WorldWideScience

Sample records for hardened low-alkaline cement

  1. Study on pore structure and diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in hardened low-alkaline cement

    Mihara, Morihiro; Torii, Kazuyuki

    2009-03-01

    Low-alkaline cement using pozzolans is under consideration as a possible filling and structural material in geological disposal for long-lived radioactive waste. Silica fume and fly ash are used to develop the low-alkaline cement which is named HFSC, High-volume Fly ash Silica fume Cement. In this study, pore structure and diffusivity of chloride ion in HFSC pastes were investigated in order to understand the fundamental transport properties of ions. HFSC which included different contents of fly ash (40%, 50% and 60%) with silica fume (20%) and ordinary Portland (OPC) cement were prepared. Hardened cement pastes were supplied to pore structure analysis and in-diffusion experiment with NaCl and CaCl 2 solution. Mercury intrusion method (MIP) commonly used and image analysis of backscattered electron microscopy (BSE) for pore in hardened cement paste were performed to investigate the pore structure. The porosity of HFSC was larger than that of OPC measured by MIP. However, pore diameter increasing pore volume of HFSC was smaller than that of OPC. It was observed that lager pores were in HFSC than in OPC from BSE. These large pores in HFSC were originated from cenosphere of FA. The apparent diffusivity of chloride in HFSC with fly ash of 40% showed smallest value in the cement pastes. It was concluded that the smallest diffusion coefficient was caused by a pore of HFSC which had a bended structure and ion exclusion/filtration effect. (author)

  2. Formulating a low-alkalinity cement for radioactive waste repositories

    Coumes, C. Cau Dit; Courtois, S.; Leclercq, S.; Bourbon, X.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-annual research program has been launched in January 2003 by CEA, EDF and ANDRA in order to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Four types of bindings have been investigated: binary blends of Portland cement and silica fume or metakaolin, as well as ternary blends of Portland cement, fly ash and silica fume or metakaolin. Promising results have been obtained with a mixture comprising 37.5% Portland cement, 32.5% silica fume, and 30% fly ash: pH of water in equilibrium with fully hydrated cement is below 11. Moreover, silica fume compensates for the low reactivity of fly ash, while fly ash allows to reduce water demand, heat release, and dimensional variations of cement pastes and mortars. (authors)

  3. Formulating a low-alkalinity cement for radioactive waste repositories

    Coumes, C. Cau Dit; Courtois, S.; Leclercq, S.; Bourbon, X

    2004-07-01

    A multi-annual research program has been launched in January 2003 by CEA, EDF and ANDRA in order to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Four types of bindings have been investigated: binary blends of Portland cement and silica fume or metakaolin, as well as ternary blends of Portland cement, fly ash and silica fume or metakaolin. Promising results have been obtained with a mixture comprising 37.5% Portland cement, 32.5% silica fume, and 30% fly ash: pH of water in equilibrium with fully hydrated cement is below 11. Moreover, silica fume compensates for the low reactivity of fly ash, while fly ash allows to reduce water demand, heat release, and dimensional variations of cement pastes and mortars. (authors)

  4. Review for the improvement of low alkaline cement from viewpoint of hydration control

    Imoto, Harutake; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2006-01-01

    It is concerns that high pH pore water from cementitious materials will become harmful to barrier system such as bedrock and buffer materials in the radioactive repository. Then sulpho-aluminate type low alkaline cement 'LAC' was developed. But LAC concrete has some problems on its workability and initial crack due to high reactability. It is necessary for LAC to be improved to avoid these problems. In this study, the conventional knowledge on reactability and hardened properties of sulpho-aluminate cement were reviewed from the viewpoint of hydration controlling. From the results, the recipe for the improvement of 'LAC' was investigated. Early hydration of sulpho-aluminate were delayed by the decreasement of calcium hydroxide quantity and increasement of calcium sulphate in cement. Retarder delayed hydration of sulpho-aluminate more than composition of cement. The effect of cement admixture on the early hydration of sulpho-aluminate cement were not reported. Blast furnace slag as cement admixture affect on the long-term hydration and strength development. So, it was guess that sulpho-aluminate type low alkaline cement 'LAC' have good strength development by controlling recipi of additional ratio of blast furnace slag and be-lite content in the sulpho-aluminate cement. (author)

  5. Applicability of low alkaline cement for construction and alteration of bentonite in the cement. 2

    Iriya, Keishiro; Fujii, Kensuke; Tajima, Takatoshi; Takeda, N.; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    This study consists of accelerating corrosion test of rebar in saline, automogeneous shrinkage test of HFSC, accelerating test for bentonite and rock, and summarizing rock and bentonite alteration. Corrosion of rebars in HFSC: Since sorption capacity of HFSC for Cl ion is slow due to low alkalinity, rate of corrosion of rebar in HFSC is very large. Cracking due to corrosion is generating in 4 years or 20 years, although service period is deferent in OPC amount. Automogenous shrinkage: Automogenous shrinkage of HFSC is larger than OPC in cement paste. It decreases corresponding to rise of fly ash content. The shrinkage in HFSC 226 is quite similar to OPC. The shrinkage in HFSC concrete is smaller than OPC concrete. 720 days alteration test of bentonite by solution of low alkaline cement: Ion exchange to Ca bentonite and calcite are observed in the solid phase. Thin plate of bentonite is disappeared and round shaped secondary mineral is generated. Dissolution of bentonite and generation of secondary minerals are limited in pH 11.0 or less, since pH of bentonite is about 10.0. 720 days alteration test of rock by solution of low alkaline cement: Calcite is generated in very test. Very small evidence is observed as generation of secondary minerals. Etched pits are observed in tuff A due to corrosion. (author)

  6. Applicability of low alkalinity cement for construction and alteration of bentonite in the cement

    Iriya, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubo, H.; Uegaki, Y.

    2002-02-01

    A concept of radioactive waste repository in which both bentonite and cementitious materials exist in deep cavern as engineered barriers is proposed. It is pointed out that pore water of cement is approximately 12.0 to 13.0 of pH and that it maintains for a long period. Therefore alteration of bentonite and rocks should be studied. Mixing test upon some interaction between modeled cement water and bentonite and rocks have been carried out since 1995 as a part of TRU repository's study. And low alkalinity of cement has been studied as parallel to study on alteration of bentonite. HFSC which has high fly ash content and which shows approximately 10.5 to 11.0 of pH of pore water was developed. Cementitious materials are generally use as a combination with steel, since its tensile strength is low. The corrosion of steel in concrete becomes a big problem in case of decreasing pH of cement. There is little available reference, since low alkalinity cement is quite new and special ordered one. Accelerating test for corrosion in low alkalinity concrete were carried out in order to collect data of corrosion. Although alteration of bentonite by several types of modeled cement water was tested. Long term test by actual cement pore water has not carried out. The alteration in 360 days was investigated. Conclusion obtained in this study is following. Corrosion of steel (re-bar) 1) Re-bar in HFSC with 60% of W/C is significantly corroded. The corrosion rate is bigger than the rate of ordinary used cement. 2) Diffusivity of Cl - ion in HFSC is similar to it in OPC comparing by the same water powder ratio. 3) Corrosion rate of HFSC 30 is similar to OPC60. However corrosion is progressed in HFSC 30 without Cl - ion due to lower alkalinity, but it isn't done in OPC within a certain amount of Cl - ion. Alteration of bentonite and rocks 1) Although no secondary minerals was observed in HFSC, monmorironite is gradually lost by increasing calcite. 2) Secondary minerals were observed in

  7. In situ test plan for concrete materials using low alkaline cement at Horonobe URL

    Kobayashi, Yasushi; Yamada, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Masashi; Matsui, Hiroya; Matsuda, Takeshi; Konishi, Kazuhiro; Iriya, Keishiro; Noda, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    HLW (high-level radioactive waste) repository is to be constructed at depths of over three hundred meters below the surface. Shotcrete and lining will be used for safety under construction and operational period. Concrete is a kind of composite material which is constituted by aggregate, cement and additives. Low alkaline cement has been developed from the viewpoint of long term stability of the barrier systems which would be influenced by high alkaline arising from cement material. HFSC (Highly Fly-ash contained Silica-fume Cement) is one of a low alkaline cement, which contains silica fume and coal ash. It has been developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). JAEA are now implementing the construction of the under ground research laboratory (URL) at Horonobe for the purpose of research in deep geological science and repository engineering technology. This report shows the in situ test plan for shotcrete using HFSC at Horonobe URL with identifying requirements for cement materials to be used in HLW repository, and also reviews major literatures of low alkaline cement. This in situ test plan is aiming to assess the performance of HFSC shotcrete in terms of mechanics, workability, durability, and so on. (author)

  8. Low alkaline cement used in the construction of a gallery in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory

    Nakayama, Masashi; Sato, Haruo; Sugita, Yutaka; Ito, Seiji; Minamide, Masashi; Kitagawa, Yoshito

    2011-01-01

    In Japan, any high level radioactive waste (HLW) pos is to be constructed at over 300 m depth below surface. Tunnel support is used for safety during the construction and operation, and shotcrete and concrete lining are used as the tunnel support. Concrete is a composite material comprised of aggregate, cement and various admixtures. Low alkaline cement has been developed for the long term stability of the barrier systems whose performance could be negatively affected by highly alkaline conditions arising due to cement used in a repository. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed a low alkaline cement, named as HFSC (Highly Flyash Contained Silicafume Cement), containing over 60wt% of silica-fume (SF) and fly-ash (FA). HFSC was used experimentally as the shotcrete material in construction of part of the 140m deep gallery in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The objective of this experiment was to assess the performance of HFSC shotcrete in terms of mechanics, workability, durability, and so on. HFSC used in this experiment is composed of 40wt% OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement), 20wt% SF, and 40 wt% FA. This composition was determined based on mechanical testing of various mixes of the above components. Because of the low OPC content, the strength of HFSC tends to be lower than that of OPC. The total length of tunnel using HFSC shotcrete is about 73 m and about 500 m 3 of HESC was used. The workability of HESC shotcrete was confirmed in this experimental construction. (author)

  9. Design and characterization of low-heat and low-alkalinity cements

    Codina, M.; Cau-dit-Coumes, C.; Le Bescop, P.; Verdier, J.; Ollivier, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Several systems comprising Portland cement, a pozzolan (silica fume or fly ash) and blastfurnace slag were compared. All blends were characterized by high amounts of additions, the Portland cement (PC) fraction ranging only from 20 to 60%. Cement hydration was studied using several techniques: X-ray Diffraction, TGA-DTA, calorimetry, pore solution extraction and microscopy. The most important result obtained with some ternary blends was the drop in the pore solution pH by more than one unit as compared with control samples elaborated with commercial cements. The alkali content (∼ 1 to 4 mmol/L) of the interstitial solution was also strongly reduced. The blends exhibited a low-heat output as required. Leaching tests carried out in pure water indicated a very slow decalcification of the samples. Several techniques such as optical microscopy, SEM/BSE, X-ray microanalysis or X-ray diffraction were compared to estimate the degraded thickness

  10. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  11. Development of low-alkaline cement using pozzolans for geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste

    Mihara, Morihiro; Iriya, Keishiro; Torii, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    To reduce uncertainties in the safety assessment of the disposal system for long-lived radioactive waste, cement was developed which generates leachates with a lower pH than that of ordinary cement paste. This cement is termed 'low-alkaline cement'. Large amounts of pozzolans were used to produce the low-alkaline cement with ordinary Portland cement. Silica fume was found to be an effective pozzolans to reduce pH, but the needed large amount of silica fume reduced the workability of fresh concrete. Therefore, the authors also used fly ash with silica fume, to develop more workable low-alkaline cement, termed high-volume fly ash silica fume cement (HFSC). Two types of HFSC developed showed high compressive strength, smaller drying shrinkage and lower temperature rise than that of ordinary Portland cement. It was confirmed that HFSC could be used as self-compacting concrete. Therefore they can be applied as either structural or backfilling concrete in the disposal system. (author)

  12. Confirmation of the applicability of low alkaline cement-based material in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory

    Nakayama, Masashi; Niunoya, Sumio; Minamide, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, high-level radioactive waste repository will be constructed in a stable host rock formation more than 300 m underground. Tunnel support is used for safety during the construction and operation, so, shotcrete and concrete lining are used as the tunnel support. Concrete is a composite material comprised of aggregate, cement, water and various additives. Low alkaline cement has been developed for the long term stability of the barrier systems whose performance could be negatively affected by highly alkaline conditions arising due to cement used in a repository. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed the low alkaline cement, named as HFSC (Highly fly-ash contained silicafume cement), containing over 60wt% of silicafume (SF) and Fly-ash (FA). JAEA is presently constructing the underground research laboratory (URL) at Horonobe for research and development in the geosciences and repository engineering technology. HFSC was used experimentally as the shotcrete material in construction of part of the 350 m deep gallery in the Horonobe URL in 2013. The objective of this experiment was to assess the performance of HFSC shotcrete in terms of mechanics, workability, durability, and so on. HFSC used in this experiment is composed of 40wt% OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement), 20wt% SF, and 40wt% FA. This composition was determined based on mechanical testing of various mixes of the above components. Because of the low OPC content, the strength of HFSC tends to be lower than that of OPC in normal concrete. The total length of tunnel constructed using HFSC shotcrete is about 112 m at 350 m deep drift. The workability of HFSC shotcrete was confirmed by this experimental construction. In this report, we present detailed results of the in-situ construction test. (author)

  13. Study on applicability of low alkaline cement in Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project (2) (Contract research)

    Nakayama, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Matsuda, Takeshi; Noda, Masaru; Iriya, Keishiro; Takeda, Nobufumi

    2009-11-01

    In Horonobe Underground Research Center construction of underground facility began in 2005 and a construction practicality test with HFSC (Highly Fly-ash contained Silica-fume Cement) is planned in a part of the gallery. Before the HFSC is used as a tunnel support in the gallery, it is necessary to validate that the HFSC is valid under the actual construction condition. The research results in the FY 2007 are as follows. For evaluating corrosion behavior in the HFSC and the durability of the HFSC, reinforced concrete specimen with HFSC 226 have been exposed to off-shore condition in saline water and splashed zone for 6 years and analyzed the corrosion rate and the amount of chloride intrusion. The durability of the HFSC reinforced concrete was assessed to be more than 50 years until cracking due to corrosion is generated. The pH measurements and the analysis of the chemical composition of solid and liquid phase in the HFSC cocrete-water immersion experiments, which were started in the FY 2002, were carried out. Also for the experiments of cement paste for shotcreting, which were started in the FY 2005, were analyzed. Furthermore, results and findings obtained in earlier studies including this study were summarized, and based on those, method of quality control including test method, frequency, standards etc. was suggested. (author)

  14. The shrinkage of hardening cement paste and mortar

    Haas, de G.D.; Kreijger, P.C.; Niël, E.M.M.G.; Slagter, J.C.; Stein, H.N.; Theissing, E.M.; Wallendael, van M.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is an abstract from the report of the commission B10: "The influence of the shrinkage of cement on the shrink-age of concrete", of the Netherlands Committee for Concrete Research. Measurements of pulse velocity, volume shrinkage and heat of hydration on hardening portland cement support

  15. Investigation of magnesium oxychloride cement at the initial hardening stage

    Averina Galina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the process of variation of magnesium oxychloride cement deformations at the initial hardening stage depending on the activity of magnesium oxide powder which is determined by the parameters of the source material burning. Investigation is focused on magnesium cements obtained from pure magnesium hydroxide. Source materials were burnt at various temperatures with the purpose to obtain magnesium oxide powder with different activity. Regular content of hydrated phases was determined in hardened magnesium cement prepared on the basis of binders with different activity. The study reveals the influence of magnesium oxide powder activity on the process of deformation occurrence in hardened magnesium cement and its tendency to crack formation.

  16. Leaching behaviour of tritium from a hardened cement paste

    Matsuzuru, H.; Moriyama, N.; Ito, A.

    1979-01-01

    Leaching of tritium from a hardened cement paste into an aqueous phase has been studied to assess the safety of solidification of the tritiated liquid waste with cement. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The leaching fraction was measured as functions of the waste-cement wt ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. the tritium leachability of cements follows the order: alumina cement > Portland cement > slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than the synthetic sea water. The coating of the specimen surface with bitumen reduces the leachability to about 5% of its value for the specimen without coating. (author)

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of Ni speciation in hardened cement paste.

    Vespa, M; Dähn, R; Grolimund, D; Wieland, E; Scheidegger, A M

    2006-04-01

    Cement-based materials play an important role in multi-barrier concepts developed worldwide for the safe disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cement is used to condition and stabilize the waste materials and to construct the engineered barrier systems (container, backfill, and liner materials) of repositories for radioactive waste. In this study, Ni uptake by hardened cement paste has been investigated with the aim of improving our understanding of the immobilization process of heavy metals in cement on the molecular level. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques were used to determine the local environment of Ni in cement systems. The Ni-doped samples were prepared at two different water/cement ratios (0.4, 1.3) and different hydration times (1 hour to 1 year) using a sulfate-resisting Portland cement. The metal loadings and the metal salts added to the system were varied (50 up to 5000 mg/kg; NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl-). The XAS study showed that for all investigated systems Ni(ll) is predominantly immobilized in a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase, which was corroborated by DRS measurements. Only a minor extent of Ni(ll) precipitates as Ni-hydroxides (alpha-Ni(OH)2 and beta-Ni(OH)2). This finding suggests that Ni-Al LDH, rather than Ni-hydroxides, is the solubility-limiting phase in the Ni-doped cement system.

  18. Resonant frequency and elastic modulus measurements on hardened cement pastes

    Lee, D.J.

    1982-12-01

    A new technique for measuring resonant frequency and elastic modulus is described. This has been used on specimens of hardened cement paste containing water with no simulated waste, and the results compared with measurements of ultrasonic pulse velocity, dimensional movements and compressive strength made on the same formulations. In addition, measurements were made on a specimen containing simulated waste which demonstrated the applicability of the new technique for following the development of the mechanical properties of cemented simulant radioactive waste in the laboratory. (U.K.)

  19. INFLUENCE OF WINE ACID ON RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WELL BORE CEMENT SLURRIES AND HARDENED CEMENT PROPERTIES

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of commercial types of domestic cements for use in cementing the deep wells is a process by which Yugoslav oil industry tends to solve problems of completion of those wells independently. In order to design a domestic, cheep and effective retarder, tests of applicability of wine acid on cement slurries have been carried out. Besides examining the necessary wine acid content to achieve desirable Theological properties, the influence of this additive on properties of hardened cement samples has been tested too (the paper is published in Croatian.

  20. On estimating the effective diffusive properties of hardened cement pastes

    Stora, E.; Bary, B.; Stora, E.; He, Qi-Chang

    2008-01-01

    The effective diffusion coefficients of hardened cement pastes can vary between a few orders of magnitude. The paper aims at building a homogenization model to estimate these macroscopic diffusivities and capture such strong variations. For this purpose, a three-scale description of the paste is proposed, relying mainly on the fact that the initial cement grains hydrate forming a complex microstructure with a multi-scale pore structure. In particular, porosity is found to be well connected at a fine scale. However, only a few homogenization schemes are shown to be adequate to account for such connectivity. Among them, the mixed composite spheres assemblage estimate (Stora, E., He, Q.-C., Bary, B.: J. Appl. Phys. 100(8), 084910, 2006a) seems to be the only one that always complies with rigorous bounds and is consequently employed to predict the effects of this fine porosity on the material effective diffusivities. The model proposed provides predictions in good agreement with experimental results and is consistent with the numerous measurements of critical pore diameters issued from mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The evolution of the effective diffusivities of cement pastes subjected to leaching is also assessed by adopting a simplified scenario of the decalcification process. (authors)

  1. Literature survey on phase composition of hardened cement paste containing fly ash

    Otsuka, Taku; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature survey is to collect the knowledge on the effect of fly ash in hardened cement paste and the information about evaluation of physicochemical performance based on phase composition of hardened cement paste. The performance of hardened cement paste containing fly ash is affected by the property of fly ash, hydration of cement and pozzolanic reaction of fly ash. Some properties of fly ash such as density and chemical composition are reflected in phase composition, showing the progress of cement hydration and pozzolanic reaction. Therefore clarification of the relationship of phase composition and performance will lead to appropriate evaluation of the property of fly ash. The amount of pore, chemical shrinkage, pore solution, compressive strength, Young modulus and alkali silica reaction have relations to the phase composition of hardened cement paste. It is considered as future subject to clarify the relationship of phase composition and performance for various properties of fly ash. (author)

  2. Physical and Thermodynamical Properties of Water Phases in Hardening Portland Cement Systems

    Hansen, T. Bæk

    The present study is devoted to the description of water phases in hardening portland cement paste systems containing a significant amount of micro-filler and having a low to moderate water/powder ratio. Emphasis has been placed on the early stages of the hardening process.......The present study is devoted to the description of water phases in hardening portland cement paste systems containing a significant amount of micro-filler and having a low to moderate water/powder ratio. Emphasis has been placed on the early stages of the hardening process....

  3. Experimental drying shrinkage of hardened cement pastes as a function of relative humidity

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Baroghel, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared.......The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared....

  4. State of the art of durability-performance evaluation of hardened cement based on phase compositions

    Kurashige, Isao; Imoto, Harutake; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2006-01-01

    Upgrading durability-performance evaluation technique for concrete is urgently demanded in connection to its application to radio-active waste repository which needs ultra long-term durability. Common concrete structures also require an advanced method for minimizing the life-cycle cost. The purpose of this research is to investigate current problems and future tasks on durability-performance evaluation of hardened cement from the view point of phase composition. Although the phase composition of hardened cement has not fully been reflected to durability-performance evaluation, it influences concrete durability as well as its pore structure. This report reviews state of the art of the factors affecting phase composition, analytical and experimental evaluation techniques for phase composition, and durability-performance evaluation methods of hardened cement based on phase composition. (author)

  5. Deflection hardening of sustainable fiber–cement composites

    Lima, P. R. L.; Santos, D. O. J.; Fontes, C. M. A.; Barros, Joaquim A. O.; Toledo Filho, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study sisal fiber–cement composites reinforced with 4% and 6% of short fibers were developed and their physical–mechanical behavior was characterized. To ensure the composite sustainability and durability, the ordinary Portland cement matrix was modified by adding fly ash and metakaolin, and the natural aggregate was substituted by 10% and 20% of recycled concrete aggregate. Flat sheets were cast in a self-compacted cement matrix and bending tests were performed ...

  6. Determining the water-cement ratio, cement content, water content and degree of hydration of hardened cement paste: Method development and validation on paste samples

    Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the initial cement content, water content and free water/cement ratio (w/c) of hardened cement-based materials made with Portland cements that have unknown mixture proportions and degree of hydration. This method first quantifies the composition of the hardened cement paste, i.e. the volumetric fractions of capillary pores, hydration products and unreacted cement, using high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode and image analysis. From the obtained data and the volumetric increase of solids during cement hydration, we compute the initial free water content and cement content, hence the free w/c ratio. The same method can also be used to calculate the degree of hydration. The proposed method has the advantage that it is quantitative and does not require comparison with calibration graphs or reference samples made with the same materials and cured to the same degree of hydration as the tested sample. This paper reports the development, assumptions and limitations of the proposed method, and preliminary results from Portland cement pastes with a range of w/c ratios (0.25-0.50) and curing ages (3-90 days). We also discuss the extension of the technique to mortars and concretes, and samples made with blended cements.

  7. Chloride diffusivity in hardened cement paste from microscale analyses and accounting for binding effects

    Carrara, P; De Lorenzis, L; Bentz, D P

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of chloride ions in hardened cement paste (HCP) under steady-state conditions and accounting for the highly heterogeneous nature of the material is investigated. The HCP microstructures are obtained through segmentation of X-ray images of real samples as well as from simulations using the cement hydration model CEMHYD3D. Moreover, the physical and chemical interactions between chloride ions and HCP phases (binding), along with their effects on the diffusive process, are explicit...

  8. Calculation of calcium diffusion coefficient of cement hardenings using minute pore data

    Hitomi, Takashi; Takeda, Nobufumi; Iriya, Keishiro

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the calculations of the diffusion coefficient of the Ca ion of cement hardenings using minute pore data. The observed hardenings were ordinary Portland cement (OPC), low-heat Portland cement with fly ash (LPC+FA) and highly fly ash containing silica fume cement (HFSC). The samples were cured in the standard and artificially leached by accelerated test. Minute pore datas of the cement hardenings were acquired with image processing of internal structural information obtained from high resolution X-ray computed tomography observations. Upon analysis, several voxels are combined into one bigger voxel, the diffusion coefficient of the voxels were determined in proportion to the number of voxels which were included in. The results reveal that the change in the calcium diffusion coefficient of OPC due to leaching was large, but the LPC+FA and HFSC cements exhibited even greater changes than OPC. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficients are proportional to the Ca/Si ratio of the samples. (author)

  9. Influence of temperature on autogenous deformation and relative humidity change in hardening cement paste

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change (RH change) in hardening cement paste. Theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented, which elucidate the influence of temperature on these properties. This is an important subject in the control...

  10. Application of water vapor sorption measurements for porosity characterization of hardened cement pastes

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    data were reviewed. Water vapor sorption measurements were then applied to two hardened cement pastes and one model porous material MCM-41. The specific surface area was calculated based on different equations accounting for multilayer adsorption and the PSD was analyzed from both the absorption...

  11. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Hardened Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Energy Storage

    Hongzhi Cui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, structural-functional integrated cement-based materials were prepared by employing cement paste and a microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM manufactured using urea-formaldehyde resin as the shell and paraffin as the core material. The encapsulation ratio of the MPCM could reach up to 91.21 wt%. Thermal energy storage cement pastes (TESCPs incorporated with different MPCM contents (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% by weight of cement were developed, and their thermal and mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that the total energy storage capacity of the hardened cement specimens with MPCM increased by up to 3.9-times compared with that of the control cement paste. The thermal conductivity at different temperature levels (35–36 °C, 55–56 °C and 72–74 °C decreased with the increase of MPCM content, and the decrease was the highest when the temperature level was 55–56 °C. Moreover, the compressive strength, flexural strength and density of hardened cement paste decreased with the increase in MPCM content linearly. Among the evaluated properties, the compressive strength of TESCPs had a larger and faster degradation with the increase of MPCM content.

  12. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Hardened Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Energy Storage.

    Cui, Hongzhi; Liao, Wenyu; Memon, Shazim Ali; Dong, Biqin; Tang, Waiching

    2014-12-16

    In this research, structural-functional integrated cement-based materials were prepared by employing cement paste and a microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) manufactured using urea-formaldehyde resin as the shell and paraffin as the core material. The encapsulation ratio of the MPCM could reach up to 91.21 wt%. Thermal energy storage cement pastes (TESCPs) incorporated with different MPCM contents (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% by weight of cement) were developed, and their thermal and mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that the total energy storage capacity of the hardened cement specimens with MPCM increased by up to 3.9-times compared with that of the control cement paste. The thermal conductivity at different temperature levels (35-36 °C, 55-56 °C and 72-74 °C) decreased with the increase of MPCM content, and the decrease was the highest when the temperature level was 55-56 °C. Moreover, the compressive strength, flexural strength and density of hardened cement paste decreased with the increase in MPCM content linearly. Among the evaluated properties, the compressive strength of TESCPs had a larger and faster degradation with the increase of MPCM content.

  13. Nanotechnological applied tasks of the increase in the efficiency of the hardening processes of cement concrete

    Chernishov Evgeny Mihalovich

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The scientific basis of the solution to the applied tasks of concrete technology through the use of «nano» tools, which provide the organization of the heterogeneous process of cement hydration and hardening, has been characterized. It is shown that the introduction of nanoadditives enables the direct regulation of the processes of structure formation in cement systems at the nanolevel. The effectiveness of the use of «nano» tools has been proposed to evaluate by means of complex criteria characterizing quantitatively the change in the activation energy, the rate of the process and time of its completion τ, the size and power consumption of the technology E while ensuring quality levels specified by R. According to the criteria, the monitoring of the results of the research has been made. Moreover, the most effective nanomodifying admixtures of two types have been identified. Type I is a compound nanoadditive based on nanoparticles SiO2 in combination with a superplasticizer, which mechanism of action is associated and also characterized by the increase in specific strength per unit measure the degree of cement hydration by 1.25–1.35 times. Engineering problems have been formulated. Moreover, the solutions are indicated for increasing the energy efficiency of the factory production of reinforced concrete products and structures. These solutions predetermine the reduction in the value of the maximum temperature for the curing of concrete, the reduction of the duration of the achievement of the required degree of cement hydration while concrete hardens, the reduction of time of cement concrete hardening to reach the regulated values of its strength, the increase in concrete strength per unit of cement consumption per m3 and energy efficiency of concrete hardening process in the preparation of reinforced concrete products. with the catalytic role in the processes of phase formation of nanoparticles of hydrated compounds. Type II is a

  14. A thermal comparator sensor for measuring autogenous deformation in hardening Portland cement paste

    Østergaard, Thomas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a simple and accurate experimental device specially developed to measure autogenous deformation in hardening cement-based materials. The measuring system consists of a so-called thermal comparator sensor and a modular thermostatically controlled system. The operating principle...... of the thermal comparator is based on thermal expansion of aluminium. A particular characteristic of the measuring system is the fixation of the thermal comparator sensor to the deforming specimen. The modular system ensures effective thermostatic control of the hydrating cement paste samples. The technique...... allows continuous measurement with high accuracy of the linear deformation as well as determination of the activation energy of autogenous deformation....

  15. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: Calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8–1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate–hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone. PMID:23836845

  16. Chloride adsorption by calcined layered double hydroxides in hardened Portland cement paste

    Yoon, Seyoon; Moon, Juhyuk; Bae, Sungchul; Duan, Xiaonan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Monteiro, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using calcined layered double hydroxides (CLDHs) to prevent chloride-induced deterioration in reinforced concrete. CLDHs not only adsorbed chloride ions in aqueous solution with a memory effect but also had a much higher binding capacity than the original layered double hydroxides (LDHs) in the cement matrix. We investigated this adsorption in hardened cement paste in batch cultures to determine adsorption isotherms. The measured and theoretical binding capacities (153 mg g −1 and 257 mg g −1 , respectively) of the CLDHs were comparable to the theoretical capacity of Friedel's salt (2 mol mol −1 or 121 mg g −1 ), which belongs to the LDH family among cementitious phases. We simulated chloride adsorption by CLDHs through the cement matrix using the Fickian model and compared the simulation result to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) chlorine map. Based on our results, it is proposed that the adsorption process is governed by the chloride transport through the cement matrix; this process differs from that in an aqueous solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the CLDH rebuilds the layered structure in a cementitious environment, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of applying CLDHs to the cement and concrete industries. - Highlights: • We examine the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of CLDH in the hydrated cement. • CLDH capacity to bind chloride ions in the hydrated cement paste is determined. • We model chloride adsorption by CLDH through the cement matrix. • CLDH reforms the layered structure with ion adsorption in the cement matrix

  17. Chloride adsorption by calcined layered double hydroxides in hardened Portland cement paste

    Yoon, Seyoon

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using calcined layered double hydroxides (CLDHs) to prevent chloride-induced deterioration in reinforced concrete. CLDHs not only adsorbed chloride ions in aqueous solution with a memory effect but also had a much higher binding capacity than the original layered double hydroxides (LDHs) in the cement matrix. We investigated this adsorption in hardened cement paste in batch cultures to determine adsorption isotherms. The measured and theoretical binding capacities (153 mg g -1 and 257 mg g-1, respectively) of the CLDHs were comparable to the theoretical capacity of Friedel\\'s salt (2 mol mol-1 or 121 mg g-1), which belongs to the LDH family among cementitious phases. We simulated chloride adsorption by CLDHs through the cement matrix using the Fickian model and compared the simulation result to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) chlorine map. Based on our results, it is proposed that the adsorption process is governed by the chloride transport through the cement matrix; this process differs from that in an aqueous solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the CLDH rebuilds the layered structure in a cementitious environment, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of applying CLDHs to the cement and concrete industries. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Water dynamics in hardened ordinary Portland cement paste or concrete: from quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Bordallo, Heloisa N; Aldridge, Laurence P; Desmedt, Arnaud

    2006-09-14

    Portland cement reacts with water to form an amorphous paste through a chemical reaction called hydration. In concrete the formation of pastes causes the mix to harden and gain strength to form a rock-like mass. Within this process lies the key to a remarkable peculiarity of concrete: it is plastic and soft when newly mixed, strong and durable when hardened. These qualities explain why one material, concrete, can build skyscrapers, bridges, sidewalks and superhighways, houses, and dams. The character of the concrete is determined by the quality of the paste. Creep and shrinkage of concrete specimens occur during the loss and gain of water from cement paste. To better understand the role of water in mature concrete, a series of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments were carried out on cement pastes with water/cement ratio varying between 0.32 and 0.6. The samples were cured for about 28 days in sealed containers so that the initial water content would not change. These experiments were carried out with an actual sample of Portland cement rather than with the components of cement studied by other workers. The QENS spectra differentiated between three different water interactions: water that was chemically bound into the cement paste, the physically bound or "glassy water" that interacted with the surface of the gel pores in the paste, and unbound water molecules that are confined within the larger capillary pores of cement paste. The dynamics of the "glassy" and "unboud" water in an extended time scale, from a hundred picoseconds to a few nanoseconds, could be clearly differentiated from the data. While the observed motions on the picosecond time scale are mainly stochastic reorientations of the water molecules, the dynamics observed on the nanosecond range can be attributed to long-range diffusion. Diffusive motion was characterized by diffusion constants in the range of (0.6-2) 10(-9) m(2)/s, with significant reduction compared to the rate of diffusion

  19. Evaluation method of radiation stability of hardened cement paste with chemical additives

    Medvedev, Vyacheslav; Pustovgar, Andrey [National Research Univ. ' Moscow State Univ. of Civil Engineering' (MSUCE), Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Univ. ' Moscow State Univ. of Civil Engineering' (MSUCE), Moscow (Russian Federation). Scientific Research Inst. of Constructional Materials and Technologies; Denisov, Alexander; Soloviev, Vitaly [National Research Univ. ' Moscow State Univ. of Civil Engineering' (MSUCE), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The influence of additives on the radiation resistance of the concrete will occur through the influence of radiation changes of hardened cement paste on radiation changes of concrete and can be quite significant. The test sequence was produced according to the modified method. The samples were prepared in the form of prisms with the following dimensions: 10 mm x 10 mm, 30 mm long. Measurement series were produced after each heating and cooling sequence. Then the difference between the values before and after heating was calculated. (orig.)

  20. Effect of AlF3 Production Waste on the Properties of Hardened Cement Paste

    Danutė VAIČIUKYNIENĖ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to use by-product SiO2·nH2O (often called AlF3 production waste in cement casting has been attracting the interest of researchers for many years, although high content of fluorine makes the use of amorphous SiO2 problematic. Finding the way of utilizing waste products is a very important research topic at the moment. In this study AlF3 production waste was investigated as the basic ingredient of a new pozzolanic material. The goal of this study is to investigate the possibilities of using AlF3 production waste, washed in ammonia solution, in cement stone specimens. Chemically treated silica gel additive was proved to reduce the amount of Ca(OH2 and CaCO3 in hardened cement paste samples. Experimental research has revealed that the density in hydrated samples reduces from 2220 kg/m3 to 2030 kg/m3 with the increase of silica gel content from 0 % to 35 %. The compressive strength of samples containing 10 % of silica gel additive increased by 8.04 % compared to the samples without the additive. SiO2 additive used at 10 % and 20 % increased the maximum hydration temperature. In this case, the additive modifies the hydration kinetics.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1925

  1. The influence of hardening conditions on the properties of masonry cement mortar prisms made in brick moulds

    Bertram, G.; Lourenco, P.B.; Hasseltine, B.A.; Vasconseles, G.

    2014-01-01

    One aspect of our investigation into the spacing of movement joints involved the short and long term deformation of mortar embedded in masonry. In this research the influence of hardening conditions on the physical and mechanical properties of masonry cement mortar [M5] were studied. Mortar prisms

  2. Prediction of water vapour sorption isotherms and microstructure of hardened Portland cement pastes

    Burgh, James M. de; Foster, Stephen J.; Valipour, Hamid R.

    2016-01-01

    Water vapour sorption isotherms of cementitious materials reflect the multi-scale physical microstructure through its interaction with moisture. Our ability to understand and predict adsorption and desorption behaviour is essential in the application of modern performance-based approaches to durability analysis, along with many other areas of hygro-mechanical and hygro-chemo-mechanical behaviour. In this paper, a new physically based model for predicting water vapour sorption isotherms of arbitrary hardened Portland cement pastes is presented. Established thermodynamic principles, applied to a microstructure model that develops with hydration, provide a rational basis for predictions. Closed-form differentiable equations, along with a rational consideration of hysteresis and scanning phenomena, makes the model suitable for use in numerical moisture simulations. The microstructure model is reconciled with recently published 1 H NMR and mercury intrusion porosimetry results.

  3. Microstructural and bulk property changes in hardened cement paste during the first drying process

    Maruyama, Ippei, E-mail: ippei@dali.nuac.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, ES Building, No. 546, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464–8603 (Japan); Nishioka, Yukiko; Igarashi, Go [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, ES Building, No. 539, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464–8603 (Japan); Matsui, Kunio [Products and Marketing Development Dept. Asahi-KASEI Construction Materials Corporation, 106 Someya, Sakai-machi, Sashima-gun, Ibaraki, 306–0493 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports the microstructural changes and resultant bulk physical property changes in hardened cement paste (hcp) during the first desorption process. The microstructural changes and solid-phase changes were evaluated by water vapor sorption, nitrogen sorption, ultrasonic velocity, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance. Strength, Young's modulus, and drying shrinkage were also examined. The first drying process increased the volume of macropores and decreased the volume of mesopores and interlayer spaces. Furthermore, in the first drying process globule clusters were interconnected. During the first desorption, the strength increased for samples cured at 100% to 90% RH, decreased for 90% to 40% RH, and increased again for 40% to 11% RH. This behavior is explained by both microstructural changes in hcp and C–S–H globule densification. The drying shrinkage strains during rapid drying and slow drying were compared and the effects of the microstructural changes and evaporation were separated.

  4. Microstructure in hardened cement pastes measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry and low temperature microcalorimetry

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Baroghel, V.B.; Künzel, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper is presenting some of the results on microstructure from the CEC-Science Project CT91-0737 "Characterization of microstructure as a tool for prediction of moisture transfer in porous media". In the Project the microstructure for the porous media is studied by absorption isotherms......, image analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and low temperature microcalorimetry.The present paper is dealing with cumulated pore size distributions measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) from two laboratories (LCPC, IBP) and low temperature microcalorimetry (CAL) from one laboratory (BKM......). The materials are five different hardened cement pastes. The materials, the preparation procedure for the samples, the experiments and the experimental results are described. Finally, the results are compared and discussed....

  5. Moisture migration and drying properties of hardened cement paste and mortar

    Numao, T.; Fukuzawa, K.; Mihashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    Moisture content and movement have a significant influence on mechanical properties of concrete. Therefore, many studies have been done on the migration or loss of water in concrete mostly without any external loads. Concrete in actual structures, however, is usually under stresses. As the microstructure of concrete is changed by the load, the observed moisture movement phenomena may be changed. Hence it is necessary to study the moisture migration in concrete under compressive stress in order to estimate rationally the mechanical behavior such as creep and shrinkage in actual concrete structures. In this paper, the influence of compressive stress on moisture migration and water loss of hardened cement paste were studied experimentally and analytically. Furthermore, comparing them with the results of mortar specimens, the influence of containing aggregates was also discussed

  6. Carbonation around near aggregate regions of old hardened concrete cement paste

    Tam, Vivian W.Y.; Gao, X.F.; Tam, C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Analogous with most modern cities, waste disposal is a pressing issue due to limited landfill and public filling (land reclamation) areas in Hong Kong in which construction and demolition (C and D) waste forms the major source. Concrete, apportioning the largest portion of C and D waste, has the greatest potential for recycling. However, the knowledge on micro-structural behavior of concrete waste is immature to give adequate details on the macro-behavior of concrete waste. This paper attempts to examine the problems of recycling old concrete by investigating the microstructure and phase transformation of the concrete samples collected from buildings with 46 and 37 years of services. From the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination, it is found that there are a lot of pores at the near layers of aggregate where carbonation of the hardened cement paste (HCP) is high. The pores may be generated as a result of poor workmanship such as insufficient concrete mixing time, trapping of air voids beneath coarse aggregate, inappropriate water to cement ratio, and the microclimate conditions such as humidity that affects the demand on water from the aggregate during mixing

  7. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 2 - testing hardened cement-fly ash pastes

    Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Levit, A.; Steiner, V.; Metzger, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash (FA), cement and other components of building products is due to the concern about health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The paper focuses on studying the influence of FA on radon exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. In the previous part of the paper the state of the art was presented, and the experiments for testing raw materials, Portland cement and coal fly ash, were described. Since the cement and FA have the most critical role in the radon release process relative to other concrete constituents (sand and gravel), and their contribution is dominant in the overall radium content of concrete, tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents, 0-60% by weight of the binder (cement+FA). It is found that the dosage of FA in cement paste has a limited influence on radon exhalation rate, if the hardened material is relatively dense. The radon flux of cement-FA pastes is lower than that of pure cement paste: it is about ∼3 mBq m -2 s -1 for cement-FA pastes with FA content as high as 960 kg m -3

  8. Macroscopic and spectroscopic investigations on the immobilization of radionuclides by hardened cement paste

    Wieland, E.; Bonhoure, I.; Tits, J.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Bradbury, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    The uptake of safety-relevant radionuclides was studied using a combination of macroscopic (wet chemistry) and spectroscopic (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy) techniques with the aim of gaining a mechanistic understanding of the uptake processes on hardened cement paste (HCP) and deducing robust sets of sorption values. HCP contains impurities of metal cations in the ppb to ppm concentration range. As a consequence, the inventories of stable isotopes are expected to be significant in a cementitious near-field and may even exceed the radionuclide inventories of the waste matrix for many safety-relevant radioelements. In view of the significant inventories of stable isotopes, it is suggested that isotopic exchange - replacement of stable isotopes by their radioactive counterparts in the cement matrix - is an important immobilisation process in HCP. However, it is not a priori known what proportion of each elemental inventory is available for isotopic exchange. Wet chemistry studies with Cs and Sr show that the total inventory of these elements is reversibly bound and that their partitioning between HCP and pore water can be modelled using the distribution values deduced from studies of the corresponding tracers ( 137 Cs and 85 Sr). This finding corroborates the relevance of isotopic exchange in cementitious systems. Wet chemistry investigations need to be complemented by spectroscopic techniques, e.g., XAFS, in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of the chemical processes by which waste ions become immobilised in cement-based matrices. XAFS can be used to obtain information at the atomic/molecular level, i.e., the type, number and distance of neighbouring atoms. XAFS studies on cementitious systems are still rather rare, and therefore information on the potential and limitations of this technique is sparse. Mechanistic aspects of the immobilisation processes are discussed for some safety-relevant radionuclides (e.g. Ni and Sr) using the

  9. Properties of fresh and hardened sustainable concrete due to the use of palm oil fuel ash as cement replacement

    Hamada, Hussein M.; Jokhio, Gul Ahmed; Mat Yahaya, Fadzil; Humada, Ali M.

    2018-04-01

    Palm oil fuel ash (POFA) is a by-product resulting from the combustion of palm oil waste such as palm oil shell and empty fruit bunches to generate electricity in the palm oil mills. Considerable quantities of POFA thus generated, accumulate in the open fields and landfills, which causes atmospheric pollution in the form of generating toxic gases. Firstly, to protect the environment; and secondly, having excellent properties for this purpose; POFA can be and has been used as partial cement replacement in concrete preparation. Therefore, this paper compiles the results obtained from previous studies that address the properties of concrete containing POFA as cement replacement in fresh and hardened states. The results indicate that there is a great potential to using POFA as cement replacement because of its ability to improve compressive strength, reduce hydration heat of cement mortar and positively affect other fresh and hardened concrete properties. The paper recommends that conducting further studies to exploit high volume of POFA along with other additives as cement replacement while maintaining high quality of concrete can help minimize CO2 emissions due to concrete.

  10. Effect of Slag Content and Hardening Accelerator Dosage on the Physico Mechanical Properties of Cement and Concrete

    Derabla, R.; Mokrani, I.; Benmalek, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Our contribution consists at the study of the effect of (0 %, 0.2 % and 0.34 %) dosage of an hardening accelerating plasticizer (Plastocrete 160, produced by Sika Aldjazair) on the properties of normal mortar and concretes prepared with portland cement artificial of Hadjar Soud cement factory (Skikda - Algeria) with addition of (10 % and 20 %) of granulated blast furnace slag finely crushed of the El Hadjar blast furnace (Annaba - Algeria). The tests are focused to the physical and mechanical characteristics of elaborated materials to knowing: setting time, porosity, water absorption capacity and the test of compressive strength at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results obtained show clearly the reliability of the additive used to accelerate the hardening and to obtain high strengths at early age, which increase by increasing of the additive dosage. For the slag, its low hydraulic capacity does not make it profitable than at the long term (beyond 28 days). (author)

  11. Moisture migration and shrinkage of hardened cement paste at elevated temperatures

    Numao, Tatsuya; Mihashi, Hirozo.

    1991-01-01

    The drying shrinkage of concrete is caused by the loss of water in the concrete. The moisture diffusion behavior influences the mechanical properties of concrete. When concrete is exposed to high temperature, the rate of moisture migration becomes fast, and moisture gradient is formed. This gradient causes cracks on the concrete surface. Accordingly, it is important to study on the relation between the drying shrinkage and the water diffusion in concrete when its mechanical properties at elevated temperature are discussed. In this paper, the results of the experiment which was carried out by using thin-walled cylinder specimens kept at different temperature and stress are reported. The specimens, the drying shrinkage of concrete and acoustic emission (AE), the thermal expansion of hardened cement paste, the influence that temperature change exerted to the drying shrinkage, and the influence that compressive stress and temperature exerted to water migration are described. The thin-walled cylinder specimens were useful for these experimental studies. (K.I.)

  12. A comparative study of the pore structures and surfaces of hardened cement pastes of potential use in radioactive waste repositories

    Rowan, S.M.; Donaldson, L.; White, S.

    1988-02-01

    Measurements of water vapour adsorption at 20 0 C and mercury intrusion have been used to compare the surfaces and pore structures of hardened cement pastes made from ordinary portland cement (OPC) and the additives blast furnace slag (BFS) and pulverised fuel ash (PFA). The results suggest that each additive, after taking part in the hydration reaction with OPC, produces a paste whose gel pore structure is similar to that derived from OPC alone. The BET adsorption surface area of the cement pastes, in the form of half inch diameter coupons was ca. 55 m 2 g -1 and was not influenced by the presence of the additives. However the pastes containing the additives have a larger and better interconnected meso and macropore structure than OPC which may account for larger diffusion coefficients reported elsewhere for caesium ions passing through concrete containing BFS in comparison with a concrete containing OPC alone. (author)

  13. Effect of Pigment Colouring on Physico-mechanical Properties of Hardened Cement Paste and Response of Colour Intensity to UV Radiation

    Khattab, M.M.; Abdel-Rahman, H.A.; Hassan, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, different ratios of pigment colour was mixed with cement paste during mixing. The pigment colour used was Phthalocyanine Green. The effect of pigment colouring on hardened cement paste (HCP) was characterized in terms of compressive strength, IR spectroscopic analysis and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the effect of UV radiation on the colour strength of hardened cement paste/pigment colour composites was investigated. The results indicated that the increase in the ratio of pigment colour was accompanied with a slight decrease in the values of compressive strength. The exposure of the coloured hardened cement paste to UV radiation for long lengths of time causes a little effect on the colour intensity

  14. The influence of calcium nitrate on setting and hardening rate of Portland cement concrete at different temperatures

    Kičaitė, A.; Pundienė, I.; Skripkiūnas, G.

    2017-10-01

    Calcium nitrate in mortars and concrete is used as a multifunctional additive: as set accelerator, plasticizer, long term strength enhancer and as antifreeze admixture. Used binding material and the amount of calcium nitrate, affect the characteristics of the concrete mixture and strength of hardened concrete. The setting time of the initial and the final binding at different temperatures of hardening (+ 20 °C and + 5 °C) of the pastes made of different cements (Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R and Portland limestone cement CEM II/A-LL 42.5 R) and various amounts of calcium nitrate from 1 % until 3 % were investigated. The effect of calcium nitrate on technological characteristics of concrete mixture (the consistency of the mixture, the density, and the amount of air in the mixture), on early concrete strength after 2 and 7 days, as well as on standard concrete strength after 28 days at different temperatures (at + 20 °C and + 5 °C) were analysed.

  15. Radon exhalation of hardening concrete: monitoring cement hydration and prediction of radon concentration in construction site.

    Kovler, Konstantin

    2006-01-01

    The unique properties of radon as a noble gas are used for monitoring cement hydration and microstructural transformations in cementitious system. It is found that the radon concentration curve for hydrating cement paste enclosed in the chamber increases from zero (more accurately - background) concentrations, similar to unhydrated cement. However, radon concentrations developed within 3 days in the test chamber containing cement paste were approximately 20 times higher than those of unhydrated cement. This fact proves the importance of microstructural transformations taking place in the process of cement hydration, in comparison with cement grain, which is a time-stable material. It is concluded that monitoring cement hydration by means of radon exhalation method makes it possible to distinguish between three main stages, which are readily seen in the time dependence of radon concentration: stage I (dormant period), stage II (setting and intensive microstructural transformations) and stage III (densification of the structure and drying). The information presented improves our understanding of the main physical mechanisms resulting in the characteristic behavior of radon exhalation in the course of cement hydration. The maximum value of radon exhalation rate observed, when cement sets, can reach 0.6 mBq kg(-1) s(-1) and sometimes exceeds 1.0 mBq kg(-1) s(-1). These values exceed significantly to those known before for cementitious materials. At the same time, the minimum ventilation rate accepted in the design practice (0.5 h(-1)), guarantees that the concentrations in most of the cases will not exceed the action level and that they are not of any radiological concern for construction workers employed in concreting in closed spaces.

  16. Influence of Rapid Freeze-Thaw Cycling on the Mechanical Properties of Sustainable Strain-Hardening Cement Composite (2SHCC

    Seok-Joon Jang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides experimental results to investigate the mechanical properties of sustainable strain-hardening cement composite (2SHCC for infrastructures after freeze-thaw actions. To improve the sustainability of SHCC materials in this study, high energy-consumptive components—silica sand, cement, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA fibers—in the conventional SHCC materials are partially replaced with recycled materials such as recycled sand, fly ash, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET fibers, respectively. To investigate the mechanical properties of green SHCC that contains recycled materials, the cement, PVA fiber and silica sand were replaced with 10% fly ash, 25% PET fiber, and 10% recycled aggregate based on preliminary experimental results for the development of 2SHCC material, respectively. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight for 2SHCC material were measured at every 30 cycles of freeze-thaw. The effects of freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties of sustainable SHCC are evaluated by conducting compressive tests, four-point flexural tests, direct tensile tests and prism splitting tests after 90, 180, and 300 cycles of rapid freeze-thaw. Freeze-thaw testing was conducted according to ASTM C 666 Procedure A. Test results show that after 300 cycles of freezing and thawing actions, the dynamic modulus of elasticity and mass loss of damaged 2SHCC were similar to those of virgin 2SHCC, while the freeze-thaw cycles influence mechanical properties of the 2SHCC material except for compressive behavior.

  17. Diffusion behavior of anion in hardened low-heat portland cement paste containing fly ash. Dependence of effective diffusion coefficient on pore structure

    Chida, Taiji; Yoshida, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    In the sub-surface disposal system, the closely packed concrete layer is expected the low diffusivity to retard the migration of radionuclides. Low-heat portland cement containing 30 wt% fly ash (FAC) is a candidate cement material for the construction of sub-surface repository because of its high dense structure and its resistance to cracking. Previously, we reported that FAC has lower diffusivity than Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) for acetic acid and iodine. However, the mechanism for low diffusivity of FAC was not clear. In this study, the diffusion of multiple trace ions (chlorine, bromine and iodine) in hardened cement pastes was examined by through-diffusion experiments. The effective diffusion coefficients, D e , of the trace ions for hardened OPC cement pastes were on the order of 10 -12 m 2 s -1 for trace ions, and D e for hardened FAC cement pastes were on the order of 10 -13 m 2 s -1 for chlorine, 10 -14 m 2 s -1 for bromine and 10 -15 m 2 s -1 for iodine. Additionally, the pore size distribution and porosity of FAC changed to more closely packed structure for 13 months by the pozzolanic reaction, and the pore size distribution of FAC (mainly 3-10 nm) were an order of magnitude smaller than that of OPC. These results suggest that the low diffusivity of FAC is based on the continuous change in the pore structure and the nano-scale pore size retarding the migration of trace ions. (author)

  18. About influence of some superplasticizers on hydration and the structure of hardened cement paste

    Koryanova Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current construction can not be imagined without the use of high-quality mortars and concretes obtained by using high-tech and workable mixtures with lower water content. Obtaining such mixtures in current conditions is impossible without the use of superplasticizers. The use of superplasticizers in concrete technology requires an answer to the question of the influence of superplasticizers on the deformation-strength properties of cement stone. There is a well-known dependence “composition-technology-structure-properties”, from which it follows that the strength and deformation properties of cement stone directly depend on the hydration of cement stone in the early stages and structure formation. The influence of some types of superplasticizers on the hydration and structure of cement stone, namely, total, open and conditionally-closed porosity, total contraction, autogenous shrinkage, contraction porosity and hydration heat is considered in the article.

  19. Measurement of water transport from saturated pumice aggregates to hardening cement paste

    Lura, Pietro; Bentz, Dale; Lange, David A.

    2006-01-01

    In internal water curing of High Performance Concrete, it is fundamental to know how and when the water contained in the internal curing agent is released into the hydrating cement paste. In this study, X-ray absorption measurements showed that considerable transport of water from saturated pumice...... the crucial factor to avoid self-desiccation shrinkage at early-age....

  20. Effect of Chlorides on Conductivity and Dielectric Constant in Hardened Cement Mortar: NDT for Durability Evaluation

    Sunkook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric constant and conductivity, the so-called EM properties (electromagnetic, are widely adopted for NDT (Nondestructive Technique in order to detect damage or evaluate performance of concrete without damage to existing RC (reinforced concrete. Among deteriorating agents, chloride ion is considered as one of the most critical threats due to rapid penetration and direct effect on steel corrosion. In the work, cement mortar samples with 3 w/c (water-to-cement ratios and 4 levels of chloride addition are considered. Conductivity and dielectric constant are measured in the normal frequency range. They increase with strength of mortar and more chloride ions due to denser pore formation. Furthermore, the behaviors of measured EM property are investigated with carbonation velocity and strength, which shows an attempt of application to durability evaluation through EM measurement.

  1. Microwave detection of delaminations between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite and hardened cement paste

    Hughes, D.; Kazemi, M.; Marler, K.; Zoughi, R.; Myers, J.; Nanni, A.

    2002-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used for the rehabilitation of concrete structures. Detection and characterization of delaminations between an FRP composite and a concrete surface are of paramount importance. Consequently, the development of a one sided, non-contact, real time and rapid nondestructive testing (NDT) technique for this purpose is of great interest. Near-field microwave NDT techniques, using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes, have shown great potential for detecting delaminations in layered composite structures such as these. The results of some theoretical and experimental investigations on a specially prepared cement paste specimen are presented here.

  2. Effects of calcium leaching on diffusion properties of hardened and altered cement pastes

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Haga, Kazuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Owada, Hitoshi

    2017-06-01

    It is very important to predict alterations in the concrete used for fabricating disposal containers for radioactive waste. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the alteration of cementitious materials caused by calcium leaching when they are in contact with ground water in the long term. To evaluate the long-term transport characteristics of cementitious materials, the microstructural behavior of these materials should be considered. However, many predictive models of transport characteristics focus on the pore structure, while only few such models consider both, the spatial distribution of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), portlandite, and the pore spaces. This study focused on the spatial distribution of these cement phases. The auto-correlation function of each phase of cementitious materials was calculated from two-dimensional backscattered electron imaging, and the three-dimensional spatial image of the cementitious material was produced using these auto-correlation functions. An attempt was made to estimate the diffusion coefficient of chloride from the three-dimensional spatial image. The estimated diffusion coefficient of the altered sample from the three-dimensional spatial image was found to be comparable to the measured value. This demonstrated that it is possible to predict the diffusion coefficient of the altered cement paste by using the proposed model.

  3. Strain Hardening Cement Composites Structural Design and Performance State-of-the-Art Report of the RILEM Technical Committee 208-HFC, SC3

    Kanda, Tetsushi

    2013-01-01

    Strain Hardening Cement Composites, SHCC hereafter, demonstrate excellent mechanical behavior showing tensile strain hardening and multiple fine cracks. This strain hardening behavior improves the durability of concrete structures employing SHCC and the multiple fine cracks enhance structural performance. Reliable tensile performance of SHCC enables us to design structures explicitly accounting for SHCC’s tensile properties. Reinforced SHCC elements (R/SHCC) indicate large energy absorbing performance under large seismic excitation. Against various types of loads, R/SHCC elements can be designed by superimposing re-bar performance and SHCC’s tensile performance.  This report focuses on flexural design, shear design, FE modeling and anti-seismic design of R/SHCC elements as well as application examples.  Establishing design methods for new materials usually leads to exploring application areas and this trend should be demonstrated by collecting actual application examples of SHCC in structures.

  4. Diffusion and sorption on hardened cement pastes - experiments and modelling results

    Jakob, A.; Sarott, F.-A.; Spieler, P.

    1999-08-01

    Large parts of repositories for low and intermediate level radioactive waste consist of cementitious materials. Radionuclides are transported by diffusion in the cement matrix or, in case of fractured or highly permeable cement, by advection and dispersion. In this work we aim at a mechanistic understanding of diffusion processes of some reactive tracers. On the laboratory scale, ten through-diffusion experiments were performed to study these processes for Cl{sup -}, I{sup -}, Cs{sup +} and Ni{sup 2+} ions in a Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC) equilibrated with an artificial pore water. Some of the experiments continued up to nearly three years with daily measurements. In all the experiments, a cement disk initially saturated with an artificial pore water was exposed on one side to a highly diluted solution containing the species of interest. On the second side, a near-zero concentration boundary was maintained to drive through-diffusion of the tracer. The changes of concentrations on both sides of the samples were monitored, allowing careful mass balances. From these data, values of the diffusive flux and the mass of tracer taken up by the cementitious material were determined as a function of time. In the subsequent modelling, the time histories of these tracer breakthroughs were fitted using five different models. The simplest model neglects all retarding mechanisms except pure diffusion. More complex models either account for instantaneous equilibrium sorption in form of linear or non-linear (Freundlich) sorption or for first-order sorption kinetics where the forward reaction may be linear or non-linear according to the Freundlich isotherm, while the back-reaction is linear. Hence, the analysis allows the extraction of the diffusion coefficient and parameter values for the sorption isotherm or rate-constants for sorption and desorption. The fits to the experimental data were carried out by an automated Marquardt-Levenberg procedure yielding error

  5. Diffusion of Tritiated Water (HTO) and 22Na+-Ions through Non-Degraded Hardened Cement Pastes - II. Modelling Results

    Jakob, A.

    2002-12-01

    In this report, the procedure and the results of an inverse modelling study on the through-diffusion of tritiated water (HTO) and 2 2Na + -ions are presented using high-porous hardened cement pastes with a water/cement ratio of 1.3 in the first stage of the cement degradation. For the analysis two alternative models were applied: 1) a diffusion model where a possible sorption of the tracer was entirely neglected, and 2) a diffusion model with linear sorption. The analysis of the through-diffusion phase allowed extracting values for the effective diffusion coefficient (D e ) and the rock-capacity factor (α). Both models could fit the breakthrough curves equally well, and also mass-balance considerations did not allow to clearly preferring one of the two competing models to the other. But blind-predictions for tracer out-diffusion using the best-fit parameter values deduced from analysing the former through-diffusion phase gave a clear indication that linear sorption had to be included in the diffusion model. The extracted K d values for HTO are in excellent agreement with values from batch sorption experiments and are of the order of 0.8. 10 -3 m 3 /kg. Those for 2 2Na + are of the order of 1.0. 10 -3 m 3 /kg and are by a factor of two larger than values from batch sorption experiments. The values for the effective diffusion coefficients for HTO are of the order of (2-3).10 -1 0 m 2 /s, and those for sodium are roughly by a factor of two smaller than values for HTO. On the one hand, the observed tracer uptake could only partially be addressed to isotope exchange; the most obvious process which could account for the remaining part of the uptaken tracer mass is diffusion into a second type of porosity, the dead-end pores. On the other hand, the results and conclusions drawn are encouraging for future investigations; therefore no major deficiency concerning the applied equipment and the modelling methodology could be detected. In the report, however, some suggestions

  6. Ultrasound monitoring of the influence of different accelerating admixtures and cement types for shotcrete on setting and hardening behaviour

    Belie, N. de; Grosse, C.U.; Kurz, J.; Reinhardt, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    The possible use of ultrasound measurements for monitoring setting and hardening of mortar containing different accelerating admixtures for shotcrete was investigated. The sensitivity to accelerator type (alkaline aluminate or alkali-free) and dosage, and accelerator-cement compatibility were evaluated. Furthermore, a new automatic onset picking algorithm for ultrasound signals was tested. A stepwise increase of the accelerator dosage resulted in increasing values for the ultrasound pulse velocity at early ages. In the accelerated mortar no dormant period could be noticed before the pulse velocity started to increase sharply, indicating a quick change in solid phase connectivity. The alkaline accelerator had a larger effect than the alkali-free accelerator, especially at ages below 90 min. The effect of the alkali-free accelerator was at very early age more pronounced on mortar containing CEM I in comparison with CEM II, while the alkaline accelerator had a larger influence on mortar containing CEM II. The increase of ultrasound energy could be related to the setting phenomenon and the maximum energy was reached when the end of workability was approached. Only the alkaline accelerator caused a significant reduction in compressive strength and this for all the dosages tested

  7. Critical aspects of nano-indentation technique in application to hardened cement paste

    Davydov, D.; Jirasek, M.; Kopecky, L.

    2011-01-01

    Several open questions related to the experimental protocol and processing of data acquired by the nano-indentation (NI) technique are investigated. The volume fractions of mechanically different phases obtained from statistical NI (SNI) analysis are shown to be different from those obtained by back-scattered electron (BSE) image analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method on the same paste. Judging from transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, the representative volume element of low-density calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) can be considered to be around 500 nm, whereas for high-density C-S-H it is about 100 nm. This raises the question how the appropriate penetration depth for NI experiments should be selected. Changing the maximum load from 1 mN to 5 mN, the effect of penetration depth on the experimental results is studied. As an alternative to the SNI method, a 'manual' indentation method is proposed, which combines information from BSE and atomic-force microscopy (AFM), coupled to the NI machine. The AFM allows to precisely indent a high-density C-S-H rim around unhydrated clinkers in cement paste. Yet the results from that technique still show a big scatter.

  8. The Bone Building Blues: Self-hardening copper-doped calcium phosphate cement and its in vitro assessment against mammalian cells and bacteria.

    Rau, Julietta V; Wu, Victoria M; Graziani, Valerio; Fadeeva, Inna V; Fomin, Alexander S; Fosca, Marco; Uskoković, Vuk

    2017-10-01

    A blue calcium phosphate cement with optimal self-hardening properties was synthesized by doping whitlockite (β-TCP) with copper ions. The mechanism and the kinetics of the cement solidification process were studied using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and it was found out that hardening was accompanied by the phase transition from TCP to brushite. Reduced lattice parameters in all crystallographic directions resulting from the rather low (1:180) substitution rate of copper for calcium was consistent with the higher ionic radius of the latter. The lower cationic hydration resulting from the partial Ca→Cu substitution facilitated the release of constitutive hydroxyls and lowered the energy of formation of TCP from the apatite precursor at elevated temperatures. Addition of copper thus effectively inhibited the formation of apatite as the secondary phase. The copper-doped cement exhibited an antibacterial effect, though exclusively against Gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. enteritidis. This antibacterial effect was due to copper ions, as demonstrated by an almost negligible antibacterial effect of the pure, copper-free cement. Also, the antibacterial activity of the copper-containing cement was significantly higher than that of its precursor powder. Since there was no significant difference between the kinetics of the release of copper from the precursor TCP powder and from the final, brushite phase of the hardened cement, this has suggested that the antibacterial effect was not solely due to copper ions, but due to the synergy between cationic copper and a particular phase and aggregation state of calcium phosphate. Though inhibitory to bacteria, the copper-doped cement increased the viability of human glial E297 cells, murine osteoblastic K7M2 cells and especially human primary lung fibroblasts. That this effect was also due to copper ions was evidenced by the null effect on viability increase exhibited by the copper

  9. Development of low alkaline cementitious grouting materials for a deep geological repository

    Suzuki, Kenichiro; Miura, Norihiko; Iriya, Keishiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    In order to reduce uncertainties of long-term safety assessment for a High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) repository system, low alkaline cementitious grouting materials have been studied. The pH of the leachate from the grouting material is targeted to be below 11.0, since the degradation of the bentonite buffer and host rock is limited. The current work focused on the effects of pozzolanic reactions to reduce pH and the development of low alkaline cementitious injection materials in which super-micro ordinary Portland cement (SOPC) was partially replaced by silica fume (SF), micro silica (MS) and fly ash (FA). As it is important to realize how the grouting material will respond to a high injection pressure into the fracture, and in order to understand the penetrability of different low alkaline cement mixes and to observe their flow behavior through the fracture, injection tests were conducted by using a simulated model fracture of 2 m diameter made from parallel plates of acrylic acid resin and stainless steel. Experimental results of the basic properties for selecting suitable materials and that of injecting into a simulated fracture to assess the grouting performance are described

  10. Isosteric Vapor Pressure – Temperature Data for Water Sorption in Hardened Cement Paste: Enthalpy, Entropy and Sorption Isotherms at Different Temperatures

    Radjy, Fariborz; Sellevold, Erik J.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    . The accuracies for pressure, enthalpy and entropy are found to be 0.5% or less. PART II: The TPA-system has been used to generate water vapor pressure – temperature data for room temperature – and steam cured hardened cement pastes as well as porous vycor glass. The moisture contents range from saturated to dry...... and the temperatures range from 2 to 95 °C, differing for the specimen types. The data has been analyzed to yield differential enthalpy and entropy of adsorption, as well as the dependence of the relative vapor pressure on temperature at various constant moisture contents. The implications for the coefficient......PART I: In order to generate isosteric (constant mass) vapor pressure – temperature data (P-T data) for adsorbed pore water in hydrated cement paste, the Thermo Piestic Analysis system (the TPA system) described herein was developed. The TPA system generates high precision equilibrium isosteric P...

  11. Concrete, hardened: Self desiccation

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Persson, Bertil

    1999-01-01

    The test method covers the determination of internal relative humidity (RH) in hardened concrete and cement mortar using RH instruments. The determination of RH is done on crushed samples of concrete or cement motar. This test method is only for measuring equipment which gives off or takes up...

  12. Observation and quantification of water penetration into Strain Hardening Cement-based Composites (SHCC) with multiple cracks by means of neutron radiography

    Zhang, P.; Wittmann, F.H.; Zhao, T.J.; Lehmann, E.H.; Tian, L.; Vontobel, P.

    2010-01-01

    Durability of reinforced concrete structures has become a crucial issue with respect to economy, ecology and sustainability. One major reason for durability problems of concrete structures is the limited strain capacity of cement-based materials under imposed tensile stress. By adding PVA fibers, a new material named Strain Hardening Cement-based Composites (SHCC) with high strain capacity can be produced. Due to the formation of multiple micro-cracks, wide cracks can be avoided in SHCC under an imposed strain. The high strain capacity, however, is beneficial with respect to durability only if the multi-crack formation in SHCC does not lead to significantly increased water penetration. If water and aggressive chemical compounds such as chlorides and sulfates dissolved in water penetrate into the cement-based matrix and reach the steel reinforcement service-life of reinforced concrete structures will be reduced significantly. In this project, neutron radiography was applied to observe and quantify the process of water penetration into uncracked SHCC and after the multi-crack formation. In addition, water penetration into integral water repellent cracked and uncracked SHCC, which has been produced by adding a silane-based water repellent agent to the fresh SHCC mortar has been investigated. Results will be discussed with respect to durability.

  13. Hydration characteristics and structure formation of cement pastes containing metakaolin

    Dvorkin Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metakaolin (MK is one of the most effective mineral admixtures for cement-based composites. The deposits of kaolin clays are wide-spread in the world. Metakaolin is comparable to silica fume as an active mineral admixture for cement-based composites. In this paper, the rheological and mechanical properties of cement paste containing metakaolin are investigated. The effect of MK is more evident at “tight” hydration conditions within mixtures with low water-cement ratio, provided by application of superplasticizers. The cement is replaced with 0 to 15% metakaolin, and superplasticizer content ranged from 0 to 1.5% by weight of cementitious materials (i.e. cement and metakaolin. An equation is derived to describe the relationship between the metakaolin and superplasticizer content and consistency of pastes. There is a linear dependence between metakalolin content and water demand. Second-degree polynomial describe the influence of superplasticizer content. The application of SP and MK may produce cement-water suspensions with water-retaining capacity at 50-70% higher than control suspensions. The investigation of initial structure forming of cement pastes with SP-MK composite admixture indicates the extension of coagulation structure forming phase comparing to the pastes without additives. Crystallization stage was characterized by more intensive strengthening of the paste with SP-MK admixture comparing to the paste without admixtures and paste with SP. Results on the porosity parameters for hardened cement paste indicate a decrease in the average diameter of pores and refinement of pore structure in the presence of metakaolin. A finer pore structure associated with an increase in strength. X-ray analysis data reveal a growing number of small-crystalline low-alkaline calcium hydrosilicates and reducing portlandite content, when MK dosage increases. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM data confirm, that hardened cement paste containing MK has

  14. Effect of calcium carbonate on hardening, physicochemical properties, and in vitro degradation of injectable calcium phosphate cements.

    Sariibrahimoglu, K.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Yubao, L.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main disadvantage of apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) is their slow degradation rate, which limits complete bone regeneration. Carbonate (CO(3)(2)(-)) is the common constituent of bone and it can be used to improve the degradability of the apatitic calcium phosphate ceramics. This study

  15. Asphalt cement poisoning

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  16. Experimental and numerical modeling of chloride diffusivity in hardened cement concrete considering the aggregate shapes and exposure-duration effects

    Wu Jie

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental and numerical model describing the effects of the aggregate shapes and exposure duration of chloride diffusion into cement-based materials. A simple chloride diffusion test was performed on a concrete specimen composed of a mixture of cement mortar with crushed granites and round gravels. A simulation was done and the numerical model developed was applied to the matrix at the meso-scale level and the chloride diffusivity was investigated at 30, 60, and 90 days. The experimental and simulation results showed that the aggregate shape and the exposure duration of chloride diffusing into concrete are of high significance. It was indicated that the model with crushed granite presents a good resistance against chloride ingress, while the model with rounded gravels shows some sensitivity to the chloride penetration. It was also found out that when the time dependence of the diffusion coefficient is not taken into account, the diffusion rate will be overestimated. The meso-scale model developed in this study also provides a new method applied in the analysis of the chloride and water transport that causes damage to concrete considering the particle inclusion and the diffusion duration. Keywords: Meso-scale modeling, Chloride diffusivity, Concrete, Effects of aggregates shape and exposure duration, FEM

  17. Quantifying the distribution of paste-void spacing of hardened cement paste using X-ray computed tomography

    Yun, Tae Sup, E-mail: taesup@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Yeom, E-mail: kimky@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 283 Goyangdae-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, 411-712 (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Jinhyun, E-mail: jinhyun@stanford.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kang, Dong Hun, E-mail: timeriver@naver.com [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The distribution of paste-void spacing in cement-based materials is an important feature related to the freeze-thaw durability of these materials, but its reliable estimation remains an unresolved problem. Herein, we evaluate the capability of X-ray computed tomography (CT) for reliable quantification of the distribution of paste-void spacing. Using X-ray CT images of three mortar specimens having different air-entrainment characteristics, we calculate the distributions of paste-void spacing of the specimens by applying previously suggested methods for deriving the exact spacing of air-void systems. This methodology is assessed by comparing the 95th percentile of the cumulative distribution function of the paste-void spacing with spacing factors computed by applying the linear-traverse method to 3D air-void system and reconstructing equivalent air-void distribution in 3D. Results show that the distributions of equivalent void diameter and paste-void spacing follow lognormal and normal distributions, respectively, and the ratios between the 95th percentile paste-void spacing value and the spacing factors reside within the ranges reported by previous numerical studies. This experimental finding indicates that the distribution of paste-void spacing quantified using X-ray CT has the potential to be the basis for a statistical assessment of the freeze-thaw durability of cement-based materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paste-void spacing in 3D can be quantified by X-ray CT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of the paste-void spacing follows normal distribution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spacing factor and 95th percentile of CDF of paste-void spacing are correlated.

  18. Study on evolution of disposal environment due to alteration of cement. Summary report. Commission work report

    Iriya, K.; Kubo, H.; Kato, T.; Fujita, H.

    2001-02-01

    The study shows effects on performance of the engineered and geological barriers due to alteration of cement including low alkalinity cement. Alteration test of bentonite and crystalline rock was carried out by low alkalinity cement pore water. Leaching of super plasticizer was investigated modeled for the latest period of alteration of cement. Planning a experiment for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was carried out. Application of the cement for shotcrete was investigated. The results described below are obtained. 1. Almost of montmorillonite was solved in Na-K-Ca mixed solution. No alteration was observed in low alkalinity cement. The similar results were obtained for crystalline rock. 2. It is noted that main part of super plasticizer wasn't leachated even in the latest period of leaching of cement. Increment of leaching of super plasticizer wasn't observed corresponding to leaching of cement hydrates. 3. Accelerating test for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was proposed. 4. It was demonstrated that low alkalinity cement was applicable for shotcrete. 5. pH of pore water of cement with highly pozzolanic materials isn't significantly decreased in high temperature. 6. Predictable alteration of barriers due to alteration of cement were pointed out including interaction of bentonite and rock. (author)

  19. Study on evolution of disposal environment due to alteration of cement. Commission work report

    Iriya, K.; Kubo, H.; Kato, T.; Fujita, H.

    2001-02-01

    The study shows effects on performance of the engineered and geological barriers due to alteration of cement including low alkalinity cement. Alteration test of bentonite and crystalline rock was carried out by low alkalinity cement pore water. Leaching of super plasticizer was investigated modeled for the latest period of alteration of cement. Planning a experiment for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was carried out. Application of the cement for shotcrete was investigated. The results described below are obtained. 1. Almost of montmorillonite was solved in Na-K-Ca mixed solution. No alteration was observed in low alkalinity cement. The similar results were obtained for crystalline rock. 2. It is noted that main part of super plasticizer wasn't leachate even in the latest period of leaching of cement. Increment of leaching of super plasticizer wasn't observed corresponding to leaching of cement hydrates. 3. Accelerating test for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was proposed. 4. It was demonstrated that low alkalinity cement was applicable for shotcrete. 5. pH of pore water of cement with highly pozzolanic materials isn't significantly decreased in high temperature. 6. Predictable alteration of barriers due to alteration of cement were pointed out including interaction of bentonite and rock. (author)

  20. A study of the water vapor sorption isotherms of hardened cement pastes: Possible pore structure changes at low relative humidity and the impact of temperature on isotherms

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    cement paste samples and a model material MCM-41. The pronounced impact of temperature on desorption isotherms of cement based materials as reported in literature was not found in this investigation. The results suggest that the differences between the sorption isotherms measured at different...

  1. Formulating a low-alkalinity, high-resistance and low-heat concrete for radioactive waste repositories

    Cau Dit Coumes, Celine; Courtois, Simone; Nectoux, Didier; Leclercq, Stephanie; Bourbon, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Investigations were carried out in order to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Several systems comprising Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), a fast-reacting pozzolan (silica fume (SF) or metakaolin (MK)) and, in some cases, a slow-reacting product (fly ash (FA) or blastfurnace slag (BFS)) were compared. Promising results were obtained with some binary mixtures of OPC and SF, and with some ternary blends of OPC, SF and FA or BFS: pH of water in equilibrium with the fully hydrated cements dropped below 11. Dependence of the properties of standard mortars on the high contents of FA and SF in the low-pH blends was examined. Combining SF and FA seemed attractive since SF compensated for the low reactivity of FA, while FA allowed to reduce the water demand, and dimensional variations of the mortars. Finally, low-heat (ΔT < 20 deg. C under semi-adiabatic conditions) and high strength (∼ 70-80 MPa) concretes were prepared from two low-pH cements: a binary blend made from 60% of OPC and 40% of SF, and a ternary blend including 37.5% OPC, 32.5% SF and 30% FA

  2. A preliminary study of the influence of ions in the pore solution of hardened cement pastes on the porosity determination by low temperature calorimetry

    Wu, Min, E-mail: miwu@byg.dtu.dk [Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 118, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Johannesson, Björn [Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 118, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Geiker, Mette [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-08-10

    Highlights: • Ionic concentrations in cement pore solution at freezing temperatures were simulated. • Effects of ions in determining pore sizes by low temperature calorimetry were studied. • Ions in cement pore solution affect the pore size determination to a limited extent. - Abstract: Thermodynamic modeling was used to predict the ionic concentrations in the pore solution of cement pastes at different temperatures during a freezing and melting measurement in low temperature calorimetry (LTC) studies. By using the predicted ionic concentrations, the temperature depressions caused by the ions presented in the pore solution were determined. The influence of the freezing/melting point depression caused by the ions on the determined pore size distribution by LTC was demonstrated. Thermodynamic modeling using the program PHREEQC was performed on the cylinder and powder samples of cement pastes prepared by two types of cements, i.e., CEM I 32.5 R and CEM III/B 42.5 N. Using the modeled ionic concentrations, the calculated differential pore size distributions for the studied samples with and without considering the temperature depression caused by the ions in the pore solution were compared. The results indicate that for the studied cement paste samples, the influence of the temperature depression caused by the presence of the ions in the pore solution on the determination of the pore size distribution by LTC is limited.

  3. A preliminary study of the influence of ions in the pore solution of hardened cement pastes on the porosity determination by low temperature calorimetry

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ionic concentrations in cement pore solution at freezing temperatures were simulated. • Effects of ions in determining pore sizes by low temperature calorimetry were studied. • Ions in cement pore solution affect the pore size determination to a limited extent. - Abstract: Thermodynamic modeling was used to predict the ionic concentrations in the pore solution of cement pastes at different temperatures during a freezing and melting measurement in low temperature calorimetry (LTC) studies. By using the predicted ionic concentrations, the temperature depressions caused by the ions presented in the pore solution were determined. The influence of the freezing/melting point depression caused by the ions on the determined pore size distribution by LTC was demonstrated. Thermodynamic modeling using the program PHREEQC was performed on the cylinder and powder samples of cement pastes prepared by two types of cements, i.e., CEM I 32.5 R and CEM III/B 42.5 N. Using the modeled ionic concentrations, the calculated differential pore size distributions for the studied samples with and without considering the temperature depression caused by the ions in the pore solution were compared. The results indicate that for the studied cement paste samples, the influence of the temperature depression caused by the presence of the ions in the pore solution on the determination of the pore size distribution by LTC is limited

  4. A preliminary study of the influence of ions in the pore solution of hardened cement pastes on the porosity determination by low temperature calorimetry

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic modeling was used to predict the ionic concentrations in the pore solution of cement pastes at different temperatures during a freezing and melting measurement in low temperature calorimetry (LTC) studies. By using the predicted ionic concentrations, the temperature depressions caused...... compared. The results indicate that for the studied cement paste samples, the influence of the temperature depression caused by the presence of the ions in the pore solution on the determination of the pore size distribution by LTC is limited. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... by the ions presented in the pore solution were determined. The influence of the freezing/melting point depression caused by the ions on the determined pore size distribution by LTC was demonstrated. Thermodynamic modeling using the program PHREEQC was performed on the cylinder and powder samples of cement...

  5. Effects of low-alkalinity binders on stabilization/solidification of geogenic As-containing soils: Spectroscopic investigation and leaching tests.

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Wang, Lei; Cui, Jin-Li; Poon, Chi Sun; Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-08-01

    The low-alkalinity stabilization/solidification (S/S) treatment of the soil containing high concentrations of geogenic As by physical encapsulation is considered as a proper management before land development; however, the choice of an effective binder and the leaching potential of As remain uncertain. In this study, the influence of S/S binders (cement blended with fuel ash (FA), furnace bottom ash (FBA), or ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS)) on the speciation and leaching characteristics of geogenic As was studied. The results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed the reduced amount of calcium silicate hydrate phase and the decrease in oxidation state of As(V)-O on the surface of Fe(III) oxides/hydroxides in the low-alkalinity S/S treated soils. This might be due to the binder incorporation and change in pH conditions, which slightly affected the As-Fe interaction and increased the non-specifically sorbed species of As. Therefore, the S/S treatment increased the leachability and bioaccessibility of geogenic As to varying degree but decreased the phyto-extractable As. The S/S treatment by cement incorporating 25% of class C fly ash (O4C1) could achieve comparable or better performance, while reducing the risk assessment code (RAC) to a greater extent compared to that of using cement only. This study illustrates the effectiveness and limitations of low-alkalinity binders (e.g., O4C1) for geogenic As immobilization and encapsulation, which provides a new insight for determining the appropriate S/S binder in soil remediation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Process of preparing hydraulic cement

    1919-12-11

    A process of preparing hydraulic cement from oil shale or shale coke is characterized in that the oil shale or shale coke after the distillation is burned long and hot to liberate the usual amount of carbonic acid and then is fine ground to obtain a slow hardening hydraulic cement.

  7. Metal bioavailability and toxicity to fish in low-alkalinity lakes: A critical review

    Spry, D.J.; Wiener, James G.

    1991-01-01

    Fish in low-alkalinity lakes having pH of 6·0–6·5 or less often have higher body or tissue burdens of mercury, cadmium, and lead than do fish in nearby lakes with higher pH. The greater bioaccumulation of these metals in such waters seems to result partly from the greater aqueous abundances of biologically available forms (CH3 Hg+, Cd2+, and Pb2+) at low pH. In addition, the low concentrations of aqueous calcium in low-alkalinity lakes increase the permeability of biological membranes to these metals, which in fish may cause greater uptake from both water and food. Fish exposed to aqueous inorganic aluminum in the laboratory and field accumulate the metal in and on the epithelial cells of the gills; however, there is little accumulation of aluminum in the blood or internal organs. In low-pH water, both sublethal and lethal toxicity of aluminum has been clearly demonstrated in both laboratory and field studies at environmental concentrations. In contrast, recently measured aqueous concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead in low-alkalinity lakes are much lower than the aqueous concentrations known to cause acute or chronic toxicity in fish, although the vast majority of toxicological research has involved waters with much higher ionic strength than that in low-alkalinity lakes. Additional work with fish is needed to better assess (1) the toxicity of aqueous metals in low-alkalinity waters, and (2) the toxicological significance of dietary methylmercury and cadmium.

  8. Osteomalacia with low alkaline phosphatase: a not so rare condition with important consequences.

    Belkhouribchia, Jamal; Bravenboer, Bert; Meuwissen, Marije; Velkeniers, Brigitte

    2016-01-28

    Hypophosphatasia is a genetic disorder, characterised by a dysfunctional tissue-non-specific isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase that impacts bone metabolism and predisposes to osteomalacia or rickets. The clinical presentation is very diverse, depending on the age of onset and the severity of the disease. Several forms of hypophosphatasia are recognised. We present a case of a 50-year-old woman with low impact fractures and loss of teeth at a young age. She also had a low alkaline phosphatase and was diagnosed with adult hypophosphatasia. Although the severe forms of hypophosphatasia are rather rare, the adult form is thought to occur quite frequently. As this condition is not well known by healthcare professionals, the time to diagnosis and initiation of adequate treatment is often postponed. When encountering a patient with low alkaline phosphatase, low bone density or a history of bone fractures, the possibility of hypophosphatasia should be considered. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  10. A hardenability test proposal

    Murthy, N.V.S.N. [Ingersoll-Rand (I) Ltd., Bangalore (India)

    1996-12-31

    A new approach for hardenability evaluation and its application to heat treatable steels will be discussed. This will include an overview and deficiencies of the current methods and discussion on the necessity for a new approach. Hardenability terminology will be expanded to avoid ambiguity and over-simplification as encountered with the current system. A new hardenability definition is proposed. Hardenability specification methods are simplified and rationalized. The new hardenability evaluation system proposed here utilizes a test specimen with varying diameter as an alternative to the cylindrical Jominy hardenability test specimen and is readily applicable to the evaluation of a wide variety of steels with different cross-section sizes.

  11. A study on the practicability of highly containing fly ash and silica fume cement

    Owada, Hitoshi; Mihara, Morihiro; Iriya, Keishiro; Matsui, Jun

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious materials have been planed to be used for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste and TRU waste. Degrading of host rock and buffer material induced by high pH leachate, however, is pointed out as one of technical issues. The authors have been developing a low alkalinity cement (the pH of the leachate of this cement is about 11) as an enhanced material to reduce the effect of the high pH problem. In this study, the applicability of low alkalinity cement developed to solve this problem was evaluated. The fluidity of the mortar was sufficient to fill the aperture in a structure filled with coarse aggregate. The concrete using the low alkalinity cement was also enough to fill a structure with the reinforcing steel. The compressive strength of a test-piece produced by the JIS method and of a core collected from the trial structure were over 60 MPa. These evaluation results show that developed low alkalinity cement had higher performances in mechanical properties and execution characteristics than JIS ordinary Portland cement. (author)

  12. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH) 2 , Al (OH) 3 and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs + from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes

  13. Influence of agglomeration of a recycled cement additive on the hydration and microstructure development of cement based materials

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study, including experimental and mechanism analysis, on investigating the effect of agglomeration of a recycled cement additive on the hydration and microstructure development of cement based materials. The recycled additive is firstly produced form waste hardened cement paste

  14. MOULDING MIXTURES HARDENING PROCESS BASED ON LIGNIN-BASE SULPHONATE BINDER

    V. N. Ektova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hardening of agglutinant sands on lignosulphonate binding agent is the result of two processes: oxidation-reduction in the system lignosulphonate acids — persulfuric natrium in the early stages of hardening and hydration of cement in the latter stages.

  15. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  16. An alternative approach to estimate the W/C ratio of hardened concrete using image analysis

    Valcke, S.; Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The water cement (w/c) ratio is a typical quality parameter for concrete. The NT Build 361 Nordtest method is a standard for estimating the w/c ratio in hardened concrete and is based on the relationship between the ilc ratio and the capillary porosity in the cement paste. The latter can be

  17. Influences of Steelmaking Slags on Hydration and Hardening of Concretes

    Kirsanova, A. A.; Dildin, A. N.; Maksimov, S. P.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that the slag of metallurgical production can be used in the construction industry as an active mineral additive for concrete. This approach allows us to solve environmental problems and reduce costs for the production of binder and concrete simultaneously. Most often slag is used in the form of a filler, an active mineral additive or as a part of a binder for artificial conglomerates. The introduction of slag allows one to notice a part of the cement, to obtain concretes that are more resistant to the impact of aggressive sulfate media. The paper shows the possibility of using recycled steel-smelting slags in the construction industry for the production of cement. An assessment was made of their effect on the hydration of the cement stone and hardening of the concrete together with the plasticizer under normal conditions. In the process of work, we used the slag of the Zlatoust Electrometallurgical Factory. Possible limitations of the content of steel-slag slag in concrete because of the possible presence of harmful impurities are shown. It is necessary to enter slag in conjunction with superplasticizers to reduce the flow of water mixing. Slags can be used as a hardening accelerator for cement concrete as they allow one to increase the degree of cement hydration and concrete strength. It is shown that slags can be used to produce fast-hardening concretes and their comparative characteristics with other active mineral additives are given.

  18. Cermet cements.

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  19. Formulating a low-alkalinity and self-consolidating concrete for the DOPASS-FSS experiment

    Poyet, S.; Le Bescop, P.; Touze, G.; Moth, J.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the DOPAS European project, the French agency for radioactive waste management (ANDRA) has recently undertaken a research program aiming at proving the technological feasibility of deep repository sealing: the Full Scale Sealing experiment (FSS). This operation involves the fabrication of a massive plug (250 m 3 ) also called 'containment wall' made from low alkalinity and self-consolidating concrete (LA-SCC), the composition of which was designed in three consecutive steps. First, different (commercial) raw materials were selected and various binder compositions were designed in the laboratory to meet the requirements (mainly pH decrease versus time and value at equilibrium). Binary blends of CEM I or CEM III with silica fume as well as ternary blends of CEM I, silica fume and slag or fly ash were tested. Constantly agitated aqueous suspensions (binder diluted in deionized water in 50 ml test tubes) were used to monitor the pH evolution vs. time of all the binders. In a second time, LA-SCC mix compositions were designed using the software BetonLab Pro 3. Some of all the virtual LA-SCC compositions were produced in the laboratory (30 l batches) and the resulting properties were measured and compared to the specifications. Last, the most promising LA-SCC mix compositions were tested (batches volume around 1 m 3 ) using the concrete plant selected for the project to check the feasibility of the 'labcretes' at a larger scale and to adjust the admixture content and modus operandi to the real concrete plant. Comparing the properties of the different LA-SCC led to the selection of a formulation that was used for the fabrication of the massive concrete plug. (authors)

  20. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  1. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  2. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.; Gordon, L.E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste

  3. Hydrothermal hardened high-temperature thermal insulation material CALUTHERM {sup registered} from hibonite and alumina cement. Pt. 1; Hydrothermal erhaerteter Hochtemperaturwaermedaemmstoff CALUTHERM {sup registered} aus Hibonit und Tonerdezement. T. 1

    Hoelscher, Tobias; Schneider, Hans-Juergen [Calsitherm Silikatbaustoffe GmbH, Bad Lippspringe (Germany); Schlegel, Ernst

    2013-07-01

    The first part features an overview to the properties of all calcium aluminates followed by a presentation of CALUTHERM {sup registered}, a high temperature-thermal insulating material. CALUTHERM is produced on the bases of SLA-92, a calcium hexaaluminat aggregate, and calcium aluminate cement CA-14 W as binder. The comprehensive studies focus on properties and changes of these raw materials during the technological stages of the CALUTHERM's production. The second part will present CALUTHERM's properties and its variants throughout the production process. A possible correlation between the properties of raw materials and thermal insulation material is researched and finally application examples are presented. CALUTHERM is suited for thermal insulation up to 1600 C and has a remarkable low thermal conductivity near 0.4 W/m . K at these high temperatures. For that reason CALUTHERM is a top high-temperature thermal insulating material. (orig.)

  4. Preparation, physical-chemical characterisation and cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cements.

    Combes, C; Miao, Baoji; Bareille, Reine; Rey, Christian

    2006-03-01

    The feasibility of calcium carbonate cements involving the recrystallisation of metastable calcium carbonate varieties has been demonstrated. Calcium carbonate cement compositions presented in this paper can be prepared straightforwardly by simply mixing water (liquid phase) with two calcium carbonate phases (solid phase) which can be easily obtained by precipitation. An original cement composition was obtained by mixing amorphous calcium carbonate and vaterite with an aqueous medium. The cement set and hardened within 2h at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere saturated with water and the final composition of the cement consisted mostly of aragonite. The hardened cement was microporous and showed poor mechanical properties. Cytotoxicity tests revealed excellent cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cement compositions. Calcium carbonates with a higher solubility than the apatite formed for most of the marketed calcium phosphate cements might be of interest to increase biomedical cement resorption rates and to favour its replacement by bone tissue.

  5. Defining the brittle failure envelopes of individual reaction zones observed in CO2-exposed wellbore cement

    Hangx, S.; Marcelis, Fons; van der Linden, Arjan; Liteanu, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    In order to predict the behaviour of the cement sheath after CO2 injection and the potential for leakage pathways, it is key to understand how the mechanical properties of the cement evolves with CO2-exposure time. We performed scratch hardness tests on hardened samples of class G cement before and

  6. Hardening Azure applications

    Gaurav, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Learn what it takes to build large scale, mission critical applications -hardened applications- on the Azure cloud platform. This 208 page book covers the techniques and engineering principles that every architect and developer needs to know to harden their Azure/.NET applications to ensure maximum reliability and high availability when deployed at scale. While the techniques are implemented in .NET and optimized for Azure, the principles here will also be valuable for users of other cloud-based development platforms. Applications come in a variety of forms, from simple apps that can be bui

  7. Radiation hardenable coating mixture

    Howard, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to coatings that harden under radiation and to their compositions. Specifically, this invention concerns unsaturated urethane resins polymerisable by addition and to compositions, hardening under the effect of radiation, containing these resins. These resins feature the presence of at least one unsaturated ethylenic terminal group of structure CH 2 =C and containing the product of the reaction of an organic isocyanate compound with at least two isocyanate groups and one polyester polyol with at least two hydroxyl groups, and one unsaturated monomer compound polymerisable by addition having a single active hydrogen group reacting with the isocyanate [fr

  8. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  9. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  10. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  11. Influence of Superplasticizer-Microsilica Complex on Cement Hydration, Structure and Properties of Cement Stone

    Ivanov, I. M.; Kramar, L. Ya; Orlov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    According to the study results, the influence of complex additives based on microsilica and superplasticizers on the processes of the heat release, hydration, hardening, formation of the structure and properties of cement stone was determined. Calorimetry, derivatography, X-ray phase analysis, electronic microscopy and physical-mechanical methods for analyzing the properties of cement stone were used for the studies. It was established that plasticizing additives, in addition to the main water-reducing and rheological functions, regulate cement solidification and hardening while polycarboxylate superplasticizers even contribute to the formation of a special, amorphized microstructure of cement stone. In a complex containing microsilica and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer the strength increases sharply with a sharp drop in the capillary porosity responsible for the density, permeability, durability, and hence, the longevity of concrete. All this is a weighty argument in favor of the use of microsilica jointly with a polycarboxylate superplasticizer in road concretes operated under aggressive conditions.

  12. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  13. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  14. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  15. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

  16. Grind hardening process

    Salonitis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the grind-hardening process and the main studies published since it was introduced in 1990s.  The modelling of the various aspects of the process, such as the process forces, temperature profile developed, hardness profiles, residual stresses etc. are described in detail. The book is of interest to the research community working with mathematical modeling and optimization of manufacturing processes.

  17. Radiation hardening coating material

    McDonald, W.H.; Prucnal, P.J.; DeMajistre, Robert.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns a radiation hardening coating material. First a resin is prepared by reaction of bisphenol diglycidylic ether with acrylic or methacrylic acids. Then the reactive solvent is prepared by reaction of acrylic or methacrylic acids with epichlorhydrine or epibromhydrine. Then a solution consisting of the resin dissolved in the reactive solvent is prepared. A substrate (wood, paper, polyesters, polyamines etc.) is coated with this composition and exposed to ionizing radiations (electron beams) or ultraviolet radiations [fr

  18. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  19. Development of alkali activated cements and concrete mixture design with high volumes of red mud

    Krivenko, Pavel; Kovalchuk, Oleksandr; Pasko, Anton; Croymans, Tom; Hutt, Mikael; Lutter, Guillaume; Vandevenne, Niels; Schreurs, Sonja; Schroeyers, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    Dedicated cement compositions were formulated to enable the incorporation of large volume fractions of red mud in alkali activated cements, taking into account the role of the aluminosilicate phase in the processes of hydration and hardening. High volume red mud alkali activated cements were synthesized using a proper combination of red mud, low basic aluminosilicate compounds with a glass phase (blast-furnace slag) and additives selected from high-basic Ca-containing cements with a crystalli...

  20. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF INTERACTION REACTIONS FOR SODIUM AND ALUMINUM SULPHATES WITH COMPONENTS OF HYDRATING PORTLAND CEMENT

    P. I. Yukhnevskiy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical additives are widely used in the technology of concrete with the purpose to solve various problems and sulphate-containing additives-electrolytes are also used as accelerators for setting and hardening of cement. Action mechanism of additive accelerators for setting and hardening of cement is rather complicated and can not be considered as well-established. An influence of sulfate-containing additives such as sodium sulfate is reduced to acceleration of cement silicate phase hydration by increasing ionic strength of the solution. In addition to it, exchange reactions of anion additive with portlandite phase (Ca(OH2 and aluminate phases of hardening cement have a significant effect on hardening process that lead to formation of readily soluble hydroxides and hardly soluble calcium salts. The influence of sulfate-containing additives on properties of water cement paste and cement stone is quite diverse and depends on salt concentration and cation type. For example, the action of the aluminum sulphate additive becomes more complicated if the additive is subjected to hydrolysis in water, which is aggravated in an alkaline medium of the water cement paste. Formation of hydrolysis products and their reaction with aluminate phases and cement portlandite lead to a significant acceleration of setting. Thus, despite the similarity of additives ensuring participation of anions in the exchange reactions, the mechanism of their influence on cement setting and hardening varies rather significantly. The present paper considers peculiar features concerning the mechanism of interaction of sodium and aluminum sulfate additives in cement compositions from the viewpoint of thermochemistry. Thermochemical equations for reactions of sulfate-containing additives with phases of hydrated cement clinker have been given in the paper. The paper contains description how to calculate thermal effects of chemical reactions and determine an influence of the formed

  1. physico-chemical studies on polymer impregnated blending cement mortar composite

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    as the increasing of the demand on a specific performance characteristics in concrete such as improved strength, low heat, sulfate resistance, improved impermeability and certain other applications. some of the industrial waste materials such as the blast-furnace slag, silica fume and fly ash were mixed with the cement clinker to produce blended cement . the use of these materials modifies the strength, pore structure and permeability of hardened cement mortar or concrete. the incorporation of blast furnace slag and silica fume in the hardened blended cement mortar or concrete is a common practice recently due to technological, economical and environmental benefits

  2. The role of chemical admixtures in the formation of the structure of cement stone

    Sopov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sulfates and carbonates of potassium and sodium on the character of the formation of the microstructure of cement stone was studied. The role of cations in the structure formation of cement stone is shown. The efficiency of chemical additives, hardening accelerators, was estimated from the ratio of the volumes of gel and capillary micropores. The ratio of gel and capillary pores allows to determine the efficiency coefficient of the action of chemical additives. It is shown that the potassium carbonate for Portland cement is the most effective additive for hardening in terms of microstructure modification, and potassium sulfate for slag Portland cement.

  3. Cement Formation

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  4. Practical aspects of systems hardening

    Shepherd, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Applications of hardening technology in a practical system require a balance between the factors governing affordability, producibility, and survivability of the finished design. Without careful consideration of the top-level system operating constraints, a design engineer may find himself with a survivable but overweight, unproductive, expensive design. This paper explores some lessons learned in applying hardening techniques to several laser communications programs and is intended as an introductory guide to novice designers faced with the task of hardening a space system

  5. Nuclear effects hardened shelters

    Lindke, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the Houston Fearless 76 Government Projects Group that has been actively engaged for more than twenty-five years as a sub-contractor and currently as a prime contractor in the design, manufacture, repair and logistics support of custom mobile ground stations and their equipment accommodations. Other associated products include environmental control units (ECU's), mobilizers for shelters and a variety of mobile power generation units (MPU's). Since 1984, Houston Fearless 76 has designed and manufactured four 8 foot by 8 foot x 22 foot nuclear hardened mobile shelters. These shelters were designed to contain electronic data processing/reduction equipment. One shelter is currently being operated by the Air Force as a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) approved and certified Special Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF). During the development and manufacturing process of the shelters, we received continual technical assistance and design concept evaluations from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Operations Analysis and Logistics Engineering Division and the Nondestructive Inspection Lab at McClellan AFB. SAIC was originally employed by the Air Force to design the nuclear hardening specifications applied to these shelters

  6. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  7. Retention of alkali ions by hydrated low-pH cements: Mechanism and Na+/K+ selectivity

    Bach, T.T.H.; Chabas, E.; Pochard, I.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Haas, J.; Frizon, F.; Nonat, A.

    2013-01-01

    Low-pH cements, also referred to as low-alkalinity cements, can be designed by replacing significant amounts of Portland cement by pozzolanic materials. Their pore solution is characterized by a pH near 11, and an alkali concentration much lower than that of Portland cement. This work investigates the retention of sodium and potassium by a hydrated low-pH cement comprising 60% Portland cement and 40% silica fume. It is shown that sorption of potassium is higher than that of sodium and mainly results from counterion charge balancing of the C-S-H negative surface charge. To explain the greater retention of potassium compared to sodium, it is postulated that potassium, unlike sodium, may enter the interlayer of C-S-H to compensate the negative charges in the interlayer, in addition to the external surfaces. This assumption is supported by structural characterization of C-S-H using X-ray diffraction

  8. Deflection hardening behaviour of short fibre reinforced fly ash based geopolymer composites

    Shaikh, F.U.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Deflection hardening behaviour is achieved in the DFRGC similar to that observed in DFRCC. • The first crack load or in other word the limit of proportionality (LOP) of DFRGC is similar to that of DFRCC. • The DFRGC also exhibited higher deflection at peak load than DFRCC. • The toughness at peak load of DFRGC is also high than that of DFRCC. • The ductility of DFRGC is also higher than that of DFRCC. - Abstract: This paper reports the newly developed ductile fibre reinforced geopolymer composite (DFRGC) exhibiting deflection hardening and multiple cracking behaviour. The binder of the above composite is different from that used in conventional cement based system. The class F fly ash is used instead of Portland cement in DFRGC and is activated by alkaline liquids (sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate). In this study, two types of fibres namely steel (ST) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibres are used in mono as well as in ST–PVA hybrid form, with a total volume fraction of 2%. The deflection hardening behaviour of newly developed DFRGC is also compared with that of conventional ductile fibre reinforced cementitious composites (DFRCC). The effects of two different sizes of sand (1.18 mm, and 0.6 mm) and sand/binder ratios of 0.5 and 0.75 on the deflection hardening and multiple cracking behaviour of both DFRGC and DFRCC are also evaluated. Results revel that the deflection hardening and multiple cracking behaviour is achieved in geopolymer based DFRGC similar to that of cement based system. For a given sand size and sand content, comparable deflection hardening behaviour, ultimate flexural strength and the deflection at peak load are observed in both cement and geopolymer based composites irrespective of fibre types and combination. The deflection hardening behaviour of DFRGC is also confirmed by the calculated toughness index values of I 20 > 20. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) study shows no degradation of PVA and steel fibres in the

  9. Porosity and liquid absorption of cement paste

    Krus, M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kunzel, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    be a slowing-down effect which is related to water because the absorption of organic liquids, such as hexane, is quite normal. Measurements of the porosity of hardened cement paste determined by helium pycnometry and water saturation show that water molecules can enter spaces in the microstructure which...... are not accessible to the smaller helium atoms. Considering the results of dilatation tests both before and after water and hexane saturation, it seems possible that a contraction of capillary pores due to moisture-related swelling of the cement gel leads to the non-linear water absorption over the square root...

  10. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  11. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Glasser, F. P. [University of Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  12. Preparation and characterization of bioceramics produced from calcium phosphate cements

    Andriotis, O.; Katsamenis, O.L. [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Mouzakis, D.E. [Technological Educational Institute of Larisa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, T.E.I of Larissa, 411 10, Larissa (Greece); Bouropoulos, N. [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, 26504 Rio Patras (Greece)

    2010-03-15

    The present work reports a method for preparing calcium phosphate ceramics by calcination of calcium phosphate cements composed mainly of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). It was found that hardened cements calcinied at temperatures from to 600 to 1300 C were transformed to tricalcium phosphates. Moreover the compressive strength was determined and porosity was estimated as a function of the calcination temperature. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  14. Cementation of the solid radioactive waste with polymer-cement solutions using the method of impregnation

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of solid radioactive waste (SRW), i.e. inclusion of solid radioactive waste into cement matrix without cavities - is one of the main technological processes used for conditioning low and intermediate level radioactive waste. At FSUE 'Radon' the industrialized method of impregnation has been developed and since 2003 has been using for cementation of solid radioactive waste. The technology is that the polymer-cement solution, having high penetrating properties, is supplied under pressure through a tube to the bottom of the container in which solid radioactive waste has preliminarily been placed. The polymer-cement solution is evenly moving upwards through the channels between the particles of solid radioactive waste, fills the voids in the bulk volume of the waste and hardens, forming a cement compound, the amount of which is equal to the original volume. The aim of the investigation was a selection of a cement solution suitable for SRW impregnation (including fine particles) without solution depletion and bottom layers stuffing. It has been chosen a polymer: PHMG (polyhexamethylene-guanidine), which is a stabilizing and water-retaining component of the cement solution. The experiments confirm that the polymer increases the permeability of the cement solution by a 2-2.5 factor, the viscosity by a 1.2 factor, the stability of the consistency by a 1.5-1.7 factor, and extends the operating range of the W/C ratio to 0.5-1.1. So it is possible to penetrate a volume of SRW bigger by a 1.5-2.0 factor. It has been proved, that PHMG polymer increases strength and frost-resistance of the final compounds by a 1.8-2.7 factor, and contributes to fast strength development at the beginning of hardening and it decreases Cs-137 leashing rate by a 1.5-2 factor

  15. Tobermorite/jennite- and tobermorite/calcium hydroxide-based models for the structure of C-S-H: applicability to hardened pastes of tricalcium silicate, β-dicalcium silicate, Portland cement, and blends of Portland cement with blast-furnace slag, metakaolin, or silica fume

    Richardson, I.G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the applicability of the tobermorite-jennite (T/J) and tobermorite-'solid-solution' calcium hydroxide (T/CH) viewpoints for the nanostructure of C-S-H present in real cement pastes. The discussion is facilitated by a consideration of the author's 1992 model, which includes formulations for both structural viewpoints; its relationship to other recent models is outlined. The structural details of the model are clearly illustrated with a number of schematic diagrams. Experimental observations on the nature of C-S-H present in a diverse range of cementitious systems are considered. In some systems, the data can only be accounted for on the T/CH structural viewpoint, whilst in others, both the T/CH and T/J viewpoints could apply. New data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are presented. The 'inner product' (Ip) C-S-H in relatively large grains of C 3 S or alite appears to consist of small globular particles, which are ∼4-8 nm in size in pastes hydrated at 20 deg. C but smaller at elevated temperatures, ∼3-4 nm. Fibrils of 'outer product' (Op) C-S-H in C 3 S or β-C 2 S pastes appear to consist of aggregations of long thin particles that are about 3 nm in their smallest dimension and of variable length, ranging from a few nanometers to many tens of nanometers. The small size of these particles of C-S-H is likely to result in significant edge effects, which would seem to offer a reasonable explanation for the persistence of Q 0 (H) species. This would also explain why there is more Q 0 (H) at elevated temperatures, where the particles seem to be smaller, and apparently less in KOH-activated pastes, where the C-S-H has foil-like morphology. In blended cements, a reduction in the mean Ca/Si ratio of the C-S-H results in a change from fibrillar to a crumpled-foil morphology, which suggests strongly that as the Ca/Si ratio is reduced, a transition occurs from essentially one-dimensional growth of the C-S-H particles to

  16. Surface analysis and depth profiling of corrosion products formed in lead pipes used to supply low alkalinity drinking water.

    Davidson, C M; Peters, N J; Britton, A; Brady, L; Gardiner, P H E; Lewis, B D

    2004-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have been applied to investigate the nature of lead pipe corrosion products formed in pH adjusted, orthophosphate-treated, low alkalinity water, under supply conditions. Depth profiling and surface analysis have been carried out on pipe samples obtained from the water distribution system in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. X-ray diffraction spectrometry identified basic lead carbonate, lead oxide and lead phosphate as the principal components. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed the crystalline structure within the corrosion product and also showed spatial correlations existed between calcium, iron, lead, oxygen and phosphorus. Elemental profiling, conducted by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutrals mass spectrometry (SNMS) indicated that the corrosion product was not uniform with depth. However, no clear stratification was apparent. Indeed, counts obtained for carbonate, phosphate and oxide were well correlated within the depth range probed by SIMS. SNMS showed relationships existed between carbon, calcium, iron, and phosphorus within the bulk of the scale, as well as at the surface. SIMS imaging confirmed the relationship between calcium and lead and suggested there might also be an association between chloride and phosphorus.

  17. The analysis and comparison of the ions present in the pore water of different cement systems

    Jolliffe, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    Cementation is currently the main encapsulation route for the safe disposal of intermediate level radioactive waste. By analysis of the pore solutions extracted from hardened cement pastes any potential interactions between the cement matrix and/or the disposal container can be identified. The effect of hydration time on three different blended cement systems has been assessed by analysing the water extracted from the pore voids within the hardened cement pastes by use of a high force hydraulic press. The pH, redox potential, anion and cation concentrations were measured using standard analytical techniques. The results showed that as the cement systems hydrated the volume of pore water extracted decreased, causing a reduction in the ionic species released into solution. The strongly basic pore waters contained mainly potassium and sodium hydroxide and this feature needs to be taken into account when modelling radionuclide migration. (author)

  18. Description of the structural evolution of a hydrating portland cement paste by SANS

    Haeussler, F.; Eichhorn, F.; Baumbach, H.

    1994-01-01

    On the spectrometer MURN at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 dry Portland cement, silica fume, and a hydrating Portland cement paste were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). By using the TOF-method a momentum transfer from 0.07 nm -1 to 7 nm -1 is detectable. Every component (dry cement powder, clinker minerals, hydrating cement pastes) shows a different scattering behaviour. In the measured Q-region the hardening cement paste does not show a Porod-like behaviour of SANS-curves. In contrast the Porod's potential law holds for dry powder samples of clinker minerals and silica fume. In experiments carried out to observe the hydration progress within the first 321 days the characteristics of the scattering curves (potential behaviour, the radius of gyration, and the macroscopic scattering cross section at Q = 0 nm -1 were measured. Some evolution of the inner structure of the hardened cement paste was noted. (orig.)

  19. The effect of temperature rise on microstructural properties of cement-based materials : Correlation of experimental data and a simulation approach

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the influence of stray current flow on temperature rise in hardening cement-based materials and consequently altered cement hydration. To simulate stray current, different levels of electrical current were applied to cement paste and mortar specimens immediately after casting.

  20. Physical and thermal behavior of cement composites reinforced with recycled waste paper fibers

    Hospodarova, Viola; Stevulova, Nadezda; Vaclavik, Vojtech; Dvorsky, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    In this study, three types of recycled waste paper fibers were used to manufacture cement composites reinforced with recycled cellulosic fibers. Waste cellulosic fibers in quantity of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 wt.% were added to cement mixtures. Physical properties such as density, water capillarity, water absorbability and thermal conductivity of fiber cement composites were studied after 28 days of hardening. However, durability of composites was tested after their water storage up to 90 days. Final results of tested properties of fiber cement composites were compared with cement reference sample without cellulosic fibers.

  1. Slurry circulation after cement compression operations; Circulacao de pasta apos operacoes de compressao de cimento

    Costa, Clavio Roberto S [PETROBRAS, BA (Brazil). Regiao de Producao da Bahia. Divisao Regional de Complementacao

    1994-07-01

    In the traditional low pressure cement compression method, after pressure stabilization we wait for the setting and remove the hardened cement with a rock bit. The method described here suggests that following pressure stabilization, the slurry must be removed from the casing with reverse circulation, thus excluding the whole process of cutting hardened cement, optimizing rig time and equipment wear, and anticipating oil production. This work describes this experience in Reconcavo basin, Potiguar basin, and Campos basin, production regions of PETROBRAS, and suggests slurry parameters and a methodology to employ the method. (author)

  2. Low porosity portland cement pastes based on furan polymers

    Darweesh, H.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of three different types of Furan polymers on the porosity, mechanical properties, mechanism of hydration and microstructure of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes was investigated. The results showed that mixing the OPC with Furan polymers, the standard water of consistency of the different cement pastes decreases and therefore the setting times (initial and final) are shortened. The total porosity of the hardened cement pastes decreased, while the mechanical properties improved and enhanced at all curing ages of hydration compared with those of the pure OPC pastes. The hydration process with Furan polymers proceeded according to the following decreasing order: F.ac. > F.ph. > F.alc. > OPC

  3. Investigation on the potential of waste cooking oil as a grinding aid in Portland cement.

    Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Jianfeng; Huang, Yuyan; Jiang, Zhengwu; Yang, Xiaojie; Yang, Zhenghong; Chen, Qing

    2016-12-15

    Although there are several methods for managing waste cooking oil (WCO), a significant result has not been achieved in China. A new method is required for safe WCO management that minimizes the environmental threat. In this context, this work was developed in which cement clinker and gypsum were interground with various WCOs, and their properties, such as grindability, water-cement ratio required to achieve a normal consistency, setting times, compressive strength, contents of calcium hydroxide and ettringite in the hardened paste, microstructure and economic and environmental considerations, were addressed in detail. The results show that, overall, WCO favorably improves cement grinding. WCO prolonged the cement setting times and resulted in longer setting times. Additionally, more remarkable effects were found in cements in which WCO contained more unsaturated fatty acid. WCOs increased the cement strength. However, this enhancement was rated with respect to the WCO contents and components. WCOs decreased the CH and AFt contents in the cement hardened paste. Even the AFt content at later ages was reduced when WCO was used. WCO also densify microstructure of the hardened cement paste. It is economically and environmentally feasible to use WCOs as grinding aids in the cement grinding process. These results contribute to the application of WCOs as grinding aids and to the safe management of WCO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Early-age monitoring of cement structures using FBG sensors

    Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Zhichun; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    With more and more broad applications of the cement-based structures such as neat cement paste, cement mortar and concrete in civil engineering, people hope to find out what their performances should like. The in-service performances of cement-based structures are highly affected by their hardening process during the early-age. But it is still a big problem for traditional sensors to be used to monitor the early curing of cement-based structures due to such disadvantages as difficulties to install sensors inside the concrete, limited measuring points, poor durability and interference of electromagnetic wave and so on. In this paper, according to the sensing properties of the Fiber Bragg Grating sensors and self-characters of the cement-based structures, we have successfully finished measuring and monitoring the early-age inner-strain and temperature changes of the neat cement paste, concrete with and without restrictions, mass concrete structures and negative concrete, respectively. Three types of FBG-based sensors have been developed to monitor the cement-based structures. Besides, the installation techniques and the embedding requirements of FBG sensors in cement-based structures are also discussed. Moreover, such kind of technique has been used in practical structure, 3rd Nanjing Yangtze Bridge, and the results show that FBG sensors are well proper for measuring and monitoring the temperature and strain changes including self-shrinkage, dry shrinkage, plastic shrinkage, temperature expansion, frost heaving and so on inside different cement-based structures. This technique provides us a new useful measuring method on early curing monitoring of cement-based structures and greater understanding of details of their hardening process.

  5. Experimental evaluation of cement materials for solidifying sodium nitrate

    Sasaki, Tadashi; Numata, Mamoru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Yoshikazu

    2003-03-01

    Low-level liquid waste containing sodium nitrate is planned to be transformed to salt block by evaporation with sodium borate in the Low-level Waste Treatment Facility (LWTF), then salt block will be stored temporally. It should be important to investigate the method how to treat these liquid waste suitable to final disposal criteria that will be settled in future. Cement solidification is one of promising candidates because it has been achieved as the solidification material for the shallow land disposal. The research was conducted to evaluate applicability of various cement materials to solidification of sodium nitrate. The following cements were tested. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Portland Blast-furnace Slag Cement; C type (PBFSC). Alkali Activated Slag Cement (AASC, supplied by JGC). The test results are as follows; (1) AASC is characterized by a high sodium nitrate loading (-70 wt%) compared with other types of cement material. High fluidity of the cement paste, high strength after solidification, and minimization of free water on the cement paste are achieved under all test conditions. (2) OOPC and PBFSC produced free water on the cement paste in the early days and delayed the hardening period. 3 or more days are required to harden evan with 30 wt% content of sodium nitrate. (3) Though PBFSC contains blast furnace slag similar to AASC, there is no advantage prior to OPC. To design an ideal cement conditioning system for sodium nitrate liquid waste in the LWTF, the further studies are necessary such as the simulated waste test, Kd test, pilot test, and layout design. (author)

  6. Laboratory Electrical Resistivity Studies on Cement Stabilized Soil

    Lokesh, K. N.; Jacob, Jinu Mary

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurement of freshly prepared uncured and cured soil-cement materials is done and the correlations between the factors controlling the performance of soil-cement and electrical resistivity are discussed in this paper. Conventional quality control of soil-cement quite often involves wastage of a lot of material, if it does not meet the strength criteria. In this study, it is observed that, in soil-cement, resistivity follows a similar trend as unconfined compressive strength, with increase in cement content and time of curing. Quantitative relations developed for predicting 7-day strength of soil-cement mix, using resistivity of the soil-cement samples at freshly prepared state, after 1-hour curing help to decide whether the soil-cement mix meets the desired strength and performance criteria. This offers the option of the soil-cement mix to be upgraded (possibly with additional cement) in its fresh state itself, if it does not fulfil the performance criteria, rather than wasting the material after hardening. PMID:28540364

  7. Development of fluorapatite cement for dental enamel defects repair.

    Wei, Jie; Wang, Jiecheng; Shan, Wenpeng; Liu, Xiaochen; Ma, Jian; Liu, Changsheng; Fang, Jing; Wei, Shicheng

    2011-06-01

    In order to restore the badly carious lesion of human dental enamel, a crystalline paste of fluoride substituted apatite cement was synthesized by using the mixture of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and ammonium fluoride. The apatite cement paste could be directly filled into the enamel defects (cavities) to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the hardened cement was fluorapatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)F(2), FA] with calcium to phosphorus atom molar ratio (Ca/P) of 1.67 and Ca/F ratio of 5. The solubility of FA cement in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 5) was slightly lower than the natural enamel, indicating the FA cement was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solutions. The FA cement was tightly combined with the enamel surface, and there was no obvious difference of the hardness between the FA cement and natural enamel. The extracts of FA cement caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. In addition, the results showed that the FA cement had good mechanical strength, hydrophilicity, and anti-bacterial adhesion properties. The study suggested that using FA cement was simple and promising approach to effectively and conveniently restore enamel defects.

  8. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  9. Radiation-hardenable diluents for radiation-hardenable compositions

    Schuster, K.E.; Rosenkranz, H.J.; Furh, K.; Ruedolph, H.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation-crosslinkable diluents for radiation-hardenable compositions (binders) consisting of a mixture of triacrylates of a reaction product of trimethylol propane and ethylene oxide with an average degree of ethoxylation of from 2.5 to 4 are described. The ethoxylated trimethylol propane is substantially free from trimethylol propane and has the following distribution: 4 to 5% by weight of monoethoxylation product, 14 to 16% by weight of diethoxylation product, 20 to 30% by weight of triethoxylation product, 20 to 30% by weight of tetraethoxylation product, 16 to 18% by weight of pentaethoxylation product, and 6 to 8% by weight of hexaethoxylation product. The diluents effectively reduce the viscosity of radiation-hardenable compositions and do not have any adverse effect upon their reactivity or upon the properties of the resulting hardened products

  10. EFFECT OF HARDENING TIME ON DEFORMATION-STRENGTH INDICATORS OF CONCRETE FOR INJECTION WITH A TWO-STAGE EXPANSION DURING HARDENING IN WATER

    Tatjana N. Zhilnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives Concretes for injection with a two-stage expansion are a kind of selfstressing concrete obtained with the use of self-stressing cement.The aim of the work is to study the influence of the duration of aging on the porosity, strength and self-stress of concrete hardening in water, depending on the expansion value at the first stage. At the first stage, the compacted concrete mixture is expanded to ensure complete filling of the formwork space. At the second stage, the hardening concrete expands due to the formation of an increased amount of ettringite. This process is prolonged in time, with the amount of self-stress and strength dependant on the conditions of hardening. Methods  Experimental evaluation of self-stress, strength and porosity of concretes that are permanently hardened in water, under air-moist and air-dry conditions after different expansion at the first stage. The self-stress of cement stone is the result of superposition of two processes: the hardening of the structure due to hydration of silicates and its expansion as a result of hydration of calcium aluminates with the subsequent formation of ettringite. The magnitude of self-stress is determined by the ratio of these two processes. The self-stress of the cement stone changes in a manner similar to the change in its expansion. The stabilisation of expansion is accompanied by stabilisation of self-stress of cement stone. Results  The relationship of self-stress, strength and porosity of concrete for injection with a two-stage expansion on the duration and humidity conditions of hardening, taking into account the conditions of deformation limitation at the first stage, is revealed. Conclusion During prolonged hardening in an aqueous medium, self-stresses are reduced up to 25% with the exception of expansion at the first stage and up to 20% with an increase in volume up to 5% at the first stage. The increase in compressive strength is up to 28% relative to

  11. Cementation of nitrate solutions by alkali-activated slag-metakaolin cement

    Rakhimova, N.R.; Rakhimov, R.Z.; Naumkina, N.I.; Gubaidullina, A.M.; Yakovlev, G.I.; Shaybadullina, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considered the feasibility of solidification of liquid salt wastes by NaNO 3 solutions of concentration 100-700 g/l by alkali-activated slag (AASC) and alkali-activated slag-meta-kaolin cements (AASMC). The AASC (activated by 5% Na 2 O) and AASMC (activated by 5% Na 2 O and introduced with 5% of MK) mixed with NaNO 3 solutions were more effective in comparison with Portland cement. The compressive strength of hardened AASC and AASMC pastes was 1.6-12. and 7- 21 MPa in 3-day age and 13.4-31 and 20-37 MPa in 28-day age, respectively, depending on concentration of NaNO 3 solution. The incorporation of 3-5% meta-kaolin in AASC: (i) increased the compressive strength of hardened AASMC pastes up to 50% depending on the type of meta-kaolin, (ii) shortened setting times of fresh AASMC pastes

  12. Salt zone cementing; Cimentacao em zonas de sal

    Santos, Fernando Jose Parente Neiva; Miranda, Cristiane Richard de; Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1994-07-01

    This work introduces new concepts in the proposal of NaCl concentrations i cement slurry and operational parameters for cementing halite salt zones. Experiments carried out in the laboratory and in the Surface Hydraulic Simulator using real halite coring allowed the determination of halite dissolution rates in relation to flow, contact time, and initial Na Cl concentration in the cement slurries. An experimental procedure was developed to measure the adherence strength of hardened cement on halite formations. A Computer Simulator was developed with the adjustment of a model representing the physical phenomenon of mass transfer to the experimental results obtained, which enable us to calculate the Na Cl concentration profile on cement slurry after its positioning in the well's annular region, as well as the total mass of dissolved salt. Employment of the methodology developed in this work shall reduce risk of collapsed casing as well as the cost of the slurry. (author)

  13. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    Naish, C.C.; Buttle, D.; Wallace-Sims, R.; O'Brien, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work to investigate acoustic emission as a non-intrusive monitor of corrosion and degradation of cemented wasteforms where the waste is a potentially reactive metal. The acoustic data collected shows good correlation with the corrosion rate as measured by hydrogen gas evolution rates and the electrochemically measured corrosion rates post cement hardening. The technique has been shown to be sensitive in detecting stress caused by expansive corrosion product within the cemented wasteform. The attenuation of the acoustic signal by the wasteform reduced the signal received by the monitoring equipment by a factor of 10 over a distance of approximately 150-400 mm, dependent on the water level in the cement. Full size packages were successfully monitored. It is concluded that the technique offers good potential for monitoring cemented containers of the more reactive metals, for example Magnox and aluminium. (author)

  14. Salt zone cementing; Cimentacao em zonas de sal

    Santos, Fernando Jose Parente Neiva; Miranda, Cristiane Richard de; Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1994-07-01

    This work introduces new concepts in the proposal of NaCl concentrations i cement slurry and operational parameters for cementing halite salt zones. Experiments carried out in the laboratory and in the Surface Hydraulic Simulator using real halite coring allowed the determination of halite dissolution rates in relation to flow, contact time, and initial Na Cl concentration in the cement slurries. An experimental procedure was developed to measure the adherence strength of hardened cement on halite formations. A Computer Simulator was developed with the adjustment of a model representing the physical phenomenon of mass transfer to the experimental results obtained, which enable us to calculate the Na Cl concentration profile on cement slurry after its positioning in the well's annular region, as well as the total mass of dissolved salt. Employment of the methodology developed in this work shall reduce risk of collapsed casing as well as the cost of the slurry. (author)

  15. Lunar cement

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  16. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  17. Superplasticizer function and sorption in high performance cement based grouts

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.N.; Roe, L.H.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes laboratory studies undertaken to determine interactions between the main components of high-performance cement-based grout. These interactions were studied with the grouts in both their unset and hardened states with the specific intention of determining the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer; the phase of residence of the superplasticizer in hardened materials; and the permanence of the superplasticizer in hardened grouts. In unset pastes attempts were made to extract superplasticizer by mechanical processes. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was leached from the grouts. A microautoradiographic method was developed to investigate the phases of residence of superplasticizer in hardened grouts and confirm the inferences from the leaching studies. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was located on the hydrated phases formed during the early stages of cement hydration. These include tricalcium aluminate hydrates and tricalcium silicate phases. There is some tendency for the superplasticizer to sorb on ettringite. The presence of superplasticizer did not coincide with the locations of unreacted silica fume and high silica content phases such as C 2 S-H. The observations explain the findings of the studies of unset pastes which also showed that the sorption of superplasticizer is likely to be enhanced with increased mixing water content and, hence, distribution in and exposure to the hydration reaction surfaces in the grout. Superplasticizer can be leached in very small quantities from the hardened grouts. Rapid release takes place from the unsorbed superplasticizer contained in the accessible pore space. Subsequent release likely occurs with dissolution of the cement phases and the exposure of isolated pores to groundwater. (au) (37 refs.)

  18. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents

    Dongliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content (Cv on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using Cv. The research reveals that when Cv is high (e.g., Cv = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as Cv increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When Cv is low (e.g., Cv = 0.01, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of Cv (the cementing agent content with c′ (the cohesion force of the sample and Δϕ′ (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  19. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents.

    Li, Dongliang; Liu, Xinrong; Liu, Xianshan

    2015-07-02

    Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08) under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa) were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content ( C v ) on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using C v . The research reveals that when C v is high (e.g., C v = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as C v increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When C v is low (e.g., C v = 0.01), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of C v (the cementing agent content) with c ' (the cohesion force of the sample) and Δϕ' (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance) is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  20. Recent developments in turning hardened steels - A review

    Sivaraman, V.; Prakash, S.

    2017-05-01

    Hard materials ranging from HRC 45 - 68 such as hardened AISI H13, AISI 4340, AISI 52100, D2 STL, D3 STEEL Steel etc., need super hard tool materials to machine. Turning of these hard materials is termed as hard turning. Hard turning makes possible direct machining of the hard materials and also eliminates the lubricant requirement and thus favoring dry machining. Hard turning is a finish turning process and hence conventional grinding is not required. Development of the new advanced super hard tool materials such as ceramic inserts, Cubic Boron Nitride, Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride etc. enabled the turning of these materials. PVD and CVD methods of coating have made easier the production of single and multi layered coated tool inserts. Coatings of TiN, TiAlN, TiC, Al2O3, AlCrN over cemented carbide inserts has lead to the machining of difficult to machine materials. Advancement in the process of hard machining paved way for better surface finish, long tool life, reduced tool wear, cutting force and cutting temperatures. Micro and Nano coated carbide inserts, nanocomposite coated PCBN inserts, micro and nano CBN coated carbide inserts and similar developments have made machining of hardened steels much easier and economical. In this paper, broad literature review on turning of hardened steels including optimizing process parameters, cooling requirements, different tool materials etc., are done.

  1. Effect of olive waste (Husk on behavior of cement paste

    Sharaf Alkheder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jordan is a famous country in terms of olive trees agriculture that resulted in a mass production of olive oil products. The huge amounts of olive waste (husk that resulted from olives processing to produce olive oil represent an environmental challenge in the country. The idea in this paper comes to use olive waste as a partial replacement for Portland cement in cement paste to conserve the environment, reduce cement consumption and increase cost efficiency. The wastes were burned properly in an oven and maintained for 6 h until it was fully transformed into ashes. Then, the oven was turned off and ashes were allowed to cool. After cooling, the material passed sieve #200 were used. The sieved ashes were used in the cement mix as a partial cement replacement for making the mortar and cement paste. Normal consistency and setting time were determined as well as soundness, compressive strength. Results indicated that normal consistency of the cement pastes containing different percentage of olive waste is somehow lower than that of the ordinary cement paste and slightly decreases with increasing the percentage. The results also indicated that the compressive strength of hardened blended cement paste containing different percentages of olive waste slightly decrease with olive waste content at 3, 7, and 28 days.

  2. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste with high content of borate salts

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    The report reviews the ways of optimization of cementation of boron-containing liquid radioactive waste. The most common way to hardening the low-level liquid radioactive waste (LRW) is the cementation. However, boron-containing liquid radioactive waste with low pH values cannot be cemented without alkaline additives, to neutralize acid forms of borate compounds. Cement setting without additives happens only on 14-56 days, the compounds have low strength, and hence an insufficient reliability of radionuclides fixation in the cement matrix. The alkaline additives increase the volume of the final cement compound which enhances financial and operational costs. In order to control the speed of hardening of cement solution with a boron-containing liquid radioactive waste and to remove the components that prevent hardening of cement solution, it is proposed an electromagnetic treatment of LRW in the vortex layer of ferromagnetic particles. The results of infrared spectroscopy show, that electromagnetic treatment of liquid radioactive waste changes the ionic forms of the borates and raises the pH due to the dissociation of the oxygen and hydrogen bonds in the aqueous solutions of the boron compounds. The various types of ferromagnetic activators of the vortex layer have been investigated, including the highly dispersed nano-powders and the magnetic phases of the iron oxides. It has been determined the technological parameters of the electromagnetic treatment of liquid radioactive waste and the subsequent cementation of this type of LRW. By using the method of scanning electron microscopy it has been shown, that the nano-particles of magnetic phases of the ferric oxides are involved in phase formation of hydro-aluminum-calcium ferrites in the early stages of hardening and improving strength of the cement compounds with liquid radioactive waste. (authors)

  3. Effect of amorphous silica ash used as a partial replacement for cement on the compressive and flexural strengths cement mortar.

    Usman, Aliyu; Ibrahim, Muhammad B.; Bala, Nura

    2018-04-01

    This research is aimed at investigating the effect of using amorphous silica ash (ASA) obtained from rice husk as a partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on the compressive and flexural strength of mortar. ASA was used in partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement in the following percentages 2.5 percent, 5 percent, 7.5 percent and 10 percent. These partial replacements were used to produce Cement-ASA mortar. ASA was found to contain all major chemical compounds found in cement with the exception of alumina, which are SiO2 (91.5%), CaO (2.84%), Fe2O3 (1.96%), and loss on ignition (LOI) was found to be 9.18%. It also contains other minor oxides found in cement. The test on hardened mortar were destructive in nature which include flexural strength test on prismatic beam (40mm x 40mm x 160mm) and compressive strength test on the cube size (40mm x 40mm, by using the auxiliary steel plates) at 2,7,14 and 28 days curing. The Cement-ASA mortar flexural and compressive strengths were found to be increasing with curing time and decreases with cement replacement by ASA. It was observed that 5 percent replacement of cement with ASA attained the highest strength for all the curing ages and all the percentage replacements attained the targeted compressive strength of 6N/mm2 for 28 days for the cement mortar

  4. Fresh and hardened properties of binary blend high strength self compacting concrete

    S.S. Vivek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Self compacting concrete (SCC made a remarkable impact on the concrete construction industry because of its innovative nature. Assessment of optimal ratio between chemical and mineral admixtures plays a vital role in developing SCC. In the present work three different mineral admixtures were used as partial substitute in different proportions to cement to produce SCC with a characteristic compressive strength of 60 MPa. All the three types of SCC were investigated for its fresh and hardened properties. From the results, 50% GGBFS, 10% SF and 20% MK were found to the optimum values as partial substitute to cement.

  5. EVALUATION OF CEMENT THIXOTROPY FOR THE CEMENT OF OIL WELLS IN AREAS WITH LOSSES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND DAIRY OF HIGH FURNACES

    T. Bouziani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped. Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  6. EVALUATION OF THE THIXOTROPY OF OIL-WELL CEMENTS USED FOR CEMENTING LOST CIRCULATION ZONES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND BLAST FURNACE SLAG

    T. Bouziani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped.Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  7. Failure of cement hydrates: freeze-thaw and fracture

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Del Gado, Emanuela; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland

    Mechanical and viscoelastic behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the ``glue'' of cement. Even more than the atomistic structure, the mesoscale amorphous texture of cement hydrates over hundreds of nanometers plays a crucial role for material properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nano-scale building units of cement hydrates and on their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles.Our mesoscale model was able to reconcile different experimental results ranging from small-angle neutron scattering, SEM, adsorption/desorption of N2, and water to nanoindentation and gain the new fundamental insights into the microscopic origin of the properties measured. Our results suggest that heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H, impacting the rheological and mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. In this talk I discuss recent investigation on failure mechanism at the mesoscale of hardened cement paste such as freeze-thaw and fracture. Using correlations between local volume fractions and local stress we provide a link between structural and mechanical heterogeneities during the failure mechanisms.

  8. Applications of radioactive methods in cement concrete testing

    Dinakaran, M.; Vijayaraghavan, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles regarding the neutron moderation technique and the successful application of this technique for determining the moisture and cement content in hardened concrete are briefly discussed. Since fast neutrons are converted into slow thermal neutrons by elastic scattering in the presence of hydrogen nuclei, it is possible to determine the moisture content in hardened cement concrete using precalibrated relationships. Also since most of the hydrogenous matter in concrete pertains to non-fixed water and hydrated cement compounds, an analysis of slow neutron counts on a sample at different non-fixed moisture contents make the estimation of cement content possible using the mathematical relationship between cement content, degree of hydration and the equivalent moisture content. The method developed is quick, non-destructive, and repeatable at the same time giving better accuracy when compared to conventional chemical methods. Use was also made of gamma ray transmission method for determining the differential density at various depths in a cement concrete pavement making use of cores cut from the pavement. Further, development proposed for determination of density at different depths of pavement in situ is also discussed. (auth.)

  9. Working hardening modelization in zirconium alloys

    Sanchez, P.; Pochettino, Alberto A.

    1999-01-01

    Working hardening effects on mechanical properties and crystallographic textures formation in Zr-based alloys are studied. The hardening mechanisms for different grain deformations and topological conditions of simple crystal yield are considered. Results obtained show that the differences in the cold rolling textures (L and T textures) can be related with hardening microstructural parameters. (author)

  10. Effect of Water-Cement Ratio on Pore Structure and Strength of Foam Concrete

    Zhongwei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foam concrete with different dry densities (400, 500, 600, 700, and 800 kg/m3 was prepared from ordinary Portland cement (P.O.42.5R and vegetable protein foaming agent by adjusting the water-cement ratio through the physical foaming method. The performance of the cement paste adopted, as well as the structure and distribution of air pores, was characterized by a rheometer, scanning electron microscope, vacuum water saturation instrument, and image analysis software. Effects of the water-cement ratio on the relative viscosity of the cement paste, as well as pore structure and strength of the hardened foam concrete, were discussed. Results showed that water-cement ratio can influence the size, distribution, and connectivity of pores in foam concrete. The compressive strength of the foam concrete showed an inverted V-shaped variation law with the increase in water-cement ratio.

  11. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991

  12. Low Shrinkage Cement Concrete Intended for Airfield Pavements

    Małgorzata, Linek

    2017-10-01

    The work concerns the issue of hardened concrete parameters improvement intended for airfield pavements. Factors which have direct or indirect influence on rheological deformation size were of particular interest. The aim of lab testing was to select concrete mixture ratio which would make hardened concrete less susceptible to influence of basic operating factors. Analyses included two research groups. External and internal factors were selected. They influence parameters of hardened cement concrete by increasing rheological deformations. Research referred to innovative cement concrete intended for airfield pavements. Due to construction operation, the research considered the influence of weather conditions and forced thermal loads intensifying concrete stress. Fresh concrete mixture parameters were tested and basic parameters of hardened concrete were defined (density, absorbability, compression strength, tensile strength). Influence of the following factors on rheological deformation value was also analysed. Based on obtained test results, it has been discovered that innovative concrete, made on the basis of modifier, which changes internal structure of concrete composite, has definitely lower values of rheological deformation. Observed changes of microstructure, in connection with reduced deformation values allowed to reach the conclusion regarding advantageous characteristic features of the newly designed cement concrete. Applying such concrete for airfield construction may contribute to extension of its operation without malfunction and the increase of its general service life.

  13. Solution hardening and strain hardening at elevated temperatures

    Kocks, U.F.

    1982-10-01

    Solutes can significantly increase the rate of strain hardening; as a consequence, the saturation stress, at which strain hardening tends to cease for a given temperature and strain rate, is increased more than the yield stress: this is the major effect of solutes on strength at elevated temperatures, especially in the regime where dynamic strain-aging occurs. It is shown that local solute mobility can affect both the rate of dynamic recovery and the dislocation/dislocation interaction strength. The latter effect leads to multiplicative solution strengthening. It is explained by a new model based on repeated dislocation unlocking, in a high-temperature limit, which also rationalizes the stress dependence of static and dynamic strain-aging, and may help explain the plateau of the yield stress at elevated temperatures. 15 figures

  14. Design of rapid hardening engineered cementitious composites for sustainable construction

    Marushchak Uliana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with design of environmentally friendly Rapid Hardening Engineered Cementitious Composite (RHECC nanomodified with ultrafine mineral additives, polycarboxylate ether based superplasticizer, calcium hydrosilicate nanoparticles and dispersal reinforced by fibers. The incremental coefficient of surface activity was proposed in order to estimation of ultrafine supplementary materials (fly ash, methakaolin, microsilica efficiency. A characterization of RHECC’s compressive and flexural properties at different ages is reported in this paper. Early compressive strength of ECC is 45-50 MPa, standard strength – 84-95 MPa and parameter Rc2/Rc28 – 65–70%. The microstructure of the cement matrix and RHECC was investigated. The use of ultrafine mineral supplementary materials provides reinforcement of structure on micro- and nanoscale level (cementing matrix due to formation of sub-microreinforcing hydrate phase as AFt- and C-S-H phases in unclinker part of cement matrix, resulting in the phenomena of “self-reinforcement” on the microstructure level. Designed RHECC may be regarded as lower brittle since the crack resistance coefficient is higher comparison to conventional fine grain concrete.

  15. Design of rapid hardening engineered cementitious composites for sustainable construction

    Marushchak, Uliana; Sanytsky, Myroslav; Sydor, Nazar

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals with design of environmentally friendly Rapid Hardening Engineered Cementitious Composite (RHECC) nanomodified with ultrafine mineral additives, polycarboxylate ether based superplasticizer, calcium hydrosilicate nanoparticles and dispersal reinforced by fibers. The incremental coefficient of surface activity was proposed in order to estimation of ultrafine supplementary materials (fly ash, methakaolin, microsilica) efficiency. A characterization of RHECC's compressive and flexural properties at different ages is reported in this paper. Early compressive strength of ECC is 45-50 MPa, standard strength - 84-95 MPa and parameter Rc2/Rc28 - 65-70%. The microstructure of the cement matrix and RHECC was investigated. The use of ultrafine mineral supplementary materials provides reinforcement of structure on micro- and nanoscale level (cementing matrix) due to formation of sub-microreinforcing hydrate phase as AFt- and C-S-H phases in unclinker part of cement matrix, resulting in the phenomena of "self-reinforcement" on the microstructure level. Designed RHECC may be regarded as lower brittle since the crack resistance coefficient is higher comparison to conventional fine grain concrete.

  16. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  17. Optimization of a biomimetic bone cement: role of DCPD.

    Panzavolta, Silvia; Bracci, Barbara; Rubini, Katia; Bigi, Adriana

    2011-08-01

    We previously proposed a biomimetic α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) bone cement where gelatin controls the transformation of α-TCP into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), leading to improved mechanical properties. In this study we investigated the setting and hardening processes of biomimetic cements containing increasing amounts of CaHPO(4)·2H2O (DCPD) (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15 wt.%), with the aim to optimize composition. Both initial and final setting times increased significantly when DCPD content accounts for 10 wt.%, whereas cements containing 15 wt.% DCPD did not set at all. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations were performed on samples maintained in physiological solution for different times. DCPD dissolution starts soon after cement preparation, but the rate of transformation decreases on increasing DCPD initial content in the samples. The rate of α-TCP to CDHA conversion during hardening decreases on increasing DCPD initial content. Moreover, the presence of DCPD prevents gelatin release during hardening. The combined effects of gelatin and DCPD on the rate of CDHA formation and porosity lead to significantly improved mechanical properties, with the best composition displaying a compressive strength of 35 MPa and a Young modulus of 1600 MPa. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of nano-dispersive modified additive on cement activity

    Sazonova, Natalya, E-mail: n.a.sazonova@mail.ru; Badenikov, Artem, E-mail: rector@agta.ru; Ivanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: lisik-iva@mail.ru [Angarsk State Technical University, 60, Tchaykovsky St., 665835, Angarsk (Russian Federation); Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    In the work the influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the cement activity and the processes of structure formation of the hardened cement paste in different periods of hydration are studied. The changes in the kinetic curves of the sample strength growth modified with SWCNT in amount of 0.01 and 0.0005 % are stipulated by the results of differential scanning colorimetry, scanning electronic and ionic microscopy, X-ray-phase analysis. It was found that the nano-modified additive may increase in the axis compressive strength of the system by 1.4–6.3 fold relatively to the reference samples and may reach 179.6 MPa. It may intensify the hydration process of calcium silicates as well as influence on the matrix of hardened cement paste. The studies are conducted on the structural changes in the hardened cement paste, the time periods of increase and decrease of the compressive strength of the samples, the amount of the calcium hydroxide and tobermorite-like gel as well as the degree of hydration C{sub 3}S and β-C{sub 2}S.

  19. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Habing, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  20. Superheat effect on bainite steel hardenability

    Kubachek, V.V.; Sklyuev, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    The bainite hardenability of 34KhN1M and 35 KhN1M2Ph steels has been investigated by the end-face hardening technique. It is established that, as the temperature of austenitization rises from 900 to 1280 deg C, the temperature of bainite transformation increases and bainite hardenability of the steels falls off. A repeated slow heating to 900 deg C of previously overheated 34KhN1M steel breaks up grain, lowers the temperature of the bainite transformation and raises the hardenability to values obtained with ordinary hardening from 900 deg C. A similar heating of previously overheated 35KhN1M2Ph steel is accompanied by restoration of initial coarse grains and maintenance of both the elevated bainite transformation temperature and to lower hardenability corresponding to hardening from the temperature of previous overheating

  1. A non-linear kinematic hardening function

    Ottosen, N.S.

    1977-05-01

    Based on the classical theory of plasticity, and accepting the von Mises criterion as the initial yield criterion, a non-linear kinematic hardening function applicable both to Melan-Prager's and to Ziegler's hardening rule is proposed. This non-linear hardening function is determined by means of the uniaxial stress-strain curve, and any such curve is applicable. The proposed hardening function considers the problem of general reversed loading, and a smooth change in the behaviour from one plastic state to another nearlying plastic state is obtained. A review of both the kinematic hardening theory and the corresponding non-linear hardening assumptions is given, and it is shown that material behaviour is identical whether Melan-Prager's or Ziegler's hardening rule is applied, provided that the von Mises yield criterion is adopted. (author)

  2. Radiation hardening of semiconductor parts

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of total-ionizing-dose and single-event hardening techniques and should be used as a guide to a range of research publications. It should be stressed that there is no clear and simple route to a radiation-tolerant silicon integrated circuit. What works for one fabrication process may not work for another, and there are many complex interactions within individual processes and designs. The authors have attempted to highlight the most important factors and those process changes which should bring improved hardness. The main point is that radiation-hardening as a procedure must be approached in a methodical fashion and with a good understanding of the response mechanisms involved

  3. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  4. Radiation-hardened control system

    Vandermolen, R.I.; Smith, S.F.; Emery, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A radiation-hardened bit-slice control system with associated input/output circuits was developed to prove that programmable circuits could be constructed to successfully implement intelligent functions in a highly radioactive environment. The goal for this effort was to design and test a programmable control system that could withstand a minimum total dose of 10 7 rads (gamma). The Radiation Hardened Control System (RHCS) was tested in operation at a dose rate that ranged up to 135 krad/h, with an average total dose of 10.75 Mrads. Further testing beyond the required 10 7 rads was also conducted. RHCS performed properly through the target dose of 10 7 rads, and sporadic intermittent failures in some programmable logic devices were noted after ∼ 13 Mrads

  5. Energetic model of metal hardening

    Ignatova O.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on Bailey hypothesis on the link between strain hardening and elastic lattice defect energy this paper suggests a shear strength energetic model that takes into consideration plastic strain intensity and rate as well as softening related to temperature annealing and dislocation annihilation. Metal strain hardening was demonstrated to be determined only by elastic strain energy related to the energy of accumulated defects. It is anticipated that accumulation of the elastic energy of defects is governed by plastic work. The suggested model has a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data for copper up to P = 70 GPa , for aluminum up to P = 10 GPa and for tantalum up to P = 20 GPa.

  6. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  7. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  8. Innovative process routes for a high-quality concrete recycling in the aggregates and cement industries

    Bru , Kathy; Menard , Yannick; Touzé , Solène; Le Moign , Alain; Poirier , Jean Eric; Ruffié , Gilles; Bonnaudin , Fabrice; Von Der Weid , Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Hardened concrete is a composite material that contains two main phases: the matrix (hardened cement paste, 20 %) and aggregates (gravels and sand, 80 %). The liberation and the recycling of these constituents can provide an answer to i) the exploration of new aggregates supply sources imposed by the depletion of natural deposit and the faced difficulties when trying to open new quarries and ii) the reduction of CO2 emissions in the clinker manufacturing process throug...

  9. Evaluation of neutron shielding made of cement type material

    Seshimo, Takuya; Nagai, Takayuki; Onose, Atsushi; Takuma, Yasuhisa; Tanuma, Hiroyuki; Otagawa, Masaaki

    1998-01-01

    We prepared boron-containing cement and evaluated the characteristics of this new cement. This is the material of neutron shielding which is lighter than existing one. The quality we aimed is: H ≥ 0.025 g/cm 3 , B ≥ 0.065 g/cm 3 , density ≤ 1.70 g/cm 3 . We made test pieces changing water powder ratio (W/P), adding amount of air entraining agent, adding amount of water reducing agent, and time of vibration, and then, evaluated the characteristics. The measured parameters are the air content, mortar flow and homogeneity for cement mortar, homogeneity and compressive strength for hardened one. From the results of these tests, we confirmed the possibility of making neutron shielding that can satisfy the aimed quality using this boron-containing cement. After all, we established the method of making the neutron shielding, and this method was used in the construction of RETF. (author)

  10. Producing cement

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  11. Induction Hardening of External Gear

    Bukanin, V. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Zenkov, A. E.; Vologdin, V. V.; Vologdin, V. V., Jr.

    2018-03-01

    Problems and solution of gear induction hardening are described. Main attention is paid to the parameters of heating and cooling systems. ELTA 7.0 program has been used to obtain the required electrical parameters of inductor, power sources, resonant circuits, as well as to choose the quenching media. Comparison of experimental and calculated results of investigation is provided. In order to compare advantages and disadvantages of single- and dual-frequency heating processes, many variants of these technologies were simulated. The predicted structure and hardness of steel gears are obtained by use of the ELTA data base taken into account the Continuous Cooling Transformation diagrams.

  12. A Novel Radiation Hardened CAM

    Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This poster describes an innovative Content Addressable Memory cell with radiation hardened (RH-CAM) architecture. The RH-CAM is designed in a commercial 28 nm CMOS technology. The circuit has been simulated in worst-case conditions, and the effects due to single particles are analyzed injecting a fault current into a circuit node. The proposed architecture can perform on-time pattern recognition tasks in harsh environments, such as very front-end electronics in hadron colliders and in space applications.

  13. Optimization of resistively hardened latches

    Gagne, G.; Savaria, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The design of digital circuits tolerant to single-event upsets is considered. The results of a study are presented on which an analytical model was used to predict the behavior of a standard resistively hardened latch. It is shown that a worst case analysis for all possible single-event upset situations (on the latch or in the logic) can be derived from studying the effects of a transient disturbed write cycle. The existence of an intrinsic minimum write period to tolerate a transient of a given duration is also demonstrated

  14. Kinetics of strength gain of biocidal cements

    Rodin Aleksandr Ivanovich

    Full Text Available Biocorrosion becomes the determinative durability factor of buildings and constructions. Damages of construction materials caused by bacteria, filamentous fungi, actinomycetes constitute a serious danger to the constructions of a building or a structure and to the health of people. Biodeteriorations are typical both in old and new constructions. A great quantity of destruction factors of industrial and residential buildings under the influence of microorganisms was established in practice. Providing products and constructions based on concretes fungicidal and bactericidal properties is an important direction of modern construction material science. The most efficient way to solve this task is creation of biocidal cements. The article presents the results of experimental studies of kinetic dependences of strength gain by biocidal cements by physico-mechanical and physico-chemical analysis methods. The identical velocity character of initial hydration of the developed compositions of biocidal cements is set, as well as a more calm behavior of hardening processes at later terms. It has been established that the compositions of biocidal cements modified by sodium sulfate and sodium fluoride possess the greatest strength.

  15. Calcium phosphate cement scaffolds with PLGA fibers.

    Vasconcellos, Letícia Araújo; dos Santos, Luís Alberto

    2013-04-01

    The use of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials has revolutionized current orthopedics and dentistry in repairing damaged parts of the skeletal system. Among those biomaterials, the cement made of hydraulic grip calcium phosphate has attracted great interest due to its biocompatibility and hardening "in situ". However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared with the bones of the human body. In the present work, we have studied the attainment of calcium phosphate cement powders and their addition to poly (co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibers to increase mechanical properties of those cements. We have used a new method that obtains fibers by dripping different reagents. PLGA fibers were frozen after lyophilized. With this new method, which was patented, it was possible to obtain fibers and reinforcing matrix which furthered the increase of mechanical properties, thus allowing the attainment of more resistant materials. The obtained materials were used in the construction of composites and scaffolds for tissue growth, keeping a higher mechanical integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of radon and thoron exhalation from Indian cement samples using smart radon and thoron monitors

    Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K; Agarwal, T.K.; Babu, D.A.R.

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that primarily, there exist two important sources that contribute to indoor radon/thoron namely, the exhalation from ground and building materials. The contribution from ground, although significant, is treated as a case of existing exposure. Then, the only source that can be controlled during the construction is the choice of building materials. Cement is an important building material used in the construction of houses and buildings in India. The housing sector is the largest cement consumer with 53% of the total Indian cement demand followed by the infrastructure sector. India with a production capacity of 165 million tones (MT) (in 2007), was the second largest cement producer in the world after China. The industry produces various types of cement like ordinary portland cement (OPC), Portland pozzolana cement (PPC), portland slag cement (PSC), rapid hardening portland cement (RHPC), sulphate resistant cement (SRC) and white cement (WC). Several studies have been undertaken on cement in various countries because it is commonly used in bulk quantities in the construction of houses and other civil structures. However, detailed information regarding the radon and thoron exhalation into indoor air from various types of cements produced in India is scarce. In the present work, an attempt has been made to systematically determine the radon and thoron exhalation from 50 cement samples (17 OPC, 15 PPC, 04 PSC, 06 RHPC, 04 WC and 04 SRC). The data thus obtained is used to calculate the indoor radon and thoron source term and the contributed inhalation dose based on a model room structure. The measured values of radon and thoron exhalation from cement samples were comparable with the reported values in other countries. This study showed that the cement samples used in civil constructions do not pose any radiological hazard to the Indian population. (author)

  17. Instabilities in power law gradient hardening materials

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    Tension and compression instabilities are investigated for specimens with dimensions in the micron range. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is implemented in a finite element scheme capable of modeling power law hardening materials. Effects...... of gradient hardening are found to delay the onset of localization under plane strain tension, and significantly reduce strain gradients in the localized zone. For plane strain compression gradient hardening is found to increase the load-carrying capacity significantly....

  18. Influence of Cooling Condition on the Performance of Grinding Hardened Layer in Grind-hardening

    Wang, G. C.; Chen, J.; Xu, G. Y.; Li, X.

    2018-02-01

    45# steel was grinded and hardened on a surface grinding machine to study the effect of three different cooling media, including emulsion, dry air and liquid nitrogen, on the microstructure and properties of the hardened layer. The results show that the microstructure of material surface hardened with emulsion is pearlite and no hardened layer. The surface roughness is small and the residual stress is compressive stress. With cooling condition of liquid nitrogen and dry air, the specimen surface are hardened, the organization is martensite, the surface roughness is also not changed, but high hardness of hardened layer and surface compressive stress were obtained when grinding using liquid nitrogen. The deeper hardened layer grinded with dry air was obtained and surface residual stress is tensile stress. This study provides an experimental basis for choosing the appropriate cooling mode to effectively control the performance of grinding hardened layer.

  19. Ground improvement using soil–cement columns: Experimental investigation

    Ahmed Farouk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of heavy structures on soils of low relative density is a challenging task. The inclusion of soil–cement columns produced by the deep mixing method is one of the soil stabilizing techniques that could be applied successfully to overcome this challenge. Nevertheless, this technique did not receive a considerable attention in Egypt yet. In the first part of this study, two different natural silty sand soils extracted from the Delta of the River Nile were mixed with cement to prepare samples of different cement doses and different water cement ratios. After curing, the hardened samples were tested and their unconfined compressive strength was investigated. The second part of this study investigates the interaction between a strip footing model and Nile deltaic soil improved by a group of soil–cement columns. Results of the first part of this study showed that the compressive strength of the investigated Nile delta soils could be increased even at lower values of cement doses. Results extracted from the second part of this study showed that a considerable settlement reduction up to 80% could be achieved depending on both the number and the length of the soil–cement columns that is used to improve the soil.

  20. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  1. Effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer on the hydration characteristics of portland cement pastes

    Safaa.M. El Gamal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (modified lignosulphonate base on the hydration characteristics of hardened Portland cement pastes were studied at different curing conditions. Four mixtures were prepared using 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 wt% addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (SR of cement. These pastes were hydrated under two different conditions; (i normal curing at room temperature; 25 °C up to 90 days periods and (ii hydrothermal curing at a pressure of 8 atm. of saturated steam up to 24 h. The compressive strength, combined water content, free lime content, gel/space ratio and microstructure of hardened cement pastes were studied. The results revealed that addition of SR superplasticizer promote the dispersion of cement particles and interacts with Ca(OH2. The addition of SR superplasticizer exhibits Portland cement better workability during the preparation of pastes. In addition, amore compact structure were obtained leading to higher values of compressive strength for all the hardened hydrated pastes under both normal and hydrothermal curing. The results indicated that the addition of SR superplasticizer to Portland cement does not alter the types of hydration products formed during normal or hydrothermal conditions; only it caused a decrease in the degree of the porosity of the formed pastes.

  2. Radioactivity of bone cement

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  3. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  4. Elution behavior of heavy metals from cement solidified products of incinerated ash waste - 59102

    Meguro, Yoshihiro; Kawato, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Takuya; Tomioka, Osamu; Mitsuda, Motoyuki

    2012-01-01

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose radioactive incinerated ash waste. In order to bury the solidified product, it is required that elution of hazardous heavy metals included in the ash from the solidified products is inhibited. In this study, the elution behavior of the heavy metals from the synthetic solidified products, which included Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cr(VI) and were prepared using ordinary portland cement (OPC), blast furnace slag cement (BFS), or a cement material that showed low alkalinity (LA-Cement), was investigated. Several chemicals and materials were added as additive agents to prevent the elution of the heavy metals. When OPC was used, Cd elution was inhibited, but Pb and Cr were not enough even using the additive agent examined. FeSO 4 and Na 2 S additive agents worked effective to inhibit elution of Cr. When BFS was used, the elution of Pb, Cd and Cr was inhibited for the all products prepared. In the case of LA-Cement, the elution of Pb and Cd was inhibited for the all products, but only the product that was added FeSO 4 showed good result of the elution of Cr. (authors)

  5. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  6. The influence of shrinkage-cracking on the drying behaviour of White Portland cement using Single-Point Imaging (SPI).

    Beyea, S D; Balcom, B J; Bremner, T W; Prado, P J; Cross, A R; Armstrong, R L; Grattan-Bellew, P E

    1998-11-01

    The removal of water from pores in hardened cement paste smaller than 50 nm results in cracking of the cement matrix due to the tensile stresses induced by drying shrinkage. Cracks in the matrix fundamentally alter the permeability of the material, and therefore directly affect the drying behaviour. Using Single-Point Imaging (SPI), we obtain one-dimensional moisture profiles of hydrated White Portland cement cylinders as a function of drying time. The drying behaviour of White Portland cement, is distinctly different from the drying behaviour of related concrete materials containing aggregates.

  7. Hardening of niobium alloys at precrystallization annealing

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Niobium base alloys were investigated. It is shown that precrystallization annealing of niobium-molybdenum, niobium-vanadium and niobium-zirconium alloys elevates much more sufficiently their resistance to microplastic strains, than to macroplastic strains. Hardening effect differs sufficiently for different alloys. The maximal hardening is observed for niobium-vanadium alloys, the minimal one - for niobium-zirconium alloys

  8. Radiation hardening of integrated circuits technologies

    Auberton-Herve, A.J.; Leray, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation hardening studies started in the mid decade -1960-1970. To survive the different military or space radiative environment, a new engineering science borned, to understand the degradation of electronics components. The different solutions to improve the electronic behavior in such environment, have been named radiation hardening of the technologies. Improvement of existing technologies, and qualification method have been widely studied. However, at the other hand, specific technologies was developped : The Silicon On Insulator technologies for CMOS or Bipolar. The HSOI3HD technology (supported by DGA-CEA DAM and LETI with THOMSON TMS) offers today the highest hardening level for the integration density of hundreds of thousand transistors on the same silicon. Full complex systems would be realized on a single die with a technological radiation hardening and no more system hardening

  9. Challenges in hardening technologies using shallow-trench isolation

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Dodd, P.E.; Draper, B.L.; Flores, R.S.

    1998-02-01

    Challenges related to radiation hardening CMOS technologies with shallow-trench isolation are explored. Results show that trench hardening can be more difficult than simply replacing the trench isolation oxide with a hardened field oxide

  10. Comparison of Thermal Creep Strain Calculation Results Using Time Hardening and Strain Hardening Rules

    Kim, Junehyung; Cheon, Jinsik; Lee, Byoungoon; Lee, Chanbock

    2014-01-01

    One of the design criteria for the fuel rod in PGSFR is the thermal creep strain of the cladding, because the cladding is exposed to a high temperature for a long time during reactor operation period. In general, there are two kind of calculation scheme for thermal creep strain: time hardening and strain hardening rules. In this work, thermal creep strain calculation results for HT9 cladding by using time hardening and strain hardening rules are compared by employing KAERI's current metallic fuel performance analysis code, MACSIS. Also, thermal creep strain calculation results by using ANL's metallic fuel performance analysis code, LIFE-METAL which adopts strain hardening rule are compared with those by using MACSIS. Thermal creep strain calculation results for HT9 cladding by using time hardening and strain hardening rules were compared by employing KAERI's current metallic fuel performance analysis code, MACSIS. Also, thermal creep strain calculation results by using ANL's metallic fuel performance analysis code, LIFE-METAL which adopts strain hardening rule were compared with those by using MACSIS. Tertiary creep started earlier in time hardening rule than in strain hardening rule. Also, calculation results by MACSIS with strain hardening and those obtained by using LIFE-METAL were almost identical to each other

  11. Electron beam hardened paint binder

    Johnson, O.B.; Labana, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a paint binder hardened by the effect of electron beams (0.1-100 Mrad/sec). It consists of a dispersion of (A) an ethylenic unsaturated material in (B) at least one vinyl monomer. The component (A) in a reaction product of degraded rubber particles (0.1-4 μm) and an ethylenic unsaturated component with a reactive epoxy, hydroxy or carboxy group which is bonded to the rubber particles by ester or urethane compounds. The rubber particles possess a nucleus and a cross-linked elastomeric acryl polymer, an outer shell with reactive groups and an intermediate layer formed by the monomers of the nucleus and the shell. The manner of production is described in great detail and supplemented by 157 examples. The coatings are suitable to coat articles which will be subject to deformation. (UWI) [de

  12. Radiation hardening of smart electronics

    Mayo, C.W.; Cain, V.R.; Marks, K.A.; Millward, D.G.

    1991-02-01

    Microprocessor based ''smart'' pressure, level, and flow transmitters were tested to determine the radiation hardness of this class of electronic instrumentation for use in reactor building applications. Commercial grade Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits used in these transmitters were found to fail at total gamma dose levels between 2500 and 10,000 rad. This results in an unacceptably short lifetime in many reactor building radiation environments. Radiation hardened integrated circuits can, in general, provide satisfactory service life for normal reactor operations when not restricted to the extremely low power budget imposed by standard 4--20 mA two-wire instrument loops. The design of these circuits will require attention to vendor radiation hardness specifications, dose rates, process control with respect to radiation hardness factors, and non-volatile programmable memory technology. 3 refs., 2 figs

  13. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  15. Effect of Lime Powder and Metakaolin on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Self Compacting Concrete

    Rizwan Ahmad Khan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the fresh and hardened properties of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC with different types and amounts of admixtures. Six mixes were prepared by replacing 30% of cement with different percentages of fly ash (FA, lime powder (LP and metakaolin (MK. Water- Cement ratio was kept constant at 0.41 and superplasticizer dosage of 1% by weight of cement. The filling and passing ability were investigated through Slump Flow, J-Ring, V-funnel and L-box test before filling the moulds. The compressive strength of hardened SCC cubes was also measured after specified days of curing (7, 14, 28, 60 & 90 days. The workability test results showed that as FA was replaced by increasing percentages of LP and MK, the mixes became dense and hence less workable. It was observed that the compressive strength showed an increase with increasing percentage replacement of FA with LP and MK. This increase was higher for mixes with MK than that of mixes with LP.

  16. Use of red mud as addition for portland cement mortars

    Ribeiro, D.V.; Morelli, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the possibility of adding red mud, an alkaline leaching waste that is obtained from bauxite during the Bayer process for alumina production, in the raw meal of Portland cement mortars. The red mud is classified as dangerous, according to NBR 10004/2004, and world while generation reached over 117 million tons/year. This huge production requires high consuming products to be used as incorporation matrix and we studied the influence of red mud addition on the characteristics of cement mortars and concrete. In this paper the properties of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of red mud was evaluated: pH variation, fresh (setting time, workability or normal consistency and water retention), and hardened state (mechanical strength, capillary water absorption, density and apparent porosity). Results seem promising for red mud additions up to 20 wt%. (author)

  17. Heavyweight cement concrete with high stability of strength parameters

    Kudyakov, Konstantin; Nevsky, Andrey; Danke, Ilia; Kudyakov, Aleksandr; Kudyakov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    The present paper establishes regularities of basalt fibers distribution in movable cement concrete mixes under different conditions of their preparation and their selective introduction into mixer during the mixing process. The optimum content of basalt fibers was defined as 0.5% of the cement weight, which provides a uniform distribution of fibers in the concrete volume. It allows increasing compressive strength up to 51.2% and increasing tensile strength up to 28.8%. Micro-structural analysis identified new formations on the surface of basalt fibers, which indicates the good adhesion of hardened cement paste to the fibers. Stability of concrete strength parameters has significantly increased with introduction of basalt fibers into concrete mix.

  18. Setting temperature evolution of nitrate radwaste immobilized in ordinary portland cement

    Rzyski, B.M.; Suarez, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Materials based on hydraulic cements such as ordinary Portland cement (OPC) have many applications in the radioactive waste disposal field. Cement hydration process is an exothermic reaction and can cause a considerable temperature rise in the cemented waste form. Specially when large blocks of waste forms are produced it is necessary to have some information about the temperature build up which occurs inside the mass, because this effect may have some influences on the ultimate properties of the hardened cement paste. This temperature rise cause expansion while the cement paste is hardening. When the cooling process takes place, to the surrounding temperature, crackings and contractions may then occur. Whether cracking arise it depends both on the magnitude of the temperature induced stress and on the capacity of the mixture to accommodate the strain. This paper compares the temperature growth in pastes into two different geometries: one uses a waste container with 3.8 dm 3 (one US gallon) capacity placed inside a 0.21 m 3 (55 gallons) concrete lined drum, which acts as a radiation shielding, and the other the same container placed in ambient at room temperature. Correlations between the time of temperature occurrence, maximum temperature, the water to cement ratio and salt content were observed

  19. Influence of Cellulosic Fibres on the Physical Properties of Fibre Cement Composites

    Hospodarova, V.; Stevulova, N.; Vaclavik, V.; Dvorsky, T.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, there are new approaches directing to processing of non-conventional fibre-cement composites for application in the housing construction. Vegetable cellulosic fibres coming from natural resources used as reinforcement in cost-effective and environmental friendly building products are in the spotlight. The applying of natural fibres in cement based composites is narrowly linked to the ecological building sector, where a choice of materials is based on components including recyclable, renewable raw materials and low-resource manufacture techniques. In this paper, two types of cellulosic fibres coming from wood pulp and recycled waste paper with 0.2%; 0.3% and 0.5% of fibre addition into cement mixtures were used. Differences in the physical characteristics (flowability, density, coefficient of thermal conductivity and water absorbability) of 28 days hardened fibre-cement composites are investigated. Addition of cellulosic fibres to cement mixture caused worsening the workability of fresh mixture as well as absorbability of hardened composites due to hydrophilic nature of biomaterial, whereas density and thermal conductivity of manufactured cement based fibre plaster are enhanced. The physical properties of cement plasters based on cellulosic fibres depend on structural, physical characteristics of cellulosic fibres, their nature and processing.

  20. Properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag

    Kourounis, S.; Tsivilis, S.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Papadimitriou, G.D.; Tsibouki, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The present research study investigates the properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag, a by-product of the conversion process of iron to steel. For this purpose, a reference sample and three cements containing up to 45% w/w steel slag were tested. The steel slag fraction used was the '0-5 mm', due to its high content in calcium silicate phases. Initial and final setting time, standard consistency, flow of normal mortar, autoclave expansion and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days were measured. The hydrated products were identified by X-ray diffraction while the non-evaporable water was determined by TGA. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that slag can be used in the production of composite cements of the strength classes 42.5 and 32.5 of EN 197-1. In addition, the slag cements present satisfactory physical properties. The steel slag slows down the hydration of the blended cements, due to the morphology of contained C 2 S and its low content in calcium silicates

  1. Properties of cement based composites modified using diatomaceous earth

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Diatomite belongs among natural materials rich on amorphous silica (a-SiO2). When finely milled, it can potentially substitute part of cement binder and positively support formation of more dense composite structure. In this connection, two types of diatomaceous earth applied as a partial substitution of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mass% of Portland cement in the composition of cement paste were studied. In the tested mixtures with cement blends, the amount of batch water remained same, with water/binder ratio 0.5. For fresh paste mixtures, initial and final setting times were measured. First, hardened pastes cured 28 days in water were characterized by their physical properties such as bulk density, matrix density and open porosity. Then, their mechanical and thermophysical parameters were assessed. Obtained results gave clear evidence of setting time shortening for pastes with diatomite what brought negative effect with respect to the impaired workability of fresh mixtures. On the other hand, there was observed strength improvement for mixtures containing diatomite with higher amount of SiO2. Here, the increase in mechanical resistivity was distinct up to 15 mass% of cement replacement. Higher cement substitution by diatomite resulted in an increase in porosity and thus improvement of thermal insulation properties.

  2. Brittle and ductile adjustable cement derived from calcium phosphate cement/polyacrylic acid composites.

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ju, Chien-Ping; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Chern Lin, Jiin-Huey

    2008-12-01

    Bone filler has been used over the years in dental and biomedical applications. The present work is to characterize a non-dispersive, fast setting, modulus adjustable, high bioresorbable composite bone cement derived from calcium phosphate-based cement combined with polymer and binding agents. This cement, we hope, will not swell in simulated body fluid and keep the osteogenetic properties of the dry bone and avoid its disadvantages of being brittle. We developed a calcium phosphate cement (CPC) of tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (TTCP/DCPA)-polyacrylic acid with tartaric acid, calcium fluoride additives and phosphate hardening solution. The results show that while composite, the hard-brittle properties of 25wt% polyacrylic acid are proportional to CPC and mixing with additives is the same as those of the CPC without polyacrylic acid added. With an increase of polyacrylic acid/CPC ratio, the 67wt% samples revealed ductile-tough properties and 100wt% samples kept ductile or elastic properties after 24h of immersion. The modulus range of this development was from 200 to 2600MPa after getting immersed in simulated body fluid for 24h. The TTCP/DCPA-polyacrylic acid based CPC demonstrates adjustable brittle/ductile strength during setting and after immersion, and the final reaction products consist of high bioresorbable monetite/brushite/calcium fluoride composite with polyacrylic acid.

  3. Laser Surface Hardening of Groove Edges

    Hussain, A.; Hamdani, A. H.; Akhter, R.; Aslam, M.

    2013-06-01

    Surface hardening of groove-edges made of 3Cr13 Stainless Steel has been carried out using 500 W CO2 laser with a rectangular beam of 2.5×3 mm2. The processing speed was varied from 150-500 mm/min. It was seen that the hardened depth increases with increase in laser interaction time. A maximum hardened depth of around 1mm was achieved. The microhardness of the transformed zone was 2.5 times the hardness of base metal. The XRD's and microstructural analysis were also reported.

  4. Geo-environmental application of municipal solid waste incinerator ash stabilized with cement

    Davinder Singh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of soluble salts contained in the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI ash significantly affects the strength development and hardening reaction when stabilized with cement. The present study focuses on the compaction and strength behavior of mixed specimens of cement and MSWI ash. A series of indices such as unconfined compressive strength, split tensile strength, California bearing ratio (CBR and pH value was examined. Prior to this, the specimens were cured for 7 d, 14 d, and 28 d. The test results depict that the maximum dry density (MDD decreases and the optimum moisture content (OMC increases with the addition of cement. The test results also reveal that the cement increases the strength of the mixed specimens. Thus, the combination of MSWI ash and cement can be used as a lightweight filling material in different structures like embankment and road construction.

  5. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  6. Influence of citric acid as setting retarder in CPV portland cement pastes and mortars

    Mendes, B.C.; Lopes, M.M.S.; Alvarenga, R.C.S.S.; Fassoni, D.P.; Pedroti, L.G.; Azevedo, A.R.G. de

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to study the availability of using and the influence of citric acid in the properties of pastes and mortars made with Portland cement CPV ARI both in fresh and hardened form. The citric acid dosages were 0, 0.4%, and 0.8% relative to the cement mass. The produced cement pastes were tested to determine normal consistency water and initial and final setting times. Mortars were tested to determine the consistency index, specific gravity, air entrained content in the fresh stage, hardened bulk density, compressive strength at ages 7, 14, and 28 days, and analysis by XRD technique. The results show that citric acid, besides improve the mortar workability, contribute to an increase in mechanical strength in older than 14 days. (author)

  7. Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge.

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Juu-En

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic β-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The microstructural origin of work hardening stages

    Hughes, D. A.; Hansen, N.

    2018-01-01

    The strain evolution of the flow stress and work hardening rate in stages III and IV is explored by utilizing a fully described deformation microstructure. Extensive measurements by transmission electron microscopy reveal a hierarchical subdivision of grains by low angle incidental dislocation...... addition of the classical Taylor and Hall-Petch formulations. Model predictions agree closely with experimental values of flow stress and work hardening rate in stages III and IV. Strong connections between the evolutionary stages of the deformation microstructure and work hardening rates create a new...... (modern) basis for the classic problem of work hardening in metals and alloys. These connections lead the way for the future development of ultra high strength ductile metals produced via plastic deformation.(c) 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Influence of additives for concrete on the containment of radio-elements and strength under radiation of 'cement' matrices

    Pholvichith epouse Lezane, Ammala

    1994-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of cement-based materials used for the storage of radioactive wastes, fluidizers are generally introduced into these materials during their preparation. Thus, Naphtalene Sulfonate Formaldehyde (NSF) and Melamine Sulfonate Formaldehyde (MSF) are used as fluidizers in concrete which therefore presents good rheological properties when fresh, and a high compactness when hardened. This research study aims at investigating what happens to the fluidizer in a hardened cement paste, how this fluidizer affects the durability (mechanical strength, porosity, apparent diffusion coefficient) of a cement paste in absence of irradiation, what is the behaviour of these organic compounds under irradiation (reticulation or degradation, nature of radiolysis gases), how these organic compounds affects the durability (dimension, porosity, mechanical strength) of a cement paste under cobalt 60 gamma radiation, and how apparent solubilities of the different isotopes vary in cement water in presence of these organic compounds [fr

  10. COMPLEX SURFACE HARDENING OF STEEL ARTICLES

    A. V. Kovalchuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of complex surface hardening of steel detailswas designed. The method is a compound of two processes of hardening: chemical heat treatment and physical vapor deposition (PVD of the coating. The result, achieved in this study is much higher, than in other work on this topic and is cumulative. The method designed can be used in mechanical engineering, medicine, energetics and is perspective for military and space technologies.

  11. Development of low-activation design method for reduction of radioactive waste (4). Development of low-activation cement

    Ichitsubo, Koki; Tanosaki, Takao; Miura, Keiichi; Tomotake, Hiroichi; Yamada, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideki; Kinno, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Akira

    2008-01-01

    When nuclear plants will reach to decommission stage, a huge amount of concrete should be disposed as radioactive waste. To reduce the amount of radioactive concrete, the most effective methodology is not to use the materials of high radionuclide content such as coal ash and blast furnace slag, and to use limestone as additives or aggregate. However, concrete uses Portland cement for hardening, therefore, it is difficult to reduce the amount of radioactive concrete unless radionuclide content in cement is reduced. So in this study, we tried to develop the new type of Low-activation cement by reducing of radionuclide as europium and cobalt. As a result, we could reduce the amount of europium and cobalt in cement significantly, and obtained the result that the new cements can reduce radioactivity to one-third or less against commercially Portland cement in Japan. (author)

  12. Durability of blended cements in contact with sulfate-bearing ground water

    Duerden, S.L.; Majumdar, A.J.; Walton, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    In the concept of radioactive waste disposal developed in the UK (United Kingdom), OPC (ordinary portland cement) blended with pulverized fuel ash or ground granulated blastfurnace slag is being considered for encapsulation of waste forms, as a material for backfilling and sealing a repository, and for concrete in repository construction. This paper describes a laboratory study of the long term durability of such cements in contact with sulfate-bearing ground water under accelerated exposure conditions. Mineralogical analysis of the cements over the exposure period, carried out with the aid of scanning electron microscope observations and x-ray diffraction studies, provides an indication of the stability of cementitious phases exposed to an aggressive environment. It is shown that for intact cement blocks there is minimal interaction between cement and sulfate-bearing ground water. Sulfate minerals produced by the reaction are accommodated in voids in the cement with no adverse effect on the cement structure. However, crystallization of C-S-H and sulfate minerals along cracks in hardened cement specimens causes expansion of fracture surfaces resulting in a more accessible route for ground water intrusion and radionuclide migration. The reaction of cement with ground water is greatly accelerated by the use of powdered material. Ettringite formed in the reaction is found to be unstable under these conditions. The mineralogical assemblage after exposure for 1 year is calcite, hydrotalcite, C-S-H and quartz

  13. Advanced cementation concepts

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  14. Preparation of hydraulic cement

    1921-08-28

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cement by the use of oil-shale residues is characterized in that the oil-shale refuse is mixed with granular basic blast-furnace slag and a small amount of portland cement and ground together.

  15. Low force cementation.

    Wilson, P R

    1996-07-01

    The marginal adaptation of full coverage restorations is adversely affected by the introduction of luting agents of various minimum film thicknesses during the cementation process. The increase in the marginal opening may have long-term detrimental effects on the health of both pulpal and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying seating forces (2.5, 12.5, 25 N), venting, and cement types on post-cementation marginal elevation in cast crowns. A standardized cement space of 40 microns was provided between a machined gold crown and a stainless steel die. An occlusal vent was placed that could be opened or closed. The post-cementation crown elevation was measured, following the use of two commercially available capsulated dental cements (Phosphacap, and Ketac-cem Applicap). The results indicate that only the combination of Ketac-Cem Applicap and crown venting produced post-cementation crown elevation of less than 20 microns when 12.5 N seating force was used. Higher forces (25 N) and venting were required for comparable seating when using Phosphacap (19 microns). The amount of force required to allow maximum seating of cast crowns appears to be cement specific, and is reduced by effective venting procedures.

  16. Cementation process study

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Ahn, S.J.; Choi, K.S.; Lee, M.W.; Ryu, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the cementation process study, in 1984, design of the waste treatment simulator was finished for the first step. We can experience not only the operation of solidification system but the design and construction of comming large scale plant through the design of cementation process. (Author)

  17. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W.; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-01-01

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by 27 Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite

  18. The secondary hardening phenomenon in strain-hardened MP35N alloy

    Asgari, S.; El-Danaf, E.; Shaji, E.; Kalidindi, S.R.; Doherty, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanical testing and microscopy techniques were used to investigate the influence of aging on the structure and strengthening of MP35N alloy. It was confirmed that aging the deformed material at 600 C for 4 h provided additional strengthening, here referred to as secondary hardening, in addition to the primary strain hardening. The secondary hardening phenomenon was shown to be distinctly different from typical age hardening processes in that it only occurred in material deformed beyond a certain cold work level. At moderate strains, aging caused a shift in the entire stress-strain curve of the annealed material to higher stresses while at high strains, it produced shear localization and limited work softening. The secondary hardening increment was also found to be grain size dependent. The magnitude of the secondary hardening appeared to be controlled by the flow stress in the strain hardened material. A model is proposed to explain the observations and is supported by direct experimental evidence. The model is based on formation of h.c.p. nuclei through the Suzuki mechanism, that is segregation of solute atoms to stacking faults, on aging the strain hardened material. The h.c.p. precipitates appear to thicken only in the presence of high dislocation density produced by prior cold work

  19. Fixation of calcined waste by bituminization or cementation

    Napravnik, J.; Kyrs, M.; Ditl, P.

    1983-01-01

    The overall concept is given of the combination of calcination with fixation into bitumen, cement etc. The design is shown of a calciner with the capacity of 10 L/h which was tested on real radioactive wastes for 2000 h. The geometrical and operating parameters of the apparatus have been optimized based on a statistical evaluation of the experiments. Wastes containing nitrates are calcined at 300-550 deg. C, yielding oxides. Wastes containing sulphates, carbonates, KMnO 4 , or borates are calcined at 150-330 deg. C, yielding soluble salts. The content of H 3 BO 4 and Na 2 B 4 O 7 and in some cases of sulphates in the calcinate retards hardening of the mixture with cement. Nitrates and detergents also interfere. The effect of the above components on the products mixed with bitumen is much less. Detergents can be decomposed at 200-300 deg. C; organic acids can be reacted with A1 salts to form insoluble substances lowering the leaching rate of Sr and Cs; small amounts of SiO 2 eliminate the effect of borates on cement hardening. The drawbacks of bituminization with bitumen emulsions are the complicated preparation of the emulsion, higher leaching rate of the product and low stability of the emulsion against breaking. The leachability was determined (1-50 days) of different products containing LWR wastes: 33% of concentrated waste in cement of calcination product stabilized with PVA exhibit approx. 8x10 - 3 g/cm 2 per day, 33% of calcine in cement approx. 3x10 - 3 ; 40% concentrate fixed with bitumen emulsion approx. 9x10 - 4 ; 50% calcine stabilized with PVA in bitumen, pilot-plant scale approx. 2x10 - 5 ; the same but on a laboratory scale approx. 1.10 - 5 . (author)

  20. Utilization of Palm Oil Clinker as Cement Replacement Material.

    Kanadasan, Jegathish; Abdul Razak, Hashim

    2015-12-16

    The utilization of waste materials from the palm oil industry provides immense benefit to various sectors of the construction industry. Palm oil clinker is a by-product from the processing stages of palm oil goods. Channelling this waste material into the building industry helps to promote sustainability besides overcoming waste disposal problems. Environmental pollution due to inappropriate waste management system can also be drastically reduced. In this study, cement was substituted with palm oil clinker powder as a binder material in self-compacting mortar. The fresh, hardened and microstructure properties were evaluated throughout this study. In addition, sustainability component analysis was also carried out to assess the environmental impact of introducing palm oil clinker powder as a replacement material for cement. It can be inferred that approximately 3.3% of cement production can be saved by substituting palm oil clinker powder with cement. Reducing the utilization of cement through a high substitution level of this waste material will also help to reduce carbon emissions by 52%. A cleaner environment free from pollutants can be created to ensure healthier living. Certain industries may benefit through the inclusion of this waste material as the cost and energy consumption of the product can be minimized.

  1. Utilization of Palm Oil Clinker as Cement Replacement Material

    Jegathish Kanadasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of waste materials from the palm oil industry provides immense benefit to various sectors of the construction industry. Palm oil clinker is a by-product from the processing stages of palm oil goods. Channelling this waste material into the building industry helps to promote sustainability besides overcoming waste disposal problems. Environmental pollution due to inappropriate waste management system can also be drastically reduced. In this study, cement was substituted with palm oil clinker powder as a binder material in self-compacting mortar. The fresh, hardened and microstructure properties were evaluated throughout this study. In addition, sustainability component analysis was also carried out to assess the environmental impact of introducing palm oil clinker powder as a replacement material for cement. It can be inferred that approximately 3.3% of cement production can be saved by substituting palm oil clinker powder with cement. Reducing the utilization of cement through a high substitution level of this waste material will also help to reduce carbon emissions by 52%. A cleaner environment free from pollutants can be created to ensure healthier living. Certain industries may benefit through the inclusion of this waste material as the cost and energy consumption of the product can be minimized.

  2. Simultaneous surface engineering and bulk hardening of precipitation hardening stainless steel

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses simultaneous bulk precipitation hardening and low temperature surface engineering of two commercial precipitation hardening stainless steels: Sandvik Nanoflex® and Uddeholm Corrax®. Surface engineering comprised gaseous nitriding or gaseous carburising. Microstructural....... The duration and temperature of the nitriding/carburising surface hardening treatment can be chosen in agreement with the thermal treatment for obtaining optimal bulk hardness in the precipitation hardening stainless steel....... characterisation of the cases developed included X-ray diffraction analysis, reflected light microscopy and micro-hardness testing. It was found that the incorporation of nitrogen or carbon resulted in a hardened case consisting of a combination of (tetragonal) martensite and expanded (cubic) austenite...

  3. Precipitation and Hardening in Magnesium Alloys

    Nie, Jian-Feng

    2012-11-01

    Magnesium alloys have received an increasing interest in the past 12 years for potential applications in the automotive, aircraft, aerospace, and electronic industries. Many of these alloys are strong because of solid-state precipitates that are produced by an age-hardening process. Although some strength improvements of existing magnesium alloys have been made and some novel alloys with improved strength have been developed, the strength level that has been achieved so far is still substantially lower than that obtained in counterpart aluminum alloys. Further improvements in the alloy strength require a better understanding of the structure, morphology, orientation of precipitates, effects of precipitate morphology, and orientation on the strengthening and microstructural factors that are important in controlling the nucleation and growth of these precipitates. In this review, precipitation in most precipitation-hardenable magnesium alloys is reviewed, and its relationship with strengthening is examined. It is demonstrated that the precipitation phenomena in these alloys, especially in the very early stage of the precipitation process, are still far from being well understood, and many fundamental issues remain unsolved even after some extensive and concerted efforts made in the past 12 years. The challenges associated with precipitation hardening and age hardening are identified and discussed, and guidelines are outlined for the rational design and development of higher strength, and ultimately ultrahigh strength, magnesium alloys via precipitation hardening.

  4. Increase in the strength characteristics of Portland cement due to introduction of the compound mineral supplements

    Il'ina, Liliia; Gichko, Nikolai; Mukhina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    At the initial phase of hardening it is the limestone component that plays a major role in the hardening process, which acts as the substrate for the crystallization of hydrate tumors due to its chemical affinity with the products of Portland cement hydration. After 7 days, the diopside supplement influences the processes more significantly. Diopside has a high modulus of elasticity compared to the cement paste. As a result, stresses are redistributed within the cement paste and the whole composition is hardened. An increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement to more than 66.7% does not provide a substantial increase in the strength of the cement paste. As the hardness of diopside is higher than the hardness of limestone, much more energy is required to grind it down to a usable component. Therefore, a further increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement is not economically feasible. An evaluation of the optimum quantity of input compound mineral supplements can be made based on the ideas of close packing of spherical particles and the Pauling rules. The optimum content of the supplement is 8-8.5% provided that its dispersion and density are close to the dispersion and density of the binder. An increase in the dispersion of the supplement reduces its optimal quantity.

  5. A procedure for the hardening of materials

    Dearnaley, G.

    1984-01-01

    A method of hardening metals or ceramics which have fcc, bcc or hcp structures in which two species of differing atomic radii are introduced into the material to be hardened. One species is of a size such that it can diffuse through the lattice normally. The other is of a size such that it can diffuse readily only along dislocations. Ion bombardment is the preferred method of introducing the species with different atomic radii. The material to be hardened is subjected to heat and plastic deformation so as to cause a large number of dislocations with jogs. The species meet at the jogs where they interact and are trapped and set up strain fields which prevent further deformation of the material. (author)

  6. An Anisotropic Hardening Model for Springback Prediction

    Zeng, Danielle; Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-01

    As more Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) are heavily used for automotive body structures and closures panels, accurate springback prediction for these components becomes more challenging because of their rapid hardening characteristics and ability to sustain even higher stresses. In this paper, a modified Mroz hardening model is proposed to capture realistic Bauschinger effect at reverse loading, such as when material passes through die radii or drawbead during sheet metal forming process. This model accounts for material anisotropic yield surface and nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening behavior. Material tension/compression test data are used to accurately represent Bauschinger effect. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by comparison of numerical and experimental springback results for a DP600 straight U-channel test.

  7. An Anisotropic Hardening Model for Springback Prediction

    Zeng, Danielle; Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-01-01

    As more Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) are heavily used for automotive body structures and closures panels, accurate springback prediction for these components becomes more challenging because of their rapid hardening characteristics and ability to sustain even higher stresses. In this paper, a modified Mroz hardening model is proposed to capture realistic Bauschinger effect at reverse loading, such as when material passes through die radii or drawbead during sheet metal forming process. This model accounts for material anisotropic yield surface and nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening behavior. Material tension/compression test data are used to accurately represent Bauschinger effect. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by comparison of numerical and experimental springback results for a DP600 straight U-channel test

  8. Crystallographic characterization of cement pastes hydrated with NaCl; Caracterizacao cristalografica de pastas de cimento hidratadas com NaCl

    Melo, Carina Gabriela de Melo e; Martinelli, Antonio Eduardo; Melo, Dulce Maria Araujo; Melo, Marcus Antonio de Freitas; Melo, Vitor Rodrigo de Melo e [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the major current challenges faced by oil companies is the exploration of pre salt basins. Salt layers deposited upon the evaporation of ocean water and continental separation are mainly formed by NaCl and isolate immense oil reservoirs. The mechanical stability and zonal isolation of oil wells that run through salt layers must be fulfilled by cement sheaths saturated with NaCl to assure chemical compatibility between cement and salt layer. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of NaCl addition on the hydration of oil well cement slurries as well as identifying the nature of crystalline phases present in the hardened cement. To that end, cement slurries containing NaCl were mixed, hardened and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the presence of NaCl affects the formation of hydration products by the presence of Friedel's salt. The intensity of the corresponding peaks increase as the contents of NaCl in the slurry increase. High concentrations of NaCl in Portland slurries increase the setting time of cement and the presence of Friedel's salt decreases the strength of the hardened cement. (author)

  9. Physicochemical properties of newly developed bioactive glass cement and its effects on various cells.

    Washio, Ayako; Nakagawa, Aika; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Maeda, Hidefumi; Kitamura, Chiaki

    2015-02-01

    Biomaterials used in dental treatments are expected to have favorable properties such as biocompatibility and an ability to induce tissue formation in dental pulp and periapical tissue, as well as sealing to block external stimuli. Bioactive glasses have been applied in bone engineering, but rarely applied in the field of dentistry. In the present study, bioactive glass cement for dental treatment was developed, and then its physicochemical properties and effects on cell responses were analyzed. To clarify the physicochemical attributes of the cement, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and pH measurement were carried out. Cell attachment, morphology, and viability to the cement were also examined to clarify the effects of the cement on odontoblast-like cells (KN-3 cells), osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 cells), human periodontal ligament stem/progenitor cells and neuro-differentiative cells (PC-12 cells). Hydroxyapatite-like precipitation was formed on the surface of the hardened cement and the pH level changed from pH10 to pH9, then stabilized in simulate body fluid. The cement had no cytotxic effects on these cells, and particulary induced process elongation of PC-12 cells. Our results suggest that the newly developed bioactive glass cement have capability of the application in dental procedures as bioactive cement. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Influence of Thermal Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Dental Silicate Cements

    Georgeta Voicu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the sol-gel process was used to synthesize a precursor mixture for the preparation of silicate cement, also called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA cement. This mixture was thermally treated under two different conditions (1400 °C/2 h and 1450 °C/3 h followed by rapid cooling in air. The resulted material (clinker was ground for one hour in a laboratory planetary mill (v = 150 rot/min, in order to obtain the MTA cements. The setting time and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF and cytocompatibility of the MTA cements were assessed in this study. The hardening processes, nature of the reaction products and the microstructural characteristics were also investigated. The anhydrous and hydrated cements were characterized by different techniques e.g., X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and thermal analysis (DTA-DTG-TG. The setting time of the MTA cement obtained by thermal treatment at 1400 °C/2 h (MTA1 was 55 min and 15 min for the MTA cement obtained at 1450 °C/3 h (MTA2. The compressive strength values were 18.5 MPa (MTA1 and 22.9 MPa (MTA2. Both MTA cements showed good bioactivity (assessed by an in vitro test, good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of cells.

  11. Calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement compositions for bone reconstruction.

    Combes, C; Bareille, R; Rey, C

    2006-11-01

    The feasibility of making calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO(3)-CaP) mixed cements, comprising at least 40% (w/w) CaCO(3) in the dry powder ingredients, has been demonstrated. Several original cement compositions were obtained by mixing metastable crystalline CaCO(3) phases with metastable amorphous or crystalline CaP powders in aqueous medium. The cements set within at most 1 h at 37 degrees C in atmosphere saturated with water. The hardened cement is microporous and exhibits weak compressive strength. The setting reaction appeared to be essentially related to the formation of a highly carbonated nanocrystalline apatite phase by reaction of the metastable CaP phase with part or almost all of the metastable CaCO(3) phase. The recrystallization of metastable CaP varieties led to a final cement consisting of a highly carbonated poorly crystalline apatite analogous to bone mineral associated with various amounts of vaterite and/or aragonite. The presence of controlled amounts of CaCO(3) with a higher solubility than that of the apatite formed in the well-developed CaP cements might be of interest to increase resorption rates in biomedical cement and favors its replacement by bone tissue. Cytotoxicity testing revealed excellent cytocompatibility of CaCO(3)-CaP mixed cement compositions.

  12. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  13. Radioactive waste cementation

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  14. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  15. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  16. Technology of hardening fills for mined spaces

    Simek, P.; Holas, M.; Chyla, A.; Pech, P.

    1985-01-01

    The technology is described of hardening fills for mined spaces of uranium deposits in North Bohemian chalk. A special equipment was developed for the controlled preparation of a hardening mixture. The composition of the fill is determined by the strength of the filled rock, expecially by the standard strength, i.e., the minimal strength of the filling under uniaxial pressure. The said parameter determines the consumption of binding materials and thereby the total costs of the filling. A description is presented of the filling technology, including rabbit tube transport of the mixture and quality control. (Pu)

  17. Radiation hardening revisited: Role of intracascade clustering

    Singh, B.N.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Trinkaus, H.

    1997-01-01

    be explained in terms of conventional dispersed-barrier hardening because (a) the grown-in dislocations are not free, and (b) irradiation-induced defect clusters are not rigid indestructible Orowan obstacles. A new model called 'cascade-induced source hardening' is presented where glissile loops produced...... directly in cascades are envisaged to decorate the grown-in dislocations so that they cannot act as dislocation sources. The upper yield stress is related to the breakaway stress which is necessary to pull the dislocation away from the clusters/loops decorating it. The magnitude of the breakaway stress has...

  18. Determination of Eigenstresses in Hardening Concrete

    Dela, Birgitte Friis; Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    It is the aim of the present ph.d.-project to develop methods for calculation as well as measurements of eigenstresses in concrete due to (autogenous) shrinkage of cement paste. The calculations will be carried out with the use of experimentally determined material properties such as autogenous s...... shrinkage, modulus of elasticity, creep/relaxation etc. A special "stress-sensor" will be developed to measure the hydrostatic pressure inside a spherical aggregate when surrounded by cement paste that undergoes shrinkage....

  19. Physical and mechanical properties of cement mortar made with brick waste

    Mohamed Guendouz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new building materials is a current problem where researchers are trying to find the right materials for each region and returning cheapest countries. Recycling and recovery of waste are now considered as a promising solution to meet the deficit between production and consumption and protecting the environment. This work focused on the study of the effect of brick waste in the production of cement mortar with substitution rates ranging from 5-30% by weight of cement and to compare its performance with fresh and hardened state with ordinary mortar considered as control mortar. Compressive and tensile strengths up to 28 days of age were compared with those of controlled mortar. Water absorption was also measured at 28 days of age. The test results indicate the beneficial effect of brick waste powder on performance of cement mortar with an optimum of 15% of cement weight substitution.

  20. Influence of spraying on the early hydration of accelerated cement pastes

    Salvador, Renan P.; Cavalaro, Sergio H.P.; Cano, Miguel; Figueiredo, Antonio D.

    2016-01-01

    In practice, most of the studies about the interaction between cement and accelerators is performed with hand-mixed pastes. However, in many applications mixing occurs through spraying, which may affect accelerators reactivity and the microstructure of the hardened paste. The objective of this study is to analyze how the mixing process influences the early hydration of accelerated cement pastes. Isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and SEM imaging were performed on cement pastes produced by hand-mixing and by spraying, using equivalent doses of an alkali-free and an alkaline accelerator and two types of cement. Results showed a great influence of the spraying process on the reactivity of accelerators and on the morphology of the precipitated hydrates. Variations in hydration kinetics caused by the mixing method are explained and the results obtained might have a significant repercussion on how future research on the behavior of accelerated mixes will be performed.

  1. Influence of Portland Cement Class on the Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement in Cement Mortar Caused by Penetrating Chloride and Sulfate from the Environment

    Bikić, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of portland cement class on the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar caused by penetrating chloride or sulfate from the environment in already hardened cement mortar is investigated in this paper. Three classes of portland cement have been used for the tests, PC 35, PC 45 and PC 55. Cylindrical samples of cement mortar with steel reinfor- cement in the middle were treated 6 months at room temperature in the following solutions: w(SO42- = 2.1 % and w(Cl- = 5 %. Two techniques have been used for testing corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar: Tafel extrapolation technique and potentiodynamic polarization technique. Investigations were conducted by potentiostat/galvanostat Princeton Applied Research 263A-2 with the software PowerCORR®. The results of both techniques indi-cate the most active corrosion of steel reinforcement in the samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both treated solutions, while the lowest corrosion of the steel reinforcement was observed in cement samples prepared from cement PC 55. This conclusion was drawn by analyzing the results shown in Figs. 1–4. Comparing corrosion current density of samples, working electrodes, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2, the results show the most stable corrosion of steel reinforcement in samples prepared from cement PC 55, and the most active corrosion in samples prepared from ce- ment PC 35. The most active corrosion in samples prepared from cement PC 35 is evident from the positions of the open circuit potentials whose values are less for samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both the treated solution, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2. Comparison of the anodic polarization curves of the working electrodes in both the treated solutions, Figs. 3 and 4, also shows that the intensity of corrosion is the largest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 35 and the smallest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 55. Investigation results should be

  2. the Danish cement industry

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Møllgård, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We test econometrically whether the sole Danish producer of cement holds a dominant position in the Danish market for (grey) cement. In import penetration tests, we find that its pricing and quantity decisions are independent of import price and quantity, implying that it can act to a considerable extent independently of its competitors. We also test whether it can act independently of its customers and find that its demand is inelastic with respect to its price. It thus holds a dominant posi...

  3. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    Romildo Dias Tolêdo Filho

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical properties, physical performance and durability of cement based matrices reinforced with naturally occurring fibres including sisal, coconut, jute, bamboo and wood fibres. These fibres have always been considered promising as reinforcement of cement based matrices because of their availability, low cost and low consumption of energy. In this review, the general properties of the composites are described in relation to fibre content, length, strength and stiffness. A chronological development of sisal fibre reinforced, cement based matrices is reported and experimental data are provided to illustrate the performance of sisal fibre reinforced cement composites. A brief description on the use of these composite materials as building products has been included. The influence of sisal fibres on the development of plastic shrinkage in the pre-hardened state, on tensile, compressive and bending strength in the hardened state of mortar mixes is discussed. Creep and drying shrinkage of the composites and the durability of natural fibres in cement based matrices are of particular interest and are also highlighted. The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute asbestos-cement composite, which is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The

  4. [Microstructural changes in hardened beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)].

    Mujica, Maria Virginia; Granito, Marisela; Soto, Naudy

    2015-06-01

    (Phaseolus vulgaris). The hardening of Phaseolus vulgaris beans stored at high temperature and high relative humidity is one of the main constraints for consumption. The objective of this research was to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy, structural changes in cotyledons and testa of the hardened beans. The freshly harvested grains were stored for twelve months under two conditions: 5 ° C-34% RH and 37 ° C-75% RH, in order to promote hardening. The stored raw and cooked grains were lyophilized and fractured. The sections of testa and cotyledons were observed in an electron microscope JSM-6390. After twelve months, grains stored at 37 ° C-75% RH increased their hardness by 503%, whereas there were no significant changes in grains stored at 5 ° C-34% RH. At the microstructural level, the cotyledons of the raw grains show clear differences in appearance of the cell wall, into the intercellular space size and texture matrix protein. There were also differences in compaction of palisade and sub-epidermal layer in the testa of raw grains. After cooking, cotyledon cells of the soft grains were well separated while these ofhard grains were seldom separated. In conclusion, the found differences in hard and soft grains showed a significant participation of both structures, cotyledons and testa, in the grains hardening.

  5. Radiation dose effects, hardening of electronic components

    Dupont-Nivet, E.

    1991-01-01

    This course reviews the mechanism of interaction between ionizing radiation and a silicon oxide type dielectric, in particular the effect of electron-hole pairs creation in the material. Then effects of cumulated dose on electronic components and especially in MOS technology are examined. Finally methods hardening of these components are exposed. 93 refs

  6. CASE-HARDENING OF STAINLESS STEEL

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to case-hardening of a stainless steel article by means of gas including carbon and/or nitrogen, whereby carbon and/or nitrogen atoms diffuse through the surface into the article. The method includes activating the surface of the article, applying a top layer on the activated...

  7. Thermomechanical properties of radiation hardened oligoesteracrylates

    Lomonosova, N.V.; Chikin, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermomechanical properties of radiation hardened oligoesteracrylates are studied by the methods of isothermal heating and thermal mechanics. Films of dimethacrylate of ethylene glycol, triethylene glycol (TGM-3), tetraethylene glycol, tridecaethylene glycol and TGM-3 mixture with methyl methacrylate hardened by different doses (5-150 kGy) using Co 60 installation with a dose rate of 2x10 -3 kGy/s served as a subject of the research. During oligoesteracrylate hargening a space network is formed, chain sections between lattice points of which are in a stressed state. Maximum of deformation is observed at 210-220 deg C on thermomechanical curves of samples hardened by doses > 5 kGy, which form and intensity is dependent on an absorbed dose. Presence of a high-temperature maximum on diaqrams of isometric heating of spatially cross-linked oligoesteracrylates is discovered. High thermal stability of three-dimensional network of radiation hardened oligoesteracrylates provides satisfactory tensile properties (40% of initial strength) in sample testing an elevated temperatures (200-250 deg C)

  8. Investigation of Waste Paper Cellulosic Fibers Utilization into Cement Based Building Materials

    Viola Hospodarova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the utilization of renewable natural cellulosic materials, such as wood, plants, and waste paper in the preparation of building materials has attracted significant interest. This is due to their advantageous properties, low environmental impact and low cost. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of recycled cellulosic fibers (in the amount 0.5 wt % of the filler and binder weight and superplasticizer (in the amount 0.5 wt % of the cement weight on the resulting properties of cement composites (consistency of fresh mixture, density, thermal conductivity, and compressive and flexural strength for hardening times of 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days. Plasticizer use improved the workability of fresh cement mixture. In comparison to the reference sample, the results revealed a decrease in density of 6.8% and in the thermal conductivity of composites with cellulosic fibers of 34%. The highest values of compressive (48.4 MPa and flexural (up to 7 MPa strength were achieved for hardened fiber cement specimens with plasticizer due to their significantly better dispersion of cement particles and improved bond strength between fibers and matrix.

  9. Elastic-Plastic Constitutive Equation of WC-Co Cemented Carbides with Anisotropic Damage

    Hayakawa, Kunio; Nakamura, Tamotsu; Tanaka, Shigekazu

    2007-01-01

    Elastic-plastic constitutive equation of WC-Co cemented carbides with anisotropic damage is proposed to predict a precise service life of cold forging tools. A 2nd rank symmetric tensor damage tensor is introduced in order to express the stress unilaterality; a salient difference in uniaxial behavior between tension and compression. The conventional framework of irreversible thermodynamics is used to derive the constitutive equation. The Gibbs potential is formulated as a function of stress, damage tensor, isotropic hardening variable and kinematic hardening variable. The elastic-damage constitutive equation, conjugate forces of damage, isotropic hardening and kinematic hardening variable is derived from the potential. For the kinematic hardening variable, the superposition of three kinematic hardening laws is employed in order to improve the cyclic behavior of the material. For the evolution equation of the damage tensor, the damage is assumed to progress by fracture of the Co matrix - WC particle interface and by the mechanism of fatigue, i.e. the accumulation of microscopic plastic strain in matrix and particles. By using the constitutive equations, calculation of uniaxial tensile and compressive test is performed and the results are compared with the experimental ones in the literature. Furthermore, finite element analysis on cold forward extrusion was carried out, in which the proposed constitutive equation was employed as die insert material

  10. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  11. Radiation hardened COTS-based 32-bit microprocessor

    Haddad, N.; Brown, R.; Cronauer, T.; Phan, H.

    1999-01-01

    A high performance radiation hardened 32-bit RISC microprocessor based upon a commercial single chip CPU has been developed. This paper presents the features of radiation hardened microprocessor, the methods used to radiation harden this device, the results of radiation testing, and shows that the RAD6000 is well-suited for the vast majority of space applications. (authors)

  12. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  13. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  14. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T 1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T 1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  15. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete.

    Fan, Wei-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Park, Ki-Bong

    2015-09-07

    High-calcium fly ash (FH) is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found.

  16. Assessment of hardened characteristics of raw fly ash blended self-compacting concrete

    B. Mahalingam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is widely used as a supplementary cementitious material in concrete. Due to the implementation of new thermal power plants as a consequence of electricity demand, generation of fly ash is noticeably increased. In addition to pozzolana blended cement production, it is very imperative to use raw fly ash in concrete. Earlier research studies investigated the performance of processed fly ash in blended cement production as well as in concrete. In general, ground fly ash is used in blended cement production. A comprehensive study on the performance evaluation of raw fly ash in self-compacting concrete is not available in the existing literature. Moreover, utilization of raw fly ash in special concrete such as self-compacting concrete is essential to comprehend the performance of raw fly ash blended concrete compared to ordinary Portland concrete. Additionally, it will help to achieve maximum utilization of raw fly ash as a supplementary cementitious material rather than disposal as a waste, which eventually leads to several environmental issues. In the study, raw fly ash was collected and is directly used in development of self-compacting concrete. Two mixes were cast and hardened characteristics of blended concrete were investigated. Results from the study showed comparable performance with control concrete. Furthermore, significant reduction in chloride permeability was observed for raw fly ash blended concrete.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  18. Mechanical properties of Self-Consolidating Concrete incorporating Cement Kiln Dust

    Mostafa Abd El-Mohsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-Consolidating Concrete (SCC has been widely used in both practical and laboratory applications. Selection of its components and their ratios depends, mainly, on the target mechanical and physical properties recommended by the project consultant. Partial replacement of cement in SCC with cheap available industrial by-product could produce environmentally durable concrete with similar properties of normal concrete. In the current research, SCC was produced by blending Cement Kiln Dust (CKD with cement in different ratios. Four mixes incorporating cement kiln dust with partial cement replacement of 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were produced and compared with a control mix of Normally Vibrated Concrete (NVC. Superplasticizer was used to increase the flow-ability of SCC mixes. The fresh and hardened mechanical properties of all mixes were determined and evaluated. Moreover, time-dependent behavior was investigated for all mixes in terms of drying shrinkage test. The shrinkage strain was measured for all specimens for a period of 120 days. Based on the experimental results, it was found that SCC mixture containing 20% cement replacement of CKD exhibited the highest mechanical strength compared to other SCC mixes and NVC mix as well. It was observed that the volumetric changes of specimens were directly proportional to the increase of the cement replacement ratio.

  19. Effects of Particle Size and Cement Replacement of LCD Glass Powder in Concrete

    Seong Kyum Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high quality liquid crystal display (LCD processing waste glass (LPWG generated from the manufacturing process of Korea’s LCD industries, having the world’s highest technological level and production, was finely ground into particles smaller than cement particles (higher fineness than OPC to verify their applicability and performance as a replacement for cement. For a concrete mix having a W/B ratio of 0.44, cement was replaced with LPWG glass powder (LGP at ratios of 5, 10, 15, and 20% (LGP12 and 5 and 10% (LGP5 according to the particle size to prepare test cylinder specimens, which were tested with respect to air contents, slump in fresh concrete, and compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of hardened concrete. The microstructure of the concrete specimens was analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX, and a Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP. Replacement of cement with LGP for cement could effectively decrease the quantity of cement used due to the excellent performance of LGP. It may positively contribute to the sustainable development of the cement industry as well as waste recycling and environment conservation on a national scale.

  20. Influence of various amount of diatomaceous earth used as cement substitute on mechanical properties of cement paste

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Medved, Igor; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Zahálková, Jana; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Active silica containing materials in the sub-micrometer size range are commonly used for modification of strength parameters and durability of cement based composites. In addition, these materials also assist to accelerate cement hydration. In this paper, two types of diatomaceous earths are used as partial cement replacement in composition of cement paste mixtures. For raw binders, basic physical and chemical properties are studied. The chemical composition of tested materials is determined using classical chemical analysis combined with XRD method that allowed assessment of SiO2 amorphous phase content. For all tested mixtures, initial and final setting times are measured. Basic physical and mechanical properties are measured on hardened paste samples cured 28 days in water. Here, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive and flexural strength, are measured. Relationship between compressive strength and total open porosity is studied using several empirical models. The obtained results give evidence of high pozzolanic activity of tested diatomite earths. Their application leads to the increase of both initial and final setting times, decrease of compressive strength, and increase of flexural strength.

  1. Solidification of metallic aluminum on magnesium phosphate cements

    Lahalle, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste using cement. More particularly, it aims at assessing the chemical compatibility between metallic aluminum and mortars based on magnesium phosphate cement. The physical and chemical processes leading to setting and hardening of the cement are first investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TGA) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ("3"1P and "1"1B MAS-NMR) are first used to characterize the solid phases formed during hydration, while inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analysis (ICP-AES), electrical conductometry and pH measurements provide information on the pore solution composition. Then, the corrosion of metallic aluminum in magnesium phosphate mortars is studied by monitoring the equilibrium potential and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Magnesium phosphate cement is prepared from a mix of magnesium oxide (MgO) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH_2PO_4). In the presence of water, hydration occurs according to a dissolution - precipitation process. The main hydrate is K-struvite (MgKPO_4.6H_2O). Its precipitation is preceded by that of two transient phases: phosphorrosslerite (MgHPO_4.7H_2O) and Mg_2KH(PO_4)_2.15H_2O. Boric acid retards cement hydration by delaying the formation of cement hydrates. Two processes may be involved in this retardation: the initial precipitation of amorphous or poorly crystallized minerals containing boron and phosphorus atoms, and/or the stabilization of cations (Mg"2"+, K"+) in solution. As compared with a Portland cement-based matrix, corrosion of aluminum is strongly limited in magnesium phosphate mortar. The pore solution pH is close to neutrality and falls within the passivation domain of aluminum. Corrosion depends on several parameters: it is promoted by a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) significantly higher than the chemical water demand of cement (w/c = 0.51), and by the addition of boric

  2. Structure and properties of steel case-hardened by non-vacuum electron-beam cladding of carbon fibers

    Losinskaya, A. A.; Lozhkina, E. A.; Bardin, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    At the present time, the actual problem of materials science is the increase in the steels performance characteristics. In the paper some mechanical properties of the case-hardened materials received by non-vacuum electron-beam cladding of carbon fibers are determined. The depth of the hardened layers varies from 1.5 to 3 mm. The impact strength of the samples exceeds 50 J/cm2. The wear resistance of the coatings obtained exceeds the properties of steel 20 after cementation and quenching with low tempering. The results of a study of the microhardness of the resulting layers and the microstructure are also given. The hardness of the surface layers exceeds 5700 MPa.

  3. Implementation of recycled cellulosic fibres into cement based composites and testing their influence on resulting properties

    Hospodarova, V.; Stevulova, N.; Vaclavik, V.; Dvorsky, T.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the application of raw materials from renewable sources such as wood, plants and waste paper to building materials preparing has gained a significant interest in this research area. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of the selected plasticizer on properties of fibres composites made of cellulosic fibres coming from recycled waste paper and cement. Investigations were performed on specimens with 0.5 wt. % of fibre addition without and with plasticizer. A comparative study did not show positive influence of plasticizer on the density and thermal conductivity of 28 days hardened composite. The specimens after 1, 3 and 7 days of hardening with plasticizer exhibited the highest impact on compressive strength in comparison to composite without plasticizer but 28 days hardened specimens reached the same value of strength characteristic (41 MPa).

  4. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  5. Structural heredity influence upon principles of strain wave hardening

    Kiricheck, A. V.; Barinov, S. V.; Yashin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    It was established experimentally that by penetration of a strain wave through material hardened not only the technological modes of processing, but also a technological heredity - the direction of the fibers of the original macrostructure have an influence upon the diagram of microhardness. By penetration of the strain wave along fibers, the degree of hardening the material is less, however, a product is hardened throughout its entire section mainly along fibers. In the direction of the strain waves across fibers of the original structure of material, the degree of material hardening is much higher, the depth of the hardened layer with the degree of hardening not less than 50% makes at least 3 mm. It was found that under certain conditions the strain wave can completely change the original structure of the material. Thus, a heterogeneously hardened structure characterized by the interchange of harder and more viscous areas is formed, which is beneficial for assurance of high operational properties of material.

  6. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of laser-hardened 4140 steel

    Tsay, L.W.; Lin, Z.W. [Nat. Taiwan Ocean Univ., Keelung (Taiwan). Inst. of Mater. Eng.; Shiue, R.K. [Institute of Materials Sciences and Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan (Taiwan); Chen, C. [Institute of Materials Sciences and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2000-10-15

    Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were performed to investigate the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of laser-hardened AISI 4140 specimens in air, gaseous hydrogen and saturated H{sub 2}S solution. Experimental results indicated that round bar specimens with two parallel hardened bands on opposite sides along the loading axis (i.e. the PH specimens), exhibited a huge reduction in tensile ductility for all test environments. While circular-hardened (CH) specimens with 1 mm hardened depth and 6 mm wide within the gauge length were resistant to gaseous hydrogen embrittlement. However, fully hardened CH specimens became susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement for testing in air at a lower strain rate. The strength of CH specimens increased with decreasing the depth of hardened zones in a saturated H{sub 2}S solution. The premature failure of hardened zones in a susceptible environment caused the formation of brittle intergranular fracture and the decrease in tensile ductility. (orig.)

  7. Radiation-hardened optoelectronic components: detectors

    Wiczer, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this talk, we will survey recent research in the area of radiation hardened optical detectors. We have studied conventional silicon photodiode structures, special radiation hardened silicon photodiodes, and special double heterojunction AlGaAs/GaAs photodiodes in neutron, gamma, pulsed x-ray and charged particle environments. We will present results of our work and summarize other research in this area. Our studies have shown that detectors can be made to function acceptably after exposures to neutron fluences of 10 15 n/cm 2 , total dose gamma exposures of 10 8 rad (Si), and flash x-ray environments of 10 8 rad/sec (Si). We will describe detector structures that can operate through these conditions, pre-rad and post-rad operational characteristics, and experimental conditions that produced these results. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  8. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  9. Hardened Solar Array High Temperature Adhesive.

    1981-04-01

    SHERWOOO. D SASIU.IS F3361S-0-C-201S UNCLASSI ED 1AC-SCG-IOOIIR AFVAL-TR-OL-201? NLm,,hinii EhhhEE11I1 AFWAL-TR-81- 2017 i : HARDENED SOLAR ARRAY D HIGH...Tg and as a consequence forms a film on the container and also precipitates as tacky waxlike particles, rather than the desired flocullated

  10. Hardening by means of ionising radiation

    Spoor, H.; Demmler, K.

    1979-01-01

    The polymerisable ethylic unsaturated mixture can be hardened by means of electron irradiation and used as a corrosion preventive layer. The mixture mainly consists of at least a di-olefinic unsaturated polyester, partial esters of polycarbonic acids, in particular the monoester of dicarbonic acids, with a copolymerizable C-C double bond, and mono-olefine unsaturated hydrocarbons, for example vinyl aromatics. The coatings exhibit good adhesion to the substrate, in particular to metal, and good flexibility. (DG) [de

  11. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  12. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  13. Fatigue of coated and laser hardened steels

    La Cruz, P. de.

    1990-01-01

    In the present work the effect of ion nitriding, laser hardening and hot dip galvanizing upon the fatigue limit and notch sensitivity of a B-Mn Swedish steel SS 2131 have been investigated. The fatigue tests were performed in plane reverse bending fatigue (R=1). The quenched and tempered condition was taken as the reference condition. The microstructure, microhardness, fracture surface and coating appearance of the fatigue surface treated specimens were studied. Residual stress and retained austenite measurements were also carried out. It was found that ion nitriding improves the fatigue limit by 53 % for smooth specimens and by 115 % for notched specimens. Laser hardening improves the fatigue limit by 18 % and 56 % for smooth and notched specimen respectively. Hot dip galvanizing gives a slight deterioration of the fatigue limit (9 % and 10 % for smooth and notched specimen respectively). Ion nitriding and laser hardening decrease the value of the notch sensitivity factor q by 78 % and 65 % respectively. Hot dip galvanizing does not modify it. A simple schematic model based on a residual stress distribution, has been used to explain the different effects. It seems that the presence of the higher compressive residual stresses and the higher uniformity of the microstructure may be the causes of the better fatigue performance of ion nitrided specimens. (119 refs.) (author)

  14. Beam hardening correction algorithm in microtomography images

    Sales, Erika S.; Lima, Inaya C.B.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Assis, Joaquim T. de

    2009-01-01

    Quantification of mineral density of bone samples is directly related to the attenuation coefficient of bone. The X-rays used in microtomography images are polychromatic and have a moderately broad spectrum of energy, which makes the low-energy X-rays passing through a sample to be absorbed, causing a decrease in the attenuation coefficient and possibly artifacts. This decrease in the attenuation coefficient is due to a process called beam hardening. In this work the beam hardening of microtomography images of vertebrae of Wistar rats subjected to a study of hyperthyroidism was corrected by the method of linearization of the projections. It was discretized using a spectrum in energy, also called the spectrum of Herman. The results without correction for beam hardening showed significant differences in bone volume, which could lead to a possible diagnosis of osteoporosis. But the data with correction showed a decrease in bone volume, but this decrease was not significant in a confidence interval of 95%. (author)

  15. Beam hardening correction algorithm in microtomography images

    Sales, Erika S.; Lima, Inaya C.B.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: esales@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Assis, Joaquim T. de, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2009-07-01

    Quantification of mineral density of bone samples is directly related to the attenuation coefficient of bone. The X-rays used in microtomography images are polychromatic and have a moderately broad spectrum of energy, which makes the low-energy X-rays passing through a sample to be absorbed, causing a decrease in the attenuation coefficient and possibly artifacts. This decrease in the attenuation coefficient is due to a process called beam hardening. In this work the beam hardening of microtomography images of vertebrae of Wistar rats subjected to a study of hyperthyroidism was corrected by the method of linearization of the projections. It was discretized using a spectrum in energy, also called the spectrum of Herman. The results without correction for beam hardening showed significant differences in bone volume, which could lead to a possible diagnosis of osteoporosis. But the data with correction showed a decrease in bone volume, but this decrease was not significant in a confidence interval of 95%. (author)

  16. GRAVITY PIPELINE TRANSPORT FOR HARDENING FILLING MIXTURES

    Leonid KROUPNIK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In underground mining of solid minerals becoming increasingly common development system with stowing hardening mixtures. In this case the natural ore array after it is replaced by an artificial excavation of solidified filling mixture consisting of binder, aggregates and water. Such a mixture is prepared on the surface on special stowing complexes and transported underground at special stowing pipelines. However, it is transported to the horizons of a few kilometers, which requires a sustainable mode of motion of such a mixture in the pipeline. Hardening stowing mixture changes its rheological characteristics over time, which complicates the calculation of the parameters of pipeline transportation. The article suggests a method of determining the initial parameters of such mixtures: the status coefficient, indicator of transportability, coefficient of hydrodynamic resistance to motion of the mixture. These indicators characterize the mixture in terms of the possibility to transport it through pipes. On the basis of these indicators is proposed methodology for calculating the parameters of pipeline transport hardening filling mixtures in drift mode when traffic on the horizontal part of the mixture under pressure column of the mixture in the vertical part of the backfill of the pipeline. This technique allows stable operation is guaranteed to provide pipeline transportation.

  17. Novel circuits for radiation hardened memories

    Haraszti, T.P.; Mento, R.P.; Moyer, N.E.; Grant, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on implementation of large storage semiconductor memories which combine radiation hardness with high packing density, operational speed, and low power dissipation and require both hardened circuit and hardened process technologies. Novel circuits, including orthogonal shuffle type of write-read arrays, error correction by weighted bidirectional codes and associative iterative repair circuits, are proposed for significant improvements of SRAMs' immunity against the effects of total dose and cosmic particle impacts. The implementation of the proposed circuit resulted in fault-tolerant 40-Mbit and 10-Mbit monolithic memories featuring a data rate of 120 MHz and power dissipation of 880 mW. These experimental serial-parallel memories were fabricated with a nonhardened standard CMOS processing technology, yet provided a total dose hardness of 1 Mrad and a projected SEU rate of 1 x 10 - 12 error/bit/day. Using radiation hardened processing improvements by factors of 10 to 100 are predicted in both total dose hardness and SEU rate

  18. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  19. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  20. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  1. MODIFICATION OF FOAMED CEMENT-CLAY MORTARS BY STABILIZERS

    Panfilova Marina Ivanovna

    2012-10-01

    by-product generated in the course of combustion of crossties, and reduction of the cement consumption rate. The authors have identified that ash added into the injection does not cause any deterioration of the mortar strength; rather, it assures its structural stability and prevents any leaching of heavy metals that it contains. The authors have identified that adding 20 to 26 % of flue ash into the injection reduces the mortar hardening time by 30 %, while the strength of the mortar that has 20 % of ash is almost equal to the one of the benchmark sample. However, any higher ash content causes deterioration of the hardening strength of the mortar. Therefore, the authors have discovered that 20 % of the cement may be replaced by the ash generated in the course of combustion of waste crossties. This replacement is to be performed in the course of preparation of mortars, and it is aimed at the strengthening of the soil. This operation is to be performed in the incinerator to preserve the solution properties. This technology reduces the amount of hazardous by-products through their recycling.

  2. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  3. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  4. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  5. Effect of bioglass 45S5 addition on properties, microstructure and cellular response of tetracalcium phosphate/monetite cements

    Stulajterova, R., E-mail: rstulajterova@saske.sk; Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Sopcak, T.; Kovalcikova, A.

    2017-04-15

    Tetracalcium phosphate/nanomonetite (TTCPMH) cement composites with 7.5 and 15 wt% addition of melt-derived 45S5 bioactive glass were prepared by mechanical homogenization of powder components and 2% NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution was used as a hardening liquid. The properties of composites with the acidic (Ca/P ratio equal 1.5) or basic (Ca/P ratio equal 1.67) TTCPMH component were compared. Addition of glass component caused rapid rise in pH of composites up to 10. In microstructure of basic cement composite, the large bioglass particles weakly bounded to surrounding cement matrix were found contrary to a more compact microstructure of acidic cement composites with the high number of spherical silica particles. Both the significant refinement of hydroxyapatite particles and the change to needle-like morphology with rise in the content of bioglass were identified in hydroxyapatite coatings created during soaking of composites in phosphate buffered saline. In acidic cement mixtures, the increase of compressive strength with an amount of bioglass was found whereas the opposite tendency was revealed in the case of basic cement mixtures. The higher concentrations of ions were verified in solutions after immersion of acidic cement composites. The severe cytotoxicity of extracts and composite cement substrates containing 15 wt% of bioglass demonstrated adverse effects of both the ionic concentrations and unappropriate surface texture on proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells. The enhanced ALP activities of cells cultured on composite cements confirmed the positive effect of bioactive glass addition on differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Novel B45S5 bioglass/tetracalcium phosphate/nanomonetite cement composites • Cement basicity negatively affected their microstructure. • Acid composite cements had higher compressive strengths than basic composites. • Fast differentiation of MSC to osteoblast line on composite with 7.5 wt% of bioglass

  6. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: A novel solution to the exothermicity problem

    Zhou, Huan; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2013-01-01

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted system for bone cement manufacturing • A solution to exothermicity problem of acid–base reaction based bone cement

  7. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: A novel solution to the exothermicity problem

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: Huan.Zhou@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted system for bone cement manufacturing • A solution to exothermicity problem of acid–base reaction based bone cement

  8. On residual stresses and fatigue of laser hardened steels

    Lin, Ru.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with studies on residual stresses and fatigue properties of laser-transformation hardened steels. Two types of specimens, cylinders and fatigue specimens were used in the studies. The cylinders, made of Swedish steels SS 2244 and SS 2258 which correspond to AISI 4140 and AISI 52100 respectively, were locally hardened by a single scan of laser beam in the longitudinal direction, with various laser parameters. Residual stress distributions across the hardened tracks were measured by means of X-ray diffraction. The origins of residual stresses were investigated and discussed. For the fatigue specimens, including smooth and notched types made of Swedish steels SS 2244, SS 2225 and SS 1572 (similar to AISI 4140, AISI 4130 and AISI 1035, respectively), laser hardening was carried out in the gauge section. The residual stress field induced by the hardening process and the fatigue properties by plane bending fatigue test were studied. In order to investigate the stability of the residual stress field, stress measurements were also made on specimens being loaded near the fatigue limits for over 10 7 cycles. Further the concept of local fatigue strength was employed to correlate quantitatively the effect of hardness and residual stress field on the fatigue limits. In addition a group of smooth specimens of SS 2244 was induction hardened and the hardening results were compared with the corresponding laser hardened ones in terms of residual stress and fatigue behaviour. It has been found that compressive stresses exist in the hardened zone of all the specimens studied. The laser hardening condition, the specimen and how the hardening is carried out can significantly affect the residual stress field. Laser hardening can greatly improve the fatigue properties by inducing a hardened and compressed surface layer. (112 refs.)(au)

  9. On residual stresses and fatigue of laser hardened steels

    Lin, Ru.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with studies on residual stresses and fatigue properties of laser-transformation hardened steels. Two types of specimens, cylinders and fatigue specimens were used in the studies. The cylinders, made of Swedish steels SS 2244 and SS 2258 which correspond to AISI 4140 and AISI 52100 respectively, were locally hardened by a single scan of laser beam in the longitudinal direction, with various laser parameters. Residual stress distributions across the hardened tracks were measured by means of X-ray diffraction. The origins of residual stresses were investigated and discussed. For the fatigue specimens, including smooth and notched types made of Swedish steels SS 2244, SS 2225 and SS 1572 (similar to AISI 4140, AISI 4130 and AISI 1035, respectively), laser hardening was carried out in the gauge section. The residual stress field induced by the hardening process and the fatigue properties by plane bending fatigue test were studied. In order to investigate the stability of the residual stress field, stress measurements were also made on specimens being loaded near the fatigue limits for over 10[sup 7] cycles. Further the concept of local fatigue strength was employed to correlate quantitatively the effect of hardness and residual stress field on the fatigue limits. In addition a group of smooth specimens of SS 2244 was induction hardened and the hardening results were compared with the corresponding laser hardened ones in terms of residual stress and fatigue behaviour. It has been found that compressive stresses exist in the hardened zone of all the specimens studied. The laser hardening condition, the specimen and how the hardening is carried out can significantly affect the residual stress field. Laser hardening can greatly improve the fatigue properties by inducing a hardened and compressed surface layer. (112 refs.)(au).

  10. Preliminary results of the immobilization of highly-salt-ladened concentrate in cement-based grout: a joint DOE/CEA research effort

    Bouniol, P.E.; Peyre, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.; Pitt, W.W.

    1988-10-01

    The ability of two types of cement-based matrices to immobilize highly-salt-ladened concentrate containing primarily nitrate and phosphate is examined when considering both fresh and hardened material properties. The effects of the incorporation ratio and the temperature of the feed concentrate are evaluated

  11. Fatigue hardening and softening studies on strain hardened 18-8 austenitic stainless steel

    Ramakrishna Prasad, C.; Vasudevan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Metals when subjected to fatigue harden or soften depending on their previous mechanical history. Annealed or mildly cold worked metals are known to harden while severely cold worked metals soften when subjected to fatigue loading. In the present work samples of austenitic 18-8 steel cold worked to 11% and 22% reduction in area were mounted in a vertical pulsator and fatigued in axial tension-compression. Clear cut effects were produced and it was noticed that these depended on the extent of cold work, the amplitude as well as the number of cycles of fatigue and mean stress if any. (orig.) [de

  12. Basic study of water-cement ratio evaluation for fresh mortar using an ultrasonic measurement technique

    Hamza Haffies Ismail; Murata, Yorinobu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research is for the basic study of ultrasonic evaluation method for the determination of the water-cement-ratio (W/C) in fresh concrete at the early age of hardening. Water-cement ratio is a important parameter to evaluate the strength of concrete for concrete construction. Using an ultrasonic pulse measurement technique, wave velocity and frequency variations depend on the age of concrete during hardening process could be evaluated. As a sample test, fresh mortar of water-cement ratio of 40 %, 50% and 60 % was poured into cylindrical plastic mould form (φ100 mm x 50 mm). For an ultrasonic pulse wave transmission technique, two wide band ultrasonic transducers were set on the top and bottom surface of mortar, and start measuring from 10 minutes after pouring water until 60 minutes of 5 minutes of intervals. As a result, it was confirmed that wave velocity and center frequency were changed with the age of mortar depends on the water-cement ratio. (author)

  13. Cement based grouts - longevity laboratory studies: leaching behaviour

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.; Roe, L.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a series of laboratory tests carried out to determine the possible leaching behaviour of cement-based grouts in repository environments. A reference high-performance cement-based grout, comprised of Canadian Type 50 (U.S. Type V) Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement, silica fume, potable water and superplasticizer, and a commercially available cement grout were subjected to leaching in distilled water and three simulated groundwaters of different ionic strength. Hardened, monolithic specimens of the grout were leached in static, pulsed-flow and continuous flow conditions at temperatures from 10 degrees C to 150 degrees C for periods of up to 56 days. The changes in concentration of ions in the leachants with time were determined and the changes in the morphology of the surfaces of the grout specimens were examined using electron microscopy. After a review of possible mechanisms of degradation of cement-based materials, the data from these experiments are presented. The data show that the grouts will leach when in contact with water through dissolution of more soluble phases. Comparison of the leaching performance of the two grouts indicates that, while there are some minor differences, they behaved quite similarly. The rate of the leaching processes were found to tend to decrease with time and to be accompanied by precipitation and/or growth of an assemblage of secondary alteration phases (i.e., CaCO 3 , Mg(OH) 2 ). The mechanisms of leaching depended on the environmental conditions of temperature, groundwater composition and water flow rate. Matrix dissolution occurred. However, in many of the tests leaching was shown to be limited by the precipitated/reaction layers which acted as protective surface coatings. (37 refs.) (au)

  14. Highly permeable, cement-bounded backfilling mortars for SMA repositories

    Jacobs, F.; Mayer, G.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1994-03-01

    In low- and intermediate-level waste repositories, gas is produced due e.g. to corrosion. This gas must be able to escape from the repository in order to prevent damage to the repository structure. A cement-based backfill should take over this function. For this purpose, the composition of cement-based materials was varied to study their influence on porosity and permeability. In parallel to this study the behaviour of fresh concrete, the liberation of the heat of hydration and the hardened concrete properties were investigated. To characterize the permeability of cement-based materials the following parameters are important: 1) composition of the material (pore fabric), 2) storage conditions (degree of saturation), 3) degree of hydration (age), 4) measuring fluid. A change in the composition of cement-based materials can vary the permeability by ten orders of magnitude. It is shown that, by using dense aggregates, the transport of the fluid takes place through the matrix and along the aggregate/matrix interface. By using porous aggregates the permeability can be increased by two orders of magnitude. In the case of a dense matrix, porous aggregates do not alter the permeability. Increasing the matrix content or interface content increases permeability. Hence light weight mortars are an obvious choice. Like-grained mixes showed higher permeabilities in combination with better mechanical properties but, in comparison to normal mixes, they showed worse flow properties. With the composition cement-: water-: aggregate content 1:0.4:5.33 the likegrained mix with aggregates ranging from 2 to 3 mm proved to be a suitable material. With a low compaction after 28 days this mix reaches a permeability of 4.10 -12 m 2 and an uniaxial cylinder compressive strength of 16 N/mm 2 . (author) 58 figs., 23 tabs., refs

  15. Laser transformation hardening effect on hardening zone features and surface hardness of tool steel AISI D2

    D. Lesyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship of technological input regimes of the laser transformation hardening on change the hardening depth, hardening width, and hardening angle, as well as surface hardness of the tool steel AISI D2 using multifactor experiment with elements of the analysis of variance and regression equations was determined. The laser transformation hardening process implemented by controlling the heating temperature using Nd:YAG fiber laser with scanner, pyrometer and proportional-integral-differential controller. The linear and quadratic regression models are developed, as well as response surface to determine the effect of the heating temperature and feed rate of the treated surface on the energy density of the laser beam, hardening depths, hardening width, hardening angle, and surface hardness are designed. The main effect on the energy density of the laser beam has a velocity laser treatment, on the other hand, the main effect on the geometrical parameters of the laser hardened zone and surface hardness has temperature heating are shown. The optimum magnitudes of the heating temperature (1270 °C and feed rate of the treated surface (90 mm/min for laser transformation hardening of the tool steel AISI D2 using fiber laser with scanner were defined.

  16. Effects of densified silica fume on microstructure and compressive strength of blended cement pastes

    Ji Yajun; Cahyadi, Jong Herman

    2003-01-01

    Some experimental investigations on the microstructure and compressive strength development of silica fume blended cement pastes are presented in this paper. The silica fume replacement varies from 0% to 20% by weight and the water/binder ratio (w/b) is 0.4. The pore structure by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive strength at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 90 days have been studied. The test results indicate that the improvements on both microstructure and mechanical properties of hardened cement pastes by silica fume replacement are not effective due to the agglomeration of silica fume particles. The unreacted silica fume remained in cement pastes, the threshold diameter was not reduced and the increase in compressive strength was insignificant up to 28 days. It is suggested that the proper measures should be taken to disperse silica fume agglomeration to make it more effective on improving the properties of materials

  17. 1H NMR relaxometry as an indicator of setting and water depletion during cement hydration

    Wang, Biyun; Faure, Paméla; Thiéry, Mickaël; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been used to detect setting and microstructure evolution during cement hydration. NMR measurements were performed since casting, during setting and until hardening (from 0 to 3 days). The mobility of water molecules was assessed by an analysis focused on the diagram of longitudinal relaxation time T 1 generated by an Inversion Recovery sequence. The initial stiffening of the solid network was identified by an analysis of the relaxation rate 1/T 1 . The kinetics of water depletion was investigated by using a simple one-pulse acquisition sequence. In parallel, conventional techniques (Vicat needle and temperature monitoring), as well as numerical simulations of hydration, were used to complement and validate these NMR results. Cement pastes and mortars with different water-to-cement ratios made of grey or white OPCs were tested. Furthermore, the effects of the addition of sand, super-plasticizer and silica fume on the hydration kinetics were investigated

  18. Properties of cement-fly ash grout admixed with bentonite, silica fume, or organic fiber

    Huang, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to investigate the properties of cement-fly ash grout mixtures as barriers for isolation of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In the grout studied, fly ash was used to replace 30 percent by mass of cement. Three additives including bentonite, silica fume, and polypropylene fiber were used individually in the grout mixes to improve the properties of the grouts in different aspects. The flowability, bleeding, and setting time of freshly mixed grouts were determined; and the unconfined compressive strength, pore size distribution, and water permeability were determined for hardened grouts at various curing durations up to 120 days. Finally, the durability of cement-fly ash grouts was carefully examined in terms of the changes in their physical properties after different levels of exposure to sulfate attack and wet-dry cycles

  19. The maximum percentage of fly ash to replace part of original Portland cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete

    Mallisa, Harun; Turuallo, Gidion

    2017-11-01

    This research investigates the maximum percent of fly ash to replace part of Orginal Portland Cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete. Many researchers have found that the incorporation of industrial by-products such as fly ash as in producing concrete can improve properties in both fresh and hardened state of concrete. The water-binder ratio was used 0.30. The used sand was medium sand with the maximum size of coarse aggregate was 20 mm. The cement was Type I, which was Bosowa Cement produced by PT Bosowa. The percentages of fly ash to the total of a binder, which were used in this research, were 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%; while the super platicizer used was typed Naptha 511P. The results showed that the replacement cement up to 25 % of the total weight of binder resulted compressive strength higher than the minimum strength at one day of high-strength concrete.

  20. BUSFET -- A radiation-hardened SOI transistor

    Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Draper, B.L.; Dodd, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The total-dose hardness of SOI technology is limited by radiation-induced charge trapping in gate, field, and SOI buried oxides. Charge trapping in the buried oxide can lead to back-channel leakage and makes hardening SOI transistors more challenging than hardening bulk-silicon transistors. Two avenues for hardening the back-channel are (1) to use specially prepared SOI buried oxides that reduce the net amount of trapped positive charge or (2) to design transistors that are less sensitive to the effects of trapped charge in the buried oxide. In this work, the authors propose a partially-depleted SOI transistor structure for mitigating the effects of trapped charge in the buried oxide on radiation hardness. They call this structure the BUSFET--Body Under Source FET. The BUSFET utilizes a shallow source and a deep drain. As a result, the silicon depletion region at the back channel caused by radiation-induced charge trapping in the buried oxide does not form a conducting path between source and drain. Thus, the BUSFET structure design can significantly reduce radiation-induced back-channel leakage without using specially prepared buried oxides. Total dose hardness is achieved without degrading the intrinsic SEU or dose rate hardness of SOI technology. The effectiveness of the BUSFET structure for reducing total-dose back-channel leakage depends on several variables, including the top silicon film thickness and doping concentration, and the depth of the source. 3-D simulations show that for a body doping concentration of 10 18 cm -3 , a drain bias of 3 V, and a source depth of 90 nm, a silicon film thickness of 180 nm is sufficient to almost completely eliminate radiation-induced back-channel leakage. However, for a doping concentration of 3 x 10 17 cm -3 , a thicker silicon film (300 nm) must be used

  1. Recycling of End of Life Concrete Fines into Hardened Cement and Clean Sand

    Lotfi, S.; Rem, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the massive by-products of concrete to concrete recycling is the crushed concrete fines, that is often 0 - 4mm. Although the construction sector is to some extent familiar with the utilization of the recycled coarse fraction (>4 mm), at present there is no high-quality application for

  2. Chloride adsorption by calcined layered double hydroxides in hardened Portland cement paste

    Yoon, Seyoon; Moon, Juhyuk; Bae, Sungchul; Duan, Xiaonan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Monteiro, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using calcined layered double hydroxides (CLDHs) to prevent chloride-induced deterioration in reinforced concrete. CLDHs not only adsorbed chloride ions in aqueous solution with a memory effect but also had

  3. Changes of strength characteristics of pervious concrete due to variations in water to cement ratio

    Kovac, M.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    Pervious concrete is considered to be a sustainable pavement material due to high water permeability. The experiment presented in this paper was aimed at study the influence of water to cement ratio on both the compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete. Typically, less water content in concrete mixture leads to less porosity of cement paste and thus it provides desirable mechanical properties. In case of conventional dense concrete, the lower is the water to cement ratio, the higher or better is the strength, density and durability of concrete. This behaviour is not quite clear in case of pervious concrete because of low amount of cement paste present. Results of compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete are discussed in the paper while taking into account values measured after 2 and 28 days of hardening and variations in water to cement ratio. The results showed that changes of water to cement ratio from 0.25 to 0.35 caused only slight differences in strength characteristics, and this applied to both types of tested strength.

  4. Defining the Brittle Failure Envelopes of Individual Reaction Zones Observed in CO2-Exposed Wellbore Cement.

    Hangx, Suzanne J T; van der Linden, Arjan; Marcelis, Fons; Liteanu, Emilia

    2016-01-19

    To predict the behavior of the cement sheath after CO2 injection and the potential for leakage pathways, it is key to understand how the mechanical properties of the cement evolves with CO2 exposure time. We performed scratch-hardness tests on hardened samples of class G cement before and after CO2 exposure. The cement was exposed to CO2-rich fluid for one to six months at 65 °C and 8 MPa Ptotal. Detailed SEM-EDX analyses showed reaction zones similar to those previously reported in the literature: (1) an outer-reacted, porous silica-rich zone; (2) a dense, carbonated zone; and (3) a more porous, Ca-depleted inner zone. The quantitative mechanical data (brittle compressive strength and friction coefficient) obtained for each of the zones suggest that the heterogeneity of reacted cement leads to a wide range of brittle strength values in any of the reaction zones, with only a rough dependence on exposure time. However, the data can be used to guide numerical modeling efforts needed to assess the impact of reaction-induced mechanical failure of wellbore cement by coupling sensitivity analysis and mechanical predictions.

  5. Coating compositions hardenable by ionization beams

    Chaudhari, D.; Haering, E.; Dobbelstein, A.; Hoselmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    Coating compositions hardenable by ionizing radiation are described which contain as binding agents a mixture of at least 1 unsaturated olefin compound containing urethane groups, and at least 1 further unsaturated olefin compound that may be copolymerized. The unsaturated olefin compound containing the urethane groups is a reaction product of a compound containing carboxylic acid groups and a compound containing at least 1 isocyanate group where the mixture of the two olefins may contain conventional additives of the lacquer industry. 6 claims, no drawings

  6. An Innovative Radiation Hardened CAM Architecture

    Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This article describes an innovative Content Addressable Memory (CAM) cell with radiation hardened (RH) architecture. The RH-CAM is designed in a commercial 28 nm CMOS technology. The circuit has been simulated in worst-case conditions, and the effects due to single particles have been analyzed by injecting a current pulse into a circuit node. The proposed architecture is suitable for on-time pattern recognition tasks in harsh environments, such as front-end electronics in hadron colliders and in space applications.

  7. Radiation-hardened nonvolatile MNOS RAM

    Wrobel, T.F.; Dodson, W.H.; Hash, G.L.; Jones, R.V.; Nasby, R.D.; Olson, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation hardened nonvolatile MNOS RAM is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The memory organization is 128 x 8 bits and utilizes two p-channel MNOS transistors per memory cell. The peripheral circuitry is constructed with CMOS metal gate and is processed with standard Sandia rad-hard processing techniques. The devices have memory retention after a dose-rate exposure of 1E12 rad(Si)/s, are functional after total dose exposure of 1E6 rad(Si), and are dose-rate upset resistant to levels of 7E8 rad(Si)/s

  8. Radiation-hardened CMOS integrated circuits

    Pikor, A.; Reiss, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Substantial effort has been directed at radiation-hardening CMOS integrated circuits using various oxide processes. While most of these integrated circuits have been successful in demonstrating megarad hardness, further investigations have shown that the 'wet-oxide process' is most compatible with the RCA CD4000 Series process. This article describes advances in the wet-oxide process that have resulted in multimegarad hardness and yield to MIL-M-38510 screening requirements. The implementation of these advances into volume manufacturing is geared towards supplying devices for aerospace requirements such as the Defense Meterological Satellite program (DMSP) and the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS). (author)

  9. Application of submerged induction hardening; Ekichu koshuha yakiire no jitsuyoka

    Nishimori, Y; Nagai, Y; Amii, Y [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan); Tanaka, Y [Netsuren Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuma, T [Toyo Advanced Technologies Co. Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    As a cost-cutting measure, the linerless diesel engine was adopted by applying submerged induction hardening process which can harden partial inner surface of cylinder block bore. In applying this process, (1) development of induction coil which can form any shape of quenched pattern and (2) the development of machining technology which can hone precisely the distorted bore after quenching, were important. With these improvements, submerged Induction hardening was made practical. 1 ref., 11 figs.

  10. Hardening device, by inserts, of electronic component against radiation

    Val, C.

    1987-01-01

    The hardening device includes at least two materials, one with high atomic number with respect to the other. One of these materials is set as inserts in a layer of the other material. The hardening device is then made by stacking of such layers, the insert density varying from one layer to the other, making thus vary the atomic number resulting from the hardening device along its thickness, following a predefined law [fr

  11. Investigation of srawberry hardening in low temperatures in vitro

    Lukoševičiūtė, Vanda; Rugienius, Rytis; Kavaliauskaitė, Danguolė

    2007-01-01

    Cold resistance of different strawberry varieties in vitro and ability to retain hardening after defrosting and repeated hardening. Phytohormons – gibberellin and abscisic acid added in the growing medium were investigated in Horticulture plant genetic and biotechnology department of LIH. We tried to model common conditions in temperate zone when freeze-thaw cycles often occur during wintertime. For investigation in vitro strawberries for the first time hardened in light at the temperature of...

  12. Smart cement modified with iron oxide nanoparticles to enhance the piezoresistive behavior and compressive strength for oil well applications

    Vipulanandan, C; Mohammed, A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, smart cement with a 0.38 water-to-cement ratio was modified with iron oxide nanoparticles (NanoFe 2 O 3 ) to have better sensing properties, so that the behavior can be monitored at various stages of construction and during the service life of wells. A series of experiments evaluated the piezoresistive smart cement behavior with and without NanoFe 2 O 3 in order to identify the most reliable sensing properties that can also be relatively easily monitored. Tests were performed on the smart cement from the time of mixing to a hardened state behavior. When oil well cement (Class H) was modified with 0.1% of conductive filler, the piezoresistive behavior of the hardened smart cement was substantially improved without affecting the setting properties of the cement. During the initial setting the electrical resistivity changed with time based on the amount of NanoFe 2 O 3 used to modify the smart oil well cement. A new quantification concept has been developed to characterize the smart cement curing based on electrical resistivity changes in the first 24 h of curing. Addition of 1% NanoFe 2 O 3 increased the compressive strength of the smart cement by 26% and 40% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. The modulus of elasticity of the smart cement increased with the addition of 1% NanoFe 2 O 3 by 29% and 28% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. A nonlinear curing model was used to predict the changes in electrical resistivity with curing time. The piezoresistivity of smart cement with NanoFe 2 O 3 was over 750 times higher than the unmodified cement depending on the curing time and nanoparticle content. Also the nonlinear stress–strain and stress–change in resistivity relationships predicated the experimental results very well. Effects of curing time and NanoFe 2 O 3 content on the model parameters have been quantified using a nonlinear model. (paper)

  13. Configurable Radiation Hardened High Speed Isolated Interface ASIC, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NVE Corporation will design and build an innovative, low cost, flexible, configurable, radiation hardened, galvanically isolated, interface ASIC chip set that will...

  14. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  15. Effect of a bonding agent on in vitro biochemical activities of remineralizing resin-based calcium phosphate cements.

    Dickens, Sabine H; Flaim, Glenn M

    2008-09-01

    To test whether fluoride in a resin-based Ca-PO4 ion releasing cement or coating with an acidic bonding agent for improved adhesion compromised the cement remineralization potential. Cements were formulated without fluoride (Cement A) or with fluoride (Cement B). The treatment groups were A=Cement A; A2=Cement A+bonding agent; B=Cement B; B2=Cement B+bonding agent. The calcium, phosphate, and fluoride ion release in saliva-like solution (SLS) was determined from hardened cement disks without or with a coating of bonding agent. For the remineralization, two cavities were prepared in dentin of extracted human molars and demineralized. One cavity received composite resin (control); the other received treatment A, A2, B or B2. After 6 week incubation in SLS, 180 microm cross-sections were cut. The percentage remineralization was determined by transverse microradiography comparing the dentin mineral density under the cement to that under the control. The percentage of remineralization (mean+/-S.D.) was A (39+/-14)=B (37+/-18), A2 (23+/-13), B2 (14+/-7). Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Holm-Sidak test showed a significant effect from the presence of bonding agent (p0.05). The ion solution concentrations of all groups showed undersaturation with respect to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium fluoride and supersaturation for fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite suggesting a positive remineralization potential. Compared to the control all treatments resulted in mineral increase. The remineralization was negatively affected by the presence of the bonding agent.

  16. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  17. Mechanical characteristics of hardened concrete with different mineral admixtures: a review.

    Ayub, Tehmina; Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Memon, Fareed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The available literature identifies that the addition of mineral admixture as partial replacement of cement improves the microstructure of the concrete (i.e., porosity and pore size distribution) as well as increasing the mechanical characteristics such as drying shrinkage and creep, compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, and modulus of elasticity; however, no single document is available in which review and comparison of the influence of the addition of these mineral admixtures on the mechanical characteristics of the hardened pozzolanic concretes are presented. In this paper, based on the reported results in the literature, mechanical characteristics of hardened concrete partially containing mineral admixtures including fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS), metakaolin (MK), and rice husk ash (RHA) are discussed and it is concluded that the content and particle size of mineral admixture are the parameters which significantly influence the mechanical properties of concrete. All mineral admixtures enhance the mechanical properties of concrete except FA and GGBS which do not show a significant effect on the strength of concrete at 28 days; however, gain in strength at later ages is considerable. Moreover, the comparison of the mechanical characteristics of different pozzolanic concretes suggests that RHA and SF are competitive.

  18. US cement industry

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Suitability of alumina cements for the cementation of boreholes under corrosive conditions, especially at the press fitting of CO{sub 2}; Eignung von Tonerdezementen fuer die Bohrlochzementierung unter korrosiven Bedingungen, insbesondere bei CO{sub 2}-Einpressung. Literaturstudie

    Plank, J.; Sieber, R. (comps.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bauchemie

    2011-07-15

    Calcium aluminate cements, also called aluminate cements, are special cements based on calcium aluminates. In construction (especially in dry-mix mortars), they are valued for their remarkably higher acid and corrosion resistance compared to Portland cement. Their high temperature resistance especially qualifies them for refractory cements which are used e.g. as liners in cement rotary kilns. The worldwide production of calcium aluminate cements adds up to about 3 million tons. In oil well cementing, calcium aluminate cements have first been used at the beginning of the 90ies, in fact initially for geothermal wells. Applications in permafrost soils as well as fire-flooding wells came later. The reason for the use in geothermal wells. Applications in permafrost soils as well as fire-flooding wells came later. The reason for the use in geothermal wells were severe problems with API Portland cements affected by hot, carbonic acid rich formation brines. With support from the companies Unocal and Halliburton, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) developed a special cement based on 60 parts by weight of calcium aluminate cement and 40 parts ASTM class F fly ash. This binder is notably CO{sub 2} resistant when mixed with a 25 wt.% Na-polyphosphate solution. Laboratory tests and field applications conclude that this cement is resistant to CO{sub 2} corrosion at temperatures up to 300 C for over 20 years. In 1997, for the first time numerous geothermal wells have been cemented using this cement. They are intact to this day. When this cement hardens at room temperature, amorphous reaction products are formed and the reaction is incomplete. However, at higher temperatures hydroxyapatite, boehmite, Na-P-zeolite, analcime or katoite are formed as crystalline reaction products. The CO{sub 2} resistance of this cement is due to specific chemical reactions. In contact with hot alkaline carbonate solutions, analcime converts to cancrinite, and CO{sub 2} is incorporated into

  20. HYDRATION AND PROPERTIES OF BLENDED CEMENT SYSTEMS INCORPORATING INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    Heikal M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the characteristics of ternary blended system, namely granulated blast-furnace slag (WCS, from iron steel company and Homra (GCB from Misr Brick (Helwan, Egypt and silica fume (SF at 30 mass % pozzolanas and 70 mass % OPC. The required water of standard consistency and setting times were measured as well as physico-chemical and mechanical characteristics of the hardened cement pastes were investigated. Some selected cement pastes were tested by TGA, DTA and FT-IR techniques to investigate the variation of hydrated products of blended cements. The pozzolanic activity of SF is higher than GCB and WCS. The higher activity of SF is mainly due to its higher surface area than the other two pozzolanic materials. On the other side, GCB is more pozzolanic than WCS due to GCB containing crystalline silica quartz in addition to an amorphous phase. The silica quartz acts as nucleating agents which accelerate the rate of hydration in addition to its amorphous phase, which can react with liberating Ca(OH2 forming additional hydration products.

  1. Physico Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Waste Rubber Cement Mortar

    Younes, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study a partial replacement of aggregate with two different ratios of waste rubber (5%, 10%) with the addition of a constant ratio of rice husk ash (RHA), 5% was carried out. The hardened cement mortar used the optimum water of consistency. The specimens were molded into 1 inch cubic moulds .The specimens were first cured for 24 hours, at 100% relative humidity and then cured under tap water for 3, 7 and 28 days followed by irradiation at different doses of gamma irradiation namely 5 and 10 kGy. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties such as compressive strength, total porosity and bulk density were studied for the three types of specimens. The results showed that the values of the compressive strength, bulk density and chemically combined water of the blended cement mortar paste (OPC-RHA) increase ,while blended cement mortar paste with 5% RHA and 5, 10% waste rubber decrease. The results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and thermal behavior of the specimens. Also, it was observed that the irradiated sample was thermally more stable than the unirradiated one

  2. Chemical environment in cements

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  3. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  4. Induction surface hardening of hard coated steels

    Pantleon, K.; Kessler, O.; Hoffann, F.; Mayr, P. [Stiftung Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik, Bremen (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    The properties of hard coatings deposited using CVD processes are usually excellent. However, high deposition temperatures negatively influence the substrate properties, especially in the case of low alloyed steels. Therefore, a subsequent heat treatment is necessary to restore the properties of steel substrates. Here, induction surface hardening is used as a method of heat treatment after the deposition of TiN hard coatings on AISI 4140 (DIN42CrMo4) substrates. The influences of the heat treatment on both the coating and the substrate properties are discussed in relation to the parameters of induction heating. Thereby, the heating time, heating atmosphere and the power input into the coating-substrate compounds are varied. As a result of induction surface hardening, the properties of the substrates are improved without losing good coating properties. High hardness values in the substrate near the interface allow the AISI 4140 substrates to support TiN hard coatings very well. Consequently, higher critical loads are measured in scratch tests after the heat treatment. Also, compressive residual stresses in the substrate are generated. In addition, only a very low distortion appears. (orig.)

  5. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF JOINT GRINDING OF CEMENT AND COOPER SLAG ON MORTAR PROPERTIES

    Kravtsov Aleksey Vladimirovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of applying copper manufacturing waste locating in the Chelyabinsk region as a component of mixed is considered in this article. Application of mixed binder with superplasticizers, based on esters with carboxyl groups, have not sufficiently been studied by the present time due to the diversity of species and complexity of the chemical structure. This trend is current for today’s science because of the growing rates and scales of building production, in particular, of concrete works. Copper slag dumps located in the Ural Federal district haven’t been widely used in building production or in other industrial production by the present time. Efficient utilization of copper production waste materials will help to solve ecological problems in many regions of Russia. Structure formation period of cement stone based on mixed binder made of Portland cement and granulated cooper slag with application of superplasticizer is studied in the article. The authors present a thermal variation diagram of mortar based on mixed binder made of Portland cement and granulated cooper slag in the process of 21 hours of hardening under normal conditions and the results of ultrasound investigation of concrete structure formation period during 5 hours of hardening. The strength development process diagram of mortar based on mixed binder made of Portland cement and granulated cooper slag for 28 days of hardening under normal conditions and the research results of the compressive strength of concrete samples are shown in this article. The obtained characteristics don’t confirm the prospects of applying joint grinding for mortar with the observed kind of non-ferrous metallurgy waste. Also, the obtained results allow us to make a conclusion about little advantages of using this method of binder production. Copper slag can be more effectively used as a component of complex organic and mineral admixture for building production with different purposes and fields

  7. Stability of reinforced cemented backfills

    Mitchell, R.J.; Stone, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mining with backfill has been the subject of several international meetings in recent years and a considerable research effort is being applied to improve both mining economics and ore recovery by using backfill for ground support. Classified mill tailings sands are the most commonly used backfill material but these fine sands must be stabilized before full ore pillar recovery can be achieved. Normal portland cement is generally used for stabilization but the high cost of cement prohibits high cement usage. This paper considers the use of reinforcements in cemented fill to reduce the cement usage. It is concluded that strong cemented layers at typical spacings of about 3 meters in a low cement content bulk fill can reinforce the fill and reduce the overall cement usage. Fibre reinforcements introduced into strong layers or into bulk fills are also known to be effective in reducing cement usage. Some development work is needed to produce the ideal type of anchored fibre in order to realize economic gains from fibre-reinforced fills

  8. Properties of Fresh and Hardened High Strength Steel Fibres Reinforced Self-Compacted Concrete

    Saad Ali Al-Ta'an

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fresh and hardened properties of high strength steel fibrous self-compacted concrete were studied in this investigation. One reference high strength self-compacted concrete mix is used, with five percent (by weight of cement silica fume and eight percent of the cement replaced by limestone powder. Three steel fibres percentages by volume of concrete are used (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2. The used steel fibres were a shelled Harex type with irregular cross-section, equivalent diameter of 0.9278 mm, and 32 mm long. Super plasticizer was used to improve the workability and flow ability of the mixes. The test results showed that the presence of steel fibres decrease the flow ability, and increase the time of spreading, segregation, and passing ability of the fresh concrete. For the fibres percentages used, the fresh properties were within the recommended specifications for the self-compacted concrete. The test results showed an early strength development rate more than that for plain normal concrete due to the presence of the fine materials. As for normal concrete, the test results showed also that the increase in the splitting strength is more than the increase in the compressive strength due to the presence of the steel fibres. The brittle mode of failure of the plain unreinforced specimens changed to a ductile one due to the presence of the steel fibres.

  9. Studies on cement matrix materials used at the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant for radwaste conditioning

    Dragolici, Felicia; Lungu, Laura; Nicu, Mihaela; Rotarescu, Gheorghe; Turcanu, Corneliu

    2003-01-01

    The research activities performed by Department of Radioactive Waste Management is focused on the treatment of LLAW products obtained by chemical precipitation and on the conditioning of these products by cementation. The individual mechanisms implied in the chemical precipitation processes are directly dependent on the precipitate properties and structure, which in turn are connected with the initial system composition and the precipitation procedure, i.e. reagent concentration, rate and orders of chemical addition, mixing rate and time and ageing conditions. In case of conditioning by cementation, the chemical nature and proportion of the sludges or concentrates affect both the hydrolysis of the initial cement components and the reactions of metastable hydration constituents, as well as the mechanical strength and chemical resistance of the hardened cemented matrix.Generally, the study of the precipitation products and their behaviour during cementation and the long-term disposal is extremely difficult because of the system complexity (phase composition and structure) and the lack of the non-destructive analytical methods. The experience accumulated by the countries who advanced nuclear programmes in military and socio-economic fields and which produced important volumes of radioactive wastes, leads us to study some of mineral additives to be used in the conditioning and disposal technology. Is well known that some mineral additives can diminish the leaching rate of the radionuclides in the disposal environment.The studies have the purpose to obtain the most propitious mixture of cement-bentonite and cement-volcanic tuff, which have the mechanical properties similar to the cement paste used for the conditioning of radioactive waste.Taking into account the characteristics of these mineral binders, namely a very good plasticity and capacity of adsorption, which lead at the decrease of porosity, the mixture is planned to be used in the future, at the Radioactive

  10. Bake hardening of nanograin AA7075 aluminum alloy

    Dehghani, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The bake hardening behavior of AA7075 was studied and compared with its coarse-grain counterpart. ► Nanograin AA7075 exhibited 88–100% increase in bake hardenability. ► Nanograin AA7075 exhibited 36–38% increase in final yield strength after baking. ► Maximum bake hardenability and final yield stress were about 185 MPa and 719 MPa. - Abstract: In the present work, the bake hardening of nanostructured AA7075 aluminum alloy was compared with that of its coarse-grain counterpart. Surface severe plastic deformation (SSPD) was used to produce nanograin layers on both surfaces of workpieces. The nanostructured layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The thickness of nanostructured layer, having the grains of 50–110 nm, was about 75 μm on each side of workpiece. The bake hardenability of nanograin and coarse-grain AA7075 was then compared by pre-straining to 2, 4 and 6% followed by baking at 100 °C and 200 °C for 20 min. Comparing to coarse-grain case, there was about 88–100% increase in bake hardenability and about 36–38% increase in yield strength after the bake hardening of present nanograin AA7075. Such an increase in bake hardenability and strength was achieved when the thickness of two nanograin layers was about only one-tenth of the whole thickness.

  11. Work hardening correlation for monotonic loading based on state variables

    Huang, F.H.; Li, C.Y.

    1977-01-01

    An absolute work hardening correlation in terms of the hardness parameter and the internal stress based on the state variable approach was developed. It was found applicable to a variety of metals and alloys. This correlation predicts strain rate insensitive work hardening properties at low homologous temperatures and produces strain rate effects at higher homologous temperatures without involving thermally induced recovery processes

  12. Analysis of the work-hardening process in spheroidized steels

    Pacheco, J.L.

    1981-07-01

    An elementary model for the work-hardening process in duplex-structures steels (ferrite - spheroidite) is proposed and tested on low, medium and high carbon content, which seems to give good results concerning the influence of the volume fraction and particle size of the second phase on the work-hardening behaviour. (Author) [pt

  13. Design and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal-enhanced epoxy hardeners

    Shane X. Peng; Robert J. Moon; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are renewable, sustainable, and abundant nanomaterial widely used as reinforcing fillers in the field of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, two-part epoxy systems with CNC-enhanced hardeners were fabricated. Three types of hardeners, Jeffamine D400 (JD400), diethylenetriamine (DETA), and (±)-trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane (DACH), were...

  14. ANISOTROPIC STRAIN-HARDENING IN POLYCRYSTALLINE COPPER AND ALUMINUM

    HESS, F

    1993-01-01

    A new viscoplastic model for the plastic stress-strain behaviour of f.c.c. metals is presented. In this model the strain hardening results from increasing dislocation densities. The observed stagnation of strain hardening after strain reversals is explained by a lowering of the increase in

  15. Using dehydrated cement paste as new type of cement additive

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.; Dong, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study, including evaluation and modification, on using dehydrated cement paste (DCP) as a new type of cement additive. After a series of processes, normal DCP (N-DCP) was produced as before and a modified form of DCP (M-DCP) was produced as well. The cementitious

  16. A review of the stages of work hardening

    Rollett, A.D.; Kocks, U.F.

    1993-07-01

    Stages of work hardening are reviewed with emphasis on links between each stage. Simple quantitative descriptions are given for each stage. Similarities between stage I, easy glide, and stage IV, large strain hardening, are pointed out both in terms of magnitude of the hardening rate and of the underlying mechanism of dislocation debris accumulation. Stage II is described as an athermal hardening stage that occurs when statistical variations in the dislocation ``forest`` lead to geometrical storage of dislocations. The steadily decreasing hardening rate observed in stage III is characterized by the increasing rate of loss of dislocation density due to dynamic recovery. Stage III appears to have an asymptote to a saturation stress which is determined by the characteristics of the dislocation tangles, or cell walls. The imperfect nature of the dynamic recovery process, however, leads to the accumulation of dislocation debris and this, by analogy with stage 1, causes the apparent saturation stress to rise, thus causing stage IV.

  17. Coating compositions hardenable by ionization beams

    Chaudhari, D.; Haering, E.; Dobbelstein, A.; Hoselmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    Coating compositions hardenable by ionizing radiation comprise as binding agents a mixture of A. at least 1 unsaturated olefin compound containing urethane groups, and B. at least 1 further unsaturated olefin compound that may be copolymerized. The unsaturated olefin compound A. containing the urethane groups in a reaction product of (a) a compound of the general formula (CHR 1 = CR 2 COOCH 2 CH(OH)CH 2 O CO-)/sub n/R where n is 1 or 2, where R stands for a straight chain or branched alkyl group of valence n, where R 1 is hydrogen, methyl; or the group -COOCH 2 CH(OH)CH 2 OCOR 3 - where R 3 is a monovalent alkyl residue and where R 2 is hydrogen or methyl, and (b) a compound containing at least 1 isocyanate group where the mixture of (A) and (B) may contain conventional additives of the lacquer industry. 6 claims

  18. Keystroke Dynamics-Based Credential Hardening Systems

    Bartlow, Nick; Cukic, Bojan

    abstract Keystroke dynamics are becoming a well-known method for strengthening username- and password-based credential sets. The familiarity and ease of use of these traditional authentication schemes combined with the increased trustworthiness associated with biometrics makes them prime candidates for application in many web-based scenarios. Our keystroke dynamics system uses Breiman’s random forests algorithm to classify keystroke input sequences as genuine or imposter. The system is capable of operating at various points on a traditional ROC curve depending on application-specific security needs. As a username/password authentication scheme, our approach decreases the system penetration rate associated with compromised passwords up to 99.15%. Beyond presenting results demonstrating the credential hardening effect of our scheme, we look into the notion that a user’s familiarity to components of a credential set can non-trivially impact error rates.

  19. Radiation hardening of MOS devices by boron

    Danchenko, V.

    1975-01-01

    A novel technique is disclosed for radiation hardening of MOS devices and specifically for stabilizing the gate threshold potential at room temperature of a radiation subjected MOS field-effect device of the type having a semiconductor substrate, an insulating layer of oxide on the substrate, and a gate electrode disposed on the insulating layer. In the preferred embodiment, the novel inventive technique contemplates the introduction of boron into the insulating oxide, the boron being introduced within a layer of the oxide of about 100A to 300A thickness immediately adjacent the semiconductor-insulator interface. The concentration of boron in the oxide layer is preferably maintained on the order of 10 atoms/ cm 3 . The novel technique serves to reduce and substantially annihilate radiation induced positive gate charge accumulations, which accumulations, if not eliminated, would cause shifting of the gate threshold potential of a radiation subjected MOS device, and thus render the device unstable and/or inoperative. (auth)

  20. Rapid cold hardening: a gut feeling.

    Worland, M R; Convey, P; Luke ov , A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the rate of cold hardening of a field population of Antarctic springtails and the effect of eating food with particular levels of ice nucleating activity on the animal's whole body freezing point. The SCPs of samples of c. 20, freshly collected, Cryptopygus antarcticus were measured hourly over a 32 hour collection period using differential scanning calorimetry and related to habitat temperature. The mean SCP of the springtails increased from -24 to -10 degree C during which time the habitat temperature warmed slowly from -2.5 to +2.5 degree C. In laboratory experiments, previously starved, cold tolerant springtails were fed on selected species of algae with measured SCP's but there was no clear correlation between the SCP of food and that of the animals after feeding. Microscopic examination of faecal pellets and guts from springtails showed that algal cells were completely destroyed during digestion.

  1. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  2. Biomass for green cement

    Cumming, R. [Lafarge Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Lafarge examined the use of waste biomass products in its building materials and provided background information on its operations. Cement kiln infrastructure was described in terms of providing access to shipping, rail and highways; conveying and off-loading equipment; having large storage facilities; and, offering continuous monitoring and stack testing. The presentation identified the advantages and disadvantages of a few different biomass cases such as coal; scrap tires; non-recyclable household waste; and processed biomass. A chart representing landfill diversion rates was presented and the presentation concluded with a discussion of energy recovery and recycling. 1 tab., figs.

  3. Health hazards of cement dust

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  4. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  5. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  6. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  7. STUDY ON POZZOLANA ACTIVITY OF WHEAT STRAW ASH AS POTENTIAL ADMIXTURE FOR BLENDED CEMENTS

    Ondrej Jankovsky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw ash coming from combustion of packed wheat straw was studied as a potential pozzolana active admixture for blended cements. X-Ray fluorescence, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to examine chemical and mineralogical composition, morphology and elemental distribution of a raw untreated ash. Due to high carbon content, the wheat straw ash was thermally treated for 2 hours at 700 °C and analyzed again using the same analytic techniques. Thermal treatment process was monitored using simultaneous thermal analysis and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The pozzolana activity was assessed using Chapelle and Frattini tests. In the next step, wheat straw ash was used for preparation of blended cement pastes. The content of ash in the blends was 10, 15, and 20% by mass. For the hardened pastes, basic physical properties, mechanical parameters, and pore size distribution were measured. For fresh past mixes, workability was tested. Moreover, leachability of chlorides, nitrates, sulfates and alkalis from paste samples was studied. The experimentally obtained data pointed to the high pozzolana activity of wheat straw ash and sufficient mechanical properties of cement pastes with the ash content up to 20 mass% of cement. In summary, the analyzed waste product from biomass combustion was found to be applicable as a part of cement-based blended binder providing economic and environmental benefits for concrete industry.

  8. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Wei Jie; Wang Jiecheng; Liu Xiaochen; Ma Jian; Liu Changsheng; Fang Jing; Wei Shicheng

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  9. Effect of the calcium to phosphorus ratio on the setting properties of calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Vlad, M D; Gómez, S; Barracó, M; López, J; Fernández, E

    2012-09-01

    α-Tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) has become the main reactant of most experimental and commercial ceramic bone cements. It has calcium-to-phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio of 1.50. The present study expands and reports on the microstructures and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate (CP) cements containing sintered monolithic reactants obtained in the interval 1.29 properties as well as on their microstructure and crystal phase evolution. The results showed that: (a) CP-cements made with reactants with Ca/P ratio other than 1.50 have longer setting and lower hardening properties; (b) CP-cements reactivity was clearly affected by the Ca/P ratio of the starting reactant; (c) reactants with Ca/P calcium pyrophosphate and α- and β-TCP. Similarly, reactants with Ca/P > 1.50 were composed of α-TCP, tetracalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite; (d) only the reactant with Ca/P = 1.50 was monophasic and was made of α-TCP, which transformed during the setting into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite; (e) CP-cements developed different crystal microstructures with specific features depending on the Ca/P ratio of the starting reactant.

  10. Incorporation of cement bypass flue dust in fly ash and blast furnace slag-based geopolymer

    Mohamed E. Sultan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This work utilizes cement kiln dust in fly ash and blast furnace slag-based geopolymer. Geopolymer cement was produced using different compositions of ground, granulated blast furnace slag with fly ash and cement bypass flue dust. Crystalline sodium metasilicate pentahydrate was used as an activator at 10, 15 and 20% (by weight of the geopolymer source materials. The geopolymer is formed in the solid state like ordinary Portland cement. The mechanical and chemical properties of the geopolymeric materials were examined. Measuring of mechanical properties by compressive strength of the hardened geopolymer pastes at different curing ages; microstructure was evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM; thermal properties were estimated by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA and derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG. The results indicate that the compressive strength of the geopolymer pastes is increased with higher Na2SiO3.5H2O content. The geopolymeric properties were enhanced by higher pH, which helps in the dissolution of geopolymer source materials during geopolymerization. SEM showed that mixes containing 15 and 20% sodium metasilicate had more compact and dense structures. On the other hand, GGBFS mix (G-20 exhibits more hydration and geopolymeric products during TGA/DTG compared with other mixes which contain FA with/without GGBFS. Keywords: Cement bypass flue dust, Geopolymer, Ground granulated blast furnace, Fly ash

  11. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Wei Jie [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang Jiecheng; Liu Xiaochen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ma Jian [Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Liu Changsheng [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Fang Jing, E-mail: biomater2006@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Shicheng, E-mail: nic7505@263.net [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  12. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  13. Effects of Medium Temperature and Industrial By-Products on the Key Hardened Properties of High Performance Concrete.

    Safiuddin, Md; Raman, Sudharshan N; Zain, Muhammad Fauzi Mohd

    2015-12-10

    The aim of the work reported in this article was to investigate the effects of medium temperature and industrial by-products on the key hardened properties of high performance concrete. Four concrete mixes were prepared based on a water-to-binder ratio of 0.35. Two industrial by-products, silica fume and Class F fly ash, were used separately and together with normal portland cement to produce three concrete mixes in addition to the control mix. The properties of both fresh and hardened concretes were examined in the laboratory. The freshly mixed concrete mixes were tested for slump, slump flow, and V-funnel flow. The hardened concretes were tested for compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity after exposing to 20, 35 and 50 °C. In addition, the initial surface absorption and the rate of moisture movement into the concretes were determined at 20 °C. The performance of the concretes in the fresh state was excellent due to their superior deformability and good segregation resistance. In their hardened state, the highest levels of compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity were produced by silica fume concrete. In addition, silica fume concrete showed the lowest level of initial surface absorption and the lowest rate of moisture movement into the interior of concrete. In comparison, the compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, initial surface absorption, and moisture movement rate of silica fume-fly ash concrete were close to those of silica fume concrete. Moreover, all concretes provided relatively low compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity when they were exposed to 50 °C. However, the effect of increased temperature was less detrimental for silica fume and silica fume-fly ash concretes in comparison with the control concrete.

  14. Effects of Medium Temperature and Industrial By-Products on the Key Hardened Properties of High Performance Concrete

    Md. Safiuddin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work reported in this article was to investigate the effects of medium temperature and industrial by-products on the key hardened properties of high performance concrete. Four concrete mixes were prepared based on a water-to-binder ratio of 0.35. Two industrial by-products, silica fume and Class F fly ash, were used separately and together with normal portland cement to produce three concrete mixes in addition to the control mix. The properties of both fresh and hardened concretes were examined in the laboratory. The freshly mixed concrete mixes were tested for slump, slump flow, and V-funnel flow. The hardened concretes were tested for compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity after exposing to 20, 35 and 50 °C. In addition, the initial surface absorption and the rate of moisture movement into the concretes were determined at 20 °C. The performance of the concretes in the fresh state was excellent due to their superior deformability and good segregation resistance. In their hardened state, the highest levels of compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity were produced by silica fume concrete. In addition, silica fume concrete showed the lowest level of initial surface absorption and the lowest rate of moisture movement into the interior of concrete. In comparison, the compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, initial surface absorption, and moisture movement rate of silica fume-fly ash concrete were close to those of silica fume concrete. Moreover, all concretes provided relatively low compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity when they were exposed to 50 °C. However, the effect of increased temperature was less detrimental for silica fume and silica fume-fly ash concretes in comparison with the control concrete.

  15. Effects of Medium Temperature and Industrial By-Products on the Key Hardened Properties of High Performance Concrete

    Safiuddin, Md.; Raman, Sudharshan N.; Zain, Muhammad Fauzi Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work reported in this article was to investigate the effects of medium temperature and industrial by-products on the key hardened properties of high performance concrete. Four concrete mixes were prepared based on a water-to-binder ratio of 0.35. Two industrial by-products, silica fume and Class F fly ash, were used separately and together with normal portland cement to produce three concrete mixes in addition to the control mix. The properties of both fresh and hardened concretes were examined in the laboratory. The freshly mixed concrete mixes were tested for slump, slump flow, and V-funnel flow. The hardened concretes were tested for compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity after exposing to 20, 35 and 50 °C. In addition, the initial surface absorption and the rate of moisture movement into the concretes were determined at 20 °C. The performance of the concretes in the fresh state was excellent due to their superior deformability and good segregation resistance. In their hardened state, the highest levels of compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity were produced by silica fume concrete. In addition, silica fume concrete showed the lowest level of initial surface absorption and the lowest rate of moisture movement into the interior of concrete. In comparison, the compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, initial surface absorption, and moisture movement rate of silica fume-fly ash concrete were close to those of silica fume concrete. Moreover, all concretes provided relatively low compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity when they were exposed to 50 °C. However, the effect of increased temperature was less detrimental for silica fume and silica fume-fly ash concretes in comparison with the control concrete. PMID:28793732

  16. Radiation chemical treatment of cement mortar - polymer composites

    Younes, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the hardened cement pastes,mortars and concretes which contain polymers has progressed rapidly in years. Developmental work has identified a number of applications where the high strength and excellent durability of the composite materials will provide definite advantages over conventional mortars and concretes. The first investigations of polymer - impregnated concrete tried mainly to increase the quantity of absorbed and polymerised monomer because this gave a greater decrease in the original of concrete and a subsequent improvement in physico - mechanical properties. However, the production costs which is due mainly to the organic polymer, becomes the most important item. In this respect recent research showed the possibility of obtaining with a very compact concrete, of relative low porosity, a compound material with high performances after impregnation 26 tabs.,28 figs.,109 refs

  17. Solidification of nitrate solutions with alkali-activated slag and slag–metakaolin cements

    Rakhimova, Nailia R.; Rakhimov, Ravil Z.; Osin, Yury N.; Naumkina, Natalia I.; Gubaidullina, Alfiya M.; Yakovlev, Grigory I.; Shaybadullina, Arina V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effectiveness of an AASC matrix for NaNO 3 solution solidification is stated. • XRD, DTA-TG, and X-ray microtomography experiments were performed. • Crystallization of NaNO 3 reduces the shrinkage of hardened AASC-based waste forms. • Metakaolin shortens the setting time and increases the compressive strength of AASC. - Abstract: The solidification of nitrate solutions with alkali-activated slag (AASC) and slag–metakaolin cements (AASMC) and the resulting setting times, compressive strengths, dimensional stability, water resistance, hydration products, microstructures, and macroporous network structures were evaluated. The influences of the alkali activator concentration, mineral composition of metakaolin, ratio of slag to slag + metakaolin, and concentration of NaNO 3 on the cement performance were all evaluated in detail. The compressive strength of cemented nitrate solutions with AASC and AASMC aged for 28 days was from 13.4 to 42 MPa depending on the NaNO 3 concentration. X-ray diffractometer, differential thermal analyzer, and electron microscope analyses suggested that NaNO 3 crystallizes in cementitious matrices without reacting with the hydration products of AASC and AASMC. X-ray microtomography showed that the solidified NaNO 3 solution with a salt concentration of 700 g/l and AASC had a denser microstructure without shrinkage microcracks, a smaller macropore volume, and smaller macropore sizes than hardened AASC-based paste mixed with water

  18. Influence of superplasticizers on the long-term properties of cement pastes and possible impact on radionuclide uptake in a cement-based repository for radioactive waste

    Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Glaus, M.A.; Thoenen, T.; Schwyn, B.

    2014-01-01

    cations. Thermodynamic modelling further indicates that radionuclide complexation by formate at the concentration level in Acc can be excluded, suggesting that the apparent effect of Acc in the sorption measurements on the resin can be attributed to colloids formed owing to the high concentrations of Al and S in Acc. Sorption studies with the same radionuclides on hardened cement paste (HCP) in the presence of concrete admixture solutions and pore fluids squeezed from cement pastes further revealed no significant effect on sorption by either the concrete admixtures or their degradation products that were potentially present in the pore fluids. This finding suggests that the investigated concrete admixtures (PNS, PCE, Acc) and their degradation products have no significant impact on radionuclide mobilisation

  19. Hardening and softening mechanisms of pearlitic steel wire under torsion

    Zhao, Tian-Zhang; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Song, Hong-Wu; Cheng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mechanical behavior of pearlitic steel wire is studied using torsion. • Work hardening results from refinement lamellar pearlitic structure. • Softening results from recovery, shear bands and lamellar fragmentations. • A microstructure based analytical flow stress model is established. - Abstract: The mechanical behaviors and microstructure evolution of pearlitic steel wires under monotonic shear deformation have been investigated by a torsion test and a number of electron microscopy techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with an aim to reveal the softening and hardening mechanisms of a randomly oriented pearlitic structure during a monotonic stain path. Significantly different from the remarkable strain hardening in cold wire drawing, the strain hardening rate during torsion drops to zero quickly after a short hardening stage. The microstructure observations indicate that the inter-lamellar spacing (ILS) decreases and the dislocations accumulate with strain, which leads to hardening of the material. Meanwhile, when the strain is larger than 0.154, the enhancement of dynamic recovery, shear bands (SBs) and cementite fragmentations results in the softening and balances the strain hardening. A microstructure based analytical flow stress model with considering the influence of ILS on the mean free path of dislocations and the softening caused by SBs and cementite fragmentations, has been established and the predicted flow shear curve meets well with the measured curve in the torsion test

  20. Numerical and experimental comparison of plastic work-hardening rules

    Haisler, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe recent numerical and experimental correlation studies of several plastic work-hardening rules. The mechanical sublayer model and the combined kinematic-isotropic hardening rules are examined and the numerical results for several structural geometries are compared to experimental results. Both monotonic and cyclic loads are considered. The governing incremental plasticity relations are developed for both work-hardening models. The combined kinematic-isotropic hardening model is developed in terms of a ratio γ which controls the relative contribution of kinematic hardening (yield surface translation) and isotropic hardening (yield surface expansion). In addition to making use of a uniaxial stress-strain curve as input data, the model allows for the input of a yield surface size vs. uniaxial plastic strain curve obtained from a cyclic uniaxial reverse loading test. The mechanical sublayer model is developed in general form and a new method for determining the sublayer parameters (stress weighting factors and yield stresses) is presented. It is demonstrated that former procedures used to obtain the sublayer parameters are inconsistent for multiaxial loading. Numerical and experimental results are presented for a cylinder, circular plate with punch, and a steel pressure vessel. The numerical results are obtained with the computer program AGGIE I. The comparison study indicates that reasonable agreement is obtained with both hardening models; the choice depending upon whether the loading is monotonic or cyclic

  1. Work hardening behavior study of structural alloys for cryogenic applications

    Chu, D.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Previous investigation on aluminum-lithium alloys have indicated different dependencies of the work hardening behavior on temperature. This variation in temperature dependence is attributed to differences in microstructure rather than composition. An understanding of the microstructural effect on the observed thermal dependency is important as it may allow the tailoring of deformation properties through mechanical processing. Work hardening analyses on other aluminum alloys and a number of structural steels have been performed to better elucidate the role played by microstructure in determining the work hardening behavior. In the paper correlations between the differences in mechanical behavior and the various microstructures observed are presented

  2. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  3. Enhancing the compressive strength of landfill soil using cement and bagasse ash

    Azim, M. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Tarmizi, A. K. A.; Shahidan, S.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The stabilisation of contaminated soil with cement and agricultural waste is a widely applied method which contributes to the sustainability of the environment. Soil may be stabilised to increase strength and durability or to prevent erosion and other geotechnical failure. This study was carried out to evaluate the compressive strength of ex-landfill soil when cement and bagasse ash (BA) are added to it. Different proportions of cement (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) was added to sample weights without BA. On the other hand, the cement in a different batch of sample weights was replaced by 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% of BA. All samples were allowed to harden and were cured at room temperature for 7, 14 and 28 days respectively. The strength of the contaminated soil was assessed using an unconfined compressive strength test (UCS). The laboratory tests also included the index properties of soil, cement and bagasse ash in raw form. The results indicated that the samples with cement achieved the highest compressive strength measuring 4.39 MPa. However, this study revealed that the use of bagasse ash produced low quality products with a reduction in strength. For example, when 5% of cement was replaced with 5% ash, the compressive strength decreased by about 54% from 0.72 MPa to 0.33 MPa. Similarly, the compressive strength of each sample after a curing period of 28 days was higher compared to samples cured for 7 and 14 days respectively. This is proved that a longer curing period is needed to increase the compressive strength of the samples.

  4. A cement based syntactic foam

    Li Guoqiang; Muthyala, Venkata D.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cement based syntactic foam core was proposed and experimentally investigated for composite sandwich structures. This was a multi-phase composite material with microballoon dispersed in a rubber latex toughened cement paste matrix. A trace amount of microfiber was also incorporated to increase the number of mechanisms for energy absorption and a small amount of nanoclay was added to improve the crystal structure of the hydrates. Three groups of cement based syntactic foams with varying cement content were investigated. A fourth group of specimens containing pure cement paste were also prepared as control. Each group contained 24 beam specimens. The total number of beam specimens was 96. The dimension of each beam was 30.5 cm x 5.1 cm x 1.5 cm. Twelve foam specimens from each group were wrapped with plain woven 7715 style glass fabric reinforced epoxy to prepare sandwich beams. Twelve cubic foam specimens, three from each group, with a side length of 5.1 cm, were also prepared. Three types of testing, low velocity impact test and four-point bending test on the beam specimens and compression test on the cubic specimens, were conducted to evaluate the impact energy dissipation, stress-strain behavior, and residual strength. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also used to examine the energy dissipation mechanisms in the micro-length scale. It was found that the cement based syntactic foam has a higher capacity for dissipating impact energy with an insignificant reduction in strength as compared to the control cement paste core. When compared to a polymer based foam core having similar compositions, it was found that the cement based foam has a comparable energy dissipation capacity. The developed cement based syntactic foam would be a viable alternative for core materials in impact-tolerant composite sandwich structures

  5. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  6. Open Source Radiation Hardened by Design Technology

    Shuler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology allows use of the latest microcircuit technology with lowest power and fastest speed, with minimal delay and engineering costs, through new Radiation Hardened by Design (RHBD) techniques that do not require extensive process characterization, technique evaluation and re-design at each Moore's Law generation. The separation of critical node groups is explicitly parameterized so it can be increased as microcircuit technologies shrink. The technology will be open access to radiation tolerant circuit vendors. INNOVATION: This technology would enhance computation intensive applications such as autonomy, robotics, advanced sensor and tracking processes, as well as low power applications such as wireless sensor networks. OUTCOME / RESULTS: 1) Simulation analysis indicates feasibility. 2)Compact voting latch 65 nanometer test chip designed and submitted for fabrication -7/2016. INFUSION FOR SPACE / EARTH: This technology may be used in any digital integrated circuit in which a high level of resistance to Single Event Upsets is desired, and has the greatest benefit outside low earth orbit where cosmic rays are numerous.

  7. Radiation-hardened microwave communications system

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    The consolidated fuel reprocessing program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing signal transmission techniques and equipment to improve the efficiency of remote handling operations for nuclear applications. These efforts have been largely directed toward the goals of (a) remotely controlling bilateral force-reflecting servomanipulators for dexterous manipulation-based operations in remote maintenance tasks and (b) providing television viewing of the work site. In September 1987, developmental microwave transceiving hardware operating with dish antennas was demonstrated in the advanced integrated maintenance system (AIMS) facility at ORNL, successfully implementing both high-quality one-way television transmissions and simultaneous bidirectional digital control data transmissions with very low error rates. Initial test results based on digital transmission at a 1.0-Mbaud data rate indicated that the error rates of the microwave system were comparable to those of a hardwired system. During these test intervals, complex manipulator operations were performed, and the AIMS transporter was moved repeatedly without adverse effects on data integrity. Results of these tests have been factored into subsequent phases of the development program, with an ultimate goal of designing a fully radiation-hardened microwave signal transmission system for use in nuclear facilities

  8. Development of the Portland cement slurries with diatomaceous earth to the oil industry; Desenvolvimento de pastas de cimento Portland com adicao de diatomita para a industria do petroleo

    Brito, Roseane A; Melo, Dulce M.A.; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Simao, Cristina A.; Paiva, Maria D.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Melo, Marcus A.F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    The class-G Portland cement has been used with success in oil well cementing. The material is usually shipped to the Northeast Brazil, because the only plant that manufactures class-G is located in Cantagalo/RJ. The present work investigates the influence of the partial substitution of Portland cement by diatomaceous earth, aiming at reducing the costs in oil well cementing, improving the slurry properties and using local raw material. The diatomaceous earth has pozzolanic properties and can be used as extenders of cement slurries. This properties added to the lower cost and availability of this material in Northeast Brazil, make the diatomaceous earth a candidate material to produce light cements, to well conditions in advanced phases of production. It were evaluated the rheological properties of the slurries (at 25 and 52 deg C), volume of free water, compressive strength after curing for 8, 24 and 48 h at 38 deg C, and consistometry tests. The results show that the diatomaceous earth maintain the viscosity values and gel force suitable for use in oil well cementing. No free water was observed in the formulations. It was also verified that the compressive strength of slurries hardened with diatomaceous earth is similar to those with only Portland cement and that the minimum compressive strength of 300 psi, after curing for 8 h was reached. The thickening time was longer than the average value and the application value. (author)

  9. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  10. Does cement mantle thickness really matter?

    Caruana, J.

    2008-01-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of differing thicknesses. This thesis is concerned with variability in cement thickness around the Stanmore Hip, due to surgical approach, broach size and stem orientation, and its effects on stress and cracking in the cement. The extent to which cement mantle thi...

  11. A Radiation Hardened Housekeeping Slave Node (RH-HKSN) ASIC

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This projects seeks to continue the development of the Radiation Hardened Housekeeping Slave Node (RH-HKSN) ASIC. The effort has taken parallel paths by implementing...

  12. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  13. Radiation-chemical hardening of phenol-formaldehyde oligomers

    Shlapatskaya, V.V.; Omel'chenko, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-chemical hardening of phenol formaldehyde oligomers of the resol type has been studied in the presence of furfural and diallylphthalate diluents. The samples have been hardened on an electron accelerator at an electron energy of 1.0-1.1 MeV and a dose rate of 2-3 Mrad/s. The kinetics of hardening has been studied on the yield of gel fraction within the range of absorbed doses from 7 to 400 Mrad. Radiation-chemical hardening of the studied compositions is activated with sensitizers, namely, amines, metal chlorides, and heterocyclic derivatives of metals. Furfural and diallylphthalate compositions are suitable for forming glass-fibre plastic items by the wet method and coatings under the action of ionizing radiations

  14. Technologies Enabling Custom Radiation-Hardened Component Development, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two primary paths are available for the creation of a Rad-Hard ASIC. The first approach is to use a radiation hardened process such as existing Rad-Hard foundries....

  15. system hardening architecture for safer access to critical business

    eobe

    System hardening is a defence strategy, where several different security measures are applied at various layers, all of which .... commerce have tremendously imparted on corporate services ..... Technology and Exploring Engineering, Vol. 2,.

  16. Space Qualified, Radiation Hardened, Dense Monolithic Flash Memory, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation hardened nonvolatile memories for space is still primarily confined to EEPROM. There is high density effective or cost effective NVM solution available to...

  17. Generation Mechanism of Work Hardened Surface Layer in Metal Cutting

    Hikiji, Rikio; Kondo, Eiji; Kawagoishi, Norio; Arai, Minoru

    Finish machining used to be carried out in grinding, but it is being replaced by cutting with very small undeformed chip thickness. In ultra precision process, the effects of the cutting conditions and the complicated factors on the machined surface integrity are the serious problems. In this research, work hardened surface layer was dealt with as an evaluation of the machined surface integrity and the effect of the mechanical factors on work hardening was investigated experimentally in orthogonal cutting. As a result, it was found that work hardened surface layer was affected not only by the shear angle varied under the cutting conditions and the thrust force of cutting resistance, but also by the thrust force acting point, the coefficient of the thrust force and the compressive stress equivalent to the bulk hardness. Furthermore, these mechanical factors acting on the depth of the work hardened surface layer were investigated with the calculation model.

  18. Radiation Hardened Ethernet PHY and Switch Fabric, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innoflight will develop a new family of radiation hardened (up to 3 Mrad(Si)), fault-tolerant, high data-rate (up to 8 Gbps), low power Gigabit Ethernet PHY and...

  19. Space Qualified, Radiation Hardened, Dense Monolithic Flash Memory, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to build a radiation hardened by design (RHBD) flash memory, using a modified version of our RH-eDRAM Memory Controller to solve all the single...

  20. System Hardening Architecture for Safer Access to Critical Business ...

    System Hardening Architecture for Safer Access to Critical Business Data. ... and the threat is growing faster than the potential victims can deal with. ... in this architecture are applied to the host, application, operating system, user, and the ...

  1. Improved penetration capacity of cement fluids during repair-insulation operations

    Kruglitskiy, M M; Gorbachev, V M; Khaber, N V

    1979-01-01

    In order to conduct repair-installation work as an additive to the plugging solution made of highly dispersed oxides, a hydrpohilic organic aerosol is suggested, diethylene glycol aerosol (DEGA). It is an amorphous silica with specific surface of the globules 300 m/sup 3//g (100 times greater than cement). When particles of DEGA are added, there is a significant change in the process of structural-formation of the suspension. Strength during bending of two-day stones hardened at temperatures 75/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure increases by 20-30%. The maximum deformation of the aerosol-containing composition increases by 8-16%, and the compression strength by 21-23% in different periods of hardening under normal conditions. These data show that in addition to increasing the fracture stablity of the cement stone, the DEGA additive promotes an improvement in its homogeneity and decrease in porosity. When DEGA is added to cement solutions, their sedimentation stability drastically improves. This is especially important in conducting insulation operations in inclined wells, since in this case the probability of formation of near-wall channels in the inclined parts of the shaft diminishes. Experiments have shown that when DEGA additive is introduced, the permeability of the plugging fluids increases 1.5-2.5-fold. The best results were obtained when DEGA is added to the plugging fluid stabilized by polymer. In this case such a shortcoming of aerosol-containing composition is removed such as aggression of the actual particles of aerosol in the hardening water as a consequence of which their dispersion is not completely manifest.

  2. Lateral-access Class II restoration using resin-modified glass-ionomer or silver-cermet cement.

    Croll, T P

    1995-02-01

    Direct-access preparation of a carious proximal surface is perhaps the most conservative approach to restoration. Physical properties and handling characteristics of silver amalgam and of resin composite and lack of fluoride ion release make these materials unsuitable for direct buccal- or lingual-access proximal restoration. Insufficient strengths and radiolucency of self-hardening glass-ionomer cements preclude their use for Class II restorations. However, glass-ionomer silver-cermet cement and some resin-modified glass-ionomer materials are proving useful for non-stress-bearing Class II restorations and may have applications in preventive dentistry. This article describes lateral-access Class II restoration with modified glass-ionomer cements. Emphasis is placed on careful handling of materials, maintenance of an ideal operative field, and conservation of tooth structure.

  3. Effect of clay nanoparticles addition in the properties of cement class G expose to CO_2-rich media

    Costa, E.M. da; Moraes, M.K. de

    2016-01-01

    This work investigate the influence of incorporation of clay nanoparticles in class G cement paste used in the completion and abandonment of oil wells, in environments containing CO_2 under high pressure and temperature. For that, hardened class G cement pastes with and without nanoparticles were submitted to degradation tests in wet supercritical CO_2 and water saturated with CO_2 at 90 ° C and 15MPa for 7, 21 and 56 days. The techniques of scanning electron microscopy for field emission, x-ray diffraction and compressive strength were used to evaluate the effect of degradation on the structure and mechanical properties of the cement paste. The chemically altered layer consists predominantly of calcium carbonate. In general, the inclusion of clay promoted an increase in chemically altered layer, but otherwise minimized the compressive strength loss over time. (author)

  4. Application of solvlent change techniques to blended cements used to immobilize low-level radioactive liquid waste

    Kruger, A.A.

    1996-07-01

    The microstructures of hardened portland and blended cement pastes, including those being considered for use in immobilizing hazardous wastes, have a complex pore structure that changes with time. In solvent exchange, the pore structure is examined by immersing a saturated sample in a large volume of solvent that is miscible with the pore fluid. This paper reports the results of solvent replacement measurements on several blended cements mixed at a solution:solids ratio of 1.0 with alkaline solutions from the simulation of the off- gas treatment system in a vitrification facility treating low-level radioactive liquid wastes. The results show that these samples have a lower permeability than ordinary portland cement samples mixed at a water:solids ratio of 0.70, despite having a higher volume of porosity. The microstructure is changed by these alkaline solutions, and these changes have important consequences with regard to durability

  5. Batch experiments of Cs, Co and Eu sorption onto cement with dissolved fibre mass UP2 in the liquid phase

    Holgersson, Stellan; Dubois, Isabelle; Boerstell, Lisa

    2011-05-01

    The potential effects of alkaline degradation products of the fibre mass UP2 on metal sorption onto fresh and degraded cement have been investigated. For this purpose, crushed cement have been leached to support material for the subsequent batch sorption experiments. Alkaline leaching of UP2 were also made, which gave leaching solutions of 30 ppm DOC after 300 days. These solutions were used in the batch experiments. Continued leaching shows that even higher concentrations can be expected: 45 ppm DOC in the leaching with a low-alkaline (pH 12.5) artificial cement pore-water and 150 ppm DOC with a high alkaline (pH 13.3) artificial pore-water. Batch sorption experiments with 134 Cs and 60 Co show no effects on metal sorption onto leached or fresh cement when the 30 ppm DOC leaching solutions of UP2 were used as liquid phase. The measured R d values were 10 -3 m 3 /kg for Cs and in the range of 0.03-0.1 m 3 /kg for Co. Separate experiments with other organics ligands were also made: EDTA, ISA and citric acid with maximum concentrations of 500, 300 and 300 ppm DOC, respectively. Also here no effects on Cs and Co sorption onto leached and fresh cement were established. Batch experiments of 152 Eu were not successful since results were above detection level of about 2-3 m 3 /kg. The addition of the aforementioned 30 ppm UP2 leaching solution or the other organic ligands did not affect the detection level. Measurements of background concentrations of total Eu show a peculiar result of Eu apparently increasing in batch experiments with cement to final values of about 5-10 nM. The underlying reason for this effect, whether real or artificial, could not be established. Background concentrations of Th were about 1 nM in both cement and blank samples. Background concentrations of Zr were about 100-700 nM in both cement and blank samples, the high values were measured acidic blanks, which suggests either acidic leaching from tube walls or contamination from the acid itself. No

  6. Batch experiments of Cs, Co and Eu sorption onto cement with dissolved fibre mass UP2 in the liquid phase

    Holgersson, Stellan; Dubois, Isabelle; Boerstell, Lisa (Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden))

    2011-05-15

    The potential effects of alkaline degradation products of the fibre mass UP2 on metal sorption onto fresh and degraded cement have been investigated. For this purpose, crushed cement have been leached to support material for the subsequent batch sorption experiments. Alkaline leaching of UP2 were also made, which gave leaching solutions of 30 ppm DOC after 300 days. These solutions were used in the batch experiments. Continued leaching shows that even higher concentrations can be expected: 45 ppm DOC in the leaching with a low-alkaline (pH 12.5) artificial cement pore-water and 150 ppm DOC with a high alkaline (pH 13.3) artificial pore-water. Batch sorption experiments with 134Cs and 60Co show no effects on metal sorption onto leached or fresh cement when the 30 ppm DOC leaching solutions of UP2 were used as liquid phase. The measured R{sub d} values were 10-3 m3/kg for Cs and in the range of 0.03-0.1 m3/kg for Co. Separate experiments with other organics ligands were also made: EDTA, ISA and citric acid with maximum concentrations of 500, 300 and 300 ppm DOC, respectively. Also here no effects on Cs and Co sorption onto leached and fresh cement were established. Batch experiments of 152Eu were not successful since results were above detection level of about 2-3 m3/kg. The addition of the aforementioned 30 ppm UP2 leaching solution or the other organic ligands did not affect the detection level. Measurements of background concentrations of total Eu show a peculiar result of Eu apparently increasing in batch experiments with cement to final values of about 5-10 nM. The underlying reason for this effect, whether real or artificial, could not be established. Background concentrations of Th were about 1 nM in both cement and blank samples. Background concentrations of Zr were about 100-700 nM in both cement and blank samples, the high values were measured acidic blanks, which suggests either acidic leaching from tube walls or contamination from the acid itself. No

  7. Long-time leaching and corrosion tests on full-scale cemented waste forms in the Asse salt mine. Sampling and analyses 2003

    Kienzler, B.; Schlieker, M.; Bauer, A.; Metz, V.; Meyer, H.

    2004-10-01

    The paper presents the follow-up of experimental findings from full-scale leach tests performed on simulated cemented waste forms for more than 20 years in salt brines and water. Measurements cover pH, density, and the composition of leachates as well as the release of radionuclides such as Cs, U and Np. Indicators for waste form corrosion and radionuclide release is Cs and NO 3 . Corrosion of cemented waste forms depends on the pore volume of the hardened cement which is correlated to the water/cement ratio. The release of radionuclides is evaluated and compared to small-scale laboratory tests. Excellent interpretation of observed concentrations is obtained for uranium and neptunium by comparison with model calculations. (orig.)

  8. DMILL circuits. The hardened electronics decuples its performances

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Thanks to the DMILL (mixed logic-linear hardening) technology under development at the CEA, MHS, a French company specialized in the fabrication of integrated circuits now produces hardened electronic circuits ten times more resistant to radiations than its competitors. Outside the initial market (several thousands of circuits for the LHC particle accelerator of Geneva), a broad choice of applications is opened to this technology: national defense, space, civil nuclear and medical engineering, and high temperature applications. Short paper. (J.S.)

  9. Micromilling of hardened tool steel for mould making applications

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    geometries as those characterizing injection moulding moulds. The realization of the micromilling process in connection with hardened tool steel as workpiece material is particularly challenging. The low strength of the miniaturized end mills implies reduction and accurate control of the chip load which...... wear. This paper presents the micromilling process applied to the manufacturing of micro injection moulding moulds in hardened tool steel, presenting experimental evidence and possible solutions to the above-mentioned issues....

  10. Radiation hardening of metals irradiated by heavy ions

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Skuratov, V.A.; Mikhajlova, N.Yu.; Regel', V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The damage dose dependence in the 10 -4 -10 -2 dpa region of radiation hardening of Al, V, Ni, Cu irradiated by xenon ions with 124 MeV energy is investigated using the microhardness technique and transmission electron microscope. It is shown that the pure metals radiation hardening is stimulated for defects clusters with the typical size less than 5 nm, as in the case of neutron and the light charge ion irradiation

  11. Mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified cement mortar with silica fume used as matrix including radioactive waste

    Dakroury, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discussed the mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol - modified cement mortar with silica fume to assess the safety for disposal of radioactive waste. The modified cement mortars containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of 10 % silica fume (SF) .The chemical reaction between polymer and cement - hydrated product were investigated by the Infrared Spectral Technology, Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray diffraction. The leaching of 137Cs from a waste composite into a surrounding fluid has been studied .The results shown that PVA increases the strength and decreases the porosity. The increase in strength duo to the interaction of PVA with cement , may be forming some new compound that fill the pores or improve the bond between the cement . The pozzolanic reaction of the SF increases the calcium silicate hydrates in the hardening matrix composites. There is distinct change in the refinement of the pore structure in cement composites giving fewer capillary pores and more of the finer gel pores

  12. Influence of Graphene Nanosheets on Rheology, Microstructure, Strength Development and Self-Sensing Properties of Cement Based Composites

    Sardar Kashif Ur Rehman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, Graphene oxide (GO, prepared by modified hammer method, is characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR Spectrometry and Raman spectra. The dispersion efficiency of GO in aqueous solution is examined by Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy and it is found that GO sheets are well dispersed. Thereafter, rheological properties, flow diameter, hardened density, compressive strength and electrical properties of GO based cement composite are investigated by incorporating 0.03% GO in cement matrix. The reasons for improvement in strength are also discussed. Rheological results confirm that GO influenced the flow behavior and enhanced the viscosity of the cement based system. From XRD and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA results, it is found that more hydration occurred when GO was incorporated in cement based composite. The GO based cement composite improves the compressive strength and density of mortar by 27% and 1.43%, respectively. Electrical properties results showed that GO–cement based composite possesses self-sensing characteristics. Hence, GO is a potential nano-reinforcement candidate and can be used as self-sensing sustainable construction material.

  13. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  14. Radiation-hardened bulk Si-gate CMOS microprocessor family

    Stricker, R.E.; Dingwall, A.G.F.; Cohen, S.; Adams, J.R.; Slemmer, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    RCA and Sandia Laboratories jointly developed a radiation-hardened bulk Si-gate CMOS technology which is used to fabricate the CDP-1800 series microprocessor family. Total dose hardness of 1 x 10 6 rads (Si) and transient upset hardness of 5 x 10 8 rads (Si)/sec with no latch up at any transient level was achieved. Radiation-hardened parts manufactured to date include the CDP-1802 microprocessor, the CDP-1834 ROM, the CDP-1852 8-bit I/O port, the CDP-1856 N-bit 1 of 8 decoder, and the TCC-244 256 x 4 Static RAM. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first section, the basic fundamentals of the non-hardened C 2 L technology used for the CDP-1800 series microprocessor parts is discussed along with the primary reasons for hardening this technology. The second section discusses the major changes in the fabrication sequence that are required to produce radiation-hardened devices. The final section details the electrical performance characteristics of the hardened devices as well as the effects of radiation on device performance. Also included in this section is a discussion of the TCC-244 256 x 4 Static RAM designed jointly by RCA and Sandia Laboratories for this application

  15. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  16. Local porosity analysis of pore structure in cement paste

    Hu Jing; Stroeven, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) local porosity theory (LPT) was originally proposed by Hilfer and recently used for the analysis of pore space geometry in model sandstone. LPT pursues to define the probability density functions of porosity and porosity connectivity. In doing so, heterogeneity differences in various sandstone samples were assessed. However, fundamental issues as to the stochastic concept of geometric heterogeneity are ignored in Hilfer's LPT theory. This paper focuses on proper sampling procedures that should be based on stochastic approaches to multistage sampling and geometric heterogeneity. Standard LPT analysis provides a 3-D microscopic modeling approach to materials. Traditional experimental techniques yield two-dimensional (2-D) section images, however. Therefore, this paper replaces the method for assessing material data in standard LPT theory to a more practical one, based on stereological, 3-D interpretation of quantitative image analysis data. The developed methodology is used to characterize the pore structure in hardened cement paste with various water/cement ratios (w/c) at different hydration stages

  17. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  18. Developing precipitation hardenable high entropy alloys

    Gwalani, Bharat

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) is a concept wherein alloys are constructed with five or more elements mixed in equal proportions; these are also known as multi-principle elements (MPEs) or complex concentrated alloys (CCAs). This PhD thesis dissertation presents research conducted to develop precipitation-hardenable high entropy alloys using a much-studied fcc-based equi-atomic quaternary alloy (CoCrFeNi). Minor additions of aluminium make the alloy amenable for precipitating ordered intermetallic phases in an fcc matrix. Aluminum also affects grain growth kinetics and Hall-Petch hardenability. The use of a combinatorial approach for assessing composition-microstructure-property relationships in high entropy alloys, or more broadly in complex concentrated alloys; using laser deposited compositionally graded AlxCrCuFeNi 2 (0 mechanically processed via conventional techniques. The phase stability and mechanical properties of these alloys have been investigated and will be presented. Additionally, the activation energy for grain growth as a function of Al content in these complex alloys has also been investigated. Change in fcc grain growth kinetic was studied as a function of aluminum; the apparent activation energy for grain growth increases by about three times going from Al0.1CoCrFeNi (3% Al (at%)) to Al0.3CoCrFeNi. (7% Al (at%)). Furthermore, Al addition leads to the precipitation of highly refined ordered L12 (gamma') and B2 precipitates in Al0.3CoCrFeNi. A detailed investigation of precipitation of the ordered phases in Al0.3CoCrFeNi and their thermal stability is done using atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Synchrotron X-ray in situ and ex situ analyses. The alloy strengthened via grain boundary strengthening following the Hall-Petch relationship offers a large increment of strength with small variation in grain size. Tensile strength of the Al0.3CoFeNi is increased by 50% on precipitation fine-scale gamma' precipitates

  19. Zinc coated sheet steel for press hardening

    Ghanbari, Zahra N.

    Galvanized steels are of interest to enhance corrosion resistance of press-hardened steels, but concerns related to liquid metal embrittlement have been raised. The objective of this study was to assess the soak time and temperature conditions relevant to the hot-stamping process during which Zn penetration did or did not occur in galvanized 22MnB5 press-hardening steel. A GleebleRTM 3500 was used to heat treat samples using hold times and temperatures similar to those used in industrial hot-stamping. Deformation at both elevated temperature and room temperature were conducted to assess the coating and substrate behavior related to forming (at high temperature) and service (at room temperature). The extent of alloying between the coating and substrate was assessed on undeformed samples heat treated under similar conditions to the deformed samples. The coating transitioned from an α + Gamma1 composition to an α (bcc Fe-Zn) phase with increased soak time. This transition likely corresponded to a decrease in availability of Zn-rich liquid in the coating during elevated temperature deformation. Penetration of Zn into the substrate sheet in the undeformed condition was not observed for any of the processing conditions examined. The number and depth of cracks in the coating and substrate steel was also measured in the hot-ductility samples. The number of cracks appeared to increase, while the depth of cracks appeared to decrease, with increasing soak time and increasing soak temperature. The crack depth appeared to be minimized in the sample soaked at the highest soak temperature (900 °C) for intermediate and extended soak times (300 s or 600 s). Zn penetration into the substrate steel was observed in the hot-ductility samples soaked at each hold temperature for the shortest soak time (10 s) before being deformed at elevated temperature. Reduction of area and elongation measurements showed that the coated sample soaked at the highest temperature and longest soak time

  20. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracting material response from simple mechanical tests on hardening-softening-hardening viscoplastic solids

    Mohan, Nisha

    Compliant foams are usually characterized by a wide range of desirable mechanical properties. These properties include viscoelasticity at different temperatures, energy absorption, recoverability under cyclic loading, impact resistance, and thermal, electrical, acoustic and radiation-resistance. Some foams contain nano-sized features and are used in small-scale devices. This implies that the characteristic dimensions of foams span multiple length scales, rendering modeling their mechanical properties difficult. Continuum mechanics-based models capture some salient experimental features like the linear elastic regime, followed by non-linear plateau stress regime. However, they lack mesostructural physical details. This makes them incapable of accurately predicting local peaks in stress and strain distributions, which significantly affect the deformation paths. Atomistic methods are capable of capturing the physical origins of deformation at smaller scales, but suffer from impractical computational intensity. Capturing deformation at the so-called meso-scale, which is capable of describing the phenomenon at a continuum level, but with some physical insights, requires developing new theoretical approaches. A fundamental question that motivates the modeling of foams is `how to extract the intrinsic material response from simple mechanical test data, such as stress vs. strain response?' A 3D model was developed to simulate the mechanical response of foam-type materials. The novelty of this model includes unique features such as the hardening-softening-hardening material response, strain rate-dependence, and plastically compressible solids with plastic non-normality. Suggestive links from atomistic simulations of foams were borrowed to formulate a physically informed hardening material input function. Motivated by a model that qualitatively captured the response of foam-type vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) pillars under uniaxial compression [2011,"Analysis of

  2. Production and characterization of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate

    Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Santos, Luis A dos; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega; Carrodeguas, Raul G.

    1997-01-01

    Setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate has risen great interest in scientific literature during recent years due to their total bio compatibility and to the fact that they harden 'in situ', providing easy handling and adaptation to the shape and dimensions of the defect which requires correction, differently from the predecessors, the calcium phosphate ceramics (Hydroxy apatite, β-tri calcium phosphate, biphasic, etc) in the shape of dense or porous blocks and grains. In the work, three calcium-phosphate cement compositions were studied. The resulting compositions were characterized according to the following aspects: setting times, pH, mechanical resistance, crystalline phases, microstructure and solubility in SBF (Simulated Body Fluid). The results show a potential use for the compositions. (author)

  3. Influence of citric acid as setting retarder in CPV portland cement pastes and mortars; Influencia do acido citrico como retardador de pega em pastas e argamassas de cimento portland CPV ARI

    Mendes, B.C.; Lopes, M.M.S.; Alvarenga, R.C.S.S.; Fassoni, D.P.; Pedroti, L.G. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil); Azevedo, A.R.G. de, E-mail: afonso.garcez91@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This work aims to study the availability of using and the influence of citric acid in the properties of pastes and mortars made with Portland cement CPV ARI both in fresh and hardened form. The citric acid dosages were 0, 0.4%, and 0.8% relative to the cement mass. The produced cement pastes were tested to determine normal consistency water and initial and final setting times. Mortars were tested to determine the consistency index, specific gravity, air entrained content in the fresh stage, hardened bulk density, compressive strength at ages 7, 14, and 28 days, and analysis by XRD technique. The results show that citric acid, besides improve the mortar workability, contribute to an increase in mechanical strength in older than 14 days. (author)

  4. Low pH Cements

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  5. Low pH Cements

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  6. Development of cement material using inorganic additives

    Toyohara, Masumitsu; Satou, Tatsuaki; Wada, Mikio; Ishii, Tomoharu; Matsuo, Kazuaki.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic admixtures to enhance the fluidity of cement material was developed. These admixtures turned into easy to immobilize the miscellaneous radioactive waste using cement material. It was found that the ζ potential of cement particles was directly proportional to the content of the inorganic admixtures in cement paste and the particles of cement were dispersed at the high ζ potential. The condensed sodium phosphate, which was the main component of the inorganic admixtures, retarded the dissolution of Ca 2+ ion from the cement, and generated the colloids by incorporating dissolved Ca 2+ ion. The cement material containing the inorganic admixtures was found to have the same mechanical strength and adsorption potential of radionuclides in comparison to normal cement materials. It was confirmed that the cement material containing the inorganic admixture was effectively filled gaps of miscellaneous radioactive waste. (author)

  7. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  8. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  9. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  10. Strain sensitivity of carbon nanotube cement-based composites for structural health monitoring

    D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, Annibale L.; Kenny, Josè M.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based smart sensors appear particularly suitable for monitoring applications, due to their self-sensing abilities, their ease of use, and their numerous possible field applications. The addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides the material with piezoresistive characteristics and enhanced sensitivity to mechanical alterations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the variation of external loads or deformations with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance. Among conductive nanofillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for the fabrication of self-monitoring composites. However, some issues related to the filler dispersion and the mix design of cementitious nanoadded materials need to be further investigated. For instance, a small difference in the added quantity of a specific nanofiller in a cement-matrix composite can substantially change the quality of the dispersion and the strain sensitivity of the resulting material. The present research focuses on the strain sensitivity of concrete, mortar and cement paste sensors fabricated with different amounts of carbon nanotube inclusions. The aim of the work is to investigate the quality of dispersion of the CNTs in the aqueous solutions, the physical properties of the fresh mixtures, the electromechanical properties of the hardened materials, and the sensing properties of the obtained transducers. Results show that cement-based sensors with CNT inclusions, if properly implemented, can be favorably applied to structural health monitoring.

  11. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties

    Hongfang Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbide residue (CCR is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH2, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP. The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope. Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  12. Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles

    Lin, Wei-Ting [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, An, E-mail: ancheng@niu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu [Dept. of Harbor and River Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

  13. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties.

    Sun, Hongfang; Li, Zishanshan; Bai, Jing; Memon, Shazim Ali; Dong, Biqin; Fang, Yuan; Xu, Weiting; Xing, Feng

    2015-02-13

    Calcium carbide residue (CCR) is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH)₂, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP). The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength) with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope). Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  14. Detection of free liquid in cement-solidified radioactive waste drums using computed tomography

    Steude, J.S.; Tonner, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    Acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste drums require that the cement-solidified material in the drum contain minimal free liquid after the cement has hardened. Free liquid is to be avoided because it may corrode the drum, escape and cause environmental contamination. The DOE has requested that a nondestructive evaluation method be developed to detect free liquid in quantities in excess of 0.5% by volume. This corresponds to about 1 liter in a standard 208 liter (55 gallon) drum. In this study, the detection of volumes of free liquid in a 57 cm (2 ft.) diameter cement-solidified drum is demonstrated using high-energy X-ray computed tomography (CT0. In this paper it is shown that liquid concentrations of simulated radioactive waste inside glass tubes imbedded in cement can easily be detected, even for tubes with inner diameters less than 2 mm (0.08 in.). Furthermore, it is demonstrated that tubes containing water and liquid concentrations of simulated radioactive waste can be distinguished from tubes of the same size containing air. The CT images were obtained at a rate of about 6 minutes per slice on a commercially available CT system using a 9 MeV linear accelerator source

  15. An Experimental Study on Effect of Palm – Shell Waste Additive to Cement Strenght Enhancement

    Adi Novriansyah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the cement strength through attaching chemical additive has been popular to meet the required condition for a particular well-cementing job. However, due to a low oil-price phenomenon, pouring and additive should be reconsidered because it can raise the cost and make the project become uneconomic. Another additive material in nanocomposite form will be introduced through this experimental study. The nanocomposite material consist of silica nanoparticle, known as “Nanosilica” and a palm-shell-waste, which is abundant in Indonesia. Before making a nanocomposite, the palm-shell should be burned to obtain a charcoal form, ground and sieved to attain a uniform size.   The study focuses on the two parameters, compressive strength and shear bond strength, which can reflect the strength of the cement. These values are obtained by performing a biaxial loading test to the cement sample. Various samples with different concentration of nanocomposite should be prepared and following the mixing, drying, and hardening process before the loading test is carried out. The result from the test shows a positive indication for compressive strength and shear bond strength values, according to the representative well cementing standards. Increasing the nanocomposite concentration on the cement will increase these values. Furthermore, an investigation on the temperature effect confirms that the sample with 700oC burning temperature have highest compressive-strength and shear-bond-strength values. This is a potential opportunity utilizing a waste-based material to produce another product with higher economic value.

  16. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  17. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2009-06-01

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  18. Computer modelling of age hardening for cast aluminium alloys

    Wu, Linda; Ferguson, W George

    2009-01-01

    Age hardening, or precipitation hardening, is one of the most widely adopted techniques for strengthening of aluminium alloys. Although various age hardening models have been developed for aluminium alloys, from the large volume of literature reviewed, it appears that the bulk of the research has been concentrated on wrought aluminium alloys, only a few of the established precipitation models have been applied to the casting aluminium alloys. In the present work, there are two modelling methods that have been developed and applied to the casting aluminium alloys A356 and A357. One is based on the Shercliff-Ashby methodology to produce a process model, by which we mean a mathematical relationship between process variables (alloy composition, ageing temperature and time) and material properties (yield strength or hardness) through microstructure evolution (precipitate radius, volume fraction). The other method is based on the Kampmann and Wagner Numerical (KWN) model which deals with concomitant nucleation, growth and coarsening and is thus capable of predicting the full evolution of the particle size distribution and then a strength model is used to evaluate the resulting change in hardness or yield strength at room temperature by taking into account contributions from lattice resistance, solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening.

  19. General analytical shakedown solution for structures with kinematic hardening materials

    Guo, Baofeng; Zou, Zongyuan; Jin, Miao

    2016-09-01

    The effect of kinematic hardening behavior on the shakedown behaviors of structure has been investigated by performing shakedown analysis for some specific problems. The results obtained only show that the shakedown limit loads of structures with kinematic hardening model are larger than or equal to those with perfectly plastic model of the same initial yield stress. To further investigate the rules governing the different shakedown behaviors of kinematic hardening structures, the extended shakedown theorem for limited kinematic hardening is applied, the shakedown condition is then proposed, and a general analytical solution for the structural shakedown limit load is thus derived. The analytical shakedown limit loads for fully reversed cyclic loading and non-fully reversed cyclic loading are then given based on the general solution. The resulting analytical solution is applied to some specific problems: a hollow specimen subjected to tension and torsion, a flanged pipe subjected to pressure and axial force and a square plate with small central hole subjected to biaxial tension. The results obtained are compared with those in literatures, they are consistent with each other. Based on the resulting general analytical solution, rules governing the general effects of kinematic hardening behavior on the shakedown behavior of structure are clearly.

  20. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    Carpenter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO 2 . (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  1. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  2. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    2011-12-08

    ... and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... and Cement Clinker from Japan: Investigation No. 731- TA-461 (Third Review). By order of the...

  3. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  4. Influence of coolant motion on structure of hardened steel element

    A. Kulawik

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper is focused on volumetric hardening process using liquid low melting point metal as a coolant. Effect of convective motion of the coolant on material structure after hardening is investigated. Comparison with results obtained for model neglecting motion of liquid is executed. Mathematical and numerical model based on Finite Element Metod is described. Characteristic Based Split (CBS method is used to uncouple velocities and pressure and finally to solve Navier-Stokes equation. Petrov-Galerkin formulation is employed to stabilize convective term in heat transport equation. Phase transformations model is created on the basis of Johnson-Mehl and Avrami laws. Continuous cooling diagram (CTPc for C45 steel is exploited in presented model of phase transformations. Temporary temperatures, phases participation, thermal and structural strains in hardening element and coolant velocities are shown and discussed.

  5. Effect of ethephon on hardening of Pachystroma longifolium seedlings

    João Alexandre Lopes Dranski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Immediately after planting, tree seedlings face adverse environmental and biotic stresses that must be overcome to ensure survival and to yield a desirable growth. Hardening practices in the nursery may help improve seedling stress resistance through reduction of aboveground plant tissues and increased root volume and biomass. We conducted an assay to quantify changes in the morphogenesis following application of ethephon on seedlings of Pachystroma longifolium (Ness I. M. Johnst.during hardening. The results showed no effect of the ethephon treatments on the number of leaves but a reduction of up to 50% in seedling height increment, and an increase in stem diameter increment of up to 44% with the 600 mg L-1 ethephon treatment, which consequently altered seedling Dickson Quality Index. Our results indicate that ethephon may help to promote desired morphological changes that occur during seedling hardening in nurseries.

  6. Branching structure and strain hardening of branched metallocene polyethylenes

    Torres, Enrique; Li, Si-Wan; Costeux, Stéphane; Dealy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    There have been a number of studies of a series of branched metallocene polyethylenes (BMPs) made in a solution, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) polymerization. The materials studied vary in branching level in a systematic way, and the most highly branched members of the series exhibit mild strain hardening. An outstanding question is which types of branched molecules are responsible for strain hardening in extension. This question is explored here by use of polymerization and rheological models along with new data on the extensional flow behavior of the most highly branched members of the set. After reviewing all that is known about the effects of various branching structures in homogeneous polymers and comparing this with the structures predicted to be present in BMPs, it is concluded that in spite of their very low concentration, treelike molecules with branch-on-branch structure provide a large number of deeply buried inner segments that are essential for strain hardening in these polymers

  7. Branching structure and strain hardening of branched metallocene polyethylenes

    Torres, Enrique; Li, Si-Wan; Costeux, Stéphane; Dealy, John M., E-mail: john.dealy@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0C4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    There have been a number of studies of a series of branched metallocene polyethylenes (BMPs) made in a solution, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) polymerization. The materials studied vary in branching level in a systematic way, and the most highly branched members of the series exhibit mild strain hardening. An outstanding question is which types of branched molecules are responsible for strain hardening in extension. This question is explored here by use of polymerization and rheological models along with new data on the extensional flow behavior of the most highly branched members of the set. After reviewing all that is known about the effects of various branching structures in homogeneous polymers and comparing this with the structures predicted to be present in BMPs, it is concluded that in spite of their very low concentration, treelike molecules with branch-on-branch structure provide a large number of deeply buried inner segments that are essential for strain hardening in these polymers.

  8. Nonlinear kinematic hardening under non-proportional loading

    Ottosen, N.S.

    1979-07-01

    Within the framework of conventional plasticity theory, it is first determined under which conditions Melan-Prager's and Ziegler's kinematic hardening rules result in identical material behaviour. Next, assuming initial isotropy and adopting the von Mises yield criterion, a nonlinear kinematic hardening function is proposed for prediction of metal behaviour. The model assumes that hardening at a specific stress point depends on the direction of the new incremental loading. Hereby a realistic response is obtained for general reversed loading, and a smooth behaviour is assured, even when loading deviates more and more from proportional loading and ultimately results in reversed loading. The predictions of the proposed model for non-proportional loading under plane stress conditions are compared with those of the classical linear kinematic model, the isotropic model and with published experimental data. Finally, the limitations of the proposaed model are discussed. (author)

  9. Effect of a biodegradable natural polymer on the properties of hardened lime-based mortars

    Izaguirre, A.; Lanas, J.; Alvarez, J. I.

    2011-01-01

    As an environmentally friendly and energy-saving alternative to cement-based materials and to some chemically obtained water-reducers, a commercialized starch was incorporated into aerial lime-based matrix. Different dosages were tested in order to study the influence that the amount of additive exerted on the properties of the material. Density, shrinkage, water absorption through capillarity, water vapour permeability, mechanical strengths, porosity, pore size distribution, and durability in the face of freezing-thawing cycles were studied in the mortars. The tested starch acted as a thickener for dosages up to 0.30%, and changed its behaviour for the largest dosage (0.50%): in that case it behaved as a plasticizer, dispersing the lime through the fresh mass and generating a more workable material. As a result, the matrix of the hardened mortar presented great coherence, owing to its large density and low porosity, characteristics which led to lower capillarity and permeability, better mechanical properties and durability. (Author) 46 refs.

  10. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    Brown, D.J.; James, J.M.; Lee, D.J.; Smith, D.L.; Walker, A.T.

    1982-03-01

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm 3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  11. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  12. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  13. Kinematic Hardening: Characterization, Modeling and Impact on Springback Prediction

    Alves, J. L.; Bouvier, S.; Jomaa, M.; Billardon, R.; Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.

    2007-01-01

    The constitutive modeling of the materials' mechanical behavior, usually carried out using a phenomenological constitutive model, i.e., a yield criterion associated to the isotropic and kinematic hardening laws, is of paramount importance in the FEM simulation of the sheet metal forming processes, as well as in the springback prediction. Among others, the kinematic behavior of the yield surface plays an essential role, since it is indispensable to describe the Bauschinger effect, i.e., the materials' answer to the multiple tension-compression cycles to which material points are submitted during the forming process. Several laws are usually used to model and describe the kinematic hardening, namely: a) the Prager's law, which describes a linear evolution of the kinematic hardening with the plastic strain rate tensor b) the Frederick-Armstrong non-linear kinematic hardening, basically a non-linear law with saturation; and c) a more advanced physically-based law, similar to the previous one but sensitive to the strain path changes. In the present paper a mixed kinematic hardening law (linear + non-linear behavior) is proposed and its implementation into a static fully-implicit FE code is described. The material parameters identification for sheet metals using different strategies, and the classical Bauschinger loading tests (i.e. in-plane forward and reverse monotonic loading), are addressed, and their impact on springback prediction evaluated. Some numerical results concerning the springback prediction of the Numisheet'05 Benchmark no. 3 are briefly presented to emphasize the importance of a correct modeling and identification of the kinematic hardening behavior

  14. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  15. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  16. Cement production from coal conversion residues

    Brown, L.D.; Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Nahas, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Cement is produced by feeding residue solids containing carbonaceous material and ash constituents obtained from converting a carbonaceous feed material into liquids and/or gases into a cement-making zone and burning the carbon in the residue solids to supply at least a portion of the energy required to convert the solids into cement

  17. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  18. The application and processing of paints hardened by electron beams

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Electron beam hardening is a process for changing liquid surface coatings of different thicknesses by irradiation with electrons of high energy into solid, hard, elastic films. In contrast to the UV process, one can harden pigmented paints with electron beams. An electron accelerator, which remits free electrons is used as the energy source for starting the chemical reaction in the coating material. In order to irradiate flat parts, which were coated with liquid paint by rolling, pouring or spraying, equally with electrons, one must produce an 'electron curtain', similar to that in a paint pouring machine. (orig./PW) [de

  19. Why semiconductors must be hardened when used in space

    Winokur, P.S.

    2000-01-01

    The natural space radiation environment presents a great challenge to present and future satellite systems with significant assets in space. Defining requirements for such systems demands knowledge about the space radiation environment and its effects on electronics and optoelectronics technologies, as well as suitable risk assessment of the uncertainties involved. For mission of high radiation levels, radiation-hardened integrated circuits will be required to preform critical mission functions. The most successful systems in space will be those that are best able to blend standard commercial electronics with custom radiation-hardened electronics in a mix that is suitable for the system of interest

  20. Influence of anisotropic hardening on longitudinal welding strains and stresses

    Gatovskij, K.M.; Revutskij, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    The algorithm and program for estimation of longitudinal welding strains and stresses with account of hardening and Bauschinger effect, which expand the possibilities of more complete description of stress change during thermodeformation welding cycles at bead surfacing on plate made of the 06Kh18N9T steel and AMg61 alloy. It is shown that for metals, deformation curves which are characterized by considerable yield moduli (Esub(T)/E>=0.05) hardening effect is considerable and its account leads to the decrease of stress level in the heataffected zone (down to 20%) [ru

  1. Radiation Hardened 10BASE-T Ethernet Physical Layer (PHY)

    Lin, Michael R. (Inventor); Petrick, David J. (Inventor); Ballou, Kevin M. (Inventor); Espinosa, Daniel C. (Inventor); James, Edward F. (Inventor); Kliesner, Matthew A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments may provide a radiation hardened 10BASE-T Ethernet interface circuit suitable for space flight and in compliance with the IEEE 802.3 standard for Ethernet. The various embodiments may provide a 10BASE-T Ethernet interface circuit, comprising a field programmable gate array (FPGA), a transmitter circuit connected to the FPGA, a receiver circuit connected to the FPGA, and a transformer connected to the transmitter circuit and the receiver circuit. In the various embodiments, the FPGA, transmitter circuit, receiver circuit, and transformer may be radiation hardened.

  2. Aspect-oriented security hardening of UML design models

    Mouheb, Djedjiga; Pourzandi, Makan; Wang, Lingyu; Nouh, Mariam; Ziarati, Raha; Alhadidi, Dima; Talhi, Chamseddine; Lima, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    This book comprehensively presents a novel approach to the systematic security hardening of software design models expressed in the standard UML language. It combines model-driven engineering and the aspect-oriented paradigm to integrate security practices into the early phases of the software development process. To this end, a UML profile has been developed for the specification of security hardening aspects on UML diagrams. In addition, a weaving framework, with the underlying theoretical foundations, has been designed for the systematic injection of security aspects into UML models. The

  3. Work hardening and plastic equation of state of tantalum

    Gypen, L.A.; Aernoudt, E.; Deruyttere, A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of cold deformation on the thermal and athermal components of the flow stress of tantalum was investigated. Up to high deformation levels the strain hardening is due only to the development of internal stress fields; the effective stress remains almost constant. The athermal strain hardening of tantalum is parabolic at low deformation levels (epsilon < 0.5) and linear at high deformation levels, as for other bcc metals. Hart's plastic equation of state is shown to be valid for tantalum at room temperature in the whole deformation range investigated (from epsilon = 0.005 to epsilon = 2.8). (author)

  4. Microstructure and properties of cast iron after laser surface hardening

    Stanislav

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface hardening of cast iron is not trivial due to the material’s heterogeneity and coarse-grained microstructure, particularly in massive castings. Despite that, hardening of heavy moulds for automotive industry is in high demand. The present paper summarises the findings collected over several years of study of materials structure and surface properties. Phase transformations in the vicinity of graphite are described using examples from production of body parts in automotive industry. The description relates to formation of martensite and carbide-based phases, which leads to hardness values above 65 HRC and to excellent abrasion resistance.

  5. Numerical simulations of progressive hardening by using ABAQUS FEA software

    Domański Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns numerical simulations of progressive hardening include phase transformations in solid state of steel. Abaqus FEA software is used for numerical analysis of temperature field and phase transformations. Numerical subroutines, written in fortran programming language are used in computer simulations where models of the distribution of movable heat source, kinetics of phase transformations in solid state as well as thermal and structural strain are implemented. Model for evaluation of fractions of phases and their kinetics is based on continuous heating diagram and continuous cooling diagram. The numerical analysis of thermal fields, phase fractions and strain associated progressive hardening of elements made of steel were done.

  6. Exploration of a radiation hardening stabilized voltage power supply

    Xie Zeyuan; Xu Xianguo

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design method of radiation hardening stabilized voltage power supply that makes use of commercial radiation resistant electronic devices and the test results of radiation performance of the power supply and devices are presented in detail. The experiment results show that the hardened power supply can normally work until 1000 Gy (Si) total dose and 1 × 10 14 n/cm 2 neutron radiation, and it doesn't latchup at about 1 × l0 9 Gy (Si)/s gamma transient dose rate. (authors)

  7. Effect of aluminizing on hardenability of steel (S45C)

    Prayitno, D.; Sugiarto, R.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of research is to know the effect of aluminizing on hardenability of steel (S45C). The research methodologies were as follows. The Steels (S45C) were machined into the Jominy test samples. Next the samples were preheating at 700 ° C for 30 minutes and then the samples were dipped into the molten of aluminium for 3 minutes as a hot dip aluminizng method. The aluminium molten was 700 ° C. Then the samples were cooled into room temperatures. Finally the samples were into the jominy tested. The results show that the aluminizing (include the preheating process) increases the hardenability of steel (S45C).

  8. Structure of hardened alloys of Sr-Rh system

    Dobromyslov, A.V.; Taluth, N.I.

    1997-01-01

    Methods of X-ray diffraction analysis, optical metallography, transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurement were applied to study the structure of hardened zirconium-rhodium system alloys with rhodium contents up to 4.5 at.%. It is shown that in hardening alloys with rhodium concentration lower 2.2 at.% the eutectoid decomposition takes place and bainite-like structure is formed. A metastable ω-phase is formed in alloys with rhodium concentration equal to 2.65 at.% and above. The formation of ω-phase suppresses the process of eutectoid decomposition

  9. Changes in hardness of magnesium alloys due to precipitation hardening

    Tatiana Oršulová

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of changes in hardness of magnesium alloys during precipitation hardening that are nowadays widely used in different fields of industry. It focuses exactly on AZ31, AZ61 and AZ91 alloys. Observing material hardness changes serves as an effective tool for determining precipitation hardening parameters, such as temperature and time. Brinell hardness measurement was chosen based on experimental needs. There was also necessary to make chemical composition analysis and to observe the microstructures of tested materials. The obtained results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  10. Thermal stress ratcheting analysis of a time-hardening structure

    Hada, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Thermal stress ratcheting and shakedown is analyzed for a time-hardening structure: the yield stress increases as time goes on under exposure to neutron irradiation or thermal aging. New three modes of ratcheting and shakedown are identified as transition to other deformation modes. Stress regimes and thermal ratchet strains are formulated as a function of time-increasing yield stress. Moreover, a new model of trouble occurrence frequency as a modification to a bath-tube curve is proposed for calculating a time period of a thermal cycle. Application of the proposed formulation tells us a benefit of taking into account the time hardening due to neutron irradiation. (author)

  11. Low-shrink airfield cement concrete with respect to thermal resistance

    Linek Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents theoretical background to the occurrence and propagation of imposed thermal load deep inside the structure of airfield pavement. The standard composition of low-shrink cement concrete intended for airfield pavements was presented. The influence of recurring temperature changes on the extent of shrinkage deformations was assessed. The obtained lab test results, combined with observations and analysis of changes of the hardened concrete microstructure, allowed the authors to draw conclusions. It was proven that the suggested concrete mix composition makes it possible to obtain the concrete type of better developed internal microstructure. More micro air voids and reduced distance between the voids were proven, which provides increased frost resistance of concrete. The change of size, structure and quantity of the hydration products in the cement matrix and better developed contact sections resulted in the improvement of the mechanical parameters of hardened concrete. Low-shrink concrete in all analysed cases proved to have increased resistance to the variable environmental conditions. Increased concrete resistance is identified through reduced registered shrinkage deformations and growth of mechanical parameters of concrete. Low-shrink concrete used for airfield structure guarantees extended time of reliable pavement operation.

  12. Study on the properties of chromium residue-cement matrices (CRCM) and the influences of superplasticizers on chromium(VI)-immobilising capability of cement matrices.

    Shi, Hui-Sheng; Kan, Li-Li

    2009-03-15

    The study of cementitious activity of chromium residue (CR) was carried out to formulate the properties of chromium residue-cement matrices (CRCM) by blending CR with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The particle size distribution, microstructures of CR were investigated by some apparatuses, and physical properties, leaching behavior of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] of CRCM were also determined by some experiments. Three types of commonly used superplasticizers (sulphonated acetone formaldehyde superplasticizer (J1), polycarboxylate-based superplasticizer (J2) and naphthalene superplasticizer (J3)) were chosen to investigate their influences on the physical properties and the Cr(VI)-immobilisation in the leachate of the CRCM hardened pastes. The results show that the CR has a certain cementitious activity. The incorporation of CR improves the pore size distribution of CRCM. The Cr(VI) concentrations in the leachate of CRCM significantly decrease by incorporation of J2. Among three superplasticizers, J2 achieves lowest Cr(VI) leaching ratio. Based on this study, it is likely to develop CR as a potential new additive used in cement-based materials.

  13. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  14. Sealing properties of cement-based grout materials. Final report on the Rock sealing project

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, Malcolm; Shenton, B.; Walker, Brad; Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Karnland, O.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory studies of material properties. A number of different high performance grouts were investigated. The laboratory studies focused on mixtures of sulphate resistant portland cement, silica fume, superplasticizer and water. The ability of the thin films to self seal was confirmed. The surface reactions were studied in specimens of hardened grouts. The leach rates were found to vary with grout and water composition and with temperature. The short-term hydraulic and strength or properties of the hardened grout were determined. These properties were determined for the grouts both in-bulk and as thin-films. The hydraulic conductivities of the bulk, hardened material were found to be less than 10 -14 m/s. The hydraulic conductivities of thin films were found to be less than 10 -11 m/s. Broken, the hydraulic conductivity of the thin films could be increased to 10 -7 m/s. Examination of the leached grout specimens revealed a trend for the pore sizes to decrease with time. The propensity for fractured grouts to self seal was also observed in tests in which the hydraulic conductivity of recompacted mechanically disrupted, granulated grouts was determined. These tests showed that the hydraulic conductivity decreased rapidly with time. The decreases were associated with decreases in mean pore size. In view of the very low hydraulic conductivity it is likely that surface leaching at the grout/groundwater interface will be that major process by which bulk high-performance grouts may degrade. With the completion of the laboratory, in situ and modelling studies it appears that high-performance cement based grouts can be considered as viable materials for some repository sealing applications. Some of the uncertainties that remain are identified in this report. (54 refs.)

  15. Study of the action of phosphate ions contained in the mixing water on the hydration of a Portland cement; Etude de l'action des phosphates presents dans l'eau de gachage sur l'hydratation d'un ciment Portland

    Benard, Ph

    2005-12-15

    Cementation is considered as the most attractive solution for the conditioning of low and intermediate radioactive wastes. The species contained in these wastes can strongly influence the reactivity of the cement pastes, it is in particular the case of the ortho-phosphate ions which are found in the evaporation concentrates. The aim of our work was to determine the influence of these ions on the hydration and the rheological properties of the cement pastes at early age as well as the mechanical and physical properties on the hardened material. (author)

  16. Disorientations and work-hardening behaviour during severe plastic deformation

    Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Orientation differences develop during plastic deformation even in grains of originally uniform orientation. The evolution of these disorientations is modelled by dislocation dynamics taking into account different storage mechanisms. The predicted average disorientation angles across different ty...... pressure torsion, but also rationalizes the work-hardening behaviour at large plastic strains as well as a saturation of the flow stress....

  17. Preparation of Dispersion-Hardened Copper by Internal Oxidation

    Brøndsted, Povl; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1978-01-01

    Internal oxidation experiments in CO2/CO atmospheres on Cu-Al alloys for preparation of dispersion-hardened Cu are described. The oxygen pressures of the atmospheres used in the experiments were controlled with a solid electrolyte oxygen cell based on ZrO2 (CaO). The particle size distributions o...

  18. Influence of alloying and secondary annealing on anneal hardening ...

    Unknown

    Influence of alloying and secondary annealing on anneal hardening effect at sintered copper alloys. SVETLANA NESTOROVIC. Technical Faculty Bor, University of Belgrade, Bor, Yugoslavia. MS received 11 February 2004; revised 29 October 2004. Abstract. This paper reports results of investigation carried out on sintered ...

  19. Influence of degree of deformation in rolling on anneal hardening ...

    Unknown

    Influence of degree of deformation in rolling on anneal hardening effect of a cast copper alloy. SVETLANA NESTOROVIC*, DESIMIR MARKOVIC and LJUBICA IVANIC. Technical Faculty Bor, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Yugoslavia. MS received 15 May 2003. Abstract. This paper reports results of investigations carried ...

  20. Fatigue Hardening and Nucleation of Persistent Slip Bands in Copper

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Winter, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    A study of fatigue hardening in single crystals of pure copper shows that, before saturation, stress-strain loops can display workhardening rates of about a third of the elastic shear modulus. These rates exceed tensile workhardening rates by roughly two orders of magnitude. This suggests that th...

  1. A unified theoretical and experimental study of anisotropic hardening

    Boehler, J.P.; Raclin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a consistent formulation of the constitutive relations regarding anisotropic hardening materials. Attention is focused on the appearance and the evolution of mechanical anisotropies during irreversible processes, such as plastic forming and inelastic deformation of structures. The representation theorems for anisotropic tensor functions constitute a theoretical basis, allowing to reduce arbitrariness and to obtain a unified formulation of anisotropic hardening. In this approach, a general three-dimensional constitutive law is developed for prestrained initially orthotropic materials. Introduction of the plastic behavior results in the general forms of both the flow-law and the yield criterion. The developed theory is then specialized for the case of plane stress and different modes of anisotropic hardening are analyzed. A new generalization of the Von Mises criterion is proposed, in considering a homogeneous form of order two in stress and employing the simplest combinations of the basic invariants entering the general form of the yield condition. The proposed criterion involves specific terms accounting for the initial anisotropy, the deformation induced anisotropy and correlative terms between initial and induced anisotropy. The effects of prestrainings result in both isotropic and anisotropic hardening. An adequate experimental program, consisting of uniaxial tensile tests on oriented specimens of prestrained sheet-metal, was performed, in order to determine the specific form and the evolution of the anisotropic failure criterion for soft-steel subjected to different irreversible prestrainings. (orig.)

  2. Epoxy modified bitumen : Chemical hardening and its interpretation

    Apostolidis, P.; Pipintakos, G.; van de Ven, M.F.C.; Liu, X.; Erkens, Sandra; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy modified bitumen (EMB) is a promising technology for long lasting paving materials ensuring higher resistance to rutting, oxygen- and moisture-induced damage. In this paper, an analysis of the chemical reactions that take place during the chemical hardening process (curing) of epoxy modified

  3. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE presen...

  4. Hardening digital systems with distributed functionality: robust networks

    Vaskova, Anna; Portela-Garcia, Marta; Garcia-Valderas, Mario; López-Ongil, Celia; Portilla, Jorge; Valverde, Juan; de la Torre, Eduardo; Riesgo, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    Collaborative hardening and hardware redundancy are nowadays the most interesting solutions in terms of fault tolerance achieved and low extra cost imposed to the project budget. Thanks to the powerful and cheap digital devices that are available in the market, extra processing capabilities can be used for redundant tasks, not only in early data processing (sensed data) but also in routing and interfacing1

  5. BUSFET - A Novel Radiation-Hardened SOI Transistor

    Dodd, P.E.; Draper, B.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A partially-depleted SOI transistor structure has been designed that does not require the use of specially-processed hardened buried oxides for total-dose hardness and maintains the intrinsic SEU and dose rate hardness advantages of SOI technology

  6. Surface Induction Hardening of Axi-Symmetric Bodies

    Barglik, J.; Doležel, Ivo; Škopek, M.; Ulrych, B.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2001), s. 11-16 ISSN 1335-8243 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/01/0184 Grant - others:-(PL) 7T08603716 Keywords : induction heating * induction hardening * numerical solution Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Coefficient of work-hardening in stage-IV

    Nabarro, FRN

    1994-04-15

    Full Text Available The theory of work hardening in stage IV depends on the relation between the relative misorientation Psi of neighbouring subgrains and the plastic strain gamma (Psi = B gamma exp). The value of the constant B is suggested to be better related...

  8. Multiaxial ratcheting with advanced kinematic and directional distortional hardening rules

    Feigenbaum, H. P.; Dugdale, J.; Dafalias, Y.F.; Kourousis, K. I.; Plešek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 22 (2012), s. 3063-3076 ISSN 0020-7683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : plasticity * directional distortional hardening * thermodynamics Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.871, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020768312002612

  9. Surface modification on PMMA : PVDF polyblend: hardening under ...

    Unknown

    Keywords. Polyblend; surface modification; microhardness; hardening; plasticization; segmental mobility. 1. Introduction. Polymeric materials have a specific feature of stability towards various aggressive chemical environments, which depends on a multiplicity of factors like structure and nature of the polymers and chemical ...

  10. Role of work hardening characteristics of matrix alloys in the ...

    Unknown

    with increasing prismatic punching of dislocations in the order 7075, 2014, 7010, 2024, 6061 and commercial purity aluminium leading to increased strength increments is noted. Keywords. Metal matrix composites; strengthening; work hardening rate; dislocation density. 1. Introduction. While in continuous fibre composites, ...

  11. Process for hardening synthetic resins by ionizing radiation

    Hesse, W.; Ritz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Synthetic resins containing hydroxy groups and polymerizable carbon-carbon bonds are reacted with diketenes to yield aceto ester derivatives, which when reacted with metal compounds to form chelates, and mixed with copolymerizable monomers, are capable of being hardened by unusually low radiation doses to form coatings and articles with superior properties. (E.C.B.)

  12. Simulation of Hamming Coding and Decoding for Microcontroller Radiation Hardening

    Rehab I. Abdul Rahman; Mazhar B. Tayel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of hardening the 8051 micro-controller, able to assure reliable operation in the presence of bit flips caused by radiation. Aiming at avoiding such faults in the 8051 micro-controller, Hamming code protection was used in its SRAM memory and registers. A VHDL code has been used for this hamming code protection.

  13. Effect of hardening methods of moulding sands with water glass on structure of bonding bridges

    M. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on influence of hardening methods on structure of bonding bridges in moulding sands with sodium water glass is presented.Moulding sands with addition of 2.5 % of binder with molar module 2.0 were hardened with CO2 and dried in traditional way or hardenedwith microwaves. It was proved that the hardening method affects structure of bonding bridges, correlating with properties of the hardened moulding sands. It was found that strength of the moulding sands hardened with microwaves for 4 min is very close to that measured after traditional drying at 110 °C for 120 min. So, application of microwave hardening ensures significant shortening of the process time to the value comparable with CO2 hardening but guaranteeing over 10-fold increase of mechanical properties. Analysis of SEM images of hardened moulding sands permitted explaining differences in quality parameters of moulding sands by connecting them with structure of the created bonding bridges.

  14. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  15. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  16. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Ito, Akihiko

    1978-10-01

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  17. 3D imaging of cement-based materials at submicron resolution by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning.

    Yio, M H N; Mac, M J; Wong, H S; Buenfeld, N R

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to reconstruct large volumes of nontransparent porous materials at submicron resolution. The proposed method combines fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning to produce a series of overlapping confocal z-stacks, which are then aligned and stitched based on phase correlation. The method can be extended in the XY plane to further increase the overall image volume. Resolution of the reconstructed image volume does not degrade with increase in sample size. We have used the method to image cementitious materials, hardened cement paste and concrete and the results obtained show that the method is reliable. Possible applications of the method such as three-dimensional characterization of the pores and microcracks in hardened concrete, three-dimensional particle shape characterization of cementitious materials and three-dimensional characterization of other porous materials such as rocks and bioceramics are discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Through BHA (Bottom Hole Assembly) cementing with proprietary cementing technology

    Fanguy, Charles ' Joey' ; Mueller, Dan T. [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, J.C. [Palm Energy Partners, LLC, Metairie, LA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    There are many problems that can arise when drilling into sub-normally pressured or naturally fractured zones. Lost circulation is one problem that is commonly encountered while drilling oil and gas wells. Lost circulation can lead to increased costs associated with drilling due to rig time, spreadsheet costs, and expensive mud system losses. Cement is one of the most effective treatment options, although it is not normally considered the first option because most operators are forced to trip out of the wellbore and utilize a squeeze packer. This is not always a viable option because of potential well control issues associated with the hydrostatic pressure reduction due to the losses of the whole mud. One treatment option that is commonly overlooked is pumping cement slurries through the bottom hole assembly and drill bit. This is generally not attempted for a variety of reasons. These reasons include: I Concern about 'squeezing off' of the cement in the bit II Lack of potential quality control associated with mixing 'on the fly' III Lack of the ability to test the actual mixed slurry samples The use of a pre-mixed, storable cement slurry has eliminated the concerns associated with pumping cement slurries through mud motors, MWD tools, BHA's, and drill bits. This advanced cement technology has been successfully utilized while reducing the risks associated with these lost circulation treatments. In addition, this technology has eliminated the costs associated with using a squeeze packer and the rig time required for several trips out of the wellbore. The paper will describe the premixed slurry properties and QA/QC procedures that are required for successful through the bit operations. This paper will also provide case histories of successful through the bit operation, as well as background information leading to the treatments. The case histories include successful through the bit remediation of severe lost circulation zones and as well the

  19. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  20. A new method to analyze copolymer based superplasticizer traces in cement leachates.

    Guérandel, Cyril; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; De Lanève, Michel; Guillot, Xavier; Pierre, Christian; Muller, Jean François

    2011-03-15

    Enhancing the flowing properties of fresh concrete is a crucial step for cement based materials users. This is done by adding polymeric admixtures. Such additives have enabled to improve final mechanicals properties and the development of new materials like high performance or self compacting concrete. Like this, the superplasticizers are used in almost cement based materials, in particular for concrete structures that can have a potential interaction with drinking water. It is then essential to have suitable detection techniques to assess whether these organic compounds are dissolved in water after a leaching process or not. The main constituent of the last generation superplasticizer is a PolyCarboxylate-Ester copolymer (PCE), in addition this organic admixture contains polyethylene oxide (free PEO) which constitutes a synthesis residue. Numerous analytical methods are available to characterize superplasticizer content. Although these techniques work well, they do not bring suitable detection threshold to analyze superplasticizer traces in solution with high mineral content such as leachates of hardened cement based materials formulated with superplasticizers. Moreover those techniques do not enable to distinguish free PEO from PCE in the superplasticizer. Here we discuss two highly sensitive analytical methods based on mass spectrometry suitable to perform a rapid detection of superplasticizer compounds traces in CEM I cement paste leachates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, is used to determine the free PEO content in the leachate. However, industrial copolymers (such as PCE) are characterized by high molecular weight and polymolecular index. These two parameters lead to limitation concerning analysis of copolymers by MALDI-TOFMS. In this study, we demonstrate how pyrolysis and a Thermally assisted Hydrolysis/Methylation coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, provides good results for the detection of PCE copolymer traces in CEM I cement paste