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Sample records for hard palatal defect

  1. Obturator with soft liner in the management of hard palate defect: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maxillary defects are created following surgical treatment of patients with congenital defects, trauma, or neoplasm. Oral cancer is one of the more common malignanciesif detected lately massive tissues will be excised surgically and correction will be challenging. One of the treatment strategies is obturator, the retention of ...

  2. Bony defect of palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S; Ma, L; Zhou, X; Sun, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize bony defects of the palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients (SMCP) by three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction and to classify the range of bony defects. Forty-eight consecutive non-operated SMCP patients were included. Diagnosis was based on the presence of at least one of three classical signs of SMCP: bifid uvula, a translucent zone in the midline of the soft palate, and a palpable 'V' notch on the posterior border of the bony palate. Patients were imaged using spiral CT. 3D reconstruction models were created of the palate and vomer. The sagittal extent of the bony cleft in SMCP was classified into four types: type I, no V-shaped hard palate cleft (8.3%); type II, cleft involving the partial palate (43.8%); type III, cleft involving the complete palate and extending to the incisive foramen (43.8%); type IV, cleft involving the complete palate and the alveolar bone (4.2%). The extent of the vomer defect was classified into three types: type A, vomer completely fused with the palate (8.3%); type B, vomer partially fused with the palate (43.8%); type C, vomer not fused with the palate up to the incisive foramen (47.9%). Significant variability in hard palate defects in SMCP is the rule rather than the exception. The association of velopharyngeal insufficiency with anatomical malformations may be complex. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Inconformity between soft tissue defect and bony defect in incomplete cleft palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Ma, Lian

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the inconformity between soft tissue defect and bony defect by observing the cleft extent of palate with complete secondary palate bony cleft in incomplete cleft palate patient. The patients with incomplete cleft palate treated in Hospital of Stomatology Peking University from July 2012 to June 2013 were reviewed, of which 75 cases with complete secondary palate bony cleft were selected in this study. The CT scan and intraoral photograph were taken before operation. The patients were classified as four types according to the extent of soft tissue defect. Type 1: soft tissue defect reached incisive foremen region, Type 2 was hard and soft cleft palate, Type 3 soft cleft palate and Type 4 submucous cleft palate. Type 1 was defined as conformity group (CG). The other three types were defined as inconformity group (ICG) and divided into three subgroups (ICG-I), (ICG-II) and (ICG-III). Fifty-seven patients were in ICG group, and the rate of inconformity was 76% (57/75). The percentage of ICG-I, ICG-II and ICG-III was 47% (27/57), 23% (13/57) and 30% (17/57), respevtively. There are different types of soft tissue deformity with complete secondary palate bony cleft. The inconformity between soft tissue and hard tissue defect exits in 3/4 of isolated cleft palate patients.

  4. [Cleft palate repair with a combined method of mucosal flap pushback of the hard palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z; Li, S; Xu, J

    1996-03-01

    From January of 1992, we applied a combined method to repair cleft palate in 20 patients and received satisfactory results. The method is characterized by pushing back the mucosal flap of the hard palate, a Z-plasty on the nasal mucosa, repositioning the levator muscle to lengthen the palate, circumferential pharyng oplasty using denervated extensor hallucis brevis muscle, without making relaxing incisions and elevating the mucoperiosteal flap, avoiding interference to the greater and lesser palatine vessels and nerves, without relaxing palatal aponeurosis. The advantages of this method are preserving the normal anatomy and function of the palate and nasopharyngeal cavity, improving the function of velopharyngeal closure and minimizing secondary deformities.

  5. Pleomorphic adenoma of minor salivary gland: hard palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Canas, Wilmer; Benitez Narvaez, N.

    2006-01-01

    The pleomorphic adenoma or mixed tumor occurs in 4 to 14% of the accessory glands salivary. Different localizations exist: AEC, nasal block, lips, maxillary sinus, nasopharynx or in any other localization where salivate tissue exists, but the palate constitutes the most frequent localization, because it gathers more than 50% of minor salivary glands. In the palate, it can be developed a wide variety of tumors coming from the connective and epithelial tissue, 44% arise in the minor salivary glands. In 49 to 65% of them are benign tumors, principally pleomorphic adenomas, located preferably in the hard palate, nearby or in the union with the soft palate as in our case. We present a 42 year old patient with at pleomorphic adenoma of hard palate. (The author)

  6. Rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a soft palate defect using a bar-retained, implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakan Tuna, S; Pekkan, Gurel; Buyukgural, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous cleft lip and palate patient with a combined hard and soft palate defect is a great challenge, due to the lack of retention of the obturator prosthesis as a result of its weight and the inability to obtain a border seal. Dental implants improve the retention, stability, and occlusal function of prostheses when used in carefully selected cleft lip and palate cases. This clinical report presents an edentulous unilateral cleft lip and palate patient who has hard and soft palate defects and an atrophied maxilla, treated with an implant-supported speech-aid prosthesis.

  7. Delayed closure of the palatal defect using buccal inversion and palatal rotation flaps after maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seunggon; Kook, Min-Suk; Park, Hong-Ju; Oh, Hee-Kyun

    2013-03-01

    Maxillectomy leaves oronasal and oroantral defects that result in functional impairment of mastication, deglutition, and speech. Many treatment options are suggested and tried including the palatal flap as local flap. Although palatal flaps have been used to repair various oral cavity defects, they have certain limitations due to the dimensions. The amount and location of the palatal tissues available are important for palatal repair. Secondary intentional healing after maxillectomy will allow the epithelialization of the defect margin adjacent to remained palate, and there will be more mucosa that is available for closure of the defect. We delayed the closure of the palatal defect, while the patient underwent prosthetic treatment for functional recovery in 5 maxillectomy patients. Delayed closure of palatal defect with local flap was done at 10.8 ± 7.9 months after the maxillectomy. While delayed closure in hemimaxillectomy patients left postoperative fistula, it provided separation of the oral cavity and nasal/sinus cavity and adequate surface for prosthesis in partial maxillectomy patients.

  8. Congenital mucous retention cyst of the anterior hard palate! The first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Priyadarshini, Smita; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Panigrahi, Rajat G

    2014-10-01

    Children may be born with birth defects, the most common being oro-facial clefts and fissural cysts. A well circumscribed pedunculated soft tissue growth that occurs congenitally is known as congenital epulis of the newborn or 'Neuman's Tumour' as described in the literature. It is a rare lesion and the diagnosis has to be confirmed histologically. We present a rare case of a 7-year-old child with a congenital growth in the pre-maxillary region of the anterior hard palate clinically diagnosed as congenital epulis however, histologically confirmed as a mucous retention cyst. An elaborate clinical differential diagnosis is discussed. The anterior hard palate is devoid of salivary glands and the presence of a mucous retention cyst in the area is suggestive of ectopic salivary gland tissue and in a child manifesting at birth is probably the first case to be reported in the English literature.

  9. Modelling human hard palate shape with Bézier curves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Janssen

    Full Text Available People vary at most levels, from the molecular to the cognitive, and the shape of the hard palate (the bony roof of the mouth is no exception. The patterns of variation in the hard palate are important for the forensic sciences and (palaeoanthropology, and might also play a role in speech production, both in pathological cases and normal variation. Here we describe a method based on Bézier curves, whose main aim is to generate possible shapes of the hard palate in humans for use in computer simulations of speech production and language evolution. Moreover, our method can also capture existing patterns of variation using few and easy-to-interpret parameters, and fits actual data obtained from MRI traces very well with as little as two or three free parameters. When compared to the widely-used Principal Component Analysis (PCA, our method fits actual data slightly worse for the same number of degrees of freedom. However, it is much better at generating new shapes without requiring a calibration sample, its parameters have clearer interpretations, and their ranges are grounded in geometrical considerations.

  10. Use of early hard palate closure using a vomer flap in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarius, Bram J A; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of the vomer flap during cleft palate closure. A retrospective review was performed of all consecutive unilateral/bilateral complete cleft lip and palate (Veau III en IV) children who were treated by a simultaneous lip and hard palate closure using a vomer flap. Data were collected for sex, date of birth, syndrome, adoption, cleft palate type, type of repair, date of cleft repair, cleft width, lateral incisions, fistula and location of fistula. Ninety-one children (M = 62, F 29) were operated. Mean age at time of lip closure and vomer flap was 5.8 months (range 2.9 months to 49.2 months, SD 7.1) and the mean age at palate closure was 13.6 months (range 6.3 months to 79.9 months, SD 10.8). The mean cleft width at first assessment was 13.0 mm (range 7-22 mm) compared to 8.8 mm (range 4-15 mm) at second assessment (mean difference 4.6 mm, 95% CI 3.93-5.35, p cleft width, subsequently leading to a low fistula incidence (1.1%). Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients......Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients...

  12. Reconstruction of a Total Soft Palatal Defect Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Jai Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The soft palate functions as a valve and helps generate the oral pressurerequired for normal speech resonance. Speech problems and nasal regurgitation can resultfrom a soft palatal defect. Reduction of the size of the velopharyngeal orifice is requiredto compensate for the lack of mobility in a reconstructed soft palate. We suggest a largevolume folded free flap for reduction of the caliber and a palmaris longus tendon sling forsuspension of the reconstructed palate.Methods Six patients had total soft palate resection for tonsillar cancer and reconstructionwith a large volume folded radial forearm free flap combined with a palmaris longus sling.A single surgeon and speech therapist examined the patients with three standardizedspeech assessment tools: nasometer test, consonant articulation test, and speech acuity testperformed for speech evaluation.Results Mean nasalance score was 76.20% for sentences with nasal sounds and 43.60% forsentences with oral sounds. Hypernasality was seen for oral sound sentences. The mean scoreof the picture consonant articulation test was 84% (range, 63% to 100%. The mean scoreof the speech acuity test was 5.84 (range, 5 to 6. These mean ratings represent a satisfactorylevel of speech function.Conclusions The large volume folded free flap with a palmaris longus tendon sling for totalsoft palate reconstruction resulted in satisfactory prognosis for speech despite moderatehypernasality.

  13. Tomographic mapping of the hard palate and overlying mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquezan, Mariana; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Freitas, Amanda Osorio Ayres de; Baratieri, Carolina; Alves Junior, Matheus; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Goncalves; Araujo, Monica Tirre de Souza, E-mail: marianamarquezan@gmail.com [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The aim of this study was to measure the thickness of the hard palate and its overlying mucosa using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for purposes of miniscrew placement. The sample comprised 36 CBCT scans of patients aged 12 to 52 years from a database of the Orthodontics Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Paracoronal views of the palatal region were reconstructed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm posterior to the incisive foramen. In each reconstruction measurements were taken at the suture, 3 mm and 6 mm bilaterally to it. Wilcoxon's test verified the differences between the selected regions. Total bone height decreased from the anterior to the posterior region. In cross sections 4, 16 and 24, bone height decreased from the suture laterally to the 3 mm region and then increased in the 6 mm region. The cortical thickness does not seem to be a concern because it presented a mean thickness of at least 1 mm at all sites evaluated. The measurements of the mucosa thickness decreased from lateral to median and from anterior to posterior regions. The most suitable areas for miniscrew placement in the palate are located 4 mm posterior to the incisive foramen, in the median or paramedian regions 3 mm adjacent to the suture. (author)

  14. Tomographic mapping of the hard palate and overlying mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquezan, Mariana; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Freitas, Amanda Osorio Ayres de; Baratieri, Carolina; Alves Junior, Matheus; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Goncalves; Araujo, Monica Tirre de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the thickness of the hard palate and its overlying mucosa using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for purposes of miniscrew placement. The sample comprised 36 CBCT scans of patients aged 12 to 52 years from a database of the Orthodontics Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Paracoronal views of the palatal region were reconstructed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm posterior to the incisive foramen. In each reconstruction measurements were taken at the suture, 3 mm and 6 mm bilaterally to it. Wilcoxon's test verified the differences between the selected regions. Total bone height decreased from the anterior to the posterior region. In cross sections 4, 16 and 24, bone height decreased from the suture laterally to the 3 mm region and then increased in the 6 mm region. The cortical thickness does not seem to be a concern because it presented a mean thickness of at least 1 mm at all sites evaluated. The measurements of the mucosa thickness decreased from lateral to median and from anterior to posterior regions. The most suitable areas for miniscrew placement in the palate are located 4 mm posterior to the incisive foramen, in the median or paramedian regions 3 mm adjacent to the suture. (author)

  15. Congenital Mucous Retention Cyst of the Anterior Hard Palate! the First Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Priyadarshini, Smita; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Panigrahi, Rajat G

    2014-01-01

    Children may be born with birth defects, the most common being oro-facial clefts and fissural cysts. A well circumscribed pedunculated soft tissue growth that occurs congenitally is known as congenital epulis of the newborn or ‘Neuman’s Tumour’ as described in the literature. It is a rare lesion and the diagnosis has to be confirmed histologically. We present a rare case of a 7-year-old child with a congenital growth in the pre-maxillary region of the anterior hard palate clinically diagnosed...

  16. Reliable critical sized defect rodent model for cleft palate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Nesrine Z; Doschak, Michael R; Major, Paul W; Talwar, Reena

    2014-12-01

    Suitable animal models are necessary to test the efficacy of new bone grafting therapies in cleft palate surgery. Rodent models of cleft palate are available but have limitations. This study compared and modified mid-palate cleft (MPC) and alveolar cleft (AC) models to determine the most reliable and reproducible model for bone grafting studies. Published MPC model (9 × 5 × 3 mm(3)) lacked sufficient information for tested rats. Our initial studies utilizing AC model (7 × 4 × 3 mm(3)) in 8 and 16 weeks old Sprague Dawley (SD) rats revealed injury to adjacent structures. After comparing anteroposterior and transverse maxillary dimensions in 16 weeks old SD and Wistar rats, virtual planning was performed to modify MPC and AC defects dimensions, taking the adjacent structures into consideration. Modified MPC (7 × 2.5 × 1 mm(3)) and AC (5 × 2.5 × 1 mm(3)) defects were employed in 16 weeks old Wistar rats and healing was monitored by micro-computed tomography and histology. Maxillary dimensions in SD and Wistar rats were not significantly different. Preoperative virtual planning enhanced postoperative surgical outcomes. Bone healing occurred at defect margin leaving central bone void confirming the critical size nature of the modified MPC and AC defects. Presented modifications for MPC and AC models created clinically relevant and reproducible defects. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of timing of hard palate repair in a two-stage procedure on early language development in Danish children with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the influence of timing of hard palate closure on early language development from 18 months to 3 years of age. Design: a prospective, randomized clinical trial. Participants: thirty-four children with UCLP with velum closure at 4 months of age, and hard palate closure...... language development in cleft palate children. Key words: cleft palate, phonological development, lexical development, surgical timing....... at 12 months (EarlyHPR (Early hard palate repair)) or 36 months (LateHPU (Late hard palate Unrepaired)) by random assignment. Thirty-five control children matched for gender and age. Methods: all children were video recorded during a play interaction with a parent at 18 months of age. These recordings...

  18. Reconstruction of palatal defect using mucoperiosteal hinge flap and pushback palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S I; Lee, H S; Hwang, K

    2001-11-01

    This article describes a simple, new surgical technique to provide a complete two-layer closure of palatal defect resulting from a surgical complication of trans palatal resection of skull base chordoma. The nasal layer was reconstructed with triangular shape oral mucoperiosteal turn over hinge flap based on anterior margin of palatal defect and rectangular shaped lateral nasal mucosal hinge flaps. The oral layer was reconstructed with conventional pushback V-Y advancement 2-flaps palatoplasty. Each layer of the flaps were secured with two key mattress suture for flap coaptation. This technique has some advantages: simple, short operation time, one-stage procedure, no need of osteotomy. It can close small- to medium-sized palatal defect of palate or wide cleft palate and can prevent common complication of oronasal fistula, which could be caused by tension.

  19. Diagnostic efficacy of radiological examinations in clefts of the hard palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslinska-Wilk, G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the work has been: 1) evaluating the efficiency of individual radiological methods in visualizing the bone structure of the hard palate; 2) elaboration of a method for skull examination, by means of which the hard palate region in patients would be best visible; 3) presentation of radiological symptomatology of hard palate clefts; 4) establishing algorithms of diagnostic procedure and determining the type of radiological examination most helpful in planning the treatment of this anomaly. Selected problems from normal anatomy of the hard palate are presented, and the technique of radiological examination in the form of occlusal radiograms, pantomography and computerized tomography (CT) are discussed. Clinical material encompassed the total of 312 patients. A total of 470 radiograms were performed, 150 occlusal ones of hard palate, 200 pantomograms (jointly with the control group) as well as 120 scannings during CT examination. It has been stated the greatest efficiency and effectiveness in planning the treatment are ascribed to computerized tomography, the second place goes to pantomography, on the third position are occlusal radiograms targeted at the region of the cleft. Algorithms have been provided for roentgen-diagnostic procedure in cases of the hard palate clefts, with an emphasis that the very first examination of a child should include the occlusal radiograms targeted at the cleft region and pantomogram; in the course of conservative treatment only pantomogram is proposed to be made, and in case of planned operative procedure - CT examination. For evaluating the calcification of the cleft, the best and with the least irradiation are the intraoral occlusal radiograms, targeted at the region of the cleft, performed 12 months after the operation. (author). 100 refs, 21 figs, 12 tabs

  20. Influence of Timing of Delayed Hard Palate Closure on Articulation Skills in 3-Year-Old Danish Children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Boers, Maria; Schöps, Antje; Kisling-Møller, Mia; Nielsen, Joan Bogh; Jørgensen, Line Dahl; Andersen, Mikael; Bolund, Stig; Andersen, Helene Søgaard

    2018-01-01

    Background: Differing results regarding articulation skills in young children with cleft palate (CP) have been reported and often interpreted as a consequence of different surgical protocols. Aims: To assess the influence of different timing of hard palate closure in a two-stage procedure on articulation skills in 3-year-olds born with unilateral…

  1. Influence of timing of delayed hard palate closure on articulation skills in 3-year-old Danish children with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Boers, Maria; Schöps, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Background Differing results regarding articulation skills in young children with cleft palate (CP) have been reported and often interpreted as a consequence of different surgical protocols. Aims To assess the influence of different timing of hard palate closure in a two-stage procedure on articu......Background Differing results regarding articulation skills in young children with cleft palate (CP) have been reported and often interpreted as a consequence of different surgical protocols. Aims To assess the influence of different timing of hard palate closure in a two-stage procedure...... on articulation skills in 3-year-olds born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Secondary aims were to compare results with peers without CP, and to investigate if there are gender differences in articulation skills. Furthermore, burden of treatment was to be estimated in terms of secondary surgery...

  2. A novel route for placing free flap pedicle from a palatal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev B Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the better options available to repair a large palatal defect is by employing a free flap. Almost all the times such free flaps are plumbed to facial vessels. The greatest challenge in such cases is the placement of the pedicle from palatal shelf to recipient vessels because there is no direct route available. As majority of large palatal fistulae are encountered in operated cleft palates there is a possibility of routing the pedicle through a cleft in the maxillary arch or via pyriform aperture. When such a possibility doesn′t exist the pedicle is routed behind the maxillary arch. We describe a novel technique of pedicle placement through a maxillary antrostomy, in this case report, where a large palatal fistula in a 16 year old boy was repaired employing a free radial artery forearm flap. The direct route provided by maxillary antrostomy is considered the most expeditious of all possibilities mentioned above.

  3. Solitary Peripheral Osteoma of the Hard Palate: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotios Bountaniotis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteomas are benign slow-growing osteogenic lesions of unknown aetiology which can be central, peripheral or extraskeletal. Peripheral osteomas of the maxilla are very uncommon. We report a 72-year-old female patient who presented to the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Dental School of Athens, Athens, Greece, in 2015 with swelling of the palate following a tooth extraction. Clinical and radiographical features were indicative of a solitary peripheral osteoma of the hard palate. An excisional biopsy and histological examination of the lesion confirmed the diagnosis. No complications occurred during the postoperative period and there was no evidence of recurrence at a one-year follow-up.

  4. Morphology of bone defects in patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Cone beam x-ray CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyo, Iyu; Kubota, Masato; Sato, Yuki; Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro

    2006-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment planning of the cleft lip and palate vary according to the morphology of the alveolar bone and palatal bone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the three-dimensional anatomy of the alveolar and palatal bone in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Thirty-three nonsyndromic consecutive patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate were treated by the cleft palate team at Showa University. Each patient had lip and palate surgeries at Showa University. Cone beam CT radiographs (CB MercuRay, Hitachi) were taken prior to secondary bone grafting, and were classified according to the method of Kita et al. 1997. Cone beam CT radiographs showed multiple types of alveolar and palatal bone morphology, and focused on special types described in the method of Kita et al. It was most frequently found that bone defects in the alveolar crest showed similar patterns in both buccal and palatal aspect, and the buccal bone defect in the nasal floor was larger than the palatal bone defect in the nasal floor. In 80% of the patients, the palatal bone defect showed similar patterns in both anterior and posterior aspects, and the anterior palatal bone defect was smaller than the posterior palatal bone defect. In addition, inadequate bone bridges were frequently found at the cleft site. It is suggested that patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate have various types of alveolar and palatal bone morphology, and are required to take three-dimensional radiographic X-rays prior to any orthodontic treatment. (author)

  5. Influence of timing of delayed hard palate closure on articulation skills in 3-year-old Danish children with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Boers, Maria; Schöps, Antje

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differing results regarding articulation skills in young children with cleft palate (CP) have been reported and often interpreted as a consequence of different surgical protocols. AIMS: To assess the influence of different timing of hard palate closure in a two-stage procedure...... on articulation skills in 3-year-olds born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Secondary aims were to compare results with peers without CP, and to investigate if there are gender differences in articulation skills. Furthermore, burden of treatment was to be estimated in terms of secondary surgery...

  6. A striated muscle on the hard palate of rodents and rabbits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, H.; Witter, Kirsti; Míšek, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2004), s. 96-99 ISSN 0340-2096 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP304/01/P021; GA ČR GA304/02/0448; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : hard palate * rabbits * rodents Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.625, year: 2004

  7. Analysis of dental arch relationships in Swedish unilateral cleft lip and palate subjects: 20-year longitudinal consecutive series treated with delayed hard palate closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Jan; Mars, Michael; Elander, Anna; Enocson, Lars; Hagberg, Catharina; Worrell, Emma; Batra, Puneet; Friede, Hans

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the dental arch relationships for a consecutive series from Goteborg, Sweden, who had delayed hard palate closure. Retrospective study. Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden. The dental study models of 104 consecutive unilateral cleft lip and palate subjects. The study cohort was born between 1979 and 1994. Longitudinal records were available at ages 5 (n = 94), 10 (n = 97), 16 (n = 59), and 19 years (n = 46). Five assessors rated models according to the GOSLON Yardstick on two separate occasions each. These patients had been operated upon according to the Goteborg protocol of delayed hard palate closure (at age 8 years). 85% of subjects were rated in groups 1 and 2 (excellent or very good outcome), 12% were rated in group 3 (satisfactory), and 3% were assigned to group 4 (poor). No patients presented in Group 5 (very poor). Weighted kappa statistics for double determination of Yardstick allocation for five assessors demonstrated values between .65 and .90 for interrater agreement (good/very good) and between .70 and .90 for intrarater agreement (very good). Delayed hard palate closure as practiced in Goteborg since 1979 has produced the best GOSLON Yardstick ratings in a consecutive series of patients ever recorded worldwide, since the Yardstick was first used in 1983. However, it is noteworthy that a new protocol has been introduced in Goteborg since 1994, in which hard palate closure is done at 3 years due to concerns regarding speech.

  8. Influence of timing of delayed hard palate closure on articulation skills in 3-year-old Danish children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Boers, Maria; Schöps, Antje; Kisling-Møller, Mia; Nielsen, Joan Bogh; Jørgensen, Line Dahl; Andersen, Mikael; Bolund, Stig; Andersen, Helene Søgaard

    2018-01-01

    Differing results regarding articulation skills in young children with cleft palate (CP) have been reported and often interpreted as a consequence of different surgical protocols. To assess the influence of different timing of hard palate closure in a two-stage procedure on articulation skills in 3-year-olds born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Secondary aims were to compare results with peers without CP, and to investigate if there are gender differences in articulation skills. Furthermore, burden of treatment was to be estimated in terms of secondary surgery, hearing and speech therapy. A randomized controlled trial (RCT). Early hard palate closure (EHPC) at 12 months versus late hard palate closure (LHPC) at 36 months in a two-stage procedure was tested in a cohort of 126 Danish-speaking children born with non-syndromic UCLP. All participants had the lip and soft palate closed around 4 months of age. Audio and video recordings of a naming test were available from 113 children (32 girls and 81 boys) and were transcribed phonetically. Recordings were obtained prior to hard palate closure in the LHPC group. The main outcome measures were percentage consonants correct adjusted (PCC-A) and consonant errors from blinded assessments. Results from 36 Danish-speaking children without CP obtained previously by Willadsen in 2012 were used for comparison. Children with EHPC produced significantly more target consonants correctly (83%) than children with LHPC (48%; p < .001). In addition, children with LHPC produced significantly more active cleft speech characteristics than children with EHPC (p < .001). Boys achieved significantly lower PCC-A scores than girls (p = .04) and produced significantly more consonant errors than girls (p = .02). No significant differences were found between groups regarding burden of treatment. The control group performed significantly better than the EHPC and LHPC groups on all compared variables. © 2017 Royal College of Speech

  9. Reconstrução marginal de pálpebras utilizando enxerto de palato duro Margin eyelid reconstruction with hard palate graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiana Gabriela Burmann

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os benefícios e complicações do uso do palato duro na reconstrução de pálpebras inferiores acometidas por carcinomas basocelulares extensos. MÉTODOS: Revisão da literatura e descrição da técnica utilizada no Setor de Oculoplástica do Hospital Santa Casa de Porto Alegre. RESULTADOS: O enxerto de palato duro é um excelente substituto da lamela posterior na reconstrução palpebral, pois apresenta os benefícios da superfície mucosa, associado ao fato de atuar como suporte semi-rígido. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica de sanduíche utilizando palato duro mostrou-se eficiente, com um resultado estético e funcional bastante satisfatório.PURPOSE: To investigate the advantages and the complications of the use of hard palate graft in the reconstruction of the inferior eyelids with large basocelular carcinoma. METHODS: Review of specialized articles and report of the technique used in the Oculoplastic Department of the "Hospital Santa Casa de Porto Alegre". RESULTS: The hard palate graft is an excellent replacement for posterior lamellar defects in eyelid reconstruction, because it presents the benefit of a mucous layer in addition to a semirigid support. CONCLUSION: The sandwich technique using hard palate was shown to be efficient, with good functional and esthetic results.

  10. Fanconi anemia manifesting as a squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Petrillo Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fanconi Anemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by various congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure at a very young age and of solid tumors development. The authors present a rare case of a squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate in a Fanconi Anaemia patient. The atypical clinical manifestation rendered the diagnosis more difficult. This case, for age of appearance, sex and localization, is unique in international literature. We recommend a quarterly follow up of the oral-rhino-pharynx complex in FA patients and to consider as carcinomas, all oral lesions that last more than two weeks.

  11. Diagnostic efficacy of radiological examinations in clefts of the hard palate; Skutecznosc diagnostyczna badan rentgenowskich w rozszczepach podniebienia twardego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslinska-Wilk, G. [Pomorska Akademia Medyczna, Szczecin (Poland)

    1992-12-31

    The aim of the work has been: (1) evaluating the efficiency of individual radiological methods in visualizing the bone structure of the hard palate; (2) elaboration of a method for skull examination, by means of which the hard palate region in patients would be best visible; (3) presentation of radiological symptomatology of hard palate clefts; (4) establishing algorithms of diagnostic procedure and determining the type of radiological examination most helpful in planning the treatment of this anomaly. Selected problems from normal anatomy of the hard palate are presented, and the technique of radiological examination in the form of occlusal radiograms, pantomography and computerized tomography (CT) are discussed. Clinical material encompassed the total of 312 patients. A total of 470 radiograms were performed, 150 occlusal ones of hard palate, 200 pantomograms (jointly with the control group) as well as 120 scannings during CT examination. It has been stated the greatest efficiency and effectiveness in planning the treatment are ascribed to computerized tomography, the second place goes to pantomography, on the third position are occlusal radiograms targeted at the region of the cleft. Algorithms have been provided for roentgen-diagnostic procedure in cases of the hard palate clefts, with an emphasis that the very first examination of a child should include the occlusal radiograms targeted at the cleft region and pantomogram; in the course of conservative treatment only pantomogram is proposed to be made, and in case of planned operative procedure - CT examination. For evaluating the calcification of the cleft, the best and with the least irradiation are the intraoral occlusal radiograms, targeted at the region of the cleft, performed 12 months after the operation. (author). 100 refs, 21 figs, 12 tabs.

  12. Necrotizing Sialometaplasia of the Hard Palate in a Patient Treated with Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

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    Alessandro Gatti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a rare, benign, self-limiting, necrotizing process involving the minor salivary glands, mainly the mucoserous glands of the hard palate. It is thought to be the result of an ischemic event of the vasculature supplying the salivary gland lobules. Some predisposing factors such as smoking, use of alcohol, denture wearing, recent surgery, traumatic injuries, respiratory infections, systemic diseases bulimia, and anorexia have been described. Herein we present a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate in a patient without known predisposing factors, in our opinion, resulting from the use of topical anti-inflammatory drug. After diagnosis, the patient underwent treatment with chlorhexidine gluconate and a full palatal acrylic guard to protect the exposed bone from food residues during meals. After the sixth week the lesion regressed.

  13. Necrotizing Sialometaplasia of the Hard Palate in a Patient Treated with Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Alessandro; Broccardo, Emanuele; Poglio, Giuseppe; Benech, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a rare, benign, self-limiting, necrotizing process involving the minor salivary glands, mainly the mucoserous glands of the hard palate. It is thought to be the result of an ischemic event of the vasculature supplying the salivary gland lobules. Some predisposing factors such as smoking, use of alcohol, denture wearing, recent surgery, traumatic injuries, respiratory infections, systemic diseases bulimia, and anorexia have been described. Herein we present a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate in a patient without known predisposing factors, in our opinion, resulting from the use of topical anti-inflammatory drug. After diagnosis, the patient underwent treatment with chlorhexidine gluconate and a full palatal acrylic guard to protect the exposed bone from food residues during meals. After the sixth week the lesion regressed.

  14. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on palatal mucosal defects and tooth extraction sockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, Ahmet; Arpağ, Osman Fatih; Atilgan, Serhat; Yaman, Ferhan; Atalay, Yusuf; Acikan, İzzet

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on palatal mucosal defects and tooth extraction sockets in an experimental model. Materials and methods Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats with a mean age of 7 weeks and weighing 280–490 g were used in this study. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: group A (the control group, n=21) and group B (the experimental group, n=21). Under anesthesia with ketamine (8 mg/100 g, intraperitoneally), palatal mucosal defects were created and tooth extraction was performed in the rats in groups A and B. Group A received no treatment, whereas group B received CAPE. CAPE was injected daily (10 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally). The rats were killed on days 7, 14, and 30 after the procedures. Palatal mucosa healing and changes in bone tissue and fibrous tissue were evaluated histopathologically. Result Pairwise comparisons showed no statistically significant difference between days 7 and 14 in either group (P>0.05). At day 30, bone healing was significantly better in group B (CAPE) than in group A (control) (P0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that CAPE can significantly improve tooth socket healing. PMID:25364232

  15. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on palatal mucosal defects and tooth extraction sockets

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    Günay A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Günay,1 Osman Fatih Arpağ,2 Serhat Atilgan,3 Ferhan Yaman,3 Yusuf Atalay,4 İzzet Acikan3 1Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey; 2Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay, Turkey; 3Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey; 4Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Kocatepe University, Afyon, Turkey Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE on palatal mucosal defects and tooth extraction sockets in an experimental model.Materials and methods: Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats with a mean age of 7 weeks and weighing 280–490 g were used in this study. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: group A (the control group, n=21 and group B (the experimental group, n=21. Under anesthesia with ketamine (8 mg/100 g, intraperitoneally, palatal mucosal defects were created and tooth extraction was performed in the rats in groups A and B. Group A received no treatment, whereas group B received CAPE. CAPE was injected daily (10 µmol/kg, intraperitoneally. The rats were killed on days 7, 14, and 30 after the procedures. Palatal mucosa healing and changes in bone tissue and fibrous tissue were evaluated histopathologically.Result: Pairwise comparisons showed no statistically significant difference between days 7 and 14 in either group (P>0.05. At day 30, bone healing was significantly better in group B (CAPE than in group A (control (P<0.05. Fibrinogen levels at day 30 were significantly higher in group A (control than in group B (CAPE (P<0.05. Pairwise comparisons showed no statistically significant difference in palatal mucosa healing levels between days 7 and 14 in both groups (P>0.05.Conclusion: In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that CAPE can significantly improve tooth socket healing. Keywords: caffeic

  16. Bilateral necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate in a patient with bulimia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, Simone F M; Suter, Valerie G A; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Reichart, Peter A; Bornstein, Michael M

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a rare and benign lesion that mostly affects the posterior hard palate. Its importance resides in its clinical and microscopic characteristics, which can closely mimic malignant neoplasias, in particular oral squamous cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Accurate histopathologic evaluation of an incisional biopsy is considered as the diagnostic gold standard. NS lesions heal spontaneously within weeks, and no further treatment is necessary. We report a case of a bilateral palatal NS in a 22-yearold woman with bulimia, where an incisional biopsy confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The different clinical stages of the lesions from onset to resolution and the possible etiologic factors are described in detail, as well as a discussion of the differential diagnoses of palatal ulcers. When taking a biopsy from suspicious oral lesions, care has to be taken that an appropriate tissue sample is harvested, and the histopathologic analysis is performed by an experienced pathologist to establish a correct diagnosis.

  17. Management of a Recurrent Pyogenic Granuloma of the Hard Palate with Diode Laser: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanoglu Erbasar, Güzin Neda; Senguven, Burcu; Gultekin, Sibel Elif; Cetiner, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a prevalent inflammatory hyperplasia of skin and oral mucosa which is often caused by constant low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury or hormonal factors. In many cases, gingival irritation and inflammation due to poor oral hygiene are precipitating factors. Oral PG occurs predominantly on the gingiva, but it is also encountered on the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa and rarely on the hard palate. Although surgical excision is the first choice of treatment, many other treatment modalities could be counted such as cryosurgery, sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy, intralesional steroids, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) lasers and diode laser have been suggested. After surgical excision recurrence occurs up to 16% of these lesions. It is believed that recurrence ensues as a result of incomplete excision, failure to eliminate etiologic factors or repeated trauma. A 50-year-old female was referred to the Department of Oral Surgery, Gazi University, School of Dentistry, complaining of a swelling and growth on the right side of the hard palate for four months. Patient reported a similar growth in the same area about two years earlier, which had turned out to be a PG by histopathology. The treatment plan included surgical excision of the lesion using diode laser. The patient reported no pain after the surgery. She was discharged with a prescription of chlorhexidine mouthwash and necessary post-operative instructions. At 7 days follow up visit, immediate recurrence of the lesion was observed, and it was excised by diode laser with 2 mm margins at its clinical periphery, to a depth up to the periosteum, by the same operator. No recurrence or scarring was observed in 14 months follow-up. Although diode laser is a secure and efficient technique for the treatment of intraoral PG, in order to minimize its recurrence, the

  18. Use of a hard palate mucoperiosteal flap for rostral muzzle reconstruction in a dog after a traumatic premaxillary degloving injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurach, Lindsey; Plesman, Rhea; Grier-Lowe, Candace; Linn, Kathleen; Anthony, James

    2013-02-01

    To describe a technique for reconstruction of the rostral aspect of the muzzle of a dog after traumatic amputation. Clinical report. Adult female dog. A 6-year-old, intact, female, mixed-breed dog was admitted for facial reconstructive surgery after traumatic amputation of the rostral aspect of the muzzle. The nasal planum and the rostral portion of the upper lips were missing. A hard palate mucoperiosteal flap and lateral labial advancement flaps were used to reconstruct the nasal philtrum and borders of the nares. This reconstructive technique resulted in adequate nostril function and an acceptable cosmetic outcome. One naris developed partial obstruction with granulation tissue that may have occurred because of a lack of circumferential nasal mucosa to appose the skin on that side. The mucoperiosteum of the hard palate can be used to reconstruct the rostral aspect of the muzzle after traumatic amputation, resulting in an acceptable cosmetic outcome. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Primary control of upper gingiva and hard palate squamous cell carcinoma. A clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beppu, Takeshi; Mitani, Hiroki; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    The primary control of upper gingiva and hard palate squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated clinically. From 1985 to 1999, there were 51 cases that received definitive treatment in our hospital with a primary control rate of 70.6%. The primary control rates according to treatment modality were: 73.3% for surgery alone (69.2% for partial maxillectomy, 80% for total maxillectomy); 71.4% for definitive radiation therapy; and 68% for combined surgery and radiation therapy. The primary control rates according to the T stage were: 85.7% for T1; 60% for T2; 77.8% for T3; and 80% for T4. In general, primary control was better when the tumor was located anteriorly rather than posterolaterally in the oral cavity. Frequent recurrent sites following the operation were the infratemporal fossa and/or the pterygopalatine fossa, especially when the tumor had been located posterolaterally. In such cases, a salvage operation was often impossible, and the uncontrollable primary lesion progressed and caused death. Therefore, when the tumor is located posterolaterally, and especially if it has invaded deeply into the infratemporal fossa and the pterygopalatine fossa, it is vitally important to properly plan the surgical approach and to ensure a good visual operative field. (author)

  20. Immunohistochemical features of multifocal melanoacanthoma in the hard palate: a case report

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    das Chagas e Silva de Carvalho Luis Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoacanthoma (MA has been described in the oral mucosa as a solitary lesion or, occasionally, as multiple lesions. MA mainly affects dark skinned patients and grows rapidly, showing a plane or slightly raised appearance and a brown to black color. The differential diagnosis includes oral nevi, amalgam tattoos, and melanomas. We report here the case of a 58-year-old black woman who presented multiple pigmented lesions on the hard palate. Case presentation Based on the differential diagnosis of melanoma, a punch biopsy (4 mm in diameter was performed. The material was fixed in 10% formalin, embedded in paraffin, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin or submitted to immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies against protein S-100, melan-A, HMB-45, MCM-2, MCM-5, Ki-67 and geminin was performed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of dendritic melanocytes for proteinS-100, HMB-45 and melan-A.Positive staining for proliferative markers (MCM-2, MCM-5, Ki-67 was only observed in basal and suprabasal epithelial cells, confirming the reactive etiology of the lesion. The diagnosis was oral Melanoacanthoma (MA. Conclusion The patient has been followed up for 30 months and shows no clinical alterations. MA should be included in the differential diagnosis of pigmented lesions of the oral cavity.

  1. Necrotizing Sialometaplasia of the Hard Palate in a Patient Treated with Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Gatti; Emanuele Broccardo; Giuseppe Poglio; Arnaldo Benech

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a rare, benign, self-limiting, necrotizing process involving the minor salivary glands, mainly the mucoserous glands of the hard palate. It is thought to be the result of an ischemic event of the vasculature supplying the salivary gland lobules. Some predisposing factors such as smoking, use of alcohol, denture wearing, recent surgery, traumatic injuries, respiratory infections, systemic diseases bulimia, and anorexia have been described. Herein we present a cas...

  2. Caries prevalence and enamel defects in 5- and 10-year-old children with cleft lip and/or palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundell, Anna Lena; Nilsson, Anna-Karin; Ullbro, Christer

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of dental caries and enamel defects in 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with cleft lip and/or palate (CL(P)) in comparison to non-cleft controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study group consisted of 139 children with CL(P) (80 subjects aged 5 years and 59...... aged 10 years) and 313 age-matched non-cleft controls. All children were examined by one of two calibrated examiners. Caries was scored according to the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS-II) and enamel defects as presence and frequency of hypoplasia and hypomineralization...... prevalence of enamel defects was found in CL(P) children of both age groups and anterior permanent teeth were most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Preschool children with cleft lip and/or palate seem to have more caries in the primary dentition than age-matched non-cleft controls. Enamel defects were more...

  3. Palatoplasty: suturing the mucoperiosteal flaps to the hard palate through hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Ji Hun; Kim, Yu Jin; Le, Se Il

    2009-05-01

    We satisfactorily repaired a wide cleft palate using a method of V-Y pushback and anchoring the oral mucoperiosteal flap onto the bony ridge of the cleft. An 8-year-old Vietnamese girl had a wide incomplete bilateral posterior cleft palate associated with congenital cardiac malformations. The gap of the posterior cleft was 2.5 cm, which exceeded the total widths of the palatal shelves. We applied V-Y pushback and used a vomer flap to close the wide cleft palate. The posterior two thirds of the nasal mucosae from the cleft margins were sutured to the vomer flap. The nasal side of the anterior one third of the bony cleft was uncovered. The elevated bilateral mucoperiosteal flaps were brought together to the midline and sutured to the anterior triangular flap in a V-Y pushback fashion. Four holes were drilled 5 mm lateral to each bony cleft margin. The lateral sides of the mucoperiosteal flaps were fixed to the palate bone with 3-0 Vicryl through the hole. This method reduces the tension of the flap which might frequently cause oronasal fistula and also improve viability.

  4. The method of diagnosis and classification of the gingival line defects of the teeth hard tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Bulbuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For solving the problem of diagnosis and treatment of hard tissue defects the significant role belongs to the choice of tactics for dental treatment of hard tissue defects located in the gingival line of any tooth. This work aims to study the problems of diagnosis and classification of gingival line defects of the teeth hard tissues. That will contribute to the objectification of differentiated diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in the dental treatment of various clinical variants of these defects localization. The objective of the study – is to develop the anatomical-functional classification for differentiated estimation of hard tissue defects in the gingival part, as the basis for the application of differential diagnostic-therapeutic approaches to the dental treatment of hard tissue defects disposed in the gingival part of any tooth. Materials and methods of investigation: There was conducted the examination of 48 patients with hard tissue defects located in the gingival part of any tooth. To assess the magnitude of gingival line destruction the periodontal probe and X-ray examination were used. Results. The result of the performed research the classification of the gingival line defects of the hard tissues was offered using exponent power. The value of this indicator is equal to an integer number expressed in millimeters of distance from the epithelial attachment to the cavity’s bottom of defect. Conclusions. The proposed classification fills an obvious gap in academic representations about hard tissue defects located in the gingival part of any tooth. Also it offers the prospects of consensus on differentiated diagnostic-therapeutic approaches in different clinical variants of location.  This classification builds methodological “bridge of continuity” between therapeutic and prosthetic dentistry in the field of treatment of the gingival line defects of dental hard tissues.

  5. Modulation of stimulus-induced 20-Hz activity for the tongue and hard palate during tongue movement in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Onishi, Kaori; Yagyu, Kazuyori; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of 20-Hz activity in the primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1) may be important for oral functions. Here, we show that 20-Hz event-related desynchronization/synchronization (20-Hz ERD/ERS) is modulated by sensory input and motor output in the oral region. Magnetic 20-Hz activity was recorded following right-sided tongue stimulation during rest (Rest) and self-paced repetitive tongue movement (Move). To exclude proprioception effects, 20-Hz activity induced by right-sided hard palate stimulation was also recorded. The 20-Hz activity in the two conditions was compared via temporal spectral evolution analyses. 20-Hz ERD/ERS was detected over bilateral temporoparietal areas in the Rest condition for both regions. Moreover, 20-Hz ERS was significantly suppressed in the Move condition for both regions. Detection of 20-Hz ERD/ERS during the Rest condition for both regions suggests that the SM1 functional state may be modulated by oral stimulation, with or without proprioceptive effects. Moreover, the suppression of 20-Hz ERS for the hard palate during the Move condition suggests that the stimulation-induced functional state of SM1 may have been modulated by the movement, even though the movement and stimulation areas were different. Sensorimotor function of the general oral region may be finely coordinated through 20-Hz cortical oscillation. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reconstrucción de defectos palatinos con el colgajo de músculo buccinador Reconstruction of palatal defects with the buccinator muscle flap

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    M. Cuesta Gil

    2005-08-01

    regurgitation and rhinolalia. The buccinator muscle flap, described by Bozola in 1989 for closing palatal fistulas and for reconstruction of the soft and hard palate, represents an important therapeutic alternative for this type of defect. In this work we present an anatomic-clinical description and the surgical technique with the myomucosal flap of buccinator muscle, as well as a small series of patients operated on in the Gregorio Marañon Hospital from the year 2000 to the year 2004. Of a total of 12 patients with palatal defects that were reconstructed using this flap, 4 were men and 8 were women. The defects in 5 cases were located in the hard palate and 7 were located in the soft palate. Primary reconstruction was carried out following oncological resectioning in 10 cases, while in 1 case secondary reconstruction was carried out after failure with a temporalis muscle flap, and in another patient it was used to cover a preprosthetic bone graft. The aesthetic and functional results were excellent in 10 out of 12 cases. The most common complication was dehiscence of the suture which occurred in five cases, three of which were resolved spontaneously and in another two cases it was necessary to re-operate. The buccinator muscle strikes us an interesting reconstruction technique for defects of the palate. It represents a surgical method that is simple and hardly aggressive, with very few sequelae and good results. It can also be used for resolving defects of the lip, tongue, jugal mucosa and of the orbits, as well as for cases of velopalatal insufficiency.

  7. [Simultaneous repairing defects of orbital floor and palate with the modified temporalis muscle flap after the maxillectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q; Huang, Z G; Fang, J G; Chen, X J; Chen, X H; Hou, L Z; Li, P D; Ma, H Z; He, S Z

    2016-09-07

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of one-stage reconstruction of maxillary and orbital defects with modified temporalis muscle flap (TMF) following the removal of malignant neoplasms. Methods: In this retrospective study, 15 patients underwent the reconstruction of defects of orbital floor and palate after maxillectomy for malignant tumor were included from June 2008 to June 2014. The modified temporalis muscle flap was used to repair the defects after surgery, and functional outcomes were analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for 12-81 months. Three cases of them received preoperative radiotherapy and 12 cases underwent postoperative radiotherapy. All flaps were survived. Epithelization of the tissues in oral and nasal cavity was completed in 4-6 weeks. Good functional reconstruction on swallowing and speaking functional results were achieved with maxillary and orbital reconstruction and no secondary deformity of external nose was observed. The eye positions in all cases were normal. Diplopia, diminution and loss of vision were not found. Conclusion: The modified TMF can be used for simultaneous reconstruction for the defects of orbital floor and palate after maxillectomy in patients whom free tissue flap can not be applied to, showing better cosmetic and functional results.

  8. Necrotizing sialometaplasia as a cause of a non-ulcerated nodule in the hard palate: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Janete

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting and rare inflammatory disease which, on clinical and histological examination, mimics malignant neoplasms. Case report We report the case of a healthy 25-year-old Caucasian woman with a three-week history of a painless lump on her hard palate. Oral examination revealed a nodule consisting of two lobules on the right side that measured 2.5 cm. Her mucosa was normal in color and a fluctuant area was detected in the posterior region upon palpation. Our patient was submitted to incisional biopsy and histopathological examination. The histological diagnosis was necrotizing sialometaplasia. The lesion had healed spontaneously after 30 days, with observed signs of involution of the nodule. Conclusion Histopathological examination is necessary for the diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia because the clinical features of this condition can mimic other diseases, particularly malignant neoplasms.

  9. Relative Composition of Fibrous Connective and Fatty/Glandular Tissue in Connective Tissue Grafts Depends on the Harvesting Technique but not the Donor Site of the Hard Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertl, Kristina; Pifl, Markus; Hirtler, Lena; Rendl, Barbara; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Whether the composition of palatal connective tissue grafts (CTGs) varies depending on donor site or harvesting technique in terms of relative amounts of fibrous connective tissue (CT) and fatty/glandular tissue (FGT) is currently unknown and is histologically assessed in the present study. In 10 fresh human cadavers, tissue samples were harvested in the anterior and posterior palate and in areas close to (marginal) and distant from (apical) the mucosal margin. Mucosal thickness, lamina propria thickness (defined as the extent of subepithelial portion of the biopsy containing ≤25% or ≤50% FGT), and proportions of CT and FGT were semi-automatically estimated for the entire mucosa and for CTGs virtually harvested by split-flap (SF) preparation minimum 1 mm deep or after deepithelialization (DE). Palatal mucosal thickness, ranging from 2.35 to 6.89 mm, and histologic composition showed high interindividual variability. Lamina propria thickness (P >0.21) and proportions of CT (P = 0.48) and FGT (P = 0.15) did not differ significantly among the donor sites (anterior, posterior, marginal, apical). However, thicker palatal tissue was associated with higher FGT content (P tissue composition in the hard palate, DE-harvested CTG contains much larger amounts of CT and much lower amounts of FGT than SF-harvested CTG, irrespective of the harvesting site.

  10. The Soft Palate Friendly Speech Bulb for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Sukhdeep Singh; Kahlon, Monaliza; Gupta, Shilpa; Dhingra, Parvinder Singh

    2016-09-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency is an anatomic defect of the soft palate making palatopharyngeal sphincter incomplete. It is an important concern to address in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Speech aid prosthesis or speech bulbs are best choice in cases where surgically repaired soft palate is too short to contact pharyngeal walls during function but these prosthesis have been associated with inadequate marginal closure, ulcerations and patient discomfort. Here is a case report of untreated bilateral cleft lip and palate associated with palatal insufficiency treated by means of palate friendly innovative speech bulb. This modified speech bulb is a combination of hard acrylic and soft lining material. The hard self-curing acrylic resin covers only the hard palate area and a permanent soft silicone lining material covering the soft palate area. A claw-shaped wire component was extended backwards from acrylic and was embedded in soft silicone to aid in retention and approximation of two materials. The advantage of adding the soft lining material in posterior area helped in covering the adequate superior extension and margins for maximal pharyngeal activity. This also improved the hypernasality, speech, comfort and overall patient acceptance.

  11. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions > Cleft lip and cleft palate Cleft lip and cleft palate E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... repair cleft lip and palate. What are cleft lip and cleft palate? Cleft lip is a birth defect in which ...

  12. Fine structure of subepithelial "free" and corpuscular trigeminal nerve endings in anterior hard palate of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, M R; Yeh, Y

    1984-01-01

    Axonally transported protein labeled many trigeminal nerve endings in subepithelial regions of the anterior hard palate of the rat. Sensory endings were most numerous in the lamina propria near the tips of the palatal rugae where large connective tissue and epithelial papillae interdigitated. Two kinds of sensory ending were found there: "free" endings, and a variety of corpuscular endings. The "free" sensory endings consisted of bundles of unmyelinated axons separated from the connective tissue by relatively unspecialized Schwann cells covering part or all of their surface and a completely continuous basal lamina; they were commonly found running parallel to the epithelium or near corpuscular endings. The corpuscular sensory endings all had a specialized nerve form, specialized Schwann cells, and axonal fingers projecting into the corpuscular basal lamina or connective tissue. There were at least four distinct types of corpuscular ending: Ruffini-like endings were found among dense collagen bundles, and they had a flattened nerve ending with a flattened Schwann lamella on either side. Meissner endings had an ordered stack of flattened nerve terminals with flattened Schwann cells and much basal lamina within and around the corpuscle. Simple corpuscles were single nerve endings surrounded by several layers of concentric lamellar Schwann processes. Glomerular endings were found in lamina propria papillae or encircling epithelial papillae; they were a tangle of varied neural forms each of which had apposed flattened Schwann cells, and a layer of basal lamina of varied thickness. Fibroblasts often formed incomplete partitions around Meissner and simple corpuscles. The axoplasm of all kinds of subepithelial sensory endings contained numerous mitochondria and vesicles, as well as occasional multivesicular bodies and lysosomes; the axoplasm of all endings was pale with few microtubules and neurofilaments. The specialized lamellar Schwann cells had much pinocytotic

  13. Radial forearm free flap for soft palate reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, V; Blackwell, K E

    1999-01-01

    Defects of the soft palate resulting from head and neck oncologic surgery traditionally have been rehabilitated using a prosthetic obturator. In general, the results of soft palate obturation have been satisfactory, with most patients achieving velopharyngeal competence during speech and swallowing. However, soft palate obturators have several disadvantages. Device stability and retention are impaired in patients who are edentulous. In addition, prosthetic obturators cover large areas of sensate mucosa in the hard palate, maxillary alveolus, and oropharynx, contributing significantly to the loss of sensory feedback from the oral cavity and oropharynx. Considerable evidence suggests that sensory impairment within the oral cavity and pharynx results in impaired mastication, deglutition, and articulation. A minority of patients find palatal obturators to be unsatisfactory, secondary to either inconvenience or device discomfort.

  14. Value of sagittal color Doppler ultrasonography as a supplementary tool in the differential diagnosis of fetal cleft lip and palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Seok; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Joong Shin; Jun, Jong Kwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of sagittal color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) for the diagnosis of fetal cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP). We performed targeted ultrasonography on 25 fetuses with CL and CP, taking coronal and axial images of the upper lip and maxillary alveolar arch in each case. The existence of defects in and malalignment of the alveolus on the axial image, hard palate defects on the midsagittal image, and flow-through defects on CDUS taken during fetal breathing or swallowing were assessed. We compared the ultrasonography findings with postnatal findings in all fetuses. Alveolar defects were detected in 16 out of 17 cases with CP and four out of eight cases with CL. Alveolar malalignment and hard palate defects were detected in 11 out of 17 cases and 14 out of 17 cases with CP, respectively, but not detected in any cases with CL. Communicating flow through the palate defect was detected in 11 out of 17 cases of CL with CP. The accuracy of detection in axial scans of an alveolar defect and malalignment was 80% and 76%, respectively. Accuracy of detection of in mid-sagittal images of hard palate defect and flow was 80% and 86%, respectively. The overall diagnostic accuracy of combined axial and sagittal images with sagittal CDUS was 92%. Sagittal CDUS of the fetal hard palate is a feasible method to directly reveal hard palate bony defects and flow through defects, which may have additional value in the differential diagnosis of fetal CL and CP

  15. Value of sagittal color Doppler ultrasonography as a supplementary tool in the differential diagnosis of fetal cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joong Shin; Jun, Jong Kwan [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of sagittal color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) for the diagnosis of fetal cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP). We performed targeted ultrasonography on 25 fetuses with CL and CP, taking coronal and axial images of the upper lip and maxillary alveolar arch in each case. The existence of defects in and malalignment of the alveolus on the axial image, hard palate defects on the midsagittal image, and flow-through defects on CDUS taken during fetal breathing or swallowing were assessed. We compared the ultrasonography findings with postnatal findings in all fetuses. Alveolar defects were detected in 16 out of 17 cases with CP and four out of eight cases with CL. Alveolar malalignment and hard palate defects were detected in 11 out of 17 cases and 14 out of 17 cases with CP, respectively, but not detected in any cases with CL. Communicating flow through the palate defect was detected in 11 out of 17 cases of CL with CP. The accuracy of detection in axial scans of an alveolar defect and malalignment was 80% and 76%, respectively. Accuracy of detection of in mid-sagittal images of hard palate defect and flow was 80% and 86%, respectively. The overall diagnostic accuracy of combined axial and sagittal images with sagittal CDUS was 92%. Sagittal CDUS of the fetal hard palate is a feasible method to directly reveal hard palate bony defects and flow through defects, which may have additional value in the differential diagnosis of fetal CL and CP.

  16. A novel method to predict the highest hardness of plasma sprayed coating without micro-defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yukun; Ye, Fuxing; Wang, Feng

    2018-04-01

    The plasma sprayed coatings are stacked by splats, which are regarded generally as the elementary units of coating. Many researchers have focused on the morphology and formation mechanism of splat. However, a novel method to predict the highest hardness of plasma sprayed coating without micro-defects is proposed according to the nanohardness of splat in this paper. The effectiveness of this novel method was examined by experiments. Firstly, the microstructure of splats and coating, meanwhile the 3D topography of the splats were observed by SEM (SU1510) and video microscope (VHX-2000). Secondly, the nanohardness of splats was evaluated by nanoindentation (NHT) in order to be compared with microhardness of coating measured by microhardness tester (HV-1000A). The results show that the nanohardness of splats with diameter of 70 μm, 100 μm and 140 μm were in the scope of 11∼12 GPa while the microhardness of coating were in the range of 8∼9 GPa. Because the splats had not micro-defects such as pores and cracks in the nanohardness evaluated nano-zone, the nanohardness of the splats can be utilized to predict the highest hardness of coating without micro-defects. This method indicates the maximum of sprayed coating hardness and will reduce the test number to get high hardness coating for better wear resistance.

  17. Chemical rescue of cleft palate and midline defects in conditional GSK-3beta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Karen J; Arron, Joseph R; Stankunas, Kryn; Crabtree, Gerald R; Longaker, Michael T

    2007-03-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) has integral roles in a variety of biological processes, including development, diabetes, and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. As such, a thorough understanding of GSK-3beta function will have a broad impact on human biology and therapeutics. Because GSK-3beta interacts with many different pathways, its specific developmental roles remain unclear. We have discovered a genetic requirement for GSK-3beta in midline development. Homozygous null mice display cleft palate, incomplete fusion of the ribs at the midline and bifid sternum as well as delayed sternal ossification. Using a chemically regulated allele of GSK-3beta (ref. 6), we have defined requirements for GSK-3beta activity during discrete temporal windows in palatogenesis and skeletogenesis. The rapamycin-dependent allele of GSK-3beta produces GSK-3beta fused to a tag, FRB* (FKBP/rapamycin binding), resulting in a rapidly destabilized chimaeric protein. In the absence of drug, GSK-3beta(FRB)*(/FRB)* mutants appear phenotypically identical to GSK-3beta-/- mutants. In the presence of drug, GSK-3betaFRB* is rapidly stabilized, restoring protein levels and activity. Using this system, mutant phenotypes were rescued by restoring endogenous GSK-3beta activity during two distinct periods in gestation. This technology provides a powerful tool for defining windows of protein function during development.

  18. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre E-mail: andre.gahleitner@univie.ac.at; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement.

  19. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, Andre; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement

  20. Correlation between intrinsic hardness and defect structures of ion irradiated Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of micro structures and mechanical properties during an in-service irradiation is one of the key issues to be addressed in nuclear materials. Ion irradiation is an effective method to study these irradiation effects thanks to an ease in handling post-irradiated specimens. But the characteristics of an ion irradiation pose a certain difficulty in evaluating irradiation effects. For example, ion irradiated region extends only a few hundred nano-meters from the surface of a sample and the depth profile of an irradiation damage level is quite heterogeneous. Thus it requires special care to quantify the changes in properties after an ion irradiation. We measured changes in a hardness by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM technique. Although the SM technique allows for a continuous measurement of hardness along penetration depth of an indenter; it is difficult to obtain an intrinsic hardness of an irradiation hardened region because one is measuring hardness of a hard layer located on a soft matrix. Thus we modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We can extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. We investigated the irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloy by using the methods mentioned above. TEM analysis revealed that an irradiation forms dislocation loops with Burgers vector of and 1/2 . These loops varied in size and density with the Cr content and dose level. We discuss in detail a correlation between the measured irradiation-induced changes in the surface hardness and an irradiation induced defect. (authors)

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They happen early during ... A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if the ...

  2. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  3. Etch Defect Characterization and Reduction in Hard-Mask-Based Al Interconnect Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.J.; Hung, C.L.; Leng, C.H.; Lian, N.T.; Young, L.W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper identifies the defect adders, for example, post hard-mask etch residue, post metal etch residue, and blocked etch metal island and investigates the removal characteristics of these defects within the oxide-masked Al etching process sequence. Post hard-mask etch residue containing C atom is related to the hardening of photoresist after the conventional post-RIE ashing at 275 degree C. An in situ O 2 -based plasma ashing on RIE etcher was developed to prevent the photoresist hardening from the high-ashing temperature; followed wet stripping could successfully eliminate such hardened polymeric residue. Post metal etch residue was caused from the attack of the Al sidewall by Cl atoms, and too much CHF 3 addition in the Al main etch step passivated the surface of Al resulting in poor capability to remove the Al-containing residue. The lower addition of CHF 3 in the Al main etch step would benefit from the residue removal. One possibility of blocked etch metal island creating was due to the micro masking formed on the opening of Ti N during the hard-mask patterning. We report that an additional Ti N surface pretreatment with the Ar/CHF 3 /N 2 plasmas could reduce the impact of the micro masking residues on blocked metal etch.

  4. Conference Report: International Research Symposium on Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal Defects-Cleft Lip and/or Palate (AEC) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fete, Mary; vanBokhoven, Hans; Clements, Suzanne; McKeon, Frank; Roop, Dennis R.; Koster, Maranke I.; Missero, Caterina; Attardi, Laura D.; Lombillo, Vivian A.; Ratovitski, Edward; Julapalli, Meena; Ruths, Derek; Sybert, Virginia P.; Siegfried, Elaine C.; Bree, Alanna F.

    2009-01-01

    Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal Defects-Cleft Lip/Palate (AEC) Syndrome (Hay-Wells syndrome, MIM #106220) is a rare autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia syndrome. It is due to mutations in the p63 gene, known to be a regulatory gene with many downstream gene targets. TP63 is important in the differentiation and proliferation of the epidermis, as well as many other processes including limb and facial development. It is also known that mutations in p63 lead to skin erosions. These erosions, especially on the scalp, are defining features of AEC syndrome and cause significant morbidity and mortality in these patients. It was this fact that led to the 2003 AEC Skin Erosion Workshop. That conference laid the groundwork for the International Research Symposium for AEC Syndrome held at Texas Children's Hospital in 2006. The conference brought together the largest cohort of individuals with AEC syndrome, along with a multitude of physicians and scientists. The overarching goals were to define the clinical and pathologic findings for improved diagnostic criteria, to obtain tissue samples for further study and to define future research directions. The symposium was successful in accomplishing these aims as detailed in this conference report. Following our report, we also present eleven manuscripts within this special section that outline the collective clinical, pathologic and mutational data from eighteen individuals enrolled in the concurrent Baylor College of Medicine IRB-approved protocol: Characterization of AEC syndrome. These collaborative findings will hopefully provide a stepping stone to future translational projects of p63 and p63-related syndromes. PMID:19353643

  5. Análise quantitativa do palato duro de respiradores orais: revisão de literatura Quantitative analysis of the hard palate of mouth breathers: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cristina Berwig

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A respiração oral gera inúmeras adaptações patológicas nas estruturas e funções orofaciais, tais como as alterações na morfologia do palato duro. Esta estrutura participa ativamente das funções orais, merecendo destaque na avaliação miofuncional orofacial, que cada vez mais tem lançado mão de instrumentos quantitativos. Apesar de o palato ser de difícil avaliação clínica, pouco se sabe sobre os recursos que podem ser empregados na avaliação quantitativa desta estrutura. Em virtude disso, realizou-se esta revisão de literatura, que teve o objetivo de abordar os resultados das avaliações quantitativas do palato de respiradores orais, bem como os instrumentos que foram empregados nas avaliações. Para tanto, foram revisados periódicos nacionais e internacionais, indexados nas bases de dados Medline, LILACS, Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source (EBSCOhost e HighWire Press, entre os anos de 1983 e 2009. Foi possível concluir, a partir da análise dos resultados dos estudos, que a respiração oral se associou com maior frequência ao aumento da profundidade do palato duro e com menor frequência com a diminuição da largura. Além disso, verificou-se que as avaliações do palato duro foram realizadas com diferentes instrumentos de medição, a partir de medidas do palato duro em modelos de gesso, diretamente na boca e em radiografias cefalométricas. Acredita-se que os métodos de avaliação quantitativa possam contribuir para a precisão do diagnóstico fonoaudiológico.Mouth breathing generates many pathological adaptations in the orofacial structures and functions, such as alterations in the morphology of the hard palate. This structure actively participates in oral functions, deserving attention in the myofunctional orofacial evaluation, which have been increasingly using quantitative instruments. Even though the palate is difficult to be clinically assessed, little is known about the resources that can be used for

  6. Development of a novel anisotropic self-inflating tissue expander: in vivo submucoperiosteal performance in the porcine hard palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Marc C; Bucknall, David G; Czernuszka, Jan T; Pigott, David W; Goodacre, Timothy E E

    2012-01-01

    The advent of self-inflating hydrogel tissue expanders heralded a significant advance in the reconstructive potential of this technique. Their use, however, is limited by their uncontrolled isotropic (i.e., uniform in all directions) expansion. Anisotropy (i.e., directional dependence) was achieved by annealing a hydrogel copolymer of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-vinyl pyrrolidone) under a compressive load for a specified time period. The expansion ratio is dictated by the percentage of vinyl pyrrolidone content and the degree of compression. The expansion rate is modified by incorporating the polymer within a silicone membrane. The in vivo efficacy of differing prototype devices was investigated in juvenile pigs under United Kingdom Home Office Licence. The devices were implanted within a submucoperiosteal pocket in a total of six porcine palates; all were euthanized by 6 weeks after implantation. A longitudinal volumetric assessment of the expanded tissue was conducted, in addition to postmortem analysis of the bony and mucoperiosteal palatal elements. Uncoated devices caused excessive soft-tissue expansion that resulted in mucoperiosteal ulceration, thus necessitating animal euthanasia. The silicone-coated devices produced controlled soft-tissue expansion over the 6-week study period. There was a statistically significant increase in the volume of expanded soft tissue with no evidence of a significant acute inflammatory response to the implant, although peri-implant capsule formation was observed. Attenuation of the bony palatal shelf was noted. A unique anisotropic hydrogel device capable of controlled expansion has been developed that addresses a number of the shortcomings of the technology hitherto available.

  7. Non-stoichiometry defects and radiation hardness of lead tungstate crystals PbWO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Nefedov, V A; Polyansky, E V; Zadneprovski, B I; Kjellberg, P; Korbel, V

    2002-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO sub 4 is to a big extent stipulated by the non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of the non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO sub 4 , the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method 'in situ' was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO sub 4 melt has found PbWO sub 4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead PbO, Pb sub 2 WO sub 5 with overall ratio Pb/W (3....

  8. Non-stoichiometry Defects and Radiation Hardness of Lead Tungstate Crystals PbWO4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Kozlov, V A; Nefedov, L; Polyansky, E V; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Zadneprovski, B I

    2001-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO4 is to big extent stipulated by non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO4 the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation (137Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method "in situ" was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO4 melt has found PbWO4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead, PbO, Pb2WO5, with overall ratio Pb/W = 3.2. Correspondingly the lack of lead and variations in th...

  9. Septal Leaflet versus Chordal Detachment in Closure of Hard-To-Expose Ventricular Septal Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmoghadam, Kamal K; Boron, Agnieszka; Ruzmetov, Mark; Narasimhulu, Sukumar Suguna; Kube, Alicia; O'Brien, Michael C; DeCampli, William M

    2018-04-04

    Different techniques have been used for exposure of ventricular septal defect (VSD) margins when there is crowding of the VSD anatomy by tricuspid valve (TV) subvalvar apparatus. The aim of this study was to compare surgical outcomes, for the two techniques of TV leaflet detachment and the rarely described TV chordal detachment for hard-to-expose VSDs. Patients undergoing transatrial VSD repair were identified from our institutional database. Follow-up echocardiography and patient data were obtained from medical records. Between 1/2005-8/2016, 130 isolated conoventricular VSDs were repaired. Among these, 26patients had leaflet detachment, while 15 underwent chordal detachment, and 89 had regular VSD repair (reference group). There was no significant difference between the groups in age, weight, postoperative length-of-stay, genetic/syndromic abnormalities, time-to-extubation, and left and right ventricular systolic function. The cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp time were significantly higher in leaflet detachment group, when compared with reference group (118+28vs102+32, p=0.02; and 73+20vs61+23, p=0.01, respectively). Echocardiographic follow-up were available for 87patients at a mean of 2.6years (1month-11years). Tricuspid regurgitation was rated as none or trivial in 66(76%), mild in 20(23%) and moderate in one reference group patient. There was no difference in presence of residual VSD, or degree of tricuspid regurgitation amongst the three groups. There was no reoperation for tricuspid regurgitation. Tricuspid valve leaflet and chordal detachment techniques provide equally viable and safe alternative to closure of hard-to-expose VSDs while maintaining appropriate TV function. Their use in our series did not lead to increased TV dysfunction at early-to-midterm echocardiographic assessment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Benefits of maxillectomy with internal dissection of the masticator space by transmandibular approach in the surgical management of malignant tumours of the upper gingiva and hard palate: a clinical review of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamoto, S; Yamada, S; Takahashi, H; Naruse, T; Shigeta, T; Minamikawa, T; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T; Umeda, M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review patients with tumours extending to the posterior portion of the upper gingiva and hard palate, and to evaluate the postoperative outcomes. Ten consecutive patients with tumours in the upper gingiva and hard palate, who underwent maxillectomy with internal dissection of the masticator space by the transmandibular approach, were reviewed retrospectively. Among the 10 patients, the pathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma in seven, adenoid cystic carcinoma in one, malignant melanoma in one, and osteosarcoma in one. Loco-regional control was achieved in eight of nine patients (88.9%). Three patients had residual moderate trismus. Cosmetic issues were not noted in any patient. En bloc resection of the maxilla with the internal portion of the masticator space and neck through the parapharyngeal space by the transmandibular approach is a useful and satisfactory technique for the excision of a tumour with involvement of the posterior portion of the upper gingiva and hard palate. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Calvarial periosteal graft for second-stage cleft palate surgery: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Cecilia; Dakpe, Stephanie; Gbaguidi, Cica; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of cleft palate surgery are to achieve optimal outcomes regarding speech development, hearing, maxillary arch development and facial skull growth. Early two-stage cleft palate repair has been the most recent protocol of choice to achieve good maxillary arch growth without compromising speech development. Hard palate closure occurs within one year of soft palate surgery. However, in some cases the residual hard palate cleft width is larger than 15 mm at the age of two. As previously reported, integrated speech development starts around that age and it is a challenge since we know that early mobilization of the mucoperiosteum interferes with normal facial growth on the long-term. In children with large residual hard palate clefts at the age 2, we report the use of calvarial periosteal grafts to close the cleft. With a retrospective 6-year study (2006-2012) we first analyzed the outcomes regarding impermeability of hard palate closure on 45 patients who at the age of two presented a residual cleft of the hard palate larger than 15 mm and benefited from a periosteal graft. We then studied the maxillary growth in these children. In order to compare long-term results, we included 14 patients (age range: 8-20) treated between 1994 & 2006. Two analyses were conducted, the first one on dental casts from birth to the age of 6 and the other one based on lateral cephalograms following Delaire's principles and TRIDIM software. After the systematic cephalometric analysis of 14 patients, we found no evidence of retrognathia or Class 3 dental malocclusion. In the population of 45 children who benefited from calvarial periosteal grafts the rate of palate fistula was 17% vs. 10% in the overall series. Despite major advances in understanding cleft defects, the issues of timing and choice of the surgical procedure remain widely debated. In second-stage surgery for hard palate closure, using a calvarial periosteal graft could be the solution for large residual clefts

  12. Correction of incomplete cleft palate by u-shaped flap palatoplasty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After complete dissection of the nasal and palatal mucosa, palatal muscles were carefully dissected from the posterior edge of the bones of the hard palate, wherein the well-mobilised flap receded backward spontaneously and elongated the soft palate. After suturing the nasal mucosa in the midline, the dissected palatal ...

  13. Case report: unusual dental morphology in a child with ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, K

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Anomalies of dental anatomy are common in the ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. These anomalies, when found in combination with dental caries, can pose a restorative challenge for the paediatric dentist. Modification of traditional techniques and approaches may help the practitioner provide a successful treatment outcome. CASE REPORT: A 3 years and 11 months old girl with a diagnosis of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasiacleft lip\\/palate (AEC) syndrome was referred for treatment to a specialist paediatric dental service. Her abnormal dental anatomy, hypodontia and dental caries formed a triad of challenges for the team. Under general anaesthesia, her dentition was restored using a combination of restorative approaches and techniques, including the placement of both composite resin and preformed metal crown restorations. FOLLOW-UP: At 18-month followup, the family had successfully implemented good home care and dietary practices, and the local dental service had instituted a preventive programme consisting of regular examination, advice and fluoride varnish placement. The restorations remained intact and no further caries was detected. At 24-month follow-up, the first permanent molars were partially erupted, and displayed unusually deep fissures. There was also a degree of ectopic eruption of the first permanent molars, and possibly of one of the maxillary permanent incisors. CONCLUSION: Dental care for children with AEC syndrome is optimised by early intervention, good home care and regular professional review. Dental care providers should be aware of the possibility of complex dental anatomy, and bear this in mind should it become necessary to formulate a restorative treatment plan.

  14. DETERMINATION OF POSSIBLE REASONS OF DEFECT FORMATION «MICROPITTING» IN HARD-ALLOY WIRE DRAWING INSTRUMENT IN WIRE DRAWING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Kurenkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is determined that during operation a hard wear along with uniform attrition occurs in working canal of die because of welding of metal particles to the material of die, what results in formation of separate microholes, their enlargement and further defect creation of type “micropitting of hard alloy”.

  15. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D. [Univ. of MIchigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  16. Análise quantitativa do palato duro em diferentes tipologias faciais de respiradores nasais e orais Quantitative analysis of the hard palate in different facial typologies in nasal and mouth breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cristina Berwig

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar as dimensões do palato duro em diferentes tipologias faciais de crianças respiradoras nasais e orais. MÉTODO: a amostra foi constituída por 54 crianças, na faixa etária entre sete e 11 anos, distribuídas em grupos conforme o tipo facial e o modo respiratório. O tipo facial foi obtido por meio da análise cefalométrica de Ricketts, e o modo respiratório foi determinado a partir da avaliação fonoaudiológica e do diagnóstico otorrinolaringológico. Para realização de medidas transversais, verticais e do comprimento anteroposterior do palato duro, foram obtidos modelos em gesso do arco dental maxilar. Para comparação das dimensões do palato duro entre os grupos, foram utilizados testes paramétricos e não paramétricos, ao nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: não foi verificada diferença estatisticamente significante nas medidas do palato duro entre as crianças braquifaciais, mesofaciais e dolicofaciais. Verificou-se diferença estatisticamente significante na distância entre os segundos pré-molares nos diferentes tipos faciais das crianças respiradoras nasais e orais, sendo que esta diferença não foi detectada nas comparações múltiplas. CONCLUSÃO: as dimensões do palato duro não diferiram quando analisadas em diferentes tipos faciais independente do modo respiratório. Porém, evidenciou-se diferença na distância entre os segundos pré-molares quando o tipo facial foi analisado nos respiradores nasais e orais.PURPOSE: to compare the hard palate dimensions in nasal and mouth breathing children of different facial typologies. METHOD: the sample comprised 54 children between seven and 11 year old, divided in two groups according to the facial type and breathing mode. The facial type was obtained through the Ricketts cephalometric analysis, and the breathing mode was determined from speech-language evaluation and otorhynolaryngologic diagnosis. In order to measure the transverse, vertical

  17. Evaluation of cleft lip and palate by computed tomography with 2 mm thin slice scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography was carried out in 65 patients of cleft lip and palate with continuous 2 mm slice scanning. The cleft lip and palate was classified by shape of the hard palate as normal, hypoplasia, and aplasia, depending on its developmental degree. The shape of alveolus was also grouped as circular, triangular, and asymmetric forms for the evaluation of maxillar development. The hard palatal development well correlated with the shape of the alveolus. Frequency of sinusitis and mastoiditis increased with the severity of hard palatal malformation. Evaluation of the hard palate by thin slice scanning is usefull standpoint of presumption of future maxillary development. (author)

  18. Evaluation of cleft lip and palate by computed tomography with 2 mm thin slice scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1988-07-01

    Computed tomography was carried out in 65 patients of cleft lip and palate with continuous 2 mm slice scanning. The cleft lip and palate was classified by shape of the hard palate as normal, hypoplasia, and aplasia, depending on its developmental degree. The shape of alveolus was also grouped as circular, triangular, and asymmetric forms for the evaluation of maxillar development. The hard palatal development well correlated with the shape of the alveolus. Frequency of sinusitis and mastoiditis increased with the severity of hard palatal malformation. Evaluation of the hard palate by thin slice scanning is usefull standpoint of presumption of future maxillary development.

  19. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Special distraction osteogenesis before bone grafting for alveolar cleft defects to correct maxillary deformities in patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates: distraction osteogenesis performed separately for each bone segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Saiga, Atsuomi; Morishita, Tadashi; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-07-01

    Patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates have premaxillary protrusion and characteristic jaw deformities involving three-dimensional malposition of the premaxilla and bilateral maxillary bone segments. This study examined patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates who had deviation and hypoplasia of the premaxillas and bilateral maxillary segments. Before bone grafting, the patients were treated with special distraction performed separately for each bone segment using a halo-type external device. This report describes this novel treatment method which produced good results. The subjects were five patients with severe jaw deformities due to bilateral cleft lip and palate. They were treated with maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy and subsequent distraction performed separately for each bone segment using a halo device. In three of five patients, premaxillary osteotomy was not performed, and osteotomy and distraction were performed only for the right and left lateral segments with severe hypoplasia. All patients achieved distraction close to the desired amount. The widths of the alveolar clefts were narrowed, and satisfactory occlusion and maxillary arch form were achieved. After the surgery, three of five patients underwent bone grafting for bilateral alveolar cleft defects and the bone graft survival was satisfactory. This method had many benefits, including narrowing of alveolar clefts, improvement of maxillary hypoplasia, and achievement of a good maxillary arch form. In addition, subsequent bone grafting for alveolar cleft defects was beneficial, dental prostheses were unnecessary, and frequency of surgery and surgical invasiveness were reduced. This method is a good surgical procedure that should be considered for patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates who have premaxillary protrusion and hypoplasia of the right and left lateral segments. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. Augmentation of the hard palate thin masticatory mucosa in the potential connective tissue donor sites using two collagen materials-Clinical and histological comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Wojciech; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Botzenhart, Ute; Gedrange, Tomasz; Ziętek, Marek

    2016-11-01

    Due to the similarity of keratinized gingival and palatal mucosa the latter can pose as a potential donor site for gingival recession coverage. However, its availability is restricted and a thin transplant bears the risk of being rejected. The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical and histological results of thin palatal mucosa augmentation, using lyophilized Biokol ® xenogenous collagen sponge and a suspension of xenogenous Gel 0 ® pure collagen with non-augmented tissue from the same patients. Ten patients simultaneously underwent bilateral augmentation procedures using Biokol ® and Gel 0 ® collagen material. The donor sites were augmented 8 weeks prior to the harvesting of the connective tissue graft (CTG) for the gingival recession coverage procedures. Prior to the implantation of the collagen material and during the course of harvesting the augmented CTG, tissue specimens were taken for histological examination. Prior to the commencement of the study and after it, the parameters of palatal gingival thickness at 4mm (PGT1), and at 8mm apical to the gingival margin (PGT2) around the teeth neighboring the operating fields were determined. In both groups the palatal mucosa had thickened significantly in both measuring sites. An intergroup comparison revealed greater thickening of the masticatory mucosa in the Biokol ® group at both measuring points. The histological image of the grafts, obtained from sites augmented using both test methods, revealed a typical pattern of mature fibrous connective tissue. No epithelial cells were found. Augmentation of thin masticatory mucosa using Biokol ® or Gel 0 ® collagen materials resulted in a significant thickening of the mucosa, which could be demonstrated to be greater in the first group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. CT and MR imaging findings of palatal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Makita, Hiroki; Kato, Keizo; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Palatal tumors commonly arise from the minor salivary glands, and benign tumors account for approximately half of all minor salivary gland tumors. Minor salivary gland tumors have an affinity for the posterior hard palate and soft palate and virtually never arise in the midline, probably because of the distribution of palatal salivary glands. The majority of benign salivary gland tumors of the palate are pleomorphic adenomas, while the most common malignant salivary gland tumor is adenoid cystic carcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Epithelial tumors frequently arise from the soft palate. The majority of benign epithelial tumors of the palate are papillomas, while most malignant epithelial tumors are squamous cell carcinomas. Various types of mesenchymal tumors, including fibromas, lipomas, schwannomas, neurofibromas, hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas, also involve the palate. This article describes the CT and MR findings of benign and malignant palatal tumors

  3. CT and MR imaging findings of palatal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki, E-mail: hkato@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki, E-mail: masa_gif@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Makita, Hiroki, E-mail: makitah@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Kato, Keizo, E-mail: keizo@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Hatakeyama, Daijiro, E-mail: hatakeya@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Shibata, Toshiyuki, E-mail: shibat@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke, E-mail: kmizuta@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Aoki, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: aoki@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Palatal tumors commonly arise from the minor salivary glands, and benign tumors account for approximately half of all minor salivary gland tumors. Minor salivary gland tumors have an affinity for the posterior hard palate and soft palate and virtually never arise in the midline, probably because of the distribution of palatal salivary glands. The majority of benign salivary gland tumors of the palate are pleomorphic adenomas, while the most common malignant salivary gland tumor is adenoid cystic carcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Epithelial tumors frequently arise from the soft palate. The majority of benign epithelial tumors of the palate are papillomas, while most malignant epithelial tumors are squamous cell carcinomas. Various types of mesenchymal tumors, including fibromas, lipomas, schwannomas, neurofibromas, hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas, also involve the palate. This article describes the CT and MR findings of benign and malignant palatal tumors.

  4. Histology of palate and soft palate tonsil of collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teófilo, T S; Morais, M R P T; Dias, G F; Diniz, A N; Chaves, H S A; Fontenele-Neto, J D

    2014-10-01

    Peccaries are characterized by a prominent skin gland, known as scent gland, which is located in the middle of the rump. These animals are able to survive in a great variety of habitats, from humid tropical forests to semi-arid areas. They are omnivorous animals, and their diet includes fibrous material, vegetables, fruits, small vertebrates and insects. Collared peccary hard palate and soft palate tonsils were studied, macroscopic morphometric data were collected and tissue samples were paraffin-embedded. Sections were stained with HE, Gomori's trichrome and von Kossa; the first two were used to study general organization and the latter to detect calcium deposits. The hard palate showed one incisive papilla followed by several rugae united by a distinct raphe. The hard palate is lined by a keratinised squamous epithelium resting on a dense connective, whereas in the soft palate, the epithelium is parakeratinised and showed lymphocyte infiltration. The palate showed several pacinian corpuscles in the propria-submucosa. Two ovoid-shaped tonsils were found in the soft palate, and several crypts were observed on its surface. The epithelium was highly infiltrated by lymphocytes, and within the crypts, tonsilloliths were frequently observed. The study showed that the general organization of collared peccary palate is similar to other species, but in its oropharynx, only the soft palate tonsil was present and the pacinian corpuscles formed small aggregates. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Influence of different palate repair protocols on facial growth in unilateral complete cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xue; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Yin, Heng; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    To address the question of whether one- or two-stage palatal treatment protocol has fewer detrimental effects on craniofacial growth in patients aged 5 years with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Forty patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCCLPs) who had received primary cleft lip repair at age 6-12 months and cleft palate repair at age 18-30 months were selected in this study. Eighteen UCCLP patients who received two-stage palate repair were selected as group 1, and 22 UCCLP patients who received one-stage palate repair were selected as group 2. The control group consisted of 20 patients with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL patients) whose age and gender matched with UCCLP patients. A one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to analyze the nature of data distribution. Bonferroni test and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used for multiple comparisons. Both case groups showed reduced maxillary sagittal length (ANS-PMP, A-PM, p palate repair had a reduced posterior maxillary vertical height (R-PMP, p palate repair. Vomer flap repair inhibited maxilla vertical growth. Delayed hard palate repair showed less detrimental effects on maxillary growth compared to early hard palate repair in UCCLP patients aged 5 years. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Suture simulator - Cleft palate surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinck, F; Riot, S; Qassemyar, A; Belkhou, A; Wolber, A; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2017-04-01

    Cleft palate requires surgery in the first years of life, furthermore repairing anatomically the soft and hard palate is complex on a surgical level because of the fine tissues and the local intraoral configuration. It is valuable to train first on simulators before going to the operating room. However, there is no material dedicated to learning how to perform intraoral sutures in cleft palate surgery. We made one, in an artisanal manner, in order to practice before the real surgical gesture. The simulator was designed based on precise anatomical data. A steel pipe, fixed on a rigid base represented the oral cavity. An adapted split spoon represented the palate. All pieces could be removed in order to apply a hydrocellular dressing before training for sutures. Our simulator was tested by 3 senior surgeons in our department in close to real-life conditions in order to evaluate its anatomical accuracy. It is valuable to have a simulator to train on cleft palate sutures within teaching university hospitals that manage this pathology. Our simulator has a very low cost, it is easy to make and is anatomically accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Palatal obturators in patients after maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, P; Bigelli, E; Vertucci, V; Balestra, F; Montani, M; DE Carli, S; Arcuri, C

    2014-01-01

    Prosthodontic management of palatal defects is fundamental to improve patient's life undergoing to a maxillary surgical treatment. A lot of maxillary defects are a direct consequence of surgical treatment of malformations, neoplasms or trauma. The obturators are prosthesis used to close palatal defects after maxillectomy, to restore masticatory function and to improve speech. The primary goals of the obturator prosthesis are to preserve the remaining teeth and tissue and to provide comfort, function, and aesthetics to the patients. Different materials and retention methods are a characteristic of new types of obturators.

  8. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  9. Evidence-Based Medicine: Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Albert S

    2017-01-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the incidence of cleft palate and risk factors associated with development of an orofacial cleft. 2. Understand differences among several techniques to repair clefts of both the hard and soft palates. 3. Discuss risk factors for development of postoperative fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and facial growth problems. 4. Establish a treatment plan for individualized care of a cleft palate patient. Orofacial clefts are the most common congenital malformations of the head and neck region, and approximately three-quarters of these patients have some form of cleft palate deformity. Cleft palate repair is generally performed in children between 6 and 12 months of age. The goals of palate repair are to minimize the occurrence of fistulas, establish a normal velopharyngeal mechanism, and optimize facial growth. This Maintenance of Certification review discusses the incidence and epidemiology associated with cleft palate deformity and specifics associated with patient care, including analgesia, surgical repair techniques, and complications associated with repair of the cleft palate.

  10. Osteoplasty of the maxilla in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate by a mandibular bone graft with the use of 3D computer modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Maxillary defects in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate are very heterogeneous. The existing methods to assess the results of osteoplasty are suboptimal. The ways to measure the volume of a defect are not truly three-dimensional; instead, they are based on the sum of the sizes of maxillary defect measured in the sections done across the alveolar process. This is a more or less precise approximation and its calculation may be time-consuming. Aim: To evaluate efficacy of osteoplasty with a mandible bone autograft in children with cleft lip and palate and to determine the optimal pre-requisites for satisfactory treatment results. Materials and methods: We examined and treated 30 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate and maxillary defects, aged from 7 to 17 (mean age 11.2 ± 3.5 years. The following types of abnormalities were found: incomplete cleft lip, alveolar process and palate; complete cleft lip, alveolar process and palate; complete cleft lip, alveolar process and palate with partial ossification of the posterior hard palate related to previous surgeries. In all patients, the surgical intervention consisted of maxillary osteoplasty with a combination graft consisting of the cortical plate from the mandible body, shaped to the existing defect, an autologous bone chips taken from the mandible ramus, and a Bio-Oss xenograft. The patients were divided into 4 groups, depending on their age, diagnosis, defect size, and postoperative complications. Three-dimensional modeling to determine the volume of the defect was performed as follows: a geometrical model of the mandible defect was obtained based on the mirror copy of the contralateral healthy part; the volume of the defect was computed as the difference between the baseline and the mirror model. The results of the osteoplasty were assessed by Bergland and Chelsea scales, as well as by our own scales. Results: The defect volumes were in the range of 0.46 to 2.9 cm3

  11. A Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semb, Gunvor; Enemark, Hans; Friede, Hans

    2017-01-01

    with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It presents the protocol developed for the trials in CONSORT format, and describes the management structure that was developed to achieve the long-term engagement and commitment required to complete the project. METHOD: Ten established national or regional...... cleft centres participated. Lip and soft palate closure at 3-4 months, and hard palate closure at 12 months served as a common method in each trial. Trial 1 compared this with hard palate closure at 36 months. Trial 2 compared it with lip closure at 3-4 months and hard and soft palate closure at 12...... months. Trial 3 compared it with lip and hard palate closure at 3-4 months and soft palate closure at 12 months. The primary outcomes were speech and dentofacial development, with a series of perioperative and longer-term secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Recruitment of 448 infants took place over a 9-year...

  12. Scandcleft Randomised Trials of Primary Surgery for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate. Planning and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semb, Gunvor; Enemark, Hans; Paulin, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It presents the protocol developed for the trials in CONSORT format, and describes the management structure that was developed to achieve the long-term engagement and commitment required to complete the project. Method: Ten established national or regional...... cleft centres participated. Lip and soft palate closure at 3–4 months, and hard palate closure at 12 months served as a common method in each trial. Trial 1 compared this with hard palate closure at 36 months. Trial 2 compared it with lip closure at 3–4 months and hard and soft palate closure at 12...... months. Trial 3 compared it with lip and hard palate closure at 3–4 months and soft palate closure at 12 months. The primary outcomes were speech and dentofacial development, with a series of perioperative and longer-term secondary outcomes. Results: Recruitment of 448 infants took place over a 9-year...

  13. The Soft Palate Friendly Speech Bulb for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlon, Sukhdeep Singh; Kahlon, Monaliza; Gupta, Shilpa; Dhingra, Parvinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency is an anatomic defect of the soft palate making palatopharyngeal sphincter incomplete. It is an important concern to address in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Speech aid prosthesis or speech bulbs are best choice in cases where surgically repaired soft palate is too short to contact pharyngeal walls during function but these prosthesis have been associated with inadequate marginal closure, ulcerations and patient discomfort. Here is a case report of...

  14. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetenkov D.Ye.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  15. Unilateral cleft lip and palate: Simultaneous early repair of the nose, anterior palate and lip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Louise Caouette

    2007-01-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate is a defect involving the lip, nose and maxilla. These structures are inter-related, and simultaneous early correction of all the aspects of the defect is necessary to obtain a satisfactory result that will be maintained with growth. The surgical technique combining various procedures is presented and compared with previously published reports. PMID:19554125

  16. Repair of large palatal fistula using tongue flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejjal Nawfal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large palatal fistulas are a challenging problem in cleft surgery. Many techniques are used to close the defect. The tongue flap is an easy and reproductible procedure for managing this complication. The authors report a case of a large palatal fistula closure with anteriorly based tongue flap.

  17. Repair of large palatal fistula using tongue flap | Nawfal | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large palatal fi stulas are a challenging problem in cleft surgery. Many techniques are used to close the defect. The tongue fl ap is an easy and reproductible procedure for managing this complication. The authors report a case of a large palatal fi stula closure with anteriorly based tongue fl ap. Key words: Cleft surgery, ...

  18. Soft Palate Reconstruction Using Bilateral Palatal Mucomuscular Flap and Pharyngeal Flap after Resection of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sik Kim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma infrequently occurs at the soft palate. Although various methodscan be used for reconstruction of soft palate defects that occur after resecting squamous cellcarcinoma, it is difficult to obtain satisfactory results from the perspective of the functionalrestoration of the soft palate. A combination of bilateral palatal mucomuscular flap for theoral side and superiorly based posterior pharyngeal flap for the nasal side were performed ontwo patients who were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate in orderto reconstruct the soft palate defects after surgical resection. After surgery, the patients werefollowed-up for a mean period of 11 months. The flaps were well maintained in both patients.The donor site defects were epithelialized and completely recovered. Additionally, no recurrenceof the primary sites was shown. Slight hyponasality was observed in the voice assessmentsthat were conducted 6 months after surgery. No food regurgitation or aspiration was observedin the swallowing tests. We used a combination of bilateral palatal mucomuscular flap andsuperiorly based posterior pharyngeal flap to reconstruct the soft palate defects that occurredafter resecting the squamous cell carcinomas. We reduced the donor site complications andachieved functionally satisfactory outcomes.

  19. We can predict postpalatoplasty velopharyngeal insufficiency in cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jacques E; Godbout, Audrey; Arteau-Gauthier, Isabelle; Lacour, Sophie; Abel, Kati; McConnell, Elisa-Maude

    2014-02-01

    To find an anatomical measurement of the cleft palate (or a calculated parameter) that predicts the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) after palatal cleft repair. Retrospective cohort study. Charts were reviewed from cleft palate patients who underwent palatoplasty by the Von Langenbeck technique for isolated cleft palate or Bardach two-flap palatoplasty for cleft lip-palate. Seven anatomical cleft parameters were prospectively measured during the palatoplasty procedure. Three blinded speech-language pathologists retrospectively scored the clinically assessed VPI at 4 years of age. The recommendation of pharyngoplasty was also used as an indicator of VPI. From 1993 to 2008, 67 patients were enrolled in the study. The best predicting parameter was the ratio a/(30 - b1), in which a is defined as the posterior gap between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall and b1 is the width of the cleft at the hard palate level. An a/(30 - b1) ratio >0.7 to 0.8 is associated with a higher risk of developing VPI (relative risk = 2.2-5.1, sensitivity = 72%-81%, P cleft at the hard palate level and the posterior gap between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall were found to be the most significant parameters in predicting VPI. The best correlation was obtained with the ratio a/(30 - b1). 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Cleft Palate Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... craniofacial journeys. Read the press release here. American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association 1504 East Franklin Street, Suite 102 ... order bottles Order ACPA publications © Copyright 2017 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Website by Mixer Creative Follow us ...

  1. Modified Nance palatal button

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes modified Nance palatal button by which problems encountered in the palatal region around the acrylic button during space closure and molar distalization can be minimized.

  2. The value of multislice spiral CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of cleft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guangxi; Sun Lianfen; Zhang Xiaolin; Yu Chengxin; Lu Ji; Wang Xiaopeng; Li Liya; Yang Cheng; Wang Jun; Tian Yiqing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the practical value of multislice spiral CT (MSCT) in the preoperative diagnosis of cleft palate. Methods: Twenty patients with cleft palate were examined by using thin-slice (1.25 mm/4i) axial MSCT scanning and CT virtual endoscope (CTVE) imaging before and after operations. The cleft of each lesion was measured in the primary axial images. Results: Of the 20 cases, soft-and-hard cleft palate (grade II) was detected in 10 cases, with the clefts of soft palate between 1.5 cm and 2.2 cm, and the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 1.2 cm and 2.0 cm. The right utter cleft palates were found in 3 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 2.0 cm and 2.5 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 2.0 cm and 2.4 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 1.8 cm and 2.2 cm. The left utter cleft palates (grade III) were found in 5 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 1.2 cm and 1.8 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 0.9 cm and 2.0 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 0.9 cm and 1.8 cm. The bilateral utter cleft palates (grade III) were detected in 2 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 2.1 cm and 2.3 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 1.8 cm and 2.0 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 1.9 cm and 2.3 cm. Conclusion: MSCT could excellently display the shape of all lesions before operation, especially the splitting degree of hard cleft palates in the axial images. Accurate measurements could be done for the cleft of different lesions in MSCT images. CTVE could clearly and directly show the shape of the lesion's interior surface. The pre-operative and post-operative images of each case could be perfectly compared by the combination of MSCT and CTVE

  3. Evaluation of cleft lip and palate by computed tomography with 2 mm thin slice scanning, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Mayuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Harada, Junta

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomography was performed on 104 patients with cleft lip and palate by continuous 2 mm slice scanning. The type of hard palate was classified as normal, hypoplasia and aplasia, depending on its developmental degree. The shape of alveolus was also classified as circular, triangular and asymmetric forms for the evaluation of the maxillary development. The hard palate development correlated with the shape of the alveolus, the diameter of maxillary and mandibular bone, and frequency of sinusitis and otitis media. Evaluation of the hard palate by thin slice scanning is useful in presumption of future fecial development. (author)

  4. Evaluation of cleft lip and palate by computed tomography with 2 mm thin slice scanning, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Mayuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Harada, Junta (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-06-01

    Computed tomography was performed on 104 patients with cleft lip and palate by continuous 2 mm slice scanning. The type of hard palate was classified as normal, hypoplasia and aplasia, depending on its developmental degree. The shape of alveolus was also classified as circular, triangular and asymmetric forms for the evaluation of the maxillary development. The hard palate development correlated with the shape of the alveolus, the diameter of maxillary and mandibular bone, and frequency of sinusitis and otitis media. Evaluation of the hard palate by thin slice scanning is useful in presumption of future fecial development. (author).

  5. Diagnosing subtle palatal anomalies: Validation of video-analysis and assessment protocol for diagnosing occult submucous cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Ryan; Weinberg, Seth M; Marazita, Mary L; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-09-01

    Submucous cleft palate (SMCP) classically involves bifid uvula, zona pellucida, and notched hard palate. However, patients may present with more subtle anatomic abnormalities. The ability to detect these abnormalities is important for surgeons managing velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) or considering adenoidectomy. Validate an assessment protocol for diagnosis of occult submucous cleft palate (OSMCP) and identify physical examination features present in patients with OSMCP in the relaxed and activated palate positions. Study participants included patients referred to a pediatric VPD clinic with concern for hypernasality or SMCP. Using an appropriately encrypted iPod touch, transoral video was obtained for each patient with the palate in the relaxed and activated positions. The videos were reviewed by two otolaryngologists in normal speed and slow-motion, as needed, and a questionnaire was completed by each reviewer pertaining to the anatomy and function of the palate. 47 patients, with an average age of 4.6 years, were included in the study over a one-year period. Four videos were unusable due to incomplete view of the palate. The most common palatal abnormality noted was OSMCP, diagnosed by each reviewer in 26/43 and 30/43 patients respectively. Using the assessment protocol, agreement on palatal diagnosis was 83.7% (kappa = 0.68), indicating substantial agreement, with the most prevalent anatomic features being vaulted palate elevation (96%) and visible notching of hard palate (75%). The diagnosis of subtle palatal anomalies is difficult and can be subjective. Using the proposed video-analysis method and assessment protocol may improve reliability of diagnosis of OSMCP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  7. Developments for radiation hard silicon detectors by defect engineering - results by the CERN RD48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, G.; Ahmed, M.; Albergo, S.; Allport, P.; Anderson, D.; Andricek, L.; Angarano, M.M.; Augelli, V.; Bacchetta, N.; Bartalini, P.; Bates, R.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Borchi, E.; Botila, T.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Bruzzi, M.; Budzynski, T.; Burger, P.; Campabadal, F.; Casse, G.; Catacchini, E.; Chilingarov, A.; Ciampolini, P.; Cindro, V.; Costa, M.J.; Creanza, D.; Clauws, P.; Da Via, C.; Davies, G.; De Boer, W.; Dell'Orso, R.; De Palma, M.; Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Evrard, O.; Fallica, G.; Fanourakis, G.; Feick, H.; Focardi, E.; Fonseca, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabathuler, K.; Glaser, M.; Grabiec, P.; Grigoriev, E.; Hall, G.; Hanlon, M.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Horisberger, R.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Jones, B.K.; Jungermann, L.; Kaminsky, A.; Kohout, Z.; Kramberger, G.; Kuhnke, M.; Kwan, S.; Lemeilleur, F.; Leroy, C.; Letheren, M.; Li, Z.; Ligonzo, T.; Linhart, V.; Litovchenko, P.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, M.; Luczynski, Z.; Lutz, G.; MacEvoy, B.; Manolopoulos, S.; Markou, A.; Martinez, C.; Messineo, A.; Miku, M.; Moll, M.; Nossarzewska, E.; Ottaviani, G.; Oshea, V.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Petre, D.; Pickford, A.; Pintilie, I.; Pintilie, L.; Pospisil, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raine, C.; Rafi, J.M.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richter, R.H.; Riedler, P.; Roe, S.; Roy, P.; Ruzin, A.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Santocchia, A.; Schiavulli, L.; Sicho, P.; Siotis, I.; Sloan, T.; Slysz, W.; Smith, K.; Solanky, M.; Sopko, B.; Stolze, K.; Sundby Avset, B.; Svensson, B.; Tivarus, C.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Valvo, G.; Vasilescu, A.; Vayaki, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verdini, P.; Vrba, V.; Watts, S.; Weber, E.R.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wegrzecka, I.; Weilhammer, P.; Wheadon, R.; Wilburn, C.; Wilhelm, I.; Wunstorf, R.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wyss, J.; Zankel, K.; Zabierowski, P.; Zontar, D.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarises the final results obtained by the RD48 collaboration. The emphasis is on the more practical aspects directly relevant for LHC applications. The report is based on the comprehensive survey given in the 1999 status report (RD48 3rd Status Report, CERN/LHCC 2000-009, December 1999), a recent conference report (Lindstroem et al. (RD48), and some latest experimental results. Additional data have been reported in the last ROSE workshop (5th ROSE workshop, CERN, CERN/LEB 2000-005). A compilation of all RD48 internal reports and a full publication list can be found on the RD48 homepage (http://cern.ch/RD48/). The success of the oxygen enrichment of FZ-silicon as a highly powerful defect engineering technique and its optimisation with various commercial manufacturers are reported. The focus is on the changes of the effective doping concentration (depletion voltage). The RD48 model for the dependence of radiation effects on fluence, temperature and operational time is verified; projections to operational scenarios for main LHC experiments demonstrate vital benefits. Progress in the microscopic understanding of damage effects as well as the application of defect kinetics models and device modelling for the prediction of the macroscopic behaviour has also been achieved but will not be covered in detail

  8. Modulating Wnt Signaling Rescues Palate Morphogenesis in Pax9 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Lan, Y; Krumlauf, R; Jiang, R

    2017-10-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect caused by disruption of palatogenesis during embryonic development. Although mutations disrupting components of the Wnt signaling pathway have been associated with cleft lip and palate in humans and mice, the mechanisms involving canonical Wnt signaling and its regulation in secondary palate development are not well understood. Here, we report that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in Pax9-mediated regulation of secondary palate development. We found that cleft palate pathogenesis in Pax9-deficient embryos is accompanied by significantly reduced expression of Axin2, an endogenous target of canonical Wnt signaling, in the developing palatal mesenchyme, particularly in the posterior regions of the palatal shelves. We found that expression of Dkk2, encoding a secreted Wnt antagonist, is significantly increased whereas the levels of active β-catenin protein, the essential transcriptional coactivator of canonical Wnt signaling, is significantly decreased in the posterior regions of the palatal shelves in embryonic day 13.5 Pax9-deficent embryos in comparison with control littermates. We show that small molecule-mediated inhibition of Dickkopf (DKK) activity in utero during palatal shelf morphogenesis partly rescued secondary palate development in Pax9-deficient embryos. Moreover, we found that genetic inactivation of Wise, which is expressed in the developing palatal shelves and encodes another secreted antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling, also rescued palate morphogenesis in Pax9-deficient mice. Furthermore, whereas Pax9 del/del embryos exhibit defects in palatal shelf elevation/reorientation and significant reduction in accumulation of hyaluronic acid-a high molecular extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan implicated in playing an important role in palatal shelf elevation-80% of Pax9 del/del ;Wise -/- double-mutant mouse embryos exhibit rescued palatal shelf elevation/reorientation, accompanied by restored

  9. A restricted test of single word intelligibility in 3-year-old children with and without cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Poulsen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In a previous study, children with cleft palate with hard palate closure at 12 months of age showed more typical phonological development than children with an unrepaired hard palate at 36 months of age. This finding was based on narrow transcription of word initial target...... hard palate closure at either12 months (HPR (hard palate repaired)) or 36 months (HPU (hard palate unrepaired)), were compared to data obtained from 14 age-matched, typically developing, control children. Methods: Video recordings of the children naming target words were shown to 84 naïve listeners...... consonants obtained from a simple naming test. To evaluate the relevance of this finding, we investigated how well the children's target words were understood by 84 naïve listeners. Design: A cross-sectional study. Participants: Data obtained from twenty-eight children with UCLP, 3 years of age, who received...

  10. Variations in Velopharyngeal Structure in Adults With Repaired Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jamie L; Kotlarek, Katelyn J; Sutton, Bradley P; Kuehn, David P; Jaskolka, Michael S; Fang, Xiangming; Point, Stuart W; Rauccio, Frank

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in velopharyngeal structures between adults with repaired cleft palate and normal resonance and adults without cleft palate. Thirty-six English-speaking adults, including 6 adults (2 males and 4 females) with repaired cleft palate (M = 32.5 years of age, SD = 17.4 years) and 30 adults (15 males and 15 females) without cleft palate (M = 23.3 years of age, SD = 4.1 years), participated in the study. Fourteen velopharyngeal measures were obtained on magnetic resonance images and compared between groups (cleft and noncleft). After adjusting for body size and sex effects, there was a statistically significant difference between groups for 10 out of the 14 velopharyngeal measures. Compared to those without cleft palate, participants with repaired cleft palate had a significantly shorter hard palate height and length, shorter levator muscle length, shorter intravelar segment, more acute levator angles of origin, shorter and thinner velum, and greater pharyngeal depth. Although significant differences were evident in the cleft palate group, individuals displayed normal resonance. These findings suggest that a wide variability in velopharyngeal anatomy can occur in the presence of normal resonance, particularly for those with repaired cleft palate. Future research is needed to understand how anatomic variability impacts function, such as during speech.

  11. Isolated cleft palate requires different surgical protocols depending on cleft type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, Anna; Persson, Christina; Lilja, Jan; Mark, Hans

    2017-08-01

    A staged protocol for isolated cleft palate (CPO), comprising the early repair of the soft palate at 6 months and delayed repair of the eventual cleft in the hard palate until 4 years, designed to improve maxillary growth, was introduced. CPO is frequently associated with additional congenital conditions. The study evaluates this surgical protocol for clefts in the soft palate (CPS) and for clefts in the hard and soft palate (CPH), with or without additional malformation, regarding primary and secondary surgical interventions needed for cleft closure and for correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency until 10 years of age. Of 94 consecutive children with CPO, divided into four groups with (+) or without (-) additional malformations (CPS + or CPS - and CPH + or CPH-), hard palate repair was required in 53%, performed with small local flaps in 21% and with bilateral mucoperiosteal flaps in 32%. The total incidence of soft palate re-repair was 2% and the fistula repair of the hard palate was 5%. The total incidence of secondary velopharyngeal surgery was 17% until 10 years, varying from 0% for CPS - and 15% for CPH-, to 28% for CPS + and 30% for CPH+. The described staged protocol for repair of CPO is found to be safe in terms of perioperative surgical results, with comparatively low need for secondary interventions. Furthermore, the study indicates that the presence of a cleft in the hard palate and/or additional conditions have a negative impact on the development of the velopharyngeal function.

  12. Prevalence, cause, and location of palatal fistula in operated complete unilateral cleft lip and palate: retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Agostino Biella Passos, Vivian; de Carvalho Carrara, Cleide Felício; da Silva Dalben, Gisele; Costa, Beatriz; Gomide, Marcia Ribeiro

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of fistulas after palate repair and analyze their location and association with possible causal factors. Retrospective analysis of patient records and evaluation of preoperative initial photographs. Tertiary craniofacial center. Five hundred eighty-nine individuals with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate that underwent palate repair at the age of 12 to 36 months by the von Langenbeck technique, in a single stage, by the plastic surgery team of the hospital, from January 2003 to July 2007. The cleft width was visually classified by a single examiner as narrow, regular, or wide. The following regions of the palate were considered for the location: anterior, medium, transition (between hard and soft palate), and soft palate. Descriptive statistics and analysis of association between the occurrence of fistula and the different parameters were evaluated. Palatal fistulas were observed in 27% of the sample, with a greater proportion at the anterior region (37.11%). The chi-square statistical test revealed statistically significant association (P ≤ .05) between the fistulas and initial cleft width (P = .0003), intraoperative problems (P = .0037), and postoperative problems (P = .00002). The prevalence of palatal fistula was similar to mean values reported in the literature. Analysis of causal factors showed a positive association between palatal fistulas with wide and regular initial cleft width and intraoperative and postoperative problems. The anterior region presented the greatest occurrence of fistulas.

  13. Comparison of the effect of the rotation palatoplasty and V-Y pushback palatoplasty techniques on palate elongation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, D; Bora, A; Yuce, S; Davran, R; Kocak, O F; Canbaz, Y; Avcu, S; Atik, B

    2015-06-01

    Most surgical techniques used in cleft palate repair require the extension of the palate to the pharynx. However, no adequate information exists regarding the extent to which this elongation obtained during operation continues in late postoperative period. In this study, we compared and measured palate elongation in patients with a cleft palate who underwent a V-Y pushback or rotation palatoplasty, by means of magnetic resonance images obtained before and 1 year after surgery. The hard palate, soft palate, and total palate lengths were measured for all of the patients, and the velopharyngeal opening area width was calculated. In patients who underwent the V-Y pushback technique (n=13), the total palate and soft palate lengths were shortened by an average of 0.10 and 0.14cm after surgery, respectively. However, the hard palate length was elongated by an average of 0.13cm. In the rotation palatoplasty group (n=13), the total palate, hard palate, and soft palate lengths were elongated by 0.57, 0.10, and 0.49cm, respectively. The velopharyngeal opening was narrowed by 0.06cm(2) using the V-Y pushback technique and by 0.29cm(2) using the rotational palatoplasty. This study demonstrated that the palate does not elongate during the V-Y pushback technique, as expected. However, rotational palatoplasty elongates the soft palate. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Palatal Perforation: A Rare Complication of Postanesthetic Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargi, Vidisha; Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Gupta, Swati

    2017-01-01

    The everyday practice of dentistry relies heavily on achieving adequate local anesthesia. Even though the safety record of local anesthetic agents is high, complications do occur. Palate is a favorable site for soft-tissue lesions. Various factors such as direct effects of the drug, blanching of the tissues during injection, relatively poor blood supply, and reactivation of the latent forms of herpes can all promote to tissue ischemia and a lesion in the palate. Among various complications, anesthetic necrotic ulcer is a rare and uncommon condition occurring mostly in the hard palate possibly after a local anesthetic infiltration. The ulceration is often deep and shows spontaneous but delayed healing. If proper treatment is not instituted on time, the necrosis can reach deep into the bone causing sequestrum formation and ultimately leading to palatal perforation. Here, we report a case of palatal perforation in a male patient followed by surgical interventions and follow-up. PMID:29042744

  15. The relationship between the hardness and the point-defect-density in neutron-irradiated MgO·3.0Al2O3 and AlN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Yatsui, K.; Yano, T.

    2001-01-01

    MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 single crystals and sintered AlN polycrystals were irradiated with fast neutrons in various conditions and the hardness of the irradiated and unirradiated samples was measured with a Vickers hardness tester. The hardness of as-irradiated MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 and AlN samples increased by 23 and 51%, respectively. After isochronal annealing, the hardness gradually decreased and mostly recovered to that of the unirradiated one up to 1400degC. Volume of the sample also increased after the irradiation and changed in the same way as the hardness by annealing. A relationship between the hardness and the density of point defects is proposed and the experimental results agree with the relationship. It implies that the point defects generated by the irradiation pin down dislocations and increase the hardness of neutron irradiated MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 samples. (author)

  16. Meta-analysis Reveals Genome-Wide Significance at 15q13 for Nonsyndromic Clefting of Both the Lip and the Palate, and Functional Analyses Implicate GREM1 As a Plausible Causative Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Ahmed, Syeda Tasnim; Böhmer, Anne C.; Sangani, Nasim Bahram; Varghese, Sheryil; Klamt, Johanna; Schuenke, Hannah; Gültepe, Pinar; Hofmann, Andrea; Rubini, Michele; Aldhorae, Khalid Ahmed; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P.; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Reiter, Rudolf; Borck, Guntram; Knapp, Michael; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Graf, Daniel; Mangold, Elisabeth; Peters, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are common birth defects with multifactorial etiology. The most common type is cleft lip, which occurs with or without cleft palate (nsCLP and nsCLO, respectively). Although genetic components play an important role in nsCLP, the genetic factors that predispose to palate involvement are largely unknown. In this study, we carried out a meta-analysis on genetic and clinical data from three large cohorts and identified strong association between a region on chromosome 15q13 and nsCLP (P = 8.13×10−14 for rs1258763; relative risk (RR): 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32–1.61)) but not nsCLO (P = 0.27; RR: 1.09 (0.94–1.27)). The 5 kb region of strongest association maps downstream of Gremlin-1 (GREM1), which encodes a secreted antagonist of the BMP4 pathway. We show during mouse embryogenesis, Grem1 is expressed in the developing lip and soft palate but not in the hard palate. This is consistent with genotype-phenotype correlations between rs1258763 and a specific nsCLP subphenotype, since a more than two-fold increase in risk was observed in patients displaying clefts of both the lip and soft palate but who had an intact hard palate (RR: 3.76, CI: 1.47–9.61, Pdifflip or palate defects in Grem1-deficient mice, wild type embryonic palatal shelves developed divergent shapes when cultured in the presence of ectopic Grem1 protein (P = 0.0014). The present study identified a non-coding region at 15q13 as the second, genome-wide significant locus specific for nsCLP, after 13q31. Moreover, our data suggest that the closely located GREM1 gene contributes to a rare clinical nsCLP entity. This entity specifically involves abnormalities of the lip and soft palate, which develop at different time-points and in separate anatomical regions. PMID:26968009

  17. Work Hard / Play Hard

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, J.; Johnson, V.; Henckel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Work Hard / Play Hard was a participatory performance/workshop or CPD experience hosted by interdisciplinary arts atelier WeAreCodeX, in association with AntiUniversity.org. As a socially/economically engaged arts practice, Work Hard / Play Hard challenged employees/players to get playful, or go to work. 'The game changes you, you never change the game'. Employee PLAYER A 'The faster the better.' Employer PLAYER B

  18. Essential Palatal Myoclonus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuwan Raj Pandey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Palatal myoclonus is a rare condition presenting with clicking sound in ear or muscle tremor in pharynx. There are two varieties: essential and symptomatic. Various treatment options exists ranging from watchful observation to botulinum toxin injection. We have not found any reported case of palatal myoclonus from our country. Here we present a case of essential palatal myoclonus managed with clonazepam. Case report: A young female presented in Ear Nose and Throat clinic with complain of auditory click and spontaneous rhythmic movement of throat muscles for eight months. On examination, there was involuntary, rhythmic contraction of bilateral soft-palate, uvula, and base of tongue. Neurological, eye, and peripheral examination were normal. A diagnosis of essential palatal myoclonus was made. It was managed successfully with clonazepam; patient was still on low dose clonazepam at the time of making this report. Conclusion: Essential palatal myoclonus can be clinically diagnosed and managed even in settings where MRI is not available or affordable.

  19. A Demonstration Project of Speech Training for the Preschool Cleft Palate Child. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert J.

    To ascertain the efficacy of a program of language and speech stimulation for the preschool cleft palate child, a research and demonstration project was conducted using 137 subjects (ages 18 to 72 months) with defects involving the soft palate. Their language and speech skills were matched with those of a noncleft peer group revealing that the…

  20. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  1. In vitro migration and adhesion of fibroblasts from different phases of palatal wound healing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, H.E. van; Snoek, P.A.; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Torensma, R.; Maltha, J.C.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Cleft palate patients often show mid-facial growth impairment after surgical closure of the defect. This is a consequence of palatal wound healing, and more specifically of wound contraction and scar tissue formation. Cells of the fibroblast lineage are responsible for these processes and they

  2. Disruption of epithelial cell migration as a potential mechanism of cleft palate induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft palate occurs in about one in seven hundred births per year, making it the most prevalent craniofacial birth defect in the world. During embryonic development, tissue fusion is a critical step in the formation of the palate, cornea, urethra, and neural tube. Epithelial cell...

  3. Management of an infant with cleft lip and palate with phocomelia in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, M S

    2000-12-01

    Cleft lip and palate is a severe birth defect occurring approximately one in 800-1000 newborn infants. The incidence varies widely among races. Cleft lip and palate together account for approximately 50% of all cases whereas isolated cleft lip and isolated cleft palate occur in about 25% of cases. Many of these congenital anomalies appear to be genetically determined though the majority are of unknown causes or teratogenic influences. Presented here is a 3 day old infant with bilateral cleft lip and palate and phocomelia for whom a feeding obturator was made and delivered to facilitate feeding.

  4. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  5. Surgical management of necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NSM is a rare benign, inflammatory disease of both major and minor salivary glands, although more commonly reported in the minor glands of the palate. The characteristic clinical presentation can perplex the clinician and may be mistaken for a malignant neoplasm, such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, as well as invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical and histological similarity between this entity and a malignant lesion may result in unnecessary or mis-treatment. Though clinically mimics malignancy, NSM is considered to be a self-limiting disease, and takes about 3-12 weeks to resolve. Majority of the case resolves itself or by supportive and symptomatic treatment. Surgical intervention is rarely required in NSM except the diagnostic biopsy. Herein we report the clinical, histopathological feature and surgical management of a case of NSM of hard palate in a young adult male.

  6. Surgical management of necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, S M; Balaji, Preetha

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NSM) is a rare benign, inflammatory disease of both major and minor salivary glands, although more commonly reported in the minor glands of the palate. The characteristic clinical presentation can perplex the clinician and may be mistaken for a malignant neoplasm, such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, as well as invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical and histological similarity between this entity and a malignant lesion may result in unnecessary or mis-treatment. Though clinically mimics malignancy, NSM is considered to be a self-limiting disease, and takes about 3-12 weeks to resolve. Majority of the case resolves itself or by supportive and symptomatic treatment. Surgical intervention is rarely required in NSM except the diagnostic biopsy. Herein we report the clinical, histopathological feature and surgical management of a case of NSM of hard palate in a young adult male.

  7. Palate dimensions in six-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate: a six-center study on dental casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koželj, Vesna; Vegnuti, Miljana; Drevenšek, Martina; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, Maria; Gonzalez-Landa, Gonzalo; Hanstein, Siiri; Klimova, Irena; Kobus, Kazimierz; Kobus-Zaleśna, Katarzyna; Semb, Gunvor; Shaw, Bill

    2012-11-01

    To compare palatal dimensions in 6-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) treated by different protocols with those of noncleft children. Retrospective intercenter outcome study. Patients : Upper dental casts from 129 children with repaired UCLP and 30 controls were analyzed by the trigonometric method. Six European cleft centers. Main outcome measures : Sagittal, transverse, and vertical dimensions of the palate were observed. Palate variables were analyzed with descriptive methods and nonparametric tests. Regarding several various characteristics measured on a relatively small number of subjects, hierarchical, k-means clustering, and principal component analyses were used. Mean values of the observed dimensions for five cleft groups differed significantly from the control (p cleft differed significantly from all other cleft groups in most variables (p palate. A similar number of treated children were classified into each cluster, while all children without clefts were classified in the same cluster. The percentage of treated children from a particular group that fit this cluster ranged from 0% to 70% and increased with age at palatal closure and number of primary surgical procedures. At 6 years of age, children with stepwise repair and hard palate closure after the age of two more frequently result in palatal dimensions of noncleft control than children with earlier palatal closure and one-stage cleft repair.

  8. Bilateral optic disc pit with maculopathy in a patient with cleft lip and cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic disc pit (ODP is small, gray-white, oval depression found at the optic nerve head. It is a congenital defect that occurs due to imperfect closure of superior edge of the embryonic fissure. Cleft lip and palate are also congenital midline abnormalities occurring due to defect in the fusion of frontonasal prominence, maxillary prominence and mandibular prominence. There is only one case report describing the occurrence of ODP in a young patient with cleft lip and palate who also had basal encephalocele. We describe a 52-year-old patient with congenital cleft lip and palate with bilateral ODP with maculopathy but without any other midline abnormality.

  9. Management of cleft lip and palate in Nigeria: A survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clefts of the lip and/or palate are the most common congenital craniofacial defects and second only to club foot among all congenital anomalies. The management of this condition is resource intensive due to the multidimensional needs. This survey was carried out to ascertain the current state of cleft ...

  10. Awareness, knowledge and attitude on cleft lip and palate among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-09

    Nov 9, 2012 ... negative beliefs and attitudes toward the condition. The objective of this ... Conclusion: There is need for increased public enlightenment/health education to increase awareness and subsequently ... The parent's feelings about their child's cleft defect ..... Gene/environment causes of cleft lip and/or palate.

  11. Morphological evaluation of clefts of the lip, palate, or both in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Santiago; Fiani, Nadine; Kan-Rohrer, Kimi H; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To systematically characterize the morphology of cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate in dogs. ANIMALS 32 client-owned dogs with clefts of the lip (n = 5), palate (23), or both (4) that had undergone a CT or cone-beam CT scan of the head prior to any surgical procedures involving the oral cavity or face. PROCEDURES Dog signalment and skull type were recorded. The anatomic form of each defect was characterized by use of a widely used human oral-cleft classification system on the basis of CT findings and clinical images. Other defect morphological features, including shape, relative size, facial symmetry, and vomer involvement, were also recorded. RESULTS 9 anatomic forms of cleft were identified. Two anatomic forms were identified in the 23 dogs with cleft palate, in which differences in defect shape and size as well as vomer abnormalities were also evident. Seven anatomic forms were observed in 9 dogs with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate, and most of these dogs had incisive bone abnormalities and facial asymmetry. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The morphological features of congenitally acquired cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate were complex and varied among dogs. The features identified here may be useful for surgical planning, developing of clinical coding schemes, or informing genetic, embryological, or clinical research into birth defects in dogs and other species.

  12. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from surgery, coping with speech problems, or improving self-esteem. Some teens join support groups or online forums where they can talk to other people who were born with cleft lip or palate. Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD Date reviewed: ...

  14. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT

  15. Accommodating Picky Palates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    Healthy gourmet offerings are fast becoming the norm at college dining halls around the country. At a time when the children of Baby Boomers are hitting higher education in record numbers, college officials have scrambled to accommodate their picky palates and their insistence for healthier meals than were served to past generations. At the same…

  16. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G. (Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT.

  17. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate Print en español Labio leporino y paladar hendido Tilt your head back a bit and look in the mirror. Do you see the way your nose connects to your upper lip? Now open your mouth. Do you see the ...

  18. A Rat Model for Muscle Regeneration in the Soft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Helmich, Maria P. A. C.; Ulrich, Dietmar J. O.; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. Methods Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4) and 2 (n = 2) were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6) was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2) was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm) were evaluated by (immuno)histochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA) after 7 days. Results The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. Conclusions This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery. PMID:23554995

  19. Speech outcomes of early palatal repair with or without intravelar veloplasty in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Jean-Charles; Herlin, Christian; Captier, Guillaume; Baylon, Hélène; Verdeil, Mélanie; Bigorre, Michèle

    2013-12-01

    We compared the early speech outcomes of 40 consecutive children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who had been treated according to different 2-stage protocols: the Malek protocol (soft palate closure without intravelar veloplasty at 3 months; lip and hard palate repair at 6 months) (n=20), and the Talmant protocol (cheilorhinoplasty and soft palate repair with intravelar veloplasty at 6 months; hard palate closure at 18 months) (n=20). We compared the speech assessments obtained at a mean (SD) age of 3.3 (0.35) years after treatment by the same surgeon. The main outcome measures evaluated were acquisition and intelligibility of speech, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and incidence of complications. A delay in speech articulation of one year or more was seen more often in patients treated by the Malek protocol (11/20) than in those treated according to the Talmant protocol (3/20, p=0.019). Good intelligibility was noted in 15/20 in the Talmant group compared with 6/20 in the Malek group (p=0.010). Assessment with an aerophonoscope showed that nasal air emission was most pronounced in patients in the Malek group (p=0.007). Velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 11/20 in the Malek group, and in 3/20 in the Talmant group (p=0.019). No patients in the Talmant group had an oronasal fistula (ppalate, early speech outcomes were better in the Talmant group because intravelar veloplasty was successful and there were no fistulas after closure of the hard palate in 2 layers. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  20. A Shh-Foxf-Fgf18-Shh Molecular Circuit Regulating Palate Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyue Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft palate is among the most common birth defects in humans. Previous studies have shown that Shh signaling plays critical roles in palate development and regulates expression of several members of the forkhead-box (Fox family transcription factors, including Foxf1 and Foxf2, in the facial primordia. Although cleft palate has been reported in mice deficient in Foxf2, whether Foxf2 plays an intrinsic role in and how Foxf2 regulates palate development remain to be elucidated. Using Cre/loxP-mediated tissue-specific gene inactivation in mice, we show that Foxf2 is required in the neural crest-derived palatal mesenchyme for normal palatogenesis. We found that Foxf2 mutant embryos exhibit altered patterns of expression of Shh, Ptch1, and Shox2 in the developing palatal shelves. Through RNA-seq analysis, we identified over 150 genes whose expression was significantly up- or down-regulated in the palatal mesenchyme in Foxf2-/- mutant embryos in comparison with control littermates. Whole mount in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the Foxf2 mutant embryos exhibit strikingly corresponding patterns of ectopic Fgf18 expression in the palatal mesenchyme and concomitant loss of Shh expression in the palatal epithelium in specific subdomains of the palatal shelves that correlate with where Foxf2, but not Foxf1, is expressed during normal palatogenesis. Furthermore, tissue specific inactivation of both Foxf1 and Foxf2 in the early neural crest cells resulted in ectopic activation of Fgf18 expression throughout the palatal mesenchyme and dramatic loss of Shh expression throughout the palatal epithelium. Addition of exogenous Fgf18 protein to cultured palatal explants inhibited Shh expression in the palatal epithelium. Together, these data reveal a novel Shh-Foxf-Fgf18-Shh circuit in the palate development molecular network, in which Foxf1 and Foxf2 regulate palatal shelf growth downstream of Shh signaling, at least in part, by repressing Fgf18

  1. A Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 1. Planning and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semb, Gunvor; Enemark, Hans; Friede, Hans; Paulin, Gunnar; Lilja, Jan; Rautio, Jorma; Andersen, Mikael; Åbyholm, Frank; Lohmander, Anette; Shaw, William; Mølsted, Kirsten; Heliövaara, Arja; Bolund, Stig; Hukki, Jyri; Vindenes, Hallvard; Davenport, Peter; Arctander, Kjartan; Larson, Ola; Berggren, Anders; Whitby, David; Leonard, Alan; Neovius, Erik; Elander, Anna; Willadsen, Elisabeth; Bannister, R Patricia; Bradbury, Eileen; Henningsson, Gunilla; Persson, Christina; Eyres, Philip; Emborg, Berit; Kisling-Møller, Mia; Küseler, Annelise; Granhof Black, Birthe; Schöps, Antje; Bau, Anja; Boers, Maria; Andersen, Helene Søgaard; Jeppesen, Karin; Marxen, Dorte; Paaso, Marjukka; Hölttä, Elina; Alaluusua, Suvi; Turunen, Leena; Humerinta, Kirsti; Elfving-Little, Ulla; Tørdal, Inger Beate; Kjøll, Lillian; Aukner, Ragnhild; Hide, Øydis; Feragen, Kristin Billaud; Rønning, Elisabeth; Skaare, Pål; Brinck, Eli; Semmingsen, Ann-Magritt; Lindberg, Nina; Bowden, Melanie; Davies, Julie; Mooney, Jeanette; Bellardie, Haydn; Schofield, Nina; Nyberg, Jill; Lundberg, Maria; Karsten, Agneta Linder-Aronson; Larson, Margareta; Holmefjord, Anders; Reisæter, Sigvor; Pedersen, Nina-Helen; Rasmussen, Therese; Tindlund, Rolf; Sæle, Paul; Blomhoff, Reidunn; Jacobsen, Gry; Havstam, Christina; Rizell, Sara; Enocson, Lars; Hagberg, Catharina; Najar Chalien, Midia; Paganini, Anna; Lundeborg, Inger; Marcusson, Agneta; Mjönes, Anna-Britta; Gustavsson, Annica; Hayden, Christine; McAleer, Eilish; Slevan, Emma; Gregg, Terry; Worthington, Helen

    2017-02-01

    Longstanding uncertainty surrounds the selection of surgical protocols for the closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate, and randomised trials have only rarely been performed. This paper is an introduction to three randomised trials of primary surgery for children born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It presents the protocol developed for the trials in CONSORT format, and describes the management structure that was developed to achieve the long-term engagement and commitment required to complete the project. Ten established national or regional cleft centres participated. Lip and soft palate closure at 3-4 months, and hard palate closure at 12 months served as a common method in each trial. Trial 1 compared this with hard palate closure at 36 months. Trial 2 compared it with lip closure at 3-4 months and hard and soft palate closure at 12 months. Trial 3 compared it with lip and hard palate closure at 3-4 months and soft palate closure at 12 months. The primary outcomes were speech and dentofacial development, with a series of perioperative and longer-term secondary outcomes. Recruitment of 448 infants took place over a 9-year period, with 99.8% subsequent retention at 5 years. The series of reports that follow this introductory paper include comparisons at age 5 of surgical outcomes, speech outcomes, measures of dentofacial development and appearance, and parental satisfaction. The outcomes recorded and the numbers analysed for each outcome and time point are described in the series. ISRCTN29932826.

  2. Reconstruction of Drug-induced Cleft Palate Using Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, Julie Christy; Gangothri, Manasa; Babu, Hari

    2017-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TAC) (Kenacort*) is a commonly used synthetic glucocorticoid in today's medical practice. The drug is also a potential agent in inducing cleft palates in rats. This drug has been used to induce cleft palate in the fetus of the pregnant rats to bring out a suitable animal model for human cleft lip and palate. The drug was given intraperitoneally to induce congenital cleft palate in pregnant mother rats. The aim of this study is to induce congenital cleft palate in pregnant Wister albino rats and reconstruct the defect with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) isolated from the same species along with PLGA (poly lactic co glycolic acid) scaffold. Twenty female animals were divided into two groups. Each group contains 10 animals. The animals were allowed to mate with male rat during the esterase period and the day, in hich vaginal plug was noticed was taken to be day 0. The pregnant rats were given triamcinolone acetonide (Kenacort* 10 mg/1 ml intramuscularly/intravenous [IM/IV] injections) injection intraperitoneally at two different dosages as the existing literature. The injection was given on the 10, 12, and 14 th day of gestation. The clinical changes observed were recorded, and the change in the body weight was noted carefully. Group 1 which received 0.5 mg/kg body weight of TAC had many drug toxic effects. Group 2 which received 0.05 mg/kg body weight produced cleft palate in rat pups. The pups were divided into three groups. Group A control group without cell transplant, the cleft was allowed to close by itself. Group B containing palate reconstructed with plain PLGA scaffold (Bioscaffold, Singapore) without BMSC, Group C containing BMSC and PLGA scaffold (Bioscaffold, Singapore), Group C operated for the cleft palate reconstruction using BMSCs and PLGA scaffold. There was faster and efficient reconstruction of bone in the cleft defect in Group C while there was no defect closure in Group A and B. There was complete

  3. Chemical and HTS Profiling of 63 Cleft Palate Teratogens from ToxCast (FutureTox III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft palate is a common human birth defect that has been linked to both genetic and environmental factors. To characterize the potential molecular targets and biological processes across mechanistically diverse teratogens that cause cleft palate, we mined the ToxCast high-throug...

  4. FOXE1 Association with both Isolated Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate; and Isolated Cleft Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Lina M; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22-q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we......) and rs4460498 (p=6.51E-12) were located inside a 70Kb high LD block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5' and 3' of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically...

  5. Revis(iting French palatalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tifrit

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the diachrony of French and reconsiders the classical analysis of French palatalizations. It is widely admitted that the transition from Latin dorsal stops to French palatal fricatives is triggered by an external palatalizing object which affects the constitution of the targeted consonant. While this analysis can satisfyingly explain the palatalization of dorsals before /i/, it makes the palatalization before /a/, which occurred a few centuries later, completely opaque. Revising the internal structure and the melody used to describe segments (Government Phonology 2.0 – Pöchtrager 2006 allows us to give a unified analysis of both palatalizations: whether /i/ or /a/, the vocalic environment is indeed the trigger, as it interferes with the structure of dorsals and lead to internal changes. However, while /i/ adds palatality to the consonant, /a/, by its lack of melody (Pöchtrager & Živanović 2010, leads to an internal reconfiguration of the dorsal, which already contains . In other words, we face two kinds of palatalization: an external one and an internal one. Furthermore, our analysis takes the intermediate stages from Latin dorsals to French palatals into consideration and attested dialectal variations observed in Northern France.

  6. Six2 Plays an Intrinsic Role in Regulating Proliferation of Mesenchymal Cells in the Developing Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis O. Okello

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cleft palate is a common congenital abnormality that results from defective secondary palate (SP formation. The Sine oculis-related homeobox 2 (Six2 gene has been linked to abnormalities of craniofacial and kidney development. Our current study examined, for the first time, the specific role of Six2 in embryonic mouse SP development. Six2 mRNA and protein expression were identified in the palatal shelves from embryonic days (E12.5 to E15.5, with peak levels during early stages of palatal shelf outgrowth. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC showed that Six2 protein is abundant throughout the mesenchyme in the oral half of each palatal shelf, whereas there is a pronounced decline in Six2 expression by mesenchyme cells in the nasal half of the palatal shelf by stages E14.5–15.5. An opposite pattern was observed in the surface epithelium of the palatal shelf. Six2 expression was prominent at all stages in the epithelial cell layer located on the nasal side of each palatal shelf but absent from the epithelium located on the oral side of the palatal shelf. Six2 is a putative downstream target of transcription factor Hoxa2 and we previously demonstrated that Hoxa2 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic palate formation. We therefore investigated whether Six2 expression was altered in the developing SP of Hoxa2 null mice. Reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that Six2 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in Hoxa2−/− palatal shelves at stages E12.5–14.5. Moreover, the domain of Six2 protein expression in the palatal mesenchyme of Hoxa2−/− embryos was expanded to include the entire nasal half of the palatal shelf in addition to the oral half. The palatal shelves of Hoxa2−/− embryos displayed a higher density of proliferating, Ki-67 positive palatal mesenchyme cells, as well as a higher density of Six2/Ki-67 double-positive cells. Furthermore, Hoxa2−/− palatal mesenchyme cells in culture displayed both increased

  7. Influence of timing of two-stage palate closure on early phonological and lexical development in children with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Numerous studies have indicated that early closure of the palatal cleft has a positive influence on the phonological development in children with cleft palate. So far, however, substantial evidence for this assumption has been lacking due to a variety of weaknesses...... of the studies conducted, including the lack of randomized clinical trials (RCT) (Peterson-Falzone 1996). A  prospective RCT was conducted to add to the knowledge of the influence of timing of hard palate closure on early phonological and lexical development from 1 to 3 years. METHODS Fourty-one children...... were video-recorded during a play interaction with a parent, and the video-recordings were transcribed in IPA. At 36 months, a naming test was administered. RESULTS At 18 months, the phonological development in the early group was more similar to that of the control group, than that of the late group...

  8. Prosthodontic management of mandibular deviation using palatal ramp appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Segmental resection of the mandible generally results in deviation of the mandible to the defective side. This loss of continuity of the mandible destroys the balance of the lower face and leads to decreased mandibular function by deviation of the residual segment toward the surgical site. Prosthetic methods advocated to reduce or eliminate mandibular deviation include intermaxillary fixation, removable mandibular guide flange, palatal ramp, implant-supported prosthesis and palatal guidance restorations which may be useful in reducing mandibular deviation and improving masticatory performance and efficiency. These methods and restorations would be combined with a well organized mandibular exercise regimen. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation following segmental mandibulectomy using palatal ramp prosthesis.

  9. Correlation of Palatal Rugoscopy with Gender, Palatal Vault Height ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Palatal rugae (PR) are asymmetrical irregular elevations, recorded during maxillary cast fabrication , that can be used for identification purpose if previous comparative sources are available. Aim: This study investigated uniqueness of PR patterns in relation to gender, palatal vault forms, and ABO blood groups ...

  10. Kappa-splints application for the treatment of pathological dental hard tissues abrasion in combination with dentition defects and dentition deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Petrishin

    2017-03-01

    2. After studying the movements of conventional hinge axis in articulate heads of TMJ with the help of condylograph «Cadiax Compact» and eliminating the symptoms of stress in masticatory muscles of the patients with occlusive disorders at pathological dental hard tissues abrasion, it is the gradual application of a kappa-splints set, made of hard transparent plates of Ercodent Ercodur material (Germany with a thickness of 1.0 to 5.0 mm, which allows prevention of further tooth wear, normalization of occlusive correlations of the jaws, separating a bite with optimum thickness throughout the dentition, thus the lower jaw takes a position at which the state of functional equilibrium of the entire dentition is restored.

  11. Preservation of palatal mucoperiosteum for oronasal separation after total maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molumi, Charles Paki; Dubey, Siba Prasad; Apaio, Matupi Lorenzz

    2012-01-01

    Oronasal communication occurs after total maxillectomy for advanced sinonasal cancers. This results in feeding, breathing and cosmetic impairment. Various methods have been described to close off the palatal defect from the oral cavity to improve the function of speech and deglutition. The object of this article is to describe our experience of preservation of palatal mucoperiosteum for oronasal separation. Retrospective review of clinical and operative records of 31 total maxillectomy patients where oronasal separation was achieved by the conventional technique of applying a maxillary obturator. The postoperative complications arising from the use of maxillary obturator for oronasal communication after total maxillectomy in these 31 patients were analysed. To avoid the complications encountered in these 31 patients we preserved and used the ipsilateral palatal mucoperiosteum for oronasal separation. This new technique was applied in 12 patients. The results are presented and compared. A total of 43 patients underwent total maxillectomy for advanced sinonasal tumors. In 31 patients the conventional maxillary obturator was used for oronasal separation. Among these patients, 30 had crustation of the maxillary cavity, nasal regurgitation and cheek skin retraction in 15 each, trismus in eight, infection of skin graft donor site in seven, cheek movement during respiration in five and ill-fitting prosthesis in three. In 12 patients palatal mucoperiosteum was preserved and used for oronasal separation. The complications encountered in oronasal separation by palatal prosthesis were avoided in the modified procedure. We found that oronasal separation by preservation of palatal mucoperiosteum following total maxillectomy allowed excellent palatal function, prompt rehabilitation and minimal complications without compromising the prognosis.

  12. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  13. Cleft palate repair with the use of osmotic expanders: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Kazimierz F

    2007-01-01

    A new method of cleft palate repair by expansion of tissue by means of osmotic expanders implanted in the first stage of treatment is described. Self-expanding expanders manufactured by OSMED (Ilmenau, Germany) were implanted under the mucoperiosteal layer of the hard palate, on purpose to generate more tissue and provide facility for palate repair performed 24-48h later. Nineteen children aged from 2 to 3 years were operated from January 2004 to 15 April 2005. In clefts10mm, cleft palate repair was more difficult and the outcomes were less favourable. Despite more generous dissection of the neurovascular bundles and other adjunctive measures such as mucosal V-Y plasty [Bardach J, Salyer K. Surgical techniques in cleft lip and palate. Chicago, London: Year Book Medical Publishers, Inc.; 1987.] and suturing of the mucosal grafts at the border of the hard and soft palate, seven 2-4mm fistulae were noted, however. Concluding, in spite of some shortcomings and unacceptable rate of fistula in wide clefts, the above-presented method seems to be an attractive concept. Despite some technical problems related mostly to still tested optimal filling phase, tissue expansion makes palate repair easier, probably without relaxing incisions and bone denudation. Consequently, some adverse effects on facial growth may be reduced. So far, there is no evidence for it, however, and since this is a preliminary report, there is a need for longer observations and larger material.

  14. A Novel Approach to Determine the Prevalence of Type of Soft Palate Using Digital Intraoral Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Chaturvedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the prevalence of type of soft palate in targeted population. Materials and Methods. Using computer technology in dentistry, intraoral digital scanner, and 3D analysis software tool, study was conducted. 100 patients selected from the outpatient clinics were divided into two groups based on the ages of 20–40 years and 41–60 years with equal ratio of males and females. Each selected patient’s maxillary arch was scanned with intraoral scanner; images so obtained were sectioned in anteroposterior cross section and with the 3D analysis software; the angulation between hard and soft palate was determined. Results. The prevalence of type II soft palate (angulation between hard and soft palate is between 10 and 45 degrees was highest, 60% in group 1 and 44% in group 2. The difference between genders was statistically significant with p value <0.05 in both the groups, although females had higher angulation compared to the males in all classes of both groups. Conclusions. In targeted population of Aseer Province, Saudi Arabia, the prevalence of type II soft palate was more common, with higher soft palate angulation among females. The advanced age had no effect in the type of soft palate in the region.

  15. A Novel Approach to Determine the Prevalence of Type of Soft Palate Using Digital Intraoral Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled Addas, Mohamed; Al Humaidi, Abdullah Saad Ali; Al Qahtani, Abdulrazaq Mohammed; Al Qahtani, Mubarak Daghash

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of type of soft palate in targeted population. Materials and Methods Using computer technology in dentistry, intraoral digital scanner, and 3D analysis software tool, study was conducted. 100 patients selected from the outpatient clinics were divided into two groups based on the ages of 20–40 years and 41–60 years with equal ratio of males and females. Each selected patient's maxillary arch was scanned with intraoral scanner; images so obtained were sectioned in anteroposterior cross section and with the 3D analysis software; the angulation between hard and soft palate was determined. Results The prevalence of type II soft palate (angulation between hard and soft palate is between 10 and 45 degrees) was highest, 60% in group 1 and 44% in group 2. The difference between genders was statistically significant with p value <0.05 in both the groups, although females had higher angulation compared to the males in all classes of both groups. Conclusions In targeted population of Aseer Province, Saudi Arabia, the prevalence of type II soft palate was more common, with higher soft palate angulation among females. The advanced age had no effect in the type of soft palate in the region. PMID:28951740

  16. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this ... Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty Patient Instructions Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge Images Cleft lip repair - series References ...

  17. Analysis of PRICKLE1 in human cleft palate and mouse development demonstrates rare and common variants involved in human malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian; Jia, Zhonglin; Bryant-Pike, Whitney; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Murray, Jeffrey C; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bassuk, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Palate development is shaped by multiple molecular signaling pathways, including the Wnt pathway. In mice and humans, mutations in both the canonical and noncanonical arms of the Wnt pathway manifest as cleft palate, one of the most common human birth defects. Like the palate, numerous studies also link different Wnt signaling perturbations to varying degrees of limb malformation; for example, shortened limbs form in mutations of Ror2,Vangl2looptail and, in particular, Wnt5a. We recently showed the noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling molecule Prickle1 (Prickle like 1) also stunts limb growth in mice. We now expanded these studies to the palate and show that Prickle1 is also required for palate development, like Wnt5a and Ror2. Unlike in the limb, the Vangl2looptail mutation only aggravates palate defects caused by other mutations. We screened Filipino cleft palate patients and found PRICKLE1 variants, both common and rare, at an elevated frequency. Our results reveal that in mice and humans PRICKLE1 directs palate morphogenesis; our results also uncouple Prickle1 function from Vangl2 function. Together, these findings suggest mouse and human palate development is guided by PCP-Prickle1 signaling that is probably not downstream of Vangl2. PMID:24689077

  18. Changes in the palatal dimensions of mouth breathing children caused by nasal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiarti, I. S.; Setyanto, D. B.; Kusumaningrum, A.; Budiardjo, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    During children’s growth and development, the breathing process plays an important role in craniofacial growth, especially of the palate. Nose breathing can stimulate the lateral growth of the maxilla, thus making the palate flat. Disturbances in nose breathing caused by nasal obstruction such as allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea can lead to a mouth breathing habit in children. This habit can cause palatal dimension changes such as a narrow V-shaped maxillary arch and a high palatal vault. This study analyzed the relationship between the mouth breathing habit in children who have nasal obstruction and palatal dimension changes. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with a consecutive sampling method on children 7-18 years old with a history of allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea in the Pediatric Respirology and Pediatric Immunology Allergy Outpatient Clinic Kiara Maternal and Child Health Center at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta. The palatal dimensions were measured by the height and transversal width of the hard palate of castings of each child’s upper dental arch using vernier calipers. Palatal dimension changes were found in children with a mouth breathing habit due to nasal obstruction.

  19. Combined endodontic-periodontic treatment of a palatal groove: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Scott A; Koch, Michael A; Deas, David E; Powell, Charles A

    2006-06-01

    The palatal groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth involved to a severe periodontal defect. When further complicated by pulp necrosis, these grooves often present a diagnostic and treatment planning challenge that requires an interdisciplinary treatment approach. This case report describes the successful collaborative management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an extensive palatal groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy, odontoplasty, and periodontal regenerative techniques.

  20. Hypothalamo-pituitary hormone insufficiency associated with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitman, A; Laron, Z

    1978-01-01

    Two male patients with congenital cleft lip and palate first seen at ages 10.2 and 21.5 years presented with typical signs of hypothalamic-interior pituitary hormone deficiencies. They were found to lack GH, LH, and FSH and to be partially deficient in TSH and ACTH. Several congenital defects may explain this rare syndrome affecting midline structures in the proximity of the maldeveloped palate, including Rathke's pouch, which migrates distally to develop into the anterior pituitary. PMID:747400

  1. Adequacy of velopharyngeal closure and speech competency following prosthetic management of soft palate resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDakkak, M

    1999-01-01

    Ten patients who had undergone soft palate resection for the removal of palatal tumors were studied. In each patient, the surgical defect involved the posterior margin of the soft palate and lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency. None of the patients suffered any speech, hearing or nasal problems before surgery. For each patient, a speech aid obturator was constructed and was used at least one month before the evaluation. Prosthetic management of each subject was evaluated as reflected in adequacy of velopharyngeal closure and speech competency. Various aspects of speech including intelligibility, articulation, nasality, hoarseness and overall speech were correlated with the adequacy of velopharyngeal closure. (author)

  2. Suction Cup Induced Palatal Fistula: Surgical Closure by Palatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Pediatrics, Pragna Children's Hospital, Hyderabad, ... Eluru, 4Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, KIMS Dental College and ... The surgical closure of palatal fistula planned under general anesthesia.

  3. Cleft deformities (lip and palate)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    hospital between February 2008 and February 2009, seventeen neonates presented with ..... are low necessitating very large sample sizes often limited by resources. ... Bianco-Davila F: Incidence of cleft lip and palate in northeast of Mexico.

  4. [Surgical correction of cleft palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, F T; Pavia Noble, A; Soriano Padilla, F; Soto Miranda, A; Medellín Rodríguez, A

    1990-04-01

    This study presents a statistical review of corrective surgery for cleft palate, based on cases treated at the maxillo-facial surgery units of the Pediatrics Hospital of the Centro Médico Nacional and at Centro Médico La Raza of the National Institute of Social Security of Mexico, over a five-year period. Interdisciplinary management as performed at the Cleft-Palate Clinic, in an integrated approach involving specialists in maxillo-facial surgery, maxillar orthopedics, genetics, social work and mental hygiene, pursuing to reestablish the stomatological and psychological functions of children afflicted by cleft palate, is amply described. The frequency and classification of the various techniques practiced in that service are described, as well as surgical statistics for 188 patients, which include a total of 256 palate surgeries performed from March 1984 to March 1989, applying three different techniques and proposing a combination of them in a single surgical time, in order to avoid complementary surgery.

  5. Augmented BMPRIA-mediated BMP signaling in cranial neural crest lineage leads to cleft palate formation and delayed tooth differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    Full Text Available The importance of BMP receptor Ia (BMPRIa mediated signaling in the development of craniofacial organs, including the tooth and palate, has been well illuminated in several mouse models of loss of function, and by its mutations associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and facial defects in humans. In this study, we took a gain-of-function approach to further address the role of BMPR-IA-mediated signaling in the mesenchymal compartment during tooth and palate development. We generated transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of BmprIa (caBmprIa in cranial neural crest (CNC cells that contributes to the dental and palatal mesenchyme. Mice bearing enhanced BMPRIa-mediated signaling in CNC cells exhibit complete cleft palate and delayed odontogenic differentiation. We showed that the cleft palate defect in the transgenic animals is attributed to an altered cell proliferation rate in the anterior palatal mesenchyme and to the delayed palatal elevation in the posterior portion associated with ectopic cartilage formation. Despite enhanced activity of BMP signaling in the dental mesenchyme, tooth development and patterning in transgenic mice appeared normal except delayed odontogenic differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that a finely tuned level of BMPRIa-mediated signaling is essential for normal palate and tooth development.

  6. Evolution of my philosophy in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusati, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    At the end of 50-year-long clinical activity, the evolution of my approach to the treatment of unilateral cleft of the lip and palate is discussed. I had several teachers in this field (Rusconi, Reherman, Perko, Delaire, Talmant, Sommerlad and others) and I introduced in my approach what I considered to be improvements from all of them. My current protocol is related to the anatomy of the cleft: for wide clefts a two-stage protocol is applied (1° step: soft palate and lip and nose repair; 2° step: hard palate repair with gingivoalveoloplasty); for narrow cleft (less than 1 cm at the posterior border of hard palate) an "all in one" protocol is performed with or without gingivoalveoloplasty (in accordance to the presence or absence of contact between the stumps at alveolar level). The most important details regarding surgery of the lip and palate are discussed. Robust data collection on speech and skeletal growth is still needed to determine whether the "all in one" approach can be validated as the treatment of choice for unilateral complete lip and palate cleft in selected cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Social life aspects of young adults with cleft lip and palate: grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetpakdeechit, Woranuch; Hallberg, Ulrika; Hagberg, Catharina; Mohlin, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    The findings of many questionnaire and inventory studies suggest that people with cleft lip and/or palate report a decreased quality of life. Common problems include dissatisfaction with the external appearance of the lips and nose, speech problems, depression, and anxiety. This qualitative study aimed to explore the subjective perceptions and values of young adults with clefts, particularly with regard to their social lives. Twelve persons participated in an in-depth interview. Among those, seven had a repaired isolated cleft palate involving only the hard/soft palate. Five had a repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate that had been a continuous lesion of the lip, the alveolar process, and the palate. A grounded theory approach was used to conduct and analyze the interviews. The study revealed seven important categories--hoping to be like other people, being treated differently from others, experiencing deviation from others, regarding oneself as being different from others, lack of recognition, low self-esteem, and receiving recognition from significant others--with hoping to be like other people as the core category. Young adults with either cleft lip and palate or isolated cleft palate who received recognition from significant others reported increased self-esteem and greater ability to cope with their social lives.

  8. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  9. Fetal genetic risk of isolated cleft lip only versus isolated cleft lip and palate: A subphenotype analysis using two population-based studies of orofacial clefts in scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip only (CLO) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) are commonly regarded as variants of the same defect and are traditionally combined to form the single group of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) prior to analysis. However, recent data have suggested that at least a subg...

  10. Consequences of phonological ability for intelligibility of speech in youngsters with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Poulsen, Mads

      In a previous Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) including children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, it was found that children who had the entire palate closed by 12 months of age had almost as good phonological abilities as a control group, whereas a group of children with a residual cleft...... groups. Based on a pilot study a difference between the groups was observed, suggesting that control children were most easily understood, followed by children with closed palates who were more easily understood than children with a residual cleft....... in the hard palate performed significantly worse at 3 years of age (Willadsen, in press). To investigate the influence of phonological ability on intelligibility of speech in 14 children from each of the 3 groups, an investigation including 84 lay listeners was conducted. The lay listeners were presented...

  11. Cleft Palate Repair Using a Double Opposing Z-Plasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Craig; Shah, Ajul; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2016-07-01

    Cleft palate is a common congenital defect with several described surgical repairs. The most successful treatment modality remains a controversy. The goals of repair focus on achievement of normal speech and optimizing velopharyngeal function while minimizing both fistula formation and facial growth restriction. In this video, the authors demonstrate use of the double opposing Z-plasty technique in the repair of a Veau II type cleft palate. The video demonstrates the marking, incisions, dissection, and repair of the cleft. It also examines the use of von Langenbeck-type relaxing incisions and demonstrates a specific approach to the repair of this particular cleft. The authors believe that the Furlow double opposing Z-plasty with the von Langenbeck relaxing incision can provide the best postoperative outcome by combining the benefits of each individual operation. The Z-plasty technique works to correct the aberrant muscle of the soft palate while increasing the length of the palate. The authors believe that this results in better velopharyngeal function.

  12. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  13. Cocaine-related oronasal communication and hard palate destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Francisco Javier; Salort-Llorca, Cesar; Mínguez-Serra, Maria Paz; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier

    2012-05-01

    Four cases of midpalatal perforation in cocaine abusers are presented. Other potential etiological processes are discussed to establish an adequate differential diagnosis. These patients were treated at our department, due to the drawback promoted by the establishment of oronasal communication that was provided after an accurate diagnosis. Histopathological evaluation of the lesion margins were conducted in two of the four cases, and yielded no evidence of vasculitis or active cocaine abuse. Therapeutic approach consisted of reconstructive surgeries and/or sealing prostheses. Histological assessment of oronasal communication margins could be useful in establishing the persistence of active addiction, and also as a complementary tool for planning possible treatment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Implications of TGFβ on transcriptome and cellular biofunctions of palatal mesenchyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan eZhu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of the palate comprises sequential stages of growth, elevation and fusion of the palatal shelves. The mesenchymal component of palates plays a major role in early phases of palatogenesis, such as growth and elevation. Failure in these steps may result in cleft palate, the second most common birth defect in the world. These early stages of palatogenesis require precise and chronological orchestration of key physiological processes, such as growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. There is compelling evidence for the vital role of TGFβ-mediated regulation of palate development. We hypothesized that the isoforms of TGFβ regulate different cellular biofunctions of the palatal mesenchyme to various extents. Human embryonic palatal mesenchyme (HEPM cells were treated with TGFβ1, β2, and β3 for microarray-based gene expression studies in order to identify the roles of TGFβ in the transcriptome of the palatal mesenchyme. Following normalization and modeling of 28,869 human genes, 566 transcripts were detected as differentially expressed in TGFβ-treated HEPM cells. Out of these altered transcripts, 234 of them were clustered in cellular biofunctions, including growth and proliferation, development, morphology, movement, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Biological interpretation and network analysis of the genes active in cellular biofunctions were performed using IPA. Among the differentially expressed genes, 11 of them were previously identified as being crucial for palatogenesis (EDN1, INHBA, LHX8, PDGFC, PIGA, RUNX1, SNAI1, SMAD3, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, and TGFβR1. These genes were used for a merged interaction network with cellular behaviors. Overall, we have determined that more than 2% of human transcripts were differentially expressed in response to TGFβ treatment in HEPM cells. Our results suggest that both TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 orchestrate major cellular biofunctions within the palatal mesenchyme in vitro by

  15. Effect of N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) on murine palatal fusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi; Cui Xiaomei; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Bringas, Pablo; Shuler, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    Maternal smoking has been linked to an increased risk for orofacial clefts. N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) is one of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines that has been shown to be linked to the deleterious effects of tobacco and could be linked to the formation of cleft palate birth defects. The effect of NNN on palatal fusion was examined using an in vitro organ culture model of palatal development. The organ cultures were exposed to NNN (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and100 mM) and the effects on palatal development characterized at defined points. Palatal fusion was evaluated at embryonic day 13 (E13) + 72 h by characterizing the remaining medial edge epithelium (MEE) and determining the extent of fusion compared to controls. The NNN-treated group (1 mM) had more MEE remaining in the palatal midline than the untreated group at E13 + 72 h (P < 0.05). Changes in cell proliferation in the MEE resulting from NNN exposure were examined by BrdU incorporation in replicating DNA. Changes in the pattern of MEE cell death were examined by TUNEL. BrdU incorporation and TUNEL staining showed that the NNN (1 mM)-treated palates had more MEE cell proliferation and less apoptosis than the untreated-palates at E13 + 24 h (P < 0.05). The mechanism altered by NNN was further evaluated by characterizations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38 and c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK). NNN at 1 mM induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but reduced p38 phosphorylation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively) in the MEE. The results suggest that NNN inhibited palatal fusion by effects on cell proliferation and MEE cell death

  16. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  17. Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... can make referrals to cleft/craniofacial treatment teams. Cleft Lip & Palate Foundation of Smiles Cleft Lip & Palate Foundation of ...

  18. Palatal radicular groove: Clinical implications of early diagnosis and surgical sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Corrêa-Faria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palatal radicular groove is a discreet alteration in tooth morphology, characterized by an invagination that begins near the cingulum of the tooth and moves in an apical direction. Clinically, palatal radicular groove may be associated with periodontal and/or endodontic problems. This paper describes a clinical case of a young patient with palatal radicular groove with no signs of periodontal disease or endodontic impairment. An early diagnosis was made and treatment consisted of surgical sealing of the defect. After a 2-year period, reexaminations demonstrated adequate hygiene, maintenance of tooth vitality and periodontal health. The early diagnosis and sealing of the groove observed surgically made the root surface smooth, avoiding subgingival bacterial plaque buildup, and preventing possible periodontal and/or pulp impairment stemming from the defect.

  19. The use of Sanskrit, an ancient language, as a tool to evaluate cleft palate speech problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajiwala Kalpesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Speech is a complex process. The evaluation of speech in an individual with cleft palate is difficult, and the existing classification of phonemes is complicated. Sanskrit, an ancient language, has an arrangement of alphabets that is orderly and scientific and therefore provides a simple means to understand the production of phonemes and memorize them. This article demonstrates the inherent advantage of this arrangement of Sanskrit alphabets to effectively analyze defective cleft palate speech and provides a tool for surgeons to decide a course of action in their routine clinical practice. Improved insight into the speech defect by the surgeon also facilitates better coordination with the speech language pathologist in assessment and treatment of a child with cleft palate.

  20. An experimental study of the radiation-induced changes in the epithelium of the rat palatal mucosae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Lee, Kang Sook; Sohn, Jung Ick; Choi, Karp Shick

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the irradiation effects on the palatal mucosa. For this study, Sprague-Dawley strain rats were irradiated to their head and neck region with the dose of 5 Gy and 10 Gy by 6MV X-radiation and sacrificed on the experimental periods after irradiation. The authors observed the histological changes of the hard and soft palatal mucosae. The results were as follows; In the light microscopic examination, hydropic change on the basal cells, increased cell size of the epithelium, and decreased epithelial cell layers were observed on the 3 hours, 6 hours, and 12 hours groups after irradiation. But, basal cell hyperplasia, increased epithelial cell layers, and elongated rete pegs were observed on the 3 days group after irradiation. After then, these changes were recovered in the mucosa of the hard palate on the 7 days and 14 days groups, and in the mucosa of the soft palate on the 14 days and 28 days groups after irradiation. And such changes were greater in the mucosa of the soft palate than in that of the hard palate, and more prominent in 10 Gy irradiated groups than in 5 Gy irradiated groups.

  1. Repair of a submucous cleft palate by W-pushback and levator repositioning without incision to the nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun

    2012-03-01

    The author created an innovative method of W-pushback and levator repositioning without having to make an incision to the nasal mucosa for submucous cleft palate repair.The W-shaped mucoperiosteal flap is outlined where the 2 peaks of W are the alveolar processes of both canine teeth and the midpoint of W is the anterior limit of the cleft notch of the hard palate. A short incision, medial to and behind the maxillary tuberosity and curved forward onto the palate and extended forward just medial to the alveolar process, is joined by a second incision from the apex of the cleft to the region of the canine tooth. The W-shaped mucoperiosteal flap is raised until the midline notch of the hard palate is exposed. The nasal mucosa and abnormally inserted levator veli palatini muscle to the posterior border of the hard palate bone are detached. By leaving the nasal mucosa intact, the detached levator veli palatini muscle is approximated at the midline and so the zona pellucida is obliterated. The cleft uvulas are cut in half and closed. The approximated W-flap is joined to the small anterior flap by 1 or more sutures (the W-pushback).Three patients were operated on with this technique without serious complications.The author believes that this method can make the levator sling and increase the length of the soft palate without making an incision to the nasal mucosa.

  2. Correlation of Palatal Rugoscopy with Gender, Palatal Vault Height ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allen in 1889[3] discussed their role as an identification method. ... a typical orientation pattern, once formed; only changed in its length due to ... along with palatal vault forms as well as ABO blood groups for racial and individualistic soft.

  3. Prevalence of cleft lip and/or palate in children from Lodz between years 1981-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszewski, Bogusław; Fijałkowska, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital malformations constitute a serious problem of both medical and social nature. Cleft lip and/or palate represent the most common congenital anomaly of the face that is why it is essential to know the real frequency of the described phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to determine the frequency of cleft lip and/or palate and the types of malformations that occurred in Lodz city between the years 1981-2010. Our clinic has been carrying on the studies concerning the incidence of cleft lip and/or palate since 1981. The Polish Registry of Congenital Malformations has been operating in Poland since 1 April 1997. The team has managed to obtain data, from the Registry, concerning the total number of all live born infants and the number of children with cleft lip and/or palate, who were born in Lodz, between 1998 and 2010. In years 1981-2010, 319 children, in 210 952 live born infants, were born with cleft lip and/or palate in Lodz. The isolated cleft palate was observed more frequently in girls and the unilateral cleft of lip and palate in boys. In all three decades palate clefts are more common whereas bilateral lip, alveolus and palate clefts are more infrequent. A small tendency to decrease in actual cleft lip and/or palate frequency among children, in the period of 30 years, is observed in Lodz. Over the years it has still been observed that the isolated cleft palate is the most common type of defect. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  4. Basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele in association with midline cleft lip and palate: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida; Rocha, Artur Bastos; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro; Furtado, Paulo Germano Cavalcanti

    2011-01-01

    Association of basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele with midline cleft lip and palate is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a nine-year-old girl presenting a midline facial cleft with meningocele that was noticeable through the palatine defect as a medial intranasal pulsatile mass. An analysis of clinical and radiological findings of the present case of cranial dysraphism is carried out. (author)

  5. Adolescent and adult cleft lip and palate, in Ile-Ife, Nigeria | Oladele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Congenital cleft lip and palate (CLP) defects usually present in childhood, especially in places with available and affordable care. In Nigeria, their incidence is low but late presentation in Adult life have been reported. This article aims at reviewing adolescent and adult CLP patients in our center, with the advent ...

  6. Basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele in association with midline cleft lip and palate: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida; Rocha, Artur Bastos; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Furtado, Paulo Germano Cavalcanti [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Pediatria e Genetica

    2011-11-15

    Association of basal sphenoethmoidal encephalocele with midline cleft lip and palate is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a nine-year-old girl presenting a midline facial cleft with meningocele that was noticeable through the palatine defect as a medial intranasal pulsatile mass. An analysis of clinical and radiological findings of the present case of cranial dysraphism is carried out. (author)

  7. Lower incidence of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... In India, as in other parts of the world, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) is a highly prevalent birth defect, its incidence in males being twice that in females. A case–control association study has been carried out with respect to homocysteine level and MTHFR C677T, A1298C and ...

  8. Speech characteristics after palatal closure in subjects with isolated clefts: an exploration in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anke Luyten

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is a congenital craniofacial defect that arises on average in 1.7 per 1000 live births. This anomaly causes atypical facial appearance, hearing problems, malocclusions and speech disorders. Outcomes in terms of speech are influenced by timing of surgical cleft closure.

  9. Suboptimal Performance in Cleft Lip/Palate Children- Who is Responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhkar, Bhavana B

    2016-10-01

    Information in this article is from an observational study comparing intelligence in children with cleft lip and palate with normal children. Both groups performed "draw a man test", the investigator noted the attitude and behaviour of children and their parents. The study shows low, but normal intelligence quotient in children with oral defects as compared to normal. The probable reason for sub-normal performance appeared to be overprotective attitude of parents and poor self esteem of children with oral defects.

  10. Long-Term Incisal Relationships After Palatoplasty in Patients With Isolated Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Elizabeth B; Woo, Albert S; Mendonca, Derick A; Huebener, Donald V; Nissen, Richard J; Skolnick, Gary B; Patel, Kamlesh B

    2016-06-01

    Various palatoplasty techniques have limited incisions in the hard palate due to concerns that these incisions may limit maxillary growth. There is little convincing long-term evidence to support this. Our purpose is to determine incisal relationships, an indicator for future orthognathic procedure, in patients after repair of an isolated cleft of the secondary palate. Our craniofacial database was used to identify patients aged 10 years or greater with an isolated cleft of the secondary palate who underwent palatoplasty between 1985 and 2002. Data collected included age at palatoplasty and follow-up, cleft type, associated syndrome, Robin sequence, surgeon, repair technique, number of operations, and occlusion. Incisal relationship was determined through clinical observation by a pediatric dentist and orthodontist. Seventy eligible patients operated on by 9 surgeons were identified. Class III incisal relationship was seen in 5 patients (7.1%). Palatoplasty techniques over the hard palate (63 of 70 patients) included 2-flap palatoplasty, VY-pushback, and Von Langenbeck repair. There was an association between class III incisal relationship and syndromic diagnosis (P <0.001). Other study variables were not associated with class III incisal relationships. In patients with an isolated cleft of the secondary palate, there was no association between class III incisal relationship and surgeon, age at repair, cleft type, palatoplasty technique, or number of operations. Increased likelihood of class III incisal relationship was associated primarily with syndromic diagnosis.

  11. [Progress in studies on the genetic risk factors for nonsyndromic cleft lip or palate in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y Q

    2017-04-09

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common congenital defects of oral and maxillofacial region in human beings. The etiology of this malformation is complex, with both genetic and environmental causal factors are involved. To provide a better understanding in the genetic etiology of cleft lip or palate, the author summarized recent years studies based on Chinese population. Those researches included validation of some candidate genes for cleft lip or palate, using genome wide association analysis which included six independent cohorts from China to elucidate the genetic architecture of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Chinese population and finally found a new susceptibility locus. This locus was on the 16p13.3 (rs8049367) between CREBBP and ADCY9. It has been mentioned common methods of genetic analysis involved in the researches on cleft lip or palate in this paper. Furthermore, we try to discuss new methods to illustrate the etiology of cleft lip and palate that could provide more inspiration on future researches.

  12. The Palatal Approach to Distraction Osteogenesis of the Anterior Maxillary Alveolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    This report describes the palatal approach to gain access for osteodistraction of the anterior maxilla to improve the vector of force during distraction. This case report illustrates a novel approach to anterior maxillary osteodistraction. The palatal approach allows the maxillary segment to be moved anteriorly and inferiorly. This is in contrast to the buccal approach, in which the palatal tissue creates a vector of force toward the palate. The vascular pedicle for the transport segment is the labial mucosa and musculature. In the present case, the alveolar segment was advanced 3.6 mm anteriorly and 12.2 mm inferiorly as measured by pre- and postoperative computed tomograms. This patient with a large vertical alveolar defect and high smile line had successful restoration with dental implants. The result has been stable for 14 months. In this case, the palatal approach to the anterior maxillary osteotomy was shown to be an effective method of reconstructing a large vertical anterior defect. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Small-molecule Wnt agonists correct cleft palates in Pax9 mutant mice in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shihai; Zhou, Jing; Fanelli, Christopher; Wee, Yinshen; Bonds, John; Schneider, Pascal; Mues, Gabriele; D'Souza, Rena N

    2017-10-15

    Clefts of the palate and/or lip are among the most common human craniofacial malformations and involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. Defects can only be corrected surgically and require complex life-long treatments. Our studies utilized the well-characterized Pax9 -/- mouse model with a consistent cleft palate phenotype to test small-molecule Wnt agonist therapies. We show that the absence of Pax9 alters the expression of Wnt pathway genes including Dkk1 and Dkk2 , proven antagonists of Wnt signaling. The functional interactions between Pax9 and Dkk1 are shown by the genetic rescue of secondary palate clefts in Pax9 -/- Dkk1 f/+ ;Wnt1Cre embryos. The controlled intravenous delivery of small-molecule Wnt agonists (Dkk inhibitors) into pregnant Pax9 +/- mice restored Wnt signaling and led to the growth and fusion of palatal shelves, as marked by an increase in cell proliferation and osteogenesis in utero , while other organ defects were not corrected. This work underscores the importance of Pax9-dependent Wnt signaling in palatogenesis and suggests that this functional upstream molecular relationship can be exploited for the development of therapies for human cleft palates that arise from single-gene disorders. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of 22q11.2 deletion in Cleft Palate patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabodha, L. B. Lahiru; Dias, Dayanath Kumara; Nanayakkara, B. Ganananda; de Silva, Deepthi C.; Chandrasekharan, N. Vishvanath; Ileyperuma, Isurani

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cleft palate is the commonest multifactorial epigenetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.43-2.45 per 1000. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical features and identify the 22q11.2 deletion in patients with cleft palate in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Cleft patients attending a Teaching Hospital in Sri Lanka were recruited for this study. The relevant data were obtained from review of case notes, interviews, and examination of patients according to a standard evaluation sheet. Quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to identify the 22q11.2 deletion. A gel documentation system (Bio-Doc) was used to quantify the PCR product following electrophoresis on 0.8% agarose gel. Results and Conclusion: There were 162 cleft palate patients of whom 59% were females. A total of 92 cleft palate subjects (56.2%) had other associated clinical features. Dysmorphic features (25.27%) and developmental delays (25.27%) were the commonest medical problems encountered. The cleft was limited to the soft palate in 125 patients, while in 25 patients it involved both the hard and the soft palate. There were seven subjects with bifid uvula and five subjects with submucous cleft palate. None of the patients had 22q11.2 deletion in this study population. A multicentered large population-based study is needed to confirm the results of this study and to develop guidelines on the appropriate use of 22q11.2 deletion testing, which are valid for cleft palate patients in Sri Lanka. PMID:23483617

  15. Changing strategy and implementation of a new treatment protocol for cleft palate surgery in "Maria Sklodowska Curie" (MSC) Children's Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataru, Radu; Mark, Hans

    2014-12-01

    In "Maria Sklodowska Curie" (MSC) Children's Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, cleft palate repair has been performed according to von Langenbeck since 1984. The speech was good in most patients but wide clefts had a high percentage of fistulas, abnormal speech due to short length and limited mobility of the soft palate. In 2009, the protocol was changed to Gothenburg Delayed Hard Palate Closure, (DHPC) technique. The present evaluation was performed to study the implementation of this technique. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with cleft palate were admitted, 89 isolated cleft palate (ICP), 53 unilateral (UCLP) and 26 bilateral (BCLP). In these, 228 surgical interventions were performed. Soft Palate Repair (SPR) and Hard Palate Repair (HPR) were performed with the DHPC procedure. The transfer to this technique was successfully performed in three steps: one team visit to Gothenburg by a surgeon from MSC and two visits by surgeons from Gothenburg to the MSC. Patients with SPR and HPR were operated on without major complications and there were no differences in results between Gothenburg surgeons and MSC surgeons. The interventions with SPR and HPR technique were proven to be easy to teach and learn and successfully performed without major complications. For cleft patients at MSC hospital it has meant earlier surgery, less re-operations and complications. This report shows a successful change of strategy for palatal repair with improved outcome regarding surgery. In future, speech and growth will be followed on a regular basis and will be compared with results from the Gothenburg Cleft Team.

  16. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-03-23

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not.

  17. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not. PMID:25394591

  18. PALATAL ROTATONIAL FLAP: AN ALTERNATIVE FOR PALATAL PRIMARY INTENTION NEALING

    OpenAIRE

    García Linares, Sixto A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives- The present clinical study tries to show an alternative for closing of superior bicuspids alveolus to maintain alveolar ridge and to avoid alveolitis because of first intention wound healing. Results. It was observed after 15 days; 12 patients had a complete wound healing of the alveolus and the palate showed a mattress of consistent granulation. A patient discontinued the treatment. Two patients had a wound healing lip to 75%. They didn't register adverse effects: hemorrhage, int...

  19. Chemometrics. Development of a sensor for the evaluation of palatable water; Chemometrics. Oishii mizu sensor no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Hamaoka, T. [Hiroshima-Denki Inst. of Technology, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    A method was developed to detect and determine palatable waters. Multiple regression analysis was carried out to verify the determination on renowned palatable waters based on requirements for palatable waters specified by the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Test samples used in the analysis are renowned palatable waters produced in the Hiroshima and other areas. It was found possible to express palatability of the waters to some extent by detecting total hardness, organic matter content, total iron and bicarbonate ion, in relation to the correlation thereof with a result of organoleptic examination. Fuzzy inference was applied to evaluation of the renowned waters. As the inference rule, selections were made on organic matter content, total hardness, bicarbonate ion and total iron for the antecedents, and values to express palatability for the consequents. A neural network method was devised, in which error from the reference water determination is minimized. The fuzzy inference was capable of expressing human sense in a numerical value. A prototype sensor was fabricated to determine reputed waters suitable for brewing Japanese Sake. Water suitable for fermentation is the water containing minerals that increase fermentation strength in yeast, and not containing such impurities as organic matters and iron. A bio-sensor was developed, which is capable of evaluating latent fermenting capability of mineral containing waters. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. [Risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolenkova, M V; Starikova, N V; Ageeva, L V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the significance of environmental risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children. Two hundred and forty-seven cleft lip and palate (CLP) children were enrolled in the study including 105 (42.5%) with bilateral CLP and 57.5% with unilateral CLP. The mean age was 11.2±4.9 years. Teeth condition was assessed clinically and radiologically. The impact of risk factors for teeth anomalies was analyzed by retrospective data obtained from computer database (absence of preoperative orthopedic treatment, palatal defects after primary palatoplasty and type of primary procedures). Surgical trauma by early periosteoplasty (at the age of 3-4 months), excessive scarring and tissue traction due to absence of early orthopedic treatment and palatal defect were associated with significantly higher incidence of incisors hypoplasia (both developmental enamel defects and microdentia) and aplasia of central incisors not seen in the other study subgroups. Incisors aplasia and hypoplasia in CLP patients do not always have disembryogenic origin but may depend on external environmental factors, including surgical trauma.

  1. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc; Kursun, Sebnem; Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm 3 (FOV 60 ); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm 3 (FOV 80 ); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm 3 (FOV 100 ). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  2. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Kursun, Sebnem [Division of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Ministry of Health, Oral and Dental Health Center, Bolu (Turkmenistan); Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer [Gealhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, (Turkmenistan)

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 60}); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 80}); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 100}). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  3. Genome-wide meta-analyses of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts identify novel associations between FOXE1 and all orofacial clefts, and TP63 and cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Carlson, Jenna C.; Shaffer, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs) are a heterogeneous group of common craniofacial birth defects with complex etiologies that include genetic and environmental risk factors. OFCs are commonly categorized as cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate alone (CP), which have h...

  4. 3-D shape analysis of palatal surface in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusková, Hana; Bejdová, Sárka; Peterka, Miroslav; Krajíček, Václav; Velemínská, Jana

    2014-07-01

    Facial development of patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) is associated with many problems including deformity of the palate. The aim of this study was to evaluate palatal morphology and variability in patients with UCLP compared with Czech norms using methods of geometric morphometrics. The study was based on virtual dental cast analysis of 29 UCLP patients and 29 control individuals at the age of 15 years. The variability of palatal shape in UCLP patients was greater than that in nonclefted palates. Only 24% of clefted palates fell within the variability of controls. The palatal form of UCLP patients (range from 11.8 to 17.2 years) was not correlated with age. Compared with control palates, palates of UCLP patients were narrower, more anteriorly than posteriorly. Apart from the praemaxilla region, they were also shallower, and the difference increased posteriorly. The UCLP palate was characterised by the asymmetry of its vault. The maximum height of the palatal vault was anterior on the clefted side, whereas it was posterior on the nonclefted side. The slope of the UCLP palate was more inclined compared with the control group. The praemaxilla was therefore situated more inferiorly. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Orofacial closure defects: cleft lip and palate. A literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Casado, G H; Díaz Grávalos, G J

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are a common problem that can lead to significant healthcare use and costs, as well as suffering on the part of the affected individuals and families. There are several theories explaining their origin, but some of the findings are inconsistent. The most accepted theories involve a major genetic basis that could be modified by the presence of external agents. Understanding the underlying causes could help to prevent its occurrence, an area in which the family physician can play an important role. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral endoscopy in prosthodontic management of the soft palate defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Q C; Aramany, M A; Katzenberg, B

    1985-08-01

    Telescopic oral endoscopy is an effective aid in the construction and modification of a speech aid prosthesis. The method is noninvasive and easy to perform, permits the prosthodontist to achieve the goal of functional effectiveness in prosthesis construction while keeping the weight and size of the pharyngeal extension at a minimum, decreases the number and length of patient visits required for modification, and when coupled to a fiberoptic teaching arm or a video camera and recording system, it becomes an excellent aid in teaching, patient education and orientation, and record keeping.

  7. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  8. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  9. Strategies to Improve Regeneration of the Soft Palate Muscles After Cleft Palate Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented. PMID:22697475

  10. Postnatal craniofacial skeleton development following a pushback operation of patients with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteporn, S; Enemark, H; Melsen, B

    1991-10-01

    A longitudinal growth study of the craniofacial skeleton in 52 (19 males, 33 females) Danish individuals with cleft palates was performed. Thirty (13 males, 17 females) had clefts of the soft palate only or clefts extending into the posterior third of the hard palate. Twenty-two (6 males, 16 females) had more extensive clefts including up to two-thirds of the hard palate. The cleft was closed with a pushback operation at 22 months of age. Orthodontic treatment was included in the early mixed dentition. Lateral cephalometries were obtained at 5, 8, 12, 16, and 21 years of age. Twenty-four variables were digitized and analyzed. The results indicated that patients with more extensive clefts demonstrated significantly smaller anterior cranial base length (N-S), total cranial base length (N-Ba), maxillary dentoalveolar base length (A-PMP), mandibular length (Cd-Pgn), upper anterior and posterior facial heights (N-ANS and P-PMP), and total facial height (N-Gn). Patients with the more extensive clefts reached maximum growth spurt later than patients with less extensive clefts in all dimensions except the A-PMP and the lower and total facial heights.

  11. Standard hardness conversion tables for metals relationship among brinell hardness, vickers hardness, rockwell hardness, superficial hardness, knoop hardness, and scleroscope hardness

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 Conversion Table 1 presents data in the Rockwell C hardness range on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, Knoop hardness, and Scleroscope hardness of non-austenitic steels including carbon, alloy, and tool steels in the as-forged, annealed, normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions provided that they are homogeneous. 1.2 Conversion Table 2 presents data in the Rockwell B hardness range on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, Knoop hardness, and Scleroscope hardness of non-austenitic steels including carbon, alloy, and tool steels in the as-forged, annealed, normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions provided that they are homogeneous. 1.3 Conversion Table 3 presents data on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, and Knoop hardness of nickel and high-nickel alloys (nickel content o...

  12. CIRPLAST: Cleft Lip and Palate Missions in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Carlos E

    2015-06-01

    females (48.1%). The incidence of isolated lip clefts was 1546 patients (25.3%); of isolated palate clefts, 2223 patients (36.4%); and combined defects, 2339 patients (38.3%). Of the 5162 patients who returned for follow-up, 377 patients (7.3%) had complications. Lip wound dehiscence was present in 58 patients (15.4). Palate fistula formation in 33 patients (8.8%): 24 (6.4%) after primary palate closure, and 9 (2.4%) after previous fistula closure. Infection occurred in 37 cleft lip patients (9.8%). Hypertrophic lip scars were seen in 56 patients (14.9%). Bleeding occurred in the recovery room after palatoplasty in 48 patients (12.7%), and in most cases, it was contained by applying pressure. No blood transfusions were used. Residual deformities of varying degree of the nose and/or lip occurred in 145 patients (38.5%). All required reoperation for correction. There were no intraoperative deaths in this series. During the past 20 years, the CIRPLAST team has offered free surgery with good outcomes and few complications, to more than 6000 cleft lip and/or palate patients in remote areas of Peru.

  13. Hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, J.P.; Boving, H.J.; Hintermann, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many processes have been developed which are variations and/or combinations of the basic CVD and PVD methods. The main difference between these two families of deposition techniques is that the CVD is an elevated temperature process (≥ 700 C), while the PVD on the contrary, is rather a low temperature process (≤ 500 C); this of course influences the choice of substrates and properties of the coating/substrate systems. Fundamental aspects of the vapor phase deposition techniques and some of their influences on coating properties will be discussed, as well as the very important interactions between deposit and substrate: diffusions, internal stress, etc. Advantages and limitations of CVD and PVD respectively will briefly be reviewed and examples of applications of the layers will be given. Parallel to the development and permanent updating of surface modification technologies, an effort was made to create novel characterisation methods. A close look will be given to the coating adherence control by means of the scratch test, at the coating hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation, at the coating wear resistance by means of a pin-on-disc tribometer, and at the surface quality evaluation by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Finally, main important trends will be highlighted. (orig.)

  14. Psychological Effect of Prenatal Diagnosis of Cleft Lip and Palate: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, V P; Arun, V; Devarajan, Anooj P; Gopinath, Arjun; Sunil, Madhuri

    2018-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate is the most common congenital craniofacial anomaly. Prenatal diagnosis of the craniofacial anomalies is possible with the advent of newer imaging modalities. The identification of the defect at an early stage in the pregnancy helps the parents to be well informed and counseled regarding the treatment possibilities and outcomes of cleft lip and palate (CLP) treatment. To analyze the psychological effects of prenatal diagnosis of CLP on the parents. PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar searches were made with search strings "prenatal diagnosis cleft lip palate," "antenatal diagnosis," "anomaly scan," "psychological effect cleft lip palate," and "prenatal counseling cleft lip palate." Of the results obtained, studies which evaluated the psychological aspects of parents of cleft children were further included in the study. Electronic search yielded 500 articles after duplication removal. Forty studies concentrated on the results of the scan and their implications predominantly in the diagnosis and management of cleft and other related abnormalities. Eight studies discussed the effects of prenatal diagnosis and counseling on the parents. Prenatal diagnosis enables appropriate and timely counseling of the parents by the cleft team and helps instill a sense of preparedness for the family which highly improves the quality of treatment received by the child enabling a near-to-normal quality and standard of life.

  15. Nasal Glial Heterotopia with Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandna, Sudhir; Mehta, Milind A; Kulkarni, Abhishek Kishore

    2018-01-01

    Congenital midline nasal masses are rare anomalies of which nasal glial heterotopia represents an even rarer subset. We report a case of a 25-day-old male child with nasal glial heterotopia along with cleft palate suggesting embryonic fusion anomaly which was treated with excision and primary closure for nasal mass followed by palatal repair at later date.

  16. Nasal glial heterotopia with cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Chandna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital midline nasal masses are rare anomalies of which nasal glial heterotopia represents an even rarer subset. We report a case of a 25-day-old male child with nasal glial heterotopia along with cleft palate suggesting embryonic fusion anomaly which was treated with excision and primary closure for nasal mass followed by palatal repair at later date.

  17. Point defects in platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercy, G.R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made of the mobility and types of point defect introduced in platinum by deformation in liquid nitrogen, quenching into water from 1600 o C, or reactor irradiation at 50 o C. In all cases the activation energy for motion of the defect was determined from measurements of electrical resistivity. Measurements of density, hardness, and x-ray line broadening were also made there applicable. These experiments indicated that the principal defects remaining in platinum after irradiation were single vacant lattice sites and after quenching were pairs of vacant lattice sites. Those present after deformation In liquid nitrogen were single vacant lattice sites and another type of defect, perhaps interstitial atoms. (author)

  18. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  19. X-chromosome inactivation patterns in monozygotic twins and sib pairs discordant for nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimani, Jane W; Shi, Min; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Nonsyndromic clefts of the lip and/or palate are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. Based on unequal gender ratios for clefting phenotypes, evidence for linkage to the X chromosome and the occurrence of several X-linked clefting syndromes, we investigated the role of skewed X c...

  20. Association studies of low-frequency coding variants in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Carlson, Jenna C; Shaffer, John R

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a group of common human birth defects with complex etiology. Although genome-wide association studies have successfully identified a number of risk loci, these loci only account for about 20% of the heritability of orofacial clefts. ...

  1. Aspiration pneumonia in patients with cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Uhm, Ki Il [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To assess the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in infants with cleft palate and to compare the incidence between complete and incomplete types of cleft palate. A review of medical records revealed 100 infants who had undergone initial surgery to repair cleft palate in our hospital during a recent three-year period. Aspiration pneumonia was defined as the coexistence of pneumonia at chest radiography with a history of frequent choking during feeding. The anatomic distribution of aspiration pneumonia was analyzed, and the incidences of aspiration pneumonia in infants with complete and incomplete cleft palate were compared. Among 100 children, aspiration pneumonia was found in 35 (35%). Those with complete and incomplete cleft palate showed similar incidences of the condition (27 of 70 [39%] vs 8 of 30 [27%], p=0.36). Pneumonia was most commonly seen in the left lower lobe (11 of 35), followed by the right upper and lower lobes. Aspiration pneumonia is frequently associated with infants with cleft palate. There is no statistical difference in the incidence of aspiration pneumonia between the complete and the incomplete cleft palate group.

  2. Aspiration pneumonia in patients with cleft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Uhm, Ki Il

    2003-01-01

    To assess the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in infants with cleft palate and to compare the incidence between complete and incomplete types of cleft palate. A review of medical records revealed 100 infants who had undergone initial surgery to repair cleft palate in our hospital during a recent three-year period. Aspiration pneumonia was defined as the coexistence of pneumonia at chest radiography with a history of frequent choking during feeding. The anatomic distribution of aspiration pneumonia was analyzed, and the incidences of aspiration pneumonia in infants with complete and incomplete cleft palate were compared. Among 100 children, aspiration pneumonia was found in 35 (35%). Those with complete and incomplete cleft palate showed similar incidences of the condition (27 of 70 [39%] vs 8 of 30 [27%], p=0.36). Pneumonia was most commonly seen in the left lower lobe (11 of 35), followed by the right upper and lower lobes. Aspiration pneumonia is frequently associated with infants with cleft palate. There is no statistical difference in the incidence of aspiration pneumonia between the complete and the incomplete cleft palate group

  3. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Barrera, Catalina; Mezarobba, Naiara

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions in the development of the nasal and oral structures lead to cleft palate and cleft lip. There are many different factors that can affect this development such as genetic, mechanical traumas or teratogeny. The oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects worldwide affecting approximately 1 in 700 to 1000 children. The development of oral clefts is multifactorial and affect a significant portion of the population. The study results showed that smoking is the risk factor most...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  5. Extent of palatal lengthening after cleft palate repair as a contributing factor to the speech outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yong-Chan; Choi, Soo-Jong; Lee, Jae-Woo; Seo, Hyoung-Joon

    2015-03-01

    Operative techniques in performing cleft palate repair have gradually evolved to achieve better speech ability with its main focus on palatal lengthening and accurate approximation of the velar musculature. The authors doubted whether the extent of palatal lengthening would be directly proportional to the speech outcome. Patients with incomplete cleft palates who went into surgery before 18 months of age were intended for this study. Cases with associated syndromes, mental retardation, hearing loss, or presence of postoperative complications were excluded from the analysis. Palatal length was measured by the authors' devised method before and immediately after the cleft palate repair. Postoperative speech outcome was evaluated around 4 years by a definite pronunciation scoring system. Statistical analysis was carried out between the extent of palatal lengthening and the postoperative pronunciation score by Spearman correlation coefficient method. However, the authors could not find any significant correlation. Although the need for additional research on other variables affecting speech outcome is unequivocal, we carefully conclude that other intraoperative constituents such as accurate reapproximation of the velar musculature should be emphasized more in cleft palate repair rather than palatal lengthening itself.

  6. Evidence-based medicine: cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepla, Kyle J; Gosain, Arun K

    2013-12-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe recent changes in treatment of cleft palate. 2. Compare the efficacy of different surgical treatments. 3. Assess their own knowledge of cleft palate repair. 4. Determine where further individual in-depth study and development are warranted. The Maintenance of Certification in Plastic Surgery series is designed to ensure professional development and measure continued competency within a specialty or subspecialty. The present article provides an evaluation of the interval studies regarding the management of cleft palate with a specific focus on craniofacial growth, speech outcomes, and obstructive sleep apnea since the last Maintenance of Certification in Plastic Surgery article on the subject published in 2010. This purpose of this article is to update plastic and craniomaxillofacial surgeons on recent changes in treatment of cleft palate, provide a means for accurate self-assessment, and guide further individual in-depth study and development.

  7. Pediatric Myofibroma of the Palate with Ulceration and Bone Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Capo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofibroma is a rare benign neoplasm occurring in the head and neck, arising primarily in infants and children. Frequently, myofibromas grow rapidly leading to suspicion of malignancy and the potential for overaggressive surgical excision. We aim to report a rare case of myofibroma with ulceration and bone destruction. A nine-year-old female presented with an ulcerated left hard palate mass. Open biopsy was performed with pathology suggestive of myofibroma. A left partial maxillectomy and reconstruction with a buccal advancement flap were performed. Final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a benign myofibroma. Myofibroma is a rare benign tumor of the head and neck which must be considered in the differential diagnosis by the clinician and the pathologist in order to prevent inappropriate and/or overaggressive treatment.

  8. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  9. Cranial Defects and Cranioplasty. Part 8. Chapter 194,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    scalp incision is outlined on the skin outside the area of the defect and infiltrated with a local anesthetic containing adrenalin. (c) Margins of the...plate to repair cleft palates in the first instance of an alloplastic material to repair a defect. J. van 14eekren in 1670 is credited with the first...osteomyelitis, infected skull flaps), aseptic necrosis of skull flaps, radionecrosis and electrical burns of skull, con- genital absences of skull

  10. 3-D shape analysis of palatal surface in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rusková, H.; Bejdová, Š.; Peterka, Miroslav; Krajíček, V.; Velemínská, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2014), e140-e147 ISSN 1010-5182 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 309611 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : unilateral cleft of lip and palate * palate shape * surface scanning Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.933, year: 2014

  11. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Jorge; Lydick, Elaine A; Torres, Olga R; Owen, Karen K; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the number of new cases of cleft lip and cleft palate in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, in 2012. Cross-sectional survey of midwives from communities identified through a two-stage cluster-sampling process. Midwives were asked how many babies they had delivered in the past year and how many of those newborns had various types of birth defects, as illustrated in pictures. Indigenous Mayan communities in rural north-central Guatemala. Midwives (n = 129) who had delivered babies in the previous year. Reports of babies born with cleft lip and cleft palate. A 1-year prevalence rate of 18.9 per 10,000 for cleft lip and 4.7 per 10,000 for cleft palate was estimated for Alta Verapaz. None of the cases of cleft lip also had cleft palate. The indigenous communities in north-central Guatemala might have a relatively high cleft lip prevalence rate compared with the global average.

  12. Cleft lip and palate: an adverse pregnancy outcome due to undiagnosed maternal and paternal coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Arali, Veena; Brennan, Peter A

    2010-07-01

    Development of orofacial component involves a complex series of events. Any insult to this significant event can lead to various orofacial cleft defects. The main categories among orofacial clefts are isolated cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate. There have been many factors implicated in the development of the anomaly. The environmental factors which contribute and the genes which predispose to the condition remain obscure despite decades of research. Though it is generally agreed that folic acid deficiency is a contributory factor for non-syndromic cleft lip and palate, fewer concerns are directed towards the role for maternal/paternal nutrition in orofacial cleft origin. However, previously undescribed, here we consider the potential influence of maternal and paternal coeliac disease on the etiology of non-syndromic cleft lip and palate as an unfavorable pregnancy outcome. We postulated this relationship based on our observation, study and an empirical survey, and could be due either to (I) folic acid mal absorption (II) a genetically mediated genomic imprinting system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p cleft lip with or without alveolus and isolated cleft palate were not statistically different from unaffected children. Patients with unilateral cleft lip with cleft palate were found to be more severely affected than bilateral cases. Nasal obstruction was observed in early childhood, although severity worsened in adolescence. This population-based study reports a high prevalence of nasal obstructive symptoms in children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate based on type and severity of the cleft. The authors encourage cleft teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  14. Important points for primary cleft palate repair for speech derived from speech outcome after three different types of palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Emi; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Nishizawa, Noriko; Mikoya, Tadashi; Okamoto, Toru; Imai, Satoko; Murao, Naoki; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Oyama, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate speech outcomes after three different types of palatoplasty for the same cleft type. The objective of this study was to investigate the surgical techniques that are essential for normal speech on the basis of each surgical characteristic. Thirty-eight consecutive nonsyndromic patients with unilateral complete cleft of the lip, alveolus, and palate were enrolled in this study. Speech outcomes, i.e., nasal emission, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and malarticulation after one-stage pushback (PB), one-stage modified Furlow (MF), or conventional two-stage MF palatoplasty, were evaluated at 4 (before intensive speech therapy) and 8 (after closure of oronasal fistula/unclosed hard palate) years of age. Velopharyngeal insufficiency at 4 (and 8) years of age was present in 5.9% (0.0%), 0.0% (0.0%), and 10.0% (10.0%) of patients who underwent one-stage PB, one-stage MF, or two-stage MF palatoplasty, respectively. No significant differences in velopharyngeal function were found among these three groups at 4 and 8 years of age. Malarticulation at 4 years of age was found in 35.3%, 10.0%, and 63.6% of patients who underwent one-stage PB, one-stage MF, and two-stage MF palatoplasty, respectively. Malarticulation at 4 years of age was significantly related to the presence of a fistula/unclosed hard palate (P<0.01). One-stage MF palatoplasty that was not associated with postoperative oronasal fistula (ONF) showed significantly better results than two-stage MF (P<0.01). Although the incidences of malarticulation at 8 years of age were decreased in each group compared to at 4 years of age, the incidence was still high in patients treated with two-stage MF (45.5%). On the whole, there was a significant correlation between ONF/unclosed hard palate at 4 years of age and malarticulation at 8 years of age (P<0.05). Appropriate muscle sling formation can compensate for a lack of retropositioning of the palate for adequate velopharyngeal closure

  15. Feeding interventions for growth and development in infants with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Alyson; Hooper, Lee; Shaw, William C; Reilly, Sheena; Reid, Julie; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-16

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth defects, affecting about one baby of every 700 born. Feeding these babies is an immediate concern and there is evidence of delay in growth of children with a cleft as compared to those without clefting. In an effort to combat reduced weight for height, a variety of advice and devices are recommended to aid feeding of babies with clefts. This review aims to assess the effects of these feeding interventions in babies with cleft lip and/or palate on growth, development and parental satisfaction. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 27 October 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 27 October 2010), PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 27 October 2010). Attempts were made to identify both unpublished and ongoing studies. There was no restriction with regard to language of publication. Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of feeding interventions for babies born with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate up to the age of 6 months (from term). Studies were assessed for relevance independently and in duplicate. All studies meeting the inclusion criteria were data extracted and assessed for validity independently by each member of the review team. Authors were contacted for clarification or missing information whenever possible. Five RCTs with a total of 292 babies, were included in the review. Comparisons made within the RCTs were squeezable versus rigid feeding bottles (two studies), breastfeeding versus spoon-feeding (one study) and maxillary plate versus no plate (two studies). No statistically significant differences were shown for any of the primary outcomes when comparing bottle types, although squeezable bottles were less likely to require

  16. Congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahvi H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Oral clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Infants with oral clefts often have other associated congenital defects, especially congenital heart defects. The reported incidences and the types of associated malformations and congenital heart defects vary between different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of associated congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts. Methods: All infants with cleft lip and palate referred to the Children's Medical Center and Bahramy; the teaching Hospitals of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1991 to 2005 were prospectively enrolled in this study group. All patients were examined and noted by an academic cleft team contain; a pediatrician and a pediatric surgeon, and received cardiac consultation and echocardiography by a pediatric cardiologist. non cardiac associated anomalies, still born and patients without echocardiography were excluded from the study.  Data including age, gender, exposure to contagions and high risk elements ,consanguinity and familial history of oral cleft, type of oral cleft, results of cardiac consultation and echocardiography and associated cardiac anomalies were cumulated and analyzed by SSPS version 13.5Results: Among the 284 infants with oral clefts, 162 were male (57% and 122 were female (43%. Seventy-nine patients (27.8% had cleft lip, 84 (29.5% had cleft palate and 121 (42.6% had both cleft lip and palate. Of all the patients, 21.1% had congenital heart defects. the most common type Of these congenital heart defects(28.3%  was atrial septal defect.Conclusions: For patients with cleft lip and palate, we recommend preoperative cardiac consultation, careful examination and routine echocardiography for associated cardiac anomalies, as well as appropriate management and prophylactic antibiotic therapy for those with associated congenital heart anomaly.

  17. Intraflagellar transport 88 (IFT88) is crucial for craniofacial development in mice and is a candidate gene for human cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Brindopke, Frederick; Figueiredo, Jane C; Magee, William; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Ciliopathies are pleiotropic human diseases resulting from defects of the primary cilium, and these patients often have cleft lip and palate. IFT88 is required for the assembly and function of the primary cilia, which mediate the activity of key developmental signaling pathways. Through whole exome sequencing of a family of three affected siblings with isolated cleft lip and palate, we discovered that they share a novel missense mutation in IFT88 (c.915G > C, p.E305D), suggesting this gene should be considered a candidate for isolated orofacial clefting. In order to evaluate the function of IFT88 in regulating craniofacial development, we generated Wnt1-Cre;Ift88fl/fl mice to eliminate Ift88 specifically in cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Wnt1-Cre;Ift88fl/flpups died at birth due to severe craniofacial defects including bilateral cleft lip and palate and tongue agenesis, following the loss of the primary cilia in the CNC-derived palatal mesenchyme. Loss of Ift88 also resulted in a decrease in neural crest cell proliferation during early stages of palatogenesis as well as a downregulation of the Shh signaling pathway in the palatal mesenchyme. Importantly, Osr2KI-Cre;Ift88fl/flmice, in which Ift88 is lost specifically in the palatal mesenchyme, exhibit isolated cleft palate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IFT88 has a highly conserved function within the primary cilia of the CNC-derived mesenchyme in the lip and palate region in mice and is a strong candidate as an orofacial clefting gene in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning.

  19. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here What treatment is available for adults with cleft lip and palate? Treatments currently available to infants and children with cleft lip and palate are also available to adults with clefts. Although ...

  20. Primary Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Palate with Cushing’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqiu Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24-year-old woman presenting with a relapsed soy-bean-size tender mass at the junction of the soft and hard palate and a history of palatine tumor of small cell carcinoma. Reexcision surgery was performed and histopathological features were consistent. The patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy consisting of etoposide and cisplatin. After one year, the patient developed bone metastases and Cushing's syndrome, and successfully recovered with subsequent chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin plus radiotherapy. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis for more than three years. Small cell carcinoma originating in the head and neck region has been reported to be highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis. This is the first case report of a patient with relapsed primary small cell carcinoma of the palate and successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy and local radiotherapy.

  1. Both Palatable and Unpalatable Butterflies Use Bright Colors to Signal Difficulty of Capture to Predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, C E G; Freitas, A V L; Campos, V C; DeVries, P J; Penz, C M

    2016-04-01

    Birds are able to recognize and learn to avoid attacking unpalatable, chemically defended butterflies after unpleasant experiences with them. It has also been suggested that birds learn to avoid prey that are efficient at escaping. This, however, remains poorly documented. Here, we argue that butterflies may utilize a variety of escape tactics against insectivorous birds and review evidence that birds avoid attacking butterflies that are hard to catch. We suggest that signaling difficulty of capture to predators is a widespread phenomenon in butterflies, and this ability may not be limited to palatable butterflies. The possibility that both palatable and unpalatable species signal difficulty of capture has not been fully explored, but helps explain the existence of aposematic coloration and escape mimicry in butterflies lacking defensive chemicals. This possibility may also change the role that putative Müllerian and Batesian mimics play in a variety of classical mimicry rings, thus opening new perspectives in the evolution of mimicry in butterflies.

  2. Midfacial Changes Through Anterior Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Imai, Yoshimichi; Nakajo, Tetsu; Daimaruya, Takayoshi; Sato, Akimitsu; Tachi, Masahiro; Nunomura, Youhei; Itagaki, Yusuke; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Kochi, Shoko; Igarashi, Kaoru

    2017-06-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a major issue in cleft lip and palate patients, and predictable surgical maxillary advancement is required. In the present study, the changes and stability of the maxilla and soft tissue profile achieved after the application of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis (AMDO) using intraoral expander in unilateral cleft lip and palate and isolated cleft palate patients were investigated by comparing to the Le Fort I osteotomy (LFI) and maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) with rigid external distraction (RED) system.Ten patients who underwent orthognathic treatment with AMDO were examined (AMDO group). Changes in the positions of soft and hard tissue landmarks were calculated from the lateral cephalograms taken before the distraction, at the end of the distraction, and 1 year after the surgery. They were compared with the changes in 7 other unilateral cleft lip and palate patients who underwent LFI (LFI group) and 6 others who underwent DO with RED (RED group).The mean maxillary advancement of the AMDO group was similar to that of the RED group, judged by the change of point A. During DO, the AMDO group showed less clockwise rotation of mandible compared to the RED group. The soft tissue advancement of the upper lip and nose in the AMDO group was similar to that in the RED group, which was significantly larger than that in the LFI group.Our results indicate that AMDO can be surgical option to cleft lip and palate patients with less invasive but excellent improvement in both midfacial skeletal and soft tissue similar to DO-RED.

  3. Massive Neurilemoma of the Hard Plate in Which Preoperative Diagnosis Was Difficult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kudoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient was an 84-year-old man who was referred to our hospital in mid-December 2012 for a close examination of a mass arising from the left side of the hard palate that was found by a local dentist. The initial examination revealed the presence of a 3.0-cm elastic soft, dome-shaped mass in the left hard palate. CE-CT showed a lesion of size 1.8 × 1.4 cm in the right hard palate, which extended upward and invaded the nasal cavity. The mass was a solid tumor associated with resorption of surrounding bone and expansion of the greater palatine canal. CE-MRI indicated that the mass extended upward and invaded the nasal cavity, and the mass showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images, hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, and an irregular margin with internal enhancement. Abnormal uptake of FDG on PET-CT (SUVmax = 5.2 was observed in the left hard palate. The biopsy site lesion rapidly increased in size and biopsy was performed again in January 2013 due to suspicion of a malignant tumor. The histopathological diagnosis was a suspected malignant neurogenic tumor. Therefore, the patient underwent partial maxillectomy and a split-thickness skin graft in late February 2013. No recurrence was noted 29 months after the operation.

  4. One-stage closure of isolated cleft palate with the Veau-Wardill-Kilner V to Y pushback procedure or the Cronin modification. III. Comparison of lateral craniofacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heliövaara, A; Ranta, R

    1993-10-01

    The craniofacial morphology of 116 consecutive patients with isolated cleft palate was studied by means of lateral cephalograms at 17 to 20 years of age. One-stage hard- and soft-palate closure had been carried out at the mean age of 1.8 years by using the Veau-Wardill-Kilner or the Cronin mucoperiosteal palatal V-Y pushback technique. In the Veau-Wardill-Kilner group the cranial base was longer, the cranial base angle was larger, and the mandible longer and its ramus higher but less backward rotated. The patients with originally the most extensive clefts showed the most marked deviations in craniofacial morphology at adult age.

  5. Acoustic Analysis on the Palatalized Vowels of Modern Mongolian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgantamir, Sangidkhorloo

    2015-01-01

    In Modern Mongolian the palatalized vowels [a?, ??, ?? ] before palatalized consonants are considered as phoneme allophones according to the most scholars. Nevertheless theses palatalized vowels have the distinctive features what could be proved by the minimal pairs and nowadays this question is open and not profoundly studied. The purpose of this…

  6. L2 Perception of Spanish Palatal Variants across Different Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Christine; Renaud, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    While considerable dialectal variation exists, almost all varieties of Spanish exhibit some sort of alternation in terms of the palatal obstruent segments. Typically, the palatal affricate [??] tends to occur in word onset following a pause and in specific linear phonotactic environments. The palatal fricative [?] tends to occur in syllable onset…

  7. Evaluation of Teeth Development in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... in patients with cleft lip and palate using medical software ... to be used in routine dental treatment and in particular the need to do more study. ... cleft palate/lip surgery were examined. ... segment from the “evaluate” tab of the program. Teeth .... cases of cleft palate or lip. ..... of maxillary canines: A CT study.

  8. Nasoseptal flap for palatal reconstruction after hemi-maxillectomy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwashahi, M K; Battaglia, P; Turri-Zanoni, M; Castelnuovo, P

    2018-01-01

    Palatal reconstruction following maxillectomy is a surgical challenge, and a nasoseptal flap is a feasible approach. This paper reports the first known successful clinical case of a nasoseptal pedicle flap applied for the reconstruction of maxillary bone following hemi-maxillectomy. This report describes hemi-maxillectomy in a 60-year-old Italian male diagnosed with stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the left maxilla. Endoscopic transnasal extended medial maxillectomy was performed, followed by a transoral modified midfacial degloving technique for removal of the maxillary bone. The contralateral nasoseptal pedicle flap was used to reconstruct the defect. The case was followed up prospectively for the assessment of flap reception and healing. The locally accessible nasoseptal flap is a viable alternative for palatal reconstruction; therefore, a second surgical procedure with its associated donor site morbidity can be avoided. Large-scale studies may help in establishing the cosmetic and functional outcomes.

  9. Cleft lip and palate review: Epidemiology, risk factors, quality of life, and importance of classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Supit

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is the most occurring craniofacial anomaly in human, resulting from a complex etiology involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. The defect carries lifelong morbidity and economic burden. Children with clefts will require continuous medical interventions for at least the first 18 years of life, affecting many aspects of their lives. The extent and complexity of clefts vary infinitely, later determining individual management and outcome. Identification and classification play significant roles in initial assessment of these unique cleft cases, which affect options for following correctional attempts. Some classifications even allow measurement of progress after anatomical repositioning, and success rate after surgical repairs. The challenge of developing one such widely inclusive classification is discussed. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 226-39Keywords: Cleft lip, cleft palate, congenital anomaly, cleft  classfications

  10. Maxillary Swing Approach for Removal of Palatal Carcinoma: A Modified Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Nomura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We report a modification of the maxillary swing approach to remove a palatal tumor while preserving the anterior alveolar area. Methods. Case report using clinical records. Results. The patient was a 54-year-old male. TNM grade was T4bN0M0, and invasion to the base of the pterygoid process was seen. Two courses of induction chemotherapy were administered prior to the operation. Because there was no evidence of anterior maxillary invasion, the maxillary swing approach was chosen. The left anterior maxilla was cut and swung laterally, preserving the blood supply. After removal of the palatal tumor, the maxilla was repositioned and the defect was restored with an anterior lateral thigh flap. Postoperative course was typical, and facial appearance, speech, and masticatory function were satisfactory. Conclusions. This technique is particularly useful for preserving appearance as well as speech and mastication.

  11. A lining vomer flap for palate pushback in unilateral cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavin, H D; Owsley, J Q

    1978-01-01

    A combinaation vomer mucoperiosteal flap and nasal floor mucoperiosteal flap is described which is used to achieve nasal coverage in unilateral cleft palate patients requiring pushbacks. A posteriorly based readily accessible vomer flap is raised on the cleft side and used as nasal lining for the palatal mucoperiosteal flap on the non-cleft side. On the cleft side, a symmetrically sized nasal floor flap is easily elevated under direct vision and used to cover the nasal aspect of the corresponding mucoperiosteal palatal flap.

  12. Postanesthetic ulceration of palate: A rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ramesh; Garg, Meenu; Pawah, Salil; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    The routine dental practice involves various dental procedures which needs the application of local anesthetics. Generally, there are very few complications associated with these procedures. Complications such as tissue necrosis can occur following the rapid injection of local anesthetic solutions. Palate is a favorable site for soft tissue lesions, various factors such as direct effects of the drug, blanching of the tissues during injection, a relatively poor blood supply, and reactivation of the latent forms of herpes can all promote to tissue ischemia and a lesion in the palate.

  13. Living with cleft lip and palate: the treatment journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, Reem; Bedos, Christophe; Allison, Paul

    2014-03-01

    To better understand how individuals with cleft lip and palate (CLP) perceive and experience their treatment process and how these perceptions and experiences change over the life course. Qualitative in-depth semistructured interviews with 11 adults with nonsyndromal complete CLP. Individuals from three Canadian cities were recruited by convenience and theoretical sampling through AboutFace International. The number of participants was determined by the principle of theoretical saturation. The experience of individuals with CLP through the treatment process changes over the life course. In childhood and early adolescence, most individuals experience stigma, negative self-perception, and as a result were more prone to perceiving the treatment process not only as unbearably burdensome but also as fueling their feeling of "defectiveness." In adulthood, participants' self-perception improved, partly because of definitive surgical correction, leading them to realize treatment benefits and reappraise the treatment process as satisfactory rather than burdensome. Subsequently, some individuals pursued further surgeries hoping for additional psychological gains, in lieu of psychosocial interventions addressing the underpinnings of residual feelings of "defectiveness." This led to dissatisfaction and frustration when the procedures did not lead to the hoped-for psychological gains. The results emphasize the importance of self-perception in determining how participants perceive several important aspects of the treatment experience throughout the life course. Further studies should focus on how to incorporate self-perception as an important variable and outcome in the treatment process.

  14. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF TOOTH DECAY IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH CLEFT LIP AND PALATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana-Gabriela HALIŢCHI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluation of the extension of caries risk and incidence of decays of temporary teeth in children with cleft lip and palate. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on a sample of 64 children with various types of cleft lip and palate (31 children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 18 children with bilateral cleft lip and palate, 5 children with cleft lip and 10 children with cleft palate, aged between 3 and 6 years, investigated in the Orthodontics Clinic of „Apollonia” University. The tooth surfaces were examined with the probe and the mirror, incipient caries and tooth decay with manifest cavities detectable by probing being identified. The gingival status was examined, whichever the inflammatory signs from the free gingival margin and papillae. Oral hygiene was rated by the presence/absence of dental biofilm after examining the buccal and lingual surfaces of the teeth. Statistical analysis was based on the non-parametric Pearson correlation, frequency analysis and linear regression method for determining the functional interrelationships between variables. Results and discussion. In children with cleft lip and palate, the highest incidence of caries occurs on the upper deciduous central incisors and first molars. Carious lesions of the central and lateral incisors tend to increase and decrease in frequency symmetrically and have a strong causal relationship. In 80.6% of cases, the decay of central incisors causes caries on the lateral incisors. Mean number of teeth affected by caries in temporary dentition at ages between 4-6 years is 7.27. The average ratio of dmft is 8.6136, a quite higher value, compared with the normal values registered in normal children, evidencing a faster and more rapid development of dental caries. Poor oral hygiene is associated with cleft and number of caries. It seems that the parents of children with cleft lip and palate have difficulties in implementing an effective brushing technique, given

  15. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  16. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  17. A Genome-wide Association Study of Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate Identifies an Etiologic Missense Variant in GRHL3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Liu, Huan; Carlson, Jenna C

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect occurring in 1 in 2,500 live births. Approximately half of infants with CP have a syndromic form, exhibiting other physical and cognitive disabilities. The other half have nonsyndromic CP, and to date, few genes associated with risk for nonsyndromic CP h...

  18. Patterning of palatal rugae through sequential addition reveals an anterior/posterior boundary in palatal development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pantalacci, S.; Procházka, Jan; Martin, A.; Rothová, Michaela; Lambert, A.; Bernard, L.; Charles, C.; Viriot, L.; Peterková, Renata; Laudet, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 8 (2008), s. 116-133 ISSN 1471-213X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/07/0223; GA MŠk OC B23.002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : secondary palate * cleft - palate * expression analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.079, year: 2008

  19. Speech intelligibility after gingivectomy of excess palatal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Balasundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To appreciate any enhancement in speech following gingivectomy of enlarged anterior palatal gingiva. Periodontal literature has documented various conditions, pathophysiology, and treatment modalities of gingival enlargement. Relationship between gingival maladies and speech alteration has received scant attention. This case report describes on altered speech pattern enhancement secondary to the gingivectomy procedure. A systemically healthy 24-year- female patient reported with bilateral anterior gingival enlargement who was provisionally diagnosed as "gingival abscess with inflammatory enlargement" in relation to palatal aspect of the right maxillary canine to left maxillary canine. Bilateral gingivectomy procedure was performed by external bevel incision in relation to anterior palatal gingiva and a large wedge of epithelium and connective tissue was removed. Patient and her close acquaintances noticed a great improvement in her pronunciation and enunciation of sounds like "t", "d", "n", "l", "th", following removal of excess gingival palatal tissue and was also appreciated with visual analog scale score. Exploration of linguistic research documented the significance of tongue-palate contact during speech. Any excess gingival tissue in palatal region brings about disruption in speech by altering tongue-palate contact. Periodontal surgery like gingivectomy may improve disrupted phonetics. Excess gingival palatal tissue impedes on tongue-palate contact and interferes speech. Pronunciation of consonants like "t", "d", "n", "l", "th", are altered with anterior enlarged palatal gingiva. Excision of the enlarged palatal tissue results in improvement of speech.

  20. Adaptation to an electropalatograph palate: acoustic, impressionistic, and perceptual data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Searl, Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adaptation to the electropalatograph (EPG) from the perspective of consonant acoustics, listener perceptions, and speaker ratings. Seven adults with typical speech wore an EPG and pseudo-EPG palate over 2 days and produced syllables, read a passage, counted, and rated their adaptation to the palate. Consonant acoustics, listener ratings, and speaker ratings were analyzed. The spectral mean for the burst (/t/) and frication (/s/) was reduced for the first 60-120 min of wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. Temporal features (stop gap, frication, and syllable duration) were unaffected by wearing the pseudo-EPG palate. The EPG palate had a similar effect on consonant acoustics as the pseudo-EPG palate. Expert listener ratings indicated minimal to no change in speech naturalness or distortion from the pseudo-EPG or EPG palate. The sounds [see text] were most likely to be affected. Speaker self-ratings related to oral comfort, speech, tongue movement, appearance, and oral sensation were negatively affected by the presence of the palatal devices. Speakers detected a substantial difference when wearing a palatal device, but the effects on speech were minimal based on listener ratings. Spectral features of consonants were initially affected, although adaptation occurred. Wearing an EPG or pseudo-EPG palate for approximately 2 hr results in relatively normal-sounding speech with acoustic features similar to a no-palate condition.

  1. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  2. Live Imaging of Mouse Secondary Palate Fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kim, S.; Procházka, Jan; Bush, J.O.

    jaro, č. 125 (2017), č. článku e56041. ISSN 1940-087X Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Developmental Biology * Issue 125 * live imaging * secondary palate * tissue fusion * cleft * craniofacial Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Developmental biology Impact factor: 1.232, year: 2016

  3. Soft Tissue Changes in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: Anterior Maxillary Distraction versus Conventional Le-Fort I Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markose, Eldho; Paulose, Joby; Paul, Eldho T

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the soft tissue changes after maxillary advancement in patients with maxillary deficiency associated with cleft lip and palate (CLP) by two approaches-anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) and advancement LeFort I osteotomy (ALO). Twenty patients with maxillary hypoplasia associated with cleft lip and palate who had undergone either LeFort I osteotomy or distraction osteogenesis with maxillary advancement were included in this study. Lateral cephalogram taken at various intervals of time were used to evaluate soft tissue and hard tissue changes over time. In both groups, vertical as well as horizontal changes in pronasale was well observed. A substantial increase in nasal parameters was noted in case of AMD group in comparison to ALO. Though maxillary advancement was evident in both the groups, a significant and consistent change was observed in AMD. Significant vertical and horizontal changes were seen with respect to subnasale and labrale superius in AMD group. Soft tissue as well as hard tissue relapse was greater in ALO group than AMD group. Significant soft tissue and hard tissue changes were clearly observed in both the groups, but the treatment results were more consistent in cases treated with AMD. Hence AMD could be considered as a better treatment of choice in cases of maxillary hypoplasia associated with cleft lip and palate.

  4. Observation of the human fetal corpses with maxillofacial malformations. 1. CT and MRI examinations of the fetal cleft lip and/or palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Chikara; Nakano, Yoko; Shigematsu, Shiro

    1999-01-01

    Of the various types of congenital malformations, the cleft lip and/or palate is one of the most frequent. Observation of human fetal corpses exhibiting cleft lip and palate is very important to research on its onset of its mechanism and development. In recent years, some of researchers have performed clinical studies on prenatal diagnosis and surgical treatment for the entirety. However, there have hardly been any reports on detailed observations of the maxillofacial structure of a fetus with cleft lip and palate. We seized an opportunity of observing the maxillofacial structure of fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate using three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) and MR imaging as non-disjunctive methods. In the present study, nine fetal corpses having cleft lip and/or palate were examined. The results were as follows: CT and MRI were useful for non-invasive observation of the maxillofacial structure, including soft tissues. Because the osseous tissues of young fetus tissue is not fully mature, observation of bone structures was slightly difficult. When corpses were immersed in formalin for a long time, osseous tissue was decalcified, thus making it difficult to obtain clear images. We could observe the details of the maxillofacial structures such as the alveolar process, the hard palate, the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, the nasal bone, and the vomer, in some of the cases. 3D-CT and MR findings observed in the fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate should provide some basement of the imaging diagnosis of congenital disorder. (author))

  5. Observation of the human fetal corpses with maxillofacial malformations. 1. CT and MRI examinations of the fetal cleft lip and/or palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Chikara; Nakano, Yoko; Shigematsu, Shiro [Tokyo Dental Coll., Chiba (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-06-01

    Of the various types of congenital malformations, the cleft lip and/or palate is one of the most frequent. Observation of human fetal corpses exhibiting cleft lip and palate is very important to research on its onset of its mechanism and development. In recent years, some of researchers have performed clinical studies on prenatal diagnosis and surgical treatment for the entirey. However, there have hardly been any reports on detailed observations of the maxillofacial structure of a fetus with cleft lip and palate. We seized an opportunity of observing the maxillofacial structure of fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate using three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) and MR imaging as non-disjunctive methods. In the present study, nine fetal corpses having cleft lip and/or palate were examined. The results were as follows: CT and MRI were useful for non-invasive observation of the maxillofacial structure, including soft tissues. Because the osseous tissues of young fetus tissue is not fully mature, observation of bone structures was slightly difficult. When corpses were immersed in formalin for a long time, osseous tissue was decalcified, thus making it difficult to obtain clear images. We could observe the details of the maxillofacial structures such as the alveolar process, the hard palate, the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, the nasal bone, and the vomer, in some of the cases. 3D-CT and MR findings observed in the fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate should provide some basement of the imaging diagnosis of congenital disorder. (author)

  6. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  7. Analysis of the presence of cell proliferation-related molecules in the Tgf-β3 null mutant mouse palate reveals misexpression of EGF and Msx-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, A; Barrio, M C; Murillo, J; Maldonado, E; López-Gordillo, Y; Martínez-Sanz, E; Martínez, M L; Martínez-Álvarez, C

    2011-01-01

    The Tgf-β(3) null mutant mouse palate presents several cellular anomalies that lead to the appearance of cleft palate. One of them concerns the cell proliferation of both the palatal medial edge epithelium and mesenchyme. In this work, our aim was to determine whether there was any variation in the presence/distribution of several cell proliferation-related molecules that could be responsible for the cell proliferation defects observed in these palates. Our results showed no difference in the presence of EGF-R, PDGF-A, TGF-β(2), Bmp-2, and Bmp-4, and differences were minimal for FGF-10 and Shh. However, the expression of EGF and Msx-1 changed substantially. The shift of the EGF protein expression was the one that most correlated with that of cell proliferation. This molecule is regulated by TGF-β(3), and experiments blocking its activity in culture suggest that EGF misexpression in the Tgf-β(3) null mutant mouse palate plays a role in the cell proliferation defect observed. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Neural network pattern recognition of lingual-palatal pressure for automated detection of swallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Aaron J; Krival, Kate R; Ridgel, Angela L; Hahn, Elizabeth C; Tyler, Dustin J

    2015-04-01

    We describe a novel device and method for real-time measurement of lingual-palatal pressure and automatic identification of the oral transfer phase of deglutition. Clinical measurement of the oral transport phase of swallowing is a complicated process requiring either placement of obstructive sensors or sitting within a fluoroscope or articulograph for recording. Existing detection algorithms distinguish oral events with EMG, sound, and pressure signals from the head and neck, but are imprecise and frequently result in false detection. We placed seven pressure sensors on a molded mouthpiece fitting over the upper teeth and hard palate and recorded pressure during a variety of swallow and non-swallow activities. Pressure measures and swallow times from 12 healthy and 7 Parkinson's subjects provided training data for a time-delay artificial neural network to categorize the recordings as swallow or non-swallow events. User-specific neural networks properly categorized 96 % of swallow and non-swallow events, while a generalized population-trained network was able to properly categorize 93 % of swallow and non-swallow events across all recordings. Lingual-palatal pressure signals are sufficient to selectively and specifically recognize the initiation of swallowing in healthy and dysphagic patients.

  9. Patterns of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Northern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Khan

    2012-04-01

    Results: A total of 159 patients of cleft lip and cleft palate deformities were included in the study, having a mean age of 3.5+6.59 years and containing 59.1% males and 40.9% females with a ratio of 1.4:1. A cleft lip with palate, cleft palate and cleft lip were found in 51.6%, 31.4% and 17% of cases, respectively. Left-sided clefts were most common in the cleft lip with palate and the isolated cleft lip deformity. A cleft lip with palate was a male dominant variety (62.8% of cases, while in the cleft palate variety, the dominant gender was female. In 61.6% of cases, the parent had a consanguineous relationship. In 21.4% of cases, family history was positive for the cleft lip/palate. Other congenital anomalies were associated in 10.7% of cases. Conclusion: Cleft deformities of the lip and palate affect the male population more than females with cleft lips, in association with a cleft palate being the most common anomaly. Females are mainly affected by an isolated cleft palate. The high prevalence of these deformities in consanguineous marriages emphasizes educating people. The lower number of patients from distant distracts of Northern Pakistan calls for the attention of the health department. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 63-70

  10. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  11. Use of hyperdry amniotic membrane in operations for cleft palate: a study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Makoto; Okabe, Motonori; Tomihara, Kei; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nikaido, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    The growth of maxillary bone and the development of dentition are often impaired in patients who have had pushback operations for repair of a cleft palate. There has been considerable discussion about the most suitable technique or material used in such repairs to resolve the problem. Hyperdry amniotic membrane, a new preservable material derived from human amnion, has recently been introduced in several procedures. We have evaluated its use during pushback surgery in animal studies to try to correct the inhibition of growth and development of the maxilla. Mucosal defects were created in 3-week-old rats, and then covered with hyperdry amniotic membrane or not. Healing was assessed by histological and morphological examination at 1 week and 7 weeks postoperatively. In the group treated with hyperdry amniotic membrane, submucosal tissue was reconstructed successfully during the early postoperative period. Lateral palatal growth was not inhibited as much, and medial inclination of the teeth was less, after a period of growth using this material. The results suggest that hyperdry amniotic membrane is a suitable new dressing material for use in the treatment of cleft palate. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Standardized Protocol for the Prospective Follow-Up of Cleft Lip and Palate Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Negar; Jolanta, Aleksejūnienė; Edwin, Yen; Angelina, Loo

    2018-01-01

    To develop a standardized all-encompassing protocol for the assessment of cleft lip and palate patients with clinical and research implications. Electronic database searches were conducted and 13 major cleft centers worldwide were contacted in order to prepare for the development of the protocol. In preparation, the available evidence was reviewed and potential fistula-related risk determinants from 4 different domains were identified. No standardized protocol for the assessment of cleft patients could be found in any of the electronic database searches that were conducted. Interviews with representatives from several major centers revealed that the majority of centers do not have a standardized comprehensive strategy for the reporting and follow-up of cleft lip and palate patients. The protocol was developed and consisted of the following domains of determinants: (1) the sociodemographic domain, (2) the cleft defect domain, (3) the surgery domain, and (4) the fistula domain. The proposed protocol has the potential to enhance the quality of patient care by ensuring that multiple patient-related aspects are consistently reported. It may also facilitate future multicenter research, which could contribute to the reduction of fistula occurrence in cleft lip and palate patients.

  13. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis versus orthognathic surgery for cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloukos, Dimitrios; Fudalej, Piotr; Sequeira-Byron, Patrick; Katsaros, Christos

    2016-09-30

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common birth defects and can cause difficulties with feeding, speech and hearing, as well as psychosocial problems. Treatment of orofacial clefts is prolonged; it typically commences after birth and lasts until the child reaches adulthood or even into adulthood. Residual deformities, functional disturbances, or both, are frequently seen in adults with a repaired cleft. Conventional orthognathic surgery, such as Le Fort I osteotomy, is often performed for the correction of maxillary hypoplasia. An alternative intervention is distraction osteogenesis, which achieves bone lengthening by gradual mechanical distraction. To provide evidence regarding the effects and long-term results of maxillary distraction osteogenesis compared to orthognathic surgery for the treatment of hypoplastic maxilla in people with cleft lip and palate. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 16 February 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 16 February 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 16 February 2016), LILACS BIREME (1982 to 16 February 2016), the US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) (to 16 February 2016), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to 16 February 2016). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication in the electronic searches. We performed handsearching of six speciality journals and we checked the reference lists of all trials identified for further studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing maxillary distraction osteogenesis to conventional Le Fort I osteotomy for the correction of cleft lip and palate maxillary hypoplasia in non-syndromic cleft patients aged 15 years or older. Two review authors assessed studies for eligibility. Two review authors independently

  14. Incidence of Speech-Correcting Surgery in Children With Isolated Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Charlotta; Heliövaara, Arja; Leikola, Junnu; Rautio, Jorma

    2018-01-01

    Speech-correcting surgeries (pharyngoplasty) are performed to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). This study aimed to analyze the need for speech-correcting surgery in children with isolated cleft palate (ICP) and to determine differences among cleft extent, gender, and primary technique used. In addition, we assessed the timing and number of secondary procedures performed and the incidence of operated fistulas. Retrospective medical chart review study from hospital archives and electronic records. These comprised the 423 consecutive nonsyndromic children (157 males and 266 females) with ICP treated at the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center of Helsinki University Hospital during 1990 to 2016. The total incidence of VPI surgery was 33.3% and the fistula repair rate, 7.8%. Children with cleft of both the hard and soft palate (n = 300) had a VPI secondary surgery rate of 37.3% (fistula repair rate 10.7%), whereas children with only cleft of the soft palate (n = 123) had a corresponding rate of 23.6% (fistula repair rate 0.8%). Gender and primary palatoplasty technique were not considered significant factors in need for VPI surgery. The majority of VPI surgeries were performed before school age. One fifth of patients receiving speech-correcting surgery had more than one subsequent procedure. The need for speech-correcting surgery and fistula repair was related to the severity of the cleft. Although the majority of the corrective surgeries were done before the age of 7 years, a considerable number were performed at a later stage, necessitating long-term observation.

  15. Nasolabial appearance after two palatoplasty types in cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudnicki, A; Bronkhorst, E M; Nada, R; Dudkiewicz, Z; Kaminek, M; Katsaros, C; Fudalej, P S

    2014-05-01

    Facial appearance is important for normal psychosocial development in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP). There is conflicting evidence on how deficient maxillary growth may affect nasolabial esthetics. We retrospectively investigated nasolabial appearance in two groups, the Langenback (35 children; mean age 11.1 years; range: 7.9-13.6) and Vomerplasty (58 children; mean age 10.8 years; range: 7.8-14), who received unilateral CLP surgery by the same surgeon. The hard palate repair technique differed between the two groups. In the Langenback group, palatal bone on the non-cleft side only was left denuded, inducing scar formation and inhibiting maxillary growth. In the Vomerplasty group, a vomerplasty with tight closure of the soft tissues on the palate was applied. Thirteen lay judges rated nasolabial esthetics on photographs using a modified Asher-McDade's index. Nasolabial esthetics in both groups was comparable (p > 0.1 for each nasolabial component). Inferior view was judged as the least esthetic component and demonstrated mean scores 3.18 (SD = 0.63) and 3.13 (SD = 0.47) in the Langenback and Vomerplasty groups, respectively. Mean scores for other components were from 2.52 (SD = 0.63) to 2.81 (SD = 0.62). Regression analysis showed that vomerplasty is related with slight improvement in the nasal profile only (coefficient B = -0.287; p = 0.043; R(2 ) = 0.096). This study demonstrates that the use of vomerplasty instead of the Langenbeck technique is weakly associated with the nasolabial appearance among pre-adolescent patients with UCLP. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Application of palatal RB obturator in babies with isolated palatal cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojičić Julija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Isolated cleft of secondary palate has a specific clinical picture due to a wide communication between the mouth and nose cavity. As a consequence of that, babies born with this malformation are often subject to infections of the upper bronchial tubes, middle ear, speech disorders, and certainly the most difficult existential problem they face at the very beginning of their lives, the impossibility of suckling (breast feeding. Such babies have to be fed with gastric probe. The difficulties in their nutrition have often been described in literature, yet a singular attitude toward early orthodontic therapy has not been adopted still. The aim of the paper was to describe a design and application of obturator immediately after the birth of a baby with isolated palatal cleft, and the role in feeding. Case report. We presented a female neonate, born on 27th December 2007, with a wide fissure in the shape of the letter U over the entire secondary palate. The baby was referred to the Stomatology Clinic due to nutrition impossibility. To avoid feeding with gastric probe, the formation of RB obturator was performed (artificial palate. Hereby, the procedure of obturator making with an explanation of its function is presented. Conclusion. The application of RB obturator and the necessary education of parents have a major role in shortening the time of breast feeding and increasing the amount of food intake and, thus, for the normal growth and development of newborn infants with isolated palate cleft.

  17. Conventional bone-anchored palatal distractor using an orthodontic palatal expander for the transverse maxillary distraction osteogenesis: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Seiji; Haraguchi, Seiji; Aikawa, Tomonao; Yashiro, Kohtaro; Okura, Masaya; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2008-02-01

    Surgical-assisted rapid palatal expansion includes various treatment procedures for solving transverse maxillary deficiencies, especially in cases with a matured palatal suture. Recent introduction of the concept of distraction osteogenesis has contributed to generalize this useful treatment and to develop some bone-borne devices that will not cause the problems found in cases treated by tooth-supported palatal expander. This report shows a conventional bone-borne distractor using commercially available orthodontic palatal expansion screws. The distractor consists of 2 parts: one is a commercially available orthodontic palatal expansion screw (Hyrax type, Fan style) and another is a screw-ring, which is one of the attached parts of the mandibular distraction system. The bone screws are inserted transmucosally to the palatal bone via the screw-rings. The palatal distractor can be applied to varied palatal shapes and can expand the palate without any trouble. This conventional palatal distractor may contribute to generalize the transpalatal maxillary distraction osteogenesis for cases with maxillary teeth problems.

  18. A randomized controlled trial comparing two techniques for unilateral cleft lip and palate: Growth and speech outcomes during mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Praveen; Murthy, Jyotsna; Ulaghanathan, Navitha; Savitha, V H

    2015-07-01

    To study the growth and speech outcomes in children who were operated on for unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) by a single surgeon using two different treatment protocols. A total of 200 consecutive patients with nonsyndromic UCLP were randomly allocated to two different treatment protocols. Of the 200 patients, 179 completed the protocol. However, only 85 patients presented for follow-up during the mixed dentition period (7-10 years of age). The following treatment protocol was followed. Protocol 1 consisted of the vomer flap (VF), whereby patients underwent primary lip nose repair and vomer flap for hard palate single-layer closure, followed by soft palate repair 6 months later; Protocol 2 consisted of the two-flap technique (TF), whereby the cleft palate (CP) was repaired by two-flap technique after primary lip and nose repair. GOSLON Yardstick scores for dental arch relation, and speech outcomes based on universal reporting parameters, were noted. A total of 40 patients in the VF group and 45 in the TF group completed the treatment protocols. The GOSLON scores showed marginally better outcomes in the VF group compared to the TF group. Statistically significant differences were found only in two speech parameters, with better outcomes in the TF group. Our results showed marginally better growth outcome in the VF group compared to the TF group. However, the speech outcomes were better in the TF group. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment modalities of palatal impacted canines

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Ristoska, Sonja; Kovacevska, Ivona

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canine remains a challenge to today’s clinicians. The treatment of this clinical entity usually involves surgical exposure of the impacted tooth, followed by orthodontic traction to guide and align it into the dental arch. The impacted palatal canine requires a combination of both treatment modalities: orthodontic management and oral surgical treatment. Two types of approach are commonly used: simple exposure, or exposure with brac...

  20. Postanesthetic ulceration of palate: A rare complication

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ramesh; Garg, Meenu; Pawah, Salil; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    The routine dental practice involves various dental procedures which needs the application of local anesthetics. Generally, there are very few complications associated with these procedures. Complications such as tissue necrosis can occur following the rapid injection of local anesthetic solutions. Palate is a favorable site for soft tissue lesions, various factors such as direct effects of the drug, blanching of the tissues during injection, a relatively poor blood supply, and reactivation o...

  1. Food palatability, rheology, and meal patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are largely of dietary origin and reflect food choice. Food palatability, eating patterns, and food form are important determinants of choice and energy balance. A review of the literature provides a characterization of the roles of these determinants of feeding. Food palatability is the strongest predictor of intake where availability is not limiting. Whether the rewarding properties of palatable items lead to nonhomeostatic feeding and weight gain warrants further study. Positive energy balance is attributed to greater energy intake within eating events but also to a greater extent, increased eating frequency. Although the size and frequency of eating events may compensate for each other, interventions aimed at limiting the latter may be especially productive. One of the most marked dietary trends is an increase of energy derived from beverages. The weak dietary compensation that energy-yielding beverages elicit leads to positive energy balance. This, too, is a promising target for moderating energy intake. A better understanding of dietary factors promoting positive energy balance should reveal strategies for weight management.

  2. TCDD disrupts posterior palatogenesis and causes cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Hirata, Azumi; Sasabe, Eri; Yoshimura, Tomohide; Ohno, Seiji; Kitamura, Naoya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Dioxins (e.g. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD) cause cleft palate at a high rate. A post-fusional split may contribute to the pathogenesis, and tissue fragility may be a concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of TCDD on the palatal epithelium, bone and muscle, which contribute to tissue integrity. ICR mice (10-12 weeks old) were used. TCDD was administered on E12.5 at 40 mg/kg. Immunohistochemical staining for AhR, ER-α, laminin, collagen IV, osteopontin, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were performed. Furthermore, western blot analysis for osteopontin, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were performed to evaluate protein expression in the palatal tissue. Immunohistologically, there was little difference in the collagen IV and laminin localization in the palatal epithelium between control versus TCDD-treated mice. Runx2 and osteopontin immunoreactivity decreased in the TCDD-treated palatal bone, and MyoD and desmin decreased in the TCDD-treated palatal muscle. AhR and ER-α immunoreactivity were localized to the normal palatal bone, but ER-α was diminished in the TCDD-treated palate. On western blot analysis, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were all downregulated in the TCDD-treated palate. TCDD may suppress palatal osteogenesis and myogenesis via AhR, and cause cleft palates via a post-fusional split mechanism, in addition to a failure of palatal fusion. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. One-stage closure of isolated cleft palate with the Veau-Wardill-Kilner V to Y pushback procedure or the Cronin modification. IV. Cephalometric comparison of transverse dentofacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heliövaara, A

    1994-02-01

    The transverse dentofacial morphology of 116 consecutive patients with isolated cleft palate was studied by PA-headfilms at 17-20 years of age. One-stage soft and hard palate closure had been carried out at the mean age of 1.8 years using the Veau-Wardill-Kilner or the Cronin mucoperiosteal palatal V-Y pushback technique. In multivariate statistical analyses no significant findings were observed with regard to craniofacial measurements and operation method, additional palate operations, cleft extent at birth or associated minor anomalies. The effect of sex was consistently in the same direction with males having larger values. The bizygomatic width (Zydx-Zysin) was greater for those who had familial disposition for clefts. No asymmetries were detected.

  4. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  10. Estimation of soft- and hard-tissue thickness at implant sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anchorage control is a critical consideration when planning treatment for patients with dental and skeletal malocclusions. To obtain sufficient stability of implants, the thickness of the soft tissue and the cortical-bone in the placement site must be considered; so as to provide an anatomical map in order to assist the clinician in the placement of the implants. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the thickness of soft- and hard-tissue. Materials and Methods: To measure soft tissue and cortical-bone thicknesses, 12 maxillary cross-sectional specimens were obtained from the cadavers, which were made at three maxillary mid-palatal suture areas: The interdental area between the first and second premolars (Group 1, the second premolar and the first molar (Group 2, and the first and second molars (Group 3. Sectioned samples along with reference rulers were digitally scanned. Scanned images were calibrated and measurements were made with image-analysis software. We measured the thickness of soft and hard-tissues at five sectional areas parallel to the buccopalatal cementoenamel junction (CEJ line at 2-mm intervals and also thickness of soft tissue at the six landmarks including the incisive papilla (IP on the palate. The line perpendicular to the occlusal plane was made and measurement was taken at 4-mm intervals from the closest five points to IP. Results: (1 Group 1:6 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 2 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (2 Group 2:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 4 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (3 Group 3:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 8 mm from CEJ in palatal side. Conclusions: The best site for placement of implant is with thinnest soft tissue and thickest hard tissue, which is in the middle from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 1 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 2 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and faraway from CEJ in palatal

  11. Use of autologous platelet - Rich plasma in the treatment of intrabony defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath K Shetty

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of intrabony defects by autologous PRP gel alone caused significant soft tissue clinical improvement as well as hard tissue defect fill as evidenced by SSD view in spiral computed tomography.

  12. Parental satisfaction in Ugandan children with cleft lip and palate following synchronous lip and palatal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Anke; D'haeseleer, Evelien; Budolfsen, Dorte; Hodges, Andrew; Galiwango, George; Vermeersch, Hubert; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present case control study was to assess parental satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Ugandan children with complete unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP), who underwent a synchronous lip and palatal closure. The results are compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. The experimental group consisted of the parents or guardians of 44 Ugandan patients (21 males, 23 females) with complete unilateral or bilateral CLP (mean age: 3;1 years). The control group included the foster mothers of 44 orphan children matched by age and gender (mean age: 3;7 years). A survey based on the Cleft Evaluation Profile was used to assess the perceived satisfaction for individual features related to cleft care. Overall high levels of satisfaction were observed in the experimental group for all features (range: 56-100%). No significant differences could be established regarding age, gender, age of lip and palatal closure, cleft type or maternal vs. paternal judgments. In participants who were dissatisfied with the appearance of the lip, the time period between the cleft closure and the survey was significantly larger compared with satisfied participants. Furthermore, significantly lower levels of satisfaction were observed in the cleft group for speech and the appearance of the teeth and the nose compared with the control group. Satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Ugandan children with cleft lip and/or palate is important since normal esthetics and speech predominantly determine the children's social acceptance in the Ugandan society. As a result of reading this manuscript, the reader will be able to explain the attitudes of parents toward the surgical repair of their children's cleft lip and palate. As a result of reading this manuscript, the reader will be able to identify differences in parental attitudes toward synchronous lip and palate repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MSX-1 gene expression and regulation in embryonic palatal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, P; Greene, R M

    1998-01-01

    The palatal cleft seen in Msx-1 knock-out mice suggests a role for this gene in normal palate development. The cleft is presumed secondary to tooth and jaw malformations, since in situ hybridization suggests that Msx-1 mRNA is not highly expressed in developing palatal tissue. In this study we demonstrate, by Northern blot analysis, the expression of Msx-1, but not Msx-2, in the developing palate and in primary cultures of murine embryonic palate mesenchymal cells. Furthermore, we propose a role for Msx-1 in retinoic acid-induced cleft palate, since retinoic acid inhibits Msx-1 mRNA expression in palate mesenchymal cells. We also demonstrate that transforming growth factor beta inhibits Msx-1 mRNA expression in palate mesenchymal cells, with retinoic acid and transforming growth factor beta acting synergistically when added simultaneously to these cells. These data suggest a mechanistic interaction between retinoic acid, transforming growth factor beta, and Msx-1 in the etiology of retinoic acid-induced cleft palate.

  14. Early secondary alveoloplasty in cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Paolo; Marianetti, Tito M; Tedaldi, Massimiliano; Ramieri, Valerio; Cascone, Piero

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this study were to present a personal surgical technique throughout the review of international literature concerning surgical techniques, objectives, and outcomes in early secondary alveoloplasty and to describe our personal surgical techniques in alveolar bone defect repair in cleft lip and palate.Throughout a literature analysis, it is now settled that early secondary alveoloplasty could reestablish the continuity of alveolar bone and prevent upper dental arch collapse after presurgical orthopedic upper maxilla expansion; it also might give a good bone support for teeth facing the cleft and allow the eruption of permanent elements with the bone graft and rebalance the symmetry of dental arch, improve facial aesthetic, guarantee an adequate amount of bone tissue for a further prosthetic reconstruction with implant, and finally close the eventual oronasal fistula.The surgical technique we are presenting permitted a total number of 35 early secondary alveoloplasty on which a long-term follow-up is still taking place.We can assess that early secondary alveoloplasty must be performed before permanent canine eruption. Iliac crest is the suggested donor site for bone grafting; orthopedic and orthodontic treatments must be performed in association with surgery, and if there is the dental element agenesia, an implantation treatment must be considered.

  15. Long-term effects of palate repair on craniofacial morphology in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Fang; Mars, Michael

    2005-11-01

    To identify the long-term effects of palate repair on craniofacial growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Sri Lankan Cleft Lip and Palate Project. Forty-eight adults with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate, 29 men and 19 women, had lip repair only (LRO group). Fifty-eight adults with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate, 35 men and 23 women, had lip and palate repairs by the age of 9 (LPR group). Clinical notes were used to record surgical treatment histories. Cephalometry was used to determine craniofacial morphology. In the lip and palate repair group, the depth of the bony pharynx (Ba-PMP), the maxillary length at the alveolar level (PMP-A), the effective length of the maxilla (Ar-IZ, Ar-ANS, Ar-A), the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA), the anteroposterior jaw relation (ANS-N-Pog, ANB), and the overjet were smaller than in the lip repair only group. There were no significant differences in the maxillary length at the basal level (PMP-IZ, PMP-ANS) and the anterior and posterior maxillary heights (N-ANS and R-PMP, respectively) in the two groups. Palate repair inhibits the forward displacement of the basal maxilla and anteroposterior development of the maxillary dentoalveolus in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Palate repair has no detrimental effects on the downward displacement of the basal maxilla or on palatal remodeling in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  16. The effect of gamma radiation on hardness evolution in high density polyethylene at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pei-Yun; Chen, C.C.; Harmon, Julie P.; Lee, Sanboh

    2014-01-01

    This research focuses on characterizing hardness evolution in irradiated high density polyethylene (HDPE) at elevated temperatures. Hardness increases with increasing gamma ray dose, annealing temperature and annealing time. The hardness change is attributed to the variation of defects in microstructure and molecular structure. The kinetics of defects that control the hardness are assumed to follow the first order structure relaxation. The experimental data are in good agreement with the predicted model. The rate constant follows the Arrhenius equation, and the corresponding activation energy decreases with increasing dose. The defects that control hardness in post-annealed HDPE increase with increasing dose and annealing temperature. The structure relaxation of HDPE has a lower energy of mixing in crystalline regions than in amorphous regions. Further, the energy of mixing for defects that influence hardness in HDPE is lower than those observed in polycarbonate (PC), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly (hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (HEMA). This is due to the fact that polyethylene is a semi-crystalline material, while PC, PMMA and PHEMA are amorphous. - Highlights: • Hardness of HDPE increases with increasing gamma ray dose, annealing time and temperature. • The hardness change arises from defects in microstructure and molecular structure. • Defects affecting hardness follow a kinetics of structure relaxation. • The structure relaxation has a low energy of mixing in crystalline regime

  17. The effect of gamma radiation on hardness evolution in high density polyethylene at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Yun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Harmon, Julie P. [Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Lee, Sanboh, E-mail: sblee@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-01

    This research focuses on characterizing hardness evolution in irradiated high density polyethylene (HDPE) at elevated temperatures. Hardness increases with increasing gamma ray dose, annealing temperature and annealing time. The hardness change is attributed to the variation of defects in microstructure and molecular structure. The kinetics of defects that control the hardness are assumed to follow the first order structure relaxation. The experimental data are in good agreement with the predicted model. The rate constant follows the Arrhenius equation, and the corresponding activation energy decreases with increasing dose. The defects that control hardness in post-annealed HDPE increase with increasing dose and annealing temperature. The structure relaxation of HDPE has a lower energy of mixing in crystalline regions than in amorphous regions. Further, the energy of mixing for defects that influence hardness in HDPE is lower than those observed in polycarbonate (PC), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly (hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (HEMA). This is due to the fact that polyethylene is a semi-crystalline material, while PC, PMMA and PHEMA are amorphous. - Highlights: • Hardness of HDPE increases with increasing gamma ray dose, annealing time and temperature. • The hardness change arises from defects in microstructure and molecular structure. • Defects affecting hardness follow a kinetics of structure relaxation. • The structure relaxation has a low energy of mixing in crystalline regime.

  18. Automatic classification of defects in weld pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar Mikdad Muad; Mohd Ashhar Hj Khalid; Abdul Aziz Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2000-01-01

    With the advancement of computer imaging technology, the image on hard radiographic film can be digitized and stored in a computer and the manual process of defect recognition and classification may be replace by the computer. In this paper a computerized method for automatic detection and classification of common defects in film radiography of weld pipe is described. The detection and classification processes consist of automatic selection of interest area on the image and then classify common defects using image processing and special algorithms. Analysis of the attributes of each defect such as area, size, shape and orientation are carried out by the feature analysis process. These attributes reveal the type of each defect. These methods of defect classification result in high success rate. Our experience showed that sharp film images produced better results

  19. Automatic classification of defects in weld pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar Mikdad Muad; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Abdul Aziz Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2001-01-01

    With the advancement of computer imaging technology, the image on hard radiographic film can be digitized and stored in a computer and the manual process of defect recognition and classification may be replaced by the computer. In this paper, a computerized method for automatic detection and classification of common defects in film radiography of weld pipe is described. The detection and classification processes consist of automatic selection of interest area on the image and then classify common defects using image processing and special algorithms. Analysis of the attributes of each defect such area, size, shape and orientation are carried out by the feature analysis process. These attributes reveal the type of each defect. These methods of defect classification result in high success rate. Our experience showed that sharp film images produced better results. (Author)

  20. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  1. Addressing the challenges of cleft lip and palate research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mossey Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Indian sub-continent remains one of the most populous areas of the world with an estimated population of 1.1 billion in India alone. This yields an estimated 24.5 million births per year and the birth prevalence of clefts is somewhere between 27,000 and 33,000 clefts per year. Inequalities exist, both in access to and quality of cleft care with distinct differences in urban versus rural access and over the years the accumulation of unrepaired clefts of the lip and palate make this a significant health care problem in India. In recent years the situation has been significantly improved through the intervention of Non Governmental Organisations such as SmileTrain and Transforming Faces Worldwide participating in primary surgical repair programmes. The cause of clefts is multi factorial with both genetic and environmental input and intensive research efforts have yielded significant advances in recent years facilitated by molecular technologies in the genetic field. India has tremendous potential to contribute by virtue of improving research expertise and a population that has genetic, cultural and socio-economic diversity. In 2008, the World Health Organisation (WHO has recognised that non-communicable diseases, including birth defects cause significant infant mortality and childhood morbidity and have included cleft lip and palate in their Global Burden of Disease (GBD initiative. This will fuel the interest of India in birth defects registration and international efforts aimed at improving quality of care and ultimately prevention of non-syndromic clefts of the lip and palate.

  2. Detection of paint polishing defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeggiani, S.; Wagner, M.; Mazal, J.; Rosén, B.-G.; Dahlén, M.

    2018-06-01

    Surface finish plays a major role on perceived product quality, and is the first thing a potential buyer sees. Today end-of-line repairs of the body of cars and trucks are inevitably to secure required surface quality. Defects that occur in the paint shop, like dust particles, are eliminated by manual sanding/polishing which lead to other types of defects when the last polishing step is not performed correctly or not fully completed. One of those defects is known as ‘polishing roses’ or holograms, which are incredibly hard to detect in artificial light but are clearly visible in sunlight. This paper will present the first tests with a measurement set-up newly developed to measure and analyse polishing roses. The results showed good correlations to human visual evaluations where repaired panels were estimated based on the defects’ intensity, severity and viewing angle.

  3. Virtues and defects of peruvians colonial heritage

    OpenAIRE

    León, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This communication reports a study in 691 students (414 women, 277 men, 16-60 years old), who were asked to rate (on a scale of 0 to 4) ten virtues and ten defects of an average Peruvian. The virtues considered were hard-working, honest, enterprising, ambitious, thrifty, sympathetic, creative, tidy, proud, and wel.organized; the defects were lazy, corrupt, conformist, fatalist, spendthrift, individualist, passive, envious, inhibited, talkative. They were asked too to rate the influence of col...

  4. Two-stage palatoplasty, is it still a valuable treatment protocol for patients with a cleft of lip, alveolus, and palate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Karsten K H; Bardach, Janusz; Filippow, Daniel; Stahl-de Castrillon, Franka; Lenz, Jan-Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    good guidance of speech development can lead to satisfactory speech for cleft patients in whom the hard palate was closed at a later age. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prenatal cleft lip and maxillary alveolar defect repair in a 2-step fetal lamb model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Deprest, J.; Goetz, W.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Bergé, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: As there is no satisfying animal model simulating the complex cleft lip and palate anatomy in a standardized defect on one hand, and comprising the possibilities for extensive surgical procedures on the other hand, an improved fetal lamb model for cleft surgery was developed. MATERIALS AND

  6. Comparison of dental arch dimensions in models of preschool children with cleft lip/palate repaired by means of surgery alone versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhan, Ahmad S; Nawaya, Fehmieh R

    2016-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) anomaly is one of the most prevalent congenital defects causing disturbances of dental arch dimensions. This study aimed at investigating differences in these dimensions between preschool children with cleft lip/palate and a matched control group representing healthy individuals with normal occlusion (NO). The sample of this cross-sectional analytical study consisted of 108 plaster models of children aged from 4 to 5.5 years. They were divided into five groups: the cleft lip group, the cleft palate (CP) group, the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, and the NO group. The NO group was used as a control group. All cleft-affected children were treated only with surgery. Dental arch length and widths were measured. The dental arch dimensions of the cleft lip group were nearly similar to those in the controls. Moreover, the mandibular transverse widths of the CP group were close to those in the controls. However, the mandibular arch length and all maxillary dimensions of the CP group were smaller than those in the controls. In the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws and the maxillary transverse widths were smaller than those in the controls, whereas the mandibular transverse widths were similar to those in the controls. In the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws were close to those in the controls, but both arches were narrower than those in the controls. The various types of CLP were found to be associated with differences in most maxillary and some mandibular arch dimensions. These data can be used for cleft patient counseling and treatment planning.

  7. Weight Gain in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate without Use of Palatal Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Freitas, Renato; Lopes-Grego, Andrey Bernardo; Dietrich, Helena Luiza Douat; Cerchiari, Natacha Regina de Moraes; Nakakogue, Tabatha; Tonocchi, Rita; Gabardo, Juarez; da Silva, Éder David Borges; Forte, Antonio Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Goals/Background. To evaluate children's growth in the first year of life, who have cleft palate and lip, without the use of palatal plates. Materials/Method. Chart review was conducted, retrospectively, in the Center for Integral Assistance of Cleft Lip and Palate (CAIF), in Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. Results for both genders were compared to the data published by the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding average weight gain in children during their first year of life. Results. Patients with syndromic diagnosis and with cleft classified as preforamen were excluded, resulting in a final number of 112 patients: 56 male and 56 female. Similar patterns were seen comparing the two genders. Although it was observed weight gain below the average until the 11th month in male patients and until 9 months in female patients, both genders remained at the 50th percentile (p50) and improved after the 4th month of age for boys and the 9th month of age for girls. Conclusion. Children with cleft palate weigh less than regular children during their first months of life. At the end of the first year, weight gain is similar comparing normal and affected children. However, factors that optimized weight gain included choosing the best treatment for each case, proper guidance, and multiprofessional integrated care. PMID:23304489

  8. Comprehensive hard materials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive Hard Materials deals with the production, uses and properties of the carbides, nitrides and borides of these metals and those of titanium, as well as tools of ceramics, the superhard boron nitrides and diamond and related compounds. Articles include the technologies of powder production (including their precursor materials), milling, granulation, cold and hot compaction, sintering, hot isostatic pressing, hot-pressing, injection moulding, as well as on the coating technologies for refractory metals, hard metals and hard materials. The characterization, testing, quality assurance and applications are also covered. Comprehensive Hard Materials provides meaningful insights on materials at the leading edge of technology. It aids continued research and development of these materials and as such it is a critical information resource to academics and industry professionals facing the technological challenges of the future. Hard materials operate at the leading edge of technology, and continued res...

  9. Phonological Patterns Observed in Young Children with Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broen, Patricia A.; And Others

    The study examined the speech production strategies used by 4 young children (30- to 32-months-old) with cleft palate and velopharyngeal inadequacy during the early stages of phonological learning. All the children had had primary palatal surgery and were producing primarily single word utterances with a few 2- and 3-word phrases. Analysis of each…

  10. COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR THE CHILD WITH A CLEFT PALATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BENSEN, JACK F.; WHITE, FRAZER D.

    A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO CHILDREN WITH CLEFT PALATES IS DESCRIBED. THE SOUTH FLORIDA CLEFT PALATE CLINIC, REPRESENTING NINE PROFESSIONAL SPECIALTIES, MEETS WEEKLY TO SEE SIX OR SEVEN CASES. SPEECH PERFORMANCE IS RECORDED ON SIX DIAGNOSTIC, DATA COLLECTING FORMS WHICH PROVIDE A BASIS FOR RECORDING CLINICAL JUDGMENTS. PROGNOSIS AND…

  11. Perioperative adverse airway events in cleft lip and palate repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Airway-related problems account for the majority of anaesthetic morbidity in paediatric anaesthesia, but more so for cleft lip and palate repair. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency, pattern, management and outcome of adverse airway events during the perioperative period in cleft lip and palate ...

  12. Mucous retention cyst of the soft palate: a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S G; Lee, N J; Peckitt, N S

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a mucous retention cyst of the soft palate associated with an over-extended complete maxillary denture. The clinical and anatomical relevance of the fovea palatinae are discussed with respect to the posterior palatal seal and post-dam positioning.

  13. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented

  14. Palatalization and Intrinsic Prosodic Vowel Features in Russian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    The presented study is aimed at investigating the interaction of palatalization and intrinsic prosodic features of the vowel in CVC (consonant+vowel+consonant) syllables in Russian. The universal nature of intrinsic prosodic vowel features was confirmed with the data from the Russian language. It was found that palatalization of the consonants…

  15. Soft tissue molding technique in cleft lip and palate patient using laser surgery in combination with orthodontic appliance: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerasopon, Pornpat; Wangsrimongkol, Tasanee; Sattayut, Sajee

    2017-03-31

    Although surgical treatment protocols for cleft lip and palate patients have been established, many patients still have some soft tissue defects after complete healing from surgical interventions. These are excess soft tissue, high attached fraena and firmed tethering scares. These soft tissue defects resulted shallowing of vestibule, restricted tooth movement, compromised periodontal health and trended to limit the maxillary growth. The aim of this case report was to present a method of correcting soft tissue defects after conventional surgery in cleft lip and palate patient by using combined laser surgery and orthodontic appliance. A bilateral cleft lip and palate patient with a clinical problem of shallow upper anterior vestibule after alveolar bone graft received a vestibular extension by using CO 2 laser with ablation and vaporization techniques at 4 W and continuous wave. A customized orthodontic appliance, called a buccal shield, was placed immediately after surgery and retained for 1 month to 3 months until complete soft tissue healing. The procedures were performed 2 episodes. Both interventions used the same CO 2 laser procedure. The first treatment resulted in partial re-attachment of soft tissue at surgical area. The second laser operation with the proper design of buccal shield providing passive contact with more extended flange resulting in a favorable outcome from 1 year follow up. Then the corrective orthodontic treatment could be continued effectively. The CO 2 laser surgery was a proper treatment for correcting soft tissue defects and the design of buccal shield was a key for success in molding surgical soft tissue.

  16. Fibrotic encapsulation of orthodontic appliance in palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Jananni; Muthanandam, Sivaramakrishnan; Umapathy, Gubernath; Kannan, Anitha Logaranjani

    2017-01-01

    Iatrogenic trauma though not serious is very common in dental practice. Orthodontic treatment can inflict such injuries as they are prolonged over a long period of time. Ill-fabricated orthodontic appliances, such as wires and brackets, or the patients' habits such as application of constant pressure over the appliance can traumatize the adjacent oral soft tissues. In rare cases, these appliances can get embedded into the mucosa and gingival tissues. This case report describes one such case of iatrogenic trauma to the palatal mucosa due to entrapment of a tongue spike appliance and its surgical management.

  17. Iliac Crest Donor Site for Children With Cleft Lip and Palate Undergoing Alveolar Bone Grafting: A Long-term Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Sanders, Megan; Loo, Stanley; Moaveni, Zac; Bartlett, Glenn; Keall, Heather; Pinkerton, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The authors aimed to accurately assess the donor site morbidity from iliac crest bone grafts for secondary bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate alveolar defects. Fifty patients between 3 months and 10 years following alveolar bone grafting for cleft lip and palate were entered into the study. Two-thirds of patients had no significant concerns about the donor site. The remaining third had some concerns about the appearance of their hips and less than 10% of patients expressing strong agreement with statements about concerns with shape, appearance, and self-consciousness about the iliac crest donor site. Examination findings showed the average length of scar being 5.4 cm and a third of patients having some minor palpable boney irregularities of the iliac crest. The authors found that the alveolar crest donor site is well tolerated by patients long term but has a measurable morbidity long term.

  18. Clefting of the Alveolus: Emphasizing the Distinction from Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Nicholas; Sidman, James; Block, William

    2016-05-01

    Oral clefting is one of the most common significant fetal abnormalities. Cleft lip and cleft palate have drastically different clinical ramifications and management from one another. A cleft of the alveolus (with or without cleft lip) can confuse the diagnostic picture and lead to a false assumption of cleft palate. The cleft alveolus should be viewed on the spectrum of cleft lip rather than be associated with cleft palate. This is made evident by understanding the embryological development of the midface and relevant terminology. Cleft alveolus carries significantly different clinical implications and treatment options than that of cleft palate. Accurately distinguishing cleft alveolus from cleft palate is crucial for appropriate discussions regarding the patient's care. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Essential Palatal Tremor Managed by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Kitamura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Essential palatal tremor is a disorder of unknown etiology involving involuntary movement of the uvula and soft palate. Treatment attempts including drugs or surgery have been conducted to cease the rhythmical movement. Case Report. A 55-year-old female visited our department complaining of a sudden, noticeable, intermittent, and rhythmical clicking noise in her throat for five years. Oral examination revealed rhythmical contractions of the soft palate with clicking at the frequency of 120 per min. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination of the brain performed after consulting with the department of neuropathic internal medicine showed no abnormalities. Thus, essential palatal tremor was diagnosed. The symptoms improved with cognitive behavioral therapy without drugs or surgical treatments. The patient is now able to stop the rhythmical movement voluntarily. Discussion. Cognitive behavioral therapy might be suitable as first-line therapy for essential palatal tremor because the therapy is noninvasive.

  20. Palatal tremor after lithium and carbamazepine use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruvilla Anju

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Palatal tremor, characterized by rhythmic contractions of the soft palate, can occur secondary to pathology in the dentato-rubro-olivary pathway, or in the absence of such structural lesions. Its pathogenesis is only partially understood. We describe a case of probable drug-induced palatal tremor. Case presentation A 27-year-old Indian man had taken carbamazepine and lithium for 7 years for the treatment of a manic episode. He presented with a one-year history of bilateral rhythmic oscillations of his soft palate and tremors of his tongue. There were no other abnormalities detected from his examination or after detailed investigation. Conclusion Palatal tremors may result from medication used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  1. STRESS – THE RISK FACTOR IN THE LIP AND PALATE CLEFT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Blazej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Lip and palate cleft (cheilognathopalatoschisis is most often congenital defect that affects craniofacial region. It is characterized by a difficult clinical presentation.The etiology is multicausal and not yet fully understood. The examination of numerous etiological factors imposed the need to study the role of stress in the development of lip and palate cleft. This is all the more important for the socioeconomic factors that characterized our society in the last years, after bombardment, poverty, higher divorce rate, and more family violence. The aim of this paper was to establish the importance of stressful events and their role in the development of lip and palate cleft. The examination included children born from March 1999 (time of war in this area, till December 2003, as well as their mothers.The study group comprised 96 children with the lip and palate cleft anomaly, and the control one included 142 healthy children. The chosen examinees were not under the influence of other etiological factors, such as heritage. The examination was conducted using a questionnaire containing questions related to stressful situations in the first trimester of pregnancy. The questions were thus formed so as to be clear to mothers of different levels of education, without expert phrases,except in the cases where it was necessary. The statistical differences between the study and control group were determined using Pearson's χ2 test. In the first trimester, the mothers of the study group, in regard to the control group,statistically more often had fears or anxiety (p<0.01, disorganized emotional life(p<0.001, more often phychological harassment (p<0.001, and the presence of any kind of harassment (p<0.001. The presence of stress was also greater in the study group, on the significance borderline in relation to the control group.The stressful situations to which mothers of the study group were exposed are in correlation with the increase of the children

  2. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  3. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  4. Three-dimensional morphology of the palate in subjects with isolated cleft palate at the stage of permanent dentition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmahel, Zbyněk; Trefný, P.; Formánek, P.; Müllerová, Ž.; Peterka, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 6 (2003), s. 577-584 ISSN 1055-6656 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/99/0891 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : fourier transform profilometry * isolated cleft palate * palatal morphology Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 0.888, year: 2003

  5. Hardening in AlN induced by point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Mitchell, T.E.; Iseki, T.; Yano, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressureless-sintered AIN was neutron irradiated and the hardness change was examined by Vickers indentation. The hardness was increased by irradiation. When the samples were annealed at high temperature, the hardness gradually decreased. Length was also found to increase and to change in the same way as the hardness. A considerable density of dislocation loops still remained, even after the hardness completely recovered to the value of the unirradiated sample. Thus, it is concluded that the hardening in AIN is caused by isolated point defects and small clusters of point defects, rather than by dislocation loops. Hardness was found to increase in proportion to the length change. If the length change is assumed to be proportional to the point defect density, then the curve could be fitted qualitatively to that predicted by models of solution hardening in metals. Furthermore, the curves for three samples irradiated at different temperatures and fluences are identical. There should be different kinds of defect clusters in samples irradiated at different conditions, e.g., the fraction of single point defects is the highest in the sample irradiated at the lowest temperature. Thus, hardening is insensitive to the kind of defects remaining in the sample and is influenced only by those which contribute to length change

  6. Expression analyses of human cleft palate tissue suggest a role for osteopontin and immune related factors in palatal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L.P.; Borup, R.; Vestergaard, J.

    2009-01-01

    . Moreover, selected differentially expressed genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, and by immunohistochemical staining of craniofacial tissue from human embryos. Osteopontin (SPP1) and other immune related genes were significantly higher expressed in palate tissue from patients with CLP compared to CP...... and palate (CLP). In order to understand the biological basis in these cleft lip and palate subgroups better we studied the expression profiles in human tissue from patients with CL/P. In each of the CL/P subgroups, samples were obtained from three patients and gene expression analysis was performed...... and immunostaining in palatal shelves against SPP1, chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and serglycin (PRG1) in human embryonic craniofacial tissue were positive, supporting a role for these genes in palatal development. However, gene expression profiles are subject to variations during growth and therefore we recommend...

  7. MALT LYMPHOMA OF PALATE AND ORBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIANA ANDREA CIFUENTES NAVAS

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available TITLE: Malt palate and orbit lymphoma  Authors: CIFUENTES NAVAS-Viviana Andrea; MARTÍN PASCUAL- María Consolación; FERNÁNDEZ RODRÍGUEZ- Ana; ALONSO MESONERO- Marta; CHAVIANO GRAHJERA-Juan; MORAIS PÉREZ-Darío. INTRODUCTIONMALT-type lymphomas are lymphoid proliferations originated in the glandular epithelium of organs like the stomach, the salivary and lacrimal glands, and even, we can find lymphoid neoformations of non-epithelial localization, like in the orbital soft tissue. The lymphomas of the mucosal-associated lymphatic tissue (MALT represent only 0.2-0.3% and constitute a well-defined group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas of B origin. In the field of oral pathology, the salivary glands, tonsils and palate are mainly affected, it is more rare to find it in jugal mucosa.We present a rare case of MALT lymphoma with involvement of the palate and orbit. MATERIAL AND METHODS84-year-old patient with multiple pathologies. Derived from his primary care physician due to pharyngeal complaints of 4 to 5 days of evolution, associated with a painful palate lesion.He presented in right hemipaladar a tumoration of elastic consistency in submucosa, ulcerated in the center, with normal neck. Also left orbital tumor that limits the visual field. RESULTSCT and MRI of the neck report mass of 4x4 x2.5 cm in right hemipaladar, noninfiltrating concordant with possible lymphoma. The orbital MRI describes an intra and extra nasal left nasal lesion of 2.3x1.2x2 cm with characteristics consistent with lymphoma. CT of the neck: It demostrates a great mass of right hemipaladar, with lobulated contours and homogeneous enhancement of 40x32x25 mm, in intimate contact with medial pterygoid muscle, although there were no signs of infiltration, the rest of the edges being well delimited. Images characteristics look like a lymphoma, without being able to rule out other etiologies. MRI of the neck: It demostrates a diffuse thickening of right side of the soft palate that

  8. Myoepithelioma of the Palate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Morikawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Myoepithelioma, a benign tumor, occurs with a frequency of 1.5% among all salivary gland tumors, and it most commonly affects the parotid gland. Nearly the entire epithelium is composed of neoplastic myoepithelial cells exhibiting spindle, plasmacytic, epithelial-like, and clear cells. Case Report: A 52-year-old woman with myoepithelioma of the palate. The patient was referred to our hospital with a chief complaint of swelling on the right side of the palate. Following clinical and intraoral examinations, the tumor was removed under general anesthesia. Viewed microscopically, the tumor was seen to be surrounded by a fbrous membrane, primarily composed of a solid growth of neoplastic myoepithelial cells, virtually surrounding a hyaline-like eosinophilic substance. Immunohistochemical examination revealed strongly-positive reactions by the tumor cells for widespectrum cytokeratin (CK wide, vimentin, and S-100 proteins. CK 7, smooth muscle actin (SMA, p63, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP gave weakly-positive reactions. Conclusion: Based on the fndings, a pathological diagnosis of myoepithelioma was reached.

  9. Protesa Maksilofasial Thermoplastic Nylon (Valplast dengan Hollow Bulb (Klas III Aramany palate schisis hereditary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Azhindra

    2012-06-01

    hollow bulb thermoplastic nylon juga dapat mengembalikan estetik yang maksimal sehingga pasien dapat menambah kepercayaan dirinya serta mengembalikan keadaan psikologi pasien yang telah lama menurun.   Background: patients with palato schisis (clelf palate due to hereditary or congenital defect will be seen that cause speech disorders (nasal, swallowing, mastication, esthetic and psychological. Purpose: to inform the way rehabilitation defect in the face with a maxillofacial prosthesis thermoplastic nylon with hollow bulb that is useful to restore the fuction of speech, swallowing, mastication, esthetics, and psychiatric patients. Case and handling:  46-yearold male patient came to RSGM Prof. Soedomo referral from Dr. Sardjito hospital. When patient come to feel annoyed talking, chewing ang swallowing due to the precence cleft palate is open and is a congential abnormality accompanied with loss of many teeth. Obturator is made immediately by considering the closure of cleft palate, using a lighter material (using a hollow bulb with retention, stabilization and occlusion of the right and restore normal nendekati face shape. Hollow bulb is a cavity created in maxillofacial, prosthesis, to close the oral cavity, nasal cavity and the defect.at the time of insetation examined retention, stabilization, occlusion, esthetics and pronunciation. Control was performed 1 week and 1 month after application. The results of the examination and evaluation after 1 week and 1 month after the use of hollow bulb know maxillofacial prostheses retentation, stabilization, occlusion and better pronunciation. Conclusion:  maxillofacial prostheses after using thermoplastic nylon with hollow bulb in patients with palate scisis, patients can speak and chew normaly. Maxillofacial prostheses nylon thermoplastic hollow bulb can also restore the maximum aesthetic, especially in the lose of anterior teeth with retention or grip that can mimic the gingival so the patient increase self confidence and

  10. A multi-ethnic genome-wide association study identifies novel loci for non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate on 2p24.2, 17q23 and 19q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Carlson, Jenna C; Shaffer, John R

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs), which include non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), are among the most common birth defects in humans, affecting approximately 1 in 700 newborns. CL/P is phenotypically heterogeneous and has a complex etiology caused by genetic and environmental fac...

  11. Detection and defect correction of operating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasendina, Elena; Plotnikova, Inna; Levitskaya, Anastasiya; Kvesko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the current problem of enterprise competitiveness rise in hard and competitive terms of business environment. The importance of modern equipment for detection of defects and their correction is explained. Production of chipboard is used as an object of research. Short description and main results of estimation efficiency of innovative solutions of enterprises are considered. (paper)

  12. Craniofacial morphology in unoperated infants with isolated cleft palate. A cephalometric analysis in three projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N.V.; Kreiborg, S.; Jensen, B.L.

    58th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, Minneapolis, Craniofacial morphology, unoperated infants, isolated cleft palate, cephalometric analysis, three projections......58th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, Minneapolis, Craniofacial morphology, unoperated infants, isolated cleft palate, cephalometric analysis, three projections...

  13. Speech and language development in toddlers with and without cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priester, G. H.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S. M.

    Objective: The effect of early palate closure on speech and language development in children with cleft palate. Design: Comparative study. Setting: University Medical Center Groningen, Cleft Palate Team (The Netherlands). Materials and methods: Forty-three toddlers with cleft palate and thirty-two

  14. Induced spherococcoid hard wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Sh.

    1981-01-01

    A mutant has been obtained - a spheroccocoid line -through irradiation of hard wheat seed with fast neutrons. It is distinguished by semispherical glumes and smaller grain; the plants have low stem with erect leaves but with shorter spikes and with lesser number of spikelets than those of the initial cultivar. Good productive tillering and resistance to lodging contributed to 23.5% higher yield. The line was superior to the standard and the initial cultivars by 14.2% as regards protein content, and by up to 22.8% - as to flour gluten. It has been successfully used in hybridization producing high-yielding hard wheat lines resistant to lodging, with good technological and other indicators. The possibility stated is of obtaining a spherococcoid mutant in tetraploid (hard) wheat out of the D-genome as well as its being suited to hard wheat breeding to enhance protein content, resistance to lodging, etc. (author)

  15. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  16. Hard coal; Steinkohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, Kai van de; Sitte, Andreas-Peter [Gesamtverband Steinkohle e.V., Herne (Germany)

    2013-04-01

    The year 2012 benefited from a growth of the consumption of hard coal at the national level as well as at the international level. Worldwide, the hard coal still is the number one energy source for power generation. This leads to an increasing demand for power plant coal. In this year, the conversion of hard coal into electricity also increases in this year. In contrast to this, the demand for coking coal as well as for coke of the steel industry is still declining depending on the market conditions. The enhanced utilization of coal for the domestic power generation is due to the reduction of the nuclear power from a relatively bad year for wind power as well as reduced import prices and low CO{sub 2} prices. Both justify a significant price advantage for coal in comparison to the utilisation of natural gas in power plants. This was mainly due to the price erosion of the inexpensive US coal which partly was replaced by the expansion of shale gas on the domestic market. As a result of this, the inexpensive US coal looked for an outlet for sales in Europe. The domestic hard coal has continued the process of adaptation and phase-out as scheduled. Two further hard coal mines were decommissioned in the year 2012. RAG Aktiengesellschaft (Herne, Federal Republic of Germany) running the hard coal mining in this country begins with the preparations for the activities after the time of mining.

  17. Five surgical maneuvers on nasal mucosa movement in cleft palate repair: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dennis C; Patel, Kamlesh B; Parikh, Rajiv P; Skolnick, Gary B; Woo, Albert S

    2016-06-01

    This biomechanical study aims to characterize the nasal mucosa during palatoplasty, thereby describing the soft tissue attachments at different zones and quantifying movement following their release. Palatal nasal mucosa was exposed and divided in the midline in 10 adult cadaver heads. Five consecutive maneuvers were performed: (1) elevation of nasal mucosa off the maxilla, (2) dissection of nasal mucosa from soft palate musculature, (3) separation of nasal mucosa from palatine aponeurosis, (4) release of mucosa at the pterygopalatine junction, and (5) mobilization of vomer flaps. The mucosal movements across the midline at the midpalate (MP) and posterior nasal spine (PNS) following each maneuver were measured. At the MP, maneuvers 1-4 cumulatively provided 3.8 mm (36.9%), 4.9 mm (47.6%), 6.1 mm (59.2%), and 10.3 mm, respectively. Vomer flap (10.5 mm) elevation led to mobility equivalent to that of maneuvers 1-4 (p = 0.72). At the PNS, cumulative measurements after maneuvers 1-4 were 1.3 mm (10%), 2.4 mm (18.6%), 5.7 mm (44.2%), and 12.9 mm. Here, vomer flaps (6.5 mm) provided less movement (p < 0.001). Maneuver 4 yielded the greatest amount of movement of the lateral nasal mucosa at both MP (4.2 mm, 40.8%) and PNS (7.2 mm, 55.8%). At the MP, complete release of the lateral nasal mucosa achieves as much movement as the vomer flap. At the hard-soft palate junction, the maneuvers progressively add to the movement of the lateral nasal mucosa. The most powerful step is release of attachments along the posterior aspect of the medial pterygoid. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Novel levocetirizine HCl tablets with enhanced palatability: synergistic effect of combining taste modifiers and effervescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labib GS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gihan S Labib1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt Objectives: Levocetirizine HCl, a second-generation piperazine derivative and H1-selective antihistaminic agent, possesses few side effects. The first objective of the study was to compare and evaluate the taste-masking effect of different ratios of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and mannitol on levocetirizine HCl using an inclusion complex and solid dispersion, respectively. The second objective was to study the possibility of preparing and evaluating effervescent tablets from the best-chosen taste-masked blends for the purpose of their use either as orodispersible tablets or as water-soluble effervescent tablets, according to patients’ will.Materials and methods: Prepared taste-masked blends were prepared and subjected to palatability, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Tablets containing different percentages of effervescent mixtures were prepared by direct compression on the selected taste-modified blends. Evaluation tests were conducted, including flowability and compressibility on the precompressed blends and hardness, friability, wetting time, effervescent time, in vitro, in vivo disintegration time, and in vitro dissolution study on the compressed tablets. Formulated tablets were evaluated and compared to marketed orodispersible tablets for mouth feel and palatability.Results: All prepared tablets showed convenient physical and palatability properties compared to the selected brand. The in vitro drug-release study revealed fast release of levocetirizine HCl within 5 minutes from all prepared tablets.Conclusion: Levocetirizine HCl effervescent tablets are likely to increase patient compliance with drug administration. Moreover, the use of these

  19. Novel levocetirizine HCl tablets with enhanced palatability: synergistic effect of combining taste modifiers and effervescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Gihan S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Levocetirizine HCl, a second-generation piperazine derivative and H1-selective antihistaminic agent, possesses few side effects. The first objective of the study was to compare and evaluate the taste-masking effect of different ratios of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and mannitol on levocetirizine HCl using an inclusion complex and solid dispersion, respectively. The second objective was to study the possibility of preparing and evaluating effervescent tablets from the best-chosen taste-masked blends for the purpose of their use either as orodispersible tablets or as water-soluble effervescent tablets, according to patients’ will. Materials and methods Prepared taste-masked blends were prepared and subjected to palatability, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Tablets containing different percentages of effervescent mixtures were prepared by direct compression on the selected taste-modified blends. Evaluation tests were conducted, including flowability and compressibility on the precompressed blends and hardness, friability, wetting time, effervescent time, in vitro, in vivo disintegration time, and in vitro dissolution study on the compressed tablets. Formulated tablets were evaluated and compared to marketed orodispersible tablets for mouth feel and palatability. Results All prepared tablets showed convenient physical and palatability properties compared to the selected brand. The in vitro drug-release study revealed fast release of levocetirizine HCl within 5 minutes from all prepared tablets. Conclusion Levocetirizine HCl effervescent tablets are likely to increase patient compliance with drug administration. Moreover, the use of these effervescent tablets in an orodispersible dosage form can improve oral drug bioavailability and act as an attractive pediatric dosage form. PMID:26379426

  20. Assessing an avoidable and dispensable reoperative entity: Self-referred flawed cleft lip and palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroglou, Pericles; Tsimponis, Antonis; Goula, Olga-Christina; Demiri, Efterpi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is comprised within the wide range of congenital deformities of the maxillofacial region with an overall incidence on the increase from 1:1000 to 1:700 live births thus being the most common congenital birth error. Failure of the lateral and medial nasal processes to fuse with the anterior extension of maxillary processes and of the palatal shelves between the 4th and 8th gestational week results in cleft lip and palate. Clefts include different types with variable severity, confirming the complexity and unpredictable expression of cleft modality and have a multifactorial aetiology. Functional impairment, aesthetic disturbances and psychosocial effects are common sequalae in patients with cleft lip and palate. The main long-term morbidity of this condition may include dysfunctional speech, impaired hearing and communication, as well as dental problems. These complications are followed by unfavourable surgical outcome and aesthetic appearance, which all seem to affect this group of patients significantly and have an impact significantly both quality of life and healthcare. Treatment requirements of cleft patients are multifactorial and a multi-disciplinary approach and intervention at multiple levels is necessary. Yet, in this country, resources available to parents and consistent publicity given to this issue and its treatment are still inadequate in spite of the introduction of "Centres of Excellence" and Unified Hospitalization Coding or DRG equivalents to optimize health management. The multi-disciplinary approach to cleft management has been a reality for over a century while cleft treatment protocols are still being evaluated in order to optimise standards of cleft care. According to relevant guidelines primary surgical management of lip and palate defects is performed during the first 3 to 9 months of life. Secondary operations in the form of revisional lip and nose procedures are performed at later stages aiming with an

  1. Cause analysis, prevention, and treatment of postoperative restlessness after general anesthesia in children with cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Hao; Mei, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Li-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital malformations of the oral and maxillofacial region, with an incidence rate of around 0.1%. Early surgical repair is the only method for treatment of a cleft lip and palate. However, because of the use of inhalation anesthesia in children and the physiological characteristics of the cleft palate itself combined with the particularities of cleft palate surgery, the incidence rate of postoperative emergence agitation (EA) in cleft palate surgery ...

  2. Oral delivery of medications to companion animals: palatability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Avinash G

    2004-06-23

    There is an increased need for highly palatable solid oral dosage forms for companion animals, which are voluntarily accepted by the dog or cat, either from a feeding bowl or from the outstretched hand of the pet owner. Such dosage forms represent an emerging trend in companion animal formulations with major impact on medical needs such as convenience and compliance, particularly for chronically administered medications, and on marketing needs such as product differentiation. This review focuses on the science of taste, food and flavor preferences of dogs and cats, and palatability testing, in the context of applying these principles to the development of an oral palatable tablet for companion animals.

  3. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaila Masih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient′s weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury.

  4. Cleft Palate Fistula Closure Utilizing Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emodi, Omri; Ginini, Jiriys George; van Aalst, John A; Shilo, Dekel; Naddaf, Raja; Aizenbud, Dror; Rachmiel, Adi

    2018-03-01

    Fistulas represent failure of cleft palate repair. Secondary and tertiary fistula repair is challenging, with high recurrence rates. In the present retrospective study, we review the efficacy of using acellular dermal matrix as an interposition layer for cleft palate fistula closure in 20 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2016. Complete fistula closure was obtained in 16 patients; 1 patient had asymptomatic recurrent fistula; 2 patients had partial closure with reduction of fistula size and minimal nasal regurgitation; 1 patient developed a recurrent fistula without changes in symptoms (success rate of 85%). We conclude that utilizing acellular dermal matrix for cleft palate fistula repair is safe and simple with a high success rate.

  5. Two rare entities in the same palate lesion: hyalinizing-type clear cell carcinoma and necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Rabia Bozdoğan; Kara, Tuba; Porgali, Canan; Serinsoz, Ebru; Polat, Ayse; Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Ozcan, Cengiz

    2014-05-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma is a low-grade malignant epithelial neoplasm of the salivary glands. The tumor has epithelial cells and lacks myoepithelial cells. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting lesion of the salivary glands. The clinical and histologic features mimic those of mucoepidermoid carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. The importance of these entities are the rarity of both of them and their potential to be misdiagnosed as other lesions. Pathologists and clinicians should be aware of these entities to prevent misdiagnosis. This is the first clinical report of 2 rare and consecutive different entities of the same location on the hard palate to our knowledge.

  6. The effects of palatal lengthening on the functional and speech outcomes after submucous cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Abdelrahman E M; El-Begermy, Marwa M; Eid, Mustafa I; Akel, Mabrouk M

    2016-02-29

    This study was designed to compare intravelar veloplasty with and without V-Y pushback palatoplasty regarding postoperative functional and speech outcomes. is to find out the importance and influence of palatal lengthening on the functional and speech outcomes after SMCP repair. This is a prospective randomized comparative study of 20 patients divided into 2 equal groups. The study was conducted between February 2008 and January 2015. Radical Intravelar Veloplasty (RIVVP group): included 10 patients with a mean age of 5.539±1.335 years and V-Y Pushback Pharyngoplasty and Radical Intravelar Veloplasty (VYP+RIVVP group): included 10 patients with a mean age of 5.688±1.341 years for non-syndromic SMCP. Academic tertiary care medical centres. In both groups there was a significant change in Eustachian tube function, nasal emission and nasal tone of voice postoperatively than preoperatively, while there was no significant difference between both groups in the postoperative outcomes as regards the same parameters (ET function, nasal emission and resonance) (p=0.558, 0.563 and 0.164 respectively). However, there was a significant difference between both groups as regards palatal lengthening, no statistically significant difference was present between both groups as regards the postoperative mean pharyngeal gap, using videoendoscopic analysis. In conclusion, RIVVP and VYP+RIVVP are both effective methods to repair non-syndromic SMCP. Moreover, the lengthening of the palate in non-syndromic SMCP is an unnecessary process.

  7. Eating habits of patients with cleft lip and palate terated with fixed appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Cudziło, Dorota; Kawala, Beata; Kopczyński, Przemysław

    2014-01-01

    Health education, built on the basis of various models as a lifelong process, has a considerable impact on eating habits. Correct nutritional patterns are particularly important during the period of intense growth and adolescence. The need to observe dietary recommendations concerns healthy, as well as sick persons, especially those with chronic diseases. To-date the data on the dietary habits of patients with cleft lip and palate during orthodontic treatment have been scarce. The objective of the study was to determine the eating habits of patients with cleft lip and palate before and during orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. The study covered 125 patients with cleft lip and palate, aged 14 to 31. The research tool was an own questionnaire assessing the dietary behaviour and oral hygiene habits during the treatment with a fixed orthodontic appliance. In the course of the orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance, 79 patients (57.6%) did not change their eating patterns and 32 patients (24%) changed them to a moderate degree. The mean of 53 patients (42.7%) changed their hygienic habits considerably. The number of meals remained the same, however in the period when patients suffered pain after orthodontic adjustment appointments, the number of persons having 4-5 meals a day decreased by 32%. It is worth considering that no statistically significant changes were recorded as regards the habit of having sweet snacks and the insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables. Difficulties with correct oral hygiene were reported after the consumption of e.g. spinach (59.8%), cucumber (57.6%), berries (54.4%), meat (58.2%). Eating habits of a considerable percentage of patients with a cleft defect, before or during the treatment with a fixed appliance, do not comply with healthy nutrition recommendations. The dietary education of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment is necessary to ensure proper oral health and prevent diet-related illnesses.

  8. Frequency and socio-psychological impact of taunting in school-age patients with cleft lip-palate surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorot-Marchand, A; Guerreschi, P; Pellerin, P; Martinot, V; Gbaguidi, C C; Neiva, C; Devauchelle, B; Frochisse, C; Poli-Merol, M L; Francois-Fiquet, C

    2015-07-01

    Cleft lip-palate (CLP) is a "social" pathology because of its impact on the child's facial appearance and speech. School is the first place where children are confronted to others and when they start socializing. Taunting and bullying are common and their psychological impact remains hard to assess. The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of taunting in school and its impact in CLP patients who had surgical repair. We conducted a multicenter prospective study where we consecutively included patients ≥ 12 years who had CLP repair. During a multidisciplinary consultation they were asked to complete a questionnaire (3 parts: surgical outcomes, taunting and its impact, socio-economic status) previously approved by our psychologists. 55 patients were included (37 B, 18 G) (mean age 15.5 years): 11 CL, 13 CP and 31 CLP. 69% of patients reported having suffered from taunting and peer victimization in school. In 84% of the cases, taunting was linked to the CLP defect itself. The teasing started in primary school to reach a peak of aggressiveness in middle school. 42% of patients reported that bullying occurred at least once a day (16/38). Regarding the psychological impact of taunting, 50% of patients reported sadness, 31% depression and 26.3% were marked for life. At one time or another 29% of patients did not want to attend school because of the teasing. The grade retention rate amounted to 37.7% (20/53), and 2 patients were in special education classes. As a matter of fact, 50% of these children repeated their 1st or 2nd year of primary school. Furthermore, 47% of patients wanted to change something to their face, but 63% of them never spoke to their surgeon about additional surgeries even though they were teased in school. Taunting is common in children with CLP. This study highlights the high frequency and impact of taunting on the daily lives and self-perception of patients with CLP or CLP repair. It is important for healthcare professionals to be

  9. Ophthalmic changes in cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Sólia Násser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The current study aimed to analyze through a literature review evidence of association between ocular changes and non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCL/P. A literature review was carried out in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration Group protocol. PubMed, Scopus, Academic Google and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically searched. A total of 16 studies were accessed, and three made up the final sample.All three studied ocular abnormalities in patients with NSCL/P.The articles found ocular abnormalities in 6.21%, 17.54% and 1.03% of patients respectively.The presence of ocular abnormalities in patients with NSCL/P was significant in this systematic review, but the articles all agreed that future studies should explore the possibility of a greater occurrence of ocular changes in individuals with NSCL/P.

  10. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, Sowmya [V.S Dental College and Hospital, Karnataka (India); Ramnarayan BK [Dayanada Sagar College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Karnataka (India)

    2011-03-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  11. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Sowmya; Ramnarayan BK

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  12. Palatal Fibroma - A Case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooque Khan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibroma is a benign tumor of fibrous connective tissue. Fibromas represent inflammatory state rather than neoplastic conditions, which  are mostly sessile or slightly pendunculated with a smooth contour, pale pink and are  firm in consistency, which commonly  occurs on gingiva, tongue, buccal mucosa and palate. Cinical, radiographic and histopathologic data combined with surgical findings are though essential, but it requires further studies to determine the exact nature of such fibromatous lesions. A multidisciplinary approach is needed in the management of ffibrtous lesions, so as to minimize its recurrence and to improve the quality of life, providing better  functioning and esthetics.JCMS Nepal. 2016;12(1:36-9.

  13. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kaori [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshizaki, Keigo [Section of Orthodontics, Division of Oral Health, Growth and Development, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arai, Shinsaku [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sanui, Terukazu [Section of Periodontology, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshiga, Daigo [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Nakamura, Seiji [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  14. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. → We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. → Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. → Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  15. Palatal myoclonus: report of two cases Mioclonia palatal: relato de dois casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIORGIO FABIANI

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of palatal myoclonus (PM, one essential and another secondary to a stroke. Case 1: a 64 years old female who developed clicking sounds in both ears after a stroke and three years later on noticed a progressive involuntary movement of the throat associated with rhythmic contractions of the soft palate, muscles of tongue and throat. MRI showed an ischemic area in brainstem. The patient had a partial response to the use of sumatriptan 6 mg subcutaneously. Case 2: a 66 years old female who began with ear clicking at left ear that worsed slowly associated with tinnitus and arrhythmic movements of soft palate and an audible click at left ear. Brain MRI was normal; audiometry showed bilateral neurosensory loss. She was prescribed clonazepan 1 mg daily with complete recovery. Primary and secondary palatal myoclonus share the same clinical features but probably have different pathophysiological underlying mechanisms.Descrevemos dois casos de mioclonia palatal (MP, um essencial e o outro secundário a acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. Caso1: mulher de 64 anos que desenvolveu cliques audíveis em ambos os ouvidos após um AVC e que três anos depois começou a apresentar movimentos involuntários do pálato, músculos do língua e garganta. A ressonância magnética (RNM mostrou áreas de isquemia no tronco cerebral. A paciente apresentou resposta parcial e não duradoura ao uso subcutâneo de 6 mg de sumatriptano. Caso 2: mulher de 66 anos, com cliques audíveis no ouvido esquerdo que pioraram progressiva e lentamente associados com tinitus e movimentos mais ou menos rítmicos do pálato mole. A RNM encefálica era normal. A audiometria mostrou perda neurossensorial bilateral. Foi medicada com 1,0 mg de clonazepan diariamente com completa recuperação. MP primária e secundária compartilham das mesmas características clínicas, mas evidências sugerem que se devam a diferentes mecanismos fisiopatológicos.

  16. The Prevalence of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate and Related Risk Factors among Iranian Children from 2000 to 2016: a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Jafari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCleft lip and cleft palate (also, known as or facial clefts, are amongst the most common congenital deformities affecting the jaw and face as well as the most common defects associated with lip and palate. Thus, the current study was an attempt to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of or facial clefts in Iranian children.Materials and Methods:The present study, was conducted through a systematic search for articles recorded in the internal database (SID, IranMedex and Magiran, and external authoritative databases (Google scholar, PubMed, Science Direct, MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE using the keywords including "cleft lip", "Iranian", "cleft palate", and "children" from 2000 to 2016. Then, 61 articles were collected. 47 studies with associated incidence or prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate were included.Results:According to the findings of the review of the studies conducted in Iran, it is revealed that the prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate was from 0.78 to 2.14 in Iranian children. It was revealed that several factors contributing to the development of this disorder consist of Family history ( P< 0.001, Antibiotics, ( P< 0.001, Stress in the first trimester of pregnancy (P=0.048, BMI before pregnancy (P=0.036 Seasonal factors (P= 0.03, and Consanguineous marriage (P=0.02.ConclusionAccording to the results of the present study, the prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate is high in Iran in comparison with international studies. Furthermore, the prevalence of this disorder is reported to be higher in males than females. Therefore, it is recommended arrange the practical programs in order to help parents eliminate or diminish the factors that affect the prevalence of this disorder and complications.

  17. The Use of CAD/CAM Trial Pattern for Facial Prosthesis Fabrication of a Maxillofacial Patient with Large Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ariani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of maxillofacial patients needs a multidisciplinary approach of several expertise based on the complexityof the case. Prosthodontists often work together with e.g. ENT, oral or plastic surgeons to provide patient with betterprosthesis and optimum treatment. Case report: A 55 years old male was referred to Dental Teaching Hospital ofUniversitas Indonesia for facial prosthesis fabrication. Patient had undergone squamous cell carcinoma ablationsurgery that encompassed nose, cheek, sinuses, upper lip and most of the hard palate. Due to the extensive natureof the defect, Department of Prosthodontics collaborated with Department of Biomedical Engineering to employ3D printing technique using general purpose machine for fabricating the trial pattern for the prosthesis, withattention given especially to margin areas and facial contours. This technique helps for prosthesis fabrication ofthis patient because manual wax carving is no longer necessary. Wax carving usually is a labor/skill intensive stepand takes longer time. Conclusion: 3D printing of the trial pattern for the prosthesis help minimizes the labor/skill intensive part of facial prosthesis fabrication.

  18. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  19. Nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate: Evidence of linkage to a microsatellite marker on 6p23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinci, F.; Pezzetti, F.; Scapoli, L.; Padula, E.; Baciliero, U.; Curioni, C.; Tognon, M.

    1995-01-01

    Nonsydromic cleft lip with or without secondary clefting of the palate (CL+/{minus}P) is one of the most common birth defects. A previous linkage study concerning CL+/{minus}P and cleft palate (CP) families indicated chromosome 6p, near F13A locus, as a possible region for the presence of a clefting gene. More recently, another linkage study performed on a sample of 12 families with nonsyndromic CL+/{minus}P seemed to exclude this association. To test the hypothesis on the possible presence of a major gene on chromosome 6p, we carried out a study on a large sample (21) of CL+/{minus}P families from northeastern Italy. In conclusion, our investigation can be summarized as follows: (i) CL+/{minus}P disease appears to be heterogeneous; (ii) {approximately}66% of the pedigrees showed an autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance; and (iii) CL+/{minus}P locus maps on 6p23 very close to or at the microsatellite marker D6S89. To verify whether the D6S89 is the closest marker to the CL+/{minus}P locus, additional examinations with new markers are underway. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  1. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  2. Economic Analysis of Cleft Palate Repair in International Adoptees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson-Hansen, Sandra; Paliga, J Thomas; Tahiri, Youssef; Paine, Kaitlyn M; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-09-01

    Retrospective cohort study. Major international tertiary care referral center for cleft palate repair. One hundred thirty-eight patients at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who had palate repair performed between 2010 and 2013, excluding syndromic patients, patients undergoing palate revision, and patients with incomplete payment information. None. Fees and charges for procedures. Surgeon payment was significantly higher for international adoptees (Δ = $2047.51 [$128.35 to $3966.66], P = .038). Medicaid-adjusted surgeon payments averaged $1006 more for adoptees ([-$394.19 to $2406.98], P = .158). Hospital and anesthesiology costs for adoptee palate repair were highly variable but did not differ significantly from those for nonadoptees. Partly due to payer mix, surgeon reimbursement was somewhat higher for international adoptees. No difference in total payment was found.

  3. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  4. Cross-linguistic perspectives on speech assessment in cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Henningsson, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    . Finally, the influence of different languages on some aspects of language acquisition in young children with cleft palate is presented and discussed. Until recently, not much has been written about cross linguistic perspectives when dealing with cleft palate speech. Most literature about assessment......This chapter deals with cross linguistic perspectives that need to be taken into account when comparing speech assessment and speech outcome obtained from cleft palate speakers of different languages. Firstly, an overview of consonants and vowels vulnerable to the cleft condition is presented. Then......, consequences for assessment of cleft palate speech by native versus non-native speakers of a language are discussed, as well as the use of phonemic versus phonetic transcription in cross linguistic studies. Specific recommendations for the construction of speech samples in cross linguistic studies are given...

  5. Management of Cleft Lip and Palate in Nigeria: A Survey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-20

    Mar 20, 2017 ... Background: Clefts of the lip and/or palate are the most common congenital craniofacial ... in the number of surgeons, but the training, scope, and standard of care remain ... specialist fellowship qualifications, 6 others (8.6%).

  6. Selected aspects of the oral environment in cleft palate patients – a problem evidently beyond dentists’ scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna AntoszewskaABCD

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The oral cavity is a specialized ecosystem composed of dentition and mucosa exposed to the effects of saliva and gingival liquid. Its structure provides advantageous conditions for various microorganisms, both aerobic streptococci and anaerobic bacilli. The dynamic balance of the oral cavity ecosystem can be threatened by various factors. Lip and palatal clefts are the most frequent disorders in embryonic facial development. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus and oral cavity hygiene in patients with cleft palate treated orthodontically are significantly different compared with patients without these congenital malformations.Material/Methods:The study group consisted of 200 patients aged 6–21 who were divided into two groups depending on the presence of cleft palate and treatment method. Group C (control consisted of 50 orthodontically untreated patients with occlusal dental defects. The performed studies consisted of 2 parts: the clinical-laboratory part and statistical analysis.Clinical-laboratory partResults:High bacteria levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus in saliva of patients were comparably frequent between groups, but there were statistically significant differences in inter-group comparisons.Conclusions:As the orthodontic treatment changes the oral environment, control of proper hygienic behavior is an essential element of health education. Introduction of preventive programs is also very important.

  7. A Population-Based Exploration of the Social Implications Associated with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glener, Adam D; Allori, Alexander C; Shammas, Ronnie L; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert; Pimenta, Luiz; Strauss, Ronald; Watkins, Stephanie; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2017-06-01

    Clefts of the lip and/or palate (CL/P) carry a social stigma that often causes psychosocial stress. The purpose of this study was to consider the association of cleft phenotype and age with self-reported aspects of psychosocial stress. Children with nonsyndromic CL/P and unaffected children born between 1997 and 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and North Carolina birth records, respectively. The psychosocial concerns of children with CL/P were assessed via a 29-question subset of a larger survey. Responses were analyzed according to school age and cleft phenotype (cleft lip with/without cleft alveolus, CL ± A; cleft palate only, CP; or cleft lip with cleft palate, CL + P). Surveys were returned for 176 children with CL/P and 333 unaffected children. When compared with unaffected children, responses differed for CL ± A in 4/29 questions, for CP in 7/29 questions, and for CL + P in 8/29 questions ( P aesthetic concerns, bullying, and difficulties with friendship, and social interaction. Children with CL + P reported more severe aesthetic-related concerns than children with CL ± A or CP but experienced similar speech-related distress as children with CP only. Social implications associated with CL/P are most pronounced during middle school, and less so during elementary and high school. This information identifies areas of social improvement aimed at reducing the stigma of CL/P.

  8. Soft and hard pomerons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maor, Uri; Tel Aviv Univ.

    1995-09-01

    The role of s-channel unitarity screening corrections, calculated in the eikonal approximation, is investigated for soft Pomeron exchange responsible for elastic and diffractive hadron scattering in the high energy limit. We examine the differences between our results and those obtained from the supercritical Pomeron-Regge model with no such corrections. It is shown that screening saturation is attained at different scales for different channels. We then proceed to discuss the new HERA data on hard (PQCD) Pomeron diffractive channels and discuss the relationship between the soft and hard Pomerons and the relevance of our analysis to this problem. (author). 18 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  9. Hard exclusive QCD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, W.

    2007-01-15

    Hard exclusive processes in high energy electron proton scattering offer the opportunity to get access to a new generation of parton distributions, the so-called generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This functions provide more detailed informations about the structure of the nucleon than the usual PDFs obtained from DIS. In this work we present a detailed analysis of exclusive processes, especially of hard exclusive meson production. We investigated the influence of exclusive produced mesons on the semi-inclusive production of mesons at fixed target experiments like HERMES. Further we give a detailed analysis of higher order corrections (NLO) for the exclusive production of mesons in a very broad range of kinematics. (orig.)

  10. Hard-hat day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will be organizing a special information day on Friday, 27th June, designed to promote the wearing of hard hats and ensure that they are worn correctly. A new prevention campaign will also be launched.The event will take place in the hall of the Main Building from 11.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m., when you will be able to come and try on various models of hard hat, including some of the very latest innovative designs, ask questions and pass on any comments and suggestions.

  11. Assessment of radiographic factors affecting surgical exposure and orthodontic alignment of impacted canines of the palate: a 15-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Tabatabaie, Fataneh Alavi; Navi, Fina; Shafeie, Hasan Ali; Fard, Behnam Khosravani; Hayati, Zahra

    2009-06-01

    Impacted canines require a combination of both surgical and orthodontic management. In this study, patients treated for bone-impacted canines of the hard palatal were evaluated to assess which radiographic factors influenced the feasibility to move impacted maxillary permanent canines from the hard palate into the alveolar arch. Eighty patients aged 12 to 24 (average 16 years) were treated surgically and orthodontically to align 146 bone-impacted canines of the hard palate (from 1994 to 2008). Factors such as age, sex, angulation of the canine to the midline (CAM), anomaly of the canine root (RA), overlap of the adjacent lateral incisor root (OALIR), and ratio of root formation (RRF) upon treatment were documented. Radiographic records and demographic data were assessed. The following radiographic measurements of canine position were made from the orthopantomogram (OPG): (1) angulation to the midline, (2) anteroposterior position of the root, (3) overlap of the adjacent incisor. RA or dilaceration was assessed from the OPG, maxillary occlusal (MO), and periapical (PA) radiographs. Whether the impacted canine had responded to surgical exposure and was orthodontically aligned, or surgically removed and discarded was also recorded. The data were analyzed to assess and correlate significance. Eighty patients aged 12 to 24 (19 males and 61 females) with 146 bone-impacted permanent canines of the hard palatal were treated. One hundred and three teeth (70.54%) had responded to surgical exposure and orthodontic alignment within 9 to 12 months. Forty-three impacted canine teeth (29.46%) had to be surgically removed because of ankylosis and no movement after 8 to 9 months using 50 to 60 g of traction force via elastic chains. Data analysis via chi-square and Pearson correlation tests showed that as the CAM increased (> 45 degrees), the canine was more likely to be unresponsive to treatment (P half the root) of the adjacent lateral incisor root (OALIR) via the canine crown

  12. Post-operative treatment of malignant salivary gland tumours of the palate with iodine-125 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Clare E.; Hering, Egbert; Hough, Jan; Knowles, Ruth; Munro, Roger; Hille, Jos

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: Malignant minor salivary gland tumours are usually small and clinically indistinguishable from benign lesions. Surgery is the treatment of choice with post-operative radiotherapy for involved margins or unfavourable histology. We assessed the results of a series of such patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy in the form of a temporary applicator or implant. Patients and methods: There were nine patients with T1/T2 tumours of the hard and/or soft palate that had been excised. All had close or involved margins. Six were treated with a dental applicator alone, two with an applicator and additional I-125 seeds in tubes and one with an implant alone. The applicator consists of two layers of plastic made from a dental impression enclosing a predetermined number of I-125 seeds, 9-39, glued to one surface and a layer of ash metal to protect the tongue. It was inserted 1-3 months post-operatively and delivered 35-62 Gy, median 56 Gy, at 5-7 mm depth over 58-156 h, median 120 h, at 0.26-0.67 Gy/h, median 0.45 Gy/h. Results: The patients have been followed up for 32-158 months, median 50 months, and there were no recurrences. The applicator was well tolerated. A confluent mucositis developed which lasted 3-4 weeks. One patient developed a mucosal ulcer which healed spontaneously. Conclusions: Brachytherapy is an effective way of delivering post-operative radiotherapy to the hard and soft palate in patients with malignant salivary gland tumours that have been incompletely excised or have unfavourable histology. Local control is excellent, treatment time is short and morbidity is minimal

  13. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttorp, Christiaan M.; Cremers, Niels A.; van Rheden, René; Regan, Raymond F.; Helmich, Pia; van Kempen, Sven; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2017-01-01

    Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES) is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO) mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling. PMID:29164113

  14. Teaching Palatoplasty Using a High-Fidelity Cleft Palate Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Homan; Podolsky, Dale J; Fisher, David M; Wong, Karen W; Lorenz, H Peter; Khosla, Rohit K; Drake, James M; Forrest, Christopher R

    2018-01-01

    Cleft palate repair is a challenging procedure for cleft surgeons to teach. A novel high-fidelity cleft palate simulator has been described for surgeon training. This study evaluates the simulator's effect on surgeon procedural confidence and palatoplasty knowledge among learners. Plastic surgery trainees attended a palatoplasty workshop consisting of a didactic session on cleft palate anatomy and repair followed by a simulation session. Participants completed a procedural confidence questionnaire and palatoplasty knowledge test immediately before and after the workshop. All participants reported significantly higher procedural confidence following the workshop (p cleft palate surgery experience had higher procedural confidence before (p cleft palate experience did not have higher mean baseline test scores than those with no experience (30 percent versus 28 percent; p > 0.05), but did have significantly higher scores after the workshop (61 percent versus 35 percent; p cleft palate simulator as a training tool to teach palatoplasty. Improved procedural confidence and knowledge were observed after a single session, with benefits seen among trainees both with and without previous cleft experience.

  15. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan M. Suttorp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO, which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling.

  16. Evidence for gene-environment interaction in a genome wide study of nonsyndromic cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect with a complex and heterogeneous etiology involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using 550 case-parent trios, ascertained through a CP case collected in an international...... consortium. Family-based association tests of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and three common maternal exposures (maternal smoking, alcohol consumption, and multivitamin supplementation) were used in a combined 2 df test for gene (G) and gene-environment (G × E) interaction simultaneously, plus...... multiple SNPs associated with higher risk of CP in the presence of maternal smoking. Additional evidence of reduced risk due to G × E interaction in the presence of multivitamin supplementation was observed for SNPs in BAALC on chr. 8. These results emphasize the need to consider G × E interaction when...

  17. From birth till palatoplasty: Prosthetic procedural limitations and safeguarding infants with palatal cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Bhandari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The most imminent issue to be addressed in a child born with cleft lip and/or palate is restoration of normal feeding. Early surgical treatment for cleft repair is crucial but may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain is attained in an infant. When other feeding interventions fail in these children, prosthetic obturation of the defect with feeding instructions in the interim period is indicated to ward off the prevailing concerns. However, the entire prosthetic management presents a significant challenge with respect to the child's age, scope of iatrogenic injury to the delicate oral tissues, and potential for life-threatening situation during the procedures. This article draws attention toward preemptive measures which should be undertaken in the clinical setting during the fabrication of obturator to ascertain a desirable outcome without experiencing a grave complication that may arise due to ignorance and/or lack of facilities.

  18. Hard times; Schwere Zeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, Markus

    2012-10-02

    The prices of silicon and solar wafers keep dropping. According to market research specialist IMS research, this is the result of weak traditional solar markets and global overcapacities. While many manufacturers are facing hard times, big producers of silicon are continuing to expand.

  19. Hardness of Clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Hardness of Clustering. Both k-means and k-medians intractable (when n and d are both inputs even for k =2). The best known deterministic algorithms. are based on Voronoi partitioning that. takes about time. Need for approximation – “close” to optimal.

  20. Rock-hard coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has signed an agreement with a number of parties to investigate this material further.

  1. Rock-hard coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has

  2. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the first excitation energy can be given by the Kohn-Sham hardness (i.e. the energy difference of the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the ...

  3. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Mertas, Anna; Skucha-Nowak, Małgorzata; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Morawiec, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis , S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis , and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical features of soft palate muscles and nerves in dogs with an elongated soft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Masanori; Harada, Yasuji; Hara, Yasushi; Michishita, Masaki; Ohkusu-Tsukada, Kozo; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2016-01-01

    To histologically evaluate and compare features of myofibers within the elongated soft palate (ESP) of brachycephalic and mesocephalic dogs with those in the soft palate of healthy dogs and to assess whether denervation or muscular dystrophy is associated with soft palate elongation. Soft palate specimens from 24 dogs with ESPs (obtained during surgical intervention) and from 14 healthy Beagles (control group). All the soft palate specimens underwent histologic examination to assess myofiber atrophy, hypertrophy, hyalinization, and regeneration. The degrees of atrophy and hypertrophy were quantified on the basis of the coefficient of variation and the number of myofibers with hyalinization and regeneration. The specimens also underwent immunohistochemical analysis with anti-neurofilament or anti-dystrophin antibody to confirm the distribution of peripheral nerve branches innervating the palatine myofibers and myofiber dystrophin expression, respectively. Myofiber atrophy, hypertrophy, hyalinization, and regeneration were identified in almost all the ESP specimens. Degrees of atrophy and hypertrophy were significantly greater in the ESP specimens, compared with the control specimens. There were fewer palatine peripheral nerve branches in the ESP specimens than in the control specimens. Almost all the myofibers in the ESP and control specimens were dystrophin positive. These results suggested that palatine myopathy in dogs may be caused, at least in part, by denervation of the palatine muscles and not by Duchenne- or Becker-type muscular dystrophy. These soft palate changes may contribute to upper airway collapse and the progression of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

  5. Prosthetic Rehabilitation by Palatal Hollow Bulb Obturator with Cast Metal Denture Base: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prosthetic reconstruction of partial maxillectomy defects is a challenging procedure that requires multidisciplinary expertise to achieve an acceptable function, speech and esthetics. This procedure improves the quality of life for the patient as a normal individual. Obturation of the defect depends on its volume and position of remaining hard and soft tissues which determine the retention, stability and support for the prosthesis. The prosthesis should be simple to handle, easy to maintain, biocompatible, light in weight and convenient for future adjustments. This case report describes a clinical case of partial maxillectomy which was successfully rehabilitated with a definitive closed hollow bulb obturator and cast metal denture base.

  6. Current Strategies in Reconstruction of Maxillectomy Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, Patricio; Militsakh, Oleg; Hanasono, Matthew M.; Rieger, Jana; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To outline a contemporary review of defect classification and reconstructive options. Design Review article. Setting Tertiary care referral centers. Results Although prosthetic rehabilitation remains the standard of care in many institutions, the discomfort of wearing, removing, and cleaning a prosthesis; the inability to retain a prosthesis in large defects; and the frequent need for readjustments often limit the value of this cost-effective and successful method of restoring speech and mastication. However, flap reconstruction offers an option for many, although there is no agreement as to which techniques should be used for optimal reconstruction. Flap reconstruction also involves a longer recovery time with increased risk of surgical complications, has higher costs associated with the procedure, and requires access to a highly experienced surgeon. Conclusion The surgeon and reconstructive team must make individualized decisions based on the extent of the maxillectomy defect (eg, the resection of the infraorbital rim, the extent of palate excision, skin compromise) and the need for radiation therapy. PMID:21844415

  7. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  8. Hard Copy Market Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testan, Peter R.

    1987-04-01

    A number of Color Hard Copy (CHC) market drivers are currently indicating strong growth in the use of CHC technologies for the business graphics marketplace. These market drivers relate to product, software, color monitors and color copiers. The use of color in business graphics allows more information to be relayed than is normally the case in a monochrome format. The communicative powers of full-color computer generated output in the business graphics application area will continue to induce end users to desire and require color in their future applications. A number of color hard copy technologies will be utilized in the presentation graphics arena. Thermal transfer, ink jet, photographic and electrophotographic technologies are all expected to be utilized in the business graphics presentation application area in the future. Since the end of 1984, the availability of color application software packages has grown significantly. Sales revenue generated by business graphics software is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of just over 40 percent to 1990. Increased availability of packages to allow the integration of text and graphics is expected. Currently, the latest versions of page description languages such as Postscript, Interpress and DDL all support color output. The use of color monitors will also drive the demand for color hard copy in the business graphics market place. The availability of higher resolution screens is allowing color monitors to be easily used for both text and graphics applications in the office environment. During 1987, the sales of color monitors are expected to surpass the sales of monochrome monitors. Another major color hard copy market driver will be the color copier. In order to take advantage of the communications power of computer generated color output, multiple copies are required for distribution. Product introductions of a new generation of color copiers is now underway with additional introductions expected

  9. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity

  10. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (pcleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  11. Palatal bone thickness measured by palatal index method using cone-beam computed tomography in nonorthodontic patients for placement of mini-implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W S Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the bone thickness of the palatal areas in different palatal index (PI groups. Materials and Methods: Cone-beam computed tomography scans of 10 subjects were selected with a mean age group of 18 years. The measurements of palatal bone thickness were made at 36 sites using CareStream 3D Imaging software. The PI was measured using Korkhaus ratio (palatal height/palatal width. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze intergroup differences, as well as the PI difference. Results: Bone thickness was higher in the anterior region than in the middle and posterior regions P<0.001. Furthermore, significant differences were found among the midline, medial, and lateral areas of the palate. Conclusions: These findings might be helpful for clinicians to enhance the successful use of temporary anchorage devices in the palate.

  12. Palatability of two artificial feeds for reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Rognmo

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Two groups of 15 reindeer were used to test the palatability of two artificial diets. None of the animals had experienced the diets before. Trials were carried out from April to mid May. Each group of animals was kept in a separate corral (600 sq. meters. Both groups were fed lichens for three days befort trials began. Then they were offered a concentrate feed (RF-80 or «Mill Waste Product» (MWP ad libitum. Both groups ate little or nothing for the first three days of the trial and so lichens were mixed with the two experimental feeds. The mean voluntary food intake of the RF-80-group increased from 0.8 Kg/day/animal to 1.8 Kg/day/animal after three weeks. A mixed feed, RF-80/lichen, was only used the first day for animals in the RF-80 group. Reindeer refused to eat MWP for twelve days despite mixing it with lichens. They were then offered RF-80 ad lib. without a mixture of lichens. The mean voluntary intake of these animals increased from 1.3 Kg RF-80/day/animal on day 13 to 2.3 Kg/day/animal by day 26. Two calves in the MWP-group got diarrhoea after refeeding with RF-80.

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Young Adults Treated for Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate by a Treatment Protocol Including Two-Stage Palatoplasty: Speech Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittermann, Dirk; Janssen, Laura; Bittermann, Gerhard Koendert Pieter; Boonacker, Chantal; Haverkamp, Sarah; de Wilde, Hester; Van Der Heul, Marise; Specken, Tom FJMC; Koole, Ron; Kon, Moshe; Breugem, Corstiaan Cornelis; Mink van der Molen, Aebele Barber

    2017-01-01

    Background No consensus exists on the optimal treatment protocol for orofacial clefts or the optimal timing of cleft palate closure. This study investigated factors influencing speech outcomes after two-stage palate repair in adults with a non-syndromal complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of adult patients with a UCLP who underwent two-stage palate closure and were treated at our tertiary cleft centre. Patients ≥17 years of age were invited for a final speech assessment. Their medical history was obtained from their medical files, and speech outcomes were assessed by a speech pathologist during the follow-up consultation. Results Forty-eight patients were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 21 years (standard deviation, 3.4 years). Their mean age at the time of hard and soft palate closure was 3 years and 8.0 months, respectively. In 40% of the patients, a pharyngoplasty was performed. On a 5-point intelligibility scale, 84.4% received a score of 1 or 2; meaning that their speech was intelligible. We observed a significant correlation between intelligibility scores and the incidence of articulation errors (P<0.001). In total, 36% showed mild to moderate hypernasality during the speech assessment, and 11%–17% of the patients exhibited increased nasalance scores, assessed through nasometry. Conclusions The present study describes long-term speech outcomes after two-stage palatoplasty with hard palate closure at a mean age of 3 years old. We observed moderate long-term intelligibility scores, a relatively high incidence of persistent hypernasality, and a high pharyngoplasty incidence. PMID:28573094

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Young Adults Treated for Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate by a Treatment Protocol Including Two-Stage Palatoplasty: Speech Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Francisca Petronella Maria Kappen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNo consensus exists on the optimal treatment protocol for orofacial clefts or the optimal timing of cleft palate closure. This study investigated factors influencing speech outcomes after two-stage palate repair in adults with a non-syndromal complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP.MethodsThis was a retrospective analysis of adult patients with a UCLP who underwent two-stage palate closure and were treated at our tertiary cleft centre. Patients ≥17 years of age were invited for a final speech assessment. Their medical history was obtained from their medical files, and speech outcomes were assessed by a speech pathologist during the follow-up consultation.ResultsForty-eight patients were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 21 years (standard deviation, 3.4 years. Their mean age at the time of hard and soft palate closure was 3 years and 8.0 months, respectively. In 40% of the patients, a pharyngoplasty was performed. On a 5-point intelligibility scale, 84.4% received a score of 1 or 2; meaning that their speech was intelligible. We observed a significant correlation between intelligibility scores and the incidence of articulation errors (P<0.001. In total, 36% showed mild to moderate hypernasality during the speech assessment, and 11%–17% of the patients exhibited increased nasalance scores, assessed through nasometry.ConclusionsThe present study describes long-term speech outcomes after two-stage palatoplasty with hard palate closure at a mean age of 3 years old. We observed moderate long-term intelligibility scores, a relatively high incidence of persistent hypernasality, and a high pharyngoplasty incidence.

  15. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Young Adults Treated for Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate by a Treatment Protocol Including Two-Stage Palatoplasty: Speech Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Isabelle Francisca Petronella Maria; Bittermann, Dirk; Janssen, Laura; Bittermann, Gerhard Koendert Pieter; Boonacker, Chantal; Haverkamp, Sarah; de Wilde, Hester; Van Der Heul, Marise; Specken, Tom Fjmc; Koole, Ron; Kon, Moshe; Breugem, Corstiaan Cornelis; Mink van der Molen, Aebele Barber

    2017-05-01

    No consensus exists on the optimal treatment protocol for orofacial clefts or the optimal timing of cleft palate closure. This study investigated factors influencing speech outcomes after two-stage palate repair in adults with a non-syndromal complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This was a retrospective analysis of adult patients with a UCLP who underwent two-stage palate closure and were treated at our tertiary cleft centre. Patients ≥17 years of age were invited for a final speech assessment. Their medical history was obtained from their medical files, and speech outcomes were assessed by a speech pathologist during the follow-up consultation. Forty-eight patients were included in the analysis, with a mean age of 21 years (standard deviation, 3.4 years). Their mean age at the time of hard and soft palate closure was 3 years and 8.0 months, respectively. In 40% of the patients, a pharyngoplasty was performed. On a 5-point intelligibility scale, 84.4% received a score of 1 or 2; meaning that their speech was intelligible. We observed a significant correlation between intelligibility scores and the incidence of articulation errors (Pspeech assessment, and 11%-17% of the patients exhibited increased nasalance scores, assessed through nasometry. The present study describes long-term speech outcomes after two-stage palatoplasty with hard palate closure at a mean age of 3 years old. We observed moderate long-term intelligibility scores, a relatively high incidence of persistent hypernasality, and a high pharyngoplasty incidence.

  16. Intrinsic Defects and H Doping in WO3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2017-01-18

    WO3 is widely used as industrial catalyst. Intrinsic and/or extrinsic defects can tune the electronic properties and extend applications to gas sensors and optoelectonics. However, H doping is a challenge to WO3, the relevant mechanisms being hardly understood. In this context, we investigate intrinsic defects and H doping by density functional theory and experiments. Formation energies are calculated to determine the lowest energy defect states. O vacancies turn out to be stable in O-poor environment, in agreement with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and O-H bond formation of H interstitial defects is predicted and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  17. Hard Electromagnetic Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, F.

    1987-09-01

    Among hard electromagnetic processes, I will use the most recent data and focus on quantitative test of QCD. More specifically, I will retain two items: - hadroproduction of direct photons, - Drell-Yan. In addition, I will briefly discuss a recent analysis of ISR data obtained with AFS (Axial Field Spectrometer) which sheds a new light on the e/π puzzle at low P T

  18. Intraoperative and early postoperative complications using the buccal fat pad during cleft palate surgery in East Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Vere Konijnendijk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Six baby’s with cleft are born in Indonesia every hour. There is no standardized treatment of cleft in East Indonesia. Closure is an important aspect during cleft lip and palate surgery. Various techniques have been advocated to gain tissue for closure of cleft area. Mostly these techniques may only provide a small amount of additional length. For lager defects they may be use the local flaps or the buccal fat pad flap. The aim of this study is gain more information about intraoperative and early postoperative complications using the buccal fat pat during cleft palate surgery in East Indonesia. The mouth can be divided in six parts therefor the LAHSAL index will be used. This LAHSAL system is a diagrammatic classification of cleft lip and palate. The LAHSAL system is being used for this study as this system classifies the cleft primarily on location and also on the cleft being complete or incomplete, which can be significant for the research. After diagnosis and classification, the following patient data was obtained: patient age, weight, gender, type of surgery (primary or following, i.e. when the surgery is a correction of a previous treatment, if a bone graft is needed for closure, history of maxillofacial surgery or orthodontics, operation technique, operation duration, type of an aesthesia (local or general, radiographical records and light photos. These data were collected during the pre-operative consultation, about 24 hours before surgery. It was the policy of the team to admit and see all patients one day prior to surgery for counselling, postoperative instructions and evaluating the patient's facial defect.

  19. Assessing Technical Performance and Determining the Learning Curve in Cleft Palate Surgery Using a High-Fidelity Cleft Palate Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolsky, Dale J; Fisher, David M; Wong Riff, Karen W; Szasz, Peter; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M; Forrest, Christopher R

    2018-06-01

    This study assessed technical performance in cleft palate repair using a newly developed assessment tool and high-fidelity cleft palate simulator through a longitudinal simulation training exercise. Three residents performed five and one resident performed nine consecutive endoscopically recorded cleft palate repairs using a cleft palate simulator. Two fellows in pediatric plastic surgery and two expert cleft surgeons also performed recorded simulated repairs. The Cleft Palate Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (CLOSATS) and end-product scales were developed to assess performance. Two blinded cleft surgeons assessed the recordings and the final repairs using the CLOSATS, end-product scale, and a previously developed global rating scale. The average procedure-specific (CLOSATS), global rating, and end-product scores increased logarithmically after each successive simulation session for the residents. Reliability of the CLOSATS (average item intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), 0.85 ± 0.093) and global ratings (average item ICC, 0.91 ± 0.02) among the raters was high. Reliability of the end-product assessments was lower (average item ICC, 0.66 ± 0.15). Standard setting linear regression using an overall cutoff score of 7 of 10 corresponded to a pass score for the CLOSATS and the global score of 44 (maximum, 60) and 23 (maximum, 30), respectively. Using logarithmic best-fit curves, 6.3 simulation sessions are required to reach the minimum standard. A high-fidelity cleft palate simulator has been developed that improves technical performance in cleft palate repair. The simulator and technical assessment scores can be used to determine performance before operating on patients.

  20. One-stage closure of isolated cleft palate with the Veau-Wardill-Kilner V to Y pushback procedure or the Cronin modification. II. Height, weight and comparison of dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heliövaara, A; Pere, A; Ranta, R

    1994-03-01

    The body height and weight, and sizes of dental arches in 116 patients with isolated cleft palate were evaluated at 16.9-20.6 years of age. One-stage closure of the soft and hard palate had been done at a mean age of 1.8 years using the Veau-Wardill-Kilner or the Cronin mucoperiosteal palatal V-Y pushback technique. The height attained in both the boys (177.6 cm) and the girls (165.7 cm) was similar to that in the general adult population, even though half of the boys had not reached their final height. The median relative weight for height and sex was 6%. There were no significant differences in dental arch measurements depending on the method of operation but the more palatal operations done the shorter the maxillary and mandibular dental arch widths. The extent of cleft made a significant difference, larger clefts having narrower palatal intercanine widths. Dental arch dimensions were consistently larger in boys than in girls.

  1. Cleft lip and palate: series of unusual clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranaíba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Miranda, Roseli Teixeira de; Martelli, Daniella Reis Barbosa; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Almeida, Hudson de; Orsi Júnior, Julian Miranda; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face, corresponding to approximately 65% of all malformations of the craniofacial region. to describe unusual clinical cases of non-syndromic CL/P (CL/PNS), diagnosed in a reference service in Minas Gerais, Brazil, and correlate these alterations with possible risk factors. we carried out a retrospective study, between the years of 1992 and the 1st half of 2009, from medical records. Among the 778 cases of CL/PNS diagnosed in the period of 17 years, 5 (0.64%) were unusual CL/PNS, and all patients were male. It was found that among the 5 patients, 2 had incomplete right cleft lip with incomplete cleft palate, 2 were affected by left incomplete cleft lip and incomplete cleft palate, and 1 had a cleft lip and palate associated with complete right cleft palate. Risk factors such as consanguinity, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption, medication usage during pregnancy, history of abortion and/or stillbirths and maternal diseases were not associated with unusual CL/PNS. This study described 5 unusual cases of CL/PNS in a Brazilian population; no associations with the risk factors analyzed were seen. It also confirmed the unusualness of the prevalence of such alterations.

  2. Early lexical characteristics of toddlers with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Jones, Mary; Chapman, Kathy L

    2014-11-01

    Objective : To examine development of early expressive lexicons in toddlers with cleft palate to determine whether they differ from those of noncleft toddlers in terms of size and lexical selectivity. Design : Retrospective. Patients : A total of 37 toddlers with cleft palate and 22 noncleft toddlers. Main Outcome Measures : The groups were compared for size of expressive lexicon reported on the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory and the percentage of words beginning with obstruents and sonorants produced in a language sample. Differences between groups in the percentage of word initial consonants correct on the language sample were also examined. Results : Although expressive vocabulary was comparable at 13 months of age for both groups, size of the lexicon for the cleft group was significantly smaller than that for the noncleft group at 21 and 27 months of age. Toddlers with cleft palate produced significantly more words beginning with sonorants and fewer words beginning with obstruents in their spontaneous speech samples. They were also less accurate when producing word initial obstruents compared with the noncleft group. Conclusions : Toddlers with cleft palate demonstrate a slower rate of lexical development compared with their noncleft peers. The preference that toddlers with cleft palate demonstrate for words beginning with sonorants could suggest they are selecting words that begin with consonants that are easier for them to produce. An alternative explanation might be that because these children are less accurate in the production of obstruent consonants, listeners may not always identify obstruents when they occur.

  3. Treatment of Palatal Myoclonus with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mursalin M. Anis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palatal myoclonus is a rare cause of pulsatile tinnitus in patients presenting to the otolaryngology office. Rhythmic involuntary contractions of the palatal muscles produce the pulsatile tinnitus in these patients. Treatment of this benign but distressing condition with anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and surgery has been largely unsuccessful. A few investigators have obtained promising results with botulinum toxin injection into the palatal muscles. We present a patient with palatal myoclonus who failed conservative treatment with anxiolytics. Unilateral injection of botulinum toxin into her tensor veli palatini muscle under electromyographic guidance resolved pulsatile tinnitus in her ipsilateral ear and unmasked pulsatile tinnitus in the contralateral ear. A novel method of following transient postinjection symptoms using a diary is presented in this study. Botulinum toxin dose must be titrated to achieve optimal results in each individual patient, analogous to titrations done for spasmodic dysphonia. Knowledge of the temporal onset of postinjection side effects and symptomatic relief may aid physicians in dose titration and surveillance. We present suggestions on titrating the botulinum toxin dose to optimal levels. A review of the literature on the use of botulinum toxin for palatal myoclonus and some common complications are discussed.

  4. Endodontic Management of Maxillary Second Molar with Two Palatal Roots: A Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Surbhi; Patel, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Endodontic treatment may sometimes fail because morphological features of the tooth adversely affect the treatment protocol. Maxillary second molars are recognized as usually having a single palatal root with a single palatal canal. The incidence of second palatal root in the maxillary second molar is very rare. Two cases are presented in this paper describing the endodontic management of a four-rooted maxillary second molar with two distinct palatal roots and canals and two distinct buccal r...

  5. Palatal growth in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate patients following neonatal cheiloplasty: Classic and geometric morphometric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmannova, Eva; Bejdová, Šárka; Borský, Jiri; Dupej, Ján; Cagáňová, Veronika; Velemínská, Jana

    2016-11-01

    A new method of early neonatal cheiloplasty has recently been employed on patients having complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). We aimed to investigate (1) their detailed palatal morphology before surgery and growth during the 10 months after neonatal cheiloplasty, (2) the growth of eight dimensions of the maxilla in these patients, (3) the development of these dimensions compared with published data on noncleft controls and on cUCLP patients operated using later operation protocol (LOP; 6 months of age). Sixty-six virtual dental models of 33 longitudinally evaluated cUCLP patients were analysed using metric analysis, a dense correspondence model, and multivariate statistics. We compared the palatal surfaces before neonatal cheiloplasty (mean age, 4 days) and before palatoplasty (mean age, 10 months). The palatal form variability of 10-month-old children was considerably reduced during the observed period thanks to their undisturbed growth, that is, the palate underwent the same growth changes following neonatal cheiloplasty. A detailed colour-coded map identified the most marked growth at the anterior and posterior ends of both segments. The maxilla of cUCLP patients after neonatal cheiloplasty had a growth tendency similar to noncleft controls (unlike LOP). Both methodological approaches showed that early neonatal cheiloplasty in cUCLP patients did not prevent forward growth of the upper jaw segments and did not reduce either the length or width of the maxilla during the first 10 months of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lexical selectivity in Danish toddlers with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    . Methods: All participants were video recorded at 18 months of age during play interaction with a parent. The video recordings were transcribed according to the IPA and an individual consonant inventory was established for each participant. The video recordings were also analysed with respect to word...... productions establishing an observed productive vocabulary size for each participant. Results: At 18 months of age Danish toddlers with cleft palate showed marked lexical selectivity in their early words. The distribution of consonant classes observed at 11 months of age in a previous study of the children...... as it has been described for English speaking toddlers with and without cleft palate, even though some qualitative differences were found. Keywords: consonant inventory, lexical selectivity, early words, cleft palate....

  7. Fixed prosthetic treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajevska Jagoda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prosthetic treatment of patients with cleft palate includes various treatment options such as fixed partial dentures, removable partial prosthesis, etc. The type of prosthetic appliance is determined by the oral health of each individual and the circumstances. We presented three adult patients with the cleft lip and palate subjected to prosthetic treatment. Case report. From the possible prosthetic solutions according to the conditions in the oral cavity and the circumstances, fixed partial dentures veneered with composite or ceramic were chosen. A proper relationship between the teeth was reached with the fixed partial dentures, and function established, the phonetics improved and satisfying aesthetics effect accomplished improving the profile appearance of the patient’s face. Plastic surgery of the nose was performed after that. Conclusion. Multidisclipinary treatment is necessary for favourable long-term outcome in cleft lip and palate patients.

  8. Cleft Palate Fistula Closure Utilizing Acellular Dermal Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Emodi, DMD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Fistulas represent failure of cleft palate repair. Secondary and tertiary fistula repair is challenging, with high recurrence rates. In the present retrospective study, we review the efficacy of using acellular dermal matrix as an interposition layer for cleft palate fistula closure in 20 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2016. Complete fistula closure was obtained in 16 patients; 1 patient had asymptomatic recurrent fistula; 2 patients had partial closure with reduction of fistula size and minimal nasal regurgitation; 1 patient developed a recurrent fistula without changes in symptoms (success rate of 85%. We conclude that utilizing acellular dermal matrix for cleft palate fistula repair is safe and simple with a high success rate.

  9. Common dental anomalies in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sanjida; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies.

  10. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis.

  11. Prevalence of orofacial clefts and risks for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in newborns at a university hospital from West Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Peña-Padilla, Christian; Olvera-Molina, Sandra; Orozco-Martín, Miriam A; García-Cruz, Diana; Ríos-Flores, Izabel M; Gómez-Rodríguez, Brian Gabriel; Rivas-Soto, Gemma; Pérez-Molina, J Jesús

    2018-02-19

    We determined the overall prevalence of typical orofacial clefts and the potential risks for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a university hospital from West México. For the prevalence, 227 liveborn infants with typical orofacial clefts were included from a total of 81,193 births occurred during the period 2009-2016 at the "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca" Civil Hospital of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico). To evaluate potential risks, a case-control study was conducted among 420 newborns, including only those 105 patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (cases), and 315 infants without birth defects (controls). Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis expressed as adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals . The overall prevalence for typical orofacial clefts was 28 per 10,000 (95% confidence interval: 24.3-31.6), or 1 per 358 live births. The mean values for the prepregnancy weight, antepartum weight, and pre-pregnancy body mass index were statistically higher among the mothers of cases. Infants with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate had a significantly higher risk for previous history of any type of congenital anomaly (adjusted odds ratio: 2.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-5.1), history of a relative with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (adjusted odds ratio: 19.6; 95% confidence interval: 8.2-47.1), and first-trimester exposures to progestogens (adjusted odds ratio: 6.8; 95% CI 1.8-25.3), hyperthermia (adjusted odds ratio: 3.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-10.6), and common cold (adjusted odds ratio: 3.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-11.9). These risks could have contributed to explain the high prevalence of orofacial clefts in our region of Mexico, emphasizing that except for history of relatives with cleft lip with or without cleft palate, most are susceptible of modification. © 2018 Japanese Teratology Society.

  12. Communicative abilities in toddlers and in early school age children with cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Jolien S.; Korsten-Meijer, Astrid G. W.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Siena M.

    Objectives: Evaluation of improvement in communicative abilities in children with nonsyndromic cleft palate. Methods: Longitudinal retrospective case history Study. Out of 117 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate born in 1998, 1999 and 2000 and enrolled in the cleft palate team of the

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  3. Three Cases of Palatal Tics and Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzo, Renata; Cath, Danielle; Pavone, Piero; Tijssen, Marina; Robertson, Mary M.

    Five patients with palatal tics and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome have been previously reported. Little is known about the characteristics of palatal tics given that there are so few reports. On one hand, palatal tics may be rare. Alternatively, they may be less well recognized than repetitive eye

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2133.2010.09859.x. Review. Citation on PubMed Cole P, Hatef DA, Kaufman Y, Magruder A, Bree ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  5. Otolaryngology Service Usage in Children With Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Kenneth R; Dargie, Jenna M; Dornan, Briana K; Boudreau, Brian

    2018-05-01

    To determine the usage of otolaryngology services by children with cleft palate at a pediatric tertiary care facility. Retrospective case series. Specialty clinic at a pediatric tertiary care hospital. Children born between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2002, with the diagnosis of cleft palate or cleft lip and palate. A total of 41 female and 48 male patients were included. Total number of otolaryngology clinic visits and total number of otolaryngologic surgeries (tympanostomy tube placements and other otologic or upper airway procedures). In the first 5 years of life, these children utilized an average of 8.2 otolaryngology clinic visits (SD = 5.0; range: 1-22) and underwent 3.3 tympanostomy tube surgeries (SD = 2.0; range: 0-10). Seventy-three had their first tube placed at the time of palate repair, and 4 at the time of lip repair. Fifty-one (57.3%) required other otologic or upper airway procedures, including tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy (27 children), removal of tympanostomy tubes (24 children), tympanomastoidectomy (3 children), and tympanoplasty (14 children). Of the children who underwent other procedures, they underwent a mean of 1.67 (SD = 0.84; range: 1-4) surgeries. Children with cleft palate are at increased risk for eustachian tube dysfunction, frequently utilize otolaryngology care, and typically receive multiple sets of tympanostomy tubes. This study found that children with cleft palate receive on average of approximately 3 sets of tympanostomy tubes, and the majority required another otologic or upper airway surgery.

  6. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate the effi cacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1 To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (2 To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (3 To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results: Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, signifi cant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. Conclusions: PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle

  7. A LINE-1 Insertion in DLX6 Is Responsible for Cleft Palate and Mandibular Abnormalities in a Canine Model of Pierre Robin Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Zena T.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Arzi, Boaz; Jayashankar, Kartika; Karmi, Nili; Jia, Zhonglin; Rowland, Douglas J.; Young, Amy; Safra, Noa; Sliskovic, Saundra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Wade, Claire M.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2014-01-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is one of the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. In order to study cleft palate in a naturally occurring model system, we utilized the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR) dog breed. Micro-computed tomography analysis of CP NSDTR craniofacial structures revealed that these dogs exhibit defects similar to those observed in a recognizable subgroup of humans with CP: Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). We refer to this phenotype in NSDTRs as CP1. Individuals with PRS have a triad of birth defects: shortened mandible, posteriorly placed tongue, and cleft palate. A genome-wide association study in 14 CP NSDTRs and 72 unaffected NSDTRs identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 14 (24.2 Mb–29.3 Mb; praw = 4.64×10−15). Sequencing of two regional candidate homeobox genes in NSDTRs, distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5) and distal-less homeobox 6 (DLX6), identified a 2.1 kb LINE-1 insertion within DLX6 in CP1 NSDTRs. The LINE-1 insertion is predicted to insert a premature stop codon within the homeodomain of DLX6. This prompted the sequencing of DLX5 and DLX6 in a human cohort with CP, where a missense mutation within the highly conserved DLX5 homeobox of a patient with PRS was identified. This suggests the involvement of DLX5 in the development of PRS. These results demonstrate the power of the canine animal model as a genetically tractable approach to understanding naturally occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. PMID:24699068

  8. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Avinash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical team to maximize positive outcome of surgery and rehabilitation. This study discusses psychological issues revolving around cleft lip and cleft palate along with lacunae in many psychological research studies.

  9. Conditioned taste aversion, drugs of abuse and palatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-You; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2014-09-01

    We consider conditioned taste aversion to involve a learned reduction in the palatability of a taste (and hence in amount consumed) based on the association that develops when a taste experience is followed by gastrointestinal malaise. The present article evaluates the well-established finding that drugs of abuse, at doses that are otherwise considered rewarding and self-administered, cause intake suppression. Our recent work using lick pattern analysis shows that drugs of abuse also cause a palatability downshift and, therefore, support conditioned taste aversion learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The development of speech production in children with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Chapman, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of speech development of children with cleft palate +/- cleft lip. The chapter will begin with a discussion of the impact of clefting on speech. Next, we will provide a brief description of those factors impacting speech development...... for this population of children. Finally, research examining various aspects of speech development of infants and young children with cleft palate (birth to age five) will be reviewed. This final section will be organized by typical stages of speech sound development (e.g., prespeech, the early word stage...

  11. A novel cognitive palatability assessment protocol for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, J A; Milgram, N W

    2004-07-01

    Assessment of canine palatability is important for both the pet food and pharmaceutical industries; however, the current palatability assessment protocols are limited in their utility. The most common technique, the two-pan test, does not control for the satiating effects of food and may not be useful for long-term palatability analysis because nutritional or caloric characteristics of the diets may interfere with the results. Furthermore, the large quantities of foods consumed may be detrimental to the health of animals that do not self-limit their food intake. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a cognitive protocol could be used to determine food palatability in dogs. Five beagle dogs were trained on a three-choice object-discrimination learning task. After establishing object preferences, the preferred object was associated with no reward, a second object was associated with the dog's normal laboratory diet (Purina Agribrands Canine Lab Chow No. 5006; Agribrands Purina Canada, Inc., Woodstock, ON, Canada), and the third object was associated with a commercial (Hill's P/D; Hill's Pet Nutrition Inc., Topeka, KS) diet. In the discrimination-training phase, dogs were trained until they learned to avoid the no-reward object. They were subsequently given an additional 20 test sessions, which were used to determine food preference. In the reversal phase, which involved reversal learning, the object-food associations were modified, such that the object that was previously associated with Hill's P/D diet was now associated with the normal laboratory diet and vice versa. Once the dogs learned to avoid the no-reward object, they were tested for an additional 20 sessions. All subjects learned to avoid the no-reward object during the initial learning, and the number of choices to the object associated with the Hill's P/D diet was greater than the number of choices to the objects associated with the dry laboratory diet (P food-choice associations were reversed

  12. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... Defect reconstruction and fixation of the graft: The defect of ... where all loose fragments of fractured frontal bone was removed via the ... Mandible. • Ilium. • Allograft ... pediatric patients owing to skull growth. Thus, autologous ...

  13. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  14. Revisiting the definition of local hardness and hardness kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Ramírez, Carlos A; Franco-Pérez, Marco; Carmona-Espíndola, Javier; Gázquez, José L; Ayers, Paul W

    2017-05-17

    An analysis of the hardness kernel and local hardness is performed to propose new definitions for these quantities that follow a similar pattern to the one that characterizes the quantities associated with softness, that is, we have derived new definitions for which the integral of the hardness kernel over the whole space of one of the variables leads to local hardness, and the integral of local hardness over the whole space leads to global hardness. A basic aspect of the present approach is that global hardness keeps its identity as the second derivative of energy with respect to the number of electrons. Local hardness thus obtained depends on the first and second derivatives of energy and electron density with respect to the number of electrons. When these derivatives are approximated by a smooth quadratic interpolation of energy, the expression for local hardness reduces to the one intuitively proposed by Meneses, Tiznado, Contreras and Fuentealba. However, when one combines the first directional derivatives with smooth second derivatives one finds additional terms that allow one to differentiate local hardness for electrophilic attack from the one for nucleophilic attack. Numerical results related to electrophilic attacks on substituted pyridines, substituted benzenes and substituted ethenes are presented to show the overall performance of the new definition.

  15. Nanocavity formation and hardness increase by dual ion beam irradiation of oxide dispersion strengthened FeCrAl alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koegler, R., E-mail: r.koegler@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Anwand, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Richter, A. [Department of Engineering, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Bahnhofstrasse 1, 15745 Wildau (Germany); Butterling, M.; Ou, Xin; Wagner, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Chen, C.-L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 840, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-15

    Open volume defects generated by ion implantation into oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy and the related hardness were investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy and nanoindentation measurements, respectively. Synchronized dual beam implantation of Fe and He ions was performed at room temperature and at moderately enhanced temperature of 300 Degree-Sign C. For room temperature implantation a significant hardness increase after irradiation is observed which is more distinctive in heat treated than in as-received ODS alloy. There is also a difference between the simultaneous and sequential implantation mode as the hardening effect for the simultaneously implanted ODS alloy is stronger than for sequential implantation. The comparison of hardness profiles and of the corresponding open volume profiles shows a qualitative agreement between the open volume defects generated on the nanoscopic scale and the macroscopic hardness characteristics. Open volume defects are drastically reduced for performing the simultaneous dual beam irradiation at 300 Degree-Sign C which is a more realistic temperature under application aspects. Few remaining defects are clusters of 3-4 vacancies in connection with Y oxide nanoparticles. These defects completely disappear in a shallow layer at the surface. The results are in agreement with hardness measurements showing little hardness increase after irradiation at 300 Degree-Sign C. Suitable characteristics of ODS alloy for nuclear applications and the close correlation between He-related open volume defects and the hardness characteristics are verified.

  16. Defect of the Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanning Nina; Pelton, Ron W; Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, John David

    2017-08-01

    Eyelid defects disrupt the complex natural form and function of the eyelids and present a surgical challenge. Detailed knowledge of eyelid anatomy is essential in evaluating a defect and composing a reconstructive plan. Numerous reconstructive techniques have been described, including primary closure, grafting, and a variety of local flaps. This article describes an updated reconstructive ladder for eyelid defects that can be used in various permutations to solve most eyelid defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Multivariate Analysis of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Facial Skeletal Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) occurs when the maxillary and nasal facial prominences fail to fuse correctly during development, resulting in a palatal cleft and clefted soft and hard tissues of the dentoalveolus. The UCLP deformity may compromise an individual's ability to eat, chew, and speak. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 7-17-year-old individuals born with UCLP (n = 24) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 24) were assessed. Coordinate values of three-dimensional anatomical landmarks (n = 32) were recorded from each CBCT image. Data were evaluated using principal coordinates analysis (PCOORD) and Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA). Approximately 40% of morphometric variation is captured by PCOORD axes 1-3, and the negative and positive ends of each axis are associated with specific patterns of morphological differences. Approximately 36% of facial skeletal measures significantly differ by confidence interval testing (α = 0.10) between samples. Although significant form differences occur across the facial skeleton, strong patterns of morphological differences were localized to the lateral and superioinferior aspects of the nasal aperture, particularly on the clefted side of the face. The UCLP deformity strongly influences facial skeletal morphology of the midface and oronasal facial regions, and to a lesser extent the upper and lower facial skeletons. The pattern of strong morphological differences in the oronasal region combined with differences across the facial complex suggests that craniofacial bones are integrated and covary, despite influences from the congenital cleft.

  18. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  19. Fibrous metaphyseal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, P.; Hajek, P.C.; Pechmann, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients with fibrous metaphyseal defects were examined with both plain radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Depending on the age of the fibrous metaphyseal defects, characteristic radiomorphologic changes were found which correlated well with MR images. Following intravenous Gadolinium-DTPA injection, fibrous metaphyseal defects invariably exhibited a hyperintense border and signal enhancement. (orig./GDG)

  20. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Defects KidsHealth / For Parents / Birth Defects What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Anomalías congénitas What Are Birth Defects? While still in the womb, some babies ...

  1. Gene expression of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp110 families in normal palate and cleft palate during mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongfei; Ren, Chuanlu; Wan, Xuying; Zhu, Yuping; Zhu, Jiangbo; Zhou, Hongyuan; Zhang, Tianbao

    2013-11-01

    Most previous studies focused on a small number of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and their relationships with embryogenesis, and the actual roles of these Hsps in normal and abnormal embryonic development remain unclear. It was found in the present systemic study that except for Grp170, whose expression was not detectable at GD18, all 19 Hsps of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp110 families were expressed in the normal development of embryonic palate tissue in mice, but their expression patterns varied with different Hsps, presenting as a correlation with the developmental phases. In the treatment group by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), the messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance of HspA1A, HspA1L, HspA8, HspA9, HspA12A, HspA12B, HspA13, HspA14, Hsp90AA1, Hsp90AB1, Grp94, Trap1, Hsp105, Hsp110 and Grp170 was higher in the palates at GD11 (the beginning of palate development), the mRNA abundance of HspA1A, HspA12A and HspA12B was higher at GD18 (before birth) and an mRNA expression peak of HspA1L, HspA8, HspA9, Hsp90AA1, Grp94, Hsp110 and Grp170 was observed at GD17. The mRNA abundance of most genes in atRA-induced cleft palates of the treatment group was different from that of the control group. Grp78, HspA14 and Hsp105 were closely associated with the normal palate development and cleft palate in mouse embryo, possibly as palate development-related genes. Except Grp170, the other genes may be closely associated with the development of mouse palates through participating in the stress response process and/or the antiapoptosis process.

  2. Hard and Soft Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Lejf

    2009-01-01

    of Denmark, and finally the third layer: the leadership used in Danish schools. The use of 'soft governance' is shifting the focus of governance and leadership from decisions towards influence and power and thus shifting the focus of the processes from the decision-making itself towards more focus......The governance and leadership at transnational, national and school level seem to be converging into a number of isomorphic forms as we see a tendency towards substituting 'hard' forms of governance, that are legally binding, with 'soft' forms based on persuasion and advice. This article analyses...... and discusses governance forms at several levels. The first layer is the global: the methods of 'soft governance' that are being utilised by transnational agencies. The second layer is the national and local: the shift in national and local governance seen in many countries, but here demonstrated in the case...

  3. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  4. Acidic Food pH Increases Palatability and Consumption and Extends Drosophila Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sonali A; Yamada, Ryuichi; Mak, Christine M; Hunter, Brooke; Soto Obando, Alina; Hoxha, Sany; Ja, William W

    2015-12-01

    Despite the prevalent use of Drosophila as a model in studies of nutrition, the effects of fundamental food properties, such as pH, on animal health and behavior are not well known. We examined the effect of food pH on adult Drosophila lifespan, feeding behavior, and microbiota composition and tested the hypothesis that pH-mediated changes in palatability and total consumption are required for modulating longevity. We measured the effect of buffered food (pH 5, 7, or 9) on male gustatory responses (proboscis extension), total food intake, and male and female lifespan. The effect of food pH on germfree male lifespan was also assessed. Changes in fly-associated microbial composition as a result of food pH were determined by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Male gustatory responses, total consumption, and male and female longevity were additionally measured in the taste-defective Pox neuro (Poxn) mutant and its transgenic rescue control. An acidic diet increased Drosophila gustatory responses (40-230%) and food intake (5-50%) and extended survival (10-160% longer median lifespan) compared with flies on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Alkaline food pH shifted the composition of fly-associated bacteria and resulted in greater lifespan extension (260% longer median survival) after microbes were eliminated compared with flies on an acidic (50%) or neutral (130%) diet. However, germfree flies lived longer on an acidic diet (5-20% longer median lifespan) compared with those on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Gustatory responses, total consumption, and longevity were unaffected by food pH in Poxn mutant flies. Food pH can directly influence palatability and feeding behavior and affect parameters such as microbial growth to ultimately affect Drosophila lifespan. Fundamental food properties altered by dietary or drug interventions may therefore contribute to changes in animal physiology, metabolism, and survival. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Cellular alterations and enhanced induction of cleft palate after coadministration of retinoic acid and TCDD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and retinoic acid (RA) are both teratogenic in mice. TCDD is a highly toxic, stable environmental contaminant, while RA is a naturally occurring form of vitamin A. Exposure to TCDD induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate, and exposure to RA induces limb defects and cleft palate. Teratology studies previously have shown that the incidence of clefting is higher after exposure to RA + TCDD than would be observed for the same doses of either compound given alone. This study examines the cellular effects which result in cleft palate, after po administration on gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12 of RA + TCDD in corn oil (10 ml/kg total volume). Exposure on GD 10 to 6 micrograms TCDD + 40 mg RA/kg inhibited early growth of the shelves and clefting was due to a failure of shelves to meet and fuse. This effect on mesenchyme was observed in previous studies to occur after exposure on GD 10 to 40 mg/kg RA alone, but not after TCDD alone. After exposure on GD 12 to 6 micrograms TCDD + 80 mg RA/kg, clefting was due to a failure of shelves to fuse after making contact, because the medial cells differentiated into an oral-like epithelium. This response was observed in previous studies to occur after exposure to TCDD alone, but RA alone on GD 12 resulted in differentiation toward nasal-like cells. The interaction between TCDD and RA results in RA-like clefting after exposure on GD 10 and TCDD-like clefting after exposure on GD 12, and this clefting occurs at higher incidences than would occur after the same levels of either agent alone. After exposure on either GD 10 or 12 to RA + TCDD, the programmed cell death of the medial cells does not occur, and these cells continue to express EGF receptors and to bind 125I-EGF. The effects of RA and TCDD may involve modulation of the cells responses to embryonic growth and differentiation factors

  6. Dirichlet topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.M.; Trodden, M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a class of field theories featuring solitonic solutions in which topological defects can end when they intersect other defects of equal or higher dimensionality. Such configurations may be termed open-quotes Dirichlet topological defects,close quotes in analogy with the D-branes of string theory. Our discussion focuses on defects in scalar field theories with either gauge or global symmetries, in 3+1 dimensions; the types of defects considered include walls ending on walls, strings on walls, and strings on strings. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  7. Synthetic Defects for Vibrothermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Jeremy; Holland, Stephen D.; Thompson, R. Bruce; Eisenmann, David J.

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic defects are an important tool used for characterizing the performance of nondestructive evaluation techniques. Viscous material-filled synthetic defects were developed for use in vibrothermography (also known as sonic IR) as a tool to improve inspection accuracy and reliability. This paper describes how the heat-generation response of these VMF synthetic defects is similar to the response of real defects. It also shows how VMF defects can be applied to improve inspection accuracy for complex industrial parts and presents a study of their application in an aircraft engine stator vane.

  8. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  9. Experimental study on the effect of radiation in the secondary palate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Dong Soo [Department of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1977-11-15

    The author observed the effect of X-ray irradiation on the secondary palate formation of the rat fetuses. The mothers were exposed to X-radiation on the 10 1/2th, 11 1/2th, and 12 1/2th day of gestation with respectively 150, 200, 250, 300, and 350 rads. The fetuses were removed from mothers on 15 1/2th, 16 1/2th, and 18 1/2th day of gestation. Morphological changes in palate formation were examined and histochemical preparations were made. 1. In control fetuses, the secondary palates were fully developed on the 15 1/2th, to 18 1/2th day of gestation. But in experimental fetuses, many cleft palates were observed in accordance with increase of X-radiation dose. 2. Frequency of incidence of horizontal position of both palatal shelves in cleft palate was highest. 3. According to the dislocation of palatal processes, the stain ability of palatal crest was varied. 4. The thickened area of palatal epithelium of palatal crest showed intense methyl green-pyronin and PAS reaction 5. Mesenchymal cell condensation was appeared under the thickened epithelium of palatal process and this mesenchymal tissue showed strong colloidal iron reaction. 6. The stain ability of alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase reaction of tectal ridge were decreased in accordance with increase of irradiation doses.

  10. Experimental study on the effect of radiation in the secondary palate formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Dong Soo

    1977-01-01

    The author observed the effect of X-ray irradiation on the secondary palate formation of the rat fetuses. The mothers were exposed to X-radiation on the 10 1/2th, 11 1/2th, and 12 1/2th day of gestation with respectively 150, 200, 250, 300, and 350 rads. The fetuses were removed from mothers on 15 1/2th, 16 1/2th, and 18 1/2th day of gestation. Morphological changes in palate formation were examined and histochemical preparations were made. 1. In control fetuses, the secondary palates were fully developed on the 15 1/2th, to 18 1/2th day of gestation. But in experimental fetuses, many cleft palates were observed in accordance with increase of X-radiation dose. 2. Frequency of incidence of horizontal position of both palatal shelves in cleft palate was highest. 3. According to the dislocation of palatal processes, the stain ability of palatal crest was varied. 4. The thickened area of palatal epithelium of palatal crest showed intense methyl green-pyronin and PAS reaction 5. Mesenchymal cell condensation was appeared under the thickened epithelium of palatal process and this mesenchymal tissue showed strong colloidal iron reaction. 6. The stain ability of alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase reaction of tectal ridge were decreased in accordance with increase of irradiation doses.

  11. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Palatization in Japanese Mimetics: Response to Mester and Ito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schourup, Lawrence; Tamori, Ikuhiro

    1992-01-01

    Mester and Ito's evidence for the phonological theory of Restricted Underspecification (RU) is refuted. Attention is focused on reduplicated forms; and it is concluded that, if there is only a rough and sporadic sound-syllable meaning association with palatization, the argument for RU is untenable. (12 references) (LB)

  13. Helping the Child with a Cleft Palate in Your Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael J.; Pentz, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    Guidelines for teachers of a student with a cleft palate include understand the physical problem; know what kind of speech problem to expect; be alert to the possibility of language-based learning difficulties; watch for signs of hearing loss; be alert to socialization problems; help the student make up work; and avoid self-fulfilling prophecies.…

  14. Frequency of oronasal fistulae in complete cleft palate repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of oro-nasal fistula in patients undergoing complete cleft palate repair by two flappalatoplasty. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Plastic Surgery, Services Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2013. Methodology: Patients admitted to the study place for repair of cleft palate after informed consent obtained were included. Cleft palate was repaired by two-flap palatoplasty, using Bardach technique. Patients were discharged on the second postoperative day and followed-up at third week postoperatively. During follow-up visits, fistulae formation and their sites were recorded on pre-designed proforma. Results: Among the total 90 patients, 40 patients (44.4%) were male and 50 patients (55.6%) were female. The mean age was 6.4 +- 5.7 years ranging from 9 months to 20 years. At third week follow-up, 5 patients (5.6%) had fistulae formation. Four patients (80%) had anterior fistulae and one patient (20%) had posterior fistula. Conclusion: With two-flap palatoplasty Bardach procedure for repair of cleft palate, the complication of fistula formation was uncommon at 5.6%, provided the repair was tension free and multi-layered. (author)

  15. Overexpression of mouse TTF-2 gene causes cleft palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tian; Shi, Jia-Yu; Wu, Min; Wang, Yan; Li, Ling; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Qian; Huang, Lei; Shi, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In humans, mutations of the gene encoding for thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2 or FOXE1) result in Bamforth syndrome. Bamforth syndrome is characterized by agenesis, cleft palate, spiky hair and choanal atresia. TTF-2 null mice (TTF-2−/−) also exhibit cleft palate, suggesting its involvement in the palatogenesis. However, the molecular pathology and genetic regulation by TTF2 remain largely unknown. In the present study, the recombinant expression vector pBROAD3-TTF-2 containing the promoter of the mouse ROSA26 gene was created to form the structural gene of mouse TTF-2 and was microinjected into the male pronuclei of fertilized ova. Sequence analysis confirmed that the TTF-2 transgenic mouse model was established successfully. The transgenic mice displayed a phenotype of cleft palate. In addition, we found that TTF-2 was highly expressed in the medial edge epithelium (MEE) from the embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) to E14.5 in TTF-2 transgenic mice. These observations suggest that overexpression of TTF-2 during palatogenesis may contribute to formation of cleft palate. PMID:22304410

  16. Cleft lip and palate surgery in children: Anaesthetic considerations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Care of cleft patients is very challenging. Team cleft care is usually lacking in many developing countries due to shortage of qualified manpower. This study is aimed at highlighting anaesthetic challenges in the management of cleft in children. Patients and Methods: This was a study of cleft lip and palate ...

  17. Cleft lip and palate malformations: essential knowledge for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cleft lip and palate malformations are a common group of congenital abnormalities, and are therefore frequently encountered by the general practitioner, who is often the primary coordinator in the management of these patients. This is especially true in a South African setting, where specialist treatment is not always readily ...

  18. Awareness, knowledge and attitude on cleft lip and palate among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adequate knowledge and awareness of cleft lip and palate (CLP) deformity may help to counter the negative beliefs and attitudes toward the condition. The objective of this study was to assess the level of awareness, knowledge and attitude of women attending antenatal clinics about CLP. Materials and ...

  19. Teratogenic effect of isotretinoin on the morphology and palate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-03

    Dec 3, 2007 ... 4Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife,. Osun State. ... that certain stages of embryonic development are more ... period of human development of the eyes, ears and heart. ..... germ and palate development in mouse embryos. Braz.

  20. The nose in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, C. D.; Mladina, R.; Nolst Trenité, G. J.; Pigott, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    Surgeons and orthodontists are still challenged to achieve 'better' noses for children with a unilateral cleft or lip, alveoulus and palate (UCLP). Various aspects are discussed: infant anatomy and later changes, developmental mechanics, cleft syndrome in animals with surgically produced facial

  1. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  2. Pleomorphic adenoma of the palate in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, Brian F; Sohn, Andy; Winston, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Presented is a pleomorphic adenoma of the palate in a 12-year-old boy. Pleomorphic adenoma is usually found in adults and is rarely found in patients under 20 years of age. We present initial exam, diagnosis, treatment and a review of literature.

  3. Chronic Pharyngitis And Multiple Soft Palate Peforation In An HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report is at advocating the need for repeated investigation and screening for HIV particularly when there is persistent clinical feature strongly suggestive of AIDS. Should we even start to contemplate therapeutic of antiretroviral dugs in some cases? KEY WORDS: Chronic pharyngitis, Soft palate perforation, AIDS, HIV ...

  4. Plexiform (multinodular) schwannoma of soft palate. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Petousis, Aristotelis; Fiska, Aliki; Stavrianaki, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Plexiform schwannoma is a rare benign neoplasm of the neural sheath characterized by a multinodular plexiform growth pattern. Only 5% of schwannomas have a plexiform or multinodular growth pattern. Schwannoma apparently derives from the Schwann cells. Extracranially, 25% of all schwannomas are located in the head and neck region, but only 1% show an intraoral origin. The intraoral lesions show a predilection for the tongue, followed by the palate, buccal mucosa, lip and gingival. Microscopic examination is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Characteristic histological signs are the palisading of the spindle-shaped Schwann cells around the central acellular area, so called Verocay bodies. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with a smooth mass of the soft palate that was gradually increasing. Surgical excision of the mass was done and the histopathology and immunohistochemistry study of the excised lesion revealed a multinodular plexiform schwannoma of the soft palate. The patient is under regular clinical control, with no signs of recurrence after 17 months. Plexiform schwannomas of the soft palate are mentioned very rarely in the English literature. This rare benign tumor is worthy of recognition because it can be misdiagnosed as plexiform neurofibroma.

  5. Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome with cleft palate, absent nipples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a 6 year old child, second in order of birth of non consanguineous Egyptian parents with typical characteristics of Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome. The patient had sparse light hair over the scalp, scanty eyebrows and eyelashes, a high arched cleft palate, decayed oligodontic teeth, hyperpigmentation all over ...

  6. Speech pattern improvement following gingivectomy of excess palatal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzclaw, Dan; Toscano, Nicholas

    2008-10-01

    Speech disruption secondary to excessive gingival tissue has received scant attention in periodontal literature. Although a few articles have addressed the causes of this condition, documentation and scientific explanation of treatment outcomes are virtually non-existent. This case report describes speech pattern improvements secondary to periodontal surgery and provides a concise review of linguistic and phonetic literature pertinent to the case. A 21-year-old white female with a history of gingival abscesses secondary to excessive palatal tissue presented for treatment. Bilateral gingivectomies of palatal tissues were performed with inverse bevel incisions extending distally from teeth #5 and #12 to the maxillary tuberosities, and large wedges of epithelium/connective tissue were excised. Within the first month of the surgery, the patient noted "changes in the manner in which her tongue contacted the roof of her mouth" and "changes in her speech." Further anecdotal investigation revealed the patient's enunciation of sounds such as "s," "sh," and "k" was greatly improved following the gingivectomy procedure. Palatometric research clearly demonstrates that the tongue has intimate contact with the lateral aspects of the posterior palate during speech. Gingival excess in this and other palatal locations has the potential to alter linguopalatal contact patterns and disrupt normal speech patterns. Surgical correction of this condition via excisional procedures may improve linguopalatal contact patterns which, in turn, may lead to improved patient speech.

  7. Anterior palatal island advancement flap for bone graft coverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Palatal Island Advancement Flap was effective in bone graft coverage in premaxillary edentulous area. Conclusion: It can be used as an aid for bone graft coverage of premaxillary edentulous ridge, where the need for mucosa is small in width but long in length. Keywords: Anterior maxilla, bone graft, dental implant, ...

  8. Polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma of the palate a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The piezoelectric unit was used to excise the mass with no further metastasis or Involvement of the palatal vault. The site of excision healed uneventfully and the hlstopathologlcal report of the excised mass showed no signs of nerve Involvement. This tumor is not only a rare lesion but also depicts a similar clinical picture of ...

  9. The nose in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.D.A. Verwoerd (Carel); R. Mladina (R.); G.J. Nolst-Trenité (Gilbert J.); R.W. Pigott (R.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSurgeons and orthodontists are still challenged to achieve ‘better’ noses for children with a unilateral cleft or lip, alveolus and palate (UCLP). Various aspects are discussed: infant anatomy and later changes, developmental mechanics, cleft syndrome in animals with surgically produced

  10. On holographic defect entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, John; Jensen, Kristan; O’Bannon, Andy; Tsatis, Efstratios; Wrase, Timm

    2014-01-01

    We study a number of (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3+1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1+1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions

  11. Influence of pork and pork by-products on macronutrient and energy digestibility and palatability in large exotic felids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iske, C J; Morris, C L; Kappen, K L

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate digestibility and palatability of a new commercial pork-based raw diet for zoo-managed felids. Currently 2 protein sources (beef or horse) comprise the majority of commercial raw meat diet formulations for exotic carnivores in zoological institutions. Pork-based diets have traditionally not been widely utilized and thus nutrient digestibility of pork has not been adequately evaluated in exotic carnivores. The objectives of this study were 1) to determine if a pork-based diet had similar apparent total tract macronutrient digestibility and fecal scores as standard zoo carnivore diets formulated with either horse or beef, in large exotic felids and 2) evaluate palatability of pork for use in zoos. Ten exotic felids were used including cheetahs (; 3), jaguars (; = 3), leopards (; 2), puma (; 1), and Bengal tiger (; 1). Dietary treatments consisted of 4 raw meat diets: 1 horse-based (Horse), 2 beef-based (B1, B2), and 1 pork-based diet (Pork). Fecal scores also were evaluated (1 = hard to 5 = watery/liquid). This randomized crossover design study consisted of 4 periods, each 10 d for treatment adaptation followed by 4 d of sample collection. Dry matter and crude protein apparent digestibility values were greater ( digestibility was greater ( digestibility values were high across all treatments but were greater ( digestibility values were greater in felids fed Pork (92.4%) compared with B1 (90.2%). Average fecal scores were 2.30, 2.94, 3.42, and 3.54 for Horse, Pork, B1 and B2, respectively; and were different ( digestibility and palatability compared with standard zoo carnivore formulations. In conclusion, pork-based diets could be included among dietary options for large zoo felids.

  12. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  13. Janka hardness using nonstandard specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Marshall Begel; William Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Janka hardness determined on 1.5- by 3.5-in. specimens (2×4s) was found to be equivalent to that determined using the 2- by 2-in. specimen specified in ASTM D 143. Data are presented on the relationship between Janka hardness and the strength of clear wood. Analysis of historical data determined using standard specimens indicated no difference between side hardness...

  14. Rat embryonic palatal shelves respond to TCDD in organ culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1990-01-01

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a highly toxic environmental contaminant, is teratogenic in mice, inducing cleft palate (CP) and hydronephrosis at doses which are not overtly maternally or embryo toxic. Palatal shelves of embryonic mice respond to TCDD, both in vivo and in organ culture, with altered differentiation of medial epithelial cells. By contrast, in the rat TCDD produces substantial maternal, embryonic, and fetal toxicity, including fetal lethality, with few malformations. In this study the possible effects of maternal toxicity on induction of cleft palate were eliminated by exposure of embryonic rat palatal shelves in organ culture. The shelves were examined for specific TCDD-induced alterations in differentiation of the medial cells. On Gestation Day (GD) 14 or 15 palatal shelves from embryonic F344 rats were placed in organ culture for 2 to 3 days (IMEM:F12 medium, 5% FBS, 0.1% DMSO) containing 0, 1 x 10(-8), 1 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-10), or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. The medial epithelial peridermal cells degenerated on shelves exposed to control media or 5 x 10(-11) M TCDD. Exposure to 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8) M TCDD inhibited this degeneration in 20, 36, and 60% of the shelves, respectively, and was statistically significant at the two highest doses. A normally occurring decrease in [3H]TdR incorporation was inhibited in some GD 15 shelves cultured with 10(-10) and 10(-9) M TCDD. The medial cells of TCDD-exposed shelves continued to express high levels of immunohistochemically detected EGF receptors. The altered differentiation of rat medial epithelium is similar to that reported for TCDD-exposed mouse medial cells in vivo and in vitro. However, in order to obtain these responses, the cultured rat shelves require much higher concentrations of TCDD than the mouse shelves

  15. Cleft lip and palate in the arts: a critical reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Masoud; Gross, Justin; Ovchinsky, Alexander; Wood-Smith, Donald

    2012-03-01

    The aesthetics of facial structure are used by humans to measure one's beauty, character, and overall "goodness." Individuals born with cleft lip and/or palate are often stigmatized and face much psychosocial adversity. Social attitudes and beliefs have a direct impact upon the psychological development of these individuals. Such social norms are in large part shaped by the physical representations of "good" and "attractive" in various art media including films, advertisements, and paintings. Individuals born with a cleft have been portrayed in the artworks of different eras. The light in which they are portrayed stems from the prevalent beliefs of each period and sheds light on the social attitudes of each epoch toward clefts. Here we discuss the social and psychological ramifications of these works. We then review several artworks representing cleft lip and/or palate and propose an active role for the artist in shaping social attitudes regarding facial deformities. Numerous articles and works of arts were examined and inspected for signs of facial deformity, with particular attention to cleft lip and/or palate. Social media have an important role in defining the norms of society. Much of the art of the past has depicted negatively individuals born with cleft lip and/or palate deformity, thus excluding them from the norm. In order to decrease the negative social stigmas of cleft lip and/or palate, it is now the responsibility of society to widen its range of norms to include individuals born with these deformities through "normal" representations in the various media.

  16. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Grant A; Brietzke, Scott E

    2017-01-01

      This study examined malpractice claims related to cleft lip and cleft palate surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and reviewed financial outcomes.   The WestlawNext legal database was analyzed for all malpractice lawsuits and settlements related to the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.   Inclusion criteria included patients undergoing surgical repair of a primary cleft lip or palate or revision for complications of previous surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes.   A total of 36 cases were identified, with 12 unique cases from 1981 to 2006 meeting the inclusion criteria. Six cases (50%) were decided by a jury and six by settlement. Five cases involved complications related to the specific surgery, and the other seven were associated with any surgery and perioperative care of children and adults. Cleft palate repair (50%) was the most frequently litigated surgery. Postoperative negligent supervision was the most common allegation (42%) and resulted in a payout in each case (mean = $3,126,032). Death (42%) and brain injury (25%) were the most frequent injuries reported. Financial awards were made in nine cases (after adjusting for inflation, mean = $2,470,552, range = $0 to $7,704,585). The awards were significantly larger for brain injury than other outcomes ($4,675,395 versus $1,368,131 after adjusting for inflation, P = .0101).   Malpractice litigation regarding cleft lip and palate surgery is uncommon. However, significant financial awards involving perioperative brain injury have been reported.

  17. Management of cleft lip and palate in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With advancement of medical services in developed countries and awareness among the patients, it is rare to find an adult with an unoperated cleft lip and palate. However, the scenario is totally different in developing countries. Working as a part of a team in developing country, where co-coordinated team work is primitive, resources to provide treatment are very thin, public awareness of availability of treatment for this anomaly is minimal, the age of patients reaching for primary treatment varies from few days to late forties. Though the aim and aspiration is to provide holistic multidisciplinary care, the priority is getting treatment for all cleft patients. In such situation, the management of cleft lip and palate demands changes of approach, techniques and philosophy. Aims and Objectives: The deformed anatomy especially the facial bones and dentition is described. Due to well established deformities, the approach for management is individualized. The procedures and modification of procedures has been described. Results and Outcome: The outcome of the primary repair is adults certainly have less than satisfactory outcome for obvious reasons. The expected outcome and expectation of patients and families following primary surgeries in cleft lip and palate has been discussed. Though all adult patients got some improvement in speech after palate repair, achieving normal speech was difficult. The naso-labial appearance was not perfect, but well accepted by the patients and families. There are many psychosocial problems in these patients, the objective evaluation could not be done due to too many variables. However, primary repair of cleft lip and palate is justified and beneficial for the patients.

  18. 2TB hard disk drive

    CERN Multimedia

    This particular object was used up until 2012 in the Data Centre. It slots into one of the Disk Server trays. Hard disks were invented in the 1950s. They started as large disks up to 20 inches in diameter holding just a few megabytes (link is external). They were originally called "fixed disks" or "Winchesters" (a code name used for a popular IBM product). They later became known as "hard disks" to distinguish them from "floppy disks (link is external)." Hard disks have a hard platter that holds the magnetic medium, as opposed to the flexible plastic film found in tapes and floppies.

  19. Associations Between Disinfection By-Product Exposures and Craniofacial Birth Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, John A; Wright, J Michael; Evans, Amanda; Rivera-Núñez, Zorimar; Meyer, Amy; Narotsky, Michael G

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine associations between craniofacial birth defects (CFDs) and disinfection by-product (DBP) exposures, including the sum of four trihalomethanes (THM4) and five haloacetic acids (HAA5) (ie, DBP9). We calculated first trimester adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for different DBPs in a matched case-control study of 366 CFD cases in Massachusetts towns with complete 1999 to 2004 THM and HAA data. We detected elevated aORs for cleft palate with DBP9 (highest quintile aOR = 3.52; 95% CI: 1.07, 11.60), HAA5, trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), and dichloroacetic acid. We detected elevated aORs for eye defects with TCAA and chloroform. This is the first epidemiological study of DBPs to examine eye and ear defects, as well as HAAs and CFDs. The associations for cleft palate and eye defects highlight the importance of examining specific defects and DBPs beyond THM4.

  20. Food choice effects on herbivory: Intra-specific seagrass palatability and inter-specific macrophyte palatability in seagrass communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ramos, Rocío; Brun, Fernando G.; Egea, Luis G.; Vergara, Juan J.

    2018-05-01

    Interactions between the palatability and abundance of different food sources may influence herbivory patterns in seagrass-dominated communities. In addition, intra-specific differences in nutrient and structural quality of leaves may also alter seagrass palatability and generate different rates of consumption within these communities. We offered two temperate seagrasses species, (Cymodocea nodosa and Zostera noltei) from two different locations to look at intraspecific differences, and two other macrophytes, both of which occur at the same location as seagrasses but represent the extremes of palatability, to a generalist herbivore Paracentrotus lividus (purple sea urchin). Using feeding assays, we compared the consumption rates in individual (single plant species) and combined diets at different food availabilities. Intra-specific differences between seagrass species growing at different locations (inner and outer bay) were indeed found to significantly modify the consumption rate for one species. Structural traits such as carbon content were linked to the low consumption found in Cymodocea nodosa from the inner bay location. In addition, we found that the co-occurrence of different macrophyte species can result in preferential consumption of the more palatable macrophyte with high nutritional content and low structural defence over seagrasses, especially when P. lividus has an abundant food supply. Overall, our findings suggest that intra- and inter-specific differences in seagrass traits and the relative abundance of other macrophytes may explain the variability in patterns of herbivory found within seagrass communities.

  1. An evaluation of factors influencing feeding in babies with a cleft palate with and without a cleft lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Vanessa; Greatrex-White, Sheila

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the impact of different bottles and teats for feeding babies with a cleft palate (with and without a cleft lip) on weight velocity, feeding behaviour, and maternal self-esteem. A mixed methods study incorporating the use of diaries to record feeding patterns of babies and levels of professional support received was used. Growth was assessed by converting weights into standard deviation scores and using the differences to express weight velocity over a six-week period. Visual analogue scales were used to assess mothers' perceptions of their children and themselves. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Score (EPDS) was used to identify maternal depression. The study demonstrated that the most significant effect on weight was determined by cleft type. Babies with isolated clefts of the hard and soft palate experienced greater feeding problems and suffered the biggest weight losses. This remained significant independently of the type of bottle/teat used. Poor weight gain was also associated with a mother's low perception of herself and her child, and her tendency towards depression. The study highlights the importance of the early assessment of babies' feeding skills and regular follow-up and support from trained and experienced nurse specialists.

  2. Hard processes. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, B.L.; Khoze, V.A.; Lipatov, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Deep inelastic (hard) processes are now at the epicenter of modern high-energy physics. These processes are governed by short-distance dynamics, which reveals the intrinsic structure of elementary particles. The theory of deep inelastic processes is now sufficiently well settled. The authors' aim was to give an effective tool to theoreticians and experimentalists who are engaged in high-energy physics. This book is intended primarily for physicists who are only beginning to study the field. To read the book, one should be acquainted with the Feynman diagram technique and with some particular topics from elementary particle theory (symmetries, dispersion relations, Regge pole theory, etc.). Theoretical consideration of deep inelastic processes is now based on quantum chromodynamics (QCD). At the same time, analysis of relevant physical phenomena demands a synthesis of QCD notions (quarks, gluons) with certain empirical characteristics. Therefore, the phenomenological approaches presented are a necessary stage in a study of this range of phenomena which should undoubtedly be followed by a detailed description based on QCD and electroweak theory. The authors were naturally unable to dwell on experimental data accumulated during the past decade of intensive investigations. Priority was given to results which allow a direct comparison with theoretical predictions. (Auth.)

  3. Hard coal; Steinkohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, Kai van de; Sitte, Andreas-Peter [Gesamtverband Steinkohle e.V. (GVSt), Herne (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    International the coal market in 2014 was the first time in a long time in a period of stagnation. In Germany, the coal consumption decreased even significantly, mainly due to the decrease in power generation. Here the national energy transition has now been noticable affected negative for coal use. The political guidances can expect a further significant downward movement for the future. In the present phase-out process of the German hard coal industry with still three active mines there was in 2014 no decommissioning. But the next is at the end of 2015, and the plans for the time after mining have been continued. [German] International war der Markt fuer Steinkohle 2014 erstmals seit langem wieder von einer Stagnation gekennzeichnet. In Deutschland ging der Steinkohlenverbrauch sogar deutlich zurueck, vor allem wegen des Rueckgangs in der Stromerzeugung. Hier hat sich die nationale Energiewende nun spuerbar und fuer die Steinkohlennutzung negativ ausgewirkt. Die politischen Weichenstellungen lassen fuer die Zukunft eine weitere erhebliche Abwaertsbewegung erwarten. Bei dem im Auslaufprozess befindlichen deutschen Steinkohlenbergbau mit noch drei aktiven Bergwerken gab es 2014 keine Stilllegung. Doch die naechste steht zum Jahresende 2015 an, und die Planungen fuer die Zeit nach dem Bergbau sind fortgefuehrt worden.

  4. Defect kinetics in novel detector materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B C

    2000-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors will be used extensively in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, where unprecedented particle fluences will cause significant atomic displacement damage. We present a model of the evolution of defect concentrations and consequent electrical behaviour in "novel" detector materials with various oxygen and carbon impurity concentrations. The divacancy-oxygen (V/sub 2/O) defect is identified as the cause of changes in device characteristics during /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation. In the case of hadron irradiation changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/) are dominated by cluster defects, in particular the divacancy (V/sub 2/), which exchange charge directly via a non-Shockley-Read- Hall mechanism. The V/sub 2/O defect also contributes to Ne/sub eff/. This defect is more copiously produced during 24 GeV/c proton irradiation than during 1 MeV neutron irradiation on account of the higher vacancy introduction rate, hence the radiation hardness of materials is more sensiti...

  5. Comparison of quality of speech after Veau-Wardill-Kilner pushback operation and the Cronin modification in the primary treatment of cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapanen, M L; Rintala, A E

    1993-01-01

    The quality of speech was compared in 124 young adults with isolated cleft palate. Forty-seven subjects were excluded because of the presence of factors that might have biased the evaluation of the success rate of the two operations studied, leaving 77 subjects who had undergone primary palatoplasty for analysis. One stage closure of the soft and hard palate was done for 43 patients by the mucoperiosteal palatal V to Y pushback technique (Veau-Wardill-Kilner, group V), and 34 underwent the Cronin modification (group C). Their speech was tape recorded, analysed by three qualified listeners, and hypernasality assessed by four published hypernasality indexes. More subjects in group C achieved normal resonance than in group V, who had higher hypernasality index scores than group C. The groups managed pressure consonants similarly. Only a few patients had weak plosives, audible nasal air emission, or compensatory articulation. Similar numbers of secondary operations were done for both groups. However, group V would have actually required secondary surgery more frequently than group C.

  6. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  7. Self-reports of psychosocial functioning among children and young adults with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Orlagh; Burden, Donald; Hepper, Peter; Stevenson, Mike; Johnston, Chris

    2006-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was employed to determine the psychosocial effects of cleft lip and/or palate among children and young adults, compared with a control group of children and young adults without cleft lip and palate. The study comprised 160 children and young adults with cleft lip and/or palate and 113 children and young adults without cleft lip and/or palate. All participants were between 8 and 21 years of age. Psychological functioning (anxiety, self-esteem, depression, and behavioral problems) was assessed using validated psychological questionnaires. Happiness with facial appearance was rated using a visual analog scale. Social functioning, including experience of teasing/bullying and satisfaction with speech, was assessed using a semistructured interview. Participants with cleft lip and/or palate reported greater behavioral problems (p palate and subjects without cleft lip and/or palate in terms of anxiety (p > .05) or self-esteem (p > .05). Having been teased was a significant predictor of poor psychological functioning, more so than having a cleft lip and/or palate per se (p palate and it was a significant predictor of poorer psychosocial functioning. Children and young adults with cleft lip and/or palate require psychological assessment, specifically focusing on their experience of teasing, as part of their routine cleft care.

  8. Clinical presentation of epignathus teratoma with cleft palate; and duplication of cranial base, tongue, mandible, and pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yujiro; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, Madoka; Saijo, Hideto; Hoshi, Kazuto; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    A 2-day-old girl was diagnosed with an oral epignathus teratoma and an uncommon combination of orofacial malformations including cleft palate; tongue, mandible, cranial base, cervical vertebrae, lower lip, and pituitary gland duplications; and fistula of the glabella and lower lip. Computed tomography revealed that the mass within the nasal cavity had tooth-like calcifications and protruded into the nasopharynx and oral cavity. It was implanted on the anterior wall of the body of the sphenoid bone and was accompanied with mandibular duplication. Magnetic resonance imaging detected duplication of the pituitary gland and confirmed the absence of intracranial communication of the nasopharyngeal mass. The teratoma did not cause respiratory obstruction; however, the patient required continuous nasogastric tube feeding. Usually, an epignathus teratoma is associated with few midline defects and can be corrected with multiple interventions at different time points. The current study describes the surgical procedure comprising excision of the tumor along with reconstructive surgeries of the mandible, tongue, and fistulae undertaken when the infant reached 7 months of age. The cleft palate was repaired at 18 months of age using the Kaplan buccal flap method. Histopathologic examination confirmed a grade 0 teratoma covered with keratinized skin and containing pilosebaceous and sweat glands, adipose tissue, and smooth muscle. The long-term success of this intervention was determined at the follow-up examination conducted at 3 years of age, with no signs of the teratoma recurrence observed.

  9. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  10. Intrinsic Defects and H Doping in WO3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie; Vasilopoulou, Maria; Davazoglou, Dimitris; Kennou, Stella; Chroneos, Alexander; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2017-01-01

    WO3 is widely used as industrial catalyst. Intrinsic and/or extrinsic defects can tune the electronic properties and extend applications to gas sensors and optoelectonics. However, H doping is a challenge to WO3, the relevant mechanisms being hardly

  11. Classification of maxillectomy defects: a systematic review and criteria necessary for a universal description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S; Jacob, Rhonda F; Taylor, Thomas D

    2012-04-01

    Maxillectomy defects are complex and involve a number of anatomic structures. Several maxillectomy defect classifications have been proposed with no universal acceptance among surgeons and prosthodontists. Established criteria for describing the maxillectomy defect are lacking. This systematic review aimed to evaluate classification systems in the available literature, to provide a critical appraisal, and to identify the criteria necessary for a universal description of maxillectomy and midfacial defects. An electronic search of the English language literature between the periods of 1974 and June 2011 was performed by using PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases with predetermined inclusion criteria. Key terms included in the search were maxillectomy classification, maxillary resection classification, maxillary removal classification, maxillary reconstruction classification, midfacial defect classification, and midfacial reconstruction classification. This was supplemented by a manual search of selected journals. After application of predetermined exclusion criteria, the final list of articles was reviewed in-depth to provide a critical appraisal and identify criteria for a universal description of a maxillectomy defect. The electronic database search yielded 261 titles. Systematic application of inclusion and exclusion criteria resulted in identification of 14 maxillectomy and midfacial defect classification systems. From these articles, 6 different criteria were identified as necessary for a universal description of a maxillectomy defect. Multiple deficiencies were noted in each classification system. Though most articles described the superior-inferior extent of the defect, only a small number of articles described the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral extent of the defect. Few articles listed dental status and soft palate involvement when describing maxillectomy defects. No classification system has accurately described the maxillectomy defect, based on

  12. Modified silk fibroin scaffolds with collagen/decellularized pulp for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate: Morphological structures and biofunctionalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangkert, Supaporn; Meesane, Jirut; Kamonmattayakul, Suttatip; Chai, Wen Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital malformation that generates a maxillofacial bone defect around the mouth area. The creation of performance scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate is an issue that was proposed in this research. Because of its good biocompatibility, high stability, and non-toxicity, silk fibroin was selected as the scaffold of choice in this research. Silk fibroin scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying before immerging in a solution of collagen, decellularized pulp, and collagen/decellularized pulp. Then, the immersed scaffolds were freeze-dried. Structural organization in solution was observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The molecular organization of the solutions and crystal structure of the scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The weight increase of the modified scaffolds and the pore size were determined. The morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical properties were tested. Biofunctionalities were considered by seeding osteoblasts in silk fibroin scaffolds before analysis of the cell proliferation, viability, total protein assay, and histological analysis. The results demonstrated that dendrite structure of the fibrils occurred in those solutions. Molecular organization of the components in solution arranged themselves into an irregular structure. The fibrils were deposited in the pores of the modified silk fibroin scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed a beta-sheet structure. The morphological structure affected the mechanical properties of the silk fibroin scaffolds with and without modification. Following assessment of the biofunctionalities, the modified silk fibroin scaffolds could induce cell proliferation, viability, and total protein particularly in modified silk fibroin with collagen/decellularized pulp. Furthermore, the histological analysis indicated that the cells could adhere in modified silk fibroin

  13. [Rhabdomyosarcoma of soft palate. A case on purpose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Marzán, F; De Bonis Redondo, M; Redondo Ventura, F; Betancor Martínez, L; Sanginés Yzzo, M; Arias Marzán, J; De Bonis Braun, C; Zurita Expósito, V; Reig Ripoll, F; De Lucas Carmona, G

    2006-01-01

    The rabdomiosarcoma (RMS) are infrequent tumors. They are principally described in infancy and located in 35% of the cases in head and neck. The nasopharynx localisation is relatively rare, being in these cases the tongue, palate and oral mucosa the preferent places of establishment. Classically the patient presented very low standard healing with surgery and radiotherapy. The introduction in the middle 70 of systematic chimiotherapy as complementary treatment, improved the survival rate in large scale. In this article the case of an adolescent patient, who presented a RMS at the level of the soft palate, the diagnostic procedure and the therapeutic decision adopted, after revision of the last studies at this respect, are described.

  14. Hardness variability in commercial technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Sexton, F.W.; Roeske, S.B.; Knoll, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation hardness of commercial Floating Gate 256K E 2 PROMs from a single diffusion lot was observed to vary between 5 to 25 krad(Si) when irradiated at a low dose rate of 64 mrad(Si)/s. Additional variations in E 2 PROM hardness were found to depend on bias condition and failure mode (i.e., inability to read or write the memory), as well as the foundry at which the part was manufactured. This variability is related to system requirements, and it is shown that hardness level and variability affect the allowable mode of operation for E 2 PROMs in space applications. The radiation hardness of commercial 1-Mbit CMOS SRAMs from Micron, Hitachi, and Sony irradiated at 147 rad(Si)/s was approximately 12, 13, and 19 krad(Si), respectively. These failure levels appear to be related to increases in leakage current during irradiation. Hardness of SRAMs from each manufacturer varied by less than 20%, but differences between manufacturers are significant. The Qualified Manufacturer's List approach to radiation hardness assurance is suggested as a way to reduce variability and to improve the hardness level of commercial technologies

  15. Metallography of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, E.A.; Bochvar, G.A.; Brun, M.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Different types of defects of metallurgical, technological and exploitation origin in intermediate and final products of titanium alloys, are considered. The examples of metallic and nonmetallic inclusions, chemical homogeneity, different grains, bands, cracks, places of searing, porosity are given; methods of detecting the above defects are described. The methods of metallography, X-ray spectral analysis, measuring microhardness are used

  16. Beating Birth Defects

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Each year in the U.S., one in 33 babies is affected by a major birth defect. Women can greatly improve their chances of giving birth to a healthy baby by avoiding some of the risk factors for birth defects before and during pregnancy. In this podcast, Dr. Stuart Shapira discusses ways to improve the chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.

  17. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa Avinash; Devare Shibani; Ghanshani Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical t...

  18. Factors prognostic for phonetic development after cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Seok; Kim, Jae Bong; Lee, Jeong Woo; Yang, Jung Dug; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Choi, Kang Young

    2015-10-01

    Palatoplasty is aimed to achieve normal speech, improve food intake, and ensure successful maxillary growth. However, the velopharyngeal function is harder to control than other functions. Therefore, many studies on the prognostic factor of velopharyngeal insufficiency have been conducted. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between speech outcomes and multimodality based on intraoral and preoperative three-dimensional computerized tomographic (CT) findings. Among 73 children with cleft palate who underwent palatoplasty between April 2011 and August 2014 at Kyungpook National University Hospital (KNUH), 27 were retrospectively evaluated. The 27 cases were non-syndromic, for which successful speech evaluation was conducted by a single speech-language pathologist (Table 1). Successful speech evaluation was defined as performing the test three times in 6-month intervals. Three intraoral parameters were measured before and immediately after operation (Fig. 1). On axial- and coronal-view preoperative facial CT, 5 and 2 different parameters were analyzed, respectively (Figs. 2 and 3). Regression analysis (SPSS IBM 22.0) was used in the statistical analysis. Two-flap palatoplasty and Furlow's double opposing Z-plasty were performed in 15 and 12 patients, respectively. The operation was performed 11 months after birth on average. Children with a higher palatal arch and wider maxillary tuberosity distance showed hypernasality (p palate width and height, rather than initial diagnosis, treatment method, or palate length. Therefore, a more active intervention is needed, such as orthopedic appliance, posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation, or early speech training. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip, and palate (EEC syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohita Marwaha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectodermal dysplasias (EDs are a large and complex group of diseases. More than 170 different clinical conditions have been recognized and defined as ectodermal dysplasias. Commonly involved ectodermal-derived structures are hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. In some conditions, it may be associated with mental retardation. We report a case of 10-year-old male child with ectrodactyly, syndactyly, ED, cleft lip/palate, hearing loss, and mental retardation.

  20. Unique expression of cytoskeletal proteins in human soft palate muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Farhan; Berggren, Diana; Holmlund, Thorbjörn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Stål, Per

    2016-03-01

    The human oropharyngeal muscles have a unique anatomy with diverse and intricate functions. To investigate if this specialization is also reflected in the cytoarchitecture of muscle fibers, intermediate filament proteins and the dystrophin-associated protein complex have been analyzed in two human palate muscles, musculus uvula (UV) and musculus palatopharyngeus (PP), with immunohistochenmical and morphological techniques. Human limb muscles were used as reference. The findings show that the soft palate muscle fibers have a cytoskeletal architecture that differs from the limb muscles. While all limb muscles showed immunoreaction for a panel of antibodies directed against different domains of cytoskeletal proteins desmin and dystrophin, a subpopulation of palate muscle fibers lacked or had a faint immunoreaction for desmin (UV 11.7% and PP 9.8%) and the C-terminal of the dystrophin molecule (UV 4.2% and PP 6.4%). The vast majority of these fibers expressed slow contractile protein myosin heavy chain I. Furthermore, an unusual staining pattern was also observed in these fibers for β-dystroglycan, caveolin-3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase nNOS, which are all membrane-linking proteins associated with the dystrophin C-terminus. While the immunoreaction for nNOS was generally weak or absent, β-dystroglycan and caveolin-3 showed a stronger immunostaining. The absence or a low expression of cytoskeletal proteins otherwise considered ubiquitous and important for integration and contraction of muscle cells indicate a unique cytoarchitecture designed to meet the intricate demands of the upper airway muscles. It can be concluded that a subgroup of muscle fibers in the human soft palate appears to have special biomechanical properties, and their unique cytoarchitecture must be taken into account while assessing function and pathology in oropharyngeal muscles. © 2015 Anatomical Society.