prevention and control. The PA-CA includes maps, graphs, tables, that are dynamically linked to support data exploration and decision-making with spatio-temporal cancer data. Our Atlas development process follows a user-centered design approach. To assess the usability of the initial versions of the PA-CA, we developed and applied a novel strategy for soliciting user feedback through multiple distributed focus groups and surveys. Our process of acquiring user feedback leverages an online web application (e-Delphi. In this paper we describe the PA-CA, detail how we have adapted e-Delphi web application to support usability and utility evaluation of the PA-CA, and present the results of our evaluation. Results We report results from four sets of users. Each group provided structured individual and group assessments of the PA-CA as well as input on the kinds of users and applications for which it is best suited. Overall reactions to the PA-CA are quite positive. Participants did, however, provide a range of useful suggestions. Key suggestions focused on improving interaction functions, enhancing methods of temporal analysis, addressing data issues, and providing additional data displays and help functions. These suggestions were incorporated in each design and implementation iteration for the PA-CA and used to inform a set of web-atlas design principles. Conclusion For the Atlas, we find that a design that utilizes linked map, graph, and table views is understandable to and perceived to be useful by the target audience of cancer prevention and control professionals. However, it is clear that considerable variation in experience using maps and graphics exists and for those with less experience, integrated tutorials and help features are needed. In relation to our usability

  12. Surficial geology and geomorphology of Potter County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, C.S.

    1956-01-01

    Potter County is located in the Appalachian Plateaus of north-central Pennsylvania and contains the headwaters of the Genesee River, the Allegheny River, and the Susquehanna River. Drift of Wisconsin age covers the northeastern part of the county. This study includes a detailed survev of the surficial deposits of the Genesee quadrangle in north-central Potter County and a reconnaissance of the remainder of the county; a soil survey and a botanical survey were carried on concurrently. The region is a deeply dissected plateau having extensive areas of steeply sloping land separated by narrow ridges and valleys; there is very little level land. Near the junction of the three watersheds the uplands rise to altitudes of more than 2,500 feet. The maximum relief in the Susquehanna drainage is more than 1,500 feet; in the Genesee and Allegheny drainage it. is about 800 feet. Valley walls are steep (15° to 30°), and the uplands have gentle slopes (0.5° to 10°). The drainage pattern is trellised. The climate is continental. Temperatures range from about -30° F. to more than 100° F. The average annual precipitation ranges approximately from 34 to 42 inches. Floods may occur at any season of the year. The large volumes of water from rain or melting snow carried by small streams come from springs. There is little precise data on frost in the ground, but it is probable that the ground seldom freezes in forested areas. The soils of Potter County have relatively immature profiles with poorly developed horizons that commonly have many characteristics inherited from their parent materials. At the great soil group level, the zonal soils are divided into Podzol soils and Brown Podzolic soils. Many soils have a high silt content in the upper part of the profile, apparently derived (at least partly) from a mantle of eolian silt. Mos~ of Potter County is covered by second-growth forests consisting of 40- to 60-year-old hardwood stands. The present forests growing on slopes and

  13. How the U. of Pennsylvania Learned that Outsourcing Is No Panacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Reports on the experience of the University of Pennsylvania in outsourcing the operation and maintenance of its campus buildings. Finds differing opinions on why the contract with Trammell Crow Company has not been successful, such as the extreme state of disrepair of many of the buildings. Also notes the experiences of institutions in this…

  14. From Pennsylvania's Front Line against Crime: A School and Youth Violence Prevention Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    Based on findings that high-quality early care and education, youth development programs for after-school and summer hours, child abuse and neglect prevention, and intervention programs can help to prevent violence crime, this document presents a violence prevention plan for the schools and youth of Pennsylvania. Four actions are proposed to…

  15. Impacts of pear thrips on a Pennsylvania sugarbush: third year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Kolb; Larry H. McCormick

    1993-01-01

    Pear thrips, Taeniothrips inconsequens (Uzel) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), were first positively identified as causing damage to sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in forest environments in the United States in 1980. Damage in Pennsylvania from this insect has occurred consistently since 1980, with the most extensive impact in 1988...

  16. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  17. 77 FR 2128 - Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad Company-Acquisition Exemption-Laurel Hill Development Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad Company--Acquisition Exemption-- Laurel Hill...) all of the tract or parcel of land and rights-of- way referred to as the Bowest Yard lying and being...

  18. 77 FR 27081 - II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg... former workers of II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania... employment related to the production of infrared and CO 2 laser optics, and related materials. The initial...

  19. 76 FR 31856 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Adoption of Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ...: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving a State Implementation Plan... Air Act (CAA). DATES: Effective Date: This final rule is effective on July 5, 2011. ADDRESSES: EPA has... more restrictive standards. Pennsylvania has adopted EPA's CTG standards for flat wood paneling surface...

  20. A Case Study on Collaboration: Sharing the Responsibility of Economic Development in Juniata Valley, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shakoor A.; Clark, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the need and importance of the community college's role in economic development, this article takes a closer look at how collaboration in the Juniata Valley of Pennsylvania between Industrial Development Corporations (IDCs) of Mifflin and Juniata counties, career and technical centers, and other agencies is…

  1. A Plan for Affirmative Action to Eliminate Discrimination Against Women at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    This Affirmative Action Plan was designed to eliminate discrimination against women at the University of Pennsylvania. Thirteen steps are recommended: (1) issue a public statement recognizing the existence of discrimination against women at the University; (2) instruct the committee on the budget and inform the President's and Provost's staff…

  2. 77 FR 58955 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Commonwealth of Pennsylvania...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... ozone and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) NAAQS and the 2006 PM 2.5 NAAQS. This action approves those... and 2006 PM 2.5 NAAQS. Pennsylvania has three Federally approved air quality monitoring plans. The... and PM 2.5. EPA continues to believe that the relevant ambient air quality monitoring and data systems...

  3. Patterns and Trends in Accidental Poisoning Deaths: Pennsylvania's Experience 1979-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren C Balmert

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine county and state-level accidental poisoning mortality trends in Pennsylvania from 1979 to 2014.Crude and age-adjusted death rates were formed for age group, race, sex, and county for accidental poisonings (ICD 10 codes X40-X49 from 1979 to 2014 for ages 15+ using the Mortality and Population Data System housed at the University of Pittsburgh. Rate ratios were calculated comparing rates from 1979 to 2014, overall and by sex, age group, and race. Joinpoint regression was used to detect statistically significant changes in trends of age-adjusted mortality rates.Rate ratios for accidental poisoning mortality in Pennsylvania increased more than 14-fold from 1979 to 2014. The largest rate ratios were among 35-44 year olds, females, and White adults. The highest accidental poisoning mortality rates were found in the counties of Southwestern Pennsylvania, those surrounding Philadelphia, and those in Northeast Pennsylvania near Scranton.The patterns and locations of accidental poisoning mortality by race, sex, and age group provide direction for interventions and policy makers. In particular, this study found the highest rate ratios in PA among females, whites, and the age group 35-44.

  4. Quantifying life cycle environmental benefits from the reuse of industrial materials in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelman, Matthew J; Chertow, Marian R

    2009-04-01

    Local reuse of waste materials from industrial processes has many potential environmental benefits, but these have been difficult to aggregate and measure across industries on a broad geographic scale. Nonhazardous industrial waste is a high volume flow principally constituted of wastewater with some solid materials. The state of Pennsylvania produced some 20 million metric tons of these residual wastes in 2004. An innovative reporting requirement for industrial generators implemented and compiled by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has resulted in a rich database collected since 1992 of residual waste generation, detailing the fate of more than 100 materials. By combining these records with life cycle inventory (LCI) data, the current and potential environmental benefits of residual waste use have been assessed. Results for Pennsylvania indicate a savings in 2004 of 13 PJ of primary energy, 0.9 million metric tons of CO2eq, 4300 tons of SO2eq, and 4200 tons of NOx emissions from reuse of residual wastes. While these energy savings constitute less than 1% of total industrial primary energy use in the state, it is a greater quantity of energy than that generated by the state's renewable energy sector. The framework and constraints surrounding reuse of residualwaste in Pennsylvania are discussed.

  5. The Relationship between Marcellus Shale Gas Development in Pennsylvania and Local Perceptions of Risk and Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafft, Kai A.; Borlu, Yetkin; Glenna, Leland

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in gas and oil drilling technology have led to dramatic boomtown development in many rural areas that have endured extended periods of economic decline. In Pennsylvania's Marcellus gas fields, the recent development of unconventional shale gas resources has not been without controversy. It has been variously framed as a major…

  6. The Pastoral Voice in John Dickinson's First "Letter from a Farmer in Pennsylvania."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Stephen H.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes how John Dickinson's "Letter from a Farmer in Pennsylvania" appropriates pastoral design and convention for rhetorical ends. Explores how literary idiom lends its force of expression to meet the needs of public controversy and how rhetorical judgment is both insubstantiated in the argument and is its chief mode of appeal. (KEH)

  7. New species of long-legged flies (Diptera: Dolichopodidae) from central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin B. Runyon

    2008-01-01

    Four new species of Dolichopodidae are described from central Pennsylvania: Campsicnemus wilderae Runyon, Dolichopus dracula Runyon, Dolichopus hurleyi Runyon, and Dolichopus frosti Runyon. Keys to males of Campsicnemus Haliday and Dolichopus Latreille with lamellate aristae are provided for species from eastern North America.

  8. Interim Recommendations To Promote Minority Permanence at the University of Pennsylvania. Working Draft for Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain-Cade McCoullum, Valarie

    A review of the programs and policies to support the retention and nurturing of minority faculty members and students at the University of Pennsylvania leads to a number of recommendations to expand minority group representation in student and faculty ranks. These include (1) establishing departmental incentives for minority faculty recruitment,…

  9. Pennsylvania Teachers' Perceptions and Use of Social Media Communication Technologies as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Brett C.

    2017-01-01

    A number of states and organizations have begun to add cross-content technology elements to their educational standards, providing teachers opportunities to use social media communication (SMC) technology in teaching and learning. Specifically, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the PA Core Standards, which are adapted from the national Common…

  10. 76 FR 29649 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Adoption of Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... global warming, through regulations that will harm the economy of the United States,'' and asserts that EPA is attempting to take such action on the issue of global warming which Congress has ``decided that... purpose of addressing global warming. IV. Final Action EPA is approving Pennsylvania's adoption of the CTG...

  11. A PILOT STUDY OF THE OPPORTUNITIES INDUSTRIALIZATION CENTER, INC., OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    A 1967 PILOT STUDY OF THE OPPORTUNITIES INDUSTRIALIZATION CENTER, PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, EXAMINED ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS, PROGRAM COMPONENTS, PARTICIPANT CHARACTERISTICS, RELATIONSHIPS WITH EMPLOYERS, EMPLOYMENT SERVICES, AND OTHER PERTINENT COMMUNITY GROUPS AND AGENCIES, AND THE IMPACT OF THE PROGRAM'S SELF-HELP PHILOSOPHY…

  12. Human Development across the Lifespan. A Pilot Intergenerational Project in Three Pennsylvania School Districts. Final Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher R.; Balavage, Valerie

    An evaluation determined the impact on participants of pilot intergenerational programs in the Central Greene, Quaker Valley, and Titusville school districts in western Pennsylvania. It examined how participation in project activities changed students' attitudes about older adults and aging. A four-part questionnaire consisted of the following:…

  13. School Choice, Racial Segregation, and Poverty Concentration: Evidence from Pennsylvania Charter School Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotok, Stephen; Frankenberg, Erica; Schafft, Kai A.; Mann, Bryan A.; Fuller, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how student movements between traditional public schools (TPSs) and charters--both brick and mortar and cyber--may be associated with both racial isolation and poverty concentration. Using student-level data from the universe of Pennsylvania public schools, this study builds upon previous research by specifically examining…

  14. The Pennsylvania State University Child Sexual Abuse Scandal: An Analysis of Institutional Factors Affecting Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alice R.

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) child sexual abuse scandal have left many scholars and individuals questioning the university's collective identity. The goal of this research was to uncover the dominant themes that describe a problematic institutional response to the child sexual abuse incidents in order to provide…

  15. Fire history reflects human history in the Pine Creek Gorge of north-central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick H. Brose; Richard P. Guyette; Joseph M. Marschall; Michael C. Stambaugh

    2015-01-01

    Fire history studies are important tools for understanding past fire regimes and the roles humans played in those regimes. Beginning in 2010, we conducted a fire history study in the Pine Creek Gorge area of north-central Pennsylvania to ascertain the number of fires and fire-free intervals, their variability through time, and the role of human influences. We collected...

  16. Optimization of dairy heifer management decisions based on production conditions of Pennsylvania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M.C.M.; Galligan, D.T.; Dijkhuizen, A.A.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2000-01-01

    We used a dynamic programming model to determine optimum rearing decisions of dairy replacements. Heifers were described in the model by age, season, body weight, pregnancy state, and prepubertal growth rate. Prices and parameters were chosen to represent the dairy population of Pennsylvania. We

  17. Advance reproduction and other stand characteristics in Pennsylvania and French stands of northern red oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim C. Steiner; Marc D. Abrams; Todd W. Bowersox

    1993-01-01

    The frequent scarcity of northern red oak (NRO) advance reproduction raises questions about its regeneration potential under prevailing stand conditions in eastern North America. In contrast, NRO plantations in France typically contain abundant advance reproduction. The purpose of this study was to document stand conditions in Pennsylvania (PA) and southwestern France...

  18. Insects affecting establishment of northern red oak seedlings in central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Galford; L.R. Auchmoody; H.C. Smith; R.S. Walters

    1991-01-01

    Studies to evaluate the impact of insects on the establishment of advance oak regeneration in Pennsylvania were initiated in 1989. The populations and species of insects feeding on germinating acorns and new seedlings, their activity periods, and the damage caused by these insects were studied in relation to overstory-density (40, 60, and 100 percent relative density)...

  19. 76 FR 32321 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Revision to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... new vehicle as part of an EPA-certified configuration): Catalytic converter, exhaust gas recirculation... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania... part of their program oversight. The amendment allows for these audits to be conducted within five days...

  20. Food Safety Knowledge, Behavior, and Attitudes of Vendors of Poultry Products Sold at Pennsylvania Farmers' Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinberg, Joshua; Radhakrishna, Rama; Cutter, Catherine N.

    2013-01-01

    A needs assessment survey was developed to assess the knowledge and attitudes of poultry vendors at farmers' markets in Pennsylvania, on food safety, regulation, and poultry production. Vendors were administered a 32-question paper survey, in person, during market hours. The results revealed critical vendor practices and identified important…

  1. Day Reporting Center and Recidivism: Comparing Offender Groups in a Western Pennsylvania County Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David R.; Harvey, Patrick J.; Schanz, Youngyol Yim

    2011-01-01

    In this study the authors report on an investigation comparing the recidivism and other variables of two similar offender populations in a western Pennsylvania county. The two groups were comparable in offense type, size (N = 63 for each) and other variables such as sex, race and age range. One group represented offenders who received a sentence…

  2. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Acquisition Among Adolescents and Young Adults in Pennsylvania: A Rural and Urban Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Casey N; Dorn, Lorah D; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Du, Ping

    2018-02-01

    Adolescent and young adult chlamydia and gonorrhea rates in rural versus urban communities of Pennsylvania were analyzed from 2004 to 2014. Higher rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea have been documented in rural youth, making them more likely to acquire to suffer adverse outcomes than youth in urban populations.

  3. Ways of Talking (and Acting) about Language Reclamation: An Ethnographic Perspective on Learning Lenape in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.; De Korne, Haley; Weinberg, Miranda

    2016-01-01

    The experiences of a community of people learning and teaching Lenape in Pennsylvania provide insights into the complexities of current ways of talking and acting about language reclamation. We illustrate how Native and non-Native participants in a university-based Indigenous language class constructed language, identity, and place in nuanced ways…

  4. Pregaming: An Exploratory Study of Strategic Drinking by College Students in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William; DeRicco, Beth; Schneider, Shari Kessel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This exploratory study examined pre-event drinking, or pregaming, by US college students. Participants: 112 undergraduates from 10 Pennsylvania colleges participated. Method: A focus group, including a written questionnaire, was conducted at each institution. Results: Only 35.7% of the participants had not pregamed during the last 2…

  5. Maximizing Basic Education Subsidy in Pennsylvania Public School Districts by Accounting for Children in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCook, Byron Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Pennsylvania public school districts are largely funded through basic education subsidy for providing educational services for resident students and non-resident students who are placed in residential programs within the school district boundaries. Non-resident placements occur through, but are not limited to, adjudication proceedings, foster home…

  6. 75 FR 29975 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 272; Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 272; Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign... Development Corporation, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 272, submitted an application to the Board for...

  7. Patterns of northern red oak growth and mortality in western Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. R. McClenahen; R. J. Hutnik; D. D. Davis

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluates the extent and cause(s) of an observed decline of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) on a 50-km portion of a major anticlinal ridge in west central Pennsylvania, and illustrates an approach for evaluating tree declines. Long term annual observations of forest health revealed the onset of crown dieback in 1983, chiefly among red...

  8. Pennsylvania boreal conifer forests and their bird communities: past, present, and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas A. Gross

    2010-01-01

    Pennsylvania spruce (Picea spp.)- and eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)-dominated forests, found primarily on glaciated parts of the Allegheny Plateau, are relicts of boreal forest that covered the region following glacial retreat. The timber era of the late 1800s and early 1900s (as late as 1942) destroyed most of the boreal...

  9. Pennsylvania Department of Education Academic Standards for the Arts and Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg.

    The Pennsylvania state academic standards describe what students should know and should be able to achieve at the end of grades 3, 5, 8 and 12 in the visual and performing arts, and the understanding about humanities context within the arts. The arts include dance, music, theater, and visual arts. The arts and humanities are interconnected through…

  10. The Comm-Bacc Study: Postbaccalaureate Activities of Degree Recipients from Pennsylvania Institutions 1971-1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, William

    This report, Comm-Bacc, examines the activity of graduates who received the baccalaureate degree in the academic year 1971-72 from the collegiate institutions of Pennsylvania. The focus concerned the condition of employment and nonemployment that existed in the late summer and early fall of 1972. Data were collected from the placement office at…

  11. Influence of markets and forest composition on lumber production in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Luppold; Matthew S. Bumgardner

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine regional differences in the hardwood timber resources of Pennsylvania and how the combined changes in inventory volume, forest composition, and lumber prices have influenced regional lumber production. Isolation of these relationships is important because shifts in lumber production reflect changes in harvesting activity. In turn, harvesting...

  12. Regional Changes in the Timber Resources of and Lumber Production in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Luppold; Matthew S. Bumgardner; Matthew S. Bumgardner

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examine regional differences in the hardwood timber resources of Pennsylvania and explain how the combined changes in this resource and in lumber prices have influenced regional lumber production. Isolation of these relationships is important because shifts in lumber production affect harvesting levels and harvesting activity influences long-term...

  13. Urban and community forests of the Mid-Atlantic region: New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2009-01-01

    This report details how land cover and urbanization vary within the states of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania by community (incorporated and census designated places), county subdivision, and county. Specifically this report provides critical urban and community forestry information for each state including human population characteristics and trends, changes in...

  14. An Articulation Model in Dental Assisting for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A Continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylves, Jane M.; Boody, Sandra

    A curriculum development project was conducted to generate additional competency-based modules to be used within the articulation model for Pennsylvania dental assisting programs, established in 1988. Project activities included reviewing, modifying, and providing parallel competency-based structure for the courses at the A.W. Beattie Technical…

  15. Prevalence and Patterns of Smokeless Tobacco Use in Pennsylvania Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Bethann; Rose-Colley, Mary

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 1,368 Pennsylvania college students found that a total of 23.9 percent used tobacco products (14 percent cigarettes and 10 percent smokeless tobacco). Data support the need for prevention and intervention programs beginning at the elementary level and continuing through college. (SM)

  16. 76 FR 34020 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Revisions to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... comments. B. E-mail: cox[email protected] . C. Mail: EPA-R03-OAR-2009-0881, Kathleen Cox, Associate..., Bureau of Air Quality Control, P.O. Box 8468, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17105; and the...

  17. 77 FR 34300 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Revision to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... instructions for submitting comments. B. Email: Cox[email protected] . C. Mail: EPA-R03-OAR-2012-0378, Kathleen Cox, Associate Director, Office of Permits and Air Toxics, Mailcode 3AP10, U.S. Environmental... Quality Control, P.O. Box 8468, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17105; and Allegheny County...

  18. 76 FR 52283 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... submitted by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The SIP revisions pertain to the control of nitrogen oxide..., Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Particulate matter, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Dated: August 8...

  19. 76 FR 29180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Portland Cement Kilns AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...) revision submitted by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This revision pertains to the control of nitrogen... emissions are generated during fuel combustion by oxidation of chemically-bound nitrogen in the fuel and by...

  20. 76 FR 34021 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Control of Nitrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ...; Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions From Glass Melting Furnaces AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...) revision submitted by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This revision pertains to the control of nitrogen... in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone...

  1. 77 FR 59090 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Adhesives and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... in 25 Pa. Code. EPA is approving this revision in accordance with the requirements of the Clean Air..., 2011. II. Summary of SIP Revision Pennsylvania's SIP submission contains amendments to 25 Pa. Code... products. The SIP revision includes amendments to the existing regulation in 25 Pa. Code section 129.51...

  2. A Customized Approach to Talent Management at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania places great emphasis on talent management, specifically on attracting and retaining top-notch people. One way it accomplishes this is by offering several avenues by which its employees can further their careers. Penn's large, decentralized structure provides significant opportunities for career growth; however,…

  3. 75 FR 20859 - Notice of Realty Action, Independence National Historical Park, Pennsylvania and Valley Forge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... land has been determined to be suitable for disposal by exchange. The authority for this exchange is 16... conveyance deeds are recorded at the Recorder of ] Deeds Office of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. The... properties to be exchanged shall be determined by a current market value appraisal and if they are not...

  4. Responses of northern red oak seedlings to lime and deer exclosure fencing in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Long; Patrick H. Brose; Stephen B. Horsley

    2012-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, two hypotheses compete to explain the chronic oak (Quercus spp.) regeneration problem: excessive deer browsing and soil cation depletion. We tested these hypotheses by evaluating the effect of forest liming and deer exclosure fencing on northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedling growth and nutrition in five...

  5. Regenerating mixed oak stands in Pennsylvania: a quarter-century retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. J. Gould; K. C. Steiner; J. C. Finley; M. E. McDill

    2003-01-01

    The outcomes of regeneration treatments in 90 oak-dominated stands in Pennsylvania are examined 20 to 33 years after treatment. Approximately one-quarter of the stands failed to reach 50 percent stocking after at least 20 years, but most stands regenerated successfully. Red maple is the most frequently observed species in the regenerated stands, followed by oak species...

  6. Teacher Effectiveness: An Update on Pennsylvania's Teacher Evaluation System. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research For Action, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Act 82 of 2012 established new standards for Pennsylvania's teacher evaluation system, including the incorporation of student performance measures in ratings decisions. Since 2009, approximately 35 states have amended teacher evaluation systems, with student achievement playing an increasingly prominent role. This count includes neighboring…

  7. Time-of-travel and dispersion studies, Lehigh River, Francis E. Walter Lake to Easton, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of time-of-travel and dispersion studies are presented for the 77.0 mile reach of the Lehigh River from Francis E. Walter Lake to Easton, Pennsylvania. Rhodamine WT dye was injected at several points for a variety of several common flow conditions and its downstream travel was monitored at a number of downstream points by means of a fluorometer. Time-of-travel data have been related to stream discharge, distance along the river channel and dispersion. If 2.205 pounds of a conservative water soluble contaminant were accidentally spilled into the Lehigh River at Penn Haven Junction at Black Creek 6.09 miles downstream from Rockport, Pennsylvania, when the discharge at Walnutport, Pennsylvania, was 600 cubic feet per second, the leading edge, peak, and trailing edge of the contaminant would arrive 31.6 miles downstream at the Northhampton, Pennsylvania, water intakes 45, 54, and 66 hours later, respectively. The maximum concentration expected at the intakes would be about 1.450 micrograms per liter. From data and relations presented, time-of-travel and maximum concentration estimates can be made for any two points within the reach. (USGS)

  8. 76 FR 31237 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... data available for 2010 in EPA's Air Quality System (AQS) are consistent with continued attainment. In... measures. This action has no effect on control measures, or air quality, in the area. For example, contrary... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania...

  9. STRESS AMONG FARM WOMEN:AN ANALYSIS OF FARM HOUSEHOLDS IN PENNSYLVANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaraman, Anuja; Findeis, Jill L; Swaminathan, Hema

    2004-01-01

    Farming is among the high-stress occupations in the United States and farm women have higher stress scores due to multiple job holdings. The study investigates the determinants of time stress experienced by farm women in Pennsylvania applying an economic model of stress developed by Hamermesh and Lee (2003).

  10. Digital Technology: A Double-Edged Sword for a School Principal in Rural Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotok, Stephen; Kryst, Erica L.

    2017-01-01

    This case study was inspired by visits to several different rural high schools in Pennsylvania. The case illuminates the challenges faced by rural principals and superintendents who want to integrate digital technology into their curriculum, but who lack certain financial and human capital resources. Although this case occurred in a remote, rural…

  11. Effect of experience, expectation and resource availability on perceptions of crowding among trout anglers in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig A. Miller

    1995-01-01

    Crowding research has suggested expectancy theory as one explanation to perceptions of crowding expressed by participants in outdoor recreation activities. Expectancy theory states that an individual enters into an activity with a preconceived set of expectations for the outcome of the experience. In this study, anglers fishing on the opening day of Pennsylvania's...

  12. Beyond Boomer Meets NextGen: Examining Mentoring Practices among Pennsylvania Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyer, Linda; Yelinek, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    A survey to assess mentoring experiences and attitudes towards work of Pennsylvania academic librarians was conducted in September 2006 with questions concerning mentoring experiences, work experiences, and attitudes towards work. Results of the survey are analyzed for differences among those librarians responding, especially generational…

  13. Current Work in Linguistics. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 4, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Alexis, Ed.; Lee, Hikyoung, Ed.; Siegel, Laura, Ed.; Surek-Clark, Clarissa, Ed.; Williams, Alexander, Ed.

    This issue contains the following articles: "Was Mir Wisse: A Review of the Literature on the Languages of the Pennsylvania Germans" (David Bowie); "Tigrinya Root Consonants and the OCP" (Eugene Buckley); "Duration of Onset Consonants in Gay Male Stereotyped Speech" (Sean Crist); "PRO, the EPP and Nominative…

  14. Integrating IWB Use in Western Pennsylvania K-12 Schools Districts: The Professional Development Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Yehuda; Medvin, Mandy; Domanski, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This research examines teacher attitudes and anxieties about interactive whiteboard (IWB) use as related to perceived classroom implementation to enhance student engagement and achievement. The research took place in four western Pennsylvania, U.S.A. school districts. Data suggest that the districts in this study have invested in IWB technology…

  15. 77 FR 13015 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ...: Section 930.10, the definition of ``Handle''; Section 930.50, ``Marketing Policy'' and Section 930.58... from definition of handle. 2. Amendment 2 would revise the ``marketing policy'' provisions in section... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon...

  16. 75 FR 34964 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Amendment to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... under FIFRA, (4) air fresheners, (5) adhesives, (6) bait station insecticides, and (7) fragrances. 6... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania... being taken under the Clean Air Act (CAA). DATES: Written comments must be received on or before July 21...

  17. 75 FR 63717 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Amendment to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ..., (3) products registered under FIFRA, (4) air fresheners, (5) adhesives, (6) bait station insecticides.... [Insert page number where the document begins]. ] Section 130.335 Air fresheners...... 10/11/08 October 18... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania...

  18. Environmental assessment of a representative grass-finishing beef operation in southern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to quantify environmental impacts of a representative grass-finished beef operation in southeastern Pennsylvania. A farm-gate life cycle assessment was conducted using the Integrated Farm System Model to estimate greenhouse gas emissions, reactive nitrogen loss, and w...

  19. A Pennsylvania Education-Welfare Collaboration Model for Successful Teen Parent Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawer, Jo Ann; Cromley, Lynn

    The Family Support Act of 1988 presented states with a unique opportunity to address the needs of pregnant and parenting teens. The Pennsylvania Departments of Education and Public Welfare have seized this opportunity and are leading the nation in combining their programmatic and fiscal resources to expand the state's teen parent initiative. The…

  20. Evaluating Pennsylvania Pharmacists' Provision of Community-based Patient Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Osborne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and describe Pennsylvania pharmacists who currently provide or are interested in providing community-based patient care services and are interested in joining a statewide practice network. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: February to June 2009 in Pennsylvania. Participants: 1700 pharmacists. Intervention: Mailed and electronic survey. Main outcome measures: Number and geographic location of pharmacists providing or interested in providing community-based patient care in Pennsylvania. Description of patient care documentation methods; physical space; services provided; perceived barriers to providing patient care; training needs; and interest in joining a statewide practice network. Results: The final analysis included data from 1700 pharmacists. Approximately one-third of pharmacists (n=554 were providing patient care services to community-based patients. Most were routinely documenting (67.5% and many had a semi-private or private space to provide care. MTM and immunizations were the most common services provided. Respondents reported the most significant barrier to providing MTM, diabetes education, and smoking cessation education was time constraints, whereas training was a barrier for immunization provision. Most pharmacists were not being compensated for patient care services. Of the 869 pharmacists interested in joining a statewide network, those providing care were more interested in joining than those who were not (70.8% vs. 43.8%, p < 0.001. Conclusion: Pennsylvania pharmacists are interested in providing community-based patient care services and joining a statewide practice network focused on providing community-based patient care services. This research serves as a foundation for building a pharmacist practice network in Pennsylvania.   Type: Original Research

  1. Structural, Nursing, and Physician Characteristics and 30-Day Mortality for Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Ramaswamy, Tara S; Brown, Sydney E S; He, Xu; Gutsche, Jacob T; Fleisher, Lee A; Neuman, Mark D

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac surgery ICU characteristics and clinician staffing patterns have not been well characterized. We sought to describe Pennsylvania cardiac ICUs and to determine whether ICU characteristics are associated with mortality in the 30 days after cardiac surgery. From 2012 to 2013, we conducted a survey of cardiac surgery ICUs in Pennsylvania to assess ICU structure, care practices, and clinician staffing patterns. ICU data were linked to an administrative database of cardiac surgery patient discharges. We used logistic regression to measure the association between ICU variables and death in 30 days. Cardiac surgery ICUs in Pennsylvania. Patients having coronary artery bypass grafting and/or cardiac valve repair or replacement from 2009 to 2011. None. Of the 57 cardiac surgical ICUs in Pennsylvania, 43 (75.4%) responded to the facility survey. Rounds included respiratory therapists in 26 of 43 (60.5%) and pharmacists in 23 of 43 (53.5%). Eleven of 41 (26.8%) reported that at least 2/3 of their nurses had a bachelor's degree in nursing. Advanced practice providers were present in most of the ICUs (37/43; 86.0%) but residents (8/42; 18.6%) and fellows (7/43; 16.3%) were not. Daytime intensivists were present in 21 of 43 (48.8%) responding ICUs; eight of 43 (18.6%) had nighttime intensivists. Among 29,449 patients, there was no relationship between mortality and nurse ICU experience, presence of any intensivist, or absence of residents after risk adjustment. To exclude patients who may have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement, we conducted a subgroup analysis of patients undergoing only coronary artery bypass grafting, and results were similar. Pennsylvania cardiac surgery ICUs have variable structures, care practices, and clinician staffing, although none of these are statistically significantly associated with mortality in the 30 days following surgery after adjustment.

  2. Chester County ground-water atlas, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Russell A.; Loper, Connie A.

    2004-01-01

    Chester County encompasses 760 square miles in southeastern Pennsylvania. Groundwater- quality studies have been conducted in the county over several decades to address specific hydrologic issues. This report compiles and describes water-quality data collected during studies conducted mostly after 1990 and summarizes the data in a county-wide perspective. In this report, water-quality constituents are described in regard to what they are, why the constituents are important, and where constituent concentrations vary relative to geology or land use. Water-quality constituents are grouped into logical units to aid presentation: water-quality constituents measured in the field (pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen), common ions, metals, radionuclides, bacteria, nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds.Waterquality constituents measured in the field, common ions (except chloride), metals, and radionuclides are discussed relative to geology. Bacteria, nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds are discussed relative to land use. If the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) or Chester County Health Department has drinkingwater standards for a constituent, the standards are included. Tables and maps are included to assist Chester County residents in understanding the water-quality constituents and their distribution in the county. Ground water in Chester County generally is of good quality and is mostly acidic except in the carbonate rocks and serpentinite, where it is neutral to strongly basic. Calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate are major constituents of these rocks. Both compounds have high solubility, and, as such, both are major contributors to elevated pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and the common ions. Elevated pH and alkalinity in carbonate rocks and serpentinite can indicate a potential for scaling in water heaters and household plumbing. Low pH and low alkalinity in the schist, quartzite, and

  3. Groundwater-Quality Assessment, Pike County, Pennsylvania, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Pike County, a 545 square-mile area in northeastern Pennsylvania, has experienced the largest relative population growth of any county in the state from 1990 to 2000 and its population is projected to grow substantially through 2025. This growing population may result in added dependence and stresses on water resources, including the potential to reduce the quantity and degrade the quality of groundwater and associated stream base flow with changing land use. Groundwater is the main source of drinking water in the county and is derived primarily from fractured-rock aquifers (shales, siltstones, and sandstones) and some unconsolidated glacial deposits that are recharged locally from precipitation. The principal land uses in the county as of 2005 were public, residential, agricultural, hunt club/private recreational, roads, and commercial. The public lands cover a third of the county and include national park, state park, and other state lands, much of which are forested. Individual on-site wells and wastewater disposal are common in many residential areas. In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pike County Conservation District, began a study to provide current information on groundwater quality throughout the county that will be helpful for water-resource planning. The countywide reconnaissance assessment of groundwater quality documents current conditions with existing land uses and may serve as a baseline of groundwater quality for future comparison. Twenty wells were sampled in 2007 throughout Pike County to represent groundwater quality in the principal land uses (commercial, high-density and moderate-density residential with on-site wastewater disposal, residential in a sewered area, pre-development, and undeveloped) and geologic units (five fractured-rock aquifers and one glacial unconsolidated aquifer). Analyses selected for the groundwater samples were intended to identify naturally occurring constituents from the aquifer or

  4. Baseline assessment of groundwater quality in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Cravotta, III, Charles A.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2016-06-30

    The Devonian-age Marcellus Shale and the Ordovician-age Utica Shale, geologic formations which have potential for natural gas development, underlie Wayne County and neighboring counties in northeastern Pennsylvania. In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wayne Conservation District, conducted a study to assess baseline shallow groundwater quality in bedrock aquifers in Wayne County prior to potential extensive shale-gas development. The 2014 study expanded on previous, more limited studies that included sampling of groundwater from 2 wells in 2011 and 32 wells in 2013 in Wayne County. Eighty-nine water wells were sampled in summer 2014 to provide data on the presence of methane and other aspects of existing groundwater quality throughout the county, including concentrations of inorganic constituents commonly present at low levels in shallow, fresh groundwater but elevated in brines associated with fluids extracted from geologic formations during shale-gas development. Depths of sampled wells ranged from 85 to 1,300 feet (ft) with a median of 291 ft. All of the groundwater samples collected in 2014 were analyzed for bacteria, major ions, nutrients, selected inorganic trace constituents (including metals and other elements), radon-222, gross alpha- and gross beta-particle activity, selected man-made organic compounds (including volatile organic compounds and glycols), dissolved gases (methane, ethane, and propane), and, if sufficient methane was present, the isotopic composition of methane.Results of the 2014 study show that groundwater quality generally met most drinking-water standards, but some well-water samples had one or more constituents or properties, including arsenic, iron, pH, bacteria, and radon-222, that exceeded primary or secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Arsenic concentrations were higher than the MCL of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) in 4 of 89 samples (4.5 percent) with concentrations as high as 20 µg/L; arsenic

  5. Retrospective Case Study in Southwestern Pennsylvania, Study of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Facturing on Drinking Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the retrospective case study for southwestern Pennsylvania, which was conducted in Amwell, Cross Creek, Hopewell, and Mount Pleasant Townships in Washington County, locations that have witnessed unconventional gas production from the Devonian-age Marcellus S...

  6. Arsenic concentrations, related environmental factors, and the predicted probability of elevated arsenic in groundwater in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eliza L.; Low, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical results for arsenic in water samples from 5,023 wells obtained during 1969–2007 across Pennsylvania were compiled and related to other associated groundwater-quality and environmental factors and used to predict the probability of elevated arsenic concentrations, defined as greater than or equal to 4.0 micrograms per liter (µg/L), in groundwater. Arsenic concentrations of 4.0 µg/L or greater (elevated concentrations) were detected in 18 percent of samples across Pennsylvania; 8 percent of samples had concentrations that equaled or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking-water maximum contaminant level of 10.0 µg/L. The highest arsenic concentration was 490.0 µg/L.

  7. Pennsylvania Public Libraries and the Great Flood of 1936: Dark Clouds and Silver Linings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette A. Lear

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Great Flood of 1936 damaged thousands of buildings, ruined millions of dollars’ worth of infrastructure and personal property, and left thousands of citizens homeless in Pennsylvania. Among affected institutions were 14 public libraries that lost books and records and/or sustained structural damage during the flood. This article recounts the experiences of the four libraries with the largest claims: the Cambria Library (Johnstown, the Annie Halenbake Ross Library (Lock Haven, Milton Public Library, and the James V. Brown Library (Williamsport. Lessons learned, unexpected opportunities to reshape collections and services, and advancement of professional knowledge about conservation of water-soaked materials are discussed. In addition, the article provides details about the Pennsylvania Library Association’s successful pursuit of state rehabilitation funds for affected libraries. Although the Great Flood of 1936 was an experience that no one would wish to repeat, it represents some silver linings in terms of public library history.

  8. First report of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in commercial fruits and vegetables in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neelendra K; Biddinger, David J; Demchak, Kathleen; Deppen, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Zaprionus indianus (Gupta) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), an invasive vinegar fly, was found for the first time in Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 2011. It was found in a commercial tart cherry orchard using apple cider vinegar (ACV) traps that were monitoring another invasive vinegar fly, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). Coincidentally, the first record of D. suzukii found in Pennsylvania was also found in this same cherry orchard only 3 months earlier as part of a spotted wing drosophila survey effort in raspberry, blackberry, grape, and tart cherry in Adams County. These same crops plus blueberry and tomato were monitored again in 2012. In this article, adult Z. indianus captures in ACV traps and other traps deployed in the aforementioned crops during 2012 season are presented and the economic importance of Z. indianus is discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  9. Baseline assessment of groundwater quality in Pike County, Pennsylvania, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2017-12-29

    The Devonian-age Marcellus Shale and the Ordovician-age Utica Shale, which have the potential for natural gas development, underlie Pike County and neighboring counties in northeastern Pennsylvania. In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pike County Conservation District, conducted a study that expanded on a previous more limited 2012 study to assess baseline shallow groundwater quality in bedrock aquifers in Pike County prior to possible extensive shale-gas development. Seventy-nine water wells ranging in depths from 80 to 610 feet were sampled during June through September 2015 to provide data on the presence of methane and other aspects of existing groundwater quality in the various bedrock geologic units throughout the county, including concentrations of inorganic constituents commonly present at low values in shallow, fresh groundwater but elevated in brines associated with fluids extracted from geologic formations during shale-gas development. All groundwater samples collected in 2015 were analyzed for bacteria, dissolved and total major ions, nutrients, selected dissolved and total inorganic trace constituents (including metals and other elements), radon-222, gross alpha- and gross beta-particle activity, dissolved gases (methane, ethane, and propane), and, if sufficient methane was present, the isotopic composition of methane. Additionally, samples from 20 wells distributed throughout the county were analyzed for selected man-made volatile organic compounds, and samples from 13 wells where waters had detectable gross alpha activity were analyzed for radium-226 on the basis of relatively elevated gross alpha-particle activity.Results of the 2015 study show that groundwater quality generally met most drinking-water standards for constituents and properties included in analyses, but groundwater samples from some wells had one or more constituents or properties, including arsenic, iron, manganese, pH, bacteria, sodium, chloride, sulfate

  10. Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie P. Gaines; Jane W. Stanley; Frederick C. Meinzer; Katherine A. McCulloh; David R. Woodruff; Weile Chen; Thomas S. Adams; Henry Lin; David M. Eissenstat; Nathan Phillips

    2015-01-01

    We investigated depth of water uptake of trees on shale-derived soils in order to assess the importance of roots over a meter deep as a driver of water use in a central Pennsylvania catchment. This information is not only needed to improve basic understanding of water use in these forests but also to improve descriptions of root function at depth in hydrologic process...

  11. Swatara Creek basin of southeastern Pennsylvania--An evaluation of its hydrologic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Wilbur Tennant; Schneider, William J.; Crooks, James W.

    1967-01-01

    Local concentrations of population in the Swatara Creek basin of Pennsylvania find it necessary to store, transport, and treat water because local supplies are either deficient or have been contaminated by disposal of wastes in upstream areas. Water in the basin is available for the deficient areas and for dilution of the coal-mine drainage in the northern parts and the sewage wastes in the southern parts.

  12. Solar energy heating system design package for a single-family residence at New Castle, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    The design of a solar heating and hot water system for the New Castle Redevelopment Authority's single-family dwelling located at New Castle, Pennsylvania is described. Documentation submitted by the contractor for Government review of plans, specifications, cost trade studies and verification status for approval to commit the system to fabrication is presented. Also included are system integration drawings, major subsystems drawings, and architect's specifications and plans.

  13. Hydraulic modeling of mussel habitat at a bridge-replacement site, Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rogers, Megan E.; Zimmerman, Gregory F.

    2010-01-01

    The Allegheny River in Pennsylvania supports a large and diverse freshwater-mussel community, including two federally listed endangered species, Pleurobema clava(Clubshell) and Epioblasma torulosa rangiana (Northern Riffleshell). It is recognized that river hydraulics and morphology play important roles in mussel distribution. To assess the hydraulic influences of bridge replacement on mussel habitat, metrics such as depth, velocity, and their derivatives (shear stress, Froude number) were collected or computed.

  14. Association of wintering raptors with Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program grasslands in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.; Brittingham, M.; Grove, G.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation grasslands can provide valuable habitat resource for breeding songbirds, but their value for wintering raptors has received little attention. We hypothesized that increased availability of grassland habitat through the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has resulted in an increase or redistribution in numbers of four species of raptors in Pennsylvania since 2001. We tested this by analyzing winter raptor counts from volunteer surveys, conducted from 2001 to 2008, for Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), Rough-legged Hawks (Buteo lagopus), Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus), and American Kestrels (Falco sparverius). During that period, numbers of wintering Northern Harriers increased by more than 20% per year. Log-linear Poisson regression models show that all four species increased in the region of Pennsylvania that had the most and longest-established conservation grasslands. At the county scale (N= 67), Bayesian spatial models showed that spatial and temporal population trends of all four species were positively correlated with the amount of conservation grassland. This relationship was particularly strong for Northern Harriers, with numbers predicted to increase by 35.7% per year for each additional 1% of farmland enrolled in CREP. Our results suggest that conservation grasslands are likely the primary cause of the increase in numbers of wintering Northern Harriers in Pennsylvania since 2001. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal of Field Ornithology ?? 2010 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  15. Spatial-temporal analysis of prostate cancer incidence from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, 2000-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among males, and the incidence in Pennsylvania, USA is considerably higher than nationally. Knowledge of regional differences and time trends in prostate cancer incidence may contribute to a better understanding of aetiologic factors and racial disparities in outcomes, and to improvements in preventive intervention and screening efforts. We used Pennsylvania Cancer Registry data on reported prostate cancer diagnoses between 2000 and 2011 to study the regional distribution and temporal trends of prostate cancer incidence in both Pennsylvania White males and Philadelphia metropolitan area Black males. For White males, we generated and mapped county-specific age-adjusted incidence and standardised incidence ratios by period cohort, and identified spatial autocorrelation and local clusters. In addition, we fitted Bayesian hierarchical generalised linear Poisson models to describe the temporal and aging effects separately in Whites state-wide and metropolitan Philadelphia blacks. Incidences of prostate cancer among white males declined from 2000-2002 to 2009-2011 with an increasing trend to some extent in the period 2006-2008 and significant variation across geographic regions, but less variation exists for metropolitan Philadelphia including majority of Black patients. No significant aging effect was detected for White and Black men, and the peak age group for prostate cancer risk varied by race. Future research should seek to identify potential social and environmental risk factors associated with geographical/racial disparities in prostate cancer. As such, there is a need for more effective surveillance so as to detect, reduce and control the cancer burden associated with prostate cancer.

  16. A new cultural adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; Doty, Richard L; Santos, Clayson Alan dos; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Voegels, Richard Louis

    2013-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, a test of olfactory function that is widely used by otolaryngologists, geriatricians, and neurologists, has been translated into more than a dozen languages. In some instances, cultural and socioeconomic factors have necessitated changes in the odorant items or the response alternatives to make the test scores congruent with North American norms. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of Brazilian subjects on a new Portuguese language version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test with their performance on an earlier Portuguese language version of the test, as well as to assess the influences of gender, age, ethnicity, and economic status on the test scores. Based on pilot data, several response alternatives of the earlier Portuguese language version of the test were altered in an effort to improve test performance. Forty-nine healthy Brazilian volunteers, who represented several economic classes, were tested. The test scores of the study cohort who received the newer version of the test were compared with those of a group of 25 subjects who received the earlier version of the test. The mean score for the new version [35 (2.1)] was significantly (p = 0.002) higher than that for the earlier version [32.5 (3.5)]. Although no apparent influence of socioeconomic status was observed, the female participants outperformed the male participants in the current subject cohort. The changes made in the new cultural adaptation of the Portuguese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test were effective in increasing the average test scores of the participants. Overall, the female subjects outperformed the male subjects on the test.

  17. Spatial-temporal analysis of prostate cancer incidence from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Matthews, Stephen A; Iskandarani, Khaled; Li, Yimei; Li, Zheng; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-11-28

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among males, and the incidence in Pennsylvania, USA is considerably higher than nationally. Knowledge of regional differences and time trends in prostate cancer incidence may contribute to a better understanding of aetiologic factors and racial disparities in outcomes, and to improvements in preventive intervention and screening efforts. We used Pennsylvania Cancer Registry data on reported prostate cancer diagnoses between 2000 and 2011 to study the regional distribution and temporal trends of prostate cancer incidence in both Pennsylvania White males and Philadelphia metropolitan area Black males. For White males, we generated and mapped county-specific age-adjusted incidence and standardised incidence ratios by period cohort, and identified spatial autocorrelation and local clusters. In addition, we fitted Bayesian hierarchical generalised linear Poisson models to describe the temporal and aging effects separately in Whites state-wide and metropolitan Philadelphia blacks. Incidences of prostate cancer among white males declined from 2000-2002 to 2009-2011 with an increasing trend to some extent in the period 2006-2008 and significant variation across geographic regions, but less variation exists for metropolitan Philadelphia including majority of Black patients. No significant aging effect was detected for White and Black men, and the peak age group for prostate cancer risk varied by race. Future research should seek to identify potential social and environmental risk factors associated with geographical/racial disparities in prostate cancer. As such, there is a need for more effective surveillance so as to detect, reduce and control the cancer burden associated with prostate cancer.

  18. Pedogenesis and Stability of Two Late Cenozoic Paleosols Developed on Alluvium in East-Central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, K. T.; Peters, S.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The ridge and valley province of central Pennsylvania is named for the resistant ridges of sandstone and quartzite adjacent to more easily eroded valleys of limestone and shale. Colluvium and alluvium have accumulated against the base of the ridges, enabling pedogenic processes to develop and preserve a rich history of paleoenvironmental conditions in buried soils. Our group builds on the legacy of existing scholarship on these paleosols by deciphering the timing of the initiation of pedogenesis, and characterizing the most likely paleoenvironmental conditions of soil formation. In this work, we report on our first efforts to study two paleosols developed through alluvium deposited on the north-facing slope of South Mountain adjacent to the Cumberland and Lehigh Valleys. The first is a periglacial kame deposit near Emmaus, Pennsylvania that hosts a 4 meter thick soil, and the second deposit is a series of alluvial fan sequences near Mainsville, Pennsylvania that host a 10 meter thick soil. Common features observed in both these soils include a deeply rubified color and horizons with abundant iron and manganese oxides. In some localities, these iron oxides were abundant enough to be a source of iron ore during in the late 1800s. The relative proportion of amorphous iron oxides, as calculated from the ratio of oxalate extractable iron to dithionite extractable iron can be used to coarsely estimate an age for these soils. Ratios in the shallow modern brown-colored soils range from 0.21 to 0.35, and then evolve towards values of 0.088 to 0.143 in the rubified paleosols as the amorphous iron is converted to crystalline iron minerals. Evolution of iron crystallinity from comparable profiles reported in the literature takes between 1e5 and 1e6 years, suggesting a fairly long period of stability in these hillslopes.

  19. Unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masteller, E.C.; Maleski, K.R.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine species composition and relative abundance of unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania 1990-1992. This information was compared with data from the only other extensive survey of unionids in the bay conducted in 1909-1911 (Ortmann 1919) to assess changes over the 80 years preceding the present study. A total of 1,540 individuals representing 18 species were collected in 1990-1992. Five relatively common species (between 7 and 42% of total individuals), six uncommon species (2 and 6%), and seven rare species (<1%) were found. The rare species were Anodontoides ferussacianus, Lasmigona costata, Ligumia recta, Ptychobranchus fasciolaris, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa, Strophitus undaulatus, and Truncilla donaciformis. Five of the species found in Presque Isle Bay (Leptodea fragilis, Ligumia nasuta, Potamilus alatus, Quadrula quadrula, and Truncilla donaciformis) are listed as critically imperiled and one species (Truncilla truncata) as extirpated in the State of Pennsylvania by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Comparisons between unionid populations in 1909-1911 and 1990-1992 indicate few substantial changes occurred during the past 80 years. A total of 22 species were found; 21 in 1909-1911 and 18 in 1990-1992. Seventeen species were found in both studies, an additional four in 1909-1911 and one in 1990-1992. The relative abundance of 11 of the 17 species found in both studies remained stable (i.e., common or uncommon) over the past 80 years. Only four species listed as uncommon in 1909-1911 were listed as rare in 1990-1992. However, the invasion of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) is considered a threat to the continued existence of the entire Unionidae fauna in Presque Isle Bay, a unique habitat of the Great Lakes.

  20. Four Curriculum Models. Coming Together Again: Art History, Art Criticism, Art Studio, Aesthetics. Proceedings of the Kutztown Art Conference (41st, Kutztown, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katter, Eldon, Ed.

    Proceedings of a conference on art history, art criticism, studio art, and aesthetics are presented. An overview entitled "For a New Beginning" outlines Pennsylvania's new curriculum requirements and their relationship to art education. Listings follow which cover Pennsylvania's goals of quality education and arts and humanities objectives…

  1. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among English Language Learner Students in Pennsylvania. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 127

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes English language learner (ELL) student enrollment and achievement trends in Pennsylvania public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. Two research questions guide this study: (1) How did the enrollment of ELL students in Pennsylvania public schools change between 2002/03 and 2008/09?; and (2) How did performance (the percentage…

  2. The Successful Presidency as a Shared Responsibility. Abstract of Remarks and Survey Data for Distribution to Pennsylvania Community College Presidents and Trustees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Lawrence S.

    In early 1983, a survey was conducted among the presidents and board chairpersons of the 14 public community colleges in Pennsylvania, asking respondents to rate the level of importance of 20 presidential roles based on their institution's needs during the 1982-83 academic year. During a joint annual meeting of Pennsylvania community college…

  3. Combating budgetary complications from the Marcellus shale: The case for a Pennsylvania gas fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Daniel R., II

    The relationship between shale gas development and budgetary and microeconomic externalities was studied. The extraction activity in the Barnett shaleformation provided a case study for assessing per-well highway infrastructure damage and water usage. The creation of a predictive model based upon the Barnett was applied to the Marcellus formation. The results showed support for the hypothesis that shale gas development creates negative externalities that amount to unfunded mandates and freerider problems for states and localities. Implications and policy solutions, including the case for a Pennsylvania natural gas fund, are discussed.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate, Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-07-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS worked with a builder of single- and multifamily homes in southwestern Pennsylvania (climate zone 5) to understand its methods of successfully using polyethylene sheeting over aggregate as a capillary break beneath the slab in new construction. This builder’s homes vary in terms of whether they have crawlspaces or basements. However, in both cases, the strategy protects the home from water intrusion via capillary action (e.g., water wicking into cracks and spaces in the slab), thereby helping to preserve the durability of the home.

  5. Pennsylvania's technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material experiences and studies of the oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, David J

    2015-02-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's experiences and ongoing studies related to technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry. It has been known for many years that Pennsylvania's geology is unique, with several areas having relatively high levels of natural uranium and thorium. In the 1950s, a few areas of the state were evaluated for commercial uranium production. In the late 1970s, scoping studies of radon in homes prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Radiation Protection (BRP) to begin planning for a larger state-wide radon study. The BRP and Oil and Gas Bureau also performed a TENORM study of produced water in the early 1990s for a number of conventional oil and gas wells. More recently, BRP and the Bureau of Solid Waste developed radiation monitoring regulations for all Pennsylvania solid waste disposal facilities. These were implemented in 2001, prompting another evaluation of oil and gas operations and sludge generated from the treatment of conventionally produced water and brine but mainly focused on the disposal of TENORM solid waste in the state's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D landfills. However, since 2008, the increase in volumes of gas well wastewater and levels of Ra observed in the unconventional shale gas well flow-back fracking water has compelled DEP to fully re-examine these oil and gas operations. Specifically, with BRP in the lead, a new TENORM study of oil and gas operations and related wastewater treatment operations has been initiated (), supported by an American National Standards Institute standard on TENORM () and a U.S. Government Accountability Office report on shale resource development and risks (). This study began in early 2013 and will examine the potential public and worker radiation exposure and environmental impact as well as re-evaluate TENORM waste disposal. This

  6. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-204-1600, Dental Health Associates, Paoli, Pennsylvania. [Nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, M.S.

    1985-06-01

    Area air and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for nitrous oxide at Dental Health Associates, Paoli, Pennsylvania on August 2, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a dental assistant because of general concern about the extent of nitrous oxide exposure, especially since the office was not equipped with a waste-anesthetic gas-scavenging system. The author recommends installing a waste anesthetic gas scavenging system with a dedicated exhaust. The nitrous oxide delivery and mixing system should be checked for leaks monthly and work practices for handling nitrous oxide should be improved.

  7. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. In Pennsylvania, there are 3 methods by which rights in water may be acquired: riparian ownership, prescription, and condemnation. These are discussed.

  8. Evaluación dietética de micronutrientes en niños entre 10 y 14 meses de edad Dietetic evaluation of micronutrients in children aged 10-14 months old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayleni Carrillo Selles

    2008-12-01

    behavioral development is complex. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the contribution of vitamins and minerals to the diet of children aged 10-14 months old living in Havana City. METHODS. A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2005 in health areas of Centro Habana, Marianao and Plaza de la Revolución municipalities. 80 children aged 10-14 months old were evaluated with the previous authorization of their parents. They were selected at random and no symptoms of disease were present at the moment of the study. The data were collected in dietetic surveys for 3 days in a row and they were processed in the CERES automated system. RESULTS. Levels of vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamine, pyridoxine, folic acid, calcium and zinc adjusted to the nutritional recommendations for children at this age were found. The iron intake in food was deficient. CONCLUSIONS. Generally, the main food consumed by children proved to be good sources of vitamins and minerals, although the deficient iron intake shows the need to study the frequency of appearance of iron-deficiency anemia in infants of Havana City and to use this research as a baseline for the implementation of new strategies to enrich the food for children at these ages.

  9. Estimation of regional air-quality damages from Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovitz, Aviva; Curtright, Aimee; Abramzon, Shmuel; Burger, Nicholas; Samaras, Constantine

    2013-03-01

    This letter provides a first-order estimate of conventional air pollutant emissions, and the monetary value of the associated environmental and health damages, from the extraction of unconventional shale gas in Pennsylvania. Region-wide estimated damages ranged from 7.2 to 32 million dollars for 2011. The emissions from Pennsylvania shale gas extraction represented only a few per cent of total statewide emissions, and the resulting statewide damages were less than those estimated for each of the state’s largest coal-based power plants. On the other hand, in counties where activities are concentrated, NOx emissions from all shale gas activities were 20-40 times higher than allowable for a single minor source, despite the fact that individual new gas industry facilities generally fall below the major source threshold for NOx. Most emissions are related to ongoing activities, i.e., gas production and compression, which can be expected to persist beyond initial development and which are largely unrelated to the unconventional nature of the resource. Regulatory agencies and the shale gas industry, in developing regulations and best practices, should consider air emissions from these long-term activities, especially if development occurs in more populated areas of the state where per-ton emissions damages are significantly higher.

  10. Increased traffic accident rates associated with shale gas drilling in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jove; Irving, Jennifer; Tang, Xiaoqin; Sellers, Stephen; Crisp, Joshua; Horwitz, Daniel; Muehlenbachs, Lucija; Krupnick, Alan; Carey, David

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between shale gas drilling and motor vehicle accident rates in Pennsylvania. Using publicly available data on all reported vehicle crashes in Pennsylvania, we compared accident rates in counties with and without shale gas drilling, in periods with and without intermittent drilling (using data from 2005 to 2012). Counties with drilling were matched to non-drilling counties with similar population and traffic in the pre-drilling period. Heavily drilled counties in the north experienced 15-23% higher vehicle crash rates in 2010-2012 and 61-65% higher heavy truck crash rates in 2011-2012 than control counties. We estimated 5-23% increases in crash rates when comparing months with drilling and months without, but did not find significant effects on fatalities and major injury crashes. Heavily drilled counties in the southwest showed 45-47% higher rates of fatal and major injury crashes in 2012 than control counties, but monthly comparisons of drilling activity showed no significant differences associated with drilling. Vehicle accidents have measurably increased in conjunction with shale gas drilling. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. White-tailed deer age ratios as herd management and predator impact measures in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Christopher S.; Norton, Andrew S.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Fleegle, Jeannine T.; Wallingford, Bret D.

    2011-01-01

    A review of the Pennsylvania Game Commission's (PGC) deer management program and public concern about predator impacts on deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations compelled the PGC to investigate the role of age ratios in developing management recommendations. Age ratios, such as proportion of juveniles in the antlerless harvest, may provide an index to population productivity and predator impacts. We estimated proportion of juveniles in the antlerless harvest from hunter-killed deer, population trends using the Pennsylvania (USA) sex–age–kill model, and reproduction from road-killed females. Using these estimates and a simulation model, we concluded that no single age-ratio value would serve as a reliable measure of population status. Wildlife Management Unit-specific trends in proportion of juveniles in the antlerless harvest and population trends provided the most relevant management information. We also provide an example decision chart to guide management actions in response to declining age ratios in the harvest. Although predator management activities and juvenile survival studies are often desired by the public, our decision-chart example indicated a number of deer management options exist before investing resources in predator management activities and juvenile survival studies.

  12. Use of bioindicators and passive sampling devices to evaluate ambient ozone concentrations in north central Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuska, D.E.; Skelly, J.M.; Ferdinand, J.A.; Stevenson, R.E.; Savage, J.E.; Mulik, J.D.; Hines, A

    2003-09-01

    Passive samplers and bioindicator plants detect ozone air pollution in north central Pennsylvania. - Ambient concentrations of tropospheric ozone and ozone-induced injury to black cherry (Prunus serotina) and common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) were determined in north central Pennsylvania from 29 May to 5 September 2000 and from 28 May to 18 September 2001. Ogawa passive ozone samplers were utilized within openings at 15 forested sites of which six were co-located with TECO model 49 continuous ozone monitors. A significant positive correlation was observed between the Ogawa passive samplers and the TECO model 49 continuous ozone monitors for the 2000 (r=0.959) and 2001 (r=0.979) seasons. In addition, a significant positive correlation existed in 2000 and 2001 between ozone concentration and elevation (r=0.720) and (r=0.802), respectively. Classic ozone-induced symptoms were observed on black cherry and common milkweed. In 2000, initial injury was observed in early June, whereas for the 2001 season, initial injury was initially observed in late June. During both seasons, injury was noted at most sites by mid- to late-July. Soil moisture potential was measured for the 2001 season and a significant positive relationship (P<0.001) showed that injury to black cherry was a function of cumulative ozone concentrations and available soil moisture.

  13. Balancing investments in Federally Qualified Health Centers and Medicaid for improved access and coverage in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Paul M; Lee, Hyunji; Scherrer, Christina; Swann, Julie L

    2014-12-01

    Two common health disparities in the US include a lack of access to care and a lack of insurance coverage. To help address these disparities, healthcare reform will provide $11B to expand Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) over the next 5 years. In 2014, Medicaid rules will be modified so that more people will become eligible. There are, however, important tradeoffs in the investment in these two programs. We find a balanced investment between FQHC expansion and relaxing Medicaid eligibility to improve both access (by increasing the number of FQHCs) and coverage (by FQHC and Medicaid expansion) for the state of Pennsylvania. The comparison is achieved by integrating multi-objective mathematical models with several public data sets that allow for specific estimations of healthcare need. Demand is estimated based on current access and coverage status in order to target groups to be considered preferentially. Results show that for Pennsylvania, FQHCs are more cost effective than Medicaid if we invest all of the resources in just one policy. However, we find a better investment point balancing those two policies. This point is approximately where the additional expenses incurred from relaxing Medicaid eligibility equals the investment in FQHC expansion.

  14. Data compilation and assessment for water resources in Pennsylvania state forest and park lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (PaDCNR), available electronic data were compiled for Pennsylvania state lands (state forests and parks) to allow PaDCNR to initially determine if data exist to make an objective evaluation of water resources for specific basins. The data compiled included water-quantity and water-quality data and sample locations for benthic macroinvertebrates within state-owned lands (including a 100-meter buffer around each land parcel) in Pennsylvania. In addition, internet links or contacts for geographic information system coverages pertinent to water-resources studies also were compiled. Water-quantity and water-quality data primarily available through January 2007 were compiled and summarized for site types that included streams, lakes, ground-water wells, springs, and precipitation. Data were categorized relative to 35 watershed boundaries defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection for resource-management purposes. The primary sources of continuous water-quantity data for Pennsylvania state lands were the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Weather Service (NWS). The USGS has streamflow data for 93 surface-water sites located in state lands; 38 of these sites have continuous-recording data available. As of January 2007, 22 of these 38 streamflow-gaging stations were active; the majority of active gaging stations have over 40 years of continuous record. The USGS database also contains continuous ground-water elevation data for 32 wells in Pennsylvania state lands, 18 of which were active as of January 2007. Sixty-eight active precipitation stations (primarily from the NWS network) are located in state lands. The four sources of available water-quality data for Pennsylvania state lands were the USGS, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PaDEP), and

  15. Public perceptions of low-level waste risks -- Lessons learned in Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornsife, W.; Serie, P.

    1989-11-01

    People in Pennsylvania are no different than citizens of other eastern states, other states, or any place in the world--they care most deeply about their health, the safety and security of their families, their investments, and their autonomy. How a particular risk is perceived depends on how it is believed to affect those valued possessions. The perception of risk from exposure to the radioactivity contained in low-level radioactive low-level waste disposal facility. The Commonwealth`s program, administered by the Department of Environmental Resources, places high priority on public dialogue on this issue. This paper discusses the Department`s program to develop and promulgate low-level waste regulations, provide a framework for selection of a qualified disposal facility operator, contract with the selected firm, and oversee its activities in siting, licensing, constructing, and operating the facility. This facility will meet the needs of the states of the Appalachian States Compact, including, in addition to Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. The focus of the paper is on the public information and outreach program accomplished to date, and the lessons learned regarding public perceptions of risk.

  16. Establishing a Social Media Presence and Network for the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.; Merkel, C.

    2011-12-01

    In Spring 2011, the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA) became an official state chapter of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA). Established with funds from the National Science Foundation, PAESTA is focused on advancing, extending, improving, and coordinating all levels of Earth Science education in Pennsylvania. Our goal is to reach earth science educators across Pennsylvania and beyond who are not physically co-located. An early priority of this new organization was to establish a web presence (http://www.paesta.psu.edu/) and to build an online community to support PAESTA activities and members. PAESTA exists as a distributed group made up of educators across Pennsylvania. Many initial members were participants in summer Earth and space science workshops held at Penn State University, which has allowed for face-to-face connections and network building. PAESTA will hold sessions and a reception at the Pennsylvania Science Teachers Association annual conference. The work of the group also takes place virtually via the PAESTA organizational website, providing professional development opportunities and Earth Science related teaching resources and links. As PAESTA is still in the very early days of its formation, we are utilizing a variety of social media tools to disseminate information and to promote asynchronous discussions around Earth and space science topics and pedagogy. The site features discussion boards for members and non-members to post comments along a specific topic or theme. For example, each month the PAESTA site features an article from one of the National Science Teacher's Association (NSTA)'s journals and encourages teachers to discuss and apply the pedagogical approach or strategy from the article to their classroom situation. We send email blasts so that members learn about organizational news and professional development opportunities. We also leverage in-person training sessions and conference sessions

  17. Environmental gamma radiation monitoring around nuclear reactor of Pennsylvania State University; Monitoracao em tempo real dos niveis de radiacao gama nos arredores do reator nuclear da Pennsylvania State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umisedo, Nancy K. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Granlund, Rodger W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Helath Physics Office; Jester, William A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University Health Physics Office environmental gamma radiation monitoring with thermoluminescent dosimeters in and around Breazeale Nuclear Reactor is presented. The source of unexpected gamma radiation levels is studied considering that certain locations have high levels which do not seem to be related to the operation of the nuclear reactor 2 refs., 4 figs.

  18. After 25 years, what does the Pennsylvania Regeneration Study tell us about oak/hickory forests under stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; James A. Westfall; Patrick H. Brose; Shawn L. Lehman; Randall S. Morin; Todd E. Ristau; Alejandro A. Royo; Susan L. Stout

    2017-01-01

    The Pennsylvania Regeneration Study was initiated in 1989 because of concerns about a long history of stress on oak/hickory (Quercus/Carya) forests from herbivory and other factors. The study, which addresses the need for landscape-level information about regeneration quality and abundance, comprises a suite of regeneration indicator measurements...

  19. Assessment of freshwater withdrawals and availability for Marcellus shale natural gas development: a case study in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick C. Eisenhauer; Nicolas P. Zegre; Samuel J. Lamont

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate surface water withdrawals used for Marcellus shale natural gas development and to assess potential impacts on water yield, a regional water balance model was developed for the Pine Creek watershed, located primarily in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Marcellus shale development has increased rapidly in Lycoming County since 2007. We used precipitation,...

  20. Developing a Contemporary Dairy Foods Extension Program: A Training and Technical Resource Needs Assessment of Pennsylvania Dairy Foods Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrko, Joseph; Kaylegian, Kerry E.

    2015-01-01

    Growth in the dairy industry and the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act have renewed interest in dairy foods processing extension positions. A needs assessment survey was sent to Pennsylvania dairy processors and raw milk providers to guide priorities for a dairy foods extension program. The successful development and delivery of…

  1. An Investigation of Principals and Assistant Principals in Pennsylvania and the Impact of Transitional Support Programs on Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, W. David

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the GROW program on the intrinsic, extrinsic, and the general job satisfaction of principals and assistant principals in Pennsylvania. The impact of the variables of year in position, age, gender, level of work, location of school, and present degree was examined; the impact of…

  2. 75 FR 6635 - Foreign-Trade Zone 33-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Expansion of Manufacturing Authority, Subzone 33E...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 33--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Expansion of Manufacturing Authority, Subzone 33E--DNP IMS America Corporation (Thermal Transfer Ribbon Printer Rolls), Mount Pleasant...

  3. Elemental concentrations in foliage of red maple, red oak, and white oak in relation to atmospheric deposition in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. D. Davis; J. M. Skelly; B. L. Nash

    1995-01-01

    Foliage was sampled in June and late August-early September in 1988 and 1989 from the outer crowns of codominant red maple (Acer rubrum L.), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), and white oak (Q. alba L.) trees in forest stands along an atmospheric deposition gradient in north-central Pennsylvania. Leaf samples...

  4. Retrospective Case Study in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Study of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing On Drinking Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the retrospective case study for northeastern Pennsylvania, which was conducted in Bradford and Susquehanna Counties where some of the most intensive unconventional gas production from the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale has occurred. Gas production from the M...

  5. 75 FR 1724 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of... grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin, and provides growers... recommendation will include an analysis of the pertinent factors and issues, including the impact of a proposed...

  6. An inventory of suspended sediment stations and type of data analysis for Pennsylvania streams, 1947-1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Arthur N.; Commings, Allen B.

    1972-01-01

    Data concerning suspended sediment concentrations and loads, frequency of occurrence of suspended sediment concentrations, and long-term trends of annual suspended sediment loads are important tools for today's environmental manager. These data are required background for those concerned with establishing and enforcing erosion and sedimentation control regulations and sediment concentration or turbidity standards for water-quality criteria, or those concerned with designing for adequate long-term water storage in reservoirs (sediment load), for efficient municipal and industrial plant operation (sediment concentration frequency), etc.This is a compilation of the location, period of record, sampling frequency and type of data synthesis for suspended sediment carried by Pennsylvania streams. Figures 1 and 2 show the approximate locations of sediment sampling stations in Pennsylvania. All of the sediment data listed were collected by the U. S. Geological Survey mainly in cooperation with the following Federal, State, and local agencies.Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources     Bureau of Engineering and Construction     Soil and Water Conservation CommissionPennsylvania Department of TransportationCity of PhiladelphiaBrandywine Valley AssociationDelaware Geological SurveyConestoga Valley AssociationLehigh County Soil and Water Conservation DistrictCorps of Engineers, U. S. Army

  7. Technical Skill Attainment and Post-Program Outcomes: An Analysis of Pennsylvania Secondary Career and Technical Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staklis, Sandra; Klein, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) has required all students concentrating in career and technical education (CTE) programs to complete a standardized technical skill assessment at or near the end of their program. Results of technical skill assessments are used for a number of purposes, including recognizing…

  8. Describing Characteristics of Pennsylvania's "Schools to Watch®": Focusing on Social Equity and Developmental Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Carol S.; Generett, Gretchen Givens; de Almeida Ramos, Renata

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how schools address two specific criteria of the Schools to Watch® (STW) program: Social equity and developmental responsiveness. Descriptions of replicable practices, program/school characteristics, and initiatives created by each of the STW sites in Pennsylvania were analyzed. The data also includes…

  9. 33 CFR 165.820 - Security Zone; Ohio River Mile, 34.6 to 35.1, Shippingport, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Ohio River Mile... Guard District § 165.820 Security Zone; Ohio River Mile, 34.6 to 35.1, Shippingport, Pennsylvania. (a) Location. The following area is a security zone: The waters of the Ohio River, extending 200 feet from the...

  10. 75 FR 52527 - The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania; Supplemental Notice That.... This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of The Trustees of the University of... intervenor must create and validate an eRegistration account using the eRegistration link. Select the eFiling...

  11. Historische Technikakzeptanz – als kontextualisierende Technikzukunftsforschung am Fallbeispiel der T1-Duplexklasse der Pennsylvania Railroad, 1942–1951

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunze, Rolf-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents the brief history of the last technological development of the steam age on US railroad tracks: the T1 duplex class of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1942–1951. Referring to the methods of today’s technological assessment, the article is questioning a teleological interpretation of the last US passenger tratin steam locomotive as a failing innovation.

  12. 77 FR 33303 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ...: the definition of ``Handle''; and regulations concerning ``Marketing Policy'' and ``Grower Diversion... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin; Order Amending Marketing Order No. 930 AGENCY...

  13. Patterns of exotic plant invasions in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest using intensive Forest Inventory and Analysis plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia D. Huebner; Randall S. Morin; Ann Zurbriggen; Robert L. White

    2009-01-01

    Intensive Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data collected in the Allegheny National Forest (ANF), Pennsylvania, between 1999 and 2006 were evaluated for their ability to predict ANF's vulnerability to invasion by exotic plants. A total of 26 variables classified by biotic, abiotic, or disturbance characteristics were examined. Likelihood of colonization by...

  14. Quantifying methane emissions from natural gas production in north-eastern Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. R. Barkley

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas infrastructure releases methane (CH4, a potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. The estimated emission rate associated with the production and transportation of natural gas is uncertain, hindering our understanding of its greenhouse footprint. This study presents a new application of inverse methodology for estimating regional emission rates from natural gas production and gathering facilities in north-eastern Pennsylvania. An inventory of CH4 emissions was compiled for major sources in Pennsylvania. This inventory served as input emission data for the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry enabled (WRF-Chem, and atmospheric CH4 mole fraction fields were generated at 3 km resolution. Simulated atmospheric CH4 enhancements from WRF-Chem were compared to observations obtained from a 3-week flight campaign in May 2015. Modelled enhancements from sources not associated with upstream natural gas processes were assumed constant and known and therefore removed from the optimization procedure, creating a set of observed enhancements from natural gas only. Simulated emission rates from unconventional production were then adjusted to minimize the mismatch between aircraft observations and model-simulated mole fractions for 10 flights. To evaluate the method, an aircraft mass balance calculation was performed for four flights where conditions permitted its use. Using the model optimization approach, the weighted mean emission rate from unconventional natural gas production and gathering facilities in north-eastern Pennsylvania approach is found to be 0.36 % of total gas production, with a 2σ confidence interval between 0.27 and 0.45 % of production. Similarly, the mean emission estimates using the aircraft mass balance approach are calculated to be 0.40 % of regional natural gas production, with a 2σ confidence interval between 0.08 and 0.72 % of production. These emission rates as a percent of production are

  15. Quantifying methane emissions from natural gas production in north-eastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Zachary R.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Davis, Kenneth J.; Deng, Aijun; Miles, Natasha L.; Richardson, Scott J.; Cao, Yanni; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Smith, MacKenzie; Kort, Eric A.; Schwietzke, Stefan; Murphy, Thomas; Cervone, Guido; Martins, Douglas; Maasakkers, Joannes D.

    2017-11-01

    Natural gas infrastructure releases methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. The estimated emission rate associated with the production and transportation of natural gas is uncertain, hindering our understanding of its greenhouse footprint. This study presents a new application of inverse methodology for estimating regional emission rates from natural gas production and gathering facilities in north-eastern Pennsylvania. An inventory of CH4 emissions was compiled for major sources in Pennsylvania. This inventory served as input emission data for the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry enabled (WRF-Chem), and atmospheric CH4 mole fraction fields were generated at 3 km resolution. Simulated atmospheric CH4 enhancements from WRF-Chem were compared to observations obtained from a 3-week flight campaign in May 2015. Modelled enhancements from sources not associated with upstream natural gas processes were assumed constant and known and therefore removed from the optimization procedure, creating a set of observed enhancements from natural gas only. Simulated emission rates from unconventional production were then adjusted to minimize the mismatch between aircraft observations and model-simulated mole fractions for 10 flights. To evaluate the method, an aircraft mass balance calculation was performed for four flights where conditions permitted its use. Using the model optimization approach, the weighted mean emission rate from unconventional natural gas production and gathering facilities in north-eastern Pennsylvania approach is found to be 0.36 % of total gas production, with a 2σ confidence interval between 0.27 and 0.45 % of production. Similarly, the mean emission estimates using the aircraft mass balance approach are calculated to be 0.40 % of regional natural gas production, with a 2σ confidence interval between 0.08 and 0.72 % of production. These emission rates as a percent of production are lower than rates found in any

  16. Traits and Training: Attributes and Skills of Pennsylvania Academic Library Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell A. Hall

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available What makes a good library manager? Is a good library manager born or bred?  To find out, Pennsylvania academic library managers were surveyed to determine their education and training backgrounds. The survey also illuminates the skills and personal traits these managers find most important in managing an academic library. Interpersonal skills and integrity were found to be the most important traits for an academic library manager to possess. Human resources and personnel issues were found to be the most difficult issues faced by academic library managers. In addition to presenting a snapshot of what today’s academic library leadership qualifications look like, the study will also provide future managers with an idea of what sort of training they should be seeking.

  17. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Babcock and Wilcox, Leechburg, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-02-14

    This report characterizes, as far as possible, the solid radioactive wastes generated by Babcock and Wilcox`s Park Township Plutonium Facility near Leechburg, Pennsylvania that were sent to retrievable storage at the Hanford Site. Solid waste as defined in this document is any containerized or self-contained material that has been declared waste. The objective is a description of characteristics of solid wastes that are or will be managed by the Restoration and Upgrades Program; gaseous or liquid effluents are discussed only at a summary level This characterization is of particular interest in the planning of transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, including the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, because Babcock and Wilcox generated greater than 2.5 percent of the total volume of TRU waste currently stored at the Hanford Site.

  18. Effects of spray-irrigated municipal wastewater on a small watershed in Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreffler, Curtis L.; Galeone, Daniel G.

    2005-01-01

    Spray irrigation is a method for disposing of secondary treated municipal wastewater by spraying it on the land surface (fig. 1). The sprayed wastewater either evaporates into the air, soaks into the soil, or percolates through the soil and recharges the ground water. Land application of wastewater has advantages over conventional means of disposal by direct discharge to streams because the wastewater recharges the ground-water system and increases base flow in streams. Additional benefits are derived from the "natural" treatment of the wastewater that takes place in the soil when plants and other biota remove some nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from the wastewater (Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, 2003). The removal of nutrients is one advantage spray irrigation has to conventional disposal methods like instream discharge.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Geographic and temporal prevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Walter O; Heagy, Robin L; Johnson, Joshua B; Marcantuno, Richard; Nolan, Thomas J

    2014-10-01

    In autumn of 2010 we collected fecal samples from the rectums of 89 trapped or road-killed Pennsylvania raccoons (Procyon lotor). Similar samples were collected in the summer and autumn of 2011 from 383 raccoons. Fecal samples were stored in 10% formalin until examined. Using saturated sugar flotation and a direct smear, we found Baylisascaris procyonis eggs in 38% of 2010 samples and 32.9% of 2011 samples. Prevalence in raccoons was greater in autumn than in summer and greater in juveniles than in adults; there was not a statistically significant difference between sexes. Infected raccoons were found in 54 of the 65 counties from which samples were recovered (a mean of 5.9 [range 1-12] raccoons were examined per county). The prevalences were similar in all regions of the state.

  1. Chemical quality of surface water in the Allegheny River basin, Pennsylvania and New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarren, Edward F.

    1967-01-01

    The Allegheny River is the principal source of water to many industries and to communities in the upper Ohio River Valley. The river and its many tributaries pass through 19 counties in northwestern and western Pennsylvania. The population in these counties exceeds 3 million. A major user of the Allegheny River is the city of Pittsburgh, which has a population greater than The Allegheny River is as basic to the economy of the upper Ohio River Valley in western Pennsylvania as are the rich deposits of bituminous coal, gas, and oil that underlie the drainage basin. During the past 5 years many streams that flow into the Allegheny have been low flowing because of droughts affecting much of the eastern United States. Consequently, the concentration of solutes in some streams has been unusually high because of wastes from coal mines and oil wells. These and other water-quality problems in the Allegheny River drainage basin are affecting the economic future of some areas in western Pennsylvania. Because of environmental factors such as climate, geology, and land and water uses, surface-water quality varies considerably throughout the river basin. The natural quality of headwater streams, for example, is affected by saltwater wastes from petroleum production. One of the streams most affected is Kinzua Creek, which had 2,900 parts per million chloride in a sample taken at Westline on September 2, 1959. However, after such streams as the Conewango, Brokenstraw, Tionesta, Oil, and French Creeks merge with the Allegheny River, the dissolved-solids and chloride concentrations are reduced by dilution. Central segments of the main river receive water from the Clarion River, Redbank, Mahoning, and Crooked Creeks after they have crossed the coal fields of west-central Pennsylvania. At times, therefore, these streams carry coal-mine wastes that are acidic. The Kiskiminetas River, which crosses these coal fields, discharged sulfuric acid into the Allegheny at a rate of 299 tons a

  2. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-392-1597, Syntex Dental Products, Inc. , Audubon, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrostek, W.J.

    1985-06-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, mercury, bacteria, and fungi at Syntex Dental Products, Incorporated, Audubon, Pennsylvania in July and August, 1984, and January, 1985. A confidential evaluation was requested because of prolonged employee complaints of eye and respiratory irritation. Ventilation rates and relative humidity of the indoor air were measured. The author concludes that chemical exposures at the facility are not exceeding the OSHA standards. There is a possibility that certain susceptible individuals may be affected by the high relative humidity, lack of outside air, and microorganisms. The author recommends increasing the supply of outside air to the ventilation system, maintaining relative humidity at about 50%, and treating microorganism infested materials with proprietary biocides.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizas in the anthracite and bituminous coal wastes of Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daft, M.J.; Hacskaylo, E.

    1976-08-01

    The extent of endomycorrhizal infection in herbaceous plants growing on the anthracite and bituminous areas in Pennsylvania was investigated and the possible role of these in plant colonization of coal spoil material assessed. Plants were collected from six sites on three different spoil areas. Most of the herbaceous plants sampled were infected with arbuscular mycorrhizas. Five of the plant species that grew naturally on both types of waste material were both nodulated and mycorrhizal. Gigaspora gigantea and maize infected with mycorrhiza grew on anthracite waste after adjustment of the pH from 4.1 to 6.4, but did not grow on bituminous waste even after the pH was raised. Lucerne that was nodulated and infected with mycorrhiza also grew well on the anthracite waste after the pH was raised. A discussion of the potential importance of arbuscular mycorrhizas in revegetation of coal wastes is included.

  4. Yersinia enterocolitica infections associated with improperly pasteurized milk products: southwest Pennsylvania, March-August, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenberger, A H; Gronostaj, M P; Yee, G Y; Johnson, L M; Lando, J F; Voorhees, R E; Waller, K; Weltman, A C; Moll, M; Lyss, S B; Cadwell, B L; Gladney, L M; Ostroff, S M

    2014-08-01

    In July 2011, a cluster of Yersinia enterocolitica infections was detected in southwestern Pennsylvania, USA. We investigated the outbreak's source and scope in order to prevent further transmission. Twenty-two persons were diagnosed with yersiniosis; 16 of whom reported consuming pasteurized dairy products from dairy A. Pasteurized milk and food samples were collected from this dairy. Y. enterocolitica was isolated from two products. Isolates from both food samples and available clinical isolates from nine dairy A consumers were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Environmental and microbiological investigations were performed at dairy A and pasteurization deficiencies were noted. Because consumption of pasteurized milk is common and outbreaks have the potential to become large, public health interventions such as consumer advisories or closure of the dairy must be implemented quickly to prevent additional cases if epidemiological or laboratory evidence implicates pasteurized milk as the outbreak source.

  5. Meltwater channel scars and the extent of Mid-Pleistocene glaciation in central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Ben

    2017-10-01

    High-resolution digital topographic data permit morphological analyses of glacial processes in detail that was previously infeasible. High-level glaciofluvial erosional scars in central Pennsylvania, identified and delimited using LiDAR data, define the approximate ice depth during a pre-Wisconsin advance, > 770,000 BP, on a landscape unaffected by Wisconsin glaciation. Distinctive scars on the prows of anticlinal ridges at 175-350 m above the valley floor locate the levels of subice meltwater channels. A two-component planar GIS model of the ice surface is derived using these features and intersected with a digital model of contemporary topography to create a glacial limit map. The map is compared to published maps, demonstrating the limits of conventional sediment-based mapping. Additional distinctive meltwater features that were cut during deglaciation are modeled in a similar fashion.

  6. The Pennsylvania domiciliary care experiment: I. Impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S; Morris, J N

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports findings concerning the impact on quality of life of a case management focused program of small board and care facilities serving aging, mental health, and mental retardation adult target populations--the Pennsylvania Domiciliary Care Program. Program participants from the counties in which the Domiciliary Care Program was initiated were matched with persons residing in similar counties without the program who were comparable on a large array of characteristics prior to program initiation. Conducted separately by target group, 10-month follow-up assessments provided the basis for determining impact. In general, the effects were positive, particularly with respect to meeting program quality of life goals (providing needed services, improving living conditions, increasing community integration, and reducing institutional days); the effects were more positive for the aging and mental health than for the mentally retarded target populations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:6405641

  7. Adult volunteerism in Pennsylvania 4-H natural resources programs for youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sanford Sherrick

    2001-07-01

    Pennsylvania's 4-H Youth Development Program relies on adult volunteers to reach youth with educational information and opportunities. Finding adults willing to do this volunteer work is challenging. This study looks at the current status of adult volunteerism with natural resources 4-H projects, and seeks to understand potential volunteers. The literature has much to offer in regards to general volunteer trends, management, motivations, and task preferences; however, few studies focus on volunteers in natural resources or environmental education. A telephone survey conducted with county 4-H agents revealed that only 3.2% of Pennsylvania's 4-H volunteers work with natural resources projects in 56 out of 67 counties, and that very few volunteers have any formal background in natural resources. Semi-structured interviews with 41 adult volunteers currently working with natural resources projects explored volunteer demographics, history, program design preferences, and ideas for seeking more volunteers. Findings from the telephone survey and the semi-structured interviews were used to generate a mail survey with large, random samples from three population groups: (1) 4-H Volunteers, (2) 4-H Parents, and (3) Natural Resources Professionals. Confidence with youth and subject matter, and adult willingness to volunteer was explored for each of the groups in relation to background, demographic characteristics, motivational needs, past and present volunteer activity, personal interests, and program design importance. Natural resources subject matter confidence was shown to be the most significant variable determining willingness to volunteer for all three groups. The variables that contributed to subject matter and youth confidence varied for each population. Key variables effecting willingness to volunteer included outdoor activity level, personal interest in natural resources, the need to fulfill feelings of social responsibility, and confidence with youth. Program design

  8. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Allegheny and Susquehanna Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004--2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Coalbed methane, which is sometimes extracted using the same technique, is commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and is frequently developed in clusters of wells across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Allegheny County and Susquehanna County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  9. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Somerset and Westmoreland Counties, Pennsylvania,2004--2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheim, L.E.; Slonecker, E.T.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Somerset County and Westmoreland County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  10. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Sullivan and Wyoming Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Sullivan County and Wyoming County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  11. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Lackawanna and Wayne Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheim, L.E.; Slonecker, E.T.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Lackawanna County and Wayne County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  12. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Fayette and Lycoming Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.; Gillenwater, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Fayette County and Lycoming County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  13. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Armstrong and Indiana Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Armstrong County and Indiana County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  14. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Beaver and Butler Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Slonecker, E. Terry; Milheim, Lesley E.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Beaver County and Butler County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  15. Evaluation of genetic population structure of smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River basin, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Megan K.; Bartron, Meredith L.; Wertz, Timothy; Niles, Jonathan M.; Shaw, Cassidy H.; Wagner, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    The Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu was introduced into the Susquehanna River basin, Pennsylvania, nearly 150 years ago. Since introduction, it has become an economically and ecologically important species that supports popular recreational fisheries. It is also one of the most abundant top predators in the system. Currently, there is no information on the level of genetic diversity or genetic structuring that may have occurred since introduction. An understanding of genetic diversity is important for the delineation of management units and investigation of gene flow at various management scales. The goals of this research were to investigate population genetic structure of Smallmouth Bass at sites within the Susquehanna River basin and to assess genetic differentiation relative to Smallmouth Bass at an out-of-basin site (Allegheny River, Pennsylvania) located within the species’ native range. During spring 2015, fin clips (n = 1,034) were collected from adults at 11 river sites and 13 tributary sites in the Susquehanna River basin and at one site on the Allegheny River. Fin clips were genotyped at 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Based on our results, adults sampled throughout the Susquehanna River basin did not represent separate genetic populations. There were only subtle differences in genetic diversity among sites (mean pairwise genetic differentiation index FST = 0.012), and there was an overall lack of population differentiation (K = 3 admixed populations). The greatest genetic differentiation was observed between fish collected from the out-of-basin site and those from the Susquehanna River basin sites. Knowledge that separate genetic populations of Smallmouth Bass do not exist in the Susquehanna River basin is valuable information for fisheries management in addition to providing baseline genetic data on an introduced sport fish population.

  16. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Bradford and Washington Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Malizia, A.R.; Marr, D.A.; Fisher, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in the area of Pennsylvania. Coalbed methane, which is sometimes extracted using the same technique, is often located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and is frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Bradford County and Washington County, Pennsylvania, between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is used to quantify these changes and are included in this publication.

  17. Survival after acute hemodialysis in Pennsylvania, 2005-2007: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Sarah J; Cohen, Elan D; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Unruh, Mark L; Barnato, Amber E

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about acute hemodialysis in the US. Here we describe predictors of receipt of acute hemodialysis in one state and estimate the marginal impact of acute hemodialysis on survival after accounting for confounding due to illness severity. This is a retrospective cohort study of acute-care hospitalizations in Pennsylvania from October 2005 to December 2007 using data from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council. Exposure variable is acute hemodialysis; dependent variable is survival following acute hemodialysis. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine propensity to receive acute hemodialysis and then, for a Cox proportional hazards model, matched acute hemodialysis and non-acute hemodialysis patients 1∶5 on this propensity. In 2,131,248 admissions of adults without end-stage renal disease, there were 6,657 instances of acute hemodialysis. In analyses adjusted for predicted probability of death upon admission plus other covariates and stratified on age, being male, black, and insured were independent predictors of receipt of acute hemodialysis. One-year post-admission mortality was 43% for those receiving acute hemodialysis, compared to 13% among those not receiving acute hemodialysis. After matching on propensity to receive acute hemodialysis and adjusting for predicted probability of death upon admission, patients who received acute hemodialysis had a higher risk of death than patients who did not over at least 1 year of follow-up (hazard ratio 1·82, 95% confidence interval 1·68-1·97). In a populous US state, receipt of acute hemodialysis varied by age, sex, race, and insurance status even after adjustment for illness severity. In a comparison of patients with similar propensity to receive acute hemodialysis, those who did receive it were less likely to survive than those who did not. These findings raise questions about reasons for lack of benefit.

  18. Survival after acute hemodialysis in Pennsylvania, 2005-2007: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Ramer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about acute hemodialysis in the US. Here we describe predictors of receipt of acute hemodialysis in one state and estimate the marginal impact of acute hemodialysis on survival after accounting for confounding due to illness severity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of acute-care hospitalizations in Pennsylvania from October 2005 to December 2007 using data from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council. Exposure variable is acute hemodialysis; dependent variable is survival following acute hemodialysis. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine propensity to receive acute hemodialysis and then, for a Cox proportional hazards model, matched acute hemodialysis and non-acute hemodialysis patients 1∶5 on this propensity. RESULTS: In 2,131,248 admissions of adults without end-stage renal disease, there were 6,657 instances of acute hemodialysis. In analyses adjusted for predicted probability of death upon admission plus other covariates and stratified on age, being male, black, and insured were independent predictors of receipt of acute hemodialysis. One-year post-admission mortality was 43% for those receiving acute hemodialysis, compared to 13% among those not receiving acute hemodialysis. After matching on propensity to receive acute hemodialysis and adjusting for predicted probability of death upon admission, patients who received acute hemodialysis had a higher risk of death than patients who did not over at least 1 year of follow-up (hazard ratio 1·82, 95% confidence interval 1·68-1·97. CONCLUSIONS: In a populous US state, receipt of acute hemodialysis varied by age, sex, race, and insurance status even after adjustment for illness severity. In a comparison of patients with similar propensity to receive acute hemodialysis, those who did receive it were less likely to survive than those who did not. These findings raise questions about reasons for lack of

  19. Occupancy patterns of regionally declining grassland sparrow populations in a forested Pennsylvania landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jason M; Diefenbach, Duane R

    2014-06-01

    Organisms can be affected by processes in the surrounding landscape outside the boundary of habitat areas and by local vegetation characteristics. There is substantial interest in understanding how these processes affect populations of grassland birds, which have experienced substantial population declines. Much of our knowledge regarding patterns of occupancy and density stem from prairie systems, whereas relatively little is known regarding how occurrence and abundance of grassland birds vary in reclaimed surface mine grasslands. Using distance sampling and single-season occupancy models, we investigated how the occupancy probability of Grasshopper (Ammodramus savannarum) and Henslow's Sparrows (A. henslowii) on 61 surface mine grasslands (1591 ha) in Pennsylvania changed from 2002 through 2011 in response to landscape, grassland, and local vegetation characteristics . A subset (n = 23; 784 ha) of those grasslands were surveyed in 2002, and we estimated changes in sparrow density and vegetation across 10 years. Grasshopper and Henslow's Sparrow populations declined 72% and 49%, respectively from 2002 to 2011, whereas overall woody vegetation density increased 2.6 fold. Henslow's Sparrows avoided grasslands with perimeter-area ratios ≥0.141 km/ha and woody shrub densities ≥0.04 shrubs/m(2). Both species occupied grasslands ≤13 ha, but occupancy probability declined with increasing grassland perimeter-area ratio and woody shrub density. Grassland size, proximity to nearest neighboring grassland (x = 0.2 km), and surrounding landscape composition at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 km were not parsimonious predictors of occupancy probability for either species. Our results suggest that reclaimed surface mine grasslands, without management intervention, are ephemeral habitats for Grasshopper and Henslow's Sparrows. Given the forecasted decline in surface coal production for Pennsylvania, it is likely that both species will continue to decline in our study region for the

  20. Just fracking: a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Emily; Bell, Derek

    2016-02-01

    This letter presents a distributive environmental justice analysis of unconventional gas development in the area of Pennsylvania lying over the Marcellus Shale, the largest shale gas formation in play in the United States. The extraction of shale gas using unconventional wells, which are hydraulically fractured (fracking), has increased dramatically since 2005. As the number of wells has grown, so have concerns about the potential public health effects on nearby communities. These concerns make shale gas development an environmental justice issue. This letter examines whether the hazards associated with proximity to wells and the economic benefits of shale gas production are fairly distributed. We distinguish two types of distributive environmental justice: traditional and benefit sharing. We ask the traditional question: are there a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells in Pennsylvania? However, we extend this analysis in two ways: we examine income distribution and level of education; and we compare before and after shale gas development. This contributes to discussions of benefit sharing by showing how the income distribution of the population has changed. We use a binary dasymetric technique to remap the data from the 2000 US Census and the 2009-2013 American Communities Survey and combine that data with a buffer containment analysis of unconventional wells to compare the characteristics of the population living nearer to unconventional wells with those further away before and after shale gas development. Our analysis indicates that there is no evidence of traditional distributive environmental injustice: there is not a disproportionate number of minority or low-income residents in areas near to unconventional wells. However, our analysis is consistent with the claim that there is benefit sharing distributive environmental injustice: the income distribution of the population nearer to shale gas wells

  1. Organic and inorganic composition and microbiology of produced waters from Pennsylvania shale gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulically fractured shales are becoming an increasingly important source of natural gas production in the United States. This process has been known to create up to 420 gallons of produced water (PW) per day, but the volume varies depending on the formation, and the characteristics of individual hydraulic fracture. PW from hydraulic fracturing of shales are comprised of injected fracturing fluids and natural formation waters in proportions that change over time. Across the state of Pennsylvania, shale gas production is booming; therefore, it is important to assess the variability in PW chemistry and microbiology across this geographical span. We quantified the inorganic and organic chemical composition and microbial communities in PW samples from 13 shale gas wells in north central Pennsylvania. Microbial abundance was generally low (66–9400 cells/mL). Non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) was high (7–31 mg/L) relative to typical shallow groundwater, and the presence of organic acid anions (e.g., acetate, formate, and pyruvate) indicated microbial activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in four samples (∼1 to 11.7 μg/L): benzene and toluene in the Burket sample, toluene in two Marcellus samples, and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in one Marcellus sample. VOCs can be either naturally occurring or from industrial activity, making the source of VOCs unclear. Despite the addition of biocides during hydraulic fracturing, H2S-producing, fermenting, and methanogenic bacteria were cultured from PW samples. The presence of culturable bacteria was not associated with salinity or location; although organic compound concentrations and time in production were correlated with microbial activity. Interestingly, we found that unlike the inorganic chemistry, PW organic chemistry and microbial viability were highly variable across the 13 wells sampled, which can have important implications for the reuse and handling of these fluids

  2. Phase III (final) evaluation report : national evaluation of the FY01 earmark, area transportation authority of North Central Pennsylvania--regional GIS/ITS initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    This report presents the results of the United States Department of Transportation evaluation of a federally : funded earmark project implemented by the Area Transportation Authority of North Central Pennsylvania : (ATA). The project implemented a su...

  3. Chromite and other mineral deposits in serpentine rocks of the Piedmont Upland, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearre, Nancy C.; Heyl, Allen V.

    1960-01-01

    The Piedmont Upland in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware is about 160 miles long and at the most 50 miles wide. Rocks that underlie the province are the Baltimore gneiss of Precambrian age and quartzite, gneiss, schist, marble, phyllite, and greenstone, which make up the Glenarm series of early Paleozoic (?) age. These are intruded by granitic, gabbroic, and ultramaflc igneous rocks. Most of the ultramaflc rocks, originally peridotite, pyroxenite, and dunite, have been partly or completely altered to serpentine and talc; they are all designated by the general term serpentine. The bodies of serpentine are commonly elongate and conformable with the enclosing rocks. Many have been extensively quarried for building, decorative, and crushed stone. In addition, chromite, titaniferous magnetite, rutile, talc and soapstone, amphibole asbestos, magnesite, sodium- rich feldspar (commercially known as soda spar), and corundum have been mined or prospected for in the serpentine. Both high-grade massive chromite and lower grade disseminated chromite occur in very irregular and unpredictable form in the serpentine, and placer deposits of chromite are in and near streams that drain areas underlain by serpentine. A group of unusual minerals, among them kammererite, are typical associates of high-grade massive chromite but are rare in lower grade deposits. Chromite was first discovered in the United States at Bare Hills, Md., around 1810. Between 1820 and 1850, additional deposits were discovered and mined in Maryland and Pennsylvania, including the largest deposit of massive chromite ever found in the United States the Wood deposit, in the State Line district. A second period of extensive chromite mining came during the late 1860's and early 1870's. Production figures are incomplete and conflicting. Estimates from the available data indicate that the aggregate production from 27 of 40 known mines before 1900 totaled between 250,000 and 280,000 tons of lode-chromite ore

  4. THE SHALE SOLUTION -How the Economic Growth Shale Gas Production in Pennsylvania has Contributed to can be Maintained, Even After the Gas is Depleted.

    OpenAIRE

    Akselsen, Anniken Berg

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of hydrocarbon energy extracted from shale has been nicknamed the Shale Gas Revolution , due to its implications for the American society, geo-politics and economy. This thesis will explain how the economic growth shale gas production in Pennsylvania so far has contributed to can be maintained, also for the future, when shale gas is no longer produced or depleted. By focusing on Pennsylvania, which has the nation s highest shale gas production growth rate, this thesis will exam...

  5. Late Neoproterozoic felsite (602.3 +/- 2 Ma) and associated metadiabase dikes in the Reading Prong, Pennsylvania, and rifting of Laurentia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    Felsite dikes in the Rittenhouse Gap iron mine district of the Reading Prong, eastern Pennsylvania, have a close geochemical affinity with the peralkaline Battle Mountain Member of the Robertson River Igneous Suite (RRIS), northern Virginia. These newly recognized Rittenhouse Gap Felsite dikes of the Swabia Creek Igneous Suite (SCIS) of eastern Pennsylvania plot as within-plate, A-type, A1 granites on various discriminant diagrams, but are quite distinct from late Neoproterozoic Catoctin Metarhyolite of Pennsylvania which has lower Ga/Al and Nb, but higher Eu. Newly recognized metadiabase dikes, also found in the Rittenhouse Gap district and proposed as Tunnel Mine Metadiabase of the SCIS, classify as alkali within-plate or continental initial rifting alkali tholeiites. They are quite distinct chemically and mineralogically from Catoctin Metabasalt flows and equivalent metadiabase dikes in Pennsylvania, which have lower Nb. Sr and Nd isotopic data indicate that the Tunnel Mine Metadiabase and Rittenhouse Gap Felsite are of mantle origin, but that the latter also includes a crustal component. The SCIS bimodal volcanics in Pennsylvania suggest a previously unrecognized rift environment in Pennsylvania at 602 Ma, somewhat predating the recognized, latest Neoproterozoic Catoctin event in Pennsylvania. As such, they fill in both temporal and geographic gaps for the rifting of Laurentia in Pennsylvania. It is proposed that the SCIS melt developed from a remnant ember of the northeastward trace of the older Mount Rogers-RRIS hotspot as Laurentia rotated clockwise. However, release and intrusion of the SCIS may have been related to younger Catoctin event crustal thinning that slightly predated the mafic dike phase of the Catoctin as Laurentia later migrated northward over a second hotspot. Eventually, the mafic phase associated with this second hotspot sufficiently attenuated the crust to allow introduction of Catoctin volcanics.

  6. Analysis of the Design and Energy Performance of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Cambria Office Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Sheffer, M.; Lau, A.

    2005-03-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection asked NREL to evaluate the energy performance of the Cambria Office Building to determine if it had met design goals. The focus of this report is the analysis of an integrated design process used to construct the facility and the postoccupancy energy performance. NREL collected energy use and other performance data and compared that data with a standard ASHRAE baseline computer model. NREL used this metered data and analysis to formulate recommendations to further improve building performance.

  7. What Drives Local Wine Expenditure in Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee and Pennsylvania? A Consumer Behavior and Wine Market Segmentation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xueting; Woods, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This study explores wine expenditure driven factors for consumers in the United States by employing a four-state consumer behaviors study. A market segmentation method is applied to investigate spending patterns of wine consumers in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Determinants including market segmentation measurements, lifestyle factors and demographic variables are investigated and compared for their significance in driving local wine expenditure, local wine purchase probabilit...

  8. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Donna A. Crouse,; Isaacs, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfbO157) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but notCryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfbO157, STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2

  9. Landscape genetics of raccoons (Procyon lotor) associated with ridges and valleys of Pennsylvania: implications for oral rabies vaccination programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, J Jeffrey; Puskas, Robert B; Fischer, Justin W; Swope, Craig B; Neubaum, Melissa A; Reeder, Serena A; Piaggio, Antoinette J

    2009-12-01

    Raccoons are the reservoir for the raccoon rabies virus variant in the United States. To combat this threat, oral rabies vaccination (ORV) programs are conducted in many eastern states. To aid in these efforts, the genetic structure of raccoons (Procyon lotor) was assessed in southwestern Pennsylvania to determine if select geographic features (i.e., ridges and valleys) serve as corridors or hindrances to raccoon gene flow (e.g., movement) and, therefore, rabies virus trafficking in this physiographic region. Raccoon DNA samples (n = 185) were collected from one ridge site and two adjacent valleys in southwestern Pennsylvania (Westmoreland, Cambria, Fayette, and Somerset counties). Raccoon genetic structure within and among these study sites was characterized at nine microsatellite loci. Results indicated that there was little population subdivision among any sites sampled. Furthermore, analyses using a model-based clustering approach indicated one essentially panmictic population was present among all the raccoons sampled over a reasonably broad geographic area (e.g., sites up to 36 km apart). However, a signature of isolation by distance was detected, suggesting that widths of ORV zones are critical for success. Combined, these data indicate that geographic features within this landscape influence raccoon gene flow only to a limited extent, suggesting that ridges of this physiographic system will not provide substantial long-term natural barriers to rabies virus trafficking. These results may be of value for future ORV efforts in Pennsylvania and other eastern states with similar landscapes.

  10. Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species composition and potential aphid vectors of plum pox virus in Pennsylvania peach orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, C M; Fleischer, S J; Luster, D; Gildow, F E

    2005-10-01

    Plum pox, an invasive disease recently identified in Pennsylvania stone fruit orchards, is caused by the aphid-transmitted Plum pox virus (genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, PPV). To identify potential vectors, we described the aphid species communities and the seasonal dynamics of the dominant aphid species within Pennsylvania peach orchards. Aphids were trapped weekly in 2002 and 2003 from mid-April through mid-November within two central Pennsylvania orchards by using yellow and green water pan traps. In total, 42 aphid species were identified from both orchards over 2 yr. Within orchards, actual species richness ranged from 24 to 30 species. The Abundance Based Coverage Estimator predicted species richness to range from 30 to 36 species, indicating that trap catches were identifying most aphid species expected to occur in the orchard. Three species, Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch), Aphis spiraecola Patch, and Myzus persicae (Sulzer), were consistently dominant across locations and years. Orchard-trapped populations of these three species peaked in a similar chronological sequence each year. As expected, trap color influenced the total number and distribution of the predominate species collected. However, the same dominant species occurred in both yellow and green traps. Based on the seasonal population dynamics reported here and on published vector efficacy studies, the most probable significant PPV vector was identified as A. spiraecola. If the PPV pathogen escapes current quarantine or if subsequent reintroductions of PPV occur, these data will be useful for developing plum pox management strategies.

  11. The changing relationships between academic health centers and their universities: a look at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan E; Rubenstein, Arthur H

    2008-09-01

    After a period of financial losses in the University of Pennsylvania Health System stemming from a combination of internal decision making and negative external market forces, the university set out to make substantial changes in the governance and administrative organization overseeing its health system and medical school. The changes were designed to assure the university and its trustees that financial controls were strengthened and that the missions of research, education, and patient care were balanced. The governance changes included creating a structure whereby a single administrative leader was responsible for all three missions--education, research, and clinical care--and reported directly to the president of the university. Further, existing governing boards responsible for various entities within the school of medicine and health system were disbanded, and a new single board was created to oversee PENN Medicine, the overarching organization established in 2001 and now responsible for oversight of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania Health System. The realignment initiated by these major changes spawned additional refinements in leadership responsibilities and process controls that, together with the new governance model, are credited with financial recovery and stronger performance in all aspects of the enterprise. These structural changes led to greater emphasis on integrating and coordinating programs to take advantage of PENN Medicine's home in a leading university.

  12. Constraining Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Northeastern Pennsylvania Using Aircraft Observations and Mesoscale Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Z.; Davis, K.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N.; Richardson, S.; Martins, D. K.; Deng, A.; Cao, Y.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Schwietzke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Leaks in natural gas infrastructure release methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. The estimated fugitive emission rate associated with the production phase varies greatly between studies, hindering our understanding of the natural gas energy efficiency. This study presents a new application of inverse methodology for estimating regional fugitive emission rates from natural gas production. Methane observations across the Marcellus region in northeastern Pennsylvania were obtained during a three week flight campaign in May 2015 performed by a team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Monitoring Division and the University of Michigan. In addition to these data, CH4 observations were obtained from automobile campaigns during various periods from 2013-2015. An inventory of CH4 emissions was then created for various sources in Pennsylvania, including coalmines, enteric fermentation, industry, waste management, and unconventional and conventional wells. As a first-guess emission rate for natural gas activity, a leakage rate equal to 2% of the natural gas production was emitted at the locations of unconventional wells across PA. These emission rates were coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the chemistry module (WRF-Chem) and atmospheric CH4 concentration fields at 1km resolution were generated. Projected atmospheric enhancements from WRF-Chem were compared to observations, and the emission rate from unconventional wells was adjusted to minimize errors between observations and simulation. We show that the modeled CH4 plume structures match observed plumes downwind of unconventional wells, providing confidence in the methodology. In all cases, the fugitive emission rate was found to be lower than our first guess. In this initial emission configuration, each well has been assigned the same fugitive emission rate, which can potentially impair our ability to match the observed spatial variability

  13. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.; Hillman, A. L.; Pompeani, D. P.; Abbott, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The remobilization of legacy contamination stored in floodplain sediments remains a threat to ecosystem and human health, particularly with potential changes in global precipitation patterns and flooding regimes. Vehicular and industrial emissions are often the dominant, recognized source of anthropogenic trace metal loadings to ecosystems today. However, loadings from early industrial activities are poorly characterized and potential sources of trace metal inputs. While potential trace metal contamination from these activities is recognized (e.g., the historical use of lead arsenate as a pesticide), the magnitude and distribution of legacy contamination is often unknown. This presentation reconstructs a lake sediment record of trace metal inputs from an oxbow lake in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sediment cores were analyzed for major and trace metal chemistry, carbon to nitrogen ratios, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Sediment trace metal chemistry in this approximately 250 year record (180 cm) record changes in land use and industry both in the 19th century and the 20th century. Of particular interest is early 19th century loadings of arsenic and calcium to the lake, likely attributable to pesticides and lime used in tanning processes near the lake. After this period of tanning dominated inputs, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of coal mining operations and resulting discharge of acid mine drainage to surface waters. In the 20th century portion of our record (70 -20 cm), patterns in sediment zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by the opening and closing of the nearby Donora Zinc Works and the American Steel & Wire Works, infamous facilities in the history of air quality regulation. The most recent sediment chemistry records periods include the enactment of air pollution legislation (~ 35 cm), and the phase out of tetraethyl leaded gasoline (~30 cm). Our study documents the impact of early industry in the

  14. Effect of natural mineral inclusions on the graphitizability of a Pennsylvania anthracite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Pappano; Harold H. Schobert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (USA)

    2009-01-15

    A Pennsylvania anthracite was heat-treated to temperatures in excess of 2000{sup o}C. Carbides formed at 2200{sup o}C and then decomposed at 2500{sup o}C. This process aided in the graphitization of the anthracite. The carbide formation-decomposition reactions were the sole graphitization mechanism for this anthracite. This was shown by demineralizing (to remove the natural mineral inclusions) and then heat-treating the sample to 2600{sup o}C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the heat-treated demineralized sample showed that the (112) peak, which is indicative of three-dimensional ordering and was previously observed in the native heat-treated anthracite, was no longer present. The demineralized anthracite was remineralized by individually adding four types of minerals (rutile, quartz, calcite, and hematite) to demineralized samples. Each of the remineralized samples was heat-treated and found to exhibit the (112) peak again. The absence of the (112) XRD peak after removal of minerals and heat treatment followed by its reappearance after remineralization and heat treatment strongly suggests that the anthracite was only graphitizable if mineral matter was present. 37 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Short-, intermediate-, and long-term outcomes of Pennsylvania's continuum of tobacco education pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank T; Evers-Casey, Sarah; Veloski, Jon; Patkar, Ashwin A; Kanzleiter, Linda

    2009-04-01

    The most effective time to introduce formal tobacco use treatment training for physicians is during the medical school experience. However, few medical schools have adopted standardized curricula, missing an important opportunity to influence future physician behavior. The Pennsylvania Continuum of Tobacco Education pilot project was undertaken from spring 2003 through summer 2005 to evaluate a generalizable method of improving students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tobacco use treatment. Intervention methods included a 1-day intensive multiformat seminar, followed by a reinforcement session 4 weeks later, within an internal medicine clerkship. Outcome measures included changes in students' attitudes, rates of "ask" and "advise" behaviors during clinical encounters, and performance on end-of-year clinical skills examinations. Short, intermediate, and long-term outcomes related to both smoking assessment and counseling improved as a result of the intervention. The percentage of students who obtained tobacco histories and counseled patients in clerkships increased following the seminar compared with the baseline. Nearly, all students demonstrated relevant skills during a clinical skills assessment at the end of the third year. The introduction of a standardized tobacco curriculum into medical school training is both feasible and effective. Results were sustained following the intervention, and the effects were reflected across several valid outcomes.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  17. Labor induction and cesarean delivery: A prospective cohort study of first births in Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjerulff, Kristen H; Attanasio, Laura B; Edmonds, Joyce K; Kozhimannil, Katy B; Repke, John T

    2017-09-01

    Mode of delivery at first childbirth largely determines mode of delivery at subsequent births, so it is particularly important to understand risk factors for cesarean delivery at first childbirth. In this study, we investigated risk factors for cesarean delivery among nulliparous women, with focus on the association between labor induction and cesarean delivery. A prospective cohort study of 2851 nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies who attempted vaginal delivery at hospitals in Pennsylvania, 2009-2011, was conducted. We used nested logistic regression models and multiple mediational analyses to investigate the role of three groups of variables in explaining the association between labor induction and unplanned cesarean delivery-the confounders of maternal characteristics and indications for induction, and the mediating (intrapartum) factors-including cervical dilatation, labor augmentation, epidural analgesia, dysfunctional labor, dystocia, fetal intolerance of labor, and maternal request of cesarean during labor. More than a third of the women were induced (34.3%) and 24.8% underwent cesarean delivery. Induced women were more likely to deliver by cesarean (35.9%) than women in spontaneous labor (18.9%), unadjusted OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.97-2.79). The intrapartum factors significantly mediated the association between labor induction and cesarean delivery (explaining 76.7% of this association), particularly cervical dilatation induction only explained 6.2%. Increased risk of cesarean delivery after labor induction among nulliparous women is attributable mainly to lower cervical dilatation at hospital admission and higher rates of labor complications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Acceptability of mobile health interventions to reduce inactivity-related health risk in central Pennsylvania adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient physical activity and excessive sedentary behavior elevate health risk. Mobile applications (apps provide one mode for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors and reduce health risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize the need for and acceptability of health behavior interventions among rural adults and evaluate the interest in and the value of app-based interventions in this population. Central Pennsylvania adults with smartphones (N = 258 completed a brief web survey in October–November 2012. Most adults report one or both inactivity-related behavioral risk factors, would use a free app to modify those risk behaviors, and would pay a small amount for that app. Low-cost, efficacious apps to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior should be promoted in public health practice. User experience should be at the forefront of this process to increase value and minimize burden in the service of long-term engagement, behavior change, and health risk reduction.

  19. Water quality data for precipitation and storm runoff in Pennypack Creek Basin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on the chemistry of precipitation and storm runoff that were collected during 29 storms from July 1979 through November 1980, in an urban environment in the Pennypack Creek basin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Daily mean and instantaneous stream discharge data were collected at two U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations. Water-quality data collected from these sites and from one storm-sewer sampling site included nutrients, chemical and biochemical oxygen demands, solids, metals, major anions, other constituents, and pH. Instantaneous loads of selected constituents were computed. Chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, sulfate, alkalinity, chloride, and dissolved solids generally were low in precipitation and runoff. During the November 5, 1980 storm at Pine Road, dissolved nitrate concentrations equaled or exceeded 10 milligrams per liter in 17 percent of the samples analyzed and dissolved ammonia nitrogen concentrations exceeded 2.5 milligrams per liter. Generally, a comparison of median concentration of copper, lead, or zinc in precipitation and runoff at the Tustin Street storm-sewer site showed that median concentrations in precipitation were greater than those in runoff.

  20. The contextual influence of coal abandoned mine lands in communities and type 2 diabetes in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ann Y; Curriero, Frank C; Glass, Thomas A; Stewart, Walter F; Schwartz, Brian S

    2013-07-01

    Coal abandoned mine lands (AMLs), persistent and prevalent across Pennsylvania, offer an instructive evaluation of potential contextual influences of chronic environmental contamination (CEC) on individual health. We evaluated associations between the burden of AMLs, represented by 10 contextual metrics at the community level, and individual-level type 2 diabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a biomarker. Cross-sectional and longitudinal multilevel analyses were conducted with over 28,000 diabetic primary care patients of the Geisinger Clinic. Adjusted models revealed five AML burden measures were associated (p<0.05), and three additional were borderline associated (0.05≤p≤0.10), with higher and/or change in HbA1c levels. This study provides key empirical evidence of adverse impacts of CEC in communities on an important chronic disease, illustrating the contextual effects of living in long-term degraded landscapes and communities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproductive health indicators of fishes from Pennsylvania watersheds: association with chemicals of emerging concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, V.S.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Walsh, H.L.; Sperry, A.J.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Alvarez, D.A.; Brightbill, R.A.; Smith, G.; Foreman, W.T.; Manning, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fishes were collected at 16 sites within the three major river drainages (Delaware, Susquehanna, and Ohio) of Pennsylvania. Three species were evaluated for biomarkers of estrogenic/antiandrogenic exposure, including plasma vitellogenin and testicular oocytes in male fishes. Smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, white sucker Catostomus commersonii, and redhorse sucker Moxostoma species were collected in the summer, a period of low flow and low reproductive activity. Smallmouth bass were the only species in which testicular oocytes were observed; however, measurable concentrations of plasma vitellogenin were found in male bass and white sucker. The percentage of male bass with testicular oocytes ranged from 10 to 100 %, with the highest prevalence and severity in bass collected in the Susquehanna drainage. The percentage of males with plasma vitellogenin ranged from 0 to 100 % in both bass and sucker. Biological findings were compared with chemical analyses of discrete water samples collected at the time of fish collections. Estrone concentrations correlated with testicular oocytes prevalence and severity and with the percentage of male bass with vitellogenin. No correlations were noted with the percentage of male sucker with vitellogenin and water chemical concentrations. The prevalence and severity of testicular oocytes in bass also correlated with the percent of agricultural land use in the watershed above a site. Two sites within the Susquehanna drainage and one in the Delaware were immediately downstream of wastewater treatment plants to compare results with upstream fish. The percentage of male bass with testicular oocytes was not consistently higher downstream; however, severity did tend to increase downstream.

  2. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Pennsylvania. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  3. Genomic characterization of a broiler reovirus field strain detected in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Lu, Huaguang

    2015-04-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) infections have been increasingly diagnosed in Pennsylvania (PA) from 2011 to the present time. A field ARV strain (Reo/PA/Broiler/05682/12) isolated from sick broilers suffered from severe arthritis/tenosynovitis of a PA broiler flock was conducted full genome sequence studies using RT-PCR and RACE techniques. The complete genome of the PA broiler ARV field strain was 23,494bp in length with an approximately 50% G+C content and 10 dsRNA segments encoding 12 viral proteins. The 10 genomic segments were ranged from 1192bp (S4) to 3958bp (L1) in length, which were almost identical to those of published reference strains. The amino acid (aa) alignments of the putative proteins encoded by the ORF in each segment revealed a high similarity to the counterpart proteins encoded by other avian orthoreoviruses in the Orthoreovirus genus, particularly with the reference strain AVS-B (89.4-98.9%). The phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of all 10 genome segments of the PA broiler ARV revealed that a moderate to significant nucleotide sequence divergence from sequences of cognate genome segments of reference ARV S1133 and 138 strains. These genomic data demonstrate that this PA broiler ARV field strain is a unique tenosynovitis ARV and is different from the traditional ARV vaccine strains. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Carbonate rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age in the Lancaster quadrangle, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, Harold; Becher, Albert E.

    1968-01-01

    Detailed mapping has shown that the carbonate rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age in the Lancaster quadrangle, Pennsylvania, can be divided into 14 rock-stratigraphic units. These units are defined primarily by their relative proportions of limestone and dolomite. The oldest units, the Vintage, Kinzers, and Ledger Formations of Cambrian age, and the Conestoga Limestone of Ordovician age are retained in this report. The Zooks Corner Formation, of Cambrian age, a dolomite unit overlying the Ledger Dolomite, is named here for exposures along Conestoga Creek near the village of Zooks Corner. The Conococheague (Cambrian) and Beekmantown (Ordovician) Limestones, as mapped by earlier workers, have been elevated to group rank and subdivided into formations that are correlated with and named for geologic units in Lebanon and Berks Counties, Pa. These formations, from oldest to youngest, are the Buffalo Springs, Snitz Creek, Millbach, and Richland Formations of the Conococheague Group, and the Stonehenge, Bpler, and Ontelaunee Formations of the Beekmantown Group. The Annville and Myerstown Limestones, which are named for lithologically similar units in Dauphin and Lebanon Counties, Pa., overlie the Beekmantown Group in one small area in the quadrangle.

  5. Hatching success and predation of Bog Turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) eggs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappalorti, Robert T.; Tutterow, Annalee M.; Pittman, Shannon E.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2017-01-01

    Nest-site selection by most turtles affects the survival of females and their offspring. Although bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) do not typically leave their wetlands for nesting, nest-site selection can impact hatching success and hatchling survival. Between 1974 and 2012, we monitored the fates of 258 bog turtle eggs incubated in the field and 91 eggs incubated under laboratory conditions from 11 different bogs, fens, or wetland complexes in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Laboratory-incubated eggs exhibited the greatest hatching success (81%), but we did not detect a significant difference in hatching success between nests protected with predator excluder cages (43%) and unprotected nests (33%). However, we found significantly lower predation rates in protected nests, suggesting that while predator excluder cages successfully reduced predation, other environmental factors persisted to reduce egg survival in the field. Natural hatching success was potentially reduced by poor weather conditions, which may have resulted in embryo developmental problems, dehydration, or embryos drowning in the egg. Our results suggest that egg depredation, coupled with embryo developmental problems and infertility, are limiting factors to hatching success in our study populations. Using predator excluder cages to protect bog turtle eggs in the field, or incubating eggs in the laboratory and releasing hatchlings at original nesting areas, may be an effective conservation tool for recovering populations of this federally threatened species.

  6. Mortality in nineteenth century America: estimates from New York and Pennsylvania census data, 1865 and 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, M R

    1977-08-01

    Given the lack of information on mortality in the nineteenth century United States, it seems appropriate to apply techniques which have been created for mortality estimation for developing nations with inadequate vital registration data, to the historical American experience. Two such related sets of techniques are the brass, Sullivan, and Trussell methods and the technique here called the Surviving Children Method, which utilizes the age structure of surviving children and the number of children ever born to women in various age or duration of marriage categories. Both techniques estimate child mortality. Coale and Demeny model life tables are used to extend child mortality estimates to adult mortality. The techniques are applied to census manuscript samples from seven New York counties in 1865 and seven Pennsylvania counties in 1900, both censuses having information on children ever born. The estimates confirm a drop in mortality between 1865 and 1900 in New York and large differentials between native and foreigh-born populations as well as between rural and urban populations.

  7. Racial/ethnic diversity management and cultural competency: the case of Pennsylvania hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Dansky, Kathryn H; De Souza, Gita; Gatto, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Major demographic trends are changing the face of America's labor pool, and healthcare managers increasingly face a scarcer and more diverse workforce. As a result, healthcare organizations (HCOs) must develop policies and practices aimed at recruiting, retaining, and managing a diverse workforce and must meet the demands of a more diverse patient population by providing culturally appropriate care and improving access to care for racial/ethnic minorities. Ultimately, the goal of managing diversity is to enhance workforce and customer satisfaction, to improve communication among members of the workforce, and to further improve organizational performance. Research on diversity management practices in HCOs is scarce, providing few guidelines for practitioners. This study attempted to close that gap. Results show that hospitals in Pennsylvania have been relatively inactive with employing diversity management practices, and equal employment requirements are the main driver of diversity management policy. The number and scope of diversity management practices used were not influenced by organizational or market characteristics. The results suggest that hospitals need to adopt diversity management practices for their workforces and need to pay particular attention to marketing and service planning activities that meet the needs of a diverse patient population.

  8. Institutional leadership and faculty response: fostering professionalism at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserstein, Alan G; Brennan, Patrick J; Rubenstein, Arthur H

    2007-11-01

    Fostering professionalism requires institutional leadership and faculty buy-in. At the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, policies and educational programs were developed to enhance professionalism in three areas: conduct of clinical trials, relations with pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the clinical and teaching environment. Responsible conduct of clinical trials has been addressed with mandatory online education and certification for clinical investigators, but some still fail to recognize conflicts of interest. Activity of pharmaceutical representatives has been strictly regulated, meals and gifts from pharmaceutical companies prohibited, and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the formulary process and in continuing medical education curtailed. Some faculty members have resented such restrictions, particularly in regard to their opportunity to give paid lectures. Professionalism in the clinical and teaching environment has been addressed with interdisciplinary rounding, experiential learning for medical students and residents in small groups, increased recognition of role models of professionalism, and active management of disruptive physicians. Leadership has been exerted through policy development, open communications, and moral suasion and example. Faculty members have expressed both their support and their reservations. Development of communication strategies continues, including town hall meetings, small groups and critical incident narratives, and individual feedback. The understanding and endorsement of faculty, staff, and trainees are an essential element of the professionalism effort.

  9. Watershed-Scale Impacts from Surface Water Disposal of Oil and Gas Wastewater in Western Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, William D; Castillo-Meza, Luis; Tasker, Travis L; Geeza, Thomas J; Drohan, Patrick J; Liu, Xiaofeng; Landis, Joshua D; Blotevogel, Jens; McLaughlin, Molly; Borch, Thomas; Warner, Nathaniel R

    2017-08-01

    Combining horizontal drilling with high volume hydraulic fracturing has increased extraction of hydrocarbons from low-permeability oil and gas (O&G) formations across the United States; accompanied by increased wastewater production. Surface water discharges of O&G wastewater by centralized waste treatment (CWT) plants pose risks to aquatic and human health. We evaluated the impact of surface water disposal of O&G wastewater from CWT plants upstream of the Conemaugh River Lake (dam controlled reservoir) in western Pennsylvania. Regulatory compliance data were collected to calculate annual contaminant loads (Ba, Cl, total dissolved solids (TDS)) to document historical industrial activity. In this study, two CWT plants 10 and 19 km upstream of a reservoir left geochemical signatures in sediments and porewaters corresponding to peak industrial activity that occurred 5 to 10 years earlier. Sediment cores were sectioned for the collection of paired samples of sediment and porewater, and analyzed for analytes to identify unconventional O&G wastewater disposal. Sediment layers corresponding to the years of maximum O&G wastewater disposal contained higher concentrations of salts, alkaline earth metals, and organic chemicals. Isotopic ratios of 226Ra/228Ra and 87Sr/86Sr identified that peak concentrations of Ra and Sr were likely sourced from wastewaters that originated from the Marcellus Shale formation.

  10. Explaining Spatial Variability in Wellbore Impairment Risk for Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Wells, 2000-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Previous modeling (ingraffea et al. PNAS, 2014) indicated roughly two-times higher cumulative risk for wellbore impairment in unconventional wells, relative to conventional wells, and large spatial variation in risk for oil and gas wells drilled in the state of Pennsylvania. Impairment risk for wells in the northeast portion of the state were found to be 8.5-times greater than that of wells drilled in the rest of the state. Here, we set out to explain this apparent regional variability through Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis of geographic, developmental, and general well attributes. We find that regional variability is largely driven by the nature of the development, i.e. whether conventional or unconventional development is dominant. Oil and natural gas market prices and total well depths present as major influences in wellbore impairment, with moderate influences from well densities and geologic factors. The figure depicts influence paths for predictors of impairments for the state (top left), SW region (top right), unconventional/NE region (bottom left) and conventional/NW region (bottom right) models. Influences are scaled to reflect percent contributions in explaining variability in the model.

  11. Field verification of reconstructed dam-break flood, Laurel Run, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-lung; Armbruster, Jeffrey T.

    1979-01-01

    A one-dimensional dam-break flood routing model is verified by using observed data on the flash flood resulting from the failure of Laurel Run Reservoir Dam near Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The model has been developed on the basis of an explicit scheme of the characteristics method with specified time intervals. The model combines one of the characteristic equations with the Rankine-Hugoniot shock equations to trace the corresponding characteristic backward to the known state for solving the depth and velocity of flow at the wave front. The previous version of the model has called for a modification of the method of solution to overcome the computational difficulty at the narrow breach and at any geomorphological constraints where channel geometry changes rapidly. The large reduction in the computational inaccuracies and oscillations was achieved by introducing the actual "storage width" in the equation of continuity and the imaginary "conveyance width" in the equation of motion. Close agreement between observed and computed peak stages at several stations downstream of the dam strongly suggests the validity and applicability of the model. However, small numerical noise appearing in the computed stage and discharge hydrographs at the dam site as well as discrepancy of attenuated peaks in the discharge hydrographs indicate the need for further model improvement.

  12. Development of normative data for the Brazilian adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis; Doty, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    It is well established that olfactory dysfunction has significant implications for safety, nutrition, and quality of life. The more reliable standardized tests of olfactory function, such as the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), assess odor identification ability. Unfortunately, cultural factors can influence such tests, as a number of odors are not universally recognized. In this study, a Portuguese language version of the UPSIT was administered to an age- and sex-stratified prospective sample of 1820 Brazilian subjects. Normative data were developed for a subset of 1578 subjects who reported having no difficulties smelling or tasting. Individuals with a history of head trauma or, in the case of those over the age of 64 years, Mini-Mental State Examination Scores <24, were excluded from analysis. As in other populations, the test scores were significantly influenced by age and sex. The median overall difference between the North American and Brazilian UPSIT scores was 2.2 points for men and 0.8 points for women, although subtle age-related differences were also apparent. This research represents that largest clinical study of olfaction ever performed in South America. Correction factors based upon age and sex are provided to allow for direct comparisons of Brazilian test scores to those based upon North American norms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Sex/Gender Differences in Cotinine Levels Among Daily Smokers in the Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allshine; Krebs, Nicolle M; Zhu, Junjia; Sun, Dongxiao; Stennett, Andrea; Muscat, Joshua E

    2017-09-05

    This study was conducted to determine sex/gender differences in smoke exposure and to quantify the role of potential predictors including puffing behaviors, nicotine dependence, and non-nicotinic factors. The Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study (PASS) of 332 adult cigarette smokers utilized portable handheld topography devices to capture the smokers' profiles in a naturalistic environment. Sex/gender differences in salivary biomarkers were modeled using ANCOVA to account for measures of dependence (Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence, nicotine metabolite ratio [3-hydroxycotinine/cotinine]), and nondependence covariates including anthropomorphic factors and stress. The Blinder-Oaxaca method was used to decompose the sex/gender differences in nicotine uptake due to covariates. Men had significantly higher cotinine levels (313.5 ng/mL vs. 255.8 ng/mL, p differ between men and women (p = 0.24). Women had a higher mean Hooked on Tobacco Checklist score than men (7.64 vs. 6.87, p different by sex. Decomposition results show that ten predictors can explain 83% of the sex/gender differences in cotinine uptake. Height was the greatest contributor to these differences, followed by average puff volume. Conclusion and Impact: The higher levels of nicotine metabolites in men, compared to women, can be explained by height, weight, puff volume, and nicotine metabolism.

  14. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  15. Ground-Water Resources of Big Elk Creek Basin, Pennsylvania and Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2002-01-01

    Many rural areas in southeastern Pennsylvania, including the Big Elk Creek Basin, are undergoing a rapid population increase. New development and an expanding population increase consumptive water use, increase surface runoff, and have the potential to reduce ground-water recharge. The Big Elk Creek Basin is between the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basins and drains directly to the Chesapeake Bay. Both the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basins have basin commissions that regulate and oversee surface-water and ground-water withdrawals. The Big Elk Creek Basin does not have a regulatory agency to oversee withdrawal of water. Ground-water quantity and quality were evaluated for the 79.4-mi2 (square mile) study area that extends from the headwaters of Big Elk Creek in Chester County, Pa., downstream to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflowmeasurement station 01495000, Big Elk Creek at Elk Mills, Md., and to inactive USGS streamflowmeasurement station 01495500, Little Elk Creek at Childs, Md. (fig. 1). The study was done by the USGS in cooperation with the Chester County Water Resources Authority and the Chester County Health Department. The full results of the study are published in a technical report by Sloto (2002). This fact sheet summarizes the key findings presented in the technical report.

  16. Occupational health behaviors and habits of women on dairy farms in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Ginger D; Brasier, Kathryn J; Henning, George F; Radhakrishna, Rama B; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine what tasks women perform, behaviors that could result in exposure to zoonotic disease, and preventative measures practiced by women on dairy farms. A written survey was sent to a stratified, random sample of dairy farms in Pennsylvania (n = 3709) using a modified version of the Dillman method. The tasks most commonly performed by the respondents (n = 624) included milking (70.8%), feeding (60.6%), and cleaning stalls (42.6%). The use of personal protective equipment was infrequent. Gloves were always worn when milking by 32.7%. More respondents, 96.5%, changed their clothes at least sometimes before working in the barn as compared to when leaving the barn. Handwashing was always performed by 86.7% after assisting with delivering calves, whereas 71.1% always washed their hands after milking. Eating and drinking in the barn were practiced by 45.0% and 72.0%, respectively. Veterinary obstetric drugs were administered by 28.2% of the respondents. Most of the respondents, 89.7%, indicated that they felt they had minimal to no risk of contracting a disease from the animals with which they worked.

  17. The Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study Risk-Adjusted Mortality Model: Results of a Statewide Benchmarking Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Douglas J; Holena, Daniel N; Delgado, M Kit; McWilliams, Nathan; Altenburg, Juliet; Carr, Brendan G

    2017-05-01

    Trauma centers need objective feedback on performance to inform quality improvement efforts. The Trauma Quality Improvement Program recently published recommended methodology for case mix adjustment and benchmarking performance. We tested the feasibility of applying this methodology to develop risk-adjusted mortality models for a statewide trauma system. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients ≥16 years old at Pennsylvania trauma centers from 2011 to 2013 (n = 100,278). Our main outcome measure was observed-to-expected mortality ratios (overall and within blunt, penetrating, multisystem, isolated head, and geriatric subgroups). Patient demographic variables, physiology, mechanism of injury, transfer status, injury severity, and pre-existing conditions were included as predictor variables. The statistical model had excellent discrimination (area under the curve = 0.94). Funnel plots of observed-to-expected identified five centers with lower than expected mortality and two centers with higher than expected mortality. No centers were outliers for management of penetrating trauma, but five centers had lower and three had higher than expected mortality for blunt trauma. It is feasible to use Trauma Quality Improvement Program methodology to develop risk-adjusted models for statewide trauma systems. Even with smaller numbers of trauma centers that are available in national datasets, it is possible to identify high and low outliers in performance.

  18. Water resources of the Clarion River and Redbank Creek basins, northwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Dodge, C.H.; Schiner, G.R.; Koester, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    The Clarion River and Redbank Creek basin occupy 1,280 and 545 square miles, respectively, in northwatern Pennsylvania. The area is mostly in Clerion, Elk, and Jefferson Counties and is approximately 70 miles long and 30 miles wide. All drainage is to the Allegheny River. Sedimentary rocks of Late Devionian Early Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian age underlie the area. Rocks of Late Devonian age underlie the entire area and crop out in the deep stream valleys in the north. Lower Mississippian rocks generally crop out in strips along major stream valleys; the strips are narrow in the south and broaden northward. Pennsylvanian rocks cover most of the interfluvial areas between major streams. The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian rocks are composed mostly of alternating sandstone and shale. Sandstone may intertongue laterally with shale. The Pennsylvanian rocks are most heterogeneous and contain many commercial coal beds. The major mineral resources are bituminous coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Narly all coal production is from strip mining in Clarion, Elk, and Jefferson Counties. Total coal production exceeded 8 million short tons in 1976. The basins are south and east of the major oil-producing regions in Pennsylvania, but more than 50,000 barrels of crude oil were produced here in 1975. Commercial quantities of natural gas are also obtained. Thirty-three public water-supply systems furnish about two-thirds of the water for domestic use. Surface water is the source of about 90 percent of public-supply water. The remainder is from wells and springs. In an average year, 64 percent of the precipitation in the Clarion River basin and 60 percent in the Redbank Creek basin leave the area as streamflow. The percentage of annuual discharge from each basin that is base runoff averaged 53 and 51 percent, respectively, during 1972-75. Only 4 of 10 stream-gaging stations recorded an average 10-year, 7-consecutive day low flow of at least 0.15 cubic feet per second per

  19. Local Impacts of Mercury Emissions from the Three Pennsylvania Coal Fired Power Plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan,T.; Adams,J.; Bender, M.; Bu, C.; Piccolo, N.; Campbell, C.

    2008-02-01

    The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) as proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when fully implemented will lead to reduction in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by 70 percent to fifteen tons per year by 2018. The EPA estimates that mercury deposition would be reduced 8 percent on average in the Eastern United States. The CAMR permits cap-and-trade approach that requires the nationwide emissions to meet the prescribed level, but do not require controls on each individual power plant. This has led to concerns that there may be hot-spots of mercury contamination near power plants. Partially because of this concern, many states including Pennsylvania have implemented, or are considering, state regulations that are stricter on mercury emissions than those in the CAMR. This study examined the possibility that coal-fired power plants act as local sources leading to mercury 'hot spots'. Soil and oak leaf samples from around three large U.S. coal-fired power plants in Western Pennsylvania were collected and analyzed for evidence of 'hot spots'. These three plants (Conemaugh, Homer City, and Keystone) are separated by a total distance of approximately 30 miles. Each emits over 500 pounds of mercury per year which is well above average for mercury emissions from coal plants in the U.S. Soil and oak leaf sampling programs were performed around each power plant. Sampling rings one-mile apart were used with eight or nine locations on each ring. The prevailing winds in the region are from the west. For this reason, sampling was conducted out to 10 miles from the Conemaugh plant which is southeast of the others. The other plants were sampled to a distance of five miles. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with wind patterns. The study

  20. Structural ordering of Pennsylvania anthracites on heat treatment to 2000-2900{sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.V. Atria; F. Rusinko Jr.; H.H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

    2002-12-01

    Three Pennsylvania anthracites from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank and Data Base were heat-treated to temperatures to 2900{sup o}C. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction. These anthracites clearly differ in the extent to which they transform to a graphitic structure by heat treatment at ambient pressure. Graphitizability, based on approach of interlayer spacing to the ideal value for graphite and development of crystallite height, is in the order DECS 21 {gt} PSOC 1461 {gt} PSOC 1468. By 2700{sup o}C the interlayer spacing is largely established, since improvements by increasing graphitization temperature to 2900{sup o}C are small. The crystallite stacking continues to develop; significant changes are achieved at 2900 vs 2700{sup o}C. The structural changes can be related to composition via two factors. In heat treatment to 2000{sup o}C, the structural ordering may be impeded by a 'locking' of aromatic sheets in place by cross-linkers, such as oxygen atoms. At the higher temperatures, i.e., 2700 and 2900{sup o}C, the ease of rearrangement of aromatic sheets, which is related to their size, is the dominant issue. The relative sizes of aromatic sheets can be approximated from the net hydrogen content of the anthracites. DECS-21, which has both the highest oxygen content and the highest net hydrogen value, shows the least order after heat treatment to 2000{sup o}C, but the best structural development after reaction at 2700 or 2900{sup o}C. 38 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Spatial Analysis of Geothermal Resource Potential in New York and Pennsylvania: A Stratified Kriging Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. D.; Whealton, C. A.; Stedinger, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Resource assessments for low-grade geothermal applications employ available well temperature measurements to determine if the resource potential is sufficient for supporting district heating opportunities. This study used a compilation of bottomhole temperature (BHT) data from recent unconventional shale oil and gas wells, along with legacy oil, gas, and storage wells, in Pennsylvania (PA) and New York (NY). Our study's goal was to predict the geothermal resource potential and associated uncertainty for the NY-PA region using kriging interpolation. The dataset was scanned for outliers, and some observations were removed. Because these wells were drilled for reasons other than geothermal resource assessment, their spatial density varied widely. An exploratory spatial statistical analysis revealed differences in the spatial structure of the geothermal gradient data (the kriging semi-variogram and its nugget variance, shape, sill, and the degree of anisotropy). As a result, a stratified kriging procedure was adopted to better capture the statistical structure of the data, to generate an interpolated surface, and to quantify the uncertainty of the computed surface. The area was stratified reflecting different physiographic provinces in NY and PA that have geologic properties likely related to variations in the value of the geothermal gradient. The kriging prediction and the variance-of-prediction were determined for each province by the generation of a semi-variogram using only the wells that were located within that province. A leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) was conducted as a diagnostic tool. The results of stratified kriging were compared to kriging using the whole region to determine the impact of stratification. The two approaches provided similar predictions of the geothermal gradient. However, the variance-of-prediction was different. The stratified approach is recommended because it gave a more appropriate site-specific characterization of uncertainty

  2. Causes of acidification of four streams on Laurel Hilld in southwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, William E.; DeWalle, David R.; Leibfried, Robert T.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Kimmel, William G.; Sherwin, Lysle S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition, soils developed from bedrock, a natural bog, gas wells, and a ski area were all investigated as possible sources of water quality degradation for four streams on Laurel Hill in southwestern Pennsylvania where fish kills have been reported since 1960. An intensive study of the chemistry of atmospheric deposition, soil leachate, and stream water and fish populations was conducted on these basins during 1980–1981 with emphasis on dormant season periods with runoff from snowmelt and rain. Although bedrock geology was found to control the natural buffering capacity of these streams, only acid precipitation could be linked to sharp drops in pH and increases in total Al concentrations observed during stormflows in the poorly buffered streams. Three poorly buffered streams exhibited drops to pH 4.4 to 4.5 and increases in total Al concentrations up to 1.5 mg/L during observed peak flows. Mineral soil leachate from the three major soil series on the basins during this time exhibited a low pH of 4.3 and mean total Al concentrations of 3.6 mg/L, indicating stream response during storms was closely linked to chemistry of soil leachate. Poorly buffered streams did not support reproducing populations of trout (Salmonidae sp.) or other fishes. In contrast, one well-buffered stream (20 mg/L CaCO3) exhibited drops to pH 5.5 during peak flow and supported reproducing trout and sculpin (Cottus bairdi) populations. The acidification of the four streams studied was attributed to atmospheric deposition.

  3. Well water contamination in a rural community in southwestern Pennsylvania near unconventional shale gas extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawattegama, Shyama K; Kondratyuk, Tetiana; Krynock, Renee; Bricker, Matthew; Rutter, Jennifer K; Bain, Daniel J; Stolz, John F

    2015-01-01

    Reports of ground water contamination in a southwestern Pennsylvania community coincided with unconventional shale gas extraction activities that started late 2009. Residents participated in a survey and well water samples were collected and analyzed. Available pre-drill and post-drill water test results and legacy operations (e.g., gas and oil wells, coal mining) were reviewed. Fifty-six of the 143 respondents indicated changes in water quality or quantity while 63 respondents reported no issues. Color change (brown, black, or orange) was the most common (27 households). Well type, when known, was rotary or cable tool, and depths ranged from 19 to 274 m. Chloride, sulfate, nitrate, sodium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese and strontium were commonly found, with 25 households exceeding the secondary maximum contaminate level (SMCL) for manganese. Methane was detected in 14 of the 18 houses tested. The 26 wells tested for total coliforms (2 positives) and E. coli (1 positive) indicated that septic contamination was not a factor. Repeated sampling of two wells in close proximity (204 m) but drawing from different depths (32 m and 54 m), revealed temporal variability. Since 2009, 65 horizontal wells were drilled within a 4 km (2.5 mile) radius of the community, each well was stimulated on average with 3.5 million gal of fluids and 3.2 million lbs of proppant. PA DEP cited violations included an improperly plugged well and at least one failed well casing. This study underscores the need for thorough analyses of data, documentation of legacy activity, pre-drill testing, and long term monitoring.

  4. Building America Case Study: High-Velocity Small-Diameter Duct System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Poerschke

    2017-04-01

    This study tests the performance of a variable airflow small-diameter duct heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system in a new construction unoccupied low-load test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The duct system was installed entirely in conditioned space and was operated from the winter through summer seasons. Measurements were collected on the in-room temperatures and energy consumed by the air handler and heat pump unit. Operation modes with three different volumes of airflow were compared to determine the ideal airflow scenario that maximizes room-to-room thermal uniformity while minimizing fan energy consumption. Black felt infrared imagery was used as a measure of diffuser throw and in-room air mixing. Measured results indicate the small-diameter, high velocity airflow system can provide comfort under some conditions. Solar heat gains resulted in southern rooms drifting beyond acceptable temperature limits. Insufficient airflow to some bedrooms also resulted in periods of potential discomfort. Homebuilders or HVAC contractors can use these results to assess whether this space conditioning strategy is an attractive alternative to a traditional duct system. The team performed a cost analysis of two duct system configurations: (1) a conventional diameter and velocity duct system, and (2) the small-diameter duct system. This work applies to both new and retrofit homes that have achieved a low heating and cooling density either by energy conservation or by operation in a mild climate with few heating or cooling degree days. Guidance is provided on cost trade-offs between the conventional duct system and the small-diameter duct system.

  5. Generational diversity in associate degree nursing students: Teaching styles and preferences in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Jennifer V.

    2011-12-01

    Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods. Most importantly, faculty must facilitate an effective multi-generational learning environment. Research has shown that the generation to which a person belongs is likely to affect the ways in which he/she learns (Hammill, 2005). Characterized by its own attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and motivational needs, each generation also has distinct educational expectations. It is imperative, therefore, that nurse educators be aware of these differences and develop skills through which to communicate with the different generations, thereby reducing teaching/learning problems in the classroom. This is a quantitative, descriptive study that compared the teaching methods preferred by different generations of associate degree nursing students with the teaching methods that the instructors actually use. The research study included 289 participants; 244 nursing student participants and 45 nursing faculty participants from four nursing departments in colleges in Pennsylvania. Overall, the results of the study found many statistically significant findings. The results of the ANOVA test revealed eight statistically significant findings among Generation Y, Generation X and Baby boomers. The preferred teaching methods included: lecture, self-directed learning, web-based course with no class meetings, important for faculty to know my name, classroom structure, know why I am learning what I am learning, learning for the sake of learning and grade is all that matters. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching methods by students. Overall, the support for a variety of

  6. Flood-inundation maps for the Susquehanna River near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Mark A.; Underwood, Stacey M.; Thomas, Craig M.; Miller, Jason F.; Pratt, Benjamin A.; Hogan, Laurie G.; Wnek, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of 28 digital flood-inundation maps was developed for an approximate 25-mile reach of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The study was selected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) national Silver Jackets program, which supports interagency teams at the state level to coordinate and collaborate on flood-risk management. This study to produce flood-inundation maps was the result of a collaborative effort between the USACE, National Weather Service (NWS), Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC), The Harrisburg Authority, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These maps are accessible through Web-mapping applications associated with the NWS, SRBC, and USGS. The maps can be used in conjunction with the real-time stage data from the USGS streamgage 01570500, Susquehanna River at Harrisburg, Pa., and NWS flood-stage forecasts to help guide the general public in taking individual safety precautions and will provide local municipal officials with a tool to efficiently manage emergency flood operations and flood mitigation efforts. The maps were developed using the USACE HEC–RAS and HEC–GeoRAS programs to compute water-surface profiles and to delineate estimated flood-inundation areas for selected stream stages. The maps show estimated flood-inundation areas overlaid on high-resolution, georeferenced, aerial photographs of the study area for stream stages at 1-foot intervals between 11 feet and 37 feet (which include NWS flood categories Action, Flood, Moderate, and Major) and the June 24, 1972, peak-of-record flood event at a stage of 33.27 feet at the Susquehanna River at Harrisburg, Pa., streamgage.

  7. Modeling the interannual variability of microbial quality metrics of irrigation water in a Pennsylvania stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eun-Mi; Shelton, Daniel; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Nam, Won-Ho; Coppock, Cary; Muirhead, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of the microbial quality of irrigation waters is extremely limited. For this reason, the US FDA has promulgated the Produce Rule, mandating the testing of irrigation water sources for many farms. The rule requires the collection and analysis of at least 20 water samples over two to four years to adequately evaluate the quality of water intended for produce irrigation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of interannual weather variability on surface water microbial quality. We used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model to simulate E. coli concentrations in the Little Cove Creek; this is a perennial creek located in an agricultural watershed in south-eastern Pennsylvania. The model performance was evaluated using the US FDA regulatory microbial water quality metrics of geometric mean (GM) and the statistical threshold value (STV). Using the 90-year time series of weather observations, we simulated and randomly sampled the time series of E. coli concentrations. We found that weather conditions of a specific year may strongly affect the evaluation of microbial quality and that the long-term assessment of microbial water quality may be quite different from the evaluation based on short-term observations. The variations in microbial concentrations and water quality metrics were affected by location, wetness of the hydrological years, and seasonality, with 15.7-70.1% of samples exceeding the regulatory threshold. The results of this work demonstrate the value of using modeling to design and evaluate monitoring protocols to assess the microbial quality of water used for produce irrigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reported health conditions in animals residing near natural gas wells in southwestern Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slizovskiy, I B; Conti, L A; Trufan, S J; Reif, J S; Lamers, V T; Stowe, M H; Dziura, J; Rabinowitz, P M

    2015-01-01

    Natural gas extraction activities, including the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, may pose potential health risks to both human and animal populations in close proximity to sites of extraction activity. Because animals may have increased exposure to contaminated water and air as well as increased susceptibility to contaminant exposures compared to nearby humans, animal disease events in communities living near natural gas extraction may provide "sentinel" information useful for human health risk assessment. Community health evaluations as well as health impact assessments (HIAs) of natural gas exploration should therefore consider the inclusion of animal health metrics in their assessment process. We report on a community environmental health survey conducted in an area of active natural gas drilling, which included the collection of health data on 2452 companion and backyard animals residing in 157 randomly-selected households of Washington County, Pennsylvania (USA). There were a total of 127 reported health conditions, most commonly among dogs. When reports from all animals were considered, there were no significant associations between reported health condition and household proximity to natural gas wells. When dogs were analyzed separately, we found an elevated risk of 'any' reported health condition in households less than 1km from the nearest gas well (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.07-9.7), with dermal conditions being the most common of canine disorders. While these results should be considered hypothesis generating and preliminary, they suggest value in ongoing assessments of pet dogs as well as other animals to better elucidate the health impacts of natural gas extraction on nearby communities.

  9. Quality of water in the upper Ohio River basin and at Erie, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Samuel James

    1906-01-01

    This paper discusses the quality of water on the most important tributaries of Ohio River in Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia, and Maryland, and the nature of the water supply at Erie, Pa. The amount and character of the pollution is described and the results of drinking contaminated water as shown by typhoid statistics are indicated. The conditions on the tributaries of Ohio River in Ohio are discussed in Water-Supply and Irrigation Paper No. 79, United States Geological Survey, pages 129-187. The water supplies and sewerage of small towns high up toward the head of a large drainage system do not in many cases receive the attention they should. Epidemics of a waterborne disease which affect large municipalities near the mouth of the river and therefore attract attention must necessarily have their origin in the pollution of the watershed above. It is evident, therefore, that adequate sanitation of the small towns and a water supply as carefully guarded as that of a large city would prevent disease at its very source and be far less expensive than the costly battles which are waged against epidemics in huge centers of population after disease has broken out. Typhoid fever statistics for small towns in this section are seldom available and are more or less unreliable at best. The few figures given show the existence of virulent typhoid fever in most towns of the drainage areas in certain years, and as these towns drain into the streams the liability ofthe water to infection is evident. The significance of typhoid fever death rates will be better understood from the statistics presented below, which have been collated from a number of cities having excellent water supplies.

  10. An Appalachian Mesozoic compressional event: Evidence from the Pennsylvania Reentrant-New York Promontory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, A.E. (Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Deformation consistent with N-S compression is found in several Mesozoic rift basins and occurs throughout the bedrock of the Pennsylvania Reentrant-New York Promontory. This area records the compressional event because the structural grain is favorably oriented (east-west) whereas most of the Appalachians is not. East-west trending structures in western PA and NY were proposed to reflect the Main Phase of Alleghanian deformation and to post-date a local Lackawanna Phase that produced weak NE-trending structures. In the Monroe area, eastern NY, the NE-trending structures are dominant and of a classic Alleghanian form. Folding, and NW-directed thrust faulting are well-developed in Devonian Catskill facies clastic rocks in the Green Pond Outlier as well as older units. These features are overprinted by structures that are consistent with N-S compression. Thrust faults with slickensides showing NW-directed movement are overprinted by slickensides showing N-directed movement. Shales and silt to fine-grained sandstones contain E-W to E-NE striking crenulation cleavages superimposed on the pervasive NE-striking cleavage. These structures are delocalized to the area around an E-W to W-NW striking reverse-dextral oblique fault with 1 to 2km offset. In some areas of NE-trending structures, such as the Peters Creek Formation along the Susquehanna R., well-developed E-W striking crenulation cleavages post-date the pervasive foliation and indicate a consistent N-directed sense of shear. Farther south in the MD Piedmont, E-W trending folds and associated crenulation cleavage cross the dominantly NE trending Baltimore Gneiss domes in zones. The Phoenix dome among others trends E-W and exhibits a strong E-W crenulation cleavage with N-directed asymmetry that crosses a weaker NE-trending crenulation cleavage.

  11. Cross-culturally modified University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test for a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Tekeli, Hakan; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Yasar, Halit; Kendirli, Mustafa T; Saglam, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) is a well-developed and popular olfactory test, which has been validated in various populations. However, there was only one study in a Turkish population, and this study indicated that the North American version of the UPSIT was not enough to evaluate the olfactory functions of Turkish population. So, we developed a cross-cultural adaptation of the UPSIT, the UPSIT-Turkish (UPSIT-T). Thus, the goal of this study was to investigate the applicability of the UPSIT-T in healthy Turkish subjects. The study included 51 healthy individuals who reported having normal olfactory function. The participants were administered the North American version of the UPSIT firstly, and then, after a day UPSIT-T was applied to the participants. The results of two smell tests were compared, and the applicability of UPSIT-T was evaluated. The mean (standard deviation) value for correctly identified odors was 27.2 ± 5.7 (range, 14-38) with the UPSIT application, whereas the mean (standard deviation) value for correctly identified odors was 35.9 ± 3.1 for UPSIT-T. There was a statistically significant increase in the scores of the participants when UPSIT-T was performed (p < 0.001). The identification rates of 10 test odorants were <80% for our study group, and 2 of 10 were <70% for the UPSIT-T. The UPSIT-T modification is an adequate olfactory test for clinical use in a Turkish population.

  12. Severity models of cross-median and rollover crashes on rural divided highways in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Donnell, Eric T

    2011-10-01

    Crossover and rollover crashes in earth-divided, traversable medians on rural divided highways can lead to severe injury outcomes. This study estimated severity models of these two crash types. Vehicle, driver, roadway, and median cross-section design data were factors considered in the models. A unique aspect of the data used to estimate the models were the availability of median cross-slope data, which are not commonly included in roadway inventory data files. A binary logit model of cross-median crash severity and a multinomial logit model of rollover crash severity were estimated using five years of data from rural divided highways in Pennsylvania. The highest probability of a fatal or major injury in cross-median and rollover crashes was found to occur in cases when a driver was not wearing a seatbelt. While flatter cross-slopes and narrower medians were associated with more severe cross-median crash outcomes, steeper cross-slopes and narrower medians significantly increased rollover crash severity outcomes. The presence of horizontal curves was associated with increased probabilities of high-severity outcomes in a median rollover crash. Modeling results in this study confirmed that cross-median and median rollover crash severity outcomes are associated with median cross-section design characteristics. Based on the estimated models, it appears that flatter and narrower medians lead to more severe injury outcomes in cross-median crashes. Steeper median cross-slopes and narrower medians were associated with higher probabilities of more severe outcomes in median rollover crashes. The results presented in this study suggest that there is a trade-off between median cross-section design and cross-median and rollover crashes in earth-divided, traversable medians on rural divided highways. While the severity models can be included in a framework to develop design guidance in relation to this trade-off, models of crash frequency should also be considered. Copyright

  13. Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, D.F.

    1976-03-01

    Twenty-seven dogs with lead poisoning were admitted to the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital from July, 1963, to April, 1975. The major source of the lead was paint. A common history was ingestion of plaster or paint scrapings during room renovation. Most of the dogs were less than 1 year old and had clinical signs referable to the gastrointestinal or the nervous system, or both. The gastrointestinal signs, in order of frequency, were vomiting, anorexia, tender abdomen, diarrhea, and constipation. The neurologic signs, in order of frequency, were hysteria, convulsions, ataxia, blindness, and mydriasis. The finding of many nucleated erythrocytes without severe anemia was nearly pathognomonic for lead poisoning. Of 14 affected dogs subjected to abdominal radiography, 9 had evidence of ingested radiopaque material. A mean blood lead concentration of 18.8 ..mu..g/100 ml, with a range of 0 to 50 ..mu..g/100 ml, was found for 26 dogs that were hospitalized for problems unrelated to lead poisoning. Of the 27 dogs with lead poisoning, 22 had their blood analyzed for lead. This group had blood lead values ranging from 40 to 530 ..mu..g/100 ml. Seven of the affected dogs were monitored throughout their period of treatment with calcium ethylene-diaminetetraacetate. The concentration of lead in the blood decreased quickly after the initiation and treatment but leveled off after 2 or 3 days. The initial rapid phase probably corresponded to the removal of weakly bound or extracellular lead, whereas the slow phase probably corresponded to strongly bound or intracellular lead. 22 references.

  14. The early evolution of southwestern Pennsylvania's regional math/science collaborative from the leadership perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Nancy R.

    Designed as a regional approach to the coordination of efforts and focusing of resources in fragmented southwestern Pennsylvania, the Collaborative's story is narrated by its founding director. Drawing from office archives, including letters of invitation, meeting notes, and participant evaluations of each event, the study describes the genesis of the Collaborative. It begins with identification of the problem and the resulting charge by a founding congress. It details the building of an organizational framework, the creation of a shared vision, the development of a blueprint for action, and the decision-making involved in determining how to strengthen mathematics and science education in the region. The study notes several influences on the Collaborative's leadership. Considering the role of other collaboratives, the study notes that knowledge of the Los Angeles Educational Partnership's LA SMART jump-started the Collaborative's initial planning process. Knowledge of San Francisco's SEABA influenced the size and naming of the Collaborative's Journal. Fred Newmann's definition of authentic instruction, learning and assessment are reflected in the shared vision and belief statements of the Collaborative. The five disciplines of Peter Senge influenced the nature of the organizational framework as well as the day-to-day operations of the Collaborative. The study also notes that the five organizational tensions identified in Ann Lieberman's work on "intentional learning communities" were present in every aspect of the evolution of the Collaborative. The study suggests that leaders of evolving collaboratives: (1) engage all relevant stakeholders in assessing the current situation and defining a desired future state, (2) take advantage of the lessons learned by others and the resources available at the state and national levels to design strategies and build action plans, (3) model the practices to be inspired in the learning community, (4) constantly gather feedback on

  15. Using Stream Chemistry Measurements by Scientists and Nonscientists to Assess Leakage from Oil and Gas Wells in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Wendt, A.; Sowers, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The recent controversies concerning the role of hydraulic fracturing in impacting water quality in the United States document that decision-making must include both scientists and nonscientists. The most common water quality problem documented in Pennsylvania with respect to shale gas well development is the occasional migration of methane into private groundwater wells. Assessing the rate of migration is difficult and has led to controversial estimates. We explore the use of nonscientists in helping to collect data from streams for comparison to groundwater data collected by government and academic scientists. Stream waters in upland landscapes generally act as collectors for upwelling groundwater, including both natural and anthropogenic methane. Collection of stream water for methane analysis is simple and robust and can be completed by nonscientists throughout the state. We have discovered several locations in the state where new or legacy gas or oil wells are leaking methane into aquifers and into streams. Methane also seeps out of landfills and from natural sources. We present stream methane data from across the oil and gas development region in Pennsylvania, including sites of release of biogenic gas, natural thermogenic gas, legacy oil/gas well leakage, shale gas well leakage, and landfill leakage, and we assess the natural background of methane in stream water in the state. In some locations we compare methane in streams to methane in groundwater. As the state with the oldest oil wells in the U.S.A., Pennsylvania is a natural laboratory to understand not only the science of methane migration but also how to incorporate citizens into strategies to understand water quality impacts related to hydrocarbon development.

  16. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  17. X-Ray Equipment and Protective Devices of Dental Assistant Programs in Pennsylvania Vocational Technical Schools. Vocational-Technical Education Research Report, Health Occupations, Monograph No. 7, Vol. 16, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hominsky, Dolores J.; Hole, F. Marvin

    Objectives of a Pennsylvania study were (1) to investigate the ways in which the vocational technical schools of the state have met the recommendations of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources for classroom structural design and dental x-ray machines in dental assistant training programs and (2) to collect data on the methods by…

  18. Simplified Space Conditioning in Low-Load Homes: Results from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, New Construction Unoccupied Test House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poerschke, A.; Stecher, D.

    2014-06-01

    Field testing was performed in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Four air-based heating, ventilation, and air conditioning distribution systems--a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a system with transfer fans to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms--were evaluated during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The relative ability of each system was assessed with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively.

  19. Techniques for delineation and portrayal of land cover types using ERTS-1 data. [Pennsylvania, Montana, and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Wilson, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS data was used to map land cover in agricultural areas, although in some parts of Pennsylvania, with small irregular fields, many of the pixels overlap field boundaries and cause difficulties in classification. Various techniques and devices were used to display the results of these land cover analyses. The most promising approach would be a user-interactive color monitor interfaced with a large computer so that classification results could be displayed on the CRT and these results output by a hard complete copier.

  20. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 3 well, Erie County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 3 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 422 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Erie County of north-western Pennsylvania.

  1. Threats of school violence in Pennsylvania after media coverage of the Columbine High School massacre: examining the role of imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinsky, S; Bixler, E O; Kettl, P A

    2001-09-01

    Following the April 20, 1999, massacre at Columbine High School, Littleton, Colo, school administrators, law enforcement officials, and the media reported a rash of successive bomb threats and threats of school violence that were attributed to imitation. To establish that the clustering of threats of school violence following the Columbine massacre was initiated by imitation. A database of threats of school violence reported to the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, Harrisburg, during the 50 days following the Columbine incident was examined to determine the daily frequency of threats. To determine factors that predict the occurrence of these threats, counties and school districts in which threats occurred were noted. Pennsylvania school districts reported 354 threats of school violence during the 50 days after the Columbine massacre, far exceeding the 1 or 2 threats per year estimated by school administrators before 1999. The frequency of these threats over time demonstrated a crescendo-decrescendo pattern. Fifty-six percent of the threats were made on or before day 10 after the incident, and more than one third occurred on days 8, 9, and 10. Factors that predicted the likelihood of a school's receiving a threat after the massacre included a greater proportion of white students and larger school enrollment. Successive threats of violence follow a publicized act of school violence. The media should recognize that imitation threats can occur and craft their stories accordingly.

  2. Assessing Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Extraction on Microbial Communities in Headwater Stream Ecosystems in Northwestern Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eTrexler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have increased dramatically in Pennsylvania Marcellus shale formations, however the potential for major environmental impacts are still incompletely understood. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed to characterize the microbial community structure of water, sediment, bryophyte, and biofilm samples from 26 headwater stream sites in northwestern Pennsylvania with different histories of fracking activity within Marcellus shale play. Further, we describe the relationship between microbial community structure and environmental parameters measured. Approximately 3.2 million 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from a total of 58 samples. Microbial community analyses showed significant reductions in species richness as well as evenness in sites with Marcellus shale activity (MSA+. Beta diversity analyses revealed distinct microbial community structure between sites with and without Marcellus shale activity (MSA-. For example, OTUs within the Acetobacteracea, Methylocystaceae, Acidobacteriaceae, and Phenylobacterium were greater than three log-fold more abundant in MSA+ sites as compared to MSA- sites. Further, several of these OTUs were strongly negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with the number of wellpads in a watershed. It should be noted that many of the OTUs enriched in MSA+ sites are putative acidophilic and/or methanotrophic populations. This study revealed apparent shifts in the autochthonous microbial communities and highlighted potential members that could be responding to changing stream conditions as a result of nascent industrial activity in these aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Historical Oil and Gas Wells in Pennsylvania: Implications for New Shale Gas Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmore, Robert M; Sams, James I; Glosser, Deborah; Carter, Kristin M; Bain, Daniel J

    2015-10-20

    Recent large-scale development of oil and gas from low-permeability unconventional formations (e.g., shales, tight sands, and coal seams) has raised concern about potential environmental impacts. If left improperly sealed, legacy oil and gas wells colocated with that new development represent a potential pathway for unwanted migration of fluids (brine, drilling and stimulation fluids, oil, and gas). Uncertainty in the number, location, and abandonment state of legacy wells hinders environmental assessment of exploration and production activity. The objective of this study is to apply publicly available information on Pennsylvania oil and gas wells to better understand their potential to serve as pathways for unwanted fluid migration. This study presents a synthesis of historical reports and digital well records to provide insights into spatial and temporal trends in oil and gas development. Areas with a higher density of wells abandoned prior to the mid-20th century, when more modern well-sealing requirements took effect in Pennsylvania, and areas where conventional oil and gas production penetrated to or through intervals that may be affected by new Marcellus shale development are identified. This information may help to address questions of environmental risk related to new extraction activities.

  4. Hydrology of area 2, Eastern Coal Province, Pennsylvania and New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herb, W.J.; Brown, D.E.; Shaw, L.C.; Stoner, J.E.; Felbinger, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    Provisions of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 recognized a nationwide need for hydrologic information in mined and potentially mined areas. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners, operators, regulatory authorities, citizens groups, and others by presenting information on existing hydrologic conditions and by identifying additional sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text accompanied by a map, chart, graph, or other illustration for each of a series of water-resourcesrelated topics. The summation of the topical discussions provides a description of the hydrology of the area. The Eastern Coal Province has been divided into 24 hydrologic study areas which are shown on the cover of this report. The divisions are based on hydrologic factors, location, and size. Hydrologic units (surface drainage basins) or parts of units are combined to form each study area. Study Area 2 covers northwestern Pennsylvania and a small part of southwestern New York. Most exposed bedrock is of Pennsylvanian, Mi;;sissippian, or Devonian ages. Glacial drift covers most of the bedrock in the northwestern part of the area. During 1979, more than 7 million tons of bituminous coal was produced from about 230 mines in Area 2 counties. Over 99 percent of the area's coal production is from surface mining. Streamflow data are available for 18 continuousrecord stations; 1 crest-stage, partial-record station; 1 low-flow, partial-record station; and 65 miscellaneous sites. Water-quality data are available for 78 locations. Streams having the highest median specific conductance, highest median dissolved-solids concentrations, lowest median pH, highest median total-iron concentration, highest median total-manganese concentration, and highest dissolved-sulfate concentrations were found in Clarion County, the leading coal-producing county in the area. Statistics on low flow, mean flow, peak flow, and flow duration for

  5. Surface-water quality in Pequea Creek basin, Pennsylvania, 1977-79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the Pequea Creek basin was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission and the EPA from February 1977 through March 1979. Pequea Creek drains an intensive agricultural area of 154 sq mi in southeastern Pennsylvania, and enters the Susquehanna River 30 mi north of the Chesapeake Bay. The study included measurement of streamflow and collection of water and bottom material samples from seven sites in the basin during selected base flows and storms. Water samples were collected daily at a site near the mouth of Pequea Creek, and analyzed for suspended sediment, nitrogen and phosphorus species, organic carbon, and pesticides. Some groundwater samples also were collected and analyzed for nitrate. Annual yields measured from the basin during the study period were 1,950 ton/sq mi for suspended sediment, 13.8 ton/sq mi for total nitrogen, and 1.8 ton/sq mi for phosphorus. These yields are five times higher than any previously measured in the Susquehanna River basin. The discharges of all constituents monitored increased with increasing flow, indicated that a large amount of material in the basin is available for transport to streams during storms. The large yields of nitrogen and phosphorus are probably caused by the intensive agriculture in the basin coupled with large applications of fertilizer and manure to farm fields. Chemical analyses of rainfall samples indicate that precipitation was not a significant source of nitrogen and phosphorus. Excluding nitrate, all constituents measured were transported mainly during storms. Nitrate concentrations during base flow were as high as 10 mg/L as N--the Environmental Protection Agency standard for domestic water supplies. Groundwater sampled from farm wells had nitrate concentrations up to 28 mg/L as N. The largest concentrations of herbicides detected in Pequea basin were for 2,4-D, atrazine, and simazine. The maximum concentrations observed during storms were 1

  6. Isolation of viable Toxoplasma gondii, molecular characterization, and seroprevalence in elk (Cervus canadensis) in Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Brown, J; Verma, S K; Cerqueira-Cézar, C K; Banfield, J; Kwok, O C H; Ying, Y; Murata, F H A; Pradhan, A K; Su, C

    2017-08-30

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide zoonosis. The ingestion of uncooked/undercooked meat and consumption of water contaminated with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts excreted by felids are the main modes of transmission of this parasite. T. gondii has been reported in multiple cervid species; however, little is known of the parasite in North American elk (Cervus canadensis). In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii were detected in serum of wild elk from Pennsylvania collected during 2013-2016 by the modified agglutination test (MAT, cut-off 1:25); 221 of 317 (69.7%) had MAT titers of 1:25 in 19, 1:50 in 28, 1:100 in 34, and 1:200 or higher in 140. Thus most (44.1%) elk had relatively high titers. Seroprevalence was slightly higher in males (76.9%) than females (67.5%, not statistically significant, Chi-square tests, P<0.0001) and was higher in adults (76.5%) than yearlings (46.4%, Odds ratio 3.82; 95% CL 1.72-8.47; P=0.001) or calves (21.7%, Odds ratio 12.58; 95% CL 4.51-35.10; P<0.0001). Annual seroprevalence was relatively stable throughout the period tested and ranged from 66.6% to 72.2%. Of the 101 elk harvested in 2016, hearts were bioassayed from 20 elk and tongues were bioassayed from 56; all tongue samples were negative. Viable T. gondii was isolated from hearts of two female elk, one of these was a seronegative adult and the other was a calf with no serum available for testing. Both T. gondii isolates were cultivated in cell culture and DNA derived from tachyzoites was characterized using the PCR-RFLP markers including SAG1, SAG2 (5'- 3'SAG2 and altSAG2), SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico. One isolate belongs to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #2 and the other is genotype #5. Both genotypes are frequently identified in animals in North America. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Radon emissions from natural gas power plants at The Pennsylvania State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidworthy, Alison G; Davis, Kenneth J; Leavey, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Burning natural gas in power plants may emit radon ((222)Rn) into the atmosphere. On the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University, atmospheric radon enhancements were measured and modeled in the vicinity of their two power plants. The three-part study first involved measuring ambient outdoor radon concentrations from August 2014 through January 2015 at four sites upwind and downwind of the power plants at distances ranging from 80 m to 310 m. For each plant, one site served as a background site, while three other sites measured radon concentration enhancements downwind. Second, the radon content of natural gas flowing into the power plant was measured, and third, a plume dispersion model was used to predict the radon concentrations downwind of the power plants. These predictions are compared to the measured downwind enhancements in radon to determine whether the observed radon concentration enhancements could be attributed to the power plants' emissions. Atmospheric radon concentrations were consistently low as compared to the EPA action level of 148 Bq m(-3), averaging 34.5 ± 2.7 Bq m(-3) around the East Campus Steam Plant (ECSP) and 31.6 ± 2.7 Bq m(-3) around the West Campus Steam Plant (WCSP). Significant concentrations of radon, ranging from 516 to 1,240 Bq m(-3), were detected in the natural gas. The measured enhancements downwind of the ECSP averaged 6.2 Bq m(-3) compared to modeled enhancements of 0.08 Bq m(-3). Measured enhancements around the WCSP averaged -0.2 Bq m(-3) compared to the modeled enhancements of 0.05 Bq m(-3), which were not significant compared to observational error. The comparison of the measured to modeled downwind radon enhancements shows no correlation over time. The measurements of radon levels in the vicinity of the power plants appear to be unaffected by the emissions from the power plants. Radon measurements at sites surrounding power plants that utilize natural gas did not indicate that the radon concentrations

  8. Estimation of methane concentrations and loads in groundwater discharge to Sugar Run, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Risser, Dennis W.; Conger, Randall W.; Grieve, Paul L.; Hynek, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    A stream-sampling study was conducted to estimate methane concentrations and loads in groundwater discharge to a small stream in an active shale-gas development area of northeastern Pennsylvania. Grab samples collected from 15 streams in Bradford, Lycoming, Susquehanna, and Tioga Counties, Pa., during a reconnaissance survey in May and June 2013 contained dissolved methane concentrations ranging from less than the minimum reporting limit (1.0) to 68.5 micrograms per liter (µg/L). The stream-reach mass-balance method of estimating concentrations and loads of methane in groundwater discharge was applied to a 4-kilometer (km) reach of Sugar Run in Lycoming County, one of the four streams with methane concentrations greater than or equal to 5 µg/L. Three synoptic surveys of stream discharge and methane concentrations were conducted during base-flow periods in May, June, and November 2013. Stream discharge at the lower end of the reach was about 0.10, 0.04, and 0.02 cubic meters per second, respectively, and peak stream methane concentrations were about 20, 67, and 29 µg/L. In order to refine estimated amounts of groundwater discharge and locations where groundwater with methane discharges to the stream, the lower part of the study reach was targeted more precisely during the successive studies, with approximate spacing between stream sampling sites of 800 meters (m), 400 m, and 200 m, in May, June, and November, respectively. Samples collected from shallow piezometers and a seep near the location of the peak methane concentration measured in streamwater had groundwater methane concentrations of 2,300 to 4,600 µg/L. These field data, combined with one-dimensional stream-methane transport modeling, indicate groundwater methane loads of 1.8 ±0.8, 0.7 ±0.3, and 0.7 ±0.2 kilograms per day, respectively, discharging to Sugar Run. Estimated groundwater methane concentrations, based on the transport modeling, ranged from 100 to 3,200 µg/L. Although total methane load

  9. 43 CFR 10.14 - Lineal descent and cultural affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony in museum or Federal agency..., funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony must be established by using the..., sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony must be established by a preponderance of the evidence...

  10. Res Oct 2014 Cover Tp 01.10.14.cdr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    a large shrub or a small evergreen tree upto 5m tall distributed in the forests of south- and south-east Asia. Barkislight-brownincolour. Branches are angled, covered withsoftwollyhairs. Leaves are opposite, densely hairy, greenish-grey incolour, elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate with crenate margin. Flowers are white incolour,.

  11. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions of... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR...

  12. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds in Pennsylvania waters, 2006-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.; Crawford, J. Kent; Loper, Connie A.; Proctor, Arianne; Manning, Rhonda; Titler, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Concern over the presence of contaminants of emerging concern, such as pharmaceutical compounds, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds (OWCs), in waters of the United States and elsewhere is growing. Laboratory techniques developed within the last decade or new techniques currently under development within the U.S. Geological Survey now allow these compounds to be measured at concentrations in nanograms per liter. These new laboratory techniques were used in a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, to determine the occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern in streams, streambed sediment, and groundwater of Pennsylvania. Compounds analyzed for in the study are pharmaceuticals (human and veterinary drugs), hormones (natural and synthetic), and OWCs (detergents, fragrances, pesticides, industrial compounds, disinfectants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fire retardants and plasticizers). Reconnaissance sampling was conducted from 2006 to 2009 to identify contaminants of emerging concern in (1) groundwater from wells used to supply livestock, (2) streamwater upstream and downstream from animal feeding operations, (3) streamwater upstream from and streamwater and streambed sediment downstream from municipal wastewater effluent discharges, (4) streamwater from sites within 5 miles of drinking-water intakes, and (5) streamwater and streambed sediment where fish health assessments were conducted. Of the 44 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed in groundwater samples collected in 2006 from six wells used to supply livestock, only cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) and the antibiotics tylosin and sulfamethoxazole were detected. The maximum concentration of any contaminant of emerging concern was 24 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for cotinine, and was detected in a groundwater sample from a Lebanon County, Pa., well. Seven pharmaceutical compounds including acetaminophen

  13. White ash (Fraxinus americana) health in the Allegheny plateau region, Pennsylvania: Evaluating the relationship between FIA phase 3 crown variables and a categorical rating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro A. Royo; Kathleen S. Knight; Jamie M. Himes; Ashley N. Will

    2012-01-01

    Following the detection of white ash (Fraxinus americana) decline in the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) of Pennsylvania, we established an intensified white ash monitoring network throughout the ANF. We rated crowns using both a categorical system as well as Forest Inventory and Analyses (FIA) Phase 3 measures of uncompacted live crown ratio,...

  14. Chronic over browsing and biodiversity collapse in a forest understory in Pennsylvania: Results from a 60 year-old deer exclusion plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Goetsch; Jennifer Wigg; Alejandro A. Royo; Todd Ristau; Walter P. Carson

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of chronic deer over browsing on the diversity and abundance of understory forbs and shrubs within a forest stand in the Allegheny High Plateau Region of Pennsylvania by comparing vegetation inside a 60-year-old exclosure to vegetation within an adjacent reference site. This is the oldest known exclosure in the Eastern Deciduous Forest. Browsing...

  15. Use of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions to Reduce Transmission of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) in Pennsylvania Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey R.; Short, Vanessa L.; Wu, Henry M.; Waller, Kirsten; Mead, Paul; Kahn, Emily; Bahn, Beth A; Dale, Jon W.; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Walton, Sabrina E.; Urdaneta, Veronica; Ostroff, Stephen; Averhoff, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: School-based recommendations for nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) were issued in response to the threat of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1). The implementation and effectiveness of these recommendations has not been assessed. Methods: In November 2009, a Web-based survey of all Pennsylvania public schools was conducted to assess…

  16. Use of Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled, School-Aged US Children in Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Families: Trends in Pennsylvania From 2005 Through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, Arina; Shults, Justine; Pinto, Andres; Rubin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We describe trends in receipt of preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled children in Pennsylvania between 2005 and 2010, comparing the US children of immigrants with their co-ethnic peers in nonimmigrant families. Methods. We analyzed Pennsylvania Medicaid claims, birth records, and census data for children born in Pennsylvania and enrolled in Medicaid for 10 or more months during any of the calendar years assessed. Results. Receipt of preventive dental care was more likely among Latino children in immigrant families than among their peers in nonimmigrant families; also, it was more likely among White children in immigrant families than among their peers in nonimmigrant families. Rates of preventive dental care use among African American and Asian children in immigrant and nonimmigrant families were comparable. From 2005 to 2010, the percentage of Latino children in nonimmigrant families who received preventive dental care increased from 33% to 61%. Changes in other groups were significant but less dramatic. Conclusions. Receipt of preventive dental care has increased among Medicaid-enrolled children in Pennsylvania, with marked gains among Latino children. Within each racial/ethnic group, the children of immigrants were either more likely than or equally likely as children in nonimmigrant families to receive care. PMID:25322290

  17. An Analysis of Training Effects on School Personnel's Knowledge, Attitudes, Comfort, and Confidence Levels toward Educating Students about HIV/AIDS in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschlander, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the training effects on school personnel's knowledge, attitudes, comfort, and confidence levels toward educating students about HIV/AIDS in Pennsylvania. The following four research questions were explored: (a) What is the knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and comfort levels of school personnel regarding…

  18. A mechanism of Pennsylvania anthracite graphitization involving carbide formation and decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter Jarod

    Four Pennsylvania anthracites were selected for this research based on presumed geological differences, in terms of mineral matter type and content, as well as amount of fixed carbon content. The LCNN, UAE, Joddo, and Summit anthracites were all heat-treated to the same temperatures for the same period of time, based on heating rate and soak time at maximum temperature. The heat-treatment temperatures were 2000, 2200, 2500, and 2640°C with a soak time of one hour. After heat-treatment it was found that all the anthracites graphitized, as evidenced by the presence of a weak (112) X-ray diffraction peak, but that the Summit anthracite achieved the highest degree of graphitization, in terms of d-spacing closest to 3.354 A and largest crystallite dimensions. It was also determined that a non graphite phase was present in the 2200°C heat-treated anthracites, and that this non-graphite phase must be a reaction product, or carbide, formed from the carbon of the anthracite and metallic elements of the minerals. The carbide phase was no longer present in the 2500°C heat-treated anthracites, meaning that the carbide must have decomposed. The possibility that this carbide formation and decomposition was involved in promoting graphitization was examined by demineralizing the Summit anthracite and adding the minerals rutile, quartz, iron oxide, and calcite back into this demineralized sample, as well as to the least graphitizing Joddo anthracite. These four minerals were selected because of computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) data, plasma emission data, and literature on industrial production of carbides and carbon electrode additives. The result of this demineralization and re-mineralization was that the Jeddo sample with added minerals achieved a higher degree of graphitization than the raw Jeddo anthracite, and that the demineralized Summit anthracite could no longer be considered a gaphitizing carbon because the (112) peak was absent from the 2600

  19. Distribution and transport of trace substances in the Schuylkill River basin from Berne to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, John K.; Yorke, Thomas H.; Pederson, Gary L.

    1985-01-01

    During the period from October 1978 to March 1981, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed the river quality of the Schuylkill River basin in Pennsylvania from the headwaters to the Fairmount Dam at Philadelphia (river mile 8.4). The assessment focused on the distribution and transport of trace metals and organic substances (trace substances). Trace metals included were arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc; trace organic substances included organochlorine insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls. In general, concentrations of trace substances in the streambed sediments were greater in the main stem of the Schuylkill River than in its tributaries and exceeded the background concentrations in the study area. Concentrations of most trace metals in the sediments were lowest in the Berne area (river mile 95) and highest in the urban-industrial area of Reading (river mile 76). Concentrations generally decreased from Reading downstream to Philadelphia (river mile 10.2). Concentrations of the organochlorine insecticides chlordane, DDT and its metabolites, and dieldrin generally increased gradually from Berne to Philadelphia. Average concentrations of trace metals in the main stem of the Schuylkill River in the sediment-sized fraction, less than 0.063 millimeters, were: zinc, 603 ?g/g (micrograms per gram); lead, 284 ?g/g; copper, 252 ?g/g; nickel, 119 ?g/g; chromium, 96 ?g/g; beryllium, 8.2 ?g/g; arsenic, 0.64 ?g/g; and mercury, 0.002 ?g/g. Average concentrations of trace organic substances in sediments of the main stem of the river were: polychlorinated biphenyls, 152 ?g/kg (micrograms per kilogram); chlordane, 24 ?g/kg; DDT and its metabolites, 18 ?g/kg; and dieldrin, 1.8 ?g/kg. The average annual transport of trace substances by the river was computed for chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc. Concentrations of other trace substances in the sediment-water mixtures were generally undetectable. Of the trace metals, average annual transport

  20. Distribution of trace metals at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Reif, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Hopewell Furnace, located approximately 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was a cold-blast, charcoal iron furnace that operated for 113 years (1771 to 1883). The purpose of this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, was to determine the distribution of trace metals released to the environment from an historical iron smelter at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS). Hopewell Furnace used iron ore from local mines that contained abundant magnetite and accessory sulfide minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, and other metals. Ore, slag, cast iron furnace products, soil, groundwater, stream base flow, streambed sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled for this study. Soil samples analyzed in the laboratory had concentrations of trace metals low enough to meet Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection standards for non-residential use. Groundwater samples from the supply well met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations. Concentrations of metals in surface-water base flow at the five stream sampling sites were below continuous concentration criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediment at the five stream sites were below probable effects level guidelines for protection of aquatic organisms except for copper at site HF-3. Arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, and possibly cobalt were incorporated into the cast iron produced by Hopewell Furnace. Manganese was concentrated in slag along with iron, nickel, and zinc. The soil near the furnace has elevated concentrations of chromium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc compared to background soil concentrations. Concentrations of toxic elements were not present at concentrations of concern in water, soil, or stream sediments, despite being elevated in ore, slag, and cast iron furnace products. The base-flow surface-water samples indicated good overall quality. The five sampled sites generally had

  1. Evaluation of the ground-water resources of parts of Lancaster and Berks Counties, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, J.M.; Lazorchick, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Secondary openings in bedrock are the avenues for virtually all ground-water flow in a 626-sqare-mile area in Lancaster and Berks Counties, Pennsylvania. The number, size, and interconnection of secondary openings are functions of lithology, depth, and topography. Ground water actively circulates to depths of 150 to 300 feet below land surface. Total average annual ground-water recharge for the area is 388 million gallons per day, most of which discharges to streams from local, unconfined flow systems. A digital ground-water flow model was developed to simulate unconfined flow under several different recharge and withdrawal scenarios. On the basis of lithologic and hydrologic differences, the modeled area was sub-divided into 22 hydrogeologic units. A finite-difference grid with rectangular blocks, each 2,015 by 2,332 feet, was used. The model was calibrated under steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state calibration was used to determine hydraulic conductivities and stream leakage coefficients and the transient calibration was used to determine specific yields. The 22 hydrogeologic units fall into four general lithologies: Carbonate rocks, metamorphic rocks, Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, and Triassic sedimentary rocks. Average hydraulic conductivity ranges from about 8.8 feet per day in carbonate units to about .5 feet per day in metamorphic units. The Stonehenge Formation (limestone) has the greatest average hydraulic conductivity--85.2 feet per day in carbonate units to about 0.11 feet per day in the greatest gaining-strem leakage coefficient--16.81 feet per day. Specific yield ranges from 0.06 to 0.09 in carbonate units, and is 0.02 to 0.015, and 0.012 in metamorphic, Paleozoic sedimentary, and Triassic sedimentary units, respectively. Transient simulations were made to determine the effects of four different combinations of natural and artificial stresses. Natural aquifer conditions (no ground-water withdrawals) and actual aquifer conditions

  2. Development of Natural Alkalinity in Appalachian Deep Coal Mine Discharges, Irwin Syncline, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, E. M.; Winters, W. R.; Winters, W. R.; Capo, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    Geochemical processes in flooded underground coal mine complexes are controlled by the relationship between overburden mineralogy and the hydrogeologic system, which is influenced by mining methodology and discharge location. Numerous large flow (over 2,000 L/min), historically acidic, deep mine discharges in Appalachian bituminous coal basins are now net alkaline, with circumneutral pH and high concentrations of dissolved iron (20-80 ppm) and sodium (100-500 ppm) [1]. Understanding natural alkalinity production offers alternative approaches for neutralizing acid mine drainage (AMD) and has implications for predictive models, mining regulations, mine discharge remediation, and resource recovery. To determine the subsurface processes involved in the generation of natural alkalinity, we focused on the Irwin syncline, a 240 sq.-km bituminous coal basin in southwestern Pennsylvania. All major streams that arise within or cross the syncline are affected by polluted mine drainage. The pollution ranges from highly acidic iron- and aluminum-contaminated discharges in the northern portion of the basin to highly alkaline, iron and sulfate-contaminated discharges in the southern portion. Underground mine barrier data were used to divide the basin into six hydraulically related sub-basins; mine waters were collected from nine discharges across the basin [2]. Sub-basin hydrology was integrated with infiltration, discharge, and overburden geochemistry and mineralogy. Modeling of Irwin syncline flows using a solute modeling program (PHREEQC 2.4.2; [3]) indicates that the spatial and temporal change in mine water chemistry involves processes other than simple carbonate dissolution or dilution with uncontaminated water. Results indicate that the acidic discharges in the northeastern end of the basin are the product of surface water modified by pyrite oxidation and dissolution of aluminosilicate minerals. Sodium concentrations in those flows are likely the result of minor halite

  3. Population dynamics of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in Spruce Creek Pennsylvania: A quarter-century perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Gary D.; Carline, Robert F.; Wagner, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    We examined the relationship between density-independent and density-dependent factors on the demography of a dense, relatively unexploited population of brown trout in Spruce Creek Pennsylvania between 1985 and 2011.Individual PCAs of flow and temperature data elucidated groups of years with multiple high flow versus multiple low flow characteristics and high versus low temperature years, although subtler patterns of variation also were observed.Density and biomass displayed similar temporal patterns, ranging from 710 to 1,803 trout/ha and 76–263 kg/ha. We detected a significantly negative linear stock-recruitment relationship (R2 = .39) and there was no evidence that flow or water temperature affected recruitment.Both annual survival and the per-capita rate of increase (r) for the population varied over the study, and density-dependent mechanisms possessed the greatest explanatory power for annual survival data. Temporal trends in population r suggested it displayed a bounded equilibrium with increases observed in 12 years and decreases detected in 13 years.Model selection analysis of per-capita rate of increase data for age 1, and adults (N = eight interpretable models) indicated that both density-dependent (five of eight) and negative density-independent processes (five of eight, i.e. high flows or temperatures), affected r. Recruitment limitation also was identified in three of eight models. Variation in the per-capita rate of increase for the population was most strongly affected by positive density independence in the form of increasing spring–summer temperatures and recruitment limitation.Model selection analyses describing annual variation in both mean length and mass data yielded similar results, although maximum wi values were low ranging from 0.09 to 0.23 (length) and 0.13 to 0.22 (mass). Density-dependence was included in 15 of 15 interpretable models for length and all ten interpretable models for mass. Similarly, positive density

  4. Hydrogeologic framework and sampling design for an assessment of agricultural pesticides in ground water in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Bickford, Tammy M.

    1999-01-01

    State agencies responsible for regulating pesticides are required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop state management plans for specific pesticides. A key part of these management plans includes assessing the potential for contamination of ground water by pesticides throughout the state. As an example of how a statewide assessment could be implemented, a plan is presented for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to illustrate how a hydrogeologic framework can be used as a basis for sampling areas within a state with the highest likelihood of having elevated pesticide concentrations in ground water. The framework was created by subdividing the state into 20 areas on the basis of physiography and aquifer type. Each of these 20 hydrogeologic settings is relatively homogeneous with respect to aquifer susceptibility and pesticide use—factors that would be likely to affect pesticide concentrations in ground water. Existing data on atrazine occurrence in ground water was analyzed to determine (1) which areas of the state already have sufficient samples collected to make statistical comparisons among hydrogeologic settings, and (2) the effect of factors such as land use and aquifer characteristics on pesticide occurrence. The theoretical vulnerability and the results of the data analysis were used to rank each of the 20 hydrogeologic settings on the basis of vulnerability of ground water to contamination by pesticides. Example sampling plans are presented for nine of the hydrogeologic settings that lack sufficient data to assess vulnerability to contamination. Of the highest priority areas of the state, two out of four have been adequately sampled, one of the three areas of moderate to high priority has been adequately sampled, four of the nine areas of moderate to low priority have been adequately sampled, and none of the three low priority areas have been sampled.Sampling to date has shown that, even in the most vulnerable hydrogeologic settings

  5. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; Seal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite–oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al2O3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe2O3, K2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al2O3, CaO and S, and low in Fe2O3, K2O and SiO2 compared to the other piles. In general, piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar to each other, whereas pile 3 is distinct – a conclusion that reflects their mineralogy. The similarities and differences among piles in terms of mineralogy and major element chemistry result from the different smelting conditions under which the slag formed and include the fuel source, the composition of the ore and flux, the type of blast (cold versus hot), which affects the furnace temperature, and other

  6. Groundwater quality for 75 domestic wells in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eliza L.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2017-03-06

    Groundwater is a major source of drinking water in Lycoming County and adjacent counties in north-central and northeastern Pennsylvania, which are largely forested and rural and are currently undergoing development for hydrocarbon gases. Water-quality data are needed for assessing the natural characteristics of the groundwater resource and the potential effects from energy and mineral extraction, timber harvesting, agriculture, sewage and septic systems, and other human influences.This report, prepared in cooperation with Lycoming County, presents analytical data for groundwater samples from 75 domestic wells sampled throughout Lycoming County in June, July, and August 2014. The samples were collected using existing pumps and plumbing prior to any treatment and analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics, including nutrients, major ions, metals and trace elements, volatile organic compounds, gross-alpha particle and gross beta-particle activity, uranium, and dissolved gases, including methane and radon-222.Results indicate groundwater quality generally met most drinking-water standards, but that some samples exceeded primary or secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for arsenic, iron, manganese, total dissolved solids (TDS), chloride, pH, bacteria, or radon-222. Arsenic concentrations were higher than the MCL of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) in 9 of the 75 (12 percent) well-water samples, with concentrations as high as 23.6 μg/L; arsenic concentrations were higher than the health advisory level (HAL) of 2 μg/L in 23 samples (31 percent). Total iron concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) of 300 μg/L in 20 of the 75 samples. Total manganese concentrations exceeded the SMCL of 50 μg/L in 20 samples and the HAL of 300 μg/L in 2 of those samples. Three samples had chloride concentrations that exceeded the SMCL of 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L); two of those samples exceeded the SMCL of 500 mg/L for TDS. The pH ranged

  7. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Westinghouse Advanced Reactors and Nuclear Fuels Divisions, Cheswick, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Dicenso, K.D.; DeLorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) waste now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Sits in southeastern Washington State is to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 5.7 percent of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division (WARD) and the Westinghouse Nuclear Fuels Division (WNFD) in Cheswick, Pennsylvania and shipped to the Hanford Sits for storage. This report characterizes these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews.

  8. Using ethnography to monitor the community health implications of onshore unconventional oil and gas developments: examples from Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Simona L

    2013-01-01

    The ethnographer's toolbox has within it a variety of methods for describing and analyzing the everyday lives of human beings that can be useful to public health practitioners and policymakers. These methods can be employed to uncover information on some of the harder-to-monitor psychological, sociocultural, and environmental factors that may lead to chronic stress in individuals and communities. In addition, because most ethnographic research studies involve deep and long-term engagement with local communities, the information collected by ethnographic researchers can be useful in tracking long- and short-term changes in overall well-being and health. Set within an environmental justice framework, this article uses examples from ongoing ethnographic fieldwork in the Marcellus Shale gas fields of Pennsylvania to describe and justify using an ethnographic approach to monitor the psychological and sociocultural determinants of community health as they relate to unconventional oil and gas development projects in the United States.

  9. An evaluation of remote sensing technologies for the detection of fugitive contamination at selected Superfund hazardous waste sites in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2014-01-01

    This evaluation was conducted to assess the potential for using both traditional remote sensing, such as aerial imagery, and emerging remote sensing technology, such as hyperspectral imaging, as tools for postclosure monitoring of selected hazardous waste sites. Sixteen deleted Superfund (SF) National Priorities List (NPL) sites in Pennsylvania were imaged with a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Airborne Real-Time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) sensor between 2009 and 2012. Deleted sites are those sites that have been remediated and removed from the NPL. The imagery was processed to radiance and atmospherically corrected to relative reflectance with standard software routines using the Environment for Visualizing Imagery (ENVI, ITT–VIS, Boulder, Colorado) software. Standard routines for anomaly detection, endmember collection, vegetation stress, and spectral analysis were applied.

  10. Priority pollutants and associated constituents in untreated and treated discharges from coal mining or processing facilities in Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, III, Charles A.; Brady, Keith B.C.

    2015-01-01

    Clean sampling and analysis procedures were used to quantify more than 70 inorganic constituents, including 35 potentially toxic or hazardous constituents, organic carbon, and other characteristics of untreated (influent) and treated (effluent) coal-mine discharges (CMD) at 38 permitted coal-mining or coal-processing facilities in the bituminous coalfield and 4 facilities in the anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania. Of the 42 facilities sampled during 2011, 26 were surface mines, 11 were underground mines, and 5 were coal refuse disposal operations. Treatment of CMD with caustic soda (NaOH), lime (CaO or Ca(OH)2), flocculent, or limestone was ongoing at 21%, 40%, 6%, and 4% of the facilities, respectively; no chemicals were added at the remaining facilities. All facilities with CMD treatment incorporated structures for active or passive aeration and settling of metal-rich precipitate.

  11. Point seroprevalence of canine influenza virus H3N8 in dogs participating in a flyball tournament in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Verna F; Stanzani, Giacomo; Smith, Gary; Otto, Cynthia M

    2011-03-15

    To determine the seroprevalence of antibody against canine influenza virus H3N8 in a group of pet dogs that participate in flyball in Pennsylvania. DESIGN-SEROLOGIC SURVEY: Animals-Dogs attending a flyball tournament in Downingtown, Pa, from November 13 to 14, 2009. Procedures-Blood samples were collected from dogs following owner consent. Medical, travel, and activity history of the dogs for the previous 10.5 months was obtained from owners. Serum was harvested and submitted to Cornell University Diagnostic Laboratory for measurement of antibody against canine influenza virus H3N8 via hemagglutination inhibition testing. Serum samples were obtained from 100 of 256 dogs participating in the flyball event. Although 3 of the 100 (3%) samples had positive results for antibody against canine influenza, none of the associated dogs had respiratory signs of infection (eg, coughing, sneezing, or nasal or ocular discharge) in the 10.5 months prior to testing. Eleven dogs had a history of respiratory signs, but none of those dogs had antibody against canine influenza H3N8. In addition, none of the study dogs had been vaccinated against canine influenza H3N8. Although canine influenza is considered enzootic in certain areas of the country (eg, Pennsylvania or New York), this study identified a low seroprevalence in dogs considered at high risk for infection given their life conditions and geographic origins. More research is warranted to elucidate the prevalence of exposure to the H3N8 virus in competitive sporting dogs and determine whether vaccination is warranted in such dogs.

  12. The Pennsylvania Experience with Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Gas Development: Relatively Infrequent Water Quality Incidents with Lots of Public Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Li, Z.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Vidic, R.

    2015-12-01

    New techniques of hydraulic fracturing - "fracking" - have changed the United States over the last 10 years into a leading producer of natural gas extraction from shale. The first such gas well in Pennsylvania was drilled and completed using high-volume hydraulic fracturing in 2004. By late 2014, more than 8500 of these gas wells had been drilled in the Marcellus Shale gas field in Pennsylvania alone. Almost 1000 public complaints about groundwater quality were logged by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) between 2008 and 2012. Only a fraction of these were attributed to unconventional gas development. The most common problem was gas migration into drinking water, but contamination incidents also included spills, seepage, or leaks of fracking fluids, brine salts, or very occasionally, radioactive species. Many problems of gas migration were from a few counties in the northeastern part of the state. However, sometimes one gas well contaminated multiple water wells. For example, one gas well was reported by the state regulator to have contaminated 18 water wells with methane near Dimock PA. It can be argued that such problems at a relatively small fraction of gas wells initiated pockets of pushback against fracking worldwide. This resistance to fracking has grown even though fracking has been in use in the U.S.A. since the 1940s. We have worked as part of an NSF-funded project (the Shale Network) to share water quality data and publish it online using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System. Sharing data has led to collaborative investigation of specific contamination incidents to understand how problems can occur, and to efforts to quantify the frequency of impacts. The Shale Network efforts have also highlighted the need for more transparency with water quality data in the arena related to the energy-water nexus. As more data are released, new techniques of data analysis will allow better understanding of how to tune best practices to be

  13. Trace metals related to historical iron smelting at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Iron ore containing elevated concentrations of trace metals was smelted at Hopewell Furnace during its 113 years of operation (1771-1883). The ore used at Hopewell Furnace was obtained from iron mines within 5 miles of the furnace. The iron-ore deposits were formed about 200 million years ago and contain abundant magnetite, the primary iron mineral, and accessory minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, lead, and other metals. Hopewell Furnace, built by Mark Bird during 1770-71, was one of the last of the charcoal-burning, cold-blast iron furnaces operated in Pennsylvania. The most productive years for Hopewell Furnace were from 1830 to 1837. Castings were the most profitable product, especially the popular Hopewell Stove. More than 80,000 stoves were cast at Hopewell, which produced as many as 23 types and sizes of cooking and heating stoves. Beginning in the 1840s, the iron industry shifted to large-scale, steam-driven coke and anthracite furnaces. Independent rural enterprises like Hopewell could no longer compete when the iron and steel industries consolidated in urban manufacturing centers. The furnace ceased operation in 1883 (Kurjack, 1954). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Park Service, completed a study at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS) in Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania, to determine the fate of toxic trace metals, such as arsenic, cobalt, and lead, released into the environment during historical iron-smelting operations. The results of the study, conducted during 2008-10, are presented in this fact sheet.

  14. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 11, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Henry; Horn, Marilee A.

    1997-01-01

    Segment 11 consists of the States of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, West Virginia, and the Commonwealths of Pennsylvania and Virginia. All but West Virginia border on the Atlantic Ocean or tidewater. Pennsylvania also borders on Lake Erie. Small parts of northwestern and north-central Pennsylvania drain to Lake Erie and Lake Ontario; the rest of the segment drains either to the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico. Major rivers include the Hudson, the Delaware, the Susquehanna, the Potomac, the Rappahannock, the James, the Chowan, the Neuse, the Tar, the Cape Fear, and the Yadkin-Peedee, all of which drain into the Atlantic Ocean, and the Ohio and its tributaries, which drain to the Gulf of Mexico. Although rivers are important sources of water supply for many cities, such as Trenton, N.J.; Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Pa.; Baltimore, Md.; Washington, D.C.; Richmond, Va.; and Raleigh, N.C., one-fourth of the population, particularly the people who live on the Coastal Plain, depends on ground water for supply. Such cities as Camden, N.J.; Dover, Del.; Salisbury and Annapolis, Md.; Parkersburg and Weirton, W.Va.; Norfolk, Va.; and New Bern and Kinston, N.C., use ground water as a source of public supply. All the water in Segment 11 originates as precipitation. Average annual precipitation ranges from less than 36 inches in parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia to more than 80 inches in parts of southwestern North Carolina (fig. 1). In general, precipitation is greatest in mountainous areas (because water tends to condense from moisture-laden air masses as the air passes over the higher altitudes) and near the coast, where water vapor that has been evaporated from the ocean is picked up by onshore winds and falls as precipitation when it reaches the shoreline. Some of the precipitation returns to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration (evaporation plus transpiration by plants), but much of it either flows overland into streams as

  15. Effect of urbanization on the water resources of eastern Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of human activity on the water resources of a 207-square-mile area of eastern Chester County was evaluated. The most serious consequence of urbanization is the contamination of ground water by volatile organic compounds, which were detected in 39 percent of the 70 wells sampled. As many as nine compounds were found in one water sample, and the concentration of total volatile organic compounds was as high as 17,400 ug/L (micrograms per liter). In the Chester Valley, volatile organic compounds are moving down the hydraulic gradient caused by quarry dewatering. Movement through the quarries reduces concentrations of these compounds and removes most of them. Phenol was detected in 28 percent of 54 wells sampled, with concentrations up to 7 ug/L. Metals, except for iron and manganese, and other trace constituents generally are not a water-quality problem. However, ground water in an area in Chester Valley has been contaminated by concentrations of boron as high as 20,000 ug/L and lithium as high as 13,000 ug/L. The ground water discharges to Valley Creek, where concentrations of boron are as high as 130 ug/L and lithium as high as 800 ug/L. Concentrations of chloride as high as 2,100 mg/L (milligrams per liter) were found in a well at a former highway salt storage site. Wells completed in carbonate rock downgradient from the Pennsylvania Turnpike had chloride concentrations as high as 350 mg/L. The base-neutral organic compounds bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene, and the pesticides alachlor, aldrian, diazanon, DDD, DDT, dieldrin, methyl parathion, picloram, and 2,4-D were detected in a few water samples in low concentrations, However, these organic compounds do not present a widespread water-quality problem. Neither acid organic compounds nor polychlorinated napthalenes (PCN) were detected in ground water. The growth of public water and sewer systems has resulted in a significant interbasin transfer of water

  16. Hydrogeology and water quality of the West Valley Creek Basin, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, L.A.; Sloto, R.A.; Reif, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The West Valley Creek Basin drains 20.9 square miles in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of southeastern Pennsylvania and is partly underlain by carbonate rocks that are highly productive aquifers. The basin is undergoing rapid urbanization that includes changes in land use and increases in demand for public water supply and wastewater disposal. Ground water is the sole source of supply in the basin. West Valley Creek flows southwest in a 1.5-mile-wide valley that is underlain by folded and faulted carbonate rocks and trends east-northeast, parallel to regional geologic structures. The valley is flanked by hills underlain by quartzite and gneiss to the north and by phyllite and schist to the south. Surface water and ground water flow from the hills toward the center of the valley. Ground water in the valley flows west-southwest parallel to the course of the stream. Seepage investigations identified losing reaches in the headwaters area where streams are underlain by carbonate rocks and gaining reaches downstream. Tributaries contribute about 75 percent of streamflow. The ground-water and surface-water divides do not coincide in the carbonate valley. The ground-water divide is about 0.5 miles west of the surface-water divide at the eastern edge of the carbonate valley. Underflow to the east is about 1.1 inches per year. Quarry dewatering operations at the western edge of the valley may act partly as an artificial basin boundary, preventing underflow to the west. Water budgets for 1990, a year of normal precipitation (45.8 inches), and 1991, a year of sub-normal precipitation (41.5 inches), were calculated. Streamflow was 14.61 inches in 1990 and 12.08 inches in 1991. Evapotranspiration was estimated to range from 50 to 60 percent of precipitation. Base flow was about 62 percent of streamflow in both years. Exportation by sewer systems was about 3 inches from the basin and, at times, equaled base flow during the dry autumn of 1991. Recharge was estimated to be 18

  17. Over-browsing in Pennsylvania creates a depauperate forest dominated by an understory tree: results from a 60-year-old deer exclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Kain; Loretta Battaglia; Alejandro Royo; Walter P. Carson

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of long-term over-browsing by white-tailed deer on the diversity and density of trees in a forest in the Allegheny High Plateau region of central Pennsylvania.We compared tree diversity and density inside a 60 year-old deer exclosure to an adjacent reference site. Browsing caused a 55-100% decline in density of four tree species (Prunus...

  18. Abstracts and Program Fourth International Shock Congress and Twenty Second Annual Conference on Shock. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 12-16, 1999. Supplement to SHOCK Volume 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-16

    Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-8410. The purpose of this study was...OCCURRING SEPSIS IN CATS. CA Brady*. LG King*. TJ Van Winkle*. CM Otto. School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA...hypothermia. All patients were ventilated and underwent hypothermia of 32-33 °C induced by surface cooling using midazolam, buprenorphine and vecuronium

  19. The Effect of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act on Food Services and Drinking Places Sales and Numbers, 1998-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhen-qiang; Fisher, Monica A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Philadelphia enacted its Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) nearly 2 years before the statewide CIAA. In this study, we assessed the economic impact of CIAAs on 4 types of food services and drinking places and addressed the predominant limitation of previous pre?post ban studies, namely the lack of control for confounders and changes in secular trends over time. Methods We analyzed data from Pennsylvania Department of Revenue Quarterly 1998?2011 taxable county-level revenue sales and nu...

  20. Proceedings of the REAPS Technical Symposium held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 14-16 October, 1980 (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    shipbuilding industry. He is also a Professor of Materials Science at Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania. Dr. Sandor has attended schools in... NYC office primarily on the UCC Computer Network. The programs listed include a number of proprietary programs (including the SPADES modules, as well as...Fallick. Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. A PROGRESS REPORT ON THE REAPS PROGRAM D. J. Martin. IIT Research Institute LUNCH GENERAL SESSION WICKES

  1. Evaulation of remote sensing, geological and geophysical data for south-central New York and northern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podwysocki, M.H.; Pohn, H.A.; Phillips, J.D.; Krohn, M.D.; Purdy, T.L.; Merin, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of the relationship between lineaments observed on Landsat satellite images and the geologic framework of a portion of the Allegheny Plateau of south-central New York and northern Pennsylvania. The area is underlain by a relatively thick sequence of salt and other evaporites in the Silurian Salina Group and is a potential site for deep-storage of solid nuclear waste. A combination of remote sensing techniques, detailed geologic mapping and geophysical investigations were applied to the problem. Because of the premature termination of the Department of Energy contract, only a portion of the total work was completed. The completed portion of the project included 1) digital contrast enhancement of several Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images, 2) analysis of lineament patterns from a Landsat MSS-7 mosaic, 3) field mapping of bedrock joint patterns, 4) compilation and analysis of surface and subsurface structure and isopach maps, 5) collection and digital analysis of aeromagnetic data for southern New York, 6) compilation and analysis of aeromagnetic and gravity data for much of New York and Pennsylvania, and 7) analysis of seismic reflection survey lines for selected portions of New York and Pennsylvania. We identified eight major lineaments or lineament zones and studied them in detail. They typically represent linear alignments of the most conspicuous or prominent physiographic features observable on Landsat images. The Cortland-Ithaca, Watkins Glen-Tanghannock, Seneca Lake-Elmira, Painted Post-Blossburg and Endicott-Syracuse conspicuous lineaments include the Corning-Bath, Van Etten-Towanda, Van Etten-Candor and Van Etten-Odessa lineaments. In addition, a major fault system--the West Danby fault zone--was further defined by geologic and geophysical investigations during our study; the fault zone was not recognizable on satellite images. The lineaments and lineament zones were categorized by their azimuthal trends. Those with a northerly

  2. The Pennsylvania Anatomy Act of 1883: Weighing the Roles of Professor William Smith Forbes and Senator William James McKnight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R

    2016-10-01

    Effective Anatomical Acts transformed medical education and curtailed grave-robbing. William S. Forbes, Demonstrator of Anatomy at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, authored the Pennsylvania Anatomy Act of 1867, but it was ineffective. In December of 1882, Forbes and accomplices were charged with grave-robbing. Forbes was acquitted in early 1883, but his accomplices were all convicted; nevertheless, these events precipitated a strengthened Anatomy Act in 1883. Forbes was crowned the Father of the Pennsylvania Anatomy Act and was revered by the Philadelphia medical community for his personal sacrifices for medical education; they even paid his legal fees. Over the remainder of his life, Forbes received many honors. However, there was a second major player, rural doctor William J. McKnight, a convicted grave-robber and State Senator. The evidence shows that Forbes precipitated the crisis, which was a racial powder keg, and then primarily focused on his trial, while McKnight, creatively working behind the scenes in collaboration with Jefferson, Anatomy Professor William H. Pancoast, used the crisis to draft and pass transformative legislation enabling anatomical dissection at Pennsylvania medical schools. While not minimizing Forbes suffering throughout these events, McKnight should be appropriately recognized for his initiative and contributions, which far exceeded those of Forbes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Pesticides in ground water in selected agricultural land-use areas and hydrogeologic settings in Pennsylvania, 2003-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loper, Connie A.; Breen, Kevin J.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Clune, John W.

    2009-01-01

    This report was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) as part of the Pennsylvania Pesticides and Ground Water Strategy (PPGWS). Monitoring data and extensive quality-assurance data on the occurrence of pesticides in ground water during 2003–07 are presented and evaluated; decreases in the land area used for agriculture and corresponding changes in the use of pesticides also are documented. In the Pennsylvania ground waters assessed since 2003, concentrations of pesticides did not exceed any maximum contaminant or health advisory levels established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; PPGWS actions are invoked by the PDA at fractions of these levels and were needed only in areas designated by the PDA for special ground-water protection. Previous investigations through 1998 of pesticides in Pennsylvania ground water identified land use, as a surrogate for pesticide use, and rock type of the aquifer combined with physiography as key hydrogeologic setting variables for understanding aquifer vulnerability to contamination and the common occurrence of atrazine and metolachlor in ground water. Of 20 major hydrogeologic settings in a framework established in 1999 for pesticide monitoring in Pennsylvania, 9 were identified as priorities for data collection in order to change the monitoring status from "inadequate" to "adequate" for the PPGWS. Agricultural and forested land-use areas are decreasing because of urban and suburban growth. In the nine hydrogeologic settings evaluated using 1992 and 2001 data, decreases of up to 12 percent for agricultural land and 10 percent for forested land corresponded to increases of up to 11 percent for urban land. Changes in agricultural pesticide use were computed from crop data. For example, from 1996 to 2004–05, atrazine use declined by about 15 percent to 1,314,000 lb/yr (pounds per year) and metolachlor use increased by about 20 percent to 895

  4. Final Report for Research in High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania for the period ending April 30, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Hugh H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Balasubramanian, V. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, G. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Beier, E. W. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cvetic, M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gladney, L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jain, B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klein, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kroll, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lipeles, E. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ovrut, B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Thomson, E. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-07-23

    The University of Pennsylvania elementary particle physics/particle cosmology group, funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science, participates in research in high energy physics and particle cosmology that addresses some of the most important unanswered questions in science. The research is divided into five areas. Energy Frontier - We participate in the study of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland using the ATLAS detector. The University of Pennsylvania group was responsible for the design, installation, and commissioning of the front-end electronics for the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) and plays the primary role in its maintenance and operation. We play an important role in the triggering of ATLAS, and we have made large contributions to the TRT performance and to the study and identification of electrons, photons, and taus. We have been actively involved in searches for the Higgs boson and for SUSY and other exotic particles. We have made significant contributions to measurement of Standard Model processes such as inclusive photon production and WW pair production. We also have participated significantly in R&D for upgrades to the ATLAS detector. Cosmic Frontier - The Dark Energy Survey (DES) telescope will be used to elucidate the nature of dark energy and the distribution of dark matter. Penn has played a leading role both in the use of weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies and the discovery of large numbers of distant supernovae. The techniques and forecasts developed at Penn are also guiding the development of the proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).We are also developing a new detector, MiniClean, to search for direct detection of dark matter particles. Intensity Frontier - We are participating in the design and R&D of detectors for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (now DUNE), a new experiment to study the properties of neutrinos. Advanced Techology R&D - We have an extensive

  5. Inclusion of sex and gender in biomedical research: survey of clinical research proposed at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Anne; Stanko, Patrick; Berkowitz, Lily N; Parnell, Neanta; Zuppe, Anastasia; Bale, Tracy L; Ziolek, Tracy; Epperson, C Neill

    2017-01-01

    The 2015 National Institutes of Health (NIH) policy that sex be considered as a biological variable (SABV) is now a critical part of the peer-review process for NIH funding as well as publication in several high-impact scientific journals. We sought to determine the degree to which biomedical researchers at the University of Pennsylvania already consider SABV or gender in their research. We reviewed 240 research protocols approved by the University of Pennsylvania Investigational Review Board (IRB) consecutively submitted between January and July 2016. Each protocol was searched for the terms sex, gender, male, female, man, and woman and justifications related to the population under study. A PubMed search was conducted to determine the current state of knowledge regarding potential sex and/or gender differences with respect to protocol topic. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 165 (68.8%) protocols that included one of the search terms, only 24 (14.5%) provided justification for the choice of the sex/gender of the population studied. Sixty-three percent (n = 151) of the protocols focused on topics for which the extant literature supports at least a moderate degree of sex/gender differences in some aspect of the disorder/condition being studied. Of these, only three (2.0%) indicated that the investigator would consider sex or gender impact on their primary outcomes. Review of a subset of IRB protocols submitted at a major research institution suggests that very few investigators are considering sex or gender as important variables in their clinical research at the stage of protocol development. IRBs are in an excellent position to encourage investigators to consider SABV and gender in order to enhance the rigor of research design, maximize the importance of the resulting knowledge, and ensure that subject selection is equitable. These findings serve as the basis for developing an intervention at the level of IRB protocol development and

  6. Production and disposal of waste materials from gas and oil extraction from the Marcellus Shale Play in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelly O.; Yoxtheimer, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing world demand for energy has led to an increase in the exploration and extraction of natural gas, condensate, and oil from unconventional organic-rich shale plays. However, little is known about the quantity, transport, and disposal method of wastes produced during the extraction process. We examined the quantity of waste produced by gas extraction activities from the Marcellus Shale play in Pennsylvania for 2011. The main types of wastes included drilling cuttings and fluids from vertical and horizontal drilling and fluids generated from hydraulic fracturing [i.e., flowback and brine (formation) water]. Most reported drill cuttings (98.4%) were disposed of in landfills, and there was a high amount of interstate (49.2%) and interbasin (36.7%) transport. Drilling fluids were largely reused (70.7%), with little interstate (8.5%) and interbasin (5.8%) transport. Reported flowback water was mostly reused (89.8%) or disposed of in brine or industrial waste treatment plants (8.0%) and largely remained within Pennsylvania (interstate transport was 3.1%) with little interbasin transport (2.9%). Brine water was most often reused (55.7%), followed by disposal in injection wells (26.6%), and then disposed of in brine or industrial waste treatment plants (13.8%). Of the major types of fluid waste, brine water was most often transported to other states (28.2%) and to other basins (9.8%). In 2011, 71.5% of the reported brine water, drilling fluids, and flowback was recycled: 73.1% in the first half and 69.7% in the second half of 2011. Disposal of waste to municipal sewage treatment plants decreased nearly 100% from the first half to second half of 2011. When standardized against the total amount of gas produced, all reported wastes, except flowback sands, were less in the second half than the first half of 2011. Disposal of wastes into injection disposal wells increased 129.2% from the first half to the second half of 2011; other disposal methods decreased. Some

  7. Gender, Madness, Religion, and Iranian-American Identity: Observations on a 2006 Murder Trial in Williamsport, Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camron Michael Amin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using participant observation, oral history interviews, and a study of court transcripts, Internet chats, and press coverage of a 2006 murder trial of an Iranian-American man in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, we can better appreciate the dynamic intersection of ethnicity, religion, and gender in constructing the social identity of Iranian-Americans. Brian Hosayn Yasipour, who immigrated to the United States in 1969, was convicted of murder in the third degree for killing his four-year-old daughter in 2001 during a custody dispute with his estranged, Iranian-born wife. He managed to avoid the death penalty. Debates about his guilt in America hinged on assessments of his mental state at the time of the crime and this, in turn, hinged on debates about how normative his actions would have been in Iran. Until his arrest, Brian had led a highly mobile life—moving back and forth between America, where he lived as a Christian, and Iran, where he visited as a Muslim. Was he a calculating Iranian-Islamic patriarch, outraged at the defiance of his wife and the attitudes of American courts toward his paternal rights? Or was he, per the court transcripts, a “white Christian” and survivor of childhood rape back in Iran, who lapsed into madness under the strain of his second divorce? Brian actively blurred these issues in court appearances before and after the murder—often expressing his agency in terms of preserving his imaginary and physical mobility.

  8. Genetic structure and distribution of pythium aphanidermatum populations in Pennsylvania greenhouses based on analysis of AFLP and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonghee; Garzón, Carla D; Moorman, Gary W

    2010-01-01

    Pythium aphanidermatum is one of the most aggressive species in the genus and has a wide host range, but little is known about its population genetic structure. We tested 123 P. aphanidermatum isolates with six AFLP primer combinations and four SSR markers. The genetic diversity of P. aphanidermatum was 0.34 with AFLP and 0.55 with SSR markers. SSR genotypes totaled 3-8 for each locus, and a total of 14 SSR genotypes were found among all isolates. Three major genetic groups were identified with the combination of AFLP and SSR marker data. The genetic structure observed among P. aphanidermatum isolates was related to location and mefenoxam fungicide resistance instead of host. Four genotypes (PA1, PA2, PA5 and PA7) were found in the population from a commercial greenhouse, and the genetic diversity of a greenhouse population was similar to that found in the whole sample. The molecular tools for P. aphanidermatum isolates identified the possible gene flow within and among populations in Pennsylvania greenhouses.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  10. Landscape disturbance from unconventional and conventional oil and gas development in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.

    2015-01-01

    The spatial footprint of unconventional (hydraulic fracturing) and conventional oil and gas development in the Marcellus Shale region of the State of Pennsylvania was digitized from high-resolution, ortho-rectified, digital aerial photography, from 2004 to 2010. We used these data to measure the spatial extent of oil and gas development and to assess the exposure of the extant natural resources across the landscape of the watersheds in the study area. We found that either form of development: (1) occurred in ~50% of the 930 watersheds that defined the study area; (2) was closer to streams than the recommended safe distance in ~50% of the watersheds; (3) was in some places closer to impaired streams and state-defined wildland trout streams than the recommended safe distance; (4) was within 10 upstream kilometers of surface drinking water intakes in ~45% of the watersheds that had surface drinking water intakes; (5) occurred in ~10% of state-defined exceptional value watersheds; (6) occurred in ~30% of the watersheds with resident populations defined as disproportionately exposed to pollutants; (7) tended to occur at interior forest locations; and (8) had >100 residents within 3 km for ~30% of the unconventional oil and gas development sites. Further, we found that exposure to the potential effects of landscape disturbance attributable to conventional oil and gas development was more prevalent than its unconventional counterpart.

  11. Enhancement of Landsat images for lineament analysis in the area of the Salina Basin, New York and Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1979-01-01

    Digital image processing of Landsat images of New York and Pennsylvania was undertaken to provide optimum images for lineament analysis in the area of the Salina Basin. Preliminary examination of Landsat images from photographic prints indicated sufficient differences between the spectral bands of the Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) to warrant digital processing of both MSS band 7 and MSS band 5. Selective contrast stretching based on analysis of the Landsat MSS histograms proved to be the most important factor affecting the appearance of the images. A three-point linear stretch using the two end points and a middle point to the Landsat frequency distribution was most successful. The flexibility of the REMAPP image processing system was helpful in creating such custom-tailored stretches. An edge enhancement was tested on the MSS band 5 image, but was not used. Stereoscopic Landsat images acquired from adjacent orbits aided recognition of topographic features; the area of stereoscopic coverage could be increased by utilizing the precession of Landsat-1?s orbit . Improvements in the digitally processed scenes did affect the analysis of lineaments for the New York area; on the enhanced MSS band 5 image, an ENE trending set of lineaments is visible, which was not recognized from other images.

  12. Synthane Pilot Plant, South Park Township, Pennsylvania. Run report No. 1-DB. Operating period: February--August 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This report covers the operation of the Synthane Coal Gasification Pilot Plant, South Park Township, Pennsylvania from February through August 1977. The facility is owned by the United States Government and operated by C-E Lummus. Following Test Directive No. 1-DB, the plant operated with Montana Rosebud coal at a pressure of 600 psig, at temperatures from 1300/sup 0/F to 1550/sup 0/F and at coal feed rates of 1.5 to 3.0 tons/hour. Gas was produced for 556 hours and 1304 tons of coal were fed to the gasifier. Continuous operation of up to 97 hours and carbon conversions of up to 78% were achieved. A total of 29 steady state periods, ranging from 1 hour and 30 minutes to 14 hours and 54 minutes, were obtained. This successful operation has demonstrated that the Synthane Process is a viable route to coal gasification. Data obtained during the operation are adequate for the preliminary design of a commercial facility. During this period of operation the coal was fed into the fluidized bed of the gasifier by ''deep bed injection'' rather than by free fall as in previous studies. The results showed conclusively that this procedure is advantageous to the operation of the gasifier and the Synthane Process in that little tar, phenol or oils were produced. This will have a considerable advantage in the cost and operation of a commercial facility.

  13. Fall and winter survival of brook trout and brown trout in a north-central Pennsylvania watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweka, John A.; Davis, Lori A.; Wagner, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Stream-dwelling salmonids that spawn in the fall generally experience their lowest survival during the fall and winter due to behavioral changes associated with spawning and energetic deficiencies during this time of year. We used data from Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis and Brown Trout Salmo trutta implanted with radio transmitters in tributaries of the Hunts Run watershed of north-central Pennsylvania to estimate survival from the fall into the winter seasons (September 2012–February 2013). We examined the effects that individual-level covariates (trout species, size, and movement rates) and stream-level covariates (individual stream and cumulative drainage area of a stream) have on survival. Brook Trout experienced significantly lower survival than Brown Trout, especially in the early fall during their peak spawning period. Besides a significant species effect, none of the other covariates examined influenced survival for either species. A difference in life history between these species, with Brook Trout having a shorter life expectancy than Brown Trout, is likely the primary reason for the lower survival of Brook Trout. However, Brook Trout also spawn earlier in the fall than Brown Trout and low flows during Brook Trout spawning may have resulted in a greater risk of predation for Brook Trout compared with Brown Trout, thereby also contributing to the observed differences in survival between these species. Our estimates of survival can aid parameterization of future population models for Brook Trout and Brown Trout through the spawning season and into winter.

  14. Fire Regimes of Remnant Pitch Pine Communities in the Ridge and Valley Region of Central Pennsylvania, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Marschall

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fire-adapted ecosystems in the northeastern U.S. are converting to fire-intolerant vegetation communities due to fire suppression in the 20th century. Prescribed fire and other vegetation management activities that increase resilience and resistance to global changes are increasingly being implemented, particularly on public lands. For many fire-dependent communities, there is little quantitative data describing historical fire regime attributes such as frequency, severity, and seasonality, or how these varied through time. Where available, fire-scarred live and remnant trees, including stumps and snags, offer valuable insights into historical fire regimes through tree-ring and fire-scar analyses. In this study, we dated fire scars from 66 trees at two sites in the Ridge and Valley Province of the Appalachian Mountains in central Pennsylvania, and described fire frequency, severity, and seasonality from the mid-17th century to 2013. Fires were historically frequent, of low to moderate severity, occurred mostly during the dormant season, and were influenced by aspect and topography. The current extended fire-free interval is unprecedented in the previous 250–300 years at both sites.

  15. Association Between Neighborhood-Level Smoking and Individual Smoking Risk: Maternal Smoking Among Latina Women in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, Arina; French, Benjamin; Weibe, Douglas; Camenga, Deepa R; Yun, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether or not high maternal smoking rates at the neighborhood level increase the likelihood of individual smoking by Latina women in the three months prior to and during pregnancy, independent of other individual and neighborhood factors. This study was observational in nature, using linked vital statistics records for 24,443 Latina women in Pennsylvania (2009-2010) and U.S. Census data for 2,398 census tracts. We used multilevel logistic regression models to determine the individual odds of self-reported maternal smoking given different census tract-level rates of maternal smoking in the previous three years (2006-2008), adjusting for maternal and census-tract characteristics, including ethnic density, population density, and poverty. Higher levels of maternal smoking at the census-tract level were associated with increased individual odds of smoking among Latina mothers. In the fully adjusted model, a 10% increase in the neighborhood smoking rate was associated with a 1.28 (95% confidence interval 1.22, 1.34) increase in the individual odds of smoking. Latina women living in census tracts where more women have smoked during or immediately prior to pregnancy are themselves at higher risk of smoking during this period.

  16. Impact of Marcellus Shale natural gas development in southwest Pennsylvania on volatile organic compound emissions and regional air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarthout, Robert F; Russo, Rachel S; Zhou, Yong; Miller, Brandon M; Mitchell, Brittney; Horsman, Emily; Lipsky, Eric; McCabe, David C; Baum, Ellen; Sive, Barkley C

    2015-03-03

    The Marcellus Shale is the largest natural gas deposit in the U.S. and rapid development of this resource has raised concerns about regional air pollution. A field campaign was conducted in the southwestern Pennsylvania region of the Marcellus Shale to investigate the impact of unconventional natural gas (UNG) production operations on regional air quality. Whole air samples were collected throughout an 8050 km(2) grid surrounding Pittsburgh and analyzed for methane, carbon dioxide, and C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Elevated mixing ratios of methane and C2-C8 alkanes were observed in areas with the highest density of UNG wells. Source apportionment was used to identify characteristic emission ratios for UNG sources, and results indicated that UNG emissions were responsible for the majority of mixing ratios of C2-C8 alkanes, but accounted for a small proportion of alkene and aromatic compounds. The VOC emissions from UNG operations accounted for 17 ± 19% of the regional kinetic hydroxyl radical reactivity of nonbiogenic VOCs suggesting that natural gas emissions may affect compliance with federal ozone standards. A first approximation of methane emissions from the study area of 10.0 ± 5.2 kg s(-1) provides a baseline for determining the efficacy of regulatory emission control efforts.

  17. An Outbreak of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in an Elementary School in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Achuyt; Fagan, Ryan P.; Ostroff, Stephen; Sodha, Samir V.; Moll, Mària E.; Lee, Bruce Y.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Ennis, Brent; Britz, Phyllis; Fiore, Anthony; Nguyen, Michael; Palekar, Rakhee; Archer, W. Roodly; Gift, Thomas L.; Leap, Rebecca; Nygren, Benjamin L.; Cauchemez, Simon; Angulo, Frederick J.; Swerdlow, David

    2011-01-01

    In May 2009, one of the earliest outbreaks of 2009 pandemic influenza A virus (pH1N1) infection resulted in the closure of a semi-rural Pennsylvania elementary school. Two sequential telephone surveys were administered to 1345 students (85% of the students enrolled in the school) and household members in 313 households to collect data on influenza-like illness (ILI). A total of 167 persons (12.4%) among those in the surveyed households, including 93 (24.0%) of the School A students, reported ILI. Students were 3.1 times more likely than were other household members to develop ILI (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–4.1). Fourth-grade students were more likely to be affected than were students in other grades (relative risk, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2–3.9). pH1N1 was confirmed in 26 (72.2%) of the individuals tested by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The outbreak did not resume upon the reopening of the school after the 7-day closure. This investigation found that pH1N1 outbreaks at schools can have substantial attack rates; however, grades and classrooms are affected variably. Additioanl study is warranted to determine the effectiveness of school closure during outbreaks. PMID:21342888

  18. Arsenic, Boron, and Fluoride Concentrations in Ground Water in and Near Diabase Intrusions, Newark Basin, Southeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    During an investigation in 2000 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) of possible contaminant releases from an industrial facility on Congo Road near Gilbertsville in Berks and Montgomery Counties, southeastern Pennsylvania, concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above USEPA drinking-water standards of 10 ?g/L and 4 mg/L, respectively, and of boron above the USEPA health advisory level of 600 ?g/L were measured in ground water in an area along the northwestern edge of the Newark Basin. In 2003, the USEPA requested technical assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help identify sources of arsenic, boron, and fluoride in the ground water in the Congo Road area, which included possible anthropogenic releases and naturally occurring mineralization in the local bedrock aquifer, and to identify other areas in the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania with similarly elevated concentrations of these constituents. The USGS reviewed available data and collected additional ground-water samples in the Congo Road area and four similar hydrogeologic settings. The Newark Basin is the largest of the 13 major exposed Mesozoic rift basins that stretch from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. Rocks in the Newark Basin include Triassic through Jurassic-age sedimentary sequences of sandstones and shales that were intruded by diabase. Mineral deposits of hydrothermal origin are associated with alteration zones bordering intrusions of diabase and also occur as strata-bound replacement deposits of copper and zinc in sedimentary rocks. The USGS review of data available in 2003 showed that water from about 10 percent of wells throughout the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania had concentrations of arsenic greater than the USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ?g/L; the highest reported arsenic concentration was at about 70 ?g/L. Few data on boron were available, and the highest reported boron concentration in well-water samples was 60 ?g/L in contrast

  19. Isotopic evidence of enhanced carbonate dissolution at a coal mine drainage site in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shikha; Sack, Andrea; Adams, James P.; Vesper, Dorothy; J Capo, Rosemary C.; Hartsock, Angela; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to determine the sources and fate of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in the circumneutral pH drainage from an abandoned bituminous coal mine in western Pennsylvania. The C isotope signatures of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) were intermediate between local carbonate and organic C sources, but were higher than those of contemporaneous Pennsylvanian age groundwaters in the region. This suggests a significant contribution of C enriched in {sup 13}C due to enhanced carbonate dissolution associated with the release of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} from pyrite oxidation. The Sr isotopic signature of the drainage was similar to other regional mine waters associated with the same coal seam and reflected contributions from limestone dissolution and cation exchange with clay minerals. The relatively high δ{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and δ{sup 18}O{sub SO4} isotopic signatures of the mine drainage and the presence of presumptive SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria suggest that SO{sub 4} reduction activity also contributes C depleted in {sup 13}C isotope to the total DIC pool. With distance downstream from the mine portal, C isotope signatures in the drainage increased, accompanied by decreased total DIC concentrations and increased pH. These data are consistent with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} dissolution of carbonate rocks, enhanced by cation exchange, and C release to the atmosphere via CO{sub 2} outgassing.

  20. Inspection Frequency, Sociodemographic Factors, and Food Safety Violations in Chain and Nonchain Restaurants, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinwand, Sarah E; Glanz, Karen; Keenan, Brendan T; Branas, Charles C

    We explored how restaurant inspection frequency and restaurant neighborhood sociodemographic characteristics are related to food safety inspection outcomes in chain and nonchain restaurants to better understand external factors that may influence inspection outcomes. We categorized the results of restaurant inspections in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 2013 and 2014 by restaurant type (chain or nonchain), inspection frequency (1, 2, or ≥3 per 2-year study period), and violation type (total number of violations, foodborne-illness risk factor violation, or good retail practice violation). We collected 2013 US Census block group sociodemographic data for each restaurant neighborhood. We used nested mixed-effects regression analyses to determine the association between restaurant inspection frequency and inspection violations, as well as between inspection violations and restaurant neighborhood sociodemographic variables, stratified by restaurant type. Compared with nonchain restaurants, chain restaurants had significantly fewer total violations per inspection (mean [SD]: 6.5 [4.6] vs 9.6 [6.8] violations, P restaurants, an increase from 1 to 2 inspections resulted in 0.8 ( P restaurants. For nonchain restaurants, a higher proportion of black residents in a restaurant neighborhood was associated with 0.6 ( P restaurant food safety inspection frequency, based on whether or not restaurants are part of chains, could reduce the frequency of violations, particularly in restaurants with the most violations.

  1. Teachers’ Perceptions of Bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ Students in a Southwestern Pennsylvania Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jered B. Kolbert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to ascertain teachers’ perceptions of bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ youth. In a sample of 200 educators (61.0% female; 96.5% White from a county in southwestern Pennsylvania, there was a significant positive relationship between the teachers’ perceptions of the supportiveness of school staff towards students regardless of sexual orientation and those teachers’ reports of the frequency of bullying victimization experienced by LGBTQ students. Teachers’ perceptions of a higher level of staff and student support was associated with higher reported frequencies of students’ use of derogatory language about LGBTQ individuals and various types of bullying of LGBTQ students. Teachers with a lesbian, gay, or bisexual orientation were found to rate the school staff and students as significantly less supportive of students regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression in comparison to heterosexual teachers. Finally, teachers who either were unaware of or believed that their school lacked an anti-bullying policy reported significantly higher rates of physical bullying victimization of LGBTQ students when compared to the rates observed by teachers who reported knowledge of their schools’ anti-bullying policies.

  2. Teachers’ Perceptions of Bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Students in a Southwestern Pennsylvania Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Jered B.; Crothers, Laura M.; Bundick, Matthew J.; Wells, Daniel S.; Buzgon, Julie; Berbary, Cassandra; Simpson, Jordan; Senko, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain teachers’ perceptions of bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth. In a sample of 200 educators (61.0% female; 96.5% White) from a county in southwestern Pennsylvania, there was a significant positive relationship between the teachers’ perceptions of the supportiveness of school staff towards students regardless of sexual orientation and those teachers’ reports of the frequency of bullying victimization experienced by LGBTQ students. Teachers’ perceptions of a higher level of staff and student support was associated with higher reported frequencies of students’ use of derogatory language about LGBTQ individuals and various types of bullying of LGBTQ students. Teachers with a lesbian, gay, or bisexual orientation were found to rate the school staff and students as significantly less supportive of students regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression in comparison to heterosexual teachers. Finally, teachers who either were unaware of or believed that their school lacked an anti-bullying policy reported significantly higher rates of physical bullying victimization of LGBTQ students when compared to the rates observed by teachers who reported knowledge of their schools’ anti-bullying policies. PMID:26030341

  3. Thermal maturity patterns in the Ordovician and Devonian of Pennsylvania using conodont color alteration index (CAI) and vitrinite reflectance (%Ro)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetski, J.E.; Ryder, R.T.; Harper, J.A.; Trippi, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    This new series of maps enhances previous thermal maturity maps in Pennsylvania by establishing: 1) new subsurface CAI data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. Thermal maturity values for the Ordovician and Devonian strata are of major interest because they contain the source rocks for most of the oil and natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Group are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones and for natural gas fields in fractured dolomite reservoirs of the Ordovician Black River-Trenton Limestones. Improved CAI-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation and Ordovician Black River-Trenton fields. Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulations in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.

  4. Adopting an ethical approach to global health training: the evolution of the Botswana - University of Pennsylvania partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacso, Matthew; Chandra, Amit; Friedman, Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Global health training opportunities for medical students and residents have proliferated in recent years. These short-term elective rotations allow trainees to learn about global health issues by participating in various aspects of education and health care in resource-limited settings. Recently published consensus-based ethical guidelines have suggested considerations for the design of international electives that address the activities of host and sending sites, visiting students and residents, and sponsors.The authors analyze the value of global health training opportunities for medical students, residents, faculty, host and sending institutions, and other stakeholders from the perspective of the Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership, a program that has provided global health experiences for health care trainees for more than 10 years. Drawing from the Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training framework, they illustrate the ethical and logistical challenges faced by the program's organizers and the solutions that they implemented alongside their host site partners. They conclude with a summary of recommendations to guide implementation of ethically sound international health electives in resource-limited settings.

  5. Landscape Disturbance from Unconventional and Conventional Oil and Gas Development in the Marcellus Shale Region of Pennsylvania, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terrence Slonecker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial footprint of unconventional (hydraulic fracturing and conventional oil and gas development in the Marcellus Shale region of the State of Pennsylvania was digitized from high-resolution, ortho-rectified, digital aerial photography, from 2004 to 2010. We used these data to measure the spatial extent of oil and gas development and to assess the exposure of the extant natural resources across the landscape of the watersheds in the study area. We found that either form of development: (1 occurred in ~50% of the 930 watersheds that defined the study area; (2 was closer to streams than the recommended safe distance in ~50% of the watersheds; (3 was in some places closer to impaired streams and state-defined wildland trout streams than the recommended safe distance; (4 was within 10 upstream kilometers of surface drinking water intakes in ~45% of the watersheds that had surface drinking water intakes; (5 occurred in ~10% of state-defined exceptional value watersheds; (6 occurred in ~30% of the watersheds with resident populations defined as disproportionately exposed to pollutants; (7 tended to occur at interior forest locations; and (8 had >100 residents within 3 km for ~30% of the unconventional oil and gas development sites. Further, we found that exposure to the potential effects of landscape disturbance attributable to conventional oil and gas development was more prevalent than its unconventional counterpart.

  6. Spatial analysis of environment and population at risk of natural gas fracking in the state of Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingmin

    2015-05-15

    Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, has been increasing exponentially across the United States, which holds the largest known shale gas reserves in the world. Studies have found that the high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing process (HVHFP) threatens water resources, harms air quality, changes landscapes, and damages ecosystems. However, there is minimal research focusing on the spatial study of environmental and human risks of HVHFP, which is necessary for state and federal governments to administer, regulate, and assess fracking. Integrating GIS and spatial kernel functions, we study the presently operating fracking wells across the state of Pennsylvania (PA), which is the main part of the current hottest Marcellus Shale in US. We geographically process the location data of hydraulic fracturing wells, 2010 census block data, urbanized region data, railway data, local road data, open water data, river data, and wetland data for the state of PA. From this we develop a distance based risk assessment in order to understand the environmental and urban risks. We generate the surface data of fracking well intensity and population intensity by integrating spatial dependence, semivariogram modeling, and a quadratic kernel function. The surface data of population risk generated by the division of fracking well intensity and population intensity provide a novel insight into the local and regional regulation of hydraulic fracturing activities in terms of environmental and health related risks due to the proximity of fracking wells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Decade-scale coastal bluff retreat from LiDAR data: Lake Erie coast of Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyle, A. M.; Naber, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Bluff retreat is a significant problem along many parts of the southern Great Lakes coastline of the United States. On the Pennsylvania coast of Lake Erie, where semi-consolidated clay-rich glacial till sequences overlie bedrock, erosion of the bluffs results in a permanent loss of fine-grained sediment from the coastal zone. Bluff retreat is of concern to coastal property owners and regulators because evaluating landslide hazards and developing regulations on coastal development must account for spatial and temporal variability in coastal retreat. Bluff retreat also contributes to temporary degradation in coastal water quality. The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate medium-term spatial variability in bluff retreat magnitudes and rates along a sector of the Pennsylvania coast. Newly available high resolution LiDAR data cover a one-decade time frame (1998-2007) and permit mapping of the bluff-crest position on two comparable, high-quality data sets. In contrast, long-term coastal change analyses typically involve comparison of a recent LiDAR data set with an older, lower-resolution data set developed from either field measurements, T-sheets, or aerial photography. While the older data can have much larger inherent errors than the LiDAR data, they become less significant over the longer time frames involved. The 6 km, geologically homogeneous, coastal bluff site is characterized by ~20 m of unlithified Pleistocene glacial tills and lake plain sediments overlying a 3-4 m ledge of near-horizontal Devonian shale and sandstone bedrock. Bluff slopes range from 35-90 degrees, beaches are narrow to non-existent, and the coast is frequently protected by ground-freeze and a lake ice shelf during winter. DEMs, hillshades, and slope and contour maps were generated from the bare-earth 1998 and 2007 LiDAR data, and checked against 2005 aerial ortho-photography. Maps were analyzed at a scale of 1:120 in ArcGIS and the bluff crest was identified primarily by the visual

  8. WATER-QUALITY CONDITIONS DURING LOW FLOW IN THE LOWER YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER BASIN, PENNSYLVANIA, OCTOBER 5-7, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James I. Sams, III, Karl T. Schroeder; Terry E. Ackman; J. Kent Crawford; Kim L. Otto

    2001-01-01

    In October 1998, a chemical synoptic survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, in the Lower Youghiogheny River Basin in Pennsylvania to give a snap-shot of present (1998) water quality during low-flow conditions. Water samples from 38 sites--12 mainstem sites, 22 tributaries, and 4 mine discharges that discharge directly to the Youghiogheny River--were used to identify sources of contaminants from mining operations. Specific conductance, water temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the field at each site and concentrations of major ions and trace elements were measured in the laboratory. Unaccounted for gains and losses in streamflow were measured during the study. Unaccounted for losses in streamflow might be attributed to water loss through streambed fractures. Extensive mine tunnels are present in the basin and loss of water to these tunnels seems likely. Unaccounted for gains in streamflow may be from unmeasured tributaries or surface seeps, but most of the gains are suspected to come from artesian flow through fractures in the streambed from underground mine pools. Influent flows of rust-colored water were noted in some river sections. The pH values for all the samples collected during this survey were above 5.8, and most (33 of 38 samples) were above 7.0. Samples from the four mine-discharge sites also had pH values between 6.3 and 6.7. The lowest pH (5.8) was in a tributary, Galley Run. All 38 sampling sites had net alkalinity. The alkalinity load in the Youghiogheny River increased between Connellsville and McKeesport from 35 to 79 tons per day. Above Smithton, the measured alkalinity load in the Lower Youghiogheny River agreed well with the estimated alkalinity load. Below Smithton, measured alkalinity loads in the Lower Youghiogheny River are greater than calculated loads, resulting in unaccounted for gains in alkalinity. These gains are

  9. Osseous dysplasia (cemento-osseous dysplasia) of the jaw bones in western Pennsylvania patients: analysis of 35 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owosho, Adepitan A; Potluri, Anitha; Bilodeau, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the demographic, clinical, and radiographic presentations of osseous dysplasia of the jaws in western Pennsylvania patients and its associated complications. The clinical records and radiographs of patients diagnosed with osseous (cement-osseous) dysplasia were retrieved from the electronic health record of the University of Pittsburgh, School of Dental Medicine from 2007 to 2012. All cases were reviewed; the WHO criteria and classification for osseous dysplasia was used. Clinical and demographic data, radiographic findings, and final diagnoses were collected and analyzed. 35 cases of osseous dysplasia were retrieved over the six-year period.The majority (33) were females [94.3%], with ages ranging from 26 to 89 years, with a mean age of 53.9 years +/- standard deviation of 15.6 years, 32 [91.4%] were African Americans and 3 [8.6%] were Caucasians. 17 [48.6%] were florid osseous dysplasia, 13 [37.1%] periapical osseous dysplasia and 5 [14.3%] focal osseous dysplasia. Of the 35 patients only 8 [22.9%] patients were symptomatic. All florid osseous dysplasia patients were African American females, with 7 of the patients being symptomatic and the commonest symptom being pain. Also, all periapical osseous dysplasia patients were African Americans (12 females and 1 male), with 1 of the patients presenting with widening of the diastema. Of the focal osseous dysplasia patients, 3 were Caucasians and 2 African American (4 females and 1 male). The cases occurred mostly in African American females with a peak incidence in the fifth and sixth decades of life; most cases occurred in the mandible. The commonest form of osseous dysplasias was the florid osseous dysplasia which is most likely to present with symptoms.

  10. Application of ICP-OES for evaluating energy extraction and production wastewater discharge impacts on surface waters in Western Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Norris, Gary A; Landis, Matthew S; Kovalcik, Kasey D; McGee, John K; Kamal, Ali S

    2015-10-01

    Oil and gas extraction and coal-fired electrical power generating stations produce wastewaters that are treated and discharged to rivers in Western Pennsylvania with public drinking water system (PDWS) intakes. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to quantify inorganic species in wastewater and river samples using a method based on EPA Method 200.7 rev4.4. A total of 53 emission lines from 30 elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Ti, Tl, V, and Zn) were investigated. Samples were prepared by microwave-assisted acid digestion using a mixture of 2% HNO3 and 0.5% HCl. Lower interferences and better detection characteristics resulted in selection of alternative wavelengths for Al, As, Sb, Mg, Mo, and Na. Radial view measurements offered accurate determinations of Al, Ba, K, Li, Na, and Sr in high-brine samples. Spike recovery studies and analyses of reference materials showed 80-105% recoveries for most analytes. This method was used to quantify species in samples with high to low brine concentrations with method detection limits a factor of 2 below the maximum contaminant limit concentrations of national drinking water standards. Elements B, Ca, K, Li, Mg, Na, and Sr were identified as potential tracers for the sources impacting PDWS intakes. Usability of the ICP-OES derived data for factor analytic model applications was also demonstrated. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Synthane Pilot Plant, South Park Township, Pennsylvania. Run report No. 2-DB: operating period September 1977--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the operation of the Synthane Coal Gasification Pilot Plant, South Park Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania from September 1977 through September 1978. The facility is owned by the United States Government and operated by C-E Lummus. Test Directive No. 2-DB directed the plant be operated with Illinois No. 6 coal from the River King Mine of the Peabody Coal Company at a pressure of 600 psig. Concurrent pretreater/gasifier operation was to take place at coal feed rates from 1.5 to 2.5 tons/hour. Gas was produced for 182 hours and 1,100 tons of coal were fed to the pretreater and gasifier. Continuous operation of up to 56 hours and carbon conversions based on char of up to 72% were achieved. This successful operation demonstrates that coal gasification via the Synthane Process is viable. Additional data are required for the design of a commercial facility; however, the data obtained to date are adequate to recommend improvements and modifications to the Synthane Process Pilot Plant to increase on stream time efficiency. The successful operation of the pilot plant with Illinois No. 6 coal demonstrates the feasibility of the Synthane Pilot Plant to process a caking type of coal. The ability to successfully pretreat a caking coal at high pressure in a plant of this size is a first and a direct result of the successful operation of the Synthane Process. Other similar type processes operated to date require pretreatment of a caking coal at atmospheric pressure with little or no recovery of the gases or heat produced during pretreatment.

  12. Timing and magnitude of Broad-winged Hawk migration at Montclair Hawk Lookout, New Jersey, and Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.W.; Greenstone, E.M.; Greenstone, W.; Bildstein, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus) breeds in eastern and central Canada and the United States, and winters in Central America and northern and central South America. Birders and ornithologists count migrating Broad-winged Hawks at dozens of traditional watch sites throughout the northeastern United States. We modeled counts of migrating Broad-winged Hawks from two raptor migration watch sites: Montclair Hawk Lookout, New Jersey, and Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Pennsylvania, to determine whether annual abundance and trend estimates from individual sites within the mid-Atlantic states are representative of the region as a whole. We restricted ourselves to counts made between 10:00 and 16:00 EST during September to standardize count effort between sites. We created one model set for annual counts and another model set for daily counts. When modeling daily counts we incorporated weather and identity of individual observers. Akaike's Information Criteria were used to select the best model from an initial set of competing models. Annual counts declined at both sites during 1979-1998. Broad-winged Hawk migration began, peaked, and ended later at Montclair than at Hawk Mountain, even though Hawk Mountain is 155 km west-southwest of Montclair. Mean annual counts of hawks at Montclair were more than twice those at Hawk Mountain, but were not correlated. Broad-winged Hawks counted at Montclair may not be the same birds as those counted at Hawk Mountain. Rather, the two sites may be monitoring different regional subpopulations. Broad-winged Hawks counted at the two sites may use different migration tactics, with those counted at Hawk Mountain being more likely to slope soar, and those at Montclair more likely to use thermal soaring. A system of multiple watch sites is needed to monitor various breeding populations of this widely dispersed migrant.

  13. Subfossil leaves reveal a new upland hardwood component of the pre-European Piedmont landscape,Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J Elliott

    Full Text Available Widespread deforestation, agriculture, and construction of milldams by European settlers greatly influenced valley-bottom stream morphology and riparian vegetation in the northeastern USA. The former broad, tussock-sedge wetlands with small, anastomosing channels were converted into today's incised, meandering streams with unstable banks that support mostly weedy, invasive vegetation. Vast accumulations of fine-grained "legacy" sediments that blanket the regional valley-bottom Piedmont landscape now are being reworked from stream banks, significantly impairing the ecological health of downstream water bodies, most notably the Chesapeake Bay. However, potential restoration is impaired by lack of direct knowledge of the pre-settlement riparian and upslope floral ecosystems. We studied the subfossil leaf flora of Denlingers Mill, an obsolete (breached milldam site in southeastern Pennsylvania that exhibits a modern secondary forest growing atop thin soils, above bedrock outcrops immediately adjacent to a modified, incised stream channel. Presumably, an overhanging old-growth forest also existed on this substrate until the early 1700s and was responsible for depositing exceptionally preserved, minimally transported subfossil leaves into hydric soil strata, which immediately underlie post-European settlement legacy sediments. We interpret the eleven identified species of the subfossil assemblage to primarily represent a previously unknown, upland Red Oak-American Beech mixed hardwood forest. Some elements also appear to belong to a valley-margin Red Maple-Black Ash swamp forest, consistent with preliminary data from a nearby site. Thus, our results add significantly to a more complete understanding of the pre-European settlement landscape, especially of the hardwood tree flora. Compared with the modern forest, it is apparent that both lowland and upslope forests in the region have been modified significantly by historical activities. Our study

  14. Modeled nitrate levels in well water supplies and prevalence of abnormal thyroid conditions among the Old Order Amish in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Heltshe, Sonya L; Nuckols, John R; Sabra, Mona M; Shuldiner, Alan R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Airola, Matt; Holford, Theodore R; Zhang, Yawei; Ward, Mary H

    2012-02-17

    Nitrate is a widespread contaminant of drinking water supplies, especially in agricultural areas. Nitrate intake from drinking water and dietary sources can interfere with the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, thus potentially impacting thyroid function. We assessed the relation of estimated nitrate levels in well water supplies with thyroid health in a cohort of 2,543 Old Order Amish residing in Lancaster, Chester, and Lebanon counties in Pennsylvania for whom thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were measured during 1995-2008. Nitrate measurement data (1976-2006) for 3,613 wells in the study area were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey and we used these data to estimate concentrations at study participants' residences using a standard linear mixed effects model that included hydrogeological covariates and kriging of the wells' residuals. Nitrate levels estimated by the model ranged from 0.35 mg/L to 16.4 mg/L N-NO3(-), with a median value of 6.5 mg/L, which was used as the cutpoint to define high and low nitrate exposure. In a validation analysis of the model, we calculated that the sensitivity of the model was 67% and the specificity was 93%. TSH levels were used to define the following outcomes: clinical hyperthyroidism (n = 10), clinical hypothyroidism (n = 56), subclinical hyperthyroidism (n = 25), and subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 228). In women, high nitrate exposure was significantly associated with subclinical hypothyroidism (OR = 1.60; 95% CI: 1.11-2.32). Nitrate was not associated with subclinical thyroid disease in men or with clinical thyroid disease in men or women. Although these data do not provide strong support for an association between nitrate in drinking water and thyroid health, our results do suggest that further exploration of this hypothesis is warranted using studies that incorporate individual measures of both dietary and drinking water nitrate intake.

  15. Modeled nitrate levels in well water supplies and prevalence of abnormal thyroid conditions among the Old Order Amish in Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy Briseis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrate is a widespread contaminant of drinking water supplies, especially in agricultural areas. Nitrate intake from drinking water and dietary sources can interfere with the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, thus potentially impacting thyroid function. Methods We assessed the relation of estimated nitrate levels in well water supplies with thyroid health in a cohort of 2,543 Old Order Amish residing in Lancaster, Chester, and Lebanon counties in Pennsylvania for whom thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels were measured during 1995-2008. Nitrate measurement data (1976-2006 for 3,613 wells in the study area were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey and we used these data to estimate concentrations at study participants' residences using a standard linear mixed effects model that included hydrogeological covariates and kriging of the wells' residuals. Nitrate levels estimated by the model ranged from 0.35 mg/L to 16.4 mg/L N-NO3-, with a median value of 6.5 mg/L, which was used as the cutpoint to define high and low nitrate exposure. In a validation analysis of the model, we calculated that the sensitivity of the model was 67% and the specificity was 93%. TSH levels were used to define the following outcomes: clinical hyperthyroidism (n = 10, clinical hypothyroidism (n = 56, subclinical hyperthyroidism (n = 25, and subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 228. Results In women, high nitrate exposure was significantly associated with subclinical hypothyroidism (OR = 1.60; 95% CI: 1.11-2.32. Nitrate was not associated with subclinical thyroid disease in men or with clinical thyroid disease in men or women. Conclusions Although these data do not provide strong support for an association between nitrate in drinking water and thyroid health, our results do suggest that further exploration of this hypothesis is warranted using studies that incorporate individual measures of both dietary and drinking water nitrate intake.

  16. Extent and frequency of inundation on the Perkiomen Creek flood plain from Green Lane Reservoir to the Schuylkill River (near Oaks, Pennsylvania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, William F.

    1969-01-01

    This is the fourth report on the extent and frequency of inundation prepared for the Delaware River Basin Commission. The first of these reports covered floods on the Delaware River in the vicinity of Easton, Pennsylvania and Phillipsburg, New Jersey. The second covered a reach of the Schuylkill River from Conshohocken to Philadelphia. The third was for the Delaware River in the vicinity of Belvidere, New Jersey. The first and third reports were written by George M. Farlekas of the Trenton district, and the second was written by Arthur T. Alter of the Harrisburg district. Specific information as to the areal extent and contents of these studies can be obtained from the Delaware River Basin Commission, P.O. Box 360, Trenton, New Jersey. This flood inundation study is part of an investigative program financed through a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Delaware River Basin Commission. The report was prepared under the direction of Norman H. Beamer, District, Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.The streamflow data for Perkiomen Creek at Graterford were collected by the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters from 1914 to 1931. Since 1931 the data have been collected under a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Department of Forests and Waters. Data on high-water marks and areas inundated in past periods of flooding have been obtained from many local residents of Montgomery County. The Reading Company cooperated by allowing survey crews to work on their right-of-way. The author is grateful to Mr. John W. Buchanan for surveys, Mr. Lewis C. Shaw for illustrations and to Mrs. Joan C. King for typing.

  17. ‘One Medicine - One Health’ at the School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania - the first 125 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Hendricks, VMD, PhD

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet, in partnership with other veterinary schools and health professions, is positioned well to advance an international ‘One Medicine - One Health’ initiative. Founded in 1884 by the University's Medical Faculty, the School has been a leader in moulding the education and practice of veterinary medicine in the nation and the world. Successfully integrating biomedical research into all aspects of veterinary medical education, the School has made significant contributions to basic and clinical research by exemplifying ‘One Medicine’. In looking to the future, Penn Vet will embrace the broader ‘One Health’ mission as well.

  18. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  19. Geohydrologic and water-quality characterization of a fractured-bedrock test hole in an area of Marcellus shale gas development, Tioga County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Risser, Dennis W.; Hand , K.L; Clifford H. Dodge,

    2013-01-01

    An integrated analysis of core, geophysical logs, gas isotopes, and specific-depth water-quality samples from the Cherry Flats test hole was used to characterize the stratigraphy, water-bearing zones, and groundwater quality at a site in southern Tioga County, Pennsylvania. The study was completed as a cooperative effort between the Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey (BTGS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The multi-disciplinary characterization of the test hole provided information to aid the bedrock mapping of the Cherry Flats 7.5-minute quadrangle by BTGS, and to help quantify the depth and character of fresh and saline groundwater in an area of shale-gas exploration. The Cherry Flats test hole was cored to a depth of 1,513 feet (ft) below land surface (bls) and cased to 189 ft through the collapsed mine workings of the former Arnot No. 2 underground coal mine. The test hole penetrated

  20. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein antibodies in wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York and Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, Megan S; Freer, Heather; Whipps, Christopher M; Wagner, Bettina

    2013-05-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi differentially exhibits outer surface proteins (Osp) on its outer membrane, and detection of particular Osp antibodies in mammals is suggestive of the infection stage. For example, OspF is typically associated with chronic infection, whereas OspC suggests early infection. A fluorescent bead-based multiplex assay was used to test sera from New York and Pennsylvania white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) for the presence of antibodies to OspA, OspC, and OspF. OspF seroprevalence was significantly greater than both OspA and OspC seroprevalence for all study sites. OspA, OspC, and OspF seroprevalences were significantly greater in Pennsylvania deer than New York deer. The regional differences in seroprevalence are believed to be attributable to a heterogeneous Ixodes scapularis distribution. While most seropositive deer were solely OspF seropositive, deer concurrently OspC and OspF seropositive were the second most commonly encountered individuals. Simultaneous detection of OspF and OspC antibodies may occur when non-infected or chronically infected deer are bitten by an infected tick within a few months of blood collection, thereby inducing production of antibodies associated with the early stages of infection with B. burgdorferi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of nonpharmaceutical interventions to reduce transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) in Pennsylvania public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey R; Short, Vanessa L; Wu, Henry M; Waller, Kirsten; Mead, Paul; Kahn, Emily; Bahn, Beth A; Dale, Jon W; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Walton, Sabrina E; Urdaneta, Veronica; Ostroff, Stephen; Averhoff, Francisco

    2013-04-01

    School-based recommendations for nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) were issued in response to the threat of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1). The implementation and effectiveness of these recommendations has not been assessed. In November 2009, a Web-based survey of all Pennsylvania public schools was conducted to assess the use of recommended NPIs. Overall, 1040 (31%) of 3351 schools participated in the survey. By fall 2009, 820 (84%) of 979 respondents reported that their school had an influenza plan in place, a 44% higher proportion than in the spring 2009 (p schools communicated health messages (eg, staying home when sick), implemented return to school requirements, and made hand sanitizer available. Schools with a spring influenza plan (N = 568) were less likely to report substantial influenza-like illness (ILI) during the fall wave of influenza than the 299 schools without a spring influenza plan (63% vs 71%, p = .02). This association persisted after controlling for schools with substantial ILI in the spring. The reported use of NPIs in participating Pennsylvania public schools improved substantially from spring to fall and was generally consistent with issued recommendations. The proactive implementation of a number of NPIs and the early implementation of communication and education initiatives might have cumulatively reduced the impact of pH1N1 in some schools. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Susquehanna River near the Boroughs of Lewisburg and Milton, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Mark A.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximate 8-mile reach of the West Branch Susquehanna River from approximately 2 miles downstream from the Borough of Lewisburg, extending upstream to approximately 1 mile upstream from the Borough of Milton, Pennsylvania, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict the estimated areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa. In addition, the information has been provided to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) for incorporation into their Susquehanna Inundation Map Viewer (SIMV) flood warning system (http://maps.srbc.net/simv/). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasted peak-stage information (http://water.weather.gov/ahps) for USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. Calibration of the model was achieved using the most current stage-discharge relations (rating number 11.1) at USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., a documented water-surface profile from the December 2, 2010, flood, and recorded peak stage data. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 14 feet (ft) to 39 ft. Modeled flood stages, as defined by NWS, include Action Stage, 14 ft; Flood Stage, 18 ft; Moderate Flood Stage, 23 ft; and Major Flood Stage, 28 ft. Geographic information system (GIS) technology

  3. Dissolved metals and associated constituents in abandoned coal-mine discharges, Pennsylvania, USA. Part 1: Constituent quantities and correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Complete hydrochemical data are rarely reported for coal-mine discharges (CMD). This report summarizes major and trace-element concentrations and loadings for CMD at 140 abandoned mines in the Anthracite and Bituminous Coalfields of Pennsylvania. Clean-sampling and low-level analytical methods were used in 1999 to collect data that could be useful to determine potential environmental effects, remediation strategies, and quantities of valuable constituents. A subset of 10 sites was resampled in 2003 to analyze both the CMD and associated ochreous precipitates; the hydrochemical data were similar in 2003 and 1999. In 1999, the flow at the 140 CMD sites ranged from 0.028 to 2210 L s-1, with a median of 18.4 L s-1. The pH ranged from 2.7 to 7.3; concentrations (range in mg/L) of dissolved (0.45-??m pore-size filter) SO4 (34-2000), Fe (0.046-512), Mn (0.019-74), and Al (0.007-108) varied widely. Predominant metalloid elements were Si (2.7-31.3 mg L-1), B ( C > P = N = Se) were not elevated in the CMD samples compared to average river water or seawater. Compared to seawater, the CMD samples also were poor in halogens (Cl > Br > I > F), alkalies (Na > K > Li > Rb > Cs), most alkaline earths (Ca > Mg > Sr), and most metalloids but were enriched by two to four orders of magnitude with Fe, Al, Mn, Co, Be, Sc, Y and the lanthanide rare-earth elements, and one order of magnitude with Ni and Zn. The ochre samples collected at a subset of 10 sites in 2003 were dominantly goethite with minor ferrihydrite or lepidocrocite. None of the samples for this subset contained schwertmannite or was Al rich, but most contained minor aluminosilicate detritus. Compared to concentrations in global average shale, the ochres were rich in Fe, Ag, As and Au, but were poor in most other metals and rare earths. The ochres were not enriched compared to commercial ore deposits mined for Au or other valuable metals. Although similar to commercial Fe ores in composition, the ochres are dispersed and

  4. Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate and Crop Management Effects on Nitrate Leaching from an Agricultural Field in Central Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Fox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen pan lysimeters were installed at a depth of 1.2 m in a Hagerstown silt loam soil in a corn field in central Pennsylvania in 1988. In 1995, wick lysimeters were also installed at 1.2 m depth in the same access pits. Treatments have included N fertilizer rates, use of manure, crop rotation (continuous corn, corn-soybean, alfalfa-corn, and tillage (chisel plow-disk, no-till. The leachate data were used to evaluate a number of nitrate leaching models. Some of the highlights of the 11 years of results include the following: 1 growing corn without organic N inputs at the economic optimum N rate (EON resulted in NO3–-N concentrations of 15 to 20 mg l-1 in leachate; 2 use of manure or previous alfalfa crop as partial source of N also resulted in 15 to 20 mg l-1 of NO3–-N in leachate below corn at EON; 3 NO3–-N concentration in leachate below alfalfa was approximately 4 mg l-1; 4 NO3–-N concentration in leachate below soybeans following corn was influenced by fertilizer N rate applied to corn; 5 the mass of NO3–-N leached below corn at the EON rate averaged 90 kg N ha-1 (approx. 40% of fertilizer N applied at EON; 6 wick lysimeters collected approximately 100% of leachate vs. 40–50% collected by pan lysimeters. Coefficients of variation of the collected leachate volumes for both lysimeter types were similar; 7 tillage did not markedly affect nitrate leaching losses; 8 tested leaching models could accurately predict leachate volumes and could be calibrated to match nitrate leaching losses in calibration years, but only one model (SOILN accurately predicted nitrate leaching losses in the majority of validation treatment years. Apparent problems with tested models: there was difficulty estimating sizes of organic N pools and their transformation rates, and the models either did not include a macropore flow component or did not handle macropore flow well.

  5. Let the sun shine in: effects of ultraviolet radiation on invasive pneumococcal disease risk in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Caroline C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community acquired pneumonia and bacteremia. Excess wintertime mortality related to pneumonia has been noted for over a century, but the seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has been described relatively recently and is poorly understood. Improved understanding of environmental influence on disease seasonality has taken on new urgency due to global climate change. Methods We evaluated 602 cases of IPD reported in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, from 2002 to 2007. Poisson regression models incorporating seasonal smoothers were used to identify associations between weekly weather patterns and case counts. Associations between acute (day-to-day environmental fluctuations and IPD occurrence were evaluated using a case-crossover approach. Effect modification across age and sex strata was explored, and meta-regression models were created using stratum-specific estimates for effect. Results IPD incidence was greatest in the wintertime, and spectral decomposition revealed a peak at 51.0 weeks, consistent with annual periodicity. After adjustment for seasonality, yearly increases in reporting, and temperature, weekly incidence was found to be associated with clear-sky UV index (IRR per unit increase in index: 0.70 [95% CI 0.54-0.91]. The effect of UV index was highest among young strata and decreased with age. At shorter time scales, only an association with increases in ambient sulphur oxides was linked to disease risk (OR for highest tertile of exposure 0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.93. Conclusion We confirmed the wintertime predominance of IPD in a major urban center. The major predictor of IPD in Philadelphia is extended periods of low UV radiation, which may explain observed wintertime seasonality. The mechanism of action of diminished light exposure on disease occurrence may be due to direct effects on pathogen survival or host immune function via altered 1,25-(OH2-vitamin

  6. Carbon, Nitrogen, and Water Response to Land Use and Management Decisions under a Changing Climate in Pennsylvania during the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felzer, B. S.; Kicklighter, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    The effects of future climate change and increases in atmospheric CO2 levels in Pennsylvania must be considered in the context of land use and management decisions. While Pennsylvania was originally completely forested at the outset of the colonial period, 19th century land clearing and subsequent regrowth has changed the forest cover of Pennsylvania from 32% to 64% of the land area. Recent trends from 1992-2005 show that developed land has increased by 131% at the expense of agricultural land and forests. Future climate projections indicate that Pennsylvania will get significantly warmer and wetter due to continued increases in greenhouse gases. Using the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model version Hydro (TEM-Hydro), this study explores the role of land use and management in carbon and water dynamics during the 20th century and for four land use scenarios in the 21st century including: 1) a potential vegetation land cover of 100% forest; 2) a current land cover comprising mature forests, crops, pasture, and developed area; 3) a current land cover with younger forests; and 4) a future land cover scenario based on expanding development at the rate of 639,284 acres per decade adjacent to existing developed lands. Common assumptions are made about land use management, but we also explore the effect of crop tilling. TEM-Hydro runs are forced by 20th century climate from the PRISM model and 21st century climate from the NCAR CCSM3.0 IPCC A2 and B1 scenarios downscaled and bias corrected to 1/8o resolution. Regrowing forests are the only ecosystem with positive Net Carbon Exchange (NCE, Net Ecosystem Productivity minus carbon losses from the conversion of natural vegetation to cultivation and decomposition of agricultural and wood products, where positive indicates ecosystem sink), and sequester about 11,000 g C m-2 over the 20th century. The highest rates of leaching of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) occur in those areas that are fertilized, which include urban turf lawns

  7. Evaluation of radon occurrence in groundwater from 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania, 1986–2015, with application to potential radon exposure from groundwater and indoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eliza L.

    2017-05-11

    Results from 1,041 groundwater samples collected during 1986‒2015 from 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania, associated with 25 or more groundwater samples with concentrations of radon-222, were evaluated in an effort to identify variations in radon-222 activities or concentrations and to classify potential radon-222 exposure from groundwater and indoor air. Radon-222 is hereafter referred to as “radon.” Radon concentrations in groundwater greater than or equal to the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) for public-water supply systems of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) were present in about 87 percent of the water samples, whereas concentrations greater than or equal to the proposed alternative MCL (AMCL) for public water-supply systems of 4,000 pCi/L were present in 14 percent. The highest radon concentrations were measured in groundwater from the schists, gneisses, and quartzites of the Piedmont Physiographic Province.In this study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, groundwater samples were aggregated among 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania to identify units with high median radon concentrations in groundwater. Graphical plots and statistical tests were used to determine variations in radon concentrations in groundwater and indoor air. Median radon concentrations in groundwater samples and median radon concentrations in indoor air samples within the 16 geologic units were classified according to proposed and recommended regulatory limits to explore potential radon exposure from groundwater and indoor air. All of the geologic units, except for the Allegheny (Pa) and Glenshaw (Pcg) Formations in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province, had median radon concentrations greater than the proposed EPA MCL of 300 pCi/L, and the Peters Creek Schist (Xpc), which is in the Piedmont

  8. Critical Pedagogy--The Practice with Veteran Teachers: The Work of the Eastern Pennsylvania Lead Teacher Consortium. [and] Abandon Ship, Change Course, or Ride It Out: A Reaction to Walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas J.; Johnson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    The Eastern Pennsylvania Lead Teacher Consortium, a regional network for professional development of vocational teachers, demonstrates that lead teachers' work must be tied to student learning outcomes, ideas and practices must be communicated to building-level staff, and regional consortia need a dedicated funding source. (SK)

  9. Teachers, Traditions, and Transformation: Keynote Address Delivered at the 9th Annual Master's Capstone Conference for the Urban Teacher Master's and Certification Program at the University of Pennsylvania on 29 April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John F., III

    2015-01-01

    An alumnus of both Teach For America and the master's program in urban education at the University of Pennsylvania, John F. Smith III delivered the following address on April 29, 2014, to teachers in the 2013 and 2014 cohorts of Teach For America in Philadelphia. Program organizers invited him to provide remarks during the capstone event and to…

  10. Simulated Water Budgets and Ground-Water/Surface-Water Interactions in Bushkill and Parts of Monocacy Creek Watersheds, Northampton County, Pennsylvania -- A Preliminary Study With Identification of Data Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Pennsylvania and is underlain by Paleozoic bedrock covered with remnants of pre-Wisconsinan glacial drift. The oldest rocks are gneisses of...documenting the response of the watershed to climate and land-use changes. Continuous monitor- ing captures events, such as storms, that are impossible

  11. Use of interrupted time-series method to evaluate the impact of cigarette excise tax increases in Pennsylvania, 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen-qiang; Kuller, Lewis H; Fisher, Monica A; Ostroff, Stephen M

    2013-10-03

    Scientific evidence shows that cigarette price increases can significantly reduce smoking prevalence and smoking initiation among adolescents and young adults. However, data are lacking regarding the effectiveness of increasing Pennsylvania's cigarette tax to reduce smoking and/or adverse health effects of smoking. The objective of our study was to assess the impact of cigarette tax increases and resulting price increases on smoking prevalence, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and asthma hospitalization rates, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) rates in Pennsylvania. We used segmented regression analyses of interrupted time series to evaluate the level and trend changes in Pennsylvania adults' current smoking prevalence, age-adjusted AMI and asthma hospitalization rates, age-specific asthma hospitalization rates, and age-adjusted SCD rates following 2 cigarette excise tax increases. After the first excise tax increase, no beneficial effects were noted on the outcomes of interest. The second tax increase was associated with significant declines in smoking prevalence for people aged 18 to 39, age-adjusted AMI hospitalization rates for men, age-adjusted asthma hospitalizations rates, and SCD rates among men. Overall smoking prevalence declined by 5.2% (P = .01), with a quarterly decrease of 1.4% (P = .01) for people aged 18 to 39 years. The age-adjusted AMI hospitalization rate for men showed a decline of 3.87/100,000 population (P = .04). The rate of age-adjusted asthma hospitalizations decreased by 10.05/100,000 population (P < .001), and the quarterly trend decreased by 3.21/100,000 population (P < .001). Quarterly SCD rates for men decreased by 1.34/100,000 population (P < .001). An increase in the price of cigarettes to more than $4 per 20-cigarette pack was associated with a significant decrease in smoking among younger people (aged 18-39). Decreases were also seen in asthma hospitalizations and men's age-adjusted AMI hospitalization and SCD rates. Further research

  12. A feasibility study to estimate minimum surface-casing depths of oil and gas wells to prevent ground-water contamination in four areas of western Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, T.F.; Squillace, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic data were evaluated from four areas of western Pennsylvania to estimate the minimum depth of well surface casing needed to prevent contamination of most of the fresh ground-water resources by oil and gas wells. The areas are representative of the different types of oil and gas activities and of the ground-water hydrology of most sections of the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province in western Pennsylvania. Approximate delineation of the base of the fresh ground-water system was attempted by interpreting the following hydrologic data: (1) reports of freshwater and saltwater in oil and gas well-completion reports, (2) water well-completion reports, (3) geophysical logs, and (4) chemical analyses of well water. Because of the poor quality and scarcity of ground-water data, the altitude of the base of the fresh ground-water system in the four study areas cannot be accurately delineated. Consequently, minimum surface-casing depths for oil and gas wells cannot be estimated with confidence. Conscientious and reliable reporting of freshwater and saltwater during drilling of oil and gas wells would expand the existing data base. Reporting of field specific conductance of ground water would greatly enhance the value of the reports of ground water in oil and gas well-completion records. Water-bearing zones in bedrock are controlled mostly by the presence of secondary openings. The vertical and horizontal discontinuity of secondary openings may be responsible, in part, for large differences in altitudes of freshwater zones noted on completion records of adjacent oil and gas wells. In upland and hilltop topographies, maximum depths of fresh ground water are reported from several hundred feet below land surface to slightly more than 1,000 feet, but the few deep reports are not substantiated by results of laboratory analyses of dissolved-solids concentrations. Past and present drillers for shallow oil and gas wells commonly install surface casing to below the

  13. Dissolved metals and associated constituents in abandoned coal-mine discharges, Pennsylvania, USA. Part 2: Geochemical controls on constituent concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Water-quality data for discharges from 140 abandoned mines in the Anthracite and Bituminous Coalfields of Pennsylvania reveal complex relations among the pH and dissolved solute concentrations that can be explained with geochemical equilibrium models. Observed values of pH ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 in the coal-mine discharges (CMD). Generally, flow rates were smaller and solute concentrations were greater for low-pH CMD samples; pH typically increased with flow rate. Although the frequency distribution of pH was similar for the anthracite and bituminous discharges, the bituminous discharges had smaller median flow rates; greater concentrations of SO4, Fe, Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni and Sr; comparable concentrations of Mn, Cd, Zn and Se; and smaller concentrations of Ba and Pb than anthracite discharges with the same pH values. The observed relations between the pH and constituent concentrations can be attributed to (1) dilution of acidic water by near-neutral or alkaline ground water; (2) solubility control of Al, Fe, Mn, Ba and Sr by hydroxide, sulfate, and/or carbonate minerals; and (3) aqueous SO4-complexation and surface-complexation (adsorption) reactions. The formation of AlSO4+ and AlHSO42 + complexes adds to the total dissolved Al concentration at equilibrium with Al(OH)3 and/or Al hydroxysulfate phases and can account for 10-20 times greater concentrations of dissolved Al in SO4-laden bituminous discharges compared to anthracite discharges at pH of 5. Sulfate complexation can also account for 10-30 times greater concentrations of dissolved FeIII concentrations at equilibrium with Fe(OH)3 and/or schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)4.5(SO4)1.75) at pH of 3-5. In contrast, lower Ba concentrations in bituminous discharges indicate that elevated SO4 concentrations in these CMD sources could limit Ba concentrations by the precipitation of barite (BaSO4). Coprecipitation of Sr with barite could limit concentrations of this element. However, concentrations of dissolved Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn

  14. Factors affecting phosphorus transport at a conventionally-farmed site in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1992-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Daniel G.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Land and Water Conservation of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection conducted a cooperative study to determine the effects of manure application and antecedent soil-phosphorus concentrations on the transport of phosphorus from the soil of a typical farm site in Lancaster County, Pa., from September 1992 to March 1995. The relation between concentrations of soil phosphorus and phosphorus transport needs to be identified because excessive phosphorus concentrations in surface-water bodies promote eutrophication. The objective of the study was to quantify and determine the significance of chemical, physical, and hydrologic factors that affected phosphorus transport. Three study plots less than 1 acre in size were tilled and planted in silage corn. Phosphorus in the form of liquid swine and dairy manure was injected to a depth of 6-8 inches on two of the three study plots in May 1993 and May 1994. Plot 1 received no inputs of phosphorus from manure while plots 2 and 3 received an average of 56 and 126 kilograms of phosphorus per acre, respectively, from the two manure applications. No other fertilizer was applied to any of the study plots. From March 30, 1993, through December 31, 1993, and March 10, 1994, through August 31, 1994 (the study period), phosphorus and selected cations were measured in precipitation, manure, soil, surface runoff, subsurface flow (at 18 inches below land surface), and corn plants before harvest. All storm events that yielded surface runoff and subsurface flow were sampled. Surface runoff was analyzed for dissolved (filtered through a 0.45-micron filter) and total concentrations. Subsurface flow was only analyzed for dissolved constituents. Laboratory soil-flask experiments and geochemical modeling were conducted to determine the maximum phosphate retention capacity of sampled soils after manure applications and primary mineralogic controls in the soils that affect phosphate

  15. Estimated use of water in the Delaware River Basin in Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan S.; Linsey, Kristin S.; Ludlow, Russell A.; Reyes, Betzaida; Shourds, Jennifer L.

    2016-11-07

    The Delaware River Basin (DRB) was selected as a Focus Area Study in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the USGS National Water Census. The National Water Census is a USGS research program that focuses on national water availability and use and then develops new water accounting tools and assesses water availability at both the regional and national scales. One of the water management needs that the DRB study addressed, and that was identified by stakeholder groups from the DRB, was to improve the integration of state water use and water-supply data and to provide the compiled water use information to basin users. This water use information was also used in the hydrologic modeling and ecological components of the study.Instream and offstream water use was calculated for 2010 for the DRB based on information received from Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. Water withdrawal, interbasin transfers, return flow, and hydroelectric power generation release data were compiled for 11 categories by hydrologic subregion, basin, subbasin, and subwatershed. Data availability varied by state. Site-specific data were used whenever possible to calculate public supply, irrigation (golf courses, nurseries, sod farms, and crops), aquaculture, self-supplied industrial, commercial, mining, thermoelectric, and hydroelectric power withdrawals. Where site-specific data were not available, primarily for crop irrigation, livestock, and domestic use, various techniques were used to estimate water withdrawals.Total water withdrawals in the Delaware River Basin were calculated to be about 7,130 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) in 2010. Calculations of withdrawals by source indicate that freshwater withdrawals were about 4,130 Mgal/d (58 percent of the total) and the remaining 3,000 Mgal/d (42 percent) were from saline water. Total surface-water withdrawals were calculated to be 6,590 Mgal/d, or 92 percent of the total; about 54 percent (3,590 Mgal/d) of surface

  16. Relations of biological indicators to nutrient data for lakes and streams in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, 1990-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Clean Water Action Plan of 1998 provides a blueprint for federal agencies to work with states, tribes, and other stakeholders to protect and restore the Nation?s water resources. The plan includes an initiative that addresses the nutrientenrichment problem of lakes and streams across the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is working to set nutrient criteria by nationwide nutrient ecoregions that are an aggregation of the Omernik level III ecoregions.Because low levels of nutrients are necessary for healthy streams and elevated concentrations can cause algal blooms that deplete available oxygen and kill off aquatic organisms, criteria levels are to be set, in part, using the relation between chlorophyll a and concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus. Data from Pennsylvania and West Virginia, collected between 1990 and 1998, were analyzed for relations between chlorophyll a, nutrients, and other explanatory variables. Both phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a concentrations from lakes and streams were analyzed separately within each of the USEPA nutrient ecoregions located within the boundaries of the two states. These four nutrient ecoregions are VII (Mostly Glaciated Dairy), VIII (Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated Upper Midwest and Northeast), IX (Southeastern Temperate Forested Plains and Hills), and XI (Central and Eastern Forested Uplands).ytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations in lakes were related to total nitrogen, total phosphorus, Secchi depth, concentration of dissolved oxygen, pH, water temperature, and specific conductivity. In nutrient ecoregion VII, nutrients were not significant predictors of chlorophyll a concentrations. Total nitrogen, Secchi depth, and pH were significantly related to phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations in nutrient ecoregion IX. Lake periphyton chlorophyll a concentrations from nutrient ecoregion XI were related to total phosphorus rather than total nitrogen, Secchi depth

  17. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a simplified provisional correlation chart that was compiled from both published and unpublished data in order to fill a need to visualize the currently accepted stratigraphic relations between Appalachian basin formations, coal beds and coal zones, and key stratigraphic units in the northern, central, and southern Appalachian basin coal regions of Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Appalachian basin coal beds and coal zones were deposited in a variety of geologic settings throughout the Lower, Middle, and Upper Pennsylvanian and Pennsylvanian formations were defined on the presence or absence of economic coal beds and coarse-grained sandstones that often are local or regionally discontinuous. The correlation chart illustrates how stratigraphic units (especially coal beds and coal zones) and their boundaries can differ between States and regions.

  18. A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar A. Patel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1 for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2 a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3 a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual

  19. Práticas bilíngues em Escolas de Surdos: Pennsylvania School for The Deaf e Oak Lodge School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Bolivar Lebedeff

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do texto é apresentar e discutir práticas bilíngues em escolas para surdos. São discutidas as impressões e inferências da autora com relação às práticas bilíngues em duas escolas: a Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, localizada na Filadélfia, nos Estados Unidos, e a Oak Lodge School, localizada em Londres, na Inglaterra. O texto está composto por três tópicos de discussão de práticas bilíngues: a língua na/da escola, tecnologia e práticas bilíngues e experiência visual.

  20. Geochemical and mineralogical sampling of the Devonian shales in the Broadtop synclinorium, Appalachian basin, in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Catherine B.; Coleman, James L.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Niemeyer, Patrick W.; Dulong, Frank T.

    2015-01-01

    Reconnaissance field mapping and outcrop sampling for geochemical and mineralogical analyses indicate that the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale in the Broadtop synclinorium and nearby areas from southeastern West Virginia to south-central Pennsylvania has an organic content sufficiently high and a thermal maturity sufficiently moderate to be considered for a shale gas play. The organic matter-rich Marcellus Shale is present throughout most of the synclinorium, being absent only where it has been eroded from the crest of anticlines. Geochemical analyses of outcrop and well drill-cuttings samples indicate that variable levels of hydrocarbons have been generated and expelled from the kerogen originally in place in the mudstone. The mineralogical characteristics of the Marcellus Shale samples from the study area are conducive to a continuous resource play, but the Middle Devonian strata are folded, faulted, and moderately to heavily sheared in the Broadtop synclinorium.

  1. Educational views and attitudes, and career goals of MD-PhD students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Christopher D; Greeley, Siri Atma W; Shea, Judy A; Ahn, Jaimo

    2005-02-01

    Despite the documented contribution of graduates of MD-PhD programs to the medical profession, few data exist concerning the views, attitudes, and career goals of students before they graduate from such programs. All 167 students enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Combined Degree Program in the spring of 2002 were invited to participate in an IRB-approved online questionnaire consisting of 81 multiple-choice questions covering students' demographics, satisfaction with their educational experience, future goals and career aspirations, and attitudes and views concerning the physician-scientist model. The 96 MD-PhD students (57.5%) who completed the questionnaire represented a diverse group with individuals from every stage of training. The majority of students were satisfied with their overall educational experience (90.5%). Although students reported an interest in a wide range of clinical specialties, 84.4% indicated plans to pursue a career in research and 79.2% preferred a position at an academic medical center. However, a larger percentage of males (70.7%) than females (50.0%) listed research as their primary professional activity. The range of students' views and attitudes regarding the physician-scientist model suggests that additional education and discussion are warranted. The MD-PhD students surveyed at the University of Pennsylvania were satisfied with their education and most were planning research-oriented careers. Yet, the aspirations, views and concerns of individual MD-PhD students were varied. The authors believe this information in aggregate will prove useful to current and future students, combined degree programs, policymakers, and residency directors.

  2. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Black Bears (Ursus americanus), Bobcats (Lynx rufus), and Feral Cats (Felis catus) from Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Jitender P; Verma, Shiv K; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Cassinelli, Ana B; Kwok, Oliver C H; Van Why, Kyle; Su, Chunlei; Humphreys, Jan G

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects virtually all warm-blooded hosts worldwide. Recently, attention has been focused on the genetic diversity of the parasite to explain its pathogenicity in different hosts. It has been hypothesized that interaction between feral and domestic cycles of T. gondii may increase unusual genotypes in domestic cats and facilitate transmission of potentially more pathogenic genotypes to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. In the present study, we tested black bear (Ursus americanus), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and feral cat (Felis catus) from the state of Pennsylvania for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 32 (84.2%) of 38 bears, both bobcats, and 2 of 3 feral cats tested by the modified agglutination test (cut off titer 1:25). Hearts from seropositive animals were bioassayed in mice, and viable T. gondii was isolated from 3 of 32 bears, 2 of 2 bobcats, and 2 of 3 feral cats. DNA isolated from culture-derived tachyzoites of these isolates was characterized using multilocus PCR-RFLP markers. Three genotypes were revealed, including ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1 or #3 (Type II, 1 isolate), #5 (Type 12, 3 isolates), and #216 (3 isolates), adding to the evidence of genetic diversity of T. gondii in wildlife in Pennsylvania. Pathogenicity of 3 T. gondii isolates (all #216, 1 from bear, and 2 from feral cat) was determined in outbred Swiss Webster mice; all three were virulent causing 100% mortality. Results indicated that highly mouse pathogenic strains of T. gondii are circulating in wildlife, and these strains may pose risk to infect human through consuming of game meat. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. A Community Landscape Model of Pro-Environmental Behavior: The Effects of Landscape and Community Interaction on Residential Energy Behaviors in Two Pennsylvania Towns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainzer, Stephen P.

    We are using more energy every year. Between 2001 and 2011, Pennsylvania residential electricity sales increased by two and a half times the number of new customers, accounting for almost one third of the state's total electricity consumption. Our ability to meet demand by acquiring new energy sources faces several challenges. Confusion surrounds the physical and economic accessibility of remaining fossil fuel sources. Immense land use requirements and subsequent environmental impacts challenge a total shift to renewable energy sources. The laws of thermodynamics limit the potential for new technology to efficiently convert raw energy to consumable sources. As a result, any rational strategy to meet future energy demands must involve conservation. Conservation is a pro-environmental behavior, an act intended to benefit the environment surrounding a person. I posit that a transdisciplinary model, the community landscape model of the pro-environmental behavior, unifies the conceptually analogous - yet disparate - fields of landscape, community, and behavior towards explaining residential energy conservation actions. Specifically, the study attempted to describe links between the physical environment, social environment, and conservation behaviors through a mixed-method framework. Two Pennsylvania townships - Spring and East Buffalo townships - were selected from an analysis of housing, electricity consumption, and land cover trends. Key informants from both townships informed the design of a survey instrument that captured the utility consumption, residential conservation actions, energy and environmental values, types and levels of community engagement, perceived barriers, and socio-demographic information from 107 randomly selected households. A mixed-method analysis produced evidence that place-based values and intention to participate in the community were significantly linked to lower utility consumption in households. People who cared deeply about their town

  4. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar to Investigate Methane and Soil Carbon Dynamics at the Weyandt Environmental Monitoring Site in Western Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, A. D.; Mount, G.; McClellan, M. D.; Hovan, S. A.; Wilson, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies involving methane budgets of western Pennsylvania have sought to quantify the amount and rate of fugitive methane released during industrial natural gas development and from distribution systems. However, in order to fully understand the carbon cycle and budget of the area, contributions from natural systems such as wetlands are also needed. Our research utilizes a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR), aerial imagery, and direct measurements (coring and gas traps) to estimate the contribution of wetlands to the total carbon stock of an agricultural and gas-producing site known as the Weyandt Farm Environmental Monitoring Site in Indiana, Pennsylvania.Our approach uses three-dimensional (3D) GPR surveys to define the thickness from the wetland surface to the regolith or bedrock interface in order to create a volume model of gas-producing organic soils. Depth-profile cores are extracted to confirm soil column interfaces and determine changes in soil carbon content with depth. In addition, gas traps placed across the wetlands measure the spatial and temporal variability of gas methane released. Carbon stocks across the monitoring site are estimated from aerial photographs and are used to determine surface area of each wetland type and develop a relationship between surface area and total carbon stocks within those wetlands. These values can be up scaled to estimate carbon stocks across similar landscapes within broader regions.This research demonstrates the ability of indirect geophysical methods to quickly estimate carbon stocks within irregular wetlands. This will be important when trying to understanding the environmental impact of methane released from both naturally occurring sources and commercial extraction and distribution activities.

  5. The effect of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act on food services and drinking places sales and numbers, 1998-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen-Qiang; Fisher, Monica A

    2013-11-27

    Philadelphia enacted its Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) nearly 2 years before the statewide CIAA. In this study, we assessed the economic impact of CIAAs on 4 types of food services and drinking places and addressed the predominant limitation of previous pre-post ban studies, namely the lack of control for confounders and changes in secular trends over time. We analyzed data from Pennsylvania Department of Revenue Quarterly 1998-2011 taxable county-level revenue sales and number of food services and drinking places. Region-specific and type-specific adjusted sales and number of food services and drinking places accounted for consumer spending as a general economic indicator. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time-series methodology assessed changes in trend and level. Pennsylvania CIAA had no significant effect on adjusted sales or numbers except for an increase in sales in Philadelphia for limited-service eating places and in the surrounding 4 counties for special food services. Philadelphia CIAA was associated with an increase in adjusted numbers of full-service restaurants in Philadelphia and the rest of the state, special food services in Philadelphia, and drinking places in the rest of the state, and a decrease in the number of special food services in the surrounding counties. Philadelphia CIAA had no significant effect on adjusted sales except for an increase in special food services in the rest of the state. Overall, CIAAs had no negative business-related impact and, for the most part, suggest a positive impact on restaurant sales and numbers. Our results provide further support for comprehensive CIAA ordinance for restaurants.

  6. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Huntingdon, and Luzerne counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E.T.; Milheim, L.E.; Roig-Silva, C.M.; Winters, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Huntingdon, and Luzerne Counties in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication. In this region, natural gas development disturbed

  7. EMS Activations for School-Aged Children From Public Buildings, Places of Recreation or Sport, and Health Care Facilities in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine, Andrew T; Olympia, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    To determine the etiology of emergency medical services (EMS) activations in 2011 to public buildings, places of recreation or sport, and health care facilities involving children aged 5 to 18 years in Pennsylvania. Electronic records documenting 2011 EMS activations as provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Health's Bureau of EMS were reviewed. Data elements (demographics, dispatch complaint, mechanism of injury, primary assessment) from patients aged 5 to 18 years involved in an EMS response call originating from either a public building, a place of recreation and sport, or health care facility were analyzed. A total of 12,289 records were available for analysis. The most common primary assessments from public buildings were traumatic injury, behavioral/psychiatric disorder, syncope/fainting, seizure, and poisoning. The most common primary assessments from places of recreation or sport were traumatic injury, syncope/fainting, altered level of consciousness, respiratory distress, and abdominal pain. The most common primary assessments from health care facilities were behavioral/psychiatric disorder, traumatic injury, abdominal pain, respiratory distress, and syncope/fainting. When examining the mechanism of injury for trauma-related primary assessments, falls were the most common mechanism at all 3 locations, followed by being struck by an object. Of the 1335 serious-incident calls (11% of the total EMS activations meeting inclusion criteria), 61.2% were from public buildings, 14.1% from places of recreation or sport, and 24.7% from health care facilities. Our identification of common EMS dispatch complaints, mechanisms of injury, and primary assessments can be used in the education of staff and preparation of facilities for medical emergencies and injuries where children spend time.

  8. Thermal maturity patterns in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania: Chapter F.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Hower, James C.; Grady, William C.; Levine, Jeffrey R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal maturation patterns of Pennsylvanian strata in the Appalachian basin and part of the Black Warrior basin were determined by compiling previously published and unpublished percent-vitrinite-reflectance (%R0) measurements and preparing isograd maps on the basis of the measurements. The isograd values range from 0.6 %R0 in Ohio and the western side of the Eastern Kentucky coal field to 5.5 %R0 in the Southern field in the Pennsylvania Anthracite region, Schuylkill County, Pa. The vitrinite-reflectance values correspond to the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) coal-rank classes of high-volatile C bituminous to meta-anthracite, respectively. In general, the isograds show that thermal maturity patterns of Pennsylvanian coals within the Appalachian basin generally decrease from east to west. In the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, the isograds show a circular pattern with the highest values (greater than 1.6 %R0) centered in Jefferson County, Ala. Most of the observed patterns can be explained by variations in the depth of burial, variations in geothermal gradient, or a combination of both; however, there are at least four areas of higher ranking coal in the Appalachian basin that are difficult to explain by these two processes alone: (1) a set of west- to northwest-trending salients centered in Somerset, Cambria, and Fayette Counties, Pa.; (2) an elliptically shaped, northeast-trending area centered in southern West Virginia and western Virginia; (3) the Pennsylvania Anthracite region in eastern Pennsylvania; and (4) the eastern part of the Black Warrior coal field in Alabama. The areas of high-ranking coal in southwestern Pennsylvania, the Black Warrior coal field, and the Pennsylvania Anthracite region are interpreted here to represent areas of higher paleo-heat flow related to syntectonic movement of hot fluids towards the foreland associated with Alleghanian deformation. In addition to the higher heat flow from these fluids, the Pennsylvania

  9. Use of Interrupted Time-Series Method to Evaluate the Impact of Cigarette Excise Tax Increases in Pennsylvania, 2000–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuller, Lewis H.; Fisher, Monica A.; Ostroff, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Scientific evidence shows that cigarette price increases can significantly reduce smoking prevalence and smoking initiation among adolescents and young adults. However, data are lacking regarding the effectiveness of increasing Pennsylvania’s cigarette tax to reduce smoking and/or adverse health effects of smoking. The objective of our study was to assess the impact of cigarette tax increases and resulting price increases on smoking prevalence, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and asthma hospitalization rates, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) rates in Pennsylvania. Methods We used segmented regression analyses of interrupted time series to evaluate the level and trend changes in Pennsylvania adults’ current smoking prevalence, age-adjusted AMI and asthma hospitalization rates, age-specific asthma hospitalization rates, and age-adjusted SCD rates following 2 cigarette excise tax increases. Results After the first excise tax increase, no beneficial effects were noted on the outcomes of interest. The second tax increase was associated with significant declines in smoking prevalence for people aged 18 to 39, age-adjusted AMI hospitalization rates for men, age-adjusted asthma hospitalizations rates, and SCD rates among men. Overall smoking prevalence declined by 5.2% (P = .01), with a quarterly decrease of 1.4% (P = .01) for people aged 18 to 39 years. The age-adjusted AMI hospitalization rate for men showed a decline of 3.87/100,000 population (P = .04). The rate of age-adjusted asthma hospitalizations decreased by 10.05/100,000 population (P < .001), and the quarterly trend decreased by 3.21/100,000 population (P < .001). Quarterly SCD rates for men decreased by 1.34/100,000 population (P < .001). Conclusion An increase in the price of cigarettes to more than $4 per 20-cigarette pack was associated with a significant decrease in smoking among younger people (aged 18–39). Decreases were also seen in asthma hospitalizations and men’s age-adjusted AMI

  10. Structure Segmentation and Transfer Faults in the Marcellus Shale, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania: Implications for Gas Recovery Efficiency and Risk Assessment Using 3D Seismic Attribute Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Emily D.

    The Marcellus Shale has become an important unconventional gas reservoir in the oil and gas industry. Fractures within this organic-rich black shale serve as an important component of porosity and permeability useful in enhancing production. Horizontal drilling is the primary approach for extracting hydrocarbons in the Marcellus Shale. Typically, wells are drilled perpendicular to natural fractures in an attempt to intersect fractures for effective hydraulic stimulation. If the fractures are contained within the shale, then hydraulic fracturing can enhance permeability by further breaking the already weakened rock. However, natural fractures can affect hydraulic stimulations by absorbing and/or redirecting the energy away from the wellbore, causing a decreased efficiency in gas recovery, as has been the case for the Clearfield County, Pennsylvania study area. Estimating appropriate distances away from faults and fractures, which may limit hydrocarbon recovery, is essential to reducing the risk of injection fluid migration along these faults. In an attempt to mitigate the negative influences of natural fractures on hydrocarbon extraction within the Marcellus Shale, fractures were analyzed through the aid of both traditional and advanced seismic attributes including variance, curvature, ant tracking, and waveform model regression. Through the integration of well log interpretations and seismic data, a detailed assessment of structural discontinuities that may decrease the recovery efficiency of hydrocarbons was conducted. High-quality 3D seismic data in Central Pennsylvania show regional folds and thrusts above the major detachment interval of the Salina Salt. In addition to the regional detachment folds and thrusts, cross-regional, northwest-trending lineaments were mapped. These lineaments may pose a threat to hydrocarbon productivity and recovery efficiency due to faults and fractures acting as paths of least resistance for induced hydraulic stimulation fluids

  11. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheim, L. E.; Slonecker, E. T.; Roig-Silva, C. M.; Winters, S. G.; Ballew, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract unconventional natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique for extraction, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication. In this region, natural gas and oil development disturbed

  12. Investigations of groundwater system and simulation of regional groundwater flow for North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in the vicinity of several industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and vicinity, Montgomery County, in southeast Pennsylvania has been shown to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the most common of which is the solvent trichloroethylene (TCE). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, and water-level monitoring, and measured streamflows in and near North Penn Area 7 from fall 2000 through fall 2006 in a technical assistance study for the USEPA to develop an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. In addition, the USGS developed a groundwater-flow computer model based on the hydrogeologic framework to simulate regional groundwater flow and to estimate directions of groundwater flow and pathways of groundwater contaminants. The study area is underlain by Triassic- and Jurassic-age sandstones and shales of the Lockatong Formation and Brunswick Group in the Mesozoic Newark Basin. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form a fractured-sedimentary-rock aquifer that acts as a set of confined to partially confined layers of differing permeabilities. Depth to competent bedrock typically is less than 20 ft below land surface. The aquifer layers are recharged locally by precipitation and discharge locally to streams. The general configuration of the potentiometric surface in the aquifer is similar to topography, except in areas affected by pumping. The headwaters of Wissahickon Creek are nearby, and the stream flows southwest, parallel to strike, to bisect North Penn Area 7. Groundwater is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use, public supply, and residential supply. Results of field investigations

  13. A reconnaissance spatial and temporal assessment of methane and inorganic constituents in groundwater in bedrock aquifers, Pike County, Pennsylvania, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Pike County in northeastern Pennsylvania is underlain by the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale and other shales, formations that have potential for natural gas development. During 2012–13, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pike County Conservation District conducted a reconnaissance study to assess baseline shallow groundwater quality in bedrock aquifers prior to possible shale-gas development in the county. For the spatial component of the assessment, 20 wells were sampled in summer 2012 to provide data on the occurrence of methane and other aspects of existing groundwater quality throughout the county, including concentrations of inorganic constituents commonly present at low levels in shallow, fresh groundwater but elevated in brines. For the temporal component of the assessment, 4 of the 20 wells sampled in summer 2012 were sampled monthly from July 2012 through June 2013 to provide data on seasonal variability in groundwater quality. All water samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, selected inorganic trace constituents (including metals and other elements), stable isotopes of water, radon-222, gross alpha- and gross beta-particle activity, dissolved gases (methane, ethane, and ethene), and, if possible, isotopic composition of methane. Additional analyses for boron and strontium isotopes, age-dating of water, and radium-226 were done on water samples collected from six wells in June 2013.

  14. A detailed risk assessment of shale gas development on headwater streams in the Pennsylvania portion of the Upper Susquehanna River Basin, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelly O.; Young, John A.; Faulkner, Stephen; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Slonecker, E. Terrence; Milheim, Lesley

    2018-01-01

    The development of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) involves infrastructure development (well pads, roads and pipelines), well drilling and stimulation (hydraulic fracturing), and production; all of which have the potential to affect stream ecosystems. Here, we developed a fine-scaled (1:24,000) catchment-level disturbance intensity index (DII) that included 17 measures of UOG capturing all steps in the development process (infrastructure, water withdrawals, probabilistic spills) that could affect headwater streams (metrics. We related this DII to three measures of high quality streams: Pennsylvania State Exceptional Value (EV) streams, Class A brook trout streams and Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture brook trout patches. Overall only 3.8% of all catchments and 2.7% of EV stream length, 1.9% of Class A streams and 1.2% of patches were classified as having medium to high level DII scores (> 50). Well density, often used as a proxy for development, only correlated strongly with well pad coverage and produced materials, and therefore may miss potential effects associated with roads and pipelines, water withdrawals and spills. When analyzed with a future development scenario, 91.1% of EV stream length, 68.7% of Class A streams and 80.0% of patches were in catchments with a moderate to high probability of development. Our method incorporated the cumulative effects of UOG on streams and can be used to identify catchments and reaches at risk to existing stressors or future development.

  15. Geologic analyses of LANDSAT-1 multispectral imagery of a possible power plant site employing digital and analog image processing. [in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegreen, J. R.; Prosser, W. J.; Millet, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A site in the Great Valley subsection of the Valley and Ridge physiographic province in eastern Pennsylvania was studied to evaluate the use of digital and analog image processing for geologic investigations. Ground truth at the site was obtained by a field mapping program, a subsurface exploration investigation and a review of available published and unpublished literature. Remote sensing data were analyzed using standard manual techniques. LANDSAT-1 imagery was analyzed using digital image processing employing the multispectral Image 100 system and using analog color processing employing the VP-8 image analyzer. This study deals primarily with linears identified employing image processing and correlation of these linears with known structural features and with linears identified manual interpretation; and the identification of rock outcrops in areas of extensive vegetative cover employing image processing. The results of this study indicate that image processing can be a cost-effective tool for evaluating geologic and linear features for regional studies encompassing large areas such as for power plant siting. Digital image processing can be an effective tool for identifying rock outcrops in areas of heavy vegetative cover.

  16. The Master of Science in clinical epidemiology degree program of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: a model for clinical research training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Norman, Sandra A; Farrar, John T; Kimmel, Stephen E; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    An innovative training program to provide clinical research training for clinicians was created in 1979 at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine. The program's principal and continuing aim is to provide trainees mentored experiences and the training needed to become skilled independent investigators able to conduct clinical research and develop academic careers as independent clinical investigators.The authors identify the vision that led to the creation of the master of science in clinical epidemiology (MSCE) degree program and describe today's training program, including administration, oversight, participating faculty, and trainees. They also describe the program's core curriculum, elective options, seminars on ongoing research, training in the responsible conduct of research, professional development activities, and the development and completion of a closely mentored clinical research project.Approximately 35 new trainees enter the two- to three-year program annually. Funding is provided primarily by National Institutes of Health-funded training programs and supplemented by private industry, private foundations, and employee-based benefits. More than 500 individuals have received or are currently receiving training through the MSCE program. A large percentage of former trainees maintain full-time positions in academic medicine today.The authors identify some challenges that have been met and insights regarding funding, faculty, trainees, and curriculum. Ongoing challenges include recruiting trainees from some selected highly paid, procedure-oriented specialties, maintaining sufficient mentors for the continually increasing numbers of trainees, and distinguishing applicants who truly desire a primary research career from others.

  17. Report of Increasing Overdose Deaths that include Acetyl Fentanyl in Multiple Counties of the Southwestern Region of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Jessica B; Janssen, Jennifer; Luckasevic, Todd M; Williams, Karl E

    2018-01-01

    Acetyl fentanyl is a Schedule I controlled synthetic opioid that is becoming an increasingly detected "designer drug." Routine drug screening procedures in local forensic toxicology laboratories identified a total of 41 overdose deaths associated with acetyl fentanyl within multiple counties of the southwestern region of the state of Pennsylvania. The range, median, mean, and standard deviation of blood acetyl fentanyl concentrations for these 41 cases were 0.13-2100 ng/mL, 11 ng/mL, 169.3 ng/mL, and 405.3 ng/mL, respectively. Thirty-six individuals (88%) had a confirmed history of substance abuse, and all but one case (96%) were ruled multiple drug toxicities. This report characterizes this localized trend of overdose deaths associated with acetyl fentanyl and provides further evidence supporting an alarmingly concentrated opiate and opioid epidemic of both traditional and novel drugs within this region of the United States. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Problems of hydroelectric development at existing dams: an analysis of institutional, economic, and environmental restraints in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.J.; Green, L.L.

    1979-04-01

    The methodology that has been developed to analyze the impact of possible government actions on the development of small-scale hydroelectric power in the United States is described. The application of the methodology to a specific region of the United States is also described. Within the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) region, the methodology has been used to evaluate the significance of some of the existing institutional and economic constraints on hydroelectric development at existing dams. The basic process for the analysis and evaluation is estimation of the hydroelectric energy that can be developed for a given price of electricity. Considering the present constraints and a geographical region of interest, one should be able to quantify the potential hydroelectric energy supply versus price. Estimates of how the supply varies with possible changes in governmental policies, regulations, and actions should assist the government in making decisions concerning these governmental functions relative to hydroelectric development. The methodology for estimating the hydroelectric supply at existing dams is included.

  19. Radiological assessment and remedial action report for the ''Son of Lansdowne'' property, 186 North Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    This document reports the results of a radiological assessment and remedial action program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory personnel at a radioactively contaminated private residence in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. The program was conducted on the residence at 186 Lansdowne Avenue. The survey conducted by the ANL personnel indicated that several dozen areas or spots of contamination were present on all floors and the basement of the three-story house. Contamination was found on furniture, carpeting, walls, floors, woodwork, and ceilings. Remedial action undertaken to remove the contamination ranged from scrubbing, to scraping, to shaving of wood, to removal and disposal of items and material that could not be adequately decontaminated. Outdoors, contaminated soil was removed from the backyard, and the driveway was dug up so the contaminated subsurface material could be removed. The remedial action generated quantities of radioactive waste, including four 55-gallon drums and one M-III bin (120 ft/sup 3/) containing floor tile, concrete, personal items, furniture, floor scrapings, vermiculite absorbed scrub water, and other items. In addition, there were 24 M-III bins containing approximately 112 tons of contaminated soil and rock from the two contaminated areas in the backyard and from the contaminated subsurface of the driveway. 2 refs., 39 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. The role of disinfectant resistance of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in recurring infections in Pennsylvania egg quality assurance program monitored flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Sherrill; Benson, Charles E; Munro, Donald S; Rankin, Shelly C; Ziegler, Andre E; Eckroade, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    The Pennsylvania egg quality assurance program (PEQAP) has made major gains in the reduction of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis (S. enteritidis). However, S. enteritidis continues to be a major food safety concern for the commercial egg laying industry. Despite intensive control efforts through PEQAP, some commercial egg layer houses still remain positive for S. enteritidis. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether S. enteritidis isolates obtained from historically environmentally S. enteritidis-positive houses were resistant to commonly used disinfectants. Archived S. enteritidis isolates (environmental, rodent, or egg) were compared with recently obtained isolates from the environment, rodents, or eggs from the same S. enteritidis-positive house. In addition, the isolates were compared with archived isolates from those premises that appeared to have eliminated S. enteritidis from their layer facilities. The official methods of the use-dilution analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists were used to evaluate each disinfectant product. Two phenolic, one quaternary ammonium, and one combination product containing quaternary ammonium and formaldehyde were evaluated, in addition to one sodium hypochlorite detergent. All products diluted according to the manufacturers' recommendations killed the S. enteritidis isolates in this test system. There was no difference in susceptibility or resistance to the disinfectants used between the isolates from those facilities that remained S. enteritidis-positive and those that appeared to have eliminated S. enteritidis from their facility.

  1. Landowner Attitudes and Perceptions of Impact from Wind and Natural Gas Development in Northern Pennsylvania: Implications for Energy Landscapes in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Jeffrey Bryan

    Energy developments such as industrial scale wind farms and unconventional natural gas drilling represent some of the largest and most controversial land use changes occurring in the United States today. A diverse array of academic disciplines have each sought to explain the social, psychological, and economic effects of siting large industrial facilities in rural areas, however the research has largely remained discipline-specific. This study measures resident attitudes and perceptions of impact from both wind and gas drilling occurring simultaneously in the Armenia Mountain Area of northern Pennsylvania. The results of a mail survey of landowners (n = 1028) in this study area reveal factors that explain landowner variation in attitudes and perception of impact, and describe new forms of participation in the planning and siting of these energy projects. Direction is provided for a new and synthetic theoretical understanding of how residents perceive these impacts and impacts from land use change. The work advances “risk of social and psychological disruption” as a key factor that may influence how residents respond to the prospect of large land use changes. Implications for the regulation and planning of these energy sources are offered, including a new understanding of how landowners participate in the planning and siting of large energy projects. Finally, the limitations of this work, as well as opportunities and implications for future research, are discussed.

  2. Estimated fecal coliform bacteria concentrations using near real-time continuous water-quality and streamflow data from five stream sites in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 2007–16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    2017-09-15

    Several streams used for recreational activities, such as fishing, swimming, and boating, in Chester County, Pennsylvania, are known to have periodic elevated concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria, a type of bacteria used to indicate the potential presence of fecally related pathogens that may pose health risks to humans exposed through water contact. The availability of near real-time continuous stream discharge, turbidity, and other water-quality data for some streams in the county presents an opportunity to use surrogates to estimate near real-time concentrations of fecal coliform (FC) bacteria and thus provide some information about associated potential health risks during recreational use of streams.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Chester County Health Department (CCHD) and the Chester County Water Resources Authority (CCWRA), has collected discrete stream samples for analysis of FC concentrations during March–October annually at or near five gaging stations where near real-time continuous data on stream discharge, turbidity, and water temperature have been collected since 2007 (or since 2012 at 2 of the 5 stations). In 2014, the USGS, in cooperation with the CCWRA and CCHD, began to develop regression equations to estimate FC concentrations using available near real-time continuous data. Regression equations included possible explanatory variables of stream discharge, turbidity, water temperature, and seasonal factors calculated using Julian Day with base-10 logarithmic (log) transformations of selected variables.The regression equations were developed using the data from 2007 to 2015 (101–106 discrete bacteria samples per site) for three gaging stations on Brandywine Creek (West Branch Brandywine Creek at Modena, East Branch Brandywine Creek below Downingtown, and Brandywine Creek at Chadds Ford) and from 2012 to 2015 (37–38 discrete bacteria samples per site) for one station each on French Creek near Phoenixville and

  3. Effects of Abandoned Coal-Mine Drainage on Streamflow and Water Quality in the Mahanoy Creek Basin, Schuylkill, Columbia, and Northumberland Counties, Pennsylvania, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    This report assesses the contaminant loading, effects to receiving streams, and possible remedial alternatives for abandoned mine drainage (AMD) within the Mahanoy Creek Basin in east-central Pennsylvania. The Mahanoy Creek Basin encompasses an area of 157 square miles (407 square kilometers) including approximately 42 square miles (109 square kilometers) underlain by the Western Middle Anthracite Field. As a result of more than 150 years of anthracite mining in the basin, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments have been adversely affected. Leakage from streams to underground mines and elevated concentrations (above background levels) of acidity, metals, and sulfate in the AMD from flooded underground mines and (or) unreclaimed culm (waste rock) degrade the aquatic ecosystem and impair uses of the main stem of Mahanoy Creek from its headwaters to its mouth on the Susquehanna River. Various tributaries also are affected, including North Mahanoy Creek, Waste House Run, Shenandoah Creek, Zerbe Run, and two unnamed tributaries locally called Big Mine Run and Big Run. The Little Mahanoy Creek and Schwaben Creek are the only major tributaries not affected by mining. To assess the current hydrological and chemical characteristics of the AMD and its effect on receiving streams, and to identify possible remedial alternatives, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a study in 2001, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the Schuylkill Conservation District. Aquatic ecological surveys were conducted by the USGS at five stream sites during low base-flow conditions in October 2001. Twenty species of fish were identified in Schwaben Creek near Red Cross, which drains an unmined area of 22.7 square miles (58.8 square kilometers) in the lower part of the Mahanoy Creek Basin. In contrast, 14 species of fish were identified in Mahanoy Creek near its mouth at Kneass, below Schwaben Creek. The diversity and abundance of fish

  4. Factors Affecting Specific-Capacity Tests and their Application--A Study of Six Low-Yielding Wells in Fractured-Bedrock Aquifers in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Dennis W.

    2010-01-01

    This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, prepared in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Mining and Reclamation, evaluates factors affecting the application of specific-capacity tests in six low-yielding water wells in areas of coal mining or quarrying in Pennsylvania. Factors such as pumping rate, duration of pumping, aquifer properties, wellbore storage, and turbulent flow were assessed by theoretical analysis and by completing multiple well tests, selected to be representative of low-yielding household-supply wells in areas of active coal mining or quarrying. All six wells were completed in fractured-bedrock aquifers--five in coal-bearing shale, siltstone, sandstone, limestone, and coal of Pennsylvanian and Permian age and one in limestone of Cambrian age. The wells were pumped 24 times during 2007-09 at rates from 0.57 to 14 gallons per minute during tests lasting from 22 to 240 minutes. Geophysical logging and video surveys also were completed to determine the depth, casing length, and location of water-yielding zones in each of the test wells, and seasonal water-level changes were measured during 2007-09 by continuous monitoring at each well. The tests indicated that specific-capacity values were reproducible within about ? 20 percent if the tests were completed at the same pumping rate and duration. A change in pumping duration, pumping rate, or saturated aquifer thickness can have a substantial effect on the comparability of repeated tests. The largest effect was caused by a change in aquifer thickness in well YO 1222 causing specific capacity from repeated tests to vary by a factor of about 50. An increase in the duration of pumping from 60 to 180 minutes caused as much as a 62 percent decrease in specific capacity. The effect of differing pumping rates on specific capacity depends on whether or not the larger rate causes the water level in the well to fall below a major water-yielding zone; when this

  5. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO{sub 2} in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity 1000 mg/l CaCO{sub 3}). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to {lt}4 during the 48 h of contact. Limestone grains developed a rind of gypsum encapsulated by a 10- to 30-mum thick, Fe-Al hydroxysulfate coating. Armoring slowed the reaction and prevented the limestone from generating any additional alkalinity in the system. With the pulsed flow limestone bed process, armor formation is largely suppressed and most limestone grains completely dissolve resulting in an effluent pH of {gt}6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface.

  7. Transport of hydraulic fracturing waste from Pennsylvania wells: A county-level analysis of road use and associated road repair costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lauren A.; Maloney, Kelly O.

    2016-01-01

    Pennsylvania’s rapid unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development—from a single well in 2004 to more than 6700 wells in 2013—has dramatically increased UOG waste transport by heavy trucks. This study quantified the amount of UOG waste and the distance it traveled between wells and disposal facilities on each type of road in each county between July 2010 and December 2013. In addition, the study estimated the associated financial costs to each county’s road infrastructure over that period. We found that UOG wells produced a median wastewater volume of 1294 m3 and a median of 89,267 kg of solid waste. The median number of waste-transport truck trips per well was 122. UOG wells existed in 38 Pennsylvania counties, but we estimated trucks transporting well waste traveled through 132 counties, including counties in West Virginia, Ohio, and New York. Median travel distance varied by disposal type, from 106 km to centralized treatment facilities up to 237 km to injection wells. Local roads experienced the greatest amount of truck traffic and associated costs ($1.1–6.5 M) and interstates, the least ($0.3–1.6 M). Counties with oil and gas development experienced the most truck traffic and incurred the highest associated roadway costs. However, many counties outside the active development area also incurred roadway repair costs, highlighting the extension of UOG development’s spatial footprint beyond the active development area. An online data visualization tool is available here: www.nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/transportation-of-hydraulic-fracturing-waste.

  8. Prevalence, Disparities, and Trends in Obesity and Severe Obesity Among Students in the School District of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Jessica M; Mallya, Giridhar; Wagner, Amanda; Buehler, James W

    2015-08-20

    Recent analyses suggest that increases in rates of childhood obesity have plateaued nationally and may be decreasing among certain populations and communities, including Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We examined 7 years of data, including 3 years not previously reported, to assess recent trends in major demographic groups. We analyzed nurse-measured data from the School District of Philadelphia for school years 2006-07 through 2012-13 to assess trends in obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥95th percentile) and severe obesity (BMI ≥120% of the 95th percentile) among all children aged 5 to 18 years for whom measurements were recorded. Over 7 school years, the prevalence of childhood obesity declined from 21.7% to 20.3% (P = .01); the prevalence of severe obesity declined from 8.5% to 7.3% (P obesity continued to decrease significantly among boys (including African Americans and Asians) but increased significantly among Hispanic girls and girls in grades kindergarten through 5. At the end of the study period, Hispanics had the highest prevalence of obesity among boys (25.9%) and girls (23.0%). The prevalence of severe obesity continued to trend downward in boys and decrease significantly among girls (including African American girls) but remained highest among Hispanic boys (10.1%) and African American girls (8.3%). The prevalence of obesity and severe obesity continued to decline among children in Philadelphia, but in some groups initial reductions were reversed in the later period. Further monitoring, community engagement, and targeted interventions are needed to address childhood obesity in urban communities.

  9. Design and Feasibility Assessment of a Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in the Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Bilonick; Daniel Connell; Evelyn Talbott; Jeanne Zborowski; Myoung Kim

    2006-12-20

    Eighty-nine (89) percent of the electricity supplied in the 35-county Pittsburgh region (comprising parts of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, and Maryland) is generated by coal-fired power plants making this an ideal region in which to study the effects of the fine airborne particulates designated as PM{sub 2.5} emitted by the combustion of coal. This report demonstrates that during the period from 1999-2006 (1) sufficient and extensive exposure data, in particular samples of speciated PM{sub 2.5} components from 1999 to 2003, and including gaseous co-pollutants and weather have been collected, (2) sufficient and extensive mortality, morbidity, and related health outcomes data are readily available, and (3) the relationship between health effects and fine particulates can most likely be satisfactorily characterized using a combination of sophisticated statistical methodologies including latent variable modeling (LVM) and generalized linear autoregressive moving average (GLARMA) time series analysis. This report provides detailed information on the available exposure data and the available health outcomes data for the construction of a comprehensive database suitable for analysis, illustrates the application of various statistical methods to characterize the relationship between health effects and exposure, and provides a road map for conducting the proposed study. In addition, a detailed work plan for conducting the study is provided and includes a list of tasks and an estimated budget. A substantial portion of the total study cost is attributed to the cost of analyzing a large number of archived PM{sub 2.5} filters. Analysis of a representative sample of the filters supports the reliability of this invaluable but as-yet untapped resource. These filters hold the key to having sufficient data on the components of PM{sub 2.5} but have a limited shelf life. If the archived filters are not analyzed promptly the important and costly information they

  10. You Asked, We Answered! A Podcasting Series by Scientists for K-12 Teachers Through the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.; Tait, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA) recently initiated a podcasting series "You Asked, We Answered!" for K-12 teachers to increase their science content knowledge through short audio podcasts, supplemented with relevant resources. The 2015-2016 PAESTA President Kathy Tait generated the idea of tapping in to the content expertise of higher education faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students to assist K-12 teachers with increasing their own Earth and space content knowledge. As time and resources for professional development are decreasing for K-12 teachers, PAESTA is committed to not only providing curricular resources through our online database of inquiry-based exercises in the PAESTA Classroom, but providing an opportunity to learn science content from professionals in an audio format.Our goal at PAESTA has been to release at least one new podcast per month that answers the questions asked by PAESTA members. Each podcast is recorded by an Earth/space science professional with content expertise and placed online with supporting images, links, and relevant exercises found in the PAESTA Classroom. Each podcast is available through the PAESTA website (http://www.paesta.psu.edu/podcasts) and PAESTA iTunes channel (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paesta-podcasts/id1017828453). For ADA compliance, the PAESTA website has a transcript for each audio file. In order to provide these podcasts, we need the participation of both K-12 teachers and science professionals. On the PAESTA Podcast website, K-12 teachers can submit discipline questions for us to pass along to our content experts, questions relating to the "what" and "how" of the Earth and space sciences, as well as questions about Earth and space science careers. We ask science professionals for help in answering the questions posed by teachers. We include online instructions and tips to help scientists generate their podcast and supporting materials.

  11. Trace Metal Characterization and Ion Exchange Capacity of Devonian to Pennsylvanian Age Bedrock in New York and Pennsylvania in Relation to Drinking Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradlin, J.; Fiorentino, A. J., II; Siegel, D. I.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of an evaluation of the trace and major metal composition of shallow sedimentary rock formations in the Appalachian Basin that control the quality of potable water produced in domestic and other wells. In particular, we quantify the mobile and total metals for which there are health concerns related to unconventional gas exploitation; Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, As, and Pb. To do this, we sampled the upper 400 feet of Devonian to Pennsylvanian aged bedrock from Marcellus, NY to State College, PA. We used a variation of the U.S. Geological Survey Field Leach Test to assess water reactivity and leaching potential. Al, Zn, and U potentially can be leached from aquifer rocks naturally under acidic conditions, such as where pyrite might oxidize, to above current allowable regulatory values for these metals (2 mg/L, 5 mg/L, and 0.03 mg/L respectively) from some of the clay-rich formations. Groundwater analyses from both New York and Pennsylvania show that natural ion exchange occurs along flow paths from ridges to valleys. We find the laboratory cation exchange capacity (CEC) spans what might be expected for illite and chlorite commonly found in these rocks. Given the low surface area of the mineral surfaces of the fractures through which most of the water moves, the observed ion exchange in these rocks is not well understood. Along with this broad scale study area we investigated a Devonian outcrop 4 miles North of Cortland, NY to evaluate small-scale trace metal heterogeneity within a single stratigraphic section. Together these two studies provide important information to determine the extent to which ground water might be naturally high in trace metal composition, either because of geochemical conditions or entrainment of suspended material not removed prior to sampling.

  12. H08807: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Lake Mead, Arizona and Nevada, 1964-10-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  13. H08777: NOS Hydrographic Survey , VIRGIN BASIN, 1964-10-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  14. A survey of the physical health status of pupils aged 10 - 14 years in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and to monitor the effects of future social and health care policy."'" New Crossroads, near Cape Town, a township which captures much of the history of blacks in Cape Town,'"'' provides a particularly useful reference point to measure change. The study, carried out in October 1991 , screened the physical health status of a ...

  15. Contractors Meeting in Propulsion Held in Boulder Colorado on June 10- 14, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-02

    0.1 and 0.2 MPa). I Results and Discussion The effects of dilution of L fuel stream has been assessed through measurements of the tota ! integrated soot...No. F49620-88-K-0003, SRI I International, Menlo Park, CA (November 1990). 2. G. Hilber, A. Lago , and R. Wallenstein, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 4, 1753 (1978

  16. 10.-14. II on Puhta Rõõmu alaliiduna tuntud...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Lõkerdus- ja tegevuskunstikollektiiv Naeruorgesster ehk Laffing ahkestra - dirigent Erki Kannus, lõkerdajad Ivika Kivi, Piret Räni, Merle Kannus, Maris Mändel, Marge Monko, Aino Sepp, Annika Kaljurand, Anya Ronacher - esines 11. II Stockholmis Moderna Museeti taasavamispidustuste raames, 12. II osaleti tegevuskunstiprogrammis "Source Live 2004". Aprillis oodatakse kollektiivi Varssavisse Zacheta galerii näitusele "Poisid ja tüdrukud" (16. II-4. IV), kus esitatakse Piret Räni ja Anu Vahtra videot "Punk.Fem.Collection"

  17. On the rise of Bayesian econometrics after Cowles Foundation Monographs 10, 14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baştürk, N.; Çakmak, C.; Pinar Ceyhan, S.; van Dijk, H.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper starts with a brief description of the introduction of the likelihood approach in econometrics as presented in Cowles Foundation Monographs 10 and 14. A sketch is given of the criticisms on this approach mainly from the first group of Bayesian econometricians. Publication and citation

  18. On the rise of Bayesian econometrics after Cowles Foundation monographs 10, 14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baştürk, N.; Çakmaklı, C.; Ceyhan, S.P.; van Dijk, H.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper starts with a brief description of the introduction of the likelihood approach in econometrics as presented in Cowles Foundation Monographs 10 and 14. A sketch is given of the criticisms on this approach mainly from the first group of Bayesian econometricians. Publication and citation

  19. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    More than 60 years of biochemical and biophysical studies have accustomed us to think of proteins as highly purified entities that act in isolation, more or less freely diffusing until they find their cognate partner to bind to. While in vitro experiments that reproduce these conditions largely remain the only way to investigate the intrinsic properties of molecules, this approach ignores an important factor: in their natural milieu , proteins are surrounded by several other molecules of different chemical nature, and this crowded environment can considerably modify their behaviour. About 40% of the cellular volume on average is occupied by all sorts of molecules. Furthermore, biological macromolecules live and operate in an extremely structured and complex environment within the cell (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, cytoskeletal structures, etc). Hence, to further complicate the picture, the interior of the cell is by no means a simply crowded medium, rather, a most crowded and confining one. In recent times, several approaches have been developed in the attempt to take into account important factors such as the ones mentioned above, at both theoretical and experimental levels, so that this field of research is now emerging as one of the most thriving in molecular and cell biology (see figure 1). Figure 1. Figure 1. Left: number of articles containing the word 'crowding' as a keyword limited to the biological and chemical science domains (source: ISI Web of Science). The arrow flags the 2003 'EMBO Workshop on Biological Implications of Macromolecular Crowding' (Embo, 2012). Right: number of citations to articles containing the word 'crowding' limited to the same domains (bars) and an exponential regression curve (source: Elsevier Scopus). To promote the importance of molecular crowding and confinement and provide researchers active in this field an interdisciplinary forum for meeting and exchanging ideas, we recently organized an international conference held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding through an exhaustive chronological account of the major milestones. It is clear that the concept of excluded volume as a key factor remains central to the concept of molecular crowding. As a consequence, simple descriptive paradigms borrowed essentially from colloid physics may still provide useful tools to understand the subtle effects of crowding and confinement in living matter. The contiguity between crowding, colloids and soft matter further emerged as an important concept in the course of the conference in several theoretical lectures and a few experimental ones. Dave Thirumalai, from the University of Maryland (USA), one of the most active theoreticians in the field of theoretical biophysics, outlined scaling theories, concepts from colloid literature and different simulation techniques to describe scenarios for crowding-induced changes in the structure and dynamics of proteins and RNA. In particular, he showed the importance of the shape of crowding particles in affecting folding oligomerization of amyloidogenic peptides. Johannes Schöneberg, from IMPRS, Mathematics Institute (Germany), illustrated ReaDDy , a newly developed particle-based simulation software tool for reaction-diffusion dynamics, developed in the group of Frank Noe at EMPRS. He showed that ReaDDy makes it possible to bridge the gap between soft matter and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the one hand and particle-based stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations on the other. We asked Johannes to organize a tutorial session to lead interested participants into the package and 'get their hands wet' under the guidance of the developers. The tutorial session was indeed successful and the broad possibilities offered by the simulation toolkit appeared to be clear to the participants. Paolo De Los Rios, from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland), examined the complexity of the effects caused by crowding conditions from the point of view of statistical physics. Starting from a modification of the well-known Smoluchowski approach to calculate the encounter rate of diffusion-limited reactions, he showed how more realistic situations accounting for crowding effects could be treated equally well on the same theoretical grounds. This talk marked an important point in the conference as it reinforced the idea that simple models of theoretical physics still have the power to provide inspiring results in spite of the intrinsic simplifications of such theoretical approaches. Along the same lines, Nicolas Dorsaz, from the University of Cambridge (UK), proposed an extension of the Smoluchowski framework that incorporates repulsive and attracting interactions between the reactants. This approach was illustrated by reaction rates obtained from event-driven Brownian dynamics and dynamical Monte Carlo simulations. Another striking example of the physical subtleties associated with modelling crowding effects was provided by Jeffrey Skolnick, from the Georgia Institute of Technology (USA). He examined the role of hydrodynamic interactions in the self-organization of biological assemblies in the presence of crowding. His results strongly suggest that hydrodynamic interactions greatly affect the kinetics of self-assembly reactions, so that including them in the picture appears crucial for understanding the dynamics of biological systems in vivo . Margareth Cheung, from the University of Houston (USA), emphasized that how the crowded environment inside a cell affects the structural conformation of a protein with a spherical shape is a vital question because the geometry of proteins and protein-protein complexes are far from globules in vivo . Her work demonstrates the malleability of 'native' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo . Huan-Xiang Zhou, from the Florida State University (USA), focused on atomistic simulations of protein folding and binding under crowding conditions. His lab has developed a post-processing method that allows the atomistic representation of proteins in folding and binding processes under crowding. A comparison with experimental results was also presented. Other lecturers pointed out that there are still aspects not entirely explored in the effects of both crowding and confinement. As suggested in the talk by Gary Pielak, from the University of North Carolina (USA), the currently used synthetic crowding agents are far from being satisfactory in replicating naturally occurring effects associated with crowded environments. For example, non-specific binding seems to play a subtle role in the cell, as natural macromolecules can induce both stabilization and destabilization when used as crowders. It is indeed possible to fine-tune the effect of proteins, as crowders, on the stability of other proteins. Another aspect that became clear is that new, more powerful methods need to be developed to study the effect of crowding, but even more to compare crowding and confinement. Indeed, it appeared clear from the lecture by Pierandrea Temussi, from the University of Naples (Italy), that a reliable comparison of the effects of crowding and confinement on the stability of proteins can only be based on the measurement of the whole stability curve of the same protein. Controversial aspects do not pertain only to the influence of crowding on protein stability, but also to aggregation phenomena in natural fluids. Domenico Sanfelice, from NIMR (London, UK), reported an interesting case of the apparent influence of crowding on aggregation. Hen egg white, a possible natural medium to study macromolecules in crowded conditions can dramatically increase the aggregation kinetics of proteins with an inbuilt tendency to associate. By carefully dissecting the phenomenology, it was shown that only part of this effect is due to crowding, while another factor playing an important role is the interaction with proteins from the milieu . In other words, high-molecular-weight glycoproteins can act as efficient molecular seeds for aggregation. A special topic of great relevance in the conference appeared to be the direct study of crowding in living systems. Alan Verkman, from the University of California, San Francisco (USA), one of the world's leading scientific personalities in the field of experimental investigation of crowding and confinement, was invited to give the second plenary lecture devoted to the experimental study of crowding effects in vivo . In his keynote lecture, Dr Verkman led us on a wide and compelling tour, exploring the main experimental approaches to study molecular crowding in and around cells. After a thorough examination of methods such as fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photo-activation localization microscopy and stochastic reconstruction microscopy, he concluded that the general consensus emerging from experimental studies is that the notion of universally anomalous diffusion in and around cells as a consequence of molecular crowding may not be correct, and that the slowing of diffusion in cells is less marked than has been widely assumed and can be simply described through a five- to sixfold reduction of the normal diffusion coefficient. A Soranno, from the University of Zürich (Switzerland), described how, by employing FRET measurements, it is possible to quantify the effect of molecular crowding on the dimensions of the highly charged, intrinsically disordered protein human prothymosin alpha. For a large variety of polymeric crowders (PEG, PVP, Ficoll, Dextran, PVA, PAA), a collapse of the polypeptide chain is observed with increasing polymer size and polymer concentration. The largest extent of collapse is observed for polymer radii comparable to the dimensions of the protein, in agreement with theoretical considerations. For his contribution, A Soranno was awarded the CSF Award for the best contributed talk. In his most inspiring talk, Clifford Brangwynne, from Princeton University (USA), drew attention to very important objects, namely Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) bodies. These are non-membrane-bound macromolecular assemblies that form from the dynamic interactions of RNA and proteins. The assembly of RNP bodies may sensitively depend on the biophysical features of the surrounding cytoplasm, including the degree of crowding, transport coefficients and mechanical properties. This dependency may have important implications for the RNA processing reactions involved in fundamental biological processes such as developmental cell growth. Remarkably, Brangwynne showed how RNPs behave in the cell as liquid droplets, pointing to a possible entirely new means that the cell could use to control and fine-tune its internal processes, in fact, more than that, a completely unexplored, new state of organization of living matter, and a functional one. Giuseppe Zaccai, from Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France), showed that protein dynamics is more sensitive than structure to environmental factors such as crowding, solvent, temperature or pressure. Furthermore, he convincingly explained how neutron scattering provides unique experimental data to underpin MD calculations in this context. Following up on environment-induced modulations of protein functional dynamics, Ruth Nussinov, from Tel Aviv University (Israel), addressed the important problem of whether cellular signals can travel long distances in a crowded environment. She proposed a model based on the evolution of at least three properties: a modular functional organization of the cellular network, sequences in some key regions of proteins, such as linkers or loops, and compact interactions between proteins, possibly favoured by a crowded environment. The workshop ended on a keynote lecture by Jean-Marie Lehn, from the Université de Strasbourg (France). Lehn, 1987 Nobel Laureate in chemistry, offered a 'supramolecular view' of the field of molecular interactions. Supramolecular chemistry explores the design of systems undergoing self-organization , i.e. systems capable of generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembling from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems . Chemistry may therefore be considered an information science , the science of informed matter. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the ability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by the reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels. CDC takes advantage of dynamic constitutional diversity to allow variation and selection in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation . The merging of the features—information and programmability, dynamics and reversibility, constitution and structural diversity—points towards the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry . The whole workshop could have not taken place without the help of the Centro Stefano Franscini. The CSF is the congress centre of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (ETH Zurich) and has been situated at Monte Verità since 1989. It is an ideal meeting point for all members of the international scientific community who wish to discuss the state-of-the-art and new challenges of any field of research. The CSF supports 20-25 international conferences every year and, since 2010, up to ten winter doctoral schools1. The competence and professionalism of the staff were at the same level of beauty and inspiring character as that of Monte Verità. A meeting of this sort, if successful, leaves the audience with more open questions than settled answers, and this was definitely the case for Crowding 2012. Excluded volume is clearly a fundamental concept that has allowed crowding, a very familiar concept in soft matter, to enter into the domain of biological sciences. However, the complexity of the biological milieu calls for more refined descriptions. What is the role of electrostatic and electrodynamic interactions? What is the role of hydrodynamics interactions? To what extent does the strong spatial inhomogeneity (clustering of molecules, cellular compartmentalization, etc) have to be taken into account? Or, more generally, what are the minimal elements that prove crucial to describe reactions within a cell? How does the diffusion proceed (diffusion, slow diffusion, sub-diffusion) given that the experimental evidences are still controversial? In conclusion, we knew that allowing scientists with very different backgrounds and ideas to mingle was a hazardous attempt. Despite that, the workshop turned out to be a very successful experiment, which was highly enjoyed both by the participants and the organizers. Discussions sparked regularly among ever-changing groups, comprising senior scientists and students, despite the rather tight schedule, adding to the sense of fulfilment ignited by the outstanding level of the presentations. Given the success of the meeting Crowding 2012, a new event has been organized and will take place on the same themes during fall 2013, this time in the beautiful scenery of the Loire valley in France. The workshop 'Macromolecular crowding effects in cell biology: models and experiments' will be held on the CNRS campus in Orléans, France, on 24-25 October 2013. More information can be found on the workshop website: http://dirac.cnrs-orleans.fr/~piazza/. 1Source: www.csf.ethz.ch/

  20. Contracts and management services site support program plan WBS 6.10.14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, J.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Contracts and Management Services is recognized as the central focal point for programs having company or sitewide application in pursuit of the Hanford Missions`s financial and operational objectives. Contracts and Management Services actively pursues cost savings and operational efficiencies through: Management Standards by ensuring all employees have an accessible, integrated system of clear, complete, accurate, timely, and useful management control policies and procedures; Contract Reform by restructuring the contract, organization, and cost accounting systems to refocus Hanford contract activities on output products; Systems and Operations Evaluation by directing the Cost Reduction program, Great Ideas, and Span of Management activities; Program Administration by enforcing conditions of Accountability (whether DEAR-based or FAR-based) for WHC, BCSR, ICF KH, and BHI; Contract Performance activities; chairing the WHC Cost Reduction Review Board; and analyzing companywide Performance Measures; Data Standards and Administration by establishing and directing the company data management program; giving direction to the major RL programs and mission areas for implementation of cost-effective and efficient data management practices; directing all operations, application, and interfaces contained within the Hanford PeopleCore System; directing accomplishment and delivery of TPA data management milestones; and directing the sitewide data management processes for Data Standards and the Data Directory.