WorldWideScience

Sample records for hard dental tissues

  1. Hard and soft tissue surgical complications in dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Shahid R

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses surgical complications associated with the placement of dental implants, specifically focusing on how they occur (etiology), as well as their management and prevention. Dental implant surgical complications can be classified into those of hard and soft tissues. In general, complications can be avoided with thorough preoperative treatment planning and proper surgical technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of ultrashort-pulsed laser on dental hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchizono, Takeyuki; Awazu, Kunio; Igarashi, Akihiro; Kato, Junji; Hirai, Yoshito

    2007-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulsed laser (USPL) can ablate various materials with precious less thermal effect. In laser dentistry, to solve the problem that were the generation of crack and carbonized layer by irradiating with conventional laser such as Er:YAG and CO II laser, USPL has been studied to ablate dental hard tissues by several researchers. We investigated the effectiveness of ablation on dental hard tissues by USPL. In this study, Ti:sapphire laser as USPL was used. The laser parameter had the pulse duration of 130 fsec, 800nm wavelength, 1KHz of repetition rate and the average power density of 90~360W/cm2. Bovine root dentin plates and crown enamel plates were irradiated with USPL at 1mm/sec using moving stage. The irradiated samples were analyzed by SEM, EDX, FTIR and roughness meter. In all irradiated samples, the cavity margin and wall were sharp and steep, extremely. In irradiated dentin samples, the surface showed the opened dentin tubules and no smear layer. The Ca/P ratio by EDX measurement and the optical spectrum by FTIR measurement had no change on comparison irradiated samples and non-irradiated samples. These results confirmed that USPL could ablate dental hard tissue, precisely and non-thermally. In addition, the ablation depths of samples were 10μm, 20μm, and 60μm at 90 W/cm2, 180 W/cm2, and 360 W/cm2, approximately. Therefore, ablation depth by USPL depends on the average power density. USPL has the possibility that can control the precision and non-thermal ablation with depth direction by adjusting the irradiated average power density.

  3. Dental hard tissue drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2017-07-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a long optical cavity and investigated the drilling characteristics of dental hard tissue. The CO2 laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 13 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, a spark gap, and a long optical cavity with a cavity length of 175 cm. The CO2 laser produced a short pulse that had a spike pulse with the width of 337 ns and the energy of 1.9 mJ, a pulse tail with the length of 180 μs and the energy of 37.6 mJ, and a doughnut-like beam. In the investigation, a sample was a natural drying human tooth (enamel and dentine). In a processing system, a ZnSe focusing lens with the focal length of 50 mm was used and the location of the focal plane was that of the sample surface. In 1 pulse irradiation, the drilling characteristics depended on the fluence was investigated. In the enamel and dentin drilling, the drilling depth increased with the fluence. The 1 pulse irradiation with the fluence of 21.5 J/cm2 produced the depth of 79.3 μm in the enamel drilling, and the depth of 152.7 μm in the dentin drilling. The short-pulse CO2 laser produced a deeper drilling depth at a lower fluence than long-pulse CO2 lasers in dental hard tissue processing.

  4. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  5. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  6. The CuHBr laser in hard dental tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Walter

    2004-01-01

    In this work, it was verified the viability of characterization of laser-irradiated dental tissues in two extreme conditions: high and low absorption by the dental tissue. Comparison with light microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy revealed that these techniques are complementary each other: quantitative topographic information is directly extracted from the atomic force microscopy, while morphological aspects can be imaged by light microscopy or scanning electronic microscopy. A cavity generated by Cu-HyBrID laser in human dental enamel was also evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Structural and morphological differences between the fused and resolidified enamel from the cavity walls and the enamel from the natural tis sue were analyzed. A model, based on the Monte Carlo method described the propagation of CuHBr laser radiation and the absorbed energy distribution in dental tissues. Experimental measures with a CCD camera were used to semiquantitatively characterize the scattered light distribution in the tooth and they corroborated the model. It was observed that Rayleigh scattering and diffuse scattered radiation is predominant. The absorbed energy distribution map and the temperature variation along the beam propagation axis presented strong dependence with the absorption coefficient of the dental enamel and they cannot be deduced from the light distribution profile. The exposure time threshold for dental enamel melting and evaporation, irradiated by a specific condition of the green line of the Cu-HyBrID laser, was determined and a phenomenological model was discussed for the laser-matter interaction, based on pulse accumulation effect. Theoretical temperature calculations associated with experimental evidences strongly suggest that optical and thermal parameters should vary with temperature. The obtained exposure time threshold should correspond to the time necessary to the sample reach the critical temperature, at which the increase of absorption

  7. General evaluation of hard dental tissue and risk factors of dental caries in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Антоніна Михайлівна Політун

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prognostication of caries in youth is important for determination and prescription of individual prophylactic arrangements and its further influence on mineralization of the hard dental tissues.Aim of the work: the study of the prevalence and intensity of caries among the young people and determination of possible connection with the risk factor of caries development for further choice of the reasonable prophylactic arrangement.Materials and methods of research: epidemiological, clinical, statistic ones.Results of research: The article describes results of the comprehensive dental examination of 135 persons18-25 years old. There was determined the high prevalence of caries (96,3±0,74 % with considerable intensity (8,87±0,39. The main etiological factors among youth are: poor nutrition with prevalence of carbohydrate (74,81±0,56 %, lack of oral hygiene (59,27±0,73 %, quantitative and qualitative composition of oral fluid, presence of somatic diseases (40±0,30 %, bad habits (31,85±0,24 %, neglect of the sport (48,88±0,36 %, chronic emotional stress (38,51±0,29 %, due to the increased workload and related stress factors.Conclusions: the high prevalence (96,3±0,74 % and intensity of carious process (8,87±0,39 is caused by the unsatisfactory state of oral cavity, (1,91±0,06, under the influence of general factors (somatic diseases, stress, poor nutrition the reactivity of protective mechanisms is lowered and the risk of dental morbidity of youth increases. So, it proves the necessity of elaboration and introduction of the active arrangements of primary prophylaxis directed on the raise of caries resistance of the hard dental tissues in young people

  8. X-Ray pictures of the developmental anomalis of the hard dental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecetkova, A.; Ondrasovicova, J.

    2008-01-01

    Dental anomalies are rare lessions of the hard dental tissue. They are as symptoms varies of the syndromes. They are as follow: hyperdoncia, hypodoncia, oligodoncia, anodoncia, mesiodens, macrodoncia and microdoncia. All of the above anomalis are detected by X-ray diagnostics ( intraoral and extra-oral radiography ). (authors)

  9. Hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp stem cells in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells, seeded into a calcium phosphate ceramic scaffold, and implanted subcutaneously in mice. Previously, STRO-1 selection was used to obtain a mesenchymal stem cell progenitor

  10. Detection for demineralization of dental hard tissues using index-sequenced radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Hyun; Park, Young Ho; Kim, Kyung Sook; Park, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Gi Ja; Choi, Sam Jin; Park, Hun Kuk; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the radiographic technique for detecting the demineralization which is known as indication of dental caries. This technique was based on the comparing of multiple radiographs which was irradiated by multiple X-ray spectra. For the meaningful comparing, the multiple radiographs were reconstructed to the dosimetrically consistent images using a standard material. The difference of resulting images of same target with multiple spectra represents the difference of response of material as regards the spectra. We have found about 10% of demineralization of dental hard tissues particularly in the proximal region through the analyzing of differences. Most intriguing thing in this investigation was that the method to analyze difference shows us to an anatomic structure of dental hard tissues even if absolute values of optical density were excluded during the procedures.

  11. Detection for demineralization of dental hard tissues using index-sequenced radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Hyun; Park, Young Ho; Kim, Kyung Sook; Park, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Gi Ja; Choi, Sam Jin; Park, Hun Kuk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, KyungHee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, KyungHee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop the radiographic technique for detecting the demineralization which is known as indication of dental caries. This technique was based on the comparing of multiple radiographs which was irradiated by multiple X-ray spectra. For the meaningful comparing, the multiple radiographs were reconstructed to the dosimetrically consistent images using a standard material. The difference of resulting images of same target with multiple spectra represents the difference of response of material as regards the spectra. We have found about 10% of demineralization of dental hard tissues particularly in the proximal region through the analyzing of differences. Most intriguing thing in this investigation was that the method to analyze difference shows us to an anatomic structure of dental hard tissues even if absolute values of optical density were excluded during the procedures.

  12. The influence of parotid gland sparing on radiation damages of dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Jeremias; Seidel, Johannes; Schweyen, Ramona; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Vordermark, Dirk; Gernhardt, Christian; Kuhnt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether radiation damage on dental hard tissue depends on the mean irradiation dose the spared parotid gland is subjected to or on stimulated whole salivary flow rate. Between June 2002 and October 2008, 70 patients with neck and cancer curatively irradiated were included in this study. All patients underwent dental treatment referring to the guidelines and recommendations of the German Society of Dental, Oral and Craniomandibular Sciences prior, during, and after radiotherapy (RT). During the follow-up period of 24 months, damages on dental hard tissues were classified according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. The mean doses (D(mean)) during spared parotid gland RT were determined. Stimulated whole saliva secretion flow rates (SFR) were measured before RT and 1, 6, 12, 24 months after RT. Thirty patients showed no carious lesions (group A), 18 patients developed sporadic carious lesions (group B), and 22 patients developed general carious lesions (group C). Group A patients received a D mean of 21.2 ± 11.04 Gy. Group B patients received a D(mean) of 26.5 ± 11.59 Gy and group C patients received a D(mean) of 33.9 ± 9.93 Gy, respectively. The D(mean) of group A was significantly lower than the D(mean) of group C (p dental hard tissue correlates with increased mean irradiation doses as well as decreased salivary flow rates. Parotid gland sparing resulting in a dose below 20 Gy reduces radiation damage on dental hard tissues, and therefore, the dose may act as a predictor for the damage to be expected.

  13. Environmental lead pollution and its possible influence on tooth loss and hard dental tissue lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenić-Milosević, Desanka; Mileusnić, Ivan; Kolak, Veljko; Pejanović, Djordje; Ristić, Tamara; Jakovljević, Ankica; Popović, Milica; Pesić, Dragana; Melih, Irena

    2013-08-01

    Environmental lead (Pb) pollution is a global problem. Hard dental tissue is capable of accumulating lead and other hard metals from the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate any correlation between the concentration of lead in teeth extracted from inhabitants of Pancevo and Belgrade, Serbia, belonging to different age groups and occurrence of tooth loss, caries and non-carious lesions. A total of 160 volunteers were chosen consecutively from Pancevo (the experimental group) and Belgrade (the control group) and divided into 5 age subgroups of 32 subjects each. Clinical examination consisted of caries and hard dental tissue diagnostics. The Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) Index and Significant Caries Index were calculated. Extracted teeth were freed of any organic residue by UV digestion and subjected to voltammetric analysis for the content of lead. The average DMFT scores in Pancevo (20.41) were higher than in Belgrade (16.52); in the patients aged 31-40 and 41-50 years the difference was significant (p lead concentration and the number of extracted teeth, number of carious lesions and non-carious lesions found in the patients living in Pancevo, one possible cause of tooth loss and hard dental tissue damage could be a long-term environmental exposure to lead.

  14. Histological observation on dental hard tissue irradiated by ultrashort-pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchizono, Takeyuki; Awazu, Kunio; Igarashi, Akihiro; Kato, Junji; Hirai, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    In the field of dentistry, effectiveness of USPL irradiation is researched because USPL has less thermal side effect to dental hard tissue. In this paper, we observed morphological change and optical change of dental hard tissue irradiated by USPL for discussing the safety and effectiveness of USPL irradiation to dental hard tissues. Irradiated samples were crown enamel and root dentin of bovine teeth. Lasers were Ti:sapphire laser, which had pulse duration (P d)of 130 fsec and pulse repetition rate (f) of 1kHz and wavelength (l) of 800nm, free electron laser (FEL), which had P d of 15 μsec and f of 10Hz and wavelength of 9.6μm, and Er:YAG laser, which had P d of 250 μsec and f of 10Hz and wavelength of 2.94μm. After laser irradiation, the sample surfaces and cross sections were examined with SEM and EDX. The optical change of samples was observed using FTIR. In SEM, the samples irradiated by USPL had sharp and accurate ablation with no crack and no carbonization. But, in FEL and Er:YAG laser, the samples has rough ablation with crack and carbonization. It was cleared that the P/Ca ratio of samples irradiated by USPL had same value as non-irradiated samples. There was no change in the IR absorption spectrum between samples irradiated by USPL and non-irradiated sample. But, they of samples irradiated by FEL and Er:YAG laser, however, had difference value as non-irradiated samples. These results showed that USPL might be effective to ablate dental hard tissue without thermal damage.

  15. Hard dental tissue minimal-invasive preparation using contemporary polymer rotating instruments and laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beloica Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of contemporary dentistry is to decrease the patient’s discomfort during treatment. Dentists aim to achieve maximum with the newly developed dental materials as well as with new cavity preparation techniques in the shortest time span. Since the development of the first constructed borer (drilling machine for caries removal, the preparation techniques have considerably changed. The progress of dental materials as well as the cavity preparation techniques has led us to contemporary carbide tungsten and diamond borers that are used with obligatory water cooling. The innovation within this field represents newly developed polymer borers that can detect the difference between carious lesions and healthy tooth structure. In this way the cavity preparation may be performed without damaging dental healthy tissue. This is possible owing to their hardness which is lower than the hardness of intact dentin. Polymer borer preparation is painless with less vibration, while the increase in temperature is negligible. Lasers have been used in clinical dentistry since 1980s so it can be said that they represent a new technology. The function of lasers is based on ablation which requires water. Erbium lasers have shown the highest potential with their ability to produce effective ablation of hard dental tissues. Laser application in dentistry requires special training as well as some protective measures. Laser advantages, compared to traditional preparation techniques, involve the absence of vibration, painless preparation, possibility of preparation without anesthetic and easier patient’s adjustment to dental intervention which is of importance, especially in pediatric dentistry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46009

  16. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  17. Use of radioisotopes in the study of permeability of hard dental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarjan, I.

    1978-01-01

    A literature survey. According to in vivo experiments 32 P, 131 I and 45 Ca penetrate dental enamel and dentine. In vitro studies revealed that the healthy enamel and that damaged by caries and dentine are penetrable by 22 Na and 24 Na both in centripetal and in centrifugal directions. 32 P, 18 F and urea, labelled with 14 C penetrate healthy hard dental tissue. 45 CaCl 2 , 110 AgNO 3 , 111 AgNO 3 , 103 PdCl 2 , 64 Cu(NO 3 ) 2 , 63 ZnCl 2 , 65 ZnCl 2 and glucose, labelled with 14 C penetrate enamel defects, lamellas and caries areas. 239 Pu citrate complex links to the surface of enamel and cement, but does not penetrate them. (author)

  18. Use of radioisotopes in the study of permeability of hard dental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarjan, I [Semmelweis Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Budapest (Hungary)

    1978-04-01

    A literature survey. According to in vivo experiments /sup 32/P, /sup 131/I and /sup 45/Ca penetrate dental enamel and dentine. In vitro studies revealed that the healthy enamel and that damaged by caries and dentine are penetrable by /sup 22/Na and /sup 24/Na both in centripetal and in centrifugal directions. /sup 32/P, /sup 18/F and urea, labelled with /sup 14/C penetrate healthy hard dental tissue. /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/, /sup 110/AgNO/sub 3/, /sup 111/AgNO/sub 3/, /sup 103/PdCl/sub 2/, /sup 64/Cu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/, /sup 63/ZnCl/sub 2/, /sup 65/ZnCl/sub 2/ and glucose, labelled with /sup 14/C penetrate enamel defects, lamellas and caries areas. /sup 239/Pu citrate complex links to the surface of enamel and cement, but does not penetrate them.

  19. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats: investigation by light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2013-08-01

    The present work aims at studying the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues. Eighty adult male albino rats with weights of about 250 g were used. The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy whole-body gamma doses. The effects on hard dental tissue samples were investigated after 48 h in histological and ground sections using light microscopy. Areas of acid phosphatase activity were detected using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stains. Observation of histological sections revealed disturbance in predentin thickness and odontoblastic layer as the irradiation dose increased. In cementum, widened cementocytes lacunae were occasionally detected even with low irradiated doses. On the other hand, relatively homogenous enamel was detected with darkened areas in enamel surface at doses over than 0.5 Gy. TRAP-positive cells were detected on the surface of the dentin of irradiated groups as well as cementum surface. Minimal detectable changes were observed in ground sections.

  20. Environmental lead pollution and its possible influence on tooth loss and hard dental tissue lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenić-Milošević Desanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Environmental lead (Pb pollution is a global problem. Hard dental tissue is capable of accumulating lead and other hard metals from the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate any correlation between the concentration of lead in teeth extracted from inhabitants of Pančevo and Belgrade, Serbia, belonging to different age groups and occurrence of tooth loss, caries and non-carious lesions. Methods. A total of 160 volunteers were chosen consecutively from Pančevo (the experimental group and Belgrade (the control group and divided into 5 age subgroups of 32 subjects each. Clinical examination consisted of caries and hard dental tissue diagnostics. The Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT Index and Significant Caries Index were calculated. Extracted teeth were freed of any organic residue by UV digestion and subjected to voltammetric analysis for the content of lead. Results. The average DMFT scores in Pančevo (20.41 were higher than in Belgrade (16.52; in the patients aged 31-40 and 41-50 years the difference was significant (p < 0.05 and highly significant in the patients aged 51-60 (23.69 vs 18.5, p < 0.01. Non-carious lesions were diagnosed in 71 (44% patients from Pančevo and 39 (24% patients from Belgrade. The concentrations of Pb in extracted teeth in all the groups from Pančevo were statistically significantly (p < 0.05 higher than in all the groups from Belgrade. In the patients from Pančevo correlations between Pb concentration in extracted teeth and the number of extracted teeth, the number of carious lesions and the number of non-carious lesions showed a statistical significance (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively. Conclusion. According to correlations between lead concentration and the number of extracted teeth, number of carious lesions and non-carious lesions found in the patients living in Pančevo, one possible cause of tooth loss and hard dental tissue damage could be a long

  1. Prevalence of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies and association with caries and oral hygiene status of children in Southwestern, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Bamidele O; Onyejaka, Nneka; Folayan, Morenike O

    2016-07-07

    Developmental dental hard tissue anomalies are often associated with oral health problems. This study determined the clinical prevalence of developmental dental hard tissue anomalies in the permanent dentition of children resident in southwestern Nigeria and its association with dental caries and poor oral hygiene status. This was a cross-sectional study recruiting 1565 school children, 12 to 15 year old attending schools in Ibadan, Oyo State and Ile-Ife, Osun State. All eligible study participants had oral examinations conducted to determine presence of developmental hard dental tissue anomalies, caries and oral hygiene status. The prevalence of developmental dental hard tissue anomalies was determined. Logistic Poisson regression was used to determine the association of between developmental dental hard tissue anomalies, caries and oral hygiene status. Only 65 (4.2 %) children had clinically diagnosed developmental dental hard tissue anomalies. The most prevalent anomaly was enamel hypoplasia (2.2 %). More females (p = 0.003) and more children with middle socioeconomic class (p = 0.001) had enamel hypoplasia. The probability of having poor oral hygiene was significantly increased for children with developmental dental anomalies (APR: 0.07; 95 % CI: 0.03 - 0.12; p = 0.002). The probability of having caries was insignificantly increased for children with developmental dental hard tissue anomalies (APR: 0.005; 95 % CI: -0.03 - 0.04; p = 0.08). The most prevalence clinically detectable developmental dental hard tissue anomalies for the study population was enamel hypoplasia. The presence of developmental dental hard tissue anomalies significantly increased the chances of having poor oral hygiene but not caries. Further studies are required to understand if poor oral hygiene is associated with dental caries in children with developmental dental hard tissue anomalies.

  2. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry. (paper)

  3. Improved classification and visualization of healthy and pathological hard dental tissues by modeling specular reflections in NIR hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots, which are difficult to diagnose. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization which can classify healthy and pathological dental tissues. However, due to non-ideal illumination of the tooth surface the hyperspectral images can exhibit specular reflections, in particular around the edges and the ridges of the teeth. These reflections significantly affect the performance of automated classification and visualization methods. Cross polarized imaging setup can effectively remove the specular reflections, however is due to the complexity and other imaging setup limitations not always possible. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on modeling the specular reflections of hard dental tissues, which significantly improves the classification accuracy in the presence of specular reflections. The method was evaluated on five extracted human teeth with corresponding gold standard for 6 different healthy and pathological hard dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. The classification was performed by employing multiple discriminant analysis. Based on the obtained results we believe the proposed method can be considered as an effective alternative to the complex cross polarized imaging setups.

  4. Chronic radiation effects on dental hard tissue (''radiation carries''). Classification and therapeutic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetz, K.A.; Brahm, R.; Al-Nawas, B.; Wagner, W.; Riesenbeck, D.; Willich, N.; Seegenschmiedt, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: Since the first description of rapid destruction of dental hard tissues following head and neck radiotherapy 80 years ago, 'radiation caries' is an established clinical finding. The internationally accepted clinical evaluation score RTOG/EORTC however is lacking a classification of this frequent radiogenic alteration. Material and Methods: Medical records, data and images of radiation effects on the teeth of more than 1,500 patients, who underwent periradiotherapeutic care, were analyzed. Macroscopic alterations regarding the grade of late lesions of tooth crowns were used for a classification into 4 grades according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. Results: No early radiation effects were found by macroscopic inspection. In the first 90 days following radiotherapy 1/3 of the patients complained of reversible hypersensitivity, which may be related to a temporary hyperemia of the pulp. It was possible to classify radiation caries as a late radiation effect on a graded scale as known from RTOG/EORTC for other organ systems. This is a prerequisite for the integration of radiation caries into the international nomenclature of the RTOG/EORTC classification. Conclusions: The documentation of early radiation effects on dental hard tissues seems to be neglectable. On the other hand the documentation of late radiation effects has a high clinical impact. The identification of an initial lesion at the high-risk areas of the neck and incisal part of the tooth can lead to a successful therapy as a major prerequisite for orofacial rehabilitation. An internationally standardized documentation is a basis for the evaluation of the side effects of radiooncotic therapy as well as the effectiveness of protective and supportive procedures. (orig.) [de

  5. Interaction of ArF laser with dental hard tissue (AEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Majdabadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Nowadays lasers are used as alternatives to the tooth preparation because of reducing pain and bloodshed. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of ArF laser on the dental hard tissues. Materials and Methods: For this research human molar teeth with no caries or dental restoration and enamel cracks were used. Irradiation laser energies were taken 95, 70 and 50 mJ for enamel and 80, 70 and 50 mJ for dentine. Then, for each of energy values pulse numbers (repetition rate were adjusted at 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1500. Ablation was carried out without water spray on both enamel and dentine. Finally, the dimensions of ablated areas were measured by using a camera connected to the computer and results were applied in graphs. Results: For each energy value, the ablation dimension increased by increasing pulse numbers. Ablation depth in dentine was more than that of for enamel. Trends of graphs for dentine and enamel were the same. SEM images of ablations by 95 mJ energy on enamel and 80 mJ energy on dentine showed sharp edges. Conclusion: Ablation depths increased by increasing pulse numbers, for each energy level. However, this increase was not that as expected, because the lack of water spray while irradiating.

  6. Evaluation of erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser radiation and dental hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, David Cameron

    Lasers have become increasingly established in medicine as effective alternatives or adjuncts to conventional techniques. In dentistry, several clinical laser systems have been developed and marketed, but their applications have been limited to soft tissue surgery. To date, no laser has been capable of effectively cutting or modifying the highly mineralised dental tissues of enamel and dentine. The aim of this study was to evaluate two new laser systems for use in dentistry through a series of in vitro experiments. Both generic erbium and holmium lasers have theoretically superior operating characteristics over currently established lasers for applications with dental hard tissues. The two lasers investigated in this study were pulsed Er:YAG (lambda=2.94) a.m. and Cr-Tm-Ho:YAG (lambda=2.1mu.m). Both operated with a macropulse duration of approximately 200lambdas, at pulse repetition rates of 2-8Hz and mean pulse energies up to 230mJ. Radiation was focused using CaF[2] lenses (f=50-120mm). The lasers could be operated with or without the addition of a surface water film at the interaction site. Tissue removal efficiency was expressed as a latent heat of ablation (LHA, kJ/cm[3]) using a modification of the technique described by Charlton et al. (1990). The mean LHA's for the Er:YAG laser were 6.24kJ/cm[3] and 22.99kJ/cm[3] with dentine and enamel respectively without water, and 10.07kJ/cm[3] and 18.73kJ/cm[3] for dentine and enamel with water. The Cr-Tm-Ho:YAG laser was unable to effectively remove enamel at the fluences and pulse energies available; the mean LHA's for the Cr-Tm- Ho:YAG laser with dentine were 82.79kJ/cm3 and 57.57kJ/cm3 with and without water respectively. The Cr-Tm-Ho;YAG was approximately 8-9 times less efficient for tissue removal than the Er:YAG system. Er:YAG tissue removal with water was characterised by clean "surgical" cuts, comparable in histological appearance to those obtained using conventional instrumentation. Some thermal disruption

  7. The effect of gastric juice on the development of erosive changes in hard dental tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is an esophageal disorder where the refluxed gastric contents enters first into the esophagus followed by the pharynx, oral cavity, larynx, airway and middle ear, causing a range of disorders and symptoms. Hydrochloric acid from the gastric contents is responsible for the demineralization of dental hard tissues and release of matrix metalloproteinase from the dentin. Objective. The aim of this study was to verify the SEM (scanning electron microscopy analysis of the surface enamel, the enamel-dentin border and dentine after the exposure of intact teeth to filtrate of gastric contents obtained during routine endoscopy. Methods. Material used in the research was 10 extracted human impacted third molars. The coronal part of the tooth was divided into two parts, and then the two halves of teeth were exposed to the filtrate of gastric juice obtained during routine gastroscopy, which had been frozen until the moment of the experiment initiation. All samples of teeth were immersed in the filtrate of the content at a temperature of 20°C for 60 minutes. The prepared samples were observed by the SEM in the area of the enamel, the enamel-dentin border and in the area of dentin at different magnification. Results. The SEM analysis showed that both enamel and dentin had a significant demineralization of these tissues. Enamel surface resembled a demineralization similar to that of acid conditioning before the application of composite restorations. The degree of mineralization was more intense towards the enamel - dentin border, and at this area the enamel prisms were not fully recognizable. The dentin had a complete loss of peritubular dentin, the entry points of the dentin tubules were expanded and intertubular dentin demineralization was also registered. Conclusion. SEM analysis showed a significant degree of destruction of enamel and dentin. Significant changes in the surface structure of enamel and

  8. SEM evaluation of the morphological changes in hard dental tissues prepared by Er: YAG laser and rotary instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomov Georgi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective ablation of dental hard tissues by means of the erbium:yttrium-aluminum garnet (Er: YAG laser has been reported recently, and its application to caries removal and cavity preparation has been expected. However, few studies have investigated the morphological changes in hard dental tissues after Er: YAG laser caries treatment. In the present study the morphological changes in hard dental tissues after Er: YAG laser caries ablation in vitro was compared with that of conventional mechanical treatment. Thirty extracted human teeth with caries were used. Ten tooth was treated with the Er: YAG laser, and the other was treated with a conventional steel and diamond burs. Laser treatment was performed by means of a non-contact irradiation modes with cooling water spray, with a new Er: YAG laser (LiteTouch. Conventional bur treatment was conducted by means of a low-speed micromotor and air turbine with water cooling. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observations were performed for each treatment. The Er: YAG laser ablated carious dentin effectively with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding intact dentin, and removed infected and softened carious dentin to the same degree as the burtreatment. In addition, a lower degree of vibration was noted with the Er: YAG laser treatment. The SEM examination revealed characteristic micro-irregularities of the lased dentin and enamel surfaces with potential benefits for adhesive restorations. Our results show that the Er: YAG laser is promising as a new technical modality for caries treatment

  9. Interaction of slow highly charged ions with hard dental tissue: studies of fluoride uptake and reminalization efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalova, A; Kasperski, G; Rousseau, P; Domaracka, A; Lawicki, A

    2014-01-01

    TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy data are presented on ion irradiation of hard dental tissue using a beam of 129 Xe 20+ (15 kV) ions delivered in the ARIBE facility by an ECR source. The investigation was focused on the mass distribution of the fragment ions. A comparison is made between the mass spectra from hard dental tissue treated by olaflur-(C 27 H 60 F 2 N 2 O 3 ) and untreated hard dental tissue obtained under irradiation by low-energy highly-charged ions (HCIs). We found significant differences between the mass spectra of enamel after introducing amine fluoride (olaflur) and the mass spectra of pure untreated enamel. Further, we separated out the effects caused by radiation induced in the tooth enamel from those induced in dentin, which has not been performed before. In order to conduct a further detailed analysis, it is necessary to extend the research scope to include the influence of fluorine compounds on enamel and dentin.

  10. Hard tissue deposition in dental pulp canal by {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Toda, T. [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Endodontics; Mandai, Y. [Bio-Chemical Lab. of Nitta Gelatin Inc., Yao (Japan); Oonishi, H. [Osaka Minami National Hospital, Kawachi (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Canal closure by hard tissue proliferation in the pulp canal and/or apical foramen is the most ideal healing after pulp removal. Generally, Ca(OH){sub 2} may induce secondary dentine or dentine-bridge on the amputated pulp surface. However, Ca(OH){sub 2} shows strong alkalinity and may cause severe inflammatory responses in the residual pulp. Moreover, completely formed dentine-bridge at the orifice will disturb further treatment of residual pulp because of the difficulty in localizing the pathway. The purpose of this study was to see hard tissue induction using newly developed {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement and to recognize the morphological difference of hard tissue from that of Ca(OH){sub 2}. (orig.)

  11. A color contrast aided density imaging technique to differentiate between dental hard tissues and its relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Charan Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Radiographic interpretation of a disease requires knowledge about normal structures. The calcifying jaw diseases can range from radiolucent areas to varying degrees of calcification. Therefore, it is vital to differentiate radiographically between various hard tissues. Materials and Methods: We have illustrated the use of computed tomography scan to quantify the calcified structures as dentin and enamel in a case of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Results: The enamel, dentin and cementum showed different values. Conclusion: The "Dentascan" can be used to distinguish the hard tissues in a variety of calcifying diseases of jaws.

  12. Hard tissue formation in a porous HA/TCP ceramic scaffold loaded with stromal cells derived from dental pulp and bone marrow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Dolder, J. van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of hard tissue regeneration of four types of stem cells or precursors under both in vitro and in vivo situations. Primary cultures of rat bone marrow, rat dental pulp, human bone marrow, and human dental pulp cells were seeded onto a porous ceramic

  13. Exogenous mineralization of hard tissues using photo-absorptive minerals and femto-second lasers; the case of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, A D; Strafford, S; Thomson, C L; Gardy, J; Edwards, T J; Malinowski, M; Hussain, S A; Metzger, N K; Hassanpour, A; Brown, C T A; Brown, A P; Duggal, M S; Jha, A

    2018-04-15

    A radical new methodology for the exogenous mineralization of hard tissues is demonstrated in the context of laser-biomaterials interaction. The proposed approach is based on the use of femtosecond pulsed lasers (fs) and Fe 3+ -doped calcium phosphate minerals (specifically in this work fluorapatite powder containing Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles (NP)). A layer of the synthetic powder is applied to the surface of eroded bovine enamel and is irradiated with a fs laser (1040 nm wavelength, 1 GHz repetition rate, 150 fs pulse duration and 0.4 W average power). The Fe 2 O 3 NPs absorb the light and may act as thermal antennae, dissipating energy to the vicinal mineral phase. Such a photothermal process triggers the sintering and densification of the surrounding calcium phosphate crystals thereby forming a new, dense layer of typically ∼20 μm in thickness, which is bonded to the underlying surface of the natural enamel. The dispersed iron oxide NPs, ensure the localization of temperature excursion, minimizing collateral thermal damage to the surrounding natural tissue during laser irradiation. Simulated brushing trials (pH cycle and mechanical force) on the synthetic layer show that the sintered material is more acid resistant than the natural mineral of enamel. Furthermore, nano-indentation confirms that the hardness and Young's modulus of the new layers are significantly more closely matched to enamel than current restorative materials used in clinical dentistry. Although the results presented herein are exemplified in the context of bovine enamel restoration, the methodology may be more widely applicable to human enamel and other hard-tissue regenerative engineering. In this work we provide a new methodology for the mineralisation of dental hard tissues using femtosecond lasers and iron doped biomaterials. In particular, we demonstrate selective laser sintering of an iron doped fluorapatite on the surface of eroded enamel under low average power and mid

  14. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats using scanning electron microscope - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; Maghraby, Ahmed; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, 40 adult male albino rats were used to study the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues (enamel surface, dentinal tubules and the cementum surface). The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma doses. The effects of irradiated hard dental tissues samples were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. For doses up to 0.5 Gy, there was no evidence of the existence of cracks on the enamel surface. With 1 Gy irradiation dose, cracks were clearly observed with localized erosive areas. At 2 Gy irradiation dose, the enamel showed morphological alterations as disturbed prismatic and interprismatic areas. An increase in dentinal tubules diameter and a contemporary inter-tubular dentine volume decrease were observed with higher irradiation dose. Concerning cementum, low doses,<0.5 Gy, showed surface irregularities and with increase in the irradiation dose to≥1 Gy, noticeable surface irregularities and erosive areas with decrease in Sharpey's fiber sites were observed. These observations could shed light on the hazardous effects of irradiation fields to the functioning of the human teeth.

  15. The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Temilola, Dada Oluwaseyi; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Fatusi, Olawunmi; Chukwumah, Nneka Maureen; Onyejaka, Nneka; Oziegbe, Elizabeth; Oyedele, Titus; Kolawole, Kikelomo Adebanke; Agbaje, Hakeem

    2014-01-01

    Background The study of dental anomalies is important because it generates information that is important for both the anthropological and clinical management of patients. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation of dental hard-tissue developmental anomalies in the mix dentition of children residing in Ile-Ife, a suburban region of Nigeria. Methods Information on age, sex and socioeconomic status was collected from 1,036 children aged four months t...

  16. Hard dental tissue minimal-invasive preparation using contemporary polymer rotating instruments and laser

    OpenAIRE

    Beloica Miloš; Vulićević Zoran R.; Mandinić Zoran; Radović Ivana; Jovičić Olivera; Carević Momir; Tekić Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Goal of contemporary dentistry is to decrease the patient’s discomfort during treatment. Dentists aim to achieve maximum with the newly developed dental materials as well as with new cavity preparation techniques in the shortest time span. Since the development of the first constructed borer (drilling machine) for caries removal, the preparation techniques have considerably changed. The progress of dental materials as well as the cavity preparation techniqu...

  17. The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temilola, Dada Oluwaseyi; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Fatusi, Olawunmi; Chukwumah, Nneka Maureen; Onyejaka, Nneka; Oziegbe, Elizabeth; Oyedele, Titus; Kolawole, Kikelomo Adebanke; Agbaje, Hakeem

    2014-10-16

    The study of dental anomalies is important because it generates information that is important for both the anthropological and clinical management of patients. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation of dental hard-tissue developmental anomalies in the mix dentition of children residing in Ile-Ife, a suburban region of Nigeria. Information on age, sex and socioeconomic status was collected from 1,036 children aged four months to 12 years through a household survey. Clinical examination was conducted to assess the presence of dental anomalies. Associations between age, sex, socioeconomic status, prevalence, and pattern of presentation of the developmental hard-tissue dental anomalies were determined. Two hundred and seventy six (26.6%) children had dental anomalies. Of these, 23.8% had one anomaly, 2.5% had two anomalies, and 0.3% had more than two anomalies. Of the children with anomalies, 49.3%were male, 50.7%were female, and 47.8%, 28.6% and 23.6% were children from low, middle and high socioeconomic classes, respectively. More anomalies were seen in permanent than primary dentition. Anomalies of tooth structure were most prevalent (16.1%); anomalies which affect tooth number were least prevalent (1.3%). Dens evaginatus, peg-shaped lateral, macrodontia, and talon cusp were more prevalent in the permanent dentition, and dens evaginatus peg-shaped lateral and macrodontia were more prevalent in the maxilla. There were significantly more macrodontia anomalies in males and in children of high socioeconomic status. This large survey of dental hard-tissue anomalies found in the primary dentition and mixed dentition of children in Nigeria provides anthropological and clinical data that may aid the detection and management of dental problems of children in Nigeria.

  18. [Lasers in dentistry. Part B--Interaction with biological tissues and the effect on the soft tissues of the oral cavity, the hard tissues of the tooth and the dental pulp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, J; Stabholz, A; Leopold, Y; Rosenberg, I; Stabholz, A

    2001-10-01

    The interaction of laser energy with target tissue is mainly determined by two non operator-dependent factors: the specific wavelength of the laser and the optical properties of the target tissues. Power density, energy density, pulse repetition rate, pulse duration and the mode of energy transferring to the tissue are dictated by the clinician. Combination of these factors enables to control optimal response for the clinical application. Four responses are described when the laser beam hits the target tissue: reflection, absorption, transmission and scattering. Three main mechanisms of interaction between the laser and the biological tissues exist: photothermic, photoacoustic and photochemical. The effect of lasers on the soft tissues of the oral cavity is based on transformation of light energy into thermal energy which, in turn heats the target tissue to produce the desirable effect. In comparison to the scalpel used in surgical procedures, the laser beam is characterized by tissue natural sterility and by minimum bleeding during the surgical procedures due to blood vessels welding. The various effects achieved by the temperature elevation during the laser application on the soft tissue are: I. coagulation and hemostasis II. tissue sterilization III. tissue welding IV. incision and excision V. ablation and vaporization Ablation and melting are the two basic modalities by which the effect of lasers on the hard tissues of the tooth is produced. When discussing the effect of laser on dental hard tissues, the energy absorption in the hydroxyapatite plays a major role in addition to its absorption in water. When laser energy is absorbed in the water of the hard tissues, a rapid volume expansion of the evaporating water occurs as a result of a substantial temperature elevation in the interaction site. Microexplosions are produced causing hard tissue disintegration. If pulp temperatures are raised beyond 5 degrees C level, damage to the dental pulp is irreversible

  19. Parallel beam microradiography of dental hard tissue using synchrotron radiation and X-ray image magnification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, S.; Chow, L.C.; Brown, W.E.; Dobbyn, R.C.; Kuriyama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A novel technique utilizing a highly parallel beam of monochromatic synchrotron radiation combined with X-ray image magnification has been used to obtain microradiographs of caries lesions in relatively thick tooth sections. Preliminary results reveal structural features not previously reported. This technique holds the promise of allowing one to follow the structural changes accompanying the formation, destruction and chemical repair of mineralized tissue in real time. (orig.)

  20. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  1. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed transverse excited atmospheric-pressure lasers operating at lambda=9.6 and 10.6 um

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Daniel; Ragadio, Jerome N.; Akrivou, Maria; Featherstone, John D.; Murray, Michael W.; Dickenson, Kevin M.

    2001-04-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed transverse excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 micrometers wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce an initial high energy spike at the beginning of the laser pulse of submicrosecond duration followed by a long tail of about 1 - 4 microsecond(s) . The pulse duration is well matched to the 1 - 2 microsecond(s) thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 micrometers and effectively heats the enamel to the temperatures required for surface modification at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk of pulpal necrosis from excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences, the high peak power of the laser pulse rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By lengthening the laser pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial high energy spike, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  2. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed TEA lasers operating at λ=9.6 and 10.6 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Daniel; Murray, Michael W.; Featherstone, John D. B.; Akrivou, Maria; Dickenson, Kevin M.; Duhn, Clifford W.; Ojeda, Orlando P.

    1999-05-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed TEA laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 μm wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce a laser pulse wit a 100-200 ns gain switched spike followed by a long tail of about 1-4 μs in duration. the pulse duration is well matched to the 1-2 μs thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 μm and effectively heats the enamel to temperatures required for surface modification for caries prevention at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk, of pulpal necrosis form excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences the high peak power of the gain-switched spike rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By slightly stretching the pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial 100-200 ns of the laser pulse, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  3. Combined effect of fluoride and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on mouse dental hard tissue formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Eija; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Partanen, Anna-Maija; Sahlberg, Carin; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-08-01

    Fluoride interferes with enamel matrix secretion and mineralization and dentin mineralization. The most toxic dioxin congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), also impairs dental hard tissue formation and mineralization in vitro and in vivo. Our aim was to investigate in vitro whether the combined effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) and TCDD on dental hard tissue formation is potentiative. For this purpose, mandibular first and second molar tooth germs of E18 mouse embryos were cultured for 5-12 days with NaF and TCDD alone at various concentrations (2.5, 5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 20 μM and 5, 10, 12.5, and 15 nM, respectively) to determine the highest concentrations, which alone cause no or negligible effects. Morphological changes were studied from the whole tooth photographs and histological tissue sections. The concentrations found were 15 μM for NaF and 10 nM for TCDD. While at these concentrations, the effects of NaF and TCDD alone were barely detectable, the effect of simultaneous exposure on dentin and enamel formation was overt; mineralization of predentin to dentin and enamel matrix secretion and mineralization were impaired. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the combined exposure modified amelogenin expression by odontoblasts. Morphology of ameloblasts and the expression of amelogenin indicated that ameloblasts were still secretory. The results show that NaF and TCDD have potentiative, harmful effects on the formation of dental hard tissues. Since children can be exposed to subclinical levels of fluoride and dioxins during early childhood, coincidently with mineralization of the first permanent teeth, this finding may have clinical significance.

  4. Kappa-splints application for the treatment of pathological dental hard tissues abrasion in combination with dentition defects and dentition deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Petrishin

    2017-03-01

    2. After studying the movements of conventional hinge axis in articulate heads of TMJ with the help of condylograph «Cadiax Compact» and eliminating the symptoms of stress in masticatory muscles of the patients with occlusive disorders at pathological dental hard tissues abrasion, it is the gradual application of a kappa-splints set, made of hard transparent plates of Ercodent Ercodur material (Germany with a thickness of 1.0 to 5.0 mm, which allows prevention of further tooth wear, normalization of occlusive correlations of the jaws, separating a bite with optimum thickness throughout the dentition, thus the lower jaw takes a position at which the state of functional equilibrium of the entire dentition is restored.

  5. Modern views on the pathogenesis of hard dental tissues and periodontium lesions and means of their treatment in children with chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupey V.Y.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the mouth covity often reflect regularities of pathogenesis of a number of disease states, and primarily from the digestive tract. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to clarify pathogenesis of certain lesions of hard dental tissues and periodontal tissues in children with chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and development of schemes for their treatment. The study observed 441 children aged from 7 to 15 years with dental caries and generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis on the background of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, duodenal ulcer and malabsorption syndrome. All the children were divided into 2 groups - basic and comparison one. The study identified the most dan¬gerous and little-known way of pathogenesis, which passes through the general processes of reducing the production of various proteins (immune system and antiseptics, is a violation of the general and local resistance and, ultimately, mineral metabolism. Such disorders impair complete mineralization of tooth enamel, reduce optimal composition and properties of saliva stimulating glycolysis processes in oral cavity. Prevention of dental caries and generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with chronic pathology of the gastrointestinal tract is based on the use of developed therapeutic and prophylactic complex, which includes mucosal gel Kvertulin, probiotic Latsidofil and drug Calcium D.

  6. Experimental study of the effect of Nd:YAG laser on dental hard tissues: comparison between multi-pulse and free-generation emission code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carballosa Amor, A.; Tellez Jimenez, H.; Ponce Flores, E.; Flores Reyes, T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and contrast the morphological changes on dental hard tissue when irradiated with a Nd: YAG laser both on multi-pulse mode, with a Q: Switch of Cr: YAG passive, and on free generation mode. The experimental sample consisted of 6 healthy third molars which were divided equally and randomly between the two emission methods. The depths of each perforation were measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). It was noted that, despite being less energy in the multi-pulse mode, the first three shots in this achieved deeper cavities than the ones on the free generation mode. Also, less damage to surrounding tissue were obtained on multi-pulse mode. (Author)

  7. High peak power Q-switched Er:YAG laser with two polarizers and its ablation performance for hard dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingwei; Wang, Li; Wu, Xianyou; Cheng, Tingqing; Jiang, Haihe

    2014-06-30

    An electro-optically Q-switched high-energy Er:YAG laser with two polarizers is proposed. By using two Al(2)O(3) polarizing plates and a LiNbO(3) crystal with Brewster angle, the polarization efficiency is significantly improved. As a result, 226 mJ pulse energy with 62 ns pulse width is achieved at the repetition rate of 3 Hz, the corresponding peak power is 3.6 MW. To our knowledge, such a high peak power has not been reported in literature. With our designed laser, in-vitro teeth were irradiated under Q-switched and free-running modes. Results of a laser ablation experiment on hard dental tissue with the high-peak-power laser demonstrates that the Q-switched Er:YAG laser has higher ablation precision and less thermal damage than the free-running Er:YAG laser.

  8. Oral health and orofacial pain in older people with dementia: a systematic review with focus on dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwel, Suzanne; Binnekade, Tarik T; Perez, Roberto S G M; Hertogh, Cees M P M; Scherder, Erik J A; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a systematic overview including a quality assessment of studies about oral health and orofacial pain in older people with dementia, compared to older people without dementia. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. The following search terms were used: dementia and oral health or stomatognathic disease. The quality assessment of the included articles was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). The search yielded 527 articles, of which 37 were included for the quality assessment and quantitative overview. The median NOS score of the included studies was 5, and the mean was 4.9 (SD 2.2). The heterogeneity between the studies was considered too large to perform a meta-analysis. An equivalent prevalence of orofacial pain, number of teeth present, decayed missing filled teeth index, edentulousness percentage, and denture use was found for both groups. However, the presence of caries and retained roots was higher in older people with dementia than in those without. Older people with dementia have worse oral health, with more retained roots and coronal and root caries, when compared to older people without dementia. Little research focused on orofacial pain in older people with dementia. The current state of oral health in older people with dementia could be improved with oral care education of caretakers and regular professional dental care.

  9. Microscopic study of dental hard tissues in primary teeth with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II: Correlation of 3D imaging using X-ray microtomography and polarising microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Graham R; Fearne, Janice M; Sabel, Nina; Norén, Jörgen G

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the histological appearance of dental hard tissues in primary teeth from children with DI using conventional polarised light microscopy and correlate that with 3D imaging using X-ray microtomograpy (XMT) to gain a further understanding of the dentine structure of teeth diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta. Undecalcified sections of primary teeth from patients diagnosed with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II were examined using polarised light microscopy. XMT was employed for 3D-imaging and analysis of the dentine. The polarised light microscopy and XMT revealed tubular structures in the dentine seen as vacuoles coinciding with the path of normal dentinal tubules but not continuous tubules. The size of the tubules was close to that of capillaries. The largest tubular structures had a direction corresponding to where the pulp tissue would have been located during primary dentine formation. The dysfunctional mineralisation of the dentine and obliteration of the pulp evidently leaves blood vessels in the dentine which have in the main been tied off and, in the undecalcified sections, appear as vacuoles. Although from radiographs, the pulp in teeth affected by Dentinogenesis Imperfect type II appears to be completely obliterated, a network of interconnected vessels may remain. The presence of large dentinal tubules and blood vessels, or the remnants of blood vessels, could provide a pathway for bacteria from the oral cavity. This might account for why some of these teeth develop periapical abscesses in spite of apparently having no pulp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Histological and ultrastructural effect of an Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam on dental hard tissue and pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignato, Costantino; Vignato, Giuseppe; Nardelli, Antonella; Baldan, Arianna; Mason, Pier N.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine histological and ultrastructural modifications produced by an Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam after an in vivo exposure of human molars. Using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam delivered by a 600 micrometers optical fiber and concurrent air and water cooling spray, 14 human third molars with artificial first class cavities were exposed at different power levels (6, 7, and 8 W). All the teeth were extracted at different time periods between 10 and 25 days and prepared for histological examination. The results of the histological examination showed no evidence of degeneration or necrosis of the pulpar tissue. Analysis of the dentinal surfaces after exposure demonstrated that the dentinal tubules are completely closed due to the melted dentin. In conclusion a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam with an air and water cooling spray is safe for treatments of class I decay and no necrosis or degeneration of the pulp was found for laser powers of 6, 7, and 8 W.

  11. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  12. Study on Dental Treatment with YAG Laser (1st Report): Temperature of Dental Tissue Irradiated with Laser Beam

    OpenAIRE

    上田, 隆司; 山田, 啓司; 古本, 達明

    2000-01-01

    The flash temperature of a dental hard tissue irradiated with pulsed Nd:YAG laser is measured using a two-color pyrometer with an optical fiber. This pyrometer consists of a chalcogenide optical fiber and a laminated infrared detector. The influence of the laser power on the temperature of the dental tissue is investigated, and the relationship between the laser power and the removal volume of the dental tissue is obtained. In order to examine the thermal damage on the dental tissue, hardness...

  13. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ=9.3-μm CO2 laser: heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A mechanically scanned CO2 laser operated at high laser pulse repetition rates can be used to rapidly and precisely remove dental decay. This study aims to determine whether these laser systems can safely ablate enamel and dentin without excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. Samples were derived from noncarious extracted molars. Pulpal temperatures were recorded using microthermocouples situated at the pulp chamber roof of samples (n=12), which were occlusally ablated using a rapid-scanning, water-cooled 300 Hz CO2 laser over a two minute time course. The mechanical strength of facially ablated dentin (n=10) was determined via four-point bend test and compared to control samples (n=10) prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Composite-to-enamel bond strength was measured via single-plane shear test for ablated/non-etched (n=10) and ablated/acid-etched (n=8) samples and compared to control samples (n=9) prepared by 320 grit wet sanding. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature at 19.0°C (s.d.=0.9) if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin and enamel, the treated surfaces were uniformly ablated and there were no cracks observable on the laser treated surfaces. Fourpoint bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d.=4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d.=2.7) for control (p>0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths of 31.2 MPa (s.d.=2.5, penamel without excessive heat accumulation and with minimal thermal damage. It is not clear whether the small (16%) but statistically significant reduction in the shear bond strength to enamel is clinically significant since the mean shear bond strength exceeded 30 MPa.

  14. CO II laser free-form processing of hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin; Klasing, Manfred; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Drilling and surface processing of bone and tooth tissue belongs to standard medical procedures (bores and embeddings for implants, trepanation etc.). Small circular bores can be generally quickly produced with mechanical drills. However problems arise at angled drilling, the need to execute drilling procedures without damaging of sensitive soft tissue structures underneath the bone or the attempt to mill small non-circular cavities in hard tissue with high precision. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The processing of bone is done with a CO II laser (10.6 μm) with pulse durations of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled fast galvanic laser beam scanner and a fine water-spray, which helps keeping the ablation process effective and without thermal side-effects. Laser "milling" of non-circular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth can be especially interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser processing of these cavities without thermal damage and with minimised tapering. It included the exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines, etc.), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, and optimal water spray position. The optimised results give evidence for the applicability of pulsed CO II lasers for biologically tolerable effective processing of deep cavities in hard tissue.

  15. Wnt and BMP signaling crosstalk in regulating dental stem cells: Implications in dental tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugui Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tooth is a complex hard tissue organ and consists of multiple cell types that are regulated by important signaling pathways such as Wnt and BMP signaling. Serious injuries and/or loss of tooth or periodontal tissues may significantly impact aesthetic appearance, essential oral functions and the quality of life. Regenerative dentistry holds great promise in treating oral/dental disorders. The past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of our understanding of the biological features of dental stem cells, along with the signaling mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this review, we first summarize the biological characteristics of seven types of dental stem cells, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental follicle precursor cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and MSCs from gingiva. We then focus on how these stem cells are regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and/or Wnt signaling by examining the interplays between these pathways. Lastly, we analyze the current status of dental tissue engineering strategies that utilize oral/dental stem cells by harnessing the interplays between BMP and Wnt pathways. We also highlight the challenges that must be addressed before the dental stem cells may reach any clinical applications. Thus, we can expect to witness significant progresses to be made in regenerative dentistry in the coming decade.

  16. The method of diagnosis and classification of the gingival line defects of the teeth hard tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Bulbuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For solving the problem of diagnosis and treatment of hard tissue defects the significant role belongs to the choice of tactics for dental treatment of hard tissue defects located in the gingival line of any tooth. This work aims to study the problems of diagnosis and classification of gingival line defects of the teeth hard tissues. That will contribute to the objectification of differentiated diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in the dental treatment of various clinical variants of these defects localization. The objective of the study – is to develop the anatomical-functional classification for differentiated estimation of hard tissue defects in the gingival part, as the basis for the application of differential diagnostic-therapeutic approaches to the dental treatment of hard tissue defects disposed in the gingival part of any tooth. Materials and methods of investigation: There was conducted the examination of 48 patients with hard tissue defects located in the gingival part of any tooth. To assess the magnitude of gingival line destruction the periodontal probe and X-ray examination were used. Results. The result of the performed research the classification of the gingival line defects of the hard tissues was offered using exponent power. The value of this indicator is equal to an integer number expressed in millimeters of distance from the epithelial attachment to the cavity’s bottom of defect. Conclusions. The proposed classification fills an obvious gap in academic representations about hard tissue defects located in the gingival part of any tooth. Also it offers the prospects of consensus on differentiated diagnostic-therapeutic approaches in different clinical variants of location.  This classification builds methodological “bridge of continuity” between therapeutic and prosthetic dentistry in the field of treatment of the gingival line defects of dental hard tissues.

  17. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  18. Imaging the hard/soft tissue interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, Alistair; Paxton, Jennifer Z; Grover, Liam M

    2014-03-01

    Interfaces between different tissues play an essential role in the biomechanics of native tissues and their recapitulation is now recognized as critical to function. As a consequence, imaging the hard/soft tissue interface has become increasingly important in the area of tissue engineering. Particularly as several biotechnology based products have made it onto the market or are close to human trials and an understanding of their function and development is essential. A range of imaging modalities have been developed that allow a wealth of information on the morphological and physical properties of samples to be obtained non-destructively in vivo or via destructive means. This review summarizes the use of a selection of imaging modalities on interfaces to date considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. We will also consider techniques which have not yet been utilized to their full potential or are likely to play a role in future work in the area.

  19. High resolution ultrastructure imaging of fractures in human dental tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Sui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dental hard tissues are dentine, cementum, and enamel. These are hydrated mineralised composite tissues with a hierarchical structure and versatile thermo-mechanical properties. The hierarchical structure of dentine and enamel was imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB milling. High resolution TEM was carried out in the vicinity of a crack tip in dentine. An intricate “random weave” pattern of hydroxyapatile crystallites was observed and this provided a possible explanation for toughening of the mineralized dentine tissue at the nano-scale. The results reported here provide the basis for improved understanding of the relationship between the multi-scale nature and the mechanical properties of hierarchically structured biomaterials, and will also be useful for the development of better prosthetic and dental restorative materials.

  20. Evaluation of radiation effects on dental enamel hardness and dental restorative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki

    2000-01-01

    This research presents the results of the microhardness of human dental enamel and of the following dental restorative materials: three dental porcelains - Ceramco II, Finesse and Noritake, and two resin restorative materials - Artglass and Targis, for materials submitted to different times of irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10 12 n cm -2 .s -1 . The results obtained indicated that there is a decrease of the surface microhardness when the enamel is irradiated for 1 h and when dental materials are irradiated for 3 h. However, enamels irradiated for 30 min. did not show significant change of their surface hardness. Therefore, the selection of irradiation time is an important factor to be considered when irradiated teeth or dental materials are used in the investigations of their properties. (author)

  1. Nonlinear scattering in hard tissue studied with ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, J.; Kim, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The back-scattered spectrum of ultrashort laser pulses (800 nm, 0.2 ps) was studied in human dental and other hard tissues in vitro below the ablation threshold. Frequency doubled radiation (SHG), frequency tripled radiation and two-photon fluorescence were detected. The relative yield for these processes was measured for various pulse energies. The dependence of the SHG signal on probe thickness was determined in forward and back scattering geometry. SHG is sensitive to linear polarization of the incident laser radiation. SHG in human teeth was studied in vitro showing larger signals in dentin than in cementum and enamel. In carious areas no SHG signal could be detected. Possible applications of higher harmonic radiation for diagnostics and microscopy are discussed. (orig.)

  2. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at ...

  3. Dental tissue as a thermoluminescence dosimetry dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solaimani, F.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Akhlaghpoor, Sh.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Thermoluminescence dosimetry is one of the dosimetry procedures used widely as routine and personal dosimeters. In order to extend this kind of dosimeters, dental tissue has been examined and was found promising as a Thermoluminescence Dosimetry dosimeter. Materials and Methods: In this study, 70 health teeth were collected. The only criterion, wich was considered for selection of the teeth, was the healthiness of them regardless of age and gender of the donors. All collected samples were washed and cleaned and milled uniformly. The final powder had a uniform grain size between 100-300 micrometer. The sample was divided into four groups. Group A and B were used for measurement of density and investigation of variation of thermoluminescent characteristics with temperature respectively. Groups C and D were used for investigation of variation of thermoluminescent intensity with dose and fading of this intensity with time. In all cases the results obtained with dental tissue were compared to a standard LiF, thermoluminescence dosimetry dosimeter. Results: It was found that, average density of the dental tissue was 1.570 g/cm 3 , which is comparable to density of LiF, which is 1.612g/cm 3 . It was also concluded that the range of 0-300 d ig C , dental tissue has a simple curve with two specific peaks at 140 and 25 d ig C respectively. The experiment also showed that, the variation of relative intensity versus dose is linear in the range of 0.04-0.1 Gy. The fading rate of dental tissue is higher than LiF but still in the acceptable range (14% per month in compare to 5.2% per month). Conclusion: Dental tissue as a natural dosimeter is comparable with Thermoluminescence Dosimetry and can be used in accidental events with a good approximation

  4. Nanomaterials for Craniofacial and Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Lin, S; Shi, S; Lin, Y

    2017-07-01

    Tissue engineering shows great potential as a future treatment for the craniofacial and dental defects caused by trauma, tumor, and other diseases. Due to the biomimetic features and excellent physiochemical properties, nanomaterials are of vital importance in promoting cell growth and stimulating tissue regeneration in tissue engineering. For craniofacial and dental tissue engineering, the frequently used nanomaterials include nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets. Nanofibers are attractive for cell invasion and proliferation because of their resemblance to extracellular matrix and the presence of large pores, and they have been used as scaffolds in bone, cartilage, and tooth regeneration. Nanotubes and nanoparticles improve the mechanical and chemical properties of scaffold, increase cell attachment and migration, and facilitate tissue regeneration. In addition, nanofibers and nanoparticles are also used as a delivery system to carry the bioactive agent in bone and tooth regeneration, have better control of the release speed of agent upon degradation of the matrix, and promote tissue regeneration. Although applications of nanomaterials in tissue engineering remain in their infancy with numerous challenges to face, the current results indicate that nanomaterials have massive potential in craniofacial and dental tissue engineering.

  5. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especial...

  6. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering. PMID:28773924

  7. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  8. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-09-27

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  9. Hard and soft tissue correlations in facial profiles: a canonical correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamlan MA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manal A Shamlan,1 Abdullah M Aldrees2 1Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 2Division of Orthodontics, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between facial hard and soft tissues in normal Saudi individuals by studying the canonical correlation between specific hard tissue landmarks and their corresponding soft tissue landmarks. Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was designed, with a sample size of 60 Saudi adults (30 males and 30 females who had a class I skeletal and dental relationship and normal occlusion. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of the study sample were investigated using a series of 29 linear and angular measurements of hard and soft tissue features. The measurements were calculated electronically using Dolphin® software, and the data were analyzed using canonical correlation. Results: Eighty-four percent of the variation in the soft tissue was explained by the variation in hard tissue. Conclusion: The position of the upper and lower incisors and inclination of the lower incisors influence upper lip length and lower lip position. The inclination of the upper incisors is associated with lower lip length. Keywords: facial profile, hard tissue, soft tissue, canonical correlation

  10. Lasers in Esthetic Dentistry: Soft Tissue Photobiomodulation, Hard Tissue Decontamination, and Ceramics Conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Müller Ramalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing concern and the search for conservative dental treatments have resulted in the development of several new technologies. Low and high power lasers can be cited as one of these new technologies. Low power lasers act at cellular level leading to pain reduction, modulation of inflammation, and improvement of tissue healing. High power lasers act by increasing temperature and have the potential to promote microbial reduction and ablation of hard and soft tissues. The clinical application of both low and high power lasers requires specific knowledge concerning laser interaction with biological tissues, so that the correct irradiation protocol can be established. The present case report describes the clinical steps of two metal-ceramic crowns development in a 60-year-old patient. Three different laser wavelengths were applied throughout the treatment with different purposes: Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm for dentin decontamination, diode (660 nm for soft tissue biomodulation, and Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm for inner ceramic surface conditioning. Lasers were successfully applied in the present case report as coadjutant in the treatment. This coadjutant technology can be a potential tool to assist treatment to reach the final success.

  11. Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Dental Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral Jhaveri-Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is amongst the latest exciting technologies having impacted the field of dentistry. Initially considered as a futuristic approach, tissue engineering is now being successfully applied in regenerative surgery. This article reviews the important determinants of tissue engineering and how they contribute to the improvement of wound healing and surgical outcomes in the oral region. Furthermore, we shall address the clinical applications of engineering involving oral and maxillofacial surgical and periodontal procedures along with other concepts that are still in experimental phase of development. This knowledge will aid the surgical and engineering researchers to comprehend the collaboration between these fields leading to extounding dental applications and to ever-continuing man-made miracles in the field of human science.

  12. The effect of food hardness on the development of dental caries in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yutaka; Sano, Tomoya; Kodama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that dental caries may be produced in diabetic rodent models fed with noncariogenic standard diets; however, many studies usually add large amounts of sugar to the diet to induce dental caries. Moreover, the physical properties of cariogenic diets have been reported as an important factor in the formation of caries. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of the hardness of non-cariogenic diets on the development of dental caries in diabetic rodents. Seven-week-old female F344 rats were divided into 4 groups: intact rats fed with a standard pelletized or powdered diet and alloxan-induced diabetic rats fed with a standard pelletized or powdered diet. All of the rats were sacrificed at 52 weeks of age for morphological examinations on their dental tissue. Dental caries had developed and extended to all the molars in the diabetic rats that were fed with both the pelletized and powdered diets. Moreover, the lesion was significantly enhanced in the powdered diet group compared to that in the pelletized diet group. In conclusion, food hardness is an important factor influencing the development of dental caries in diabetic rats.

  13. The Effect of Food Hardness on the Development of Dental Caries in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Nakahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that dental caries may be produced in diabetic rodent models fed with noncariogenic standard diets; however, many studies usually add large amounts of sugar to the diet to induce dental caries. Moreover, the physical properties of cariogenic diets have been reported as an important factor in the formation of caries. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of the hardness of non-cariogenic diets on the development of dental caries in diabetic rodents. Seven-week-old female F344 rats were divided into 4 groups: intact rats fed with a standard pelletized or powdered diet and alloxan-induced diabetic rats fed with a standard pelletized or powdered diet. All of the rats were sacrificed at 52 weeks of age for morphological examinations on their dental tissue. Dental caries had developed and extended to all the molars in the diabetic rats that were fed with both the pelletized and powdered diets. Moreover, the lesion was significantly enhanced in the powdered diet group compared to that in the pelletized diet group. In conclusion, food hardness is an important factor influencing the development of dental caries in diabetic rats.

  14. Regenerative medicine in dental and oral tissues: Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janti Sudiono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative medicine is a new therapeutic modality using cell, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies. Purpose. To describe the regenerative capacity of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell. Review. In dentistry, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies develop incredibly and attract great interest, due to the capacity to facilitate innovation in dental material and regeneration of dental and oral tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp, periodontal ligament and dental follicle, can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into various cells, so that can be useful for regeneration of dental, nerves, periodontal and bone tissues. Tissue engineering is a technology in reconstructive biology, which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biological mediators to facilitate regeneration or reconstruction of a particular tissue. The multipotency, high proliferation rates and accessibility, make dental pulp as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. Revitalized dental pulp and continued root development is the focus of regenerative endodontic while biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum is the focus of regenerative periodontic. Conclucion. Dentin-derived morphogens such as BMP are known to be involved in the regulation of odontogenesis. The multipotency and angiogenic capacity of DPSCs as the regenerative capacity of human dentin / pulp complex indicated that dental pulp may contain progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. The human periodontal ligament is a viable alternative source for possible primitive precursors to be used in stem cell therapy.

  15. Establishing the soft and hard tissue area centers (centroids) for the skull and introducing a newnon-anatomical cephalometric line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlBalkhi, Khalid M; AlShahrani, Ibrahim; AlMadi, Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how to establish the area center (centroid) of both the soft and hard tissues of the outline of the lateral cephalometric skull image, and to introduce the concept of a new non-anatomical centroid line. Lateral cephalometric radiographs, size 12 x 14 inch, of fifty seven adult subjects were selected based on their pleasant, balanced profile, Class I skeletal and dental relationship and no major dental malocclusion or malrelationship. The area centers (centroids) of both soft and hard tissue skull were practically established using a customized software computer program called the m -file . Connecting the two centers introduced the concept of a new non-anatomical soft and hard centroids line. (author)

  16. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  17. Dental Tissue — New Source for Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been isolated from many tissues and organs, including dental tissue. Five types of dental stem cells have been established: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. The main characteristics of dental stem cells are their potential for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal capacity. Dental stem cells can differentiate into odontoblasts, adipocytes, neuronal-like cells, glial cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, melanocytes, myotubes, and endothelial cells. Possible application of these cells in various fields of medicine makes them good candidates for future research as a new, powerful tool for therapy. Although the possible use of these cells in therapeutic purposes and tooth tissue engineering is still in the beginning stages, the results are promising. The efforts made in the research of dental stem cells have clarified many mechanisms underlying the biological processes in which these cells are involved. This review will focus on the new findings in the field of dental stem cell research and on their potential use in the therapy of various disorders.

  18. [Investigation on noncarious hard tissue lesions of teeth in teachers of one university in Shanghai municipality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-li; Zhang, Zhe-dan; Guo, Jian-qing; Zhu, Ya-ping; Wang, Qun; Gao, Ling-yu

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the condition of four kinds of noncarious hard tissue lesions of the teeth in teachers of one university in Shanghai municipality and provide guidance about oral health care. The table and the standard on oral health survey authorized by WHO were adopted, condition of four kinds of noncarious hard tissue lesions of teeth in 776 teachers of East China University of Science was investigated and analyzed using SPSS16.0 software package. The average wedge-shaped defect teeth was 5.54±3.87, the incidence was 30.41%, caries incidence of the first bicuspid was the highest(29.52%). The incidence of tetracycline pigmentation teeth was 3.09%, the incidence of enamel hypoplasia was 2.06%, and the incidence of dental fluorosis was 1.55%. The average wedge-shaped defect teeth is higher than the data over the country, the incidence of dental textural anomaly is lower. The behaviors of oral health care of university teachers in Shanghai municipality remains to be further strengthened.

  19. Automated classification and visualization of healthy and pathological dental tissues based on near-infrared hyper-spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots which are difficult to diagnose. If detected early enough, such demineralization can be arrested and reversed by non-surgical means through well established dental treatments (fluoride therapy, anti-bacterial therapy, low intensity laser irradiation). Near-infrared (NIR) hyper-spectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization based on distinct spectral features of healthy and pathological dental tissues. In this study, we apply NIR hyper-spectral imaging to classify and visualize healthy and pathological dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized areas. For this purpose, a standardized teeth database was constructed consisting of 12 extracted human teeth with different degrees of natural dental lesions imaged by NIR hyper-spectral system, X-ray and digital color camera. The color and X-ray images of teeth were presented to a clinical expert for localization and classification of the dental tissues, thereby obtaining the gold standard. Principal component analysis was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. Finally, the dental tissues were classified by employing multiple discriminant analysis. High agreement was observed between the resulting classification and the gold standard with the classification sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85 % and 97 %, respectively. This study demonstrates that NIR hyper-spectral imaging has considerable diagnostic potential for imaging hard dental tissues.

  20. Evaluation of radiation effects on dental enamel hardness and dental restorative materials; Avaliacao do efeito da irradiacao na dureza do esmalte dental e de materiais odontologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Supervisao de Radioquimica; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Protese

    2000-07-01

    This research presents the results of the microhardness of human dental enamel and of the following dental restorative materials: three dental porcelains - Ceramco II, Finesse and Noritake, and two resin restorative materials - Artglass and Targis, for materials submitted to different times of irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 12}n cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} . The results obtained indicated that there is a decrease of the surface microhardness when the enamel is irradiated for 1 h and when dental materials are irradiated for 3 h. However, enamels irradiated for 30 min. did not show significant change of their surface hardness. Therefore, the selection of irradiation time is an important factor to be considered when irradiated teeth or dental materials are used in the investigations of their properties. (author)

  1. Photoacoustic imaging in both soft and hard biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T; Dewhurst, R J

    2010-01-01

    To date, most Photoacoustic (PA) imaging results have been from soft biotissues. In this study, a PA imaging system with a near-infrared pulsed laser source has been applied to obtain 2-D and 3-D images from both soft tissue and post-mortem dental samples. Imaging results showed that the PA technique has the potential to image human oral disease, such as early-stage teeth decay. For non-invasive photoacoustic imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. Several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict initial temperature and pressure fields within a tooth sample. Predicted initial temperature and pressure rises are below corresponding safety limits.

  2. [The elemental composition of teeth hard tissues depending on the state of the environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suladze, N; Shishniashvili, T; Margvelashvili, V; Kobakhidze, K

    2014-01-01

    At present, great attention is paid to the origin of man-made micro elemental anomalies. To monitor the state of the environment and its effects on the human body, of great importance is the determination of the amount and distribution of various chemical elements in the dentin and enamel of the teeth. To determine the essential (Ca, Zn, Mn, Ni), conditionally essential (Rb, Ni, Sr) and toxic (Pb, Hg) trace elements in the mineralized tissues of the teeth and to identify the relationship between the elemental composition of the tooth structure and the state of the general and dental health depending on the state of the environment, we have examined 29 children aged 3-4 years who have carried out analysis of hard tissue of teeth (teeth used for remote medical reasons) for the maintenance of nine chemical elements. Children living in a relatively environmentally favorable conditions essential value and conditionally essential elements in the mineralized tissues of the teeth were within normal limits, and toxic elements slightly increased limits that differ from those of children living in environmentally disadvantaged areas. In particular, these essential elements were significantly reduced (except for zinc), as indicators of toxic elements - mercury and lead, increased by 12.5% and 44.5%, respectively, which is clearly reflected on the state of dental health because noted decompensated form of tooth decay. Thus, deviations in a state of general and dental health of children associated with an imbalance of macro-and microelements in the mineralized tissues of the teeth.

  3. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  4. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  5. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen [University Medical Center Freiburg, Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Spittau, Bjoern [Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm{sup 3}, FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm{sup 3} and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 34 cm{sup 3} in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 36.5 cm{sup 3}. Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c{sub v}). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja; Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen; Spittau, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm 3 , FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm 3 and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm 3 and FOV of 34 cm 3 in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm 3 and FOV of 36.5 cm 3 . Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c v ). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  8. Photoabalation in dental hard substances and atheromatous plaques - The efficiency and selectivity criteria for surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, B.

    1995-01-01

    The basic principals of IR photoabalation are relatively easy to understand as long as water is the predominant absorber in the target tissue (e.g. brain tissue, cornea). Dental hard substances are typical target materials for the study of biological materials with low water content (30%) Its main constituent is hydroxyapatit (50%) with maximal absorption at 9.5 μm wavelength. The photoablation efficiency, the collateral thermal damage and the resultant formation of thermally induced surface cracks were investigated. Unlike the 2.95 μm of the Er:YAG, already in use, the 9.5 μm radiation minimizes the penetration depth; as a consequence, the volume of heated material per pulse is minimal too and thus thermal cracks - a potential source of caries are avoided. Furthermore at 9.5 μm, the ablation threshold requires a minimal fluence; this is an element of selectivity, limiting photoablation to dentin and enamel, while neighboring gingiva cannot be ablated accidentally. Removal of atherosclerotic plaques for recanalization of obliterated cardiac vessels (laser angioplasty) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure of highest socioeconomic relevance. The rather inhomogeneous composition of apatit and colesterol (both absorbing at 9.5 μm) make plaques a particularly complex target material; while the ablation efficiency has to be high, the related shock wave should be minimal. The open-quote selectivity close-quote criterion of the ablation process must avoid accidental perforation of the underlying vessel walls (composed of connective tissue with high water content), a deadly complication exclamation point Experimental results with FELIX will be demonstrated. Photoacoustic spectroscopy in a recently developed non contact mode has been proved to provide various informations (on line) about the IR-photoablation process

  9. Analysis of enamel microhardness at various hard tissue states and depth of the microfissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Yarova

    2013-08-01

    micro-hardness of enamel have been identified in the cervical area: the presence of defects of type I - in intact teeth, defects of II and III types - in the teeth with wedge-shaped defect. The least indices, regardless of the depth of micro-cracks in teeth, were diagnosed in cervical caries. In samples with carious and non-carious pathology the largest micro-hardness of enamel in the cervical area were recorded in deep micro-cracks type III, and the lowest - in the teeth with defects type I. In intact samples, conversely, the strength of enamel was higher in minor defects type I, lower - in the presence of micro-cracks type II. Changes in the mechanical properties of the enamel were due to its chemical composition, which was confirmed by microroentgen-spectral analysis. Thus, the content of calcium and phosphorus in the cervical region was significantly different depending on the pathology of hard tissues (p <0,05. The higher content of macro-elements was determined in the wedge-shaped defects. Some discrepancy of the obtained indices with the depth of micro-cracks indicates that complex of adaptive processes occurs not only in the enamel but in the strength of the enamel, depending on the depth of cracks and pathology of hard tissues and demand further investigation. The revealed features should be used for a substantiation of principles of treatment and prophylaxis of the dental hard tissues defects.

  10. Hard tissue compatibility of natural hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaojun; Gui Lai; Lue Xiaoying

    2008-01-01

    The natural hydroxyapatite/chitosan (NHC) composite is a new synthesized material. The aim of this experiment was to assess the bone tissue compatibility of this NHC composite in vivo. Twenty-four healthy New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. Of those, 20 were used as the experimental group and four as the control group. In the experimental group, animals receive a cranium defect procedure and NHC composite repair. In the control group, animals underwent the cranium defect procedure without NHC composite repair. At 1, 4, 12, 24, and 40 weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed and samples were taken and assessed by gross observation, three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomographic (CT) reconstruction, histology and scanning electron microscope. Our results showed that at 1 week after repairing the bone defect with the NHC composite in the experimental group, new bone appeared around the composite and matured gradually. At 24 weeks after surgery, there were little collagenous tissues present between the material and surrounding bones. At 40 weeks after surgery, new bone had grown into the mature bone and total osseointegration had occurred. In the control group, however, no bone defect healing was observed at 40 weeks after surgery. All these results of the present in vivo work suggest that the NHC composite has a good hard tissue biocompatibility and an excellent osteoconductivity. It is suitable for artificial bone implants and frame materials of tissue engineering.

  11. Hard tissue compatibility of natural hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Xiaojun; Gui Lai [Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, Plastic Surgery Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 33 Ba-Da-Chu Road, Beijing, 100144 (China); Lue Xiaoying [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210096 (China)], E-mail: laiguiplastic@tom.com, E-mail: luxy@seu.edu.cn

    2008-12-15

    The natural hydroxyapatite/chitosan (NHC) composite is a new synthesized material. The aim of this experiment was to assess the bone tissue compatibility of this NHC composite in vivo. Twenty-four healthy New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. Of those, 20 were used as the experimental group and four as the control group. In the experimental group, animals receive a cranium defect procedure and NHC composite repair. In the control group, animals underwent the cranium defect procedure without NHC composite repair. At 1, 4, 12, 24, and 40 weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed and samples were taken and assessed by gross observation, three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomographic (CT) reconstruction, histology and scanning electron microscope. Our results showed that at 1 week after repairing the bone defect with the NHC composite in the experimental group, new bone appeared around the composite and matured gradually. At 24 weeks after surgery, there were little collagenous tissues present between the material and surrounding bones. At 40 weeks after surgery, new bone had grown into the mature bone and total osseointegration had occurred. In the control group, however, no bone defect healing was observed at 40 weeks after surgery. All these results of the present in vivo work suggest that the NHC composite has a good hard tissue biocompatibility and an excellent osteoconductivity. It is suitable for artificial bone implants and frame materials of tissue engineering.

  12. Pulp and periodontal tissue repair - regeneration or tissue metaplasia after dental trauma. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens O

    2012-01-01

    Healing subsequent to dental trauma is known to be very complex, a result explained by the variability of the types of dental trauma (six luxations, nine fracture types, and their combinations). On top of that, at least 16 different cellular systems get involved in more severe trauma types each o...... of tissue replaces the injured). In this study, a review is given of the impact of trauma to various dental tissues such as alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, cementum, Hertvigs epithelial root sheath, and the pulp....... of them with a different potential for healing with repair, i.e. (re-establishment of tissue continuity without functional restitution) and regeneration (where the injured or lost tissue is replaced with new tissue with identical tissue anatomy and function) and finally metaplasia (where a new type...

  13. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Dillen, Yörg; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Driesen, Ronald B.; Wolfs, Esther; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Given their straightforward and relatively easy isolation from extracted third molars, dental stem cells (DSCs) have become an attractive source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Over the past decade, there have been numerous studies supporting the angiogenic, neuroprotective, and neurotrophic effects of the DSC secretome. Together with their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells and neural cell types, this makes DSCs suitable candidates for dental tissue engineering and nerve injury repair. PMID:27688777

  15. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ratajczak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Given their straightforward and relatively easy isolation from extracted third molars, dental stem cells (DSCs have become an attractive source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Over the past decade, there have been numerous studies supporting the angiogenic, neuroprotective, and neurotrophic effects of the DSC secretome. Together with their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells and neural cell types, this makes DSCs suitable candidates for dental tissue engineering and nerve injury repair.

  16. Method and device for bio-impedance measurement with hard-tissue applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimerà, A; Calderón, E; Los, P; Christie, A M

    2008-01-01

    Bio-impedance measurements can be used to detect and monitor several properties of living hard-tissues, some of which include bone mineral density, bone fracture healing or dental caries detection. In this paper a simple method and hardware architecture for hard tissue bio-impedance measurement is proposed. The key design aspects of such architecture are discussed and a commercial handheld ac impedance device is presented that is fully certified to international medical standards. It includes a 4-channel multiplexer and is capable of measuring impedances from 10 kΩ to 10 MΩ across a frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz with a maximum error of 5%. The device incorporates several user interface methods and a Bluetooth link for bi-directional wireless data transfer. Low-power design techniques have been implemented, ensuring the device exceeds 8 h of continuous use. Finally, bench test results using dummy cells consisting of parallel connected resistors and capacitors, from 10 kΩ to 10 MΩ and from 20 pF to 100 pF, are discussed

  17. Method and device for bio-impedance measurement with hard-tissue applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimerà, A; Calderón, E; Los, P; Christie, A M

    2008-06-01

    Bio-impedance measurements can be used to detect and monitor several properties of living hard-tissues, some of which include bone mineral density, bone fracture healing or dental caries detection. In this paper a simple method and hardware architecture for hard tissue bio-impedance measurement is proposed. The key design aspects of such architecture are discussed and a commercial handheld ac impedance device is presented that is fully certified to international medical standards. It includes a 4-channel multiplexer and is capable of measuring impedances from 10 kOmega to 10 MOmega across a frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz with a maximum error of 5%. The device incorporates several user interface methods and a Bluetooth link for bi-directional wireless data transfer. Low-power design techniques have been implemented, ensuring the device exceeds 8 h of continuous use. Finally, bench test results using dummy cells consisting of parallel connected resistors and capacitors, from 10 kOmega to 10 MOmega and from 20 pF to 100 pF, are discussed.

  18. Soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2014-04-01

    To provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants. This narrative review focuses on cell biology and histology of soft tissue wounds around natural teeth and dental implants. The available data indicate that: (a) Oral wounds follow a similar pattern. (b) The tissue specificities of the gingival, alveolar and palatal mucosa appear to be innately and not necessarily functionally determined. (c) The granulation tissue originating from the periodontal ligament or from connective tissue originally covered by keratinized epithelium has the potential to induce keratinization. However, it also appears that deep palatal connective tissue may not have the same potential to induce keratinization as the palatal connective tissue originating from an immediately subepithelial area. (d) Epithelial healing following non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy appears to be completed after a period of 7–14 days. Structural integrity of a maturing wound between a denuded root surface and a soft tissue flap is achieved at approximately 14-days post-surgery. (e) The formation of the biological width and maturation of the barrier function around transmucosal implants requires 6–8 weeks of healing. (f) The established peri-implant soft connective tissue resembles a scar tissue in composition, fibre orientation, and vasculature. (g) The peri-implant junctional epithelium may reach a greater final length under certain conditions such as implants placed into fresh extraction sockets versus conventional implant procedures in healed sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Hardness of model dental composites - the effect of filler volume fraction and silanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, J F; Wassell, R W

    1999-05-01

    The relationship between structure and mechanical properties for dental composites has often proved difficult to determine due to the use of commercially available materials having a number of differences in composition i.e. different type of resin, different type of filler, etc. This makes a scientific study of any one variable such as filler content difficult if not impossible. In the current study it was the aim to test the hypothesis that hardness measurements of dental composites could be used to monitor the status of the resin-filler interface and to determine the efficacy of any particle silanation process. Ten model composites formulated from a single batch of resin and containing a common type of glass filler were formulated to contain varying amounts of filler. Some materials contained silanated filler, others contained unsilanated filler. Specimens were prepared and stored in water and hardness (Vickers') was determined at 24 h using loads of 50, 100, 200 and 300 g. Composites containing silanated fillers were significantly harder than materials containing unsilanated fillers. For unsilanated products hardness was independent of applied load and in this respect they behaved like homogeneous materials. For composites containing silanated fillers there was a marked increase in measured hardness as applied load was increased. This suggests that the hardness-load profile could be used to monitor the status of the resin-filler interface. Copyright 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  20. Effect of Repeated Microwave Disinfection on Surface Hardness and Dimensional Accuracy of Two Dental Stone Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Robati Anaraki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversial evidence in relation to the effect of microwave on mechanical properties of stone casts. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of repeated microwave disinfection on surface hardness and dimensional accuracy of dental stone. In this in vitro study, 48 cylindrical stone samples were prepared using two products of type IV stone to assess surface hardness and 48 impressions were taken from a model and poured by these stones to assess the dimensional accuracy. The evaluation of the samples was carried out consequently by a micro-hardness tester and a digital caliper after the stone samples were exposed to 7 consecutive rounds of 900 watts (W microwave irradiation for five minutes each time after cooling. Data were analyzed by t-test and ANOVA. According to the obtained results, multiple disinfections of the stone casts by microwave do not negatively affect their surface hardness and dimensional accuracy.   Key words: Dental stone; Dimensional accuracy; Hardness; Microwave

  1. Estimation of soft- and hard-tissue thickness at implant sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anchorage control is a critical consideration when planning treatment for patients with dental and skeletal malocclusions. To obtain sufficient stability of implants, the thickness of the soft tissue and the cortical-bone in the placement site must be considered; so as to provide an anatomical map in order to assist the clinician in the placement of the implants. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the thickness of soft- and hard-tissue. Materials and Methods: To measure soft tissue and cortical-bone thicknesses, 12 maxillary cross-sectional specimens were obtained from the cadavers, which were made at three maxillary mid-palatal suture areas: The interdental area between the first and second premolars (Group 1, the second premolar and the first molar (Group 2, and the first and second molars (Group 3. Sectioned samples along with reference rulers were digitally scanned. Scanned images were calibrated and measurements were made with image-analysis software. We measured the thickness of soft and hard-tissues at five sectional areas parallel to the buccopalatal cementoenamel junction (CEJ line at 2-mm intervals and also thickness of soft tissue at the six landmarks including the incisive papilla (IP on the palate. The line perpendicular to the occlusal plane was made and measurement was taken at 4-mm intervals from the closest five points to IP. Results: (1 Group 1:6 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 2 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (2 Group 2:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 4 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (3 Group 3:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 8 mm from CEJ in palatal side. Conclusions: The best site for placement of implant is with thinnest soft tissue and thickest hard tissue, which is in the middle from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 1 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 2 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and faraway from CEJ in palatal

  2. Teasing apart the contributions of hard dietary items on 3D dental microtextures in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Ivan; Schulz, Ellen; Pinnow, Mona; Krohn, Susanne; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2012-07-01

    3D dental microtexture analysis is a powerful tool for reconstructing the diets of extinct primates. This method is based on the comparison of fossils with extant species of known diet. The diets of primates are highly diversified and include fruits, seeds, grass, tree leaves, bark, roots, tubers, and animal resources. Fruits remain the main component in the diets of most primates. We tested whether the proportion of fruit consumed is correlated with dental microtexture. Two methods of microtexture analysis, the scale-sensitive fractal analysis (SSFA) and the Dental Areal Surface Texture Analysis (DASTA; after ISO/FDIS 25178-2), were applied to specimens of eight primate species (Alouatta seniculus, Gorilla gorilla, Lophocebus albigena, Macaca fascicularis, Pan troglodytes, Papio cynocephalus, Pongo abelii, Theropithecus gelada). These species largely differ in the mean annual proportion of fruit (from 0 to 90%) in their diet, as well as in their consumption of other hard items (seeds, bark, and insect cuticles) and of abrasive plants. We find the complexity and heterogeneity of textures (SSFA) to correlate with the proportion of fruits consumed. Textural fill volume (SSFA) indicates the proportion of both fruits and other hard items processed. Furthermore, anisotropy (SSFA) relates to the consumption of abrasive plants like grass and other monocots. ISO parameters valley height, root mean square height, material volume, density of peaks, and closed hill and dale areas (DASTA) describe the functional interaction between food items and enamel facets during mastication. The shallow, plastic deformation of enamel surfaces induced by small hard particles, such as phytoliths or dust, results in flat microtexture relief, whereas the brittle, deep fracture caused by large hard items such as hard seeds creates larger relief. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of hard tissue surgical changes on soft tissue displacement: a pilot CBCT study

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    Leonardo Koerich

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: This pilot study had as main objective to test the reliability of a new method to evaluate orthognathic surgery outcomes and also, to understand the effect of hard tissue changes on soft tissue displacement. Methods: The sample consisted of eight patients that underwent bimaxillary advancement and had CBCT at two time points (before surgery and 6-8 months follow-up. Voxel-based cranial base superimposition was used to register the scans. A different technique of iterative closest point (ICP was used to measure and correlate the changes. The average displacement of 15 areas (4 hard tissue and 11 soft tissue were measured twice. Results: ICC was > 0.99 for all areas. Changes in the tip of the nose did not correlate with changes in any maxillary area, whereas soft tissue A point, A point and upper lips had correlation with several areas. The highest correlation for the maxilla was between the upper lip and the left/right supra cheilion (p< 0.001, r= 0.91 and p< 0.001, r= 0.93, respectively. In the mandible, the majority of the correlations involved soft tissue pogonion, pogonion and lower incisors, with the strongest one between pogonion and lower incisors (p< 0.001, r= 0.98. Conclusion: With the proper case selection, ICP is a reliable method that can be used to assess three-dimensional changes.

  4. Measurement of hard tissue density of head phantom based on the HU by using CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Sun; Kang, Dong Wan; Kim, Jae Duk

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a conversion coefficient for Hounsfield Units(HU) to material density (g cm -3 ) obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBMercuRay TM ) data and to measure the hard tissue density based on the Hounsfield scale on dental head phantom. CT Scanner Phantom (AAPM) equipped with CT Number Insert consists of five cylindrical pins of materials with different densities and teflon ring was scanned by using the CBMercuRay TM (Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) volume scanner. The raw data were converted into DICOM format and the HU of different areas of CT number insert measured by using CBWorks TM . Linear regression analysis and Student t-test were performed statistically. There was no significant difference (P>0.54) between real densities and measured densities. A linear regression was performed using the density, ρ (g cm -3 ), as the dependent variable in terms of the HU (H). The regression equation obtained was ρ=0.00072 H-0.01588 with an R2 value of 0.9968. Density values based on the Hounsfield scale was 1697.1 ± 24.9 HU in cortical bone, 526.5 ± 44.4 HU in trabecular bone, 2639.1 ± 48.7 HU in enamel, 1246.1 ± 39.4 HU in dentin of dental head phantom. CBCT provides an effective option for determination of material density expressed as Hounsfield Units.

  5. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Pulp Tissues Obtained from Teeth with Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekfar, Azin; Valli, Kusum S; Kanafi, Mohammad Mahboob; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are becoming an attractive target for therapeutic purposes because of their neural crest origin and propensity. Although DPSCs can be successfully cryopreserved, there are hardly any reports on cryopreservation of dental pulp tissues obtained from teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis during endodontic treatment and isolation and characterization of DPSCs from such cryopreserved pulp. The aim of this study was to cryopreserve the said pulp tissues to propagate and characterize isolated DPSCs. A medium consisting of 90% fetal bovine serum and 10% dimethyl sulfoxide was used for cryopreservation of pulp tissues. DPSCs were isolated from fresh and cryopreserved pulp tissues using an enzymatic method. Cell viability and proliferation were determined using the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. DPSC migration and interaction were analyzed with the wound healing assay. Mesenchymal characteristics of DPSCs were verified by flow cytometric analysis of cell surface CD markers. The osteogenic and adipogenic potential of DPSCs was shown by von Kossa and oil red O staining methods, respectively, and the polymerase chain reaction method. We found no significant difference in CD marker expression and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of DPSCs obtained from fresh and cryopreserved dental pulp tissue. Our study shows that dental pulp can be successfully cryopreserved without losing normal characteristics and differentiation potential of their DPSCs, thus making them suitable for dental banking and future therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microangiographic study of the canine dental tissues: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabayashi, T.; Morgan, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A microangiographic study of the dental tissues was performed on one adult mongrel dog to examine the usefulness of the technique. This preliminary study used 30% wt/vol Micropaque suspension which was perfused into the common carotid arteries. After the complete perfusion, the specimen was fixed into a mixture of 10% buffered neutral formalin solution and 95% ethyl alcohol. The mandibular bone with teeth in situ was decalcified. The specimen was embedded in methyl methacrylate. One mm slab sections were made, and then the microangiographs were made. Adequate filling of arterioles was evident on the microangiographs. This technique is shown to be useful in characterizing the nature of the blood supply to the bone and teeth that might be involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury in the canine dental and periodontal tissues

  8. The fluorescence in the diagnosis of dental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puron, E.; Homs, R.; Paya, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental method for obtaining fluorescence of the dental tissue is described. A comparative analysis for the behaviour of the tissue fluorescence, both, healthy or intact enamel and carious samples is presented; the comparison of the obtained results with the ones described in the literature is done. Optical methods for the detection of carious lesions have the advantage of being minimally invasive. For this reason, induced fluorescence with a blue light to detect the presence of the Streptococcus in the oral cavity is proposed as an identifier method for find initial caries in dentistry in our country. (Author)

  9. The irradiation action on human dental tissue by X-rays and electrons. A nanoindenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraenzel, Wolfgang [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Dept. of Physics; Gerlach, Reinhard [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Clinic of Radiation Therapy

    2009-07-01

    It is known that ionizing radiation is used in medicine for Roentgen diagnostics and for radiation therapy. The radiation interacts with matter, in particular with biological one, essentially by scattering, photoelectric effect, Compton effect and pair production. To what extent the biological material is changed thereby, depends on the type and the amount of radiation energy, on the dose and on the tissue constitution. In modern radiation therapy two different kinds of radiation are used: high energy X-rays and electron radiation. In the case of head-neck tumors the general practice is an irradiation with high energy X-rays with absorbed dose to water up to 70 Gy. Teeth destruction has been identified as a side effect during irradiation. In addition, damage to the salivary glands is often observed which leads to a decrease or even the complete loss of the salivary secretion (xerostomia). This study shows how the different energy and radiation types damage the tooth tissue. The effects of both, high X-ray energy and high energy electrons, on the mechanical properties hardness and elasticity of the human dental tissue are measured by the nanoindentation technique. We compare these results with the effect of the irradiation of low X-ray energy on the dental tissue. (orig.)

  10. The irradiation action on human dental tissue by X-rays and electrons. A nanoindenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Gerlach, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    It is known that ionizing radiation is used in medicine for Roentgen diagnostics and for radiation therapy. The radiation interacts with matter, in particular with biological one, essentially by scattering, photoelectric effect, Compton effect and pair production. To what extent the biological material is changed thereby, depends on the type and the amount of radiation energy, on the dose and on the tissue constitution. In modern radiation therapy two different kinds of radiation are used: high energy X-rays and electron radiation. In the case of head-neck tumors the general practice is an irradiation with high energy X-rays with absorbed dose to water up to 70 Gy. Teeth destruction has been identified as a side effect during irradiation. In addition, damage to the salivary glands is often observed which leads to a decrease or even the complete loss of the salivary secretion (xerostomia). This study shows how the different energy and radiation types damage the tooth tissue. The effects of both, high X-ray energy and high energy electrons, on the mechanical properties hardness and elasticity of the human dental tissue are measured by the nanoindentation technique. We compare these results with the effect of the irradiation of low X-ray energy on the dental tissue. (orig.)

  11. In Vitro Comparative Study of Two Different Bleaching Agents on Micro-hardness Dental Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nazish; Ali Abidi, Syed Yawar; Meo, Ashraf Ali

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent containing 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on enamel micro-hardness. An in vitroexperimental study. Department of Operative Dentistry and Science of Dental Materials at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences and Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from July to December 2014. Atotal of 90 enamel slabs from 45 sound human 3rd molar were randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained 30 specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator during the whole experiment. However, Groups 2 and 3 were treated with power whitening gel and tooth whitening pen respectively. After bleaching session, specimens were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water again for 10 seconds and then stored in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator. Artificial saliva was changed after every 2 days. The Vickers hardness tester (Wolpert 402 MVD, Germany) was adjusted to a load of 0.1 kg (100 gm) and dwell time of 5 seconds. Three Vickers were performed on each specimen using a hardness tester according to the ISO 6507-3:1998 specification. Micro-hardness measurements were performed before and after bleaching at day 1, 7 and 14. In the control group, the baseline micro-hardness was 181.1 ±9.3 which was reduced after the storage on day 1, 7 and 14 (p = 0.104). In Group 2, baseline micro-hardness was 180.4 ±10.1 which was reduced to 179.79 ±10.0 units after day 1. Whereas, on day 7 and 14, the values of micro-hardness were 179.8 ±10 and 179.7 ±10.29, respectively (p=0.091). Furthermore, the baseline micro-hardness in Group 3 was 174.0 ±22.9 units which was reduced to 173 ±23 on day 1, 170 ±30 on day 7 and 173 ±23 on day 14 (p = 0.256). The statistically insignificant difference was found among micro-hardness values of different bleaching

  12. In Vitro Comparative Study of Two Different Bleaching Agents on Micro-hardness Dental Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, N.; Abidi, S. Y. A.; Meo, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16 percentage Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent containing 38 percentage Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on enamel micro-hardness. Study Design: An in vitro experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Operative Dentistry and Science of Dental Materials at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences and Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from July to December 2014. Methodology: A total of 90 enamel slabs from 45 sound human 3rd molar were randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained 30 specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37 Degree C in incubator during the whole experiment. However, Groups 2 and 3 were treated with power whitening gel and tooth whitening pen respectively. After bleaching session, specimens were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water again for 10 seconds and then stored in artificial saliva at 37 Degree C in incubator. Artificial saliva was changed after every 2 days. The Vickers hardness tester (Wolpert 402 MVD, Germany) was adjusted to a load of 0.1 kg (100 gm) and dwell time of 5 seconds. Three Vickers were performed on each specimen using a hardness tester according to the ISO 6507-3:1998 specification. Micro-hardness measurements were performed before and after bleaching at day 1, 7 and 14. Results: In the control group, the baseline micro-hardness was 181.1 ± 9.3 which was reduced after the storage on day 1, 7 and 14 (p = 0.104). In Group 2, baseline micro-hardness was 180.4 ±10.1 which was reduced to 179.79 ± 10.0 units after day 1. Whereas, on day 7 and 14, the values of micro-hardness were 179.8 ±10 and 179.7 ±10.29, respectively (p=0.091). Furthermore, the baseline micro-hardness in Group 3 was 174.0 ±22.9 units which was reduced to 173 ± 23 on day 1, 170 ±30 on day 7 and 173 ± 23 on day 14 (p = 0

  13. Chemical and physical analysis on hard tissues after irradiation with short pulse Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Andrea Antunes

    2003-01-01

    This work reports on a study that was designed to investigate chemical, physical and morphological alterations in the dental enamel surface. The influence of application of laser in enamel surface by microscopic technical, X-ray fluorescence for chemical analysis, physical property as well as hardness and thermal analysis with Nd:YAG laser is also pointed out. A prototype of Nd:YAG (Q-switched) laser developed at the Center of Lasers and Applications - Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, aiming applications in the Medical Sciences that typical wavelength of 1.064 nm was used. The modifications in human dental enamel chemical composition for major and trace elements are here outlined. The accuracy of procedures was performed by analysis of natural hydroxyapatite as standard reference material. The identification and quantification of the chemical elements presented in the dental tissue samples were performed trough EDS, XRF and INAA. We determined the rate Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) for different techniques. We performed an analysis in different regions of the surface and for different areas allowing a description of the chemical change in the total area of the specimen and the assessment of the compositional homogeneity of the each specimen. A comparison between XRF and INAA is presented. Based on morphological analysis of the irradiated surfaces with short pulse Nd:YAG laser we determined the area surrounded by the irradiation for the parameters for this thesis, and this technique allowed us to visualize the regions of fusion and re-solidification. The energy densities ranged from 10 J/cm 2 to 40 J/cm 2 , with pulse width of 6, 10 e 200 ns, and repetition rates of 5 and 7 Hz. In this thesis, FTIR-spectroscopy is used to analyze powder of mineralized tissue as well as enamel, dentine, root and cementum for human and bovine teeth after irradiation with short-pulse Nd:YAG laser. Characteristic spectra were obtained for the proteins components and mineral

  14. Annealing of Co-Cr dental alloy: effects on nanostructure and Rockwell hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyıldız, Simel; Soylu, Elif Hilal; Ide, Semra; Kılıç, Selim; Sipahi, Cumhur; Pişkin, Bulent; Gökçe, Hasan Suat

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of annealing on the nanostructure and hardness of Co-Cr metal ceramic samples that were fabricated with a direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. Five groups of Co-Cr dental alloy samples were manufactured in a rectangular form measuring 4 × 2 × 2 mm. Samples fabricated by a conventional casting technique (Group I) and prefabricated milling blanks (Group II) were examined as conventional technique groups. The DMLS samples were randomly divided into three groups as not annealed (Group III), annealed in argon atmosphere (Group IV), or annealed in oxygen atmosphere (Group V). The nanostructure was examined with the small-angle X-ray scattering method. The Rockwell hardness test was used to measure the hardness changes in each group, and the means and standard deviations were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA for comparison of continuous variables and Tukey's HSD test was used for post hoc analysis. P values of directly affected both the nanostructure and hardness of the Co-Cr alloy. Group III exhibited a non-homogeneous structure and increased hardness (48.16 ± 3.02 HRC) because the annealing process was incomplete and the inner stress was not relieved. Annealing in argon atmosphere of Group IV not only relieved the inner stresses but also decreased the hardness (27.40 ± 3.98 HRC). The results of fitting function presented that Group IV was the most homogeneous product as the minimum bilayer thickness was measured (7.11 Å). After the manufacturing with DMLS technique, annealing in argon atmosphere is an essential process for Co-Cr metal ceramic substructures. The dentists should be familiar with the materials that are used in clinic for prosthodontics treatments.

  15. Advances of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and dental tissue in craniofacial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Maobin; Zhang, Hongming; Gangolli, Riddhi

    2014-05-01

    Bone and dental tissues in craniofacial region work as an important aesthetic and functional unit. Reconstruction of craniofacial tissue defects is highly expected to ensure patients to maintain good quality of life. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been developed in the last two decades, and been advanced with the stem cell technology. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells are one of the most extensively studied post-natal stem cell population, and are widely utilized in cell-based therapy. Dental tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells are a relatively new stem cell population that isolated from various dental tissues. These cells can undergo multilineage differentiation including osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation, thus provide an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the important issues in mesenchymal stem cell biology including the origin and functions of mesenchymal stem cells, compare the properties of these two types of mesenchymal cells, update recent basic research and clinic applications in this field, and address important future challenges.

  16. Staining plastic blocks with triiodide to image cells and soft tissues in backscattered electron SEM of skeletal and dental tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Boyde

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM is an invaluable method for studying the histology of the hard, mineralised components of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA or other resin embedded skeletal and dental tissues. Intact tissues are studied in micro-milled or polished block faces with an electron-optical section thickness of the order of a half to one micron and with the area of the section as big as a whole – large or small – bone organ. However, BSE SEM does not give information concerning the distribution of uncalcified, ‘soft’, cellular and extracellular matrix components. This can be obtained by confocal microscopy of the same block and the two sorts of images merged but the blocks have to be studied in two microscope systems. The present work shows a new, simple and economic approach to visualising both components by using the triiodide ion in Lugol's iodine solution to stain the block surface prior to the application of any conductive coating – and the latter can be omitted if charging is suppressed by use of poor vacuum conditions in the SEM sample chamber. The method permits the use of archival tissue, and it will be valuable in studies of both normal growth and development and pathological changes in bones and joints, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, and tissue adaptation to implants.

  17. The Effect of Food Hardness on the Development of Dental Caries in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, Yutaka; Sano, Tomoya; Kodama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that dental caries may be produced in diabetic rodent models fed with noncariogenic standard diets; however, many studies usually add large amounts of sugar to the diet to induce dental caries. Moreover, the physical properties of cariogenic diets have been reported as an important factor in the formation of caries. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of the hardness of non-cariogenic diets on the development of dental caries in diabetic rodents. Seven-wee...

  18. A tissue-dependent hypothesis of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Soro, A; Belda-Ferre, P; Cabrera-Rubio, R; Alcaraz, L D; Mira, A

    2013-01-01

    Current understanding of dental caries considers this disease a demineralization of the tooth tissues due to the acid produced by sugar-fermenting microorganisms. Thus, caries is considered a diet- and pH-dependent process. We present here the first metagenomic analysis of the bacterial communities present at different stages of caries development, with the aim of determining whether the bacterial composition and biochemical profile are specific to the tissue affected. The data show that microbial composition at the initial, enamel-affecting stage of caries is significantly different from that found at subsequent stages, as well as from dental plaque of sound tooth surfaces. Although the relative proportion of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.12% in dental plaque to 0.72% in enamel caries, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis were the dominant streptococci in these lesions. The functional profile of caries-associated bacterial communities indicates that genes involved in acid stress tolerance and dietary sugar fermentation are overrepresented only at the initial stage (enamel caries), whereas other genes coding for osmotic stress tolerance as well as collagenases and other proteases enabling dentin degradation are significantly overrepresented in dentin cavities. The results support a scenario in which pH and diet are determinants of the disease during the degradation of enamel, but in dentin caries lesions not only acidogenic but also proteolytic bacteria are involved. We propose that caries disease is a process of varying etiology, in which acid-producing bacteria are the vehicle to penetrate enamel and allow dentin degrading microorganisms to expand the cavity. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Hard- and soft-tissue contributions to the esthetics of the posed smile in growing patients seeking orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Laurie; McNamara, James A; Ackerman, Marc B; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to broaden the understanding of how various skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue relationships are related to the esthetics of the smile in patients with malocclusions before orthodontic treatment. Images of the posed smile were captured from digital video clips of 60 growing patients (33 girls, 27 boys) seeking orthodontic treatment; they were judged by panels of laypersons and orthodontists. Discriminant analysis identified determinants of the "pleasing smile" from the results of a visual analog scale. Quantitative measurements of the soft and hard tissues were made by using the smile images, cephalometric radiographs, and study models. The esthetics of the smile were correlated with specific skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue structures in the anteroposterior, vertical, and transverse dimensions (Pearson test on non-topographic correlations). The esthetic smile judgments of orthodontists agreed with those of laypersons (r >0.93). The vertical thicknesses of the lips were the most significant component of a pleasant smile, for both the orthodontists (upper lip) and laypersons (lower lip) (discriminant power: 75%). The vertical thickness of the upper lip had a significant positive correlation with the position of the maxillary incisor. Vertical lip thickness proved to be the most influential variable in smile esthetics. The significant relationship of incisor protrusion with the vertical thickness of the vermilion border of the upper lip must be considered when planning orthodontic treatment.

  20. Calcium and magnesium content in hard tissues of rats under condition of subchronic lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Tatjana; Vujanovic, Dragana; Dozic, Ivan; Petkovic-Curcin, Aleksandra

    2008-03-01

    Lead manifests toxic effects in almost all organs and tissues, especially in: the nervous system, hematopoietic system, kidney and liver. This metal has a special affinity for deposition in hard tissue, i.e., bones and teeth. It is generally believed that the main mechanism of its toxicity relies on its interaction with bioelements, especially with Ca and Mg. This article analyses the influence of Pb poisoning on Ca and Mg content in hard tissues, (mandible, femur, teeth and skull) of female and young rats. Experiments were carried out on 60 female rats, AO breed, and on 80 of their young rats (offspring). Female rats were divided into three groups: the first one was a control group, the second one received 100 mg/kg Pb2+ kg b.wt. per day in drinking water, the third one received 30 mg/kg Pb(2+) kg b.wt. per day in drinking water. Young rats (offspring) were divided into the same respective three groups. Lead, calcium and magnesium content in hard tissues (mandible, femur, teeth-incisors and skull) was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry in mineralized samples. There was a statistically significant Pb deposition in all analyzed female and young rat hard tissues. Ca and Mg contents were significantly reduced in all female and young rat hard tissues. These results show that Pb poisoning causes a significant reduction in Ca and Mg content in animal hard tissues, which is probably the consequence of competitive antagonism between Pb and Ca and Mg.

  1. Bioengineering of Dental Tissues: Bibliometric Analysis 2000-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Zamorano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been a noticeable increase in experimental use and therapies based on stem cells over recent years. Nevertheless, there is a lack of information about this progress in the dental field, which makes it difficult to trace development and design policies. The purpose of this study, as a first approach to the subject, is to determine a bibliometric profile for the investigation related to bioengineering of dental tissue at a worldwide scale, based on the MEDLINE database, for the period 2000-2011. Methodology: A bibliometric study was carried out. Every article indexed in the MEDLINE database and associated with the terms “stem cells” and “tooth regeneration” for the period 2000-2011 was included. The analyzed variables were publishing date, country of origin, language and publication type (original or review, journal, author, associated university and tissue source (human or animal. Results: For the entire period included in the study, 257 articles were found. Of these, 149 corresponded to original Works published in English; 5 in other languages; 92 comprised literature reviews in English, 9 in other languages and 2 publications were included in the “others” category. The countries with the highest research productivity were the United States (24.51%, Japan (20.62% and China (17.90%, while Brazil (3.9% was the only Latin-American country found in the list. Animal tissues were used in 59.09% of them. The most productive authors were Ueda M (17 and Jin Y (11, whereas Fourth Military University (13, University of Tokyo (12 and Capital Medical University (10 had the largest number of publications. Conclusion: The United States, Japan and China concentrate about two thirds of the production. Latin-America was represented only by Brazil.

  2. Noninvasive computerized scanning method for the correlation between the facial soft and hard tissues for an integrated three-dimensional anthropometry and cephalometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantucci, Luigi Maria; Percoco, Gianluca; Lavecchia, Fulvio; Di Gioia, Eliana

    2013-05-01

    The article describes a new methodology to scan and integrate facial soft tissue surface with dental hard tissue models in a three-dimensional (3D) virtual environment, for a novel diagnostic approach.The facial and the dental scans can be acquired using any optical scanning systems: the models are then aligned and integrated to obtain a full virtual navigable representation of the head of the patient. In this article, we report in detail and further implemented a method for integrating 3D digital cast models into a 3D facial image, to visualize the anatomic position of the dentition. This system uses several 3D technologies to scan and digitize, integrating them with traditional dentistry records. The acquisitions were mainly performed using photogrammetric scanners, suitable for clinics or hospitals, able to obtain high mesh resolution and optimal surface texture for the photorealistic rendering of the face. To increase the quality and the resolution of the photogrammetric scanning of the dental elements, the authors propose a new technique to enhance the texture of the dental surface. Three examples of the application of the proposed procedure are reported in this article, using first laser scanning and photogrammetry and then only photogrammetry. Using cheek retractors, it is possible to scan directly a great number of dental elements. The final results are good navigable 3D models that integrate facial soft tissue and dental hard tissues. The method is characterized by the complete absence of ionizing radiation, portability and simplicity, fast acquisition, easy alignment of the 3D models, and wide angle of view of the scanner. This method is completely noninvasive and can be repeated any time the physician needs new clinical records. The 3D virtual model is a precise representation both of the soft and the hard tissue scanned, and it is possible to make any dimensional measure directly in the virtual space, for a full integrated 3D anthropometry and

  3. The caries environment: saliva, pellicle, diet, and hard tissue ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Anderson T; Zero, Domenick T

    2010-07-01

    The pathogenicity of the dental biofilm is modified by salivary and dietary factors, as well as by the characteristics of the tooth structure. The composition of the acquired pellicle can modify the mineral homeostasis of the tooth surfaces and the attachment of bacteria for the development of the biofilm. The substitution of sucrose from the diet by other less cariogenic sugars and/or sugar substitutes can contribute to reducing the pathogenicity of the biofilm. Saliva clears, dilutes, neutralizes, and buffers acids produced by the biofilm. In addition, saliva provides the biofilm/tooth structure with Ca(2+) PO(4)(3-) and F(-) ions, which can positively affect the equilibrium between demineralization-remineralization toward the remineralization and modify the susceptibility of the tooth structure to caries progression. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional Coatings or Films for Hard-Tissue Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guocheng Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials like stainless steel, Co-based alloy, Ti and its alloys are widely used as artificial hip joints, bone plates and dental implants due to their excellent mechanical properties and endurance. However, there are some surface-originated problems associated with the metallic implants: corrosion and wear in biological environments resulting in ions release and formation of wear debris; poor implant fixation resulting from lack of osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity; implant-associated infections due to the bacterial adhesion and colonization at the implantation site. For overcoming these surface-originated problems, a variety of surface modification techniques have been used on metallic implants, including chemical treatments, physical methods and biological methods. This review surveys coatings that serve to provide properties of anti-corrosion and anti-wear, biocompatibility and bioactivity, and antibacterial activity.

  5. Water hardness and cardiovascular disease. Elements in water and human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharrett, A R

    1977-05-01

    The hypothesis that the hardness of drinking water has a causal role in the development of cardiovascular disease will be strengthened if it can be demonstrated that elements in drinking water find their way into human tissues in significant amounts. For biologically important metals, the evidence is reviewed for a relationship of tissue levels to levels in drinking water. Hard water can contribute significantly to daily magnesium intake. Residents of hard-water areas may have raised levels of magnesium in coronary arteries, bone, and myocardial tissue. Lead levels in bone and in blood have been shown to be elevated in individuals living in homes with lead plumbing and soft water. Cadmium intake from water is probably small compared to that from other sources, and there is no convincing evidence of alteration in human tissue levels via drinking water cadmium. Human zinc and copper tissue levels are of interest but have not been adequately studied in relation to drinking water levels.

  6. Biomechanical study of the bone tissue with dental implants interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navrátil P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the stress-strain analysis of human mandible in the physiological state and after the dental implant application. The evaluation is focused on assessing of the cancellous bone tissue modeling-level. Three cancellous bone model-types are assessed: Non-trabecular model with homogenous isotropic material, nontrabecular model with inhomogeneous material obtained from computer tomography data using CT Data Analysis software, and trabecular model built from mandible section image. Computational modeling was chosen as the most suitable solution method and the solution on two-dimensional level was carried out. The results show that strain is more preferable value than stress in case of evaluation of mechanical response in cancellous bone. The non-trabecular model with CT-obtained material model is not acceptable for stress-strain analysis of the cancellous bone for singularities occurring on interfaces of regions with different values of modulus of elasticity.

  7. REE compositions in fossil vertebrate dental tissues indicate biomineral preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigaite, Ž.; Kear, B.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Jeffries, T.; Blom, H.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured in a number of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic dental tissues using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Fossil vertebrates analysed comprise scales and tesserae of Silurian and Devonian acanthodians, chondrichthyans, galeaspids, mongolepids, thelodonts, as well as teeth of Cretaceous lungfish and marine reptiles. The evaluation of fossil preservation level has been made by semi-quantitative spot geochemistry analyses on fine polished teeth and scale thin sections, using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Fossil teeth and scales with significant structure and colour alteration have shown elevated heavy element concentrations, and the silicification of bioapatite has been common in their tissues. Stable oxygen isotope measurements (δ18O) of bulk biomineral have been conducted in parallel, and showed comparatively lower heavy oxygen values in the same fossil tissues with stronger visible alteration. Significant difference in REE concentrations has been observed between the dentine and enamel of Cretaceous plesiosaurs, suggesting the enamel to be more geochemically resistant to diagenetic overprint.

  8. In vivo imaging of human oral hard and soft tissues by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Golde, Jonas; Kirsten, Lars; Tetschke, Florian; Hempel, Franz; Rosenauer, Tobias; Hannig, Christian; Koch, Edmund

    2017-12-01

    Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides three-dimensional high-resolution images of biological tissue, the benefit of polarization contrast in the field of dentistry is highlighted in this study. Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS OCT) with phase-sensitive recording is used for imaging dental and mucosal tissues in the human oral cavity in vivo. An enhanced polarization contrast of oral structures is reached by analyzing the signals of the co- and crosspolarized channels of the swept source PS OCT system quantitatively with respect to reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and depolarization. The calculation of these polarization parameters enables a high tissue-specific contrast imaging for the detailed physical interpretation of human oral hard and soft tissues. For the proof-of-principle, imaging of composite restorations and mineralization defects at premolars as well as gingival, lingual, and labial oral mucosa was performed in vivo within the anterior oral cavity. The achieved contrast-enhanced results of the investigated human oral tissues by means of polarization-sensitive imaging are evaluated by the comparison with conventional intensity-based OCT.

  9. A retrospective study on traumatic dental and soft-tissue injuries in preschool children in Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuletić, Marko; Škaričić, Josip; Batinjan, Goran; Trampuš, Zdenko; Čuković Bagić, Ivana; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data according to gender, age, cause, number of traumatized teeth, time elapsed before treatment and type of tooth from the records of traumatized children. A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at the University Dental Clinic in Zagreb, Croatia using the documentation of 128 patients (61 males and 67 females) aged 1 month to 6 years with injuries of primary teeth between February 2009 and January 2013. Trauma was seen in 217 primary teeth, which implies that the number of injured primary teeth was 1.69 per child. The maxillary central incisors were the most frequently affected teeth (81.1%), they were followed by maxillary lateral incisors, while the least affected were mandibular central incisors. Traumatic dental injuries involved periodontal tissue 2.82 times more frequently than hard dental and pulp tissue. The main cause of teeth injury was fall (67.2%) and the majority of injuries occurred at home (51.6%) (p<0.05). Of 128 patients who received treatment 71 (55.5%) also had soft-tissue injuries. The distribution of soft-tissue injuries by gender (35 males, 36 females) was not statistically significant. Comparing children with soft-tissue injuries and those without them, a statistically significant difference was found in the time of arrival (p<0.01). The results of this study showed the need of informing about preventive measures against falls at home and the methods of providing first aid in dental trauma injuries.

  10. Factors causing risks of caries evolvement in dental solid tissues under acclimatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Rakhmanov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed parameters characterizing mineral balance in a body and dental state in two groups of healthy men (n = 15 in each, aged 34.7 ± 0.6 in hot and humid marine climate conditions; one group was made of people undergoing acclimatization, the second one consisted of local population. We assessed working conditions and their category, and metrological data with determining environmental thermal load (ETL-index. Both groups worked outdoors; their labor had IIb category; they had to work overtime and under increased psy-choemotional loads; their working conditions differed as per nutrition and accommodation. When people from both groups had to work beyond their permanent location, their nutrition was represented by individual rations. Labor hardness was assessed as 3.2; labor intensity, as 3.2. Daytime temperature reached 30,0 С, relative air humidity was 77.3 ± 2.6 %, wind speed was 4.3 ± 0.3 m/sec. Microclimate was assessed as having 3.1 hazard category. Overall, working conditions were assessed as hazardous (3.3 hazard category. Electrolyte balance in a body was violated and it was proved by ower contents of K, Na, and Cl in blood serum; it was more apparent in people who were undergoing acclimatization. 70.0 % of local people had Ca contents in blood serum lower than the physiological standard. Lower Ca and increased P contents in blood serum were also detected in those undergoing acclimatization which could be evidence that Ca was washed out of a body and greater risk of dental caries occurred. As per observation dynamics we detected the following processes in people undergoing acclimatization: pH saliva and its mineralizing function shifting to acidity, salivation rate, and lower enamel resistance; they proved there was a growth in dental solid tissues demineralization. These parameters corresponded to those detected in local population. It calls for primary prevention activities aimed at fighting caries of dental solid tissues.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Dental Origin for Inducing Tissue Regeneration in Periodontitis: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Hernández-Monjaraz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic disease that begins with a period of inflammation of the supporting tissues of the teeth table and then progresses, destroying the tissues until loss of the teeth occurs. The restoration of the damaged dental support apparatus is an extremely complex process due to the regeneration of the cementum, the periodontal ligament, and the alveolar bone. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials that fill defects and replace lost dental tissue, but these approaches are not substitutes for a real regeneration of tissue. To address this, there are several approaches to tissue engineering for regenerative dentistry, among them, the use of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can be obtained from various sources of adult tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, skin, and tissues of the orofacial area. MSC of dental origin, such as those found in the bone marrow, have immunosuppressive and immunotolerant properties, multipotency, high proliferation rates, and the capacity for tissue repair. However, they are poorly used as sources of tissue for therapeutic purposes. Their accessibility makes them an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells, so this review describes the field of dental stem cell research and proposes a potential mechanism involved in periodontal tissue regeneration induced by dental MSC.

  12. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues.

  13. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues. PMID:25954205

  14. Photobiomodulation of mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in an injectable rhBMP4-loaded hydrogel directs hard tissue bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ivana M A; Carreira, Ana C O; Sipert, Carla R; Uehara, Cindi M; Moreira, Maria S N; Freire, Laila; Pelissari, Cibele; Kossugue, Patrícia M; de Araújo, Daniele R; Sogayar, Mari C; Marques, Márcia M

    2018-06-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy displays relevant properties for tissue healing and regeneration, which may be of interest for the tissue engineering field. Here, we show that PBM is able to improve cell survival and to interact with recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (rhBMP4) to direct and accelerate odonto/osteogenic differentiation of dental derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs were encapsulated in an injectable and thermo-responsive cell carrier (Pluronic ® F-127) loaded with rhBMP4 and then photoactivated. PBM improved MSCs self-renewal and survival upon encapsulation in the Pluronic ® F-127. In the presence of rhBMP4, cell odonto/osteogenic differentiation was premature and markedly improved in the photoactivated MSCs. An in vivo calvarial critical sized defect model demonstrated significant increase in bone formation after PBM treatment. Finally, a balance in the reactive oxygen species levels may be related to the favorable results of PBM and rhBMP4 association. PBM may act in synergism with rhBMP4 and is a promise candidate to direct and accelerate hard tissue bioengineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comparison of soft and hard tissue ablation with sub-ps and ns pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Stuart, B.C.; Celliers, P.M.; Feit, M.D.; Glinsky, M.E.; Heredia, N.J.; Herman, S.; Lane, S.M.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Perry, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chang, T.D. [Veterans Administration Hospital, Martinez, CA (United States); Neev, J. [Beckman Laser Inst. and Medical Clinic, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses offers several unique advantages. The nonlinear energy deposition is insensitive to tissue type, allowing this tool to be used for soft and hard tissue ablation. The localized energy deposition lead to precise ablation depth and minimal collateral damage. This paper reports on efforts to study and demonstrate tissue ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser. Ablation efficiency and extent of collateral damage for 0.3 ps and 1000 ps duration laser pulses are compared. Temperature measurements of the rear surface of a tooth section is also presented.

  16. Evaluation of the linearity of soft- to hard-tissue movement after orthognathic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Ming Tak; Sandham, John; Wong, Hwee Bee

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim in this study was to investigate whether a linear relationship exists between soft- to hard-tissue changes for both maxillary and mandibular landmarks over a wide range of skeletal changes. Methods: The sample consisted of 30 Chinese patients with Class III malocclusion treated

  17. Evaluation of the linearity of soft- to hard-tissue movement after orthognathic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Ming Tak; Sandham, John; Wong, Hwee Bee

    Introduction: Our aim in this study was to investigate whether a linear relationship exists between soft- to hard-tissue changes for both maxillary and mandibular landmarks over a wide range of skeletal changes. Methods: The sample consisted of 30 Chinese patients with Class III malocclusion treated

  18. A study to evaluate cephalometric hard tissue profile of Tamil population for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachiappan, S; Tharanikumar, S; Chandran, Ajay; Anusudha, P; Nandini, G D; Balasubramaniam, Murali

    2015-08-01

    The primary aim of this study is to compare, the cephalometric hard tissue profile values and analysis between Tamil and Caucasian population. The study also aims to create a better understanding in the facial proportions of Tamil Nadu population and to have better diagnosis and treatment planning for orthognathic surgery for Tamil population in Tamil Nadu.

  19. Study on the hard tissue changes in osteomyelitis of the jaws using CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Bo Ram; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul

    2009-01-01

    To assess the clinical findings and hard tissue changes of osteomyelitis of the jaws using computed tomographic (CT) image analysis. We reviewed and interpreted the CT images of 163 patients (64 males and 99 females, age range from 10 to 87 years) who visited the Seoul National University Dental Hospital from April 23, 2006 to December 31, 2008 and were diagnosed as osteomyelitis of the jaws through clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic examination. Each CT findings was investigated for frequency, correlation with age and gender. Of the 163 patients, 31 (19.0%) were affected on the maxilla, 135 (82.8%) were affected on the mandible, and 3 (1.8%) were affected on the both jaws simultaneously. The mean age of the patients who were affected on the maxilla was 61.0 years and that of the patients who were affected on the mandible was 56.2 years. On the maxilla, the most frequent site of disease was the posterior area (83.9%) and on the mandible, mandibular body (83.0%), followed by angle (48.1%), ramus (38.5%), condyle (13.3%), incisal area (9.6%), and coronoid process (3.0%). Among the 31 maxillary osteomyelitis, defect in the trabecular bone was observed in 28 (90.3%), osteosclerosis 20 (64.5%), defect in the cortical bone 27 (87.1%), sequestrum 17 (54.8%), and periosteal reaction 2 (6.5%). Among the 135 mandibular osteomyelitis, defect in the trabecular bone was observed in 100 (74.1%), osteosclerosis 104 (77.0%), defect in the cortical bone 116 (85.9%), sequestrum 36 (26.7%), and periosteal reaction 67 (49.6%). Of our cases, the maxillary osteomyelitis was visibly observed more frequently in females than males. The incidence is the highest in seventies (28.8%) and the lowest in teens (3.1%). The osteomyelitis of the jaws was observed more frequently in males than females before the age of 50, and observed more frequently in females after the age of 50. The most noticeable point was that the sequestrum was observed more often on maxillary osteomyelitis and the

  20. Potential Role of Dentin Sialoprotein by Inducing Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Mineralization for Dental Tissue Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Chen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentin sialoprotein (DSP is a dentin extracellular matrix protein, a unique marker of dentinogenesis and plays a vital role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin mineralization. Recently, studies have shown that DSP induces differentiation and mineralization of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental papilla mesenchymal cells in vitro and rescues dentin deficiency and increases enamel mineralization in animal models.The hypothesis: DSP as a nature therapeutic agent stimulates dental tissue repair by inducing endogenous dental pulp mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into odontoblast-like cells to synthesize and to secrete dentin extracellular matrix forming new tertiary dentin as well as to regenerate a functional dentin-pulp complex. As DSP is a nature protein, and clinical procedure for DSP therapy is easy and simple, application of DSP may provide a new avenue for dentists with additional option for the treatment of substantially damaged vital teeth.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Dental caries is the most common dental disease. Deep caries and pulp exposure have been treated by various restorative materials with limited success. One promising approach is dental pulp stem/progenitor-based therapies to regenerate dentin-pulp complex and restore its functions by DSP induction in vivo.

  1. Potential Role of Dentin Sialoprotein by Inducing Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Mineralization for Dental Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guo-Hua; Yang, Guo-Bin; Wu, Li-An; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein, a unique marker of dentinogenesis and plays a vital role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin mineralization. Recently, studies have shown that DSP induces differentiation and mineralization of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental papilla mesenchymal cells in vitro and rescues dentin deficiency and increases enamel mineralization in animal models. THE HYPOTHESIS: DSP as a nature therapeutic agent stimulates dental tissue repair by inducing endogenous dental pulp mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into odontoblast-like cells to synthesize and to secrete dentin extracellular matrix forming new tertiary dentin as well as to regenerate a functional dentin-pulp complex. As DSP is a nature protein, and clinical procedure for DSP therapy is easy and simple, application of DSP may provide a new avenue for dentists with additional option for the treatment of substantially damaged vital teeth. EVALUATION OF THE HYPOTHESIS: Dental caries is the most common dental disease. Deep caries and pulp exposure have been treated by various restorative materials with limited success. One promising approach is dental pulp stem/progenitor-based therapies to regenerate dentin-pulp complex and restore its functions by DSP induction in vivo.

  2. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  3. A Hyaluronan-Based Scaffold for the in Vitro Construction of Dental Pulp-Like Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Ferroni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp tissue supports the vitality of the tooth, but it is particularly vulnerable to external insults, such as mechanical trauma, chemical irritation or microbial invasion, which can lead to tissue necrosis. In the present work, we present an endodontic regeneration method based on the use of a tridimensional (3D hyaluronan scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs to produce a functional dental pulp-like tissue in vitro. An enriched population of DPSCs was seeded onto hyaluronan-based non-woven meshes in the presence of differentiation factors to induce the commitment of stem cells to neuronal, glial, endothelial and osteogenic phenotypes. In vitro experiments, among which were gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence (IF staining, proved the commitment of DPSCs to the main components of dental pulp tissue. In particular, the hyaluronan-DPSCs construct showed a dental pulp-like morphology consisting of several specialized cells growing inside the hyaluronan fibers. Furthermore, these constructs were implanted into rat calvarial critical-size defects. Histological analyses and gene expression profiling performed on hyaluronan-DPSCs grafts showed the regeneration of osteodentin-like tissue. Altogether, these data suggest the regenerative potential of the hyaluronan-DPSC engineered tissue.

  4. A hyaluronan-based scaffold for the in vitro construction of dental pulp-like tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Berengo, Mario; Piattelli, Adriano; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-03-02

    Dental pulp tissue supports the vitality of the tooth, but it is particularly vulnerable to external insults, such as mechanical trauma, chemical irritation or microbial invasion, which can lead to tissue necrosis. In the present work, we present an endodontic regeneration method based on the use of a tridimensional (3D) hyaluronan scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to produce a functional dental pulp-like tissue in vitro. An enriched population of DPSCs was seeded onto hyaluronan-based non-woven meshes in the presence of differentiation factors to induce the commitment of stem cells to neuronal, glial, endothelial and osteogenic phenotypes. In vitro experiments, among which were gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence (IF) staining, proved the commitment of DPSCs to the main components of dental pulp tissue. In particular, the hyaluronan-DPSCs construct showed a dental pulp-like morphology consisting of several specialized cells growing inside the hyaluronan fibers. Furthermore, these constructs were implanted into rat calvarial critical-size defects. Histological analyses and gene expression profiling performed on hyaluronan-DPSCs grafts showed the regeneration of osteodentin-like tissue. Altogether, these data suggest the regenerative potential of the hyaluronan-DPSC engineered tissue.

  5. Dental pulp stem cells. Biology and use for periodontal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashri, Nahid Y; Ajlan, Sumaiah A; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors.

  6. Detection of free radicals in γ-irradiated seasnail hard tissues by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeseoglu, Rahmi; Koeksal, Fevzi

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-irradiated seasnail (from family of Helix lukortium) hard tissues (CaCO 3 ) were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at room temperature. The radicals produced by γ-irradiation in seasnail were attributed to orthorhombic C · O 2 - , freely rotating C · O 2 - , orthorhombic C · O 3 - , axial C · O 3 - , and axial C · O 3 3- free radicals. Unirradiated seasnail hard tissues also feature Mn 2+ ions in their EPR spectra. The hyperfine values were determined for the 13 C nucleus in the orthorhombic C · O 2 - and axial C · O 3 3- free radicals and for the manganese impurity ions. The g values of all the free radicals have been measured. The results were compared with the literature data for similar defects

  7. Relative growth pattern and hard tissue of vertebral centra by microradiography of bluefin tuna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Asano, H.

    1989-01-01

    To clarify the growth feature and the structure of hard tissue, we studied the vertebral centrum of three species, bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus, bigeye tuna T. obesus and skipjack Katsuwonus pelamis (BL: 44.2, 39.5 and 40.0cm respectively). We examined the ratio of cetrum length to diameter in each vertebral centrum and obtained the value of 0.9-1.3 in most centra among three species. This indicates that the examined species belong to the equivalent type of the relative growth pattern of vertebral centra. The hard tissue was observed by microradiography, with the longitudinal and cross sections (about 100 μm) cut through the center of notochordal pore. The major centra of the vertebral column were composed of characteristic simple structure like a cross, when seen in the microradiographs of cross sections. Microradiographs indicated that the bone has complicated canals with minute spaces like the bone cavities

  8. Biologically Active Polycaprolactone/Titanium Hybrid Electrospun Nanofibers for Hard Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Sheikh, Faheem A.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel strategy to improve the bioactivity of polycaprolactone nanofibers is proposed. Incorporation of pure titanium nanoparticles into polycaprolactone nanofibers strongly enhances the precipitation of bone-like apatite materials when the doped nanofibers are soaked in a simulat...... nanofiber mats and the successful incorporation of the titanium nanoparticles make the prepared polycaprolactone nanofiber mat a proper candidate for the hard-tissue engineering applications....

  9. Effect of irradiation on the dental pulp tissues in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Duk; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2005-01-01

    To observe the histological changes in the pulp tissues of mandibular molars in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after irradiation. The male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 250 gm were divided into four groups : control, diabetes, irradiation, and diabetes-irradiation groups. Diabetes mellitus was induced in the rats by injecting streptozotocin. Rats in control and irradiation groups were injected with citrate buffer only. After 5 days, the head and neck region of the rats in irradiation and diabetes-irradiation groups were irradiated with a single absorbed dose of 10 Gy. All the rats were sacrificed at 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after irradiation. The specimen including the mandibular molars were sectioned and observed using a histopathological method. In the diabetes group, capillary dilatation was observed. However, there was no obvious morphologic alteration of the odontoblasts. In the irradiation group, generalized necrosis of the dental pulp tissues was observed. Vacuolation of the odontoblasts and dilatation of the capillaries were noted in the early experimental phases. In the diabetes-irradiation group, generalized degeneration of the dental pulp tissues was observed. Vacuolation of the dental pulp cells and the odontoblasts was noted in the late experimental phases. This experiment suggest that dilatation of the capillaries in the dental pulp tissue is induced by diabetic state, and generalized degeneration of the dental pulp tissues is induced by irradiation of the diabetic group.

  10. Characterization of Human Dental Pulp Tissue Under Oscillatory Shear and Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Burak; Bayrak, Ece; Erisken, Cevat

    2016-06-01

    Availability of material as well as biological properties of native tissues is critical for biomaterial design and synthesis for regenerative engineering. Until recently, selection of biomaterials and biomolecule carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been done randomly or based on experience mainly due to the absence of benchmark data for dental pulp tissue. This study, for the first time, characterizes the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of human dental pulp tissue harvested from wisdom teeth, under oscillatory shear and compression. The results revealed a gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps. Uniaxial compression tests generated peak normal stress and compressive modulus values of 39.1 ± 20.4 kPa and 5.5 ± 2.8 kPa, respectively. Taken collectively, the linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the human dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the better tailoring of biomaterials or biomolecule carriers to be employed in dental pulp regeneration.

  11. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment

  12. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. W.; Rizoiu, I.; Welch, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment.

  13. Soft and Hard Tissue Management in Implant Therapy—Part I: Surgical Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio D'Addona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant therapy has become a reliable and predictable treatment alternative for the replacement of missing teeth with conventional removable and fixed partial dentures. Recently though, in the pursuit for improved esthetics, the literature has dedicated a considerable amount of its research on the successful maintenance and regeneration of the surrounding gingiva and bone, which are lost following extraction of a tooth. Thoroughly analyzing the anatomic situation and well-planned treatment has become a requirement, because incorrectly planned and positioned implants may jeopardize long-term esthetic and functional prognosis. In addition, many types of biocompatible materials, autogenous hard and soft tissue grafts, and different surgical techniques have been developed, and their viability has been investigated. As a result, implant specialists have gained a greater understanding of the dynamics and anatomical and biological concepts of the periodontium and peri-implant tissues both at the surgical and prosthetic phases of treatment, which contributes to better soft and hard tissue management (SHTM. This may further contribute to achieving a superior final result which is obtained by having a harmonious soft tissue profile, a correctly placed and contoured final restoration, and the reestablishment of masticatory function and phonetics.

  14. Electrochemical removal of metallic implants from Technovit 9100 New embedded hard and soft tissues prior to histological sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbold, Elmar; Reebmann, Mattias; Jeffries, Richard; Witte, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Solid metallic implants in soft or hard tissues are serious challenges for histological processing. However, metallic implants are more frequently used in e.g. cardiovascular or orthopaedic therapies. Before clinical use, these devices need to be tested thoroughly in a biological environment and histological analysis of their biocompatibility is a major requirement. To allow the histological analysis of metallic implants in tissues especially in calcified hard tissues, we describe a method for embedding these tissues in the resin Technovit 9100 New and removing the metallic implants by electrochemical dissolution. With the combination of these two processes, we are able to achieve 5 μm thick sections from soft or hard tissues with a superior preservation of tissue architecture and especially the implant-tissue interface. These sections can be stained by classical stainings, immunohistochemical and enzymehistochemical as well as DNA-based staining methods.

  15. Uranium content and U-Th dating of fossil bones and dental tissues from Lazaret cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, V.; Falgueres, Ch.; Yokoyama, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Fossil bone and dental tissues from Lazaret cave and modern ones are here the subject of a comparative microscopical study. Porous tissues such as dentine and bone have retained their Haversian and Tomes canals respectively. However, cracked areas with calcite were detected, indicating a water percolation within porous tissues and an alteration of tissue in places. In addition, compact fossil enamel is particularly well preserved. These results are essential for U-Tb and ESR dating application. Uranium contents, U-Tb ages of two fossil mandibular tissues, two tibias and of six burnt fossil bones are presented and discussed. (authors)

  16. Interaction of a pulsed alexandrite laser with hard and soft biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Watts, David C.

    1994-02-01

    An alexandrite laser has been used in the fixed-Q and Q-switched modes, at the fundamental and frequency doubled wavelengths on a selection of hard and soft tissue. In an investigation into the potential use of the laser for the removal of deep lying lesions such as cutaneous vascular lesions and tatoos, studies have been carried out to characterize the depth and extent of the laser/tissue interaction in samples of tissue which greatly absorb the 750 nm radiation. The interaction of the laser radiation with extracted teeth was investigated looking at healthy enamel and dentine, and caries. Surface profile measurements of the enamel and dentine before and after irradiation show little physical effect of the laser irradiation, whereas caries appear to be ablated.

  17. The importance of the biomimetic composites components for recreating the optical properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Gushchin, M. S.; Ippolitov, Y. A.; Prutskij, T.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate whether it is possible to obtain biomimetic materials recreating the luminescent properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues. Biomimetic materials were produced and their properties compared with native dental tissues. In addition, the overall contribution of the organic and non-organic components in the photoluminescence band was investigated. The results showed that it is possible to develop biomimetic materials with similar molecular composition and optical properties to native dental tissues for the early identification of dental caries.

  18. Baring the teeth. [Dental caries and the analysis of trace elements in dental tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaton-Jones, P [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dental Research Unit; Retief, H [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (USA); Turkstra, J [Fort Hare Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry

    1979-07-01

    To determine whether trace elements other than fluorine play a role in the varying prevalences of dental caries in different South African population groups, neutron activation techniques have been devised to establish the concentrations of trace elements in tooth enamel and dentine.

  19. Hard X-ray submicrometer tomography of human brain tissue at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimchenko, A.; Bikis, C.; Schulz, G.; Zdora, M.-C.; Zanette, I.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Schweighauser, G.; Hench, J.; Hieber, S. E.; Deyhle, H.; Thalmann, P.; Müller, B.

    2017-06-01

    There is a lack of the necessary methodology for three-dimensional (3D) investigation of soft tissues with cellular resolution without staining or tissue transformation. Synchrotron radiation based hard X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography using single-distance phase reconstruction (SDPR) provides high spatial resolution and density contrast for the visualization of individual cells using a standard specimen preparation and data reconstruction. In this study, we demonstrate the 3D characterization of a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human cerebellum specimen by SDPR at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, UK) at pixel sizes down to 0.45 μm. The approach enables visualization of cerebellar layers (Stratum moleculare and Stratum granulosum), the 3D characterization of individual cells (Purkinje, stellate and granule cells) and can even resolve some subcellular structures (nucleus and nucleolus of Purkinje cells). The tomographic results are qualitatively compared to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histological sections. We demonstrate the potential benefits of hard X-ray microtomography for the investigations of biological tissues in comparison to conventional histology.

  20. Hard X-ray submicrometer tomography of human brain tissue at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khimchenko, A; Bikis, C; Schulz, G; Hieber, S E; Deyhle, H; Thalmann, P; Müller, B; Zdora, M-C; Zanette, I; Vila-Comamala, J; Schweighauser, G; Hench, J

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of the necessary methodology for three-dimensional (3D) investigation of soft tissues with cellular resolution without staining or tissue transformation. Synchrotron radiation based hard X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography using single-distance phase reconstruction (SDPR) provides high spatial resolution and density contrast for the visualization of individual cells using a standard specimen preparation and data reconstruction. In this study, we demonstrate the 3D characterization of a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human cerebellum specimen by SDPR at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, UK) at pixel sizes down to 0.45 μm. The approach enables visualization of cerebellar layers ( Stratum moleculare and Stratum granulosum ), the 3D characterization of individual cells (Purkinje, stellate and granule cells) and can even resolve some subcellular structures (nucleus and nucleolus of Purkinje cells). The tomographic results are qualitatively compared to hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained histological sections. We demonstrate the potential benefits of hard X-ray microtomography for the investigations of biological tissues in comparison to conventional histology. (paper)

  1. Nuclear-chemical methods in a hard tooth tissue abrasion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosman, A.; Spevacek, V.; Konicek, J.; Vopalka, D.; Housova, D.; Dolezalova, L.

    1999-01-01

    The advanced method consists in implantation-labelling of the thin surface layers of the solid objects, e.g. hard tooth tissue, by atoms of suitable natural or artificial radionuclides. Nuclides from the uranium series were implanted into the surface by using nuclear recoil effect at alpha decay of 226 Ra to 222 Rn, alpha decay of 222 Rn to RaA, alpha decay of RaA to RaB (beta-emitter) and further alpha or beta emitters. With regard to chosen alpha detection and to the half-lives of the radionuclides, there was actually measured the activity of 222 Rn, RaA and RaC' in the thin surface layer. This was followed by the laboratory simulation of the abrasion in the system of 'toothbrush - various suspensions of the tooth-pastes - hard tooth tissue (or material standard - ivory)' in specially designed device - the dentoabrasion meter. The activities of the tissue surface measured before and after abrasion were used for calculations of the relative drop of the surface activity. On this basis the influence of various tooth-pastes containing various abrasive substances was determined. (author)

  2. Effects of an Er, Cr:YSGG laser on canine oral hard tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizoiu, Ioana-Mihaela; Kimmel, Andrew I.; Eversole, Lewis R.

    1996-12-01

    Beagle dogs were utilized to assess the biologic effects of an Er, Cr:YSGG hard tissue cutting laser and results were compared with conventional mechanical preparations of enamel and dentin. Intraoperative pulpal temperature fluctuations were recorded with thermocouples. The laser cuts failed to induce inflammation in the pulps except in teeth with intentional pulp exposures for both methods. No increase in temperature was detected with the laser. It is concluded that this laser system may be safely employed for tooth preparations without causing adverse pulpal effects.

  3. A study of tooth brushing pattern and its effects on dental tissues in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of non carious cervical lesion was 3% and these lesions were found in males only. Conclusion: The pattern of tooth brushing was correct in 51.7% of the respondents as reported. However the effect on dental tissues though present is not exaggerated when compared to other studies done in other parts of ...

  4. Suitability of Different Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials for Dental Pulp Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, Kerstin M; Brandl, Ferdinand P; Kirchhof, Susanne; Widbiller, Matthias; Eidt, Andreas; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Göpferich, Achim; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2018-02-01

    Dental pulp tissue engineering is possible after insertion of pulpal stem cells combined with a scaffold into empty root canals. Commonly used biomaterials are collagen or poly(lactic) acid, which are either difficult to modify or to insert into such a narrow space. New hydrogel scaffolds with bioactive, specifically tailored functions could optimize the conditions for this approach. Different synthetic and natural hydrogels were tested for their suitability to engineer dental pulp. Two functionalized modifications of polyethylene glycol were developed in this study and compared to a self-assembling peptide, as well as to collagen and fibrin. Cell viability of dental pulp stem cells in test materials was assessed over two weeks. Cells in selected test materials laden with dentin-derived growth factors were inserted into human tooth roots and implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. In vitro cell culture exhibited distinct differences between scaffold types, where viability was significantly higher in natural compared to synthetic materials. In vivo experiments showed considerable differences regarding scaffold degradation, soft tissue formation, vascularization, and odontoblast-like cell differentiation. Fibrin appeared most suitable to enable generation of a pulp-like tissue and differentiation of cells into odontoblasts at the cell-dentin interface. In conclusion, natural materials, especially fibrin, proved to be superior compared to synthetic scaffolds regarding cell viability and dental pulp-like tissue formation.

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Dental Pulp Tissue and Ramifications on Biomaterial Development for Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erisken, Cevat; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng G; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-10-01

    A critical step in biomaterial selection effort is the determination of material as well as the biological properties of the target tissue. Previously, the selection of biomaterials and carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been solely based on empirical experience. In this study, first, the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of miniature pig dental pulp were characterized using small-amplitude oscillatory shear and uniaxial compression at a constant rate. They were then compared with the properties of hydrogels (ie, agarose, alginate, and collagen) that are widely used in tissue regeneration. The comparisons of the linear viscoelastic material functions of the native pulp tissue with those of the 3 hydrogels revealed the gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over a relatively large range of time scales (ie, over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps). At the constant gelation agent concentration of 2%, the dynamic properties (ie, storage and loss moduli and the tanδ) of the collagen-based gel approached those of the native tissue. Under uniaxial compression, the peak normal stresses and compressive moduli of the agarose gel were similar to those of the native tissue, whereas alginate and collagen exhibited significantly lower compressive properties. The linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the more appropriate selection of biogels for dental pulp regeneration via the better tailoring of gelation agents and their concentrations to better mimic the dynamic and compressive properties of native pulp tissue. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Metal Ion Concentration in Hard Tissues of Teeth in Residents of Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wychowanski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was an assessment of the content of trace elements in enamel and dentin of teeth extracted in patients residing in urban and agricultural areas of Poland. Methods. The study included 30 generally healthy patients with retained third molars. 65 samples of enamel and dentin from individuals living in urban areas and 85 samples of enamel and dentin from individuals living in agricultural areas were prepared. The content of manganese, lead, cadmium, and chromium in the studied enamel and dentin samples from retained teeth was determined by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. In the process of statistical hypothesis testing, the level of significance was assumed at α=0.05. Results. A comparative analysis of the data showed that enamel and dentin of inhabitants of industrialized areas contain significantly higher amounts of lead and cadmium than hard tissues of teeth in residents of agricultural areas and comparable amounts of manganese and chromium. Significance. It appears that hard tissues of retained teeth may constitute valuable material for assessment of long-term environmental exposure to metal ions. The study confirms that the risk of exposure to heavy metals depends on the place of residence and environmental pollution.

  7. Growth type of vertebral centra and the hard tissue observed by microradiography of the rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Asano, H.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the growth feature and the structure of hard tissue, we studied the vertebral centrum of rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, using three specimens (BL: 21.0, 29.0 and 40.0cm). We examined the ratio of centrum length to centrum diameter in each vertebral centrum and obtained the value of 0.8-1.0 in most centra. This indicates that the vertebral centra of rainbow trout belong to the so-called equivalent type. The hard tissue was observed by microradiography, with the longitudinal and cross sections (about 100 μm)cut through the center of notochordal pore. The microradiograph of thin section of centrurn differentiated serially and changed in pattern, but it is clear to sustain the specific characteristics. In longitudinal sections, the V-shaped part of bone was composed of structure like compact bone through the length of vertebral column. In cross sections, the notochordal pore was enclosed by the radial trabecular bones, the arrangement gradually turning toward the posterior centra like paired fans set opposite each other laterally

  8. A novel basalt fiber-reinforced polylactic acid composite for hard tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Yan; Gu, Ning

    2010-08-01

    A basalt fiber (BF) was, for the first time, introduced into a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix as innovative reinforcement to fabricate composite materials for hard tissue repair. Firstly, BF/PLLA composites and pure PLLA were produced by the methods of solution blending and freeze drying. The results showed that basalt fibers can be uniformly dispersed in the PLLA matrix and significantly improve the mechanical properties and hydrophilicity of the PLLA matrix. The presence of basalt fibers may retard the polymer degradation rate and neutralize the acid degradation from PLLA. Osteoblasts were cultured in vitro to evaluate the cytocompatibility of the composite. An MTT assay revealed that osteoblasts proliferated well for 7 days and there was little difference found in their viability on both PLLA and BF/PLLA films, which was consistent with the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity results. A fluorescent staining observation showed that osteoblasts grew well on the composites. SEM images displayed that osteoblasts tended to grow along the fiber axis. The formation of mineralized nodules was observed on the films by Alizarin red S staining. These results suggest that the presence of basalt fibers does not noticeably affect osteoblastic behavior and the designed composites are osteoblast compatible. It is concluded that basalt fibers, as reinforcing fibers, may have promising applications in hard tissue repair.

  9. A novel basalt fiber-reinforced polylactic acid composite for hard tissue repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xi; Li Yan; Gu Ning

    2010-01-01

    A basalt fiber (BF) was, for the first time, introduced into a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix as innovative reinforcement to fabricate composite materials for hard tissue repair. Firstly, BF/PLLA composites and pure PLLA were produced by the methods of solution blending and freeze drying. The results showed that basalt fibers can be uniformly dispersed in the PLLA matrix and significantly improve the mechanical properties and hydrophilicity of the PLLA matrix. The presence of basalt fibers may retard the polymer degradation rate and neutralize the acid degradation from PLLA. Osteoblasts were cultured in vitro to evaluate the cytocompatibility of the composite. An MTT assay revealed that osteoblasts proliferated well for 7 days and there was little difference found in their viability on both PLLA and BF/PLLA films, which was consistent with the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity results. A fluorescent staining observation showed that osteoblasts grew well on the composites. SEM images displayed that osteoblasts tended to grow along the fiber axis. The formation of mineralized nodules was observed on the films by Alizarin red S staining. These results suggest that the presence of basalt fibers does not noticeably affect osteoblastic behavior and the designed composites are osteoblast compatible. It is concluded that basalt fibers, as reinforcing fibers, may have promising applications in hard tissue repair.

  10. Antifungal Effect of a Dental Tissue Conditioner Containing Nystatin-Loaded Alginate Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Son, Jun Sik; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2018-02-01

    In this in vitro study, nystatin-alginate microparticles were successfully fabricated to control the release of nystatin from a commercial dental tissue conditioner. These nystatin-alginate microparticles were spherical and had a slightly rough surface. The microparticles incorporated into the tissue conditioner were distributed homogeneously throughout the tissue conditioner matrix. The incorporation of the microparticles did not deteriorate the mechanical properties of the original material. The agar diffusion test results showed that the tissue conditioner containing the microparticles had a good antifungal effect against Candida albicans. The nystatin-alginate microparticles efficiently controlled the release of nystatin from the tissue conditioner matrix over the experimental period of 14 days. Moreover, the nystatin-alginate microparticles incorporated in the tissue conditioner showed effective antifungal function even at lower concentrations of nystatin. The current study suggests that the tissue conditioner containing the nystatin-alginate microparticle carrier system has potential as an effective antifungal material.

  11. 'In vitro' assessment to instrumented indentation hardness tests in enamel of bovine teeth, before and after dental bleaching by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britto Junior, Francisco Meira

    2004-01-01

    The laser enamel bleaching is a common used procedure due to its satisfactory esthetic results. The possible changes on the dental structures caused by the bleaching technique are of great importance. The enamel superficial microhardness changes through instrumented indentation hardness on bovine teeth were analyzed in this present study. The samples were divided in two halves, one being the control and the other irradiated with a diode laser (808 nm) or with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) to activate the Whiteness HP bleaching gel (hydrogen peroxide at 35%). It was possible to conclude that there was a statistical significant increase on the enamel superficial microhardness (Group I, sample 1 and Group II, sample 1) despite this increase did not seem to indicate a concern regarding the enamel surface resistance change. There was not a significant statistical change on the enamel microhardness on the other samples. The final conclusion is that there was no superficial enamel morphological change after these treatments. (author)

  12. Evaluation of human muscle hardness after dynamic exercise with ultrasound real-time tissue elastography: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, O., E-mail: o.yanagisawa@aoni.waseda.jp [Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan); Niitsu, M. [Department of Radiological Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurihara, T. [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Fukubayashi, T. [Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE) for measuring exercise-induced changes in muscle hardness and to compare the findings of RTE with those of a tissue hardness meter for semi-quantitative assessment of the hardness of exercised muscles. Materials and methods: Nine male participants performed an arm-curl exercise. RTE measurements were performed by manually applying repetitive compression with the transducer on the scan position before exercise, immediately after exercise, and at 30 min after exercise; strain ratios between muscle and a reference material (hydrogel) were calculated (muscle strain/material strain). A tissue hardness meter was also used to evaluate muscle hardness. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the three repeated measurements at each measurement time were calculated to evaluate the intra-observer reproducibility of each technique. Results: Immediately after exercise, the strain ratio and the value obtained using the tissue hardness meter significantly decreased (from 1.65 to 1.35) and increased (from 51.8 to 54.3), respectively. Both parameters returned to their pre-exercise value 30 min after exercise. The ICCs of the RTE (and the ICCs of the muscle hardness meter) were 0.971 (0.816) before exercise, 0.939 (0.776) immediately after exercise, and 0.959 (0.882) at 30 min after exercise. Conclusion: Similar to the muscle hardness meter, RTE revealed the exercise-induced changes of muscle hardness semi-quantitatively. The intra-observer reproducibility of RTE was very high at each measurement time. These findings suggest that RTE is a clinically useful technique for assessing hardness of specific exercised muscles.

  13. Evaluation of human muscle hardness after dynamic exercise with ultrasound real-time tissue elastography: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, O.; Niitsu, M.; Kurihara, T.; Fukubayashi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE) for measuring exercise-induced changes in muscle hardness and to compare the findings of RTE with those of a tissue hardness meter for semi-quantitative assessment of the hardness of exercised muscles. Materials and methods: Nine male participants performed an arm-curl exercise. RTE measurements were performed by manually applying repetitive compression with the transducer on the scan position before exercise, immediately after exercise, and at 30 min after exercise; strain ratios between muscle and a reference material (hydrogel) were calculated (muscle strain/material strain). A tissue hardness meter was also used to evaluate muscle hardness. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the three repeated measurements at each measurement time were calculated to evaluate the intra-observer reproducibility of each technique. Results: Immediately after exercise, the strain ratio and the value obtained using the tissue hardness meter significantly decreased (from 1.65 to 1.35) and increased (from 51.8 to 54.3), respectively. Both parameters returned to their pre-exercise value 30 min after exercise. The ICCs of the RTE (and the ICCs of the muscle hardness meter) were 0.971 (0.816) before exercise, 0.939 (0.776) immediately after exercise, and 0.959 (0.882) at 30 min after exercise. Conclusion: Similar to the muscle hardness meter, RTE revealed the exercise-induced changes of muscle hardness semi-quantitatively. The intra-observer reproducibility of RTE was very high at each measurement time. These findings suggest that RTE is a clinically useful technique for assessing hardness of specific exercised muscles.

  14. Vascular imaging with contrast agent in hard and soft tissues using microcomputed-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blery, P; Pilet, P; Bossche, A Vanden-; Thery, A; Guicheux, J; Amouriq, Y; Espitalier, F; Mathieu, N; Weiss, P

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization is essential for many tissues and is a main requisite for various tissue-engineering strategies. Different techniques are used for highlighting vasculature, in vivo and ex vivo, in 2-D or 3-D including histological staining, immunohistochemistry, radiography, angiography, microscopy, computed tomography (CT) or micro-CT, both stand-alone and synchrotron system. Vascularization can be studied with or without a contrast agent. This paper presents the results obtained with the latest Skyscan micro-CT (Skyscan 1272, Bruker, Belgium) following barium sulphate injection replacing the bloodstream in comparison with results obtained with a Skyscan In Vivo 1076. Different hard and soft tissues were perfused with contrast agent and were harvested. Samples were analysed using both forms of micro-CT, and improved results were shown using this new micro-CT. This study highlights the vasculature using micro-CT methods. The results obtained with the Skyscan 1272 are clearly defined compared to results obtained with Skyscan 1076. In particular, this instrument highlights the high number of small vessels, which were not seen before at lower resolution. This new micro-CT opens broader possibilities in detection and characterization of the 3-D vascular tree to assess vascular tissue engineering strategies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  16. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Influence of lead injection on calcium-45 distribution in hard tissues of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Makoto

    1978-01-01

    This study determines the relationship between calcium distribution in hard tissues and age. The distribution of calcium was examined by using calcium-45 as tracer. Further, influences of such environmental toxic heavy metals as lead, cadmium and mercury upon calcium metabolism were determined. According to checks performed on 3-week-old rats, calcium-45 distributions in hard tissues from 6 hours to 6 days after injection were greater in the following tissues in the order listed: femurs, incisors, molars. In 2-week-old rats, the calcium distributions throughout the body were about the same. In 3-week-old rats, however, they were graded in descending order from femur to incisors, and then to molars. In rats of 18 weeks or more, the distribution of calcium-45 in the femur decreased. A slow increase was noted in calcium-45 deposits in the incisors of rats of four or more weeks; this increase remained constant at a very low level in rats of more than eight weeks. Calcium-45 distribution in rats of 61 weeks of age was graded in this descending order: incisors, femurs, and molars. In the group injected with calcium-45 and lead acetate, calcium-45 distribution was significantly less in 3-week-old than in 3-month-old rats. The following are percentages of calcium-45 distribution in rats to which 100 mg/kg of lead (equivalent of 1/3 of LD 50 were injected, when 100-percent distribution is assumed for controls; 3-week-old rats: femur 48 percent, incisors 49 percent, and molars 40 percent, 3-month-old rats: femurs 73 percent, incisors 67 percent, and molars 71 percent. No difference was observed in calcium-45 uptake between rats to whom injections of cadmium and mercury equivalent to 1/3 of a dose of LD 50 had been administered and rats who received only a single injection of calcium-45. (auth.)

  18. The effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride application on dental enamel surfaces hardness

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    Edhie Arief P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Enamel demineralization by acid is the first step of caries process. It has recently been shown that acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF can maintain the hardness of enamel surface. The aim of this study was examine the effect of APF application in the hardest of enamel surface. Fifty extracted teeth were cut at their crown, 40 teeth were taken randomly then divided into 4 groups, group 1 as the control, group 2 was treated with APF for 1 minute, group 3 for 4 minutes and group 4 for 7 minutes, then all the samples were washed with demineralized water. To see the effect of APF, all of the samples were soaked in lactic acid demineralization solution with pH 4,5 for 72 hours., the hardness of the surfaces of those samples before and after the treatment was measured by Micro Vickers Hardness Tester. The data were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA and LSD tests. In conclusion, 1.23% APF gel can reduce higher enamel demineralization.

  19. Ultrastructural study of tissues surrounding replanted teeth and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioya, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Takashi; Miake, Yasuo; Inoue, Sadayuki; Yanagisawa, Takaaki

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructure of the dentogingival border at replanted teeth and implants. Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided into groups for replantation and implantation experiments. In the former, the upper right first molars were extracted and then immediately replanted. In the latter, pure titanium implants were used. All tissues were fixed, demineralized and embedded in epoxy resin for ultrastructural observations. One week after replantation, the junctional epithelium was lost, and the oral sulcular epithelium covered the enamel surface. The amount of the epithelium increased in 2 weeks, and resembled the junctional epithelium, and the internal basal lamina and hemidesmosomes were formed in 4 weeks. One week after implantation, peri-implant epithelium was formed, and in 2 and 4 weeks, this epithelium with aggregated connective tissue cells were observed. In 8 weeks, the peri-implant epithelium receded, and aligned special cells with surrounding elongated fibroblasts and bundles of collagen fibers appeared to seal the implant interface. In replantation of the tooth, the internal basal lamina remained at the surface of the enamel of the replanted tooth, which is likely to be related to regeneration of the junctional epithelium and the attachment apparatus at the epithelium-tooth interface. Following implantation, a layer of cells with characteristics of connective tissue cells, but no junctional epithelium and attachment apparatus, was formed to seal the site of the implant.

  20. Experimental investigation on the caries characteristic of dental tissues by photothermal radiometry scanning imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jun-yan; Wang, Xiao-chun; Wang, Yang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) thermal-wave model coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave for three-layer dental tissues using modulated laser stimulation was employed to illustrate the relationship between dental caries characteristic (i.e. caries layer thickness, optical absorption coefficient and optical scattering coefficient) and photothermal radiometry (PTR) signal. Experimental investigation of artificial caries was carried out using PTR scanning imaging. The PTR amplitude and phase delay were increased with dental demineralized treatment. The local caries characteristic parameters were obtained by the best-fitting method based on the 1D thermal-wave model. The PTR scanning imaging measurements illustrated that the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient of caries region were much higher than those of the healthy enamel area. The demineralization thickness of caries region was measured by PTR scanning imaging and its average value shows in good agreement with the digital microscope. Experimental results show that PTR scanning imaging has the merits of high contrast for local inhomogeneity of dental caries; furthermore, this method is an allowance to provide a flexibility for non-contact quantitative evaluation of dental caries.

  1. Magnetization transfer from macromolecules to water protons in murine dental tissues as revealed by 500 MHz 1H-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Koji; Era, Seiichi; Nagai, Naoki; Sogami, Masaru; Takasaki, Akihiko; Kato, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    Although much is known about magnetization transfer phenomena in biological soft tissues, little is known about those in hard tissues. Using a 500 MHz 1 H-NMR spectrometer, we studied the spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 (H 2 O)) and the intermolecular cross-relaxation times (T IS (H 2 O)) from irradiated macromolecular protons to observed water protons in murine lower incisors (hard tissue) and compared with those in murine lens tissue (soft tissue). Mean values for the water content (%) of murine lower incisors and lens tissue were 16.02±2.39 (n=14) and 67.20±4.60 (n=15), respectively. These findings were consistent with the large different in water content between soft tissues and hard tissues. T IS (H 2 O) values obtained by f 2 -irradiation at 7.13 or -4.00 ppm showed no significant difference between lower incisors and lens tissue. Plots of 1/T IS (H 2 O) values vs. tissue dry weight (W(%)) for lower incisor tissue approximated a straight line with slope approximately equal for that obtained for lens tissue. These results suggest that the state of water in hard tissue may be similar to that in soft tissues, in spite of the significant difference in water content. Thus, saturation transfer NMR techniques such as measurement of T IS (H 2 O) values may be applicable to the study of water-macromolecule interactions in both biological soft and hard tissues. (author)

  2. Dental lesions and restorative treatment in molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghiu Irina-Maria

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article review specific clinical issues of the molar teeth, as well as the therapeutic approach of their pathology. The dental pathology we face in the group of molars is related to: dental caries, dental trauma (crown and crown-root fractures, dental wear phenomena. The therapeutic approach of the molar teeth is represented by: restoration of the loss of hard dental tissues; endodontic treatments of pulpal and periapical complications; surgical treatment. The restorative treatments in molars are: direct restorations, with or without supplementary anchorage for obturations; inlay, onlay; prosthetic crown.

  3. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  4. Action of nitric oxide on healthy and inflamed human dental pulp tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leopoldo Penteado Nucci; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida

    2008-10-01

    Irreversible pulpitis has been associated with pain and an increase in the number of pulp inflammatory cells. Based on the action of nitric oxide (NO) elsewhere, NO may possibly participate in the sensory and autonomic innervation of the dental pulp, and may influence local inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to analyze normal and inflamed human dental pulp for the presence of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), as an index of NO system activity. Six non-carious second premolar pulp tissue samples were obtained from young patients who required extractions for orthodontic reasons and six inflamed samples were obtained from symptomatic carious second premolars clinically diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Pulp tissue was carefully removed, fixed by immersion in a cold 4% PFA buffered solution for 120 min, rinsed in cold phosphate buffer, and quickly-frozen for cryostat sectioning. Pulp tissue was sectioned perpendicularly to the vertical axis of the tooth at 20 microm and processed for histochemistry. Sections of each specimen were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and other sections were subjected to histochemical NADPH-d detection. Results indicated the presence of NADPH reactivity within the pulps of both normal and carious teeth. In the normal teeth NADPH-d activity was detected in a small number of vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The inflammatory response of the pulp from carious premolars was detected in connective tissue by the presence of an increased number of fibroblasts, angioblasts and collagen fibers. It was possible to determine the extent of odontoblast reactivity since the odontoblast layer was usually absent in these split-peel preparations. There were no obvious signs of stained pulpal nerve fibers. Overall NADPH-d staining was significantly more intense within inflamed pulp tissues compared to normal healthy samples (Mann-Whitney test, pfunctions of NO in human dental pulp in pathophysiological situations.

  5. Autoradiographic study of 3H-proline incorporation by rat periodontal ligament, gingival connective tissue and dental pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The rates of 3 H-proline incorporation by the rat periodontal ligament, the gingival connective tissue and the dental pulp were studied by autoradiography. The rate of 3 H-proline incorporation by the periodontal ligament was 2.8 times higher than by the gingival connective tissue and 5 times higher than by the dental pulp. These differences were significant (p 3 H-proline incorporation by the periodontal ligament was significantly different (p 3 H-proline incorporation. The ratio of the rates of 3 H-proline incorporation by the three tissues did not correlate with the ratio of the cellular densities in the same three tissues. (author)

  6. The application of lesion sterilization and tissue repair 3Mix-MP for treating rat's dental pulp tissue

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    Raditya Nugroho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lesion sterilization and tissue repair (LSTR 3Mix-MP are three broad-spectrum antibiotics, including metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and minocycline are mixed with propylene glycol or macrogol. There is the possibility ofthe healing process that marked proliferation ofnew blood vessels and proliferation offibroblasts in the treatment ofirreversible pulpitis by pulp capping LSTR 3MixMP because of  the principle of the method LSTR 3Mix-MP is to kill bacteria. Purpose: The purpose of this study to prove the effect of LSTR 3Mix-MP on chronic inflammation and the healing process in rat dental pulp tissue in vivo. Methods: Rattus norvegicus anaesthetized by using ketamine and xylazine dissolved in sterile isotonic saline solution (0.2 ml/50gr mm on the upper right thigh. Cavity preparation class I to perforation by using a low speed tapered diamond round bur. In the treatment group, rats were treated 3Mix-MP at a dose of10 mg and then covered with glass ionomer cement for 7 days on the pulp that has been opened for 3 days. The control group treated with saline irrigation on the pulp that has been opened for 3 days. Rats were killed after seven days, and then made preparations pulp tissue to count the number oflymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, blood vessels, and fibroblasts Results: There is an increase in the average number ofmacrophage cells, plasma, and fibroblasts; and decreased lymphocytes and blood vessels in the treated group exposure LSTR 3Mix-MP. Conclusion:LSTR 3Mix-MP can reduce chronic inflammation process and enhance the healing process in rat dental pulp tissue.

  7. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    C. Maiorana; D. Andreoni; P. P. Poli

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to re...

  8. Numerical Analysis of Masticatory Forces on a Lower First Molar considering the Contact between Dental Tissues

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    Rosa Alicia Hernández-Vázquez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to identify the reactions of the dental organs to the different forces that occur during chewing and the transcendence of the union and contact maintained by the dental tissues. The study used a lower first molar biomodel with a real morphology and morphometry and consisting of the three dental tissues (enamel, dentin, and pulp each with its mechanical properties. In it, two simulations were carried out, as would the process of chewing a food. One of the simulations considers the contact between the enamel and the dentin, and the other does not take it into account. The results obtained differ significantly between the simulations that consider contact and those that do not, establishing the importance of taking this contact into account. In this way, the theories that establish horizontal and lateral occlusion forces are present during the functional chewing process which are viable to be correct. The case studies carried out present not only the reasons for the failure of enamel but also the failure of the restoration materials used. This reflection will allow the development of more adequate materials, mechanical design of prostheses, implants, and treatment.

  9. X-ray scattering evaluation of ultrastructural changes in human dental tissues with thermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholzer, Michael A; Sui, Tan; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Walmsley, Anthony Damien; Lumley, Philip J; Landini, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Micro- and ultrastructural analysis of burned skeletal remains is crucial for obtaining a reliable estimation of cremation temperature. Earlier studies mainly focused on heat-induced changes in bone tissue, while this study extends this research to human dental tissues using a novel quantitative analytical approach. Twelve tooth sections were burned at 400-900°C (30-min exposure, increments of 100°C). Subsequent combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) experiments were performed at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility, where 28 scattering patterns were collected within each tooth section. In comparison with the control sample, an increase in mean crystal thickness was found in burned dentine (2.8-fold) and enamel (1.4-fold), however at a smaller rate than reported earlier for bone tissue (5-10.7-fold). The results provide a structural reference for traditional X-ray scattering methods and emphasize the need to investigate bone and dental tissues separately to obtain a reliable estimation of cremation temperature. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Dental Pulp Stem Cells as a multifaceted tool for bioengineering and the regeneration of craniomaxillofacial tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitane eAurrekoetxea

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells, or DPSC, are neural crest-derived cells with an outstanding capacity to differentiate along multiple cell lineages of interest for cell therapy. In particular, highly efficient osteo/dentinogenic differentiation of DPSC can be achieved using simple in vitro protocols, making these cells a very attractive and promising tool for the future treatment of dental and periodontal diseases. Among craniomaxillofacial organs, the tooth and salivary gland are two such cases in which complete regeneration by tissue engineering using DPSC appears to be possible, as research over the last decade has made substantial progress in experimental models of partial or total regeneration of both organs, by cell recombination technology. Moreover, DPSC seem to be a particularly good choice for the regeneration of nerve tissues, including injured or transected cranial nerves. In this context, the oral cavity appears to be an excellent testing ground for new regenerative therapies using DPSC. However, many issues and challenges need yet to be addressed before these cells can be employed in clinical therapy. In this review, we point out some important aspects on the biology of DPSC with regard to their use for the reconstruction of different craniomaxillofacial tissues and organs, with special emphasis on cranial bones, nerves, teeth, and salivary glands. We suggest new ideas and strategies to fully exploit the capacities of DPSC for bioengineering of the aforementioned tissues.

  11. Human dental pulp stem cells derived from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease demonstrate hepatic-like differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y K; Huang, Anderson H C; Chan, Anthony W S; Lin, L M

    2016-06-01

    Reviewing the literature, hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease has not been studied. This study is aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease could possess potential hepatic differentiation. Forty vital extracted teeth with disease recruited for hDPSCs isolation, stem cell characterization and hepatic differentiation were randomly and equally divided into group A (liquid nitrogen-stored dental pulp tissues) and group B (freshly derived dental pulp tissues). Samples of hDPSCs isolated from groups A and B but without hepatic growth factors formed negative controls. A well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cell line was employed as a positive control. All the isolated hDPSCs from groups A and B showed hepatic-like differentiation with morphological change from a spindle-shaped to a polygonal shape and normal karyotype. Differentiated hDPSCs and the positive control expressed hepatic metabolic function genes and liver-specific genes. Glycogen storage of differentiated hDPSCs was noted from day 7 of differentiation-medium culture. Positive immunofluorescence staining of low-density lipoprotein and albumin was observed from day 14 of differentiation-medium culture; urea production in the medium was noted from week 6. No hepatic differentiation was observed for any of the samples of the negative controls. We not only demonstrated the feasibility of hepatic-like differentiation of hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease but also indicated that the differentiated cells possessed normal karyotype and were functionally close to normal hepatic-like cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A hard tissue cephalometric comparative study between hand tracing and computerized tracing

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    Ramachandra Prabhakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyze and compare the angular and linear hard tissue cephalometric measurements using hand-tracing and computerized tracings with Nemoceph and Dolphin software systems. Subjects and Methods: A total of 30 cephalograms were randomly chosen for study with the following criteria, cephalograms of patients with good contrast, no distortion, and minimal radiographic artifacts were considered using the digital method (Kodak 8000 C with 12 angular and nine linear parameters selected for the study. Comparisons were determined by post-hoc test using Tukey HSD method. The N-Par tests were performed using Kruskal-Walli′s method. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and post-hoc. Results: The results of this study show that there is no significant difference in the angular and linear measurements recorded. The P values were significant at 0.05 levels for two parameters, Co-A and Co-Gn with the hand-tracing method. This was significant in ANOVA and post-hoc test by Tukey HSD method. Conclusions: This study of comparison provides support for transition from digital hand to computerized tracing methodology. In fact, digital computerized tracings were easier and less time consuming, with the same reliability irrespective of each method of tracing.

  13. Soft tissue adhesion of polished versus glazed lithium disilicate ceramic for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunot-Gohin, C; Duval, J-L; Azogui, E-E; Jannetta, R; Pezron, I; Laurent-Maquin, D; Gangloff, S C; Egles, C

    2013-09-01

    Ceramics are widely used materials for prosthesis, especially in dental fields. Despite multiple biomedical applications, little is known about ceramic surface modifications and the resulting cell behavior at its contact. The aim of this study is to evaluate the biological response of polished versus glazed surface treatments on lithium disilicate dental ceramic. We studied a lithium disilicate ceramic (IPS e.max(®) Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) with 3 different surface treatments: raw surface treatment, hand polished surface treatment, and glazed surface treatment (control samples are Thermanox(®), Nunc). In order to evaluate the possible modulation of cell response at the surface of ceramic, we compared polished versus glazed ceramics using an organotypic culture model of chicken epithelium. Our results show that the surface roughness is not modified as demonstrated by equivalent Ra measurements. On the contrary, the contact angle θ in water is very different between polished (84°) and glazed (33°) samples. The culture of epithelial tissues allowed a very precise assessment of histocompatibility of these interfaces and showed that polished samples increased cell adhesion and proliferation as compared to glazed samples. Lithium disilicate polished ceramic provided better adhesion and proliferation than lithium disilicate glazed ceramic. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time, how it is possible to use simple surface modifications to finely modulate the adhesion of tissues. Our results will help dental surgeons to choose the most appropriate surface treatment for a specific clinical application, in particular for the ceramic implant collar. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CHANGES IN TOOTH HARD TISSUE MINERALI-ZATION AND BLOOD RHEOLOGY IN HEALTHY ADOLESCENTS AND THOSE WITH THYROID DYSFUNCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriashvili, S; Nikolaishvili, M; Mantskava, M; Momtsemlidze, N; Franchuk, K

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid dysfunction causes spreading and development of caries in the teeth and changes in periodontal tissues. In addition, it causes changes in peripheral blood flow and mineralization, local transcapillary metabolism causes changes in blood rheology. There are only few works in this direction and, therefore, the purpose of our research was to find out how the mineralization and the rheological properties of blood are changed in lesion of periodontal tissue on a background of thyroid dysfunction. Accordingly, the stomatological study was conducted in 75 adolescents aged 12-18 years by the standard method, recommended by the World Health Organization. According to the study, 45 patients out of them suffered from thyroid dysfunction, in particular from hypothyroidism. The comparator group consisted of 30 children of the same age without endocrine abnormalities. By the gained results it is noted that in spite of different type lesions due to dental caries, the caries incidence and intensiveness is higher in children with hypothyroidism as compared to healthy children. Decrease in saliva excretion rate and increase in oral fluid viscosity was found in children with thyroid and endocrine diseases as compared to healthy children. In children with endocrine disorders concurrent increase in calcium content (1,43±0,08 mmol/l) and decrease in inorganic phosphate concentrations (4,54±0,15 mmol/l) is reliably established. In children with thyroid disfunction and while periodontal tissue pathology, rheological features are disordered more dramatically than in healthy children. Therefore, it can be said that the changes in the adolescents' thyroid function is one of the reasons for formation of periodontal tissue diseases.Therefore, at detecting even the first signs of the periodontal tissue diseases, it is desirable in adolescents to assess the thyroid functional condition, since it will be the precondition for effective treatment and management of dental disease, in

  15. Caspase-7 participates in differentiation of cells forming dental hard tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Lesot, H.; Švandová, Eva; Vanden Berghe, T.; Sharpe, P. T.; Healy, C.; Vandenabeele, P.; Tucker, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2013), s. 615-621 ISSN 0012-1592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/1418 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP502/12/1285 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : ameloblast * apoptosis * caspase Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.178, year: 2013

  16. Mineral features of connective dental hard tissues in hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, R; Behets, C; Mansour, L; Ghoul-Mazgar, S

    2018-04-01

    To explore the mineral features of dentin and cementum in hypoplastic Amelogenesis imperfecta AI teeth. Forty-four (44) teeth cleaned and free of caries were used: 20 control and 24 affected by hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta. Thirty-two teeth were studied by pQCT, cut in sections, and analyzed under microradiography, polarized light microscopy, and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Eight teeth were observed under scanning electron microscope. Four teeth were used for an X-ray diffraction. The mineral density data were analyzed statistically with the Mann-Whitney U test, using GraphPad InStat software. Both coronal dentin and radicular dentin were less mineralized in AI teeth when compared to control (respectively 6.2% and 6.8%; p < .001). Root dentinal walls were thin and irregular, while the cellular cementum layers were thick, reaching sometimes the cervical region of the tooth. Regular dentinal tubules and sclerotic dentin areas were noticed. Partially tubular or cellular dysplastic dentin and hyper-, normo-, or hypomineralized areas were noticed in the inter-radicular areas of hypoplastic AI teeth. The main mineral component was carbonate hydroxyapatite as explored by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dentin and cementum in hypoplastic AI teeth are (i) hypomineralized, (ii) constituted of carbonate hydroxyapatite, and (iii) of non-homogenous structure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wear measurement of dental tissues and materials in clinical studies: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfman, C; Koenig, V; Mainjot, A K

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to systematically review the different methods used for wear measurement of dental tissues and materials in clinical studies, their relevance and reliability in terms of accuracy and precision, and the performance of the different steps of the workflow taken independently. An exhaustive search of clinical studies related to wear of dental tissues and materials reporting a quantitative measurement method was conducted. MedLine, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases were used. Prospective studies, pilot studies and case series (>10 patients), as long as they contained a description of wear measurement methodology. Only studies published after 1995 were considered. After duplicates' removal, 495 studies were identified, and 41 remained for quantitative analysis. Thirty-four described wear-measurement protocols, using digital profilometry and superimposition, whereas 7 used alternative protocols. A specific form was designed to analyze the risk of bias. The methods were described in terms of material analyzed; study design; device used for surface acquisition; matching software details and settings; type of analysis (vertical height-loss measurement vs volume loss measurement); type of area investigated (entire occlusal area or selective areas); and results. There is a need of standardization of clinical wear measurement. Current methods exhibit accuracy, which is not sufficient to monitor wear of restorative materials and tooth tissues. Their performance could be improved, notably limiting the use of replicas, using standardized calibration procedures and positive controls, optimizing the settings of scanners and matching softwares, and taking into account unusable data. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of dental arch relationships in Swedish unilateral cleft lip and palate subjects: 20-year longitudinal consecutive series treated with delayed hard palate closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Jan; Mars, Michael; Elander, Anna; Enocson, Lars; Hagberg, Catharina; Worrell, Emma; Batra, Puneet; Friede, Hans

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the dental arch relationships for a consecutive series from Goteborg, Sweden, who had delayed hard palate closure. Retrospective study. Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden. The dental study models of 104 consecutive unilateral cleft lip and palate subjects. The study cohort was born between 1979 and 1994. Longitudinal records were available at ages 5 (n = 94), 10 (n = 97), 16 (n = 59), and 19 years (n = 46). Five assessors rated models according to the GOSLON Yardstick on two separate occasions each. These patients had been operated upon according to the Goteborg protocol of delayed hard palate closure (at age 8 years). 85% of subjects were rated in groups 1 and 2 (excellent or very good outcome), 12% were rated in group 3 (satisfactory), and 3% were assigned to group 4 (poor). No patients presented in Group 5 (very poor). Weighted kappa statistics for double determination of Yardstick allocation for five assessors demonstrated values between .65 and .90 for interrater agreement (good/very good) and between .70 and .90 for intrarater agreement (very good). Delayed hard palate closure as practiced in Goteborg since 1979 has produced the best GOSLON Yardstick ratings in a consecutive series of patients ever recorded worldwide, since the Yardstick was first used in 1983. However, it is noteworthy that a new protocol has been introduced in Goteborg since 1994, in which hard palate closure is done at 3 years due to concerns regarding speech.

  19. Impact of dental implant insertion method on the peri-implant bone tissue: Experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatović Novak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The function of dental implants depends on their stability in bone tissue over extended period of time, i.e. on osseointegration. The process through which osseointegration is achieved depends on several factors, surgical insertion method being one of them. The aim of this study was to histopathologically compare the impact of the surgical method of implant insertion on the peri-implant bone tissue. Methods. The experiment was performed on 9 dogs. Eight weeks following the extraction of lower premolars implants were inserted using the one-stage method on the right mandibular side and two-stage method on the left side. Three months after implantation the animals were sacrificed. Three distinct regions of bone tissue were histopathologically analyzed, the results were scored and compared. Results. In the specimens of one-stage implants increased amount of collagen fibers was found in 5 specimens where tissue necrosis was also observed. Only moderate osteoblastic activity was found in 3 sections. The analysis of bone-to-implant contact region revealed statistically significantly better results regarding the amount of collagen tissue fibers for the implants inserted in the two-stage method (Wa = 59 105, α = 0.05. No necrosis and osteoblastic activity were observed. Conclusion. Better results were achieved by the two-stage method in bone-to-implant contact region regarding the amount of collagen tissue, while the results were identical regarding the osteoblastic activity and bone tissue necrosis. There was no difference between the methods in the bone-implant interface region. In the bone tissue adjacent to the implant the results were identical regarding the amount of collagen tissue, osteoblastic reaction and bone tissue necrosis, while better results were achieved by the two-stage method regarding the number of osteocytes.

  20. 2D beam hardening correction for micro-CT of immersed hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Graham; Mills, David

    2016-10-01

    Beam hardening artefacts arise in tomography and microtomography with polychromatic sources. Typically, specimens appear to be less dense in the center of reconstructions because as the path length through the specimen increases, so the X-ray spectrum is shifted towards higher energies due to the preferential absorption of low energy photons. Various approaches have been taken to reduce or correct for these artefacts. Pre-filtering the X-ray beam with a thin metal sheet will reduce soft energy X-rays and thus narrow the spectrum. Correction curves can be applied to the projections prior to reconstruction which transform measured attenuation with polychromatic radiation to predicted attenuation with monochromatic radiation. These correction curves can be manually selected, iteratively derived from reconstructions (this generally works where density is assumed to be constant) or derived from a priori information about the X-ray spectrum and specimen composition. For hard tissue specimens, the latter approach works well if the composition is reasonably homogeneous. In the case of an immersed or embedded specimen (e.g., tooth or bone) the relative proportions of mineral and "organic" (including medium and plastic container) species varies considerably for different ray paths and simple beam hardening correction does not give accurate results. By performing an initial reconstruction, the total path length through the container can be determined. By modelling the X-ray properties of the specimen, a 2D correction transform can then be created such that the predicted monochromatic attenuation can be derived as a function of both the measured polychromatic attenuation and the container path length.

  1. Preparation and characterization of gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres for hard tissue repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Shao Ching; Wang, Ming-Jia; Pai, Nai-Su; Yen, Shiow-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres composed of 21% gelatin (G) and 79% hydroxyapatite (HA) with uniform morphology and controllable size were synthesized from a mixed solution of Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 and gelatin by a wet-chemical method. Material analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy examination (SEM/TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to characterize G–HA microspheres by analyzing their crystalline phase, microstructure, morphology and composition. HA crystals precipitate along G fibers to form nano-rods with diameters of 6–10 nm and tangle into porous microspheres after blending. The cell culture indicates that G–HA composite microspheres without any toxicity could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. In a rat calvarial defect model, G–HA bioactive scaffolds were compared with fibrin glue (F) and Osteoset® Bone Graft Substitute (OS) for their capacity of regenerating bone. Four weeks post-implantation, new bone, mineralization, and expanded blood vessel area were found in G–HA scaffolds, indicating greater osteoconductivity and bioactivity than F and OS. - Highlights: • G–HA composite microspheres were prepared by hydroxyapatite and gelatin. • In vitro tests indicated that the G–HA microspheres were biocompatible and bioactive. • In in vitro tests, G–HA microspheres could be applied in hard tissue engineering. • G–HA had healed the bone defect and provides a high proportion of surface area to open space

  2. Preparation and characterization of gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres for hard tissue repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Shao Ching [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Minimally Invasive Skull Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 1650 Taiwan Boulevard, Sect. 4, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurosurgery, ChangHua Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, 80 Chung Cheng Road, Sect. 2 Chiu Kuan Village, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Wang, Ming-Jia; Pai, Nai-Su [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yen, Shiow-Kang, E-mail: skyen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres composed of 21% gelatin (G) and 79% hydroxyapatite (HA) with uniform morphology and controllable size were synthesized from a mixed solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and gelatin by a wet-chemical method. Material analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy examination (SEM/TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to characterize G–HA microspheres by analyzing their crystalline phase, microstructure, morphology and composition. HA crystals precipitate along G fibers to form nano-rods with diameters of 6–10 nm and tangle into porous microspheres after blending. The cell culture indicates that G–HA composite microspheres without any toxicity could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. In a rat calvarial defect model, G–HA bioactive scaffolds were compared with fibrin glue (F) and Osteoset® Bone Graft Substitute (OS) for their capacity of regenerating bone. Four weeks post-implantation, new bone, mineralization, and expanded blood vessel area were found in G–HA scaffolds, indicating greater osteoconductivity and bioactivity than F and OS. - Highlights: • G–HA composite microspheres were prepared by hydroxyapatite and gelatin. • In vitro tests indicated that the G–HA microspheres were biocompatible and bioactive. • In in vitro tests, G–HA microspheres could be applied in hard tissue engineering. • G–HA had healed the bone defect and provides a high proportion of surface area to open space.

  3. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maiorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases.

  4. Dimensional soft tissue changes following soft tissue grafting in conjunction with implant placement or around present dental implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskevicius, Lukas; Sidlauskas, Antanas; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2017-01-01

    To systematically review changes in mucosal soft tissue thickness and keratinised mucosa width after soft tissue grafting around dental implants. An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE database published between 2009 and 2014. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract, and full-text levels were performed. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported changes in soft tissue thickness or keratinised mucosa width after soft tissue grafting at implant placement or around a present implant at 6-month follow-up or longer were included. The search resulted in fourteen articles meeting the inclusion criteria: Six of them reported connective tissue grafting around present dental implants, compared to eight at the time of implant placement. Better long-term soft tissue thickness outcomes were reported for soft tissue augmentation around dental implants (0.8-1.4 mm), compared with augmentation at implant placement (-0.25-1.43 mm). Both techniques were effective in increasing keratinised tissue width: at implant placement (2.5 mm) or around present dental implants (2.33-2.57 mm). The present systematic review discovered that connective tissue grafts enhanced keratinised mucosa width and soft tissue thickness for an observation period of up to 48 months. However, some shrinkage may occur, resulting in decreases in soft tissue, mostly for the first three months. Further investigations using accurate evaluation methods need to be done to evaluate the appropriate time for grafting. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The presence of antimony in various dental filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokhia, Anat; Combe, E.C.; Lilley, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Antimony was determined in a number of non-metallic dental materials currently used for tooth restoration. The method applied was instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of antimony in some of the brands tested was found to be as high as 900 fold that in the normal hard dental tissues. (author)

  6. Development of highly porous scaffolds based on bioactive silicates for dental tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudouri, O.M.; Theodosoglou, E.; Kontonasaki, E.; Will, J.; Chrissafis, K.; Koidis, P.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic via the sol–gel technique. • The heat treatment of the glass-ceramic promoted the crystallization of akermanite. • Akermanite scaffolds coated with gelatin were successfully fabricated. • An HCAp layer was developed on the surface of all scaffolds after 9 days in SBF. - Abstract: Various scaffolding materials, ceramics and especially Mg-based ceramic materials, including akermanite (Ca 2 MgSi 2 O 7 ) and diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ), have attracted interest for dental tissue regeneration because of their improved mechanical properties and controllable biodegradation. The aim of the present work was the synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic, which would be used for the construction of workable akermanite scaffolds. The characterization of the synthesized material was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Finally, the apatite forming ability of the scaffolds was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid. The scaffolds were fabricated by the foam replica technique and were subsequently coated with gelatin to provide a functional surface for increased cell attachment. Finally, SEM microphotographs and FTIR spectra of the scaffolds after immersion in SBF solution indicated the inorganic bioactive character of the scaffolds suitable for the intended applications in dental tissue engineering

  7. Development of highly porous scaffolds based on bioactive silicates for dental tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudouri, O.M., E-mail: menti.goudouri@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Institute for Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Theodosoglou, E. [School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kontonasaki, E. [Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Will, J. [Institute for Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Chrissafis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Koidis, P. [Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Paraskevopoulos, K.M. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Boccaccini, A.R. [Institute for Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic via the sol–gel technique. • The heat treatment of the glass-ceramic promoted the crystallization of akermanite. • Akermanite scaffolds coated with gelatin were successfully fabricated. • An HCAp layer was developed on the surface of all scaffolds after 9 days in SBF. - Abstract: Various scaffolding materials, ceramics and especially Mg-based ceramic materials, including akermanite (Ca{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), have attracted interest for dental tissue regeneration because of their improved mechanical properties and controllable biodegradation. The aim of the present work was the synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic, which would be used for the construction of workable akermanite scaffolds. The characterization of the synthesized material was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Finally, the apatite forming ability of the scaffolds was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid. The scaffolds were fabricated by the foam replica technique and were subsequently coated with gelatin to provide a functional surface for increased cell attachment. Finally, SEM microphotographs and FTIR spectra of the scaffolds after immersion in SBF solution indicated the inorganic bioactive character of the scaffolds suitable for the intended applications in dental tissue engineering.

  8. The effect of dental bleaching on pulpal tissue response in a diabetic animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, L T A; Ferreira, L L; Benetti, F; Gastélum, A A; Gomes-Filho, J E; Ervolino, E; Briso, A L F

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate pulpal tissue response after dental bleaching in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Twenty-eight rats were divided into two groups of normoglycaemic and diabetic rats (n = 14). Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced with alloxan. After DM confirmation, all rats were anaesthetized and dental bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) on the right maxillary molars for 30 min. Left molars were used as controls. Bleaching resulted in four hemimaxillae groups: normoglycaemic (N), N-bleached (NBle), diabetic (D) and D-bleached (DBle). After 2 or 30 days, the animals were euthanized and the hemimaxillae were removed, processed for histopathological analysis and stained with haematoxylin-eosin (HE), Masson's trichrome (MT) and picrosirius red (PSR). Results obtained within animals (normoglycaemic or diabetic rats) were submitted to Wilcoxon or paired t-tests, and between animal (normoglycaemic and diabetic rats), to Mann-Whitney test or t-tests. At 2 days, the NBle group had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the pulpal tissue, whilst the DBle had severe inflammation or necrosis (P bleaching was greater in diabetic rats. Additionally, the increase in reactionary dentine deposition and mature collagen fibres observed in diabetic rats needs further evaluation to confirm the present results. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Effect of Arch Height and Material Hardness of Personalized Insole on Correction and Tissues of Flatfoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shonglun Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat foot is one of the common deformities in the youth population, seriously affecting the weight supporting and daily exercising. However, there is lacking of quantitative data relative to material selection and shape design of the personalized orthopedic insole. This study was to evaluate the biomechanical effects of material hardness and support height of personalized orthopedic insole on foot tissues, by in vivo experiment and finite element modeling. The correction of arch height increased with material hardness and support height. The peak plantar pressure increased with the material hardness, and these values by wearing insoles of 40° were apparently higher than the bare feet condition. Harder insole material results in higher stress in the joint and ligament stress than softer material. In the calcaneocuboid joint, the stress increased with the arch height of insoles. The material hardness did not apparently affect the stress in the ankle joints, but the support heights of insole did. In general, insole material and support design are positively affecting the correction of orthopedic insole, but negatively resulting in unreasonable stress on the stress in the joint and ligaments. There should be an integration of improving correction and reducing stress in foot tissues.

  10. Advances in dental imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E

    2001-04-01

    The number of dental radiographs taken in the UK has steadily increased over the past 20 years--recently estimating around 18 million taken in the general dental services alone, and dental radiographs now account for nearly 25% of all medical radiographic exposures. Radiographs remain our most useful diagnostic aid. Their strength is in demonstrating hard tissue pathology, which makes radiographs particularly effective in the maxillofacial region. Although well accepted in this capacity, there remain a number of limitations and drawbacks to conventional radiographs which recent developments have begun to overcome. There have been improvements in the scope and capabilities of dental imaging equipment. There has also been a continuing effort to reduce radiation-induced harm by limiting our exposure to it. This has been possible both through the introduction of new methods and protocols for reducing individual radiation exposures and by the creation of guidelines for selecting radiographs more effectively and thereby reducing the total number of radiographs taken.

  11. Assessing accumulated hard-tissue debris using micro-computed tomography and free software for image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Marins, Juliana; Neves, Aline de Almeida; Reis, Claudia; Fidel, Sandra; Versiani, Marco A; Alves, Haimon; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Paciornik, Sidnei

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of debris occurs after root canal preparation procedures specifically in fins, isthmus, irregularities, and ramifications. The aim of this study was to present a step-by-step description of a new method used to longitudinally identify, measure, and 3-dimensionally map the accumulation of hard-tissue debris inside the root canal after biomechanical preparation using free software for image processing and analysis. Three mandibular molars presenting the mesial root with a large isthmus width and a type II Vertucci's canal configuration were selected and scanned. The specimens were assigned to 1 of 3 experimental approaches: (1) 5.25% sodium hypochlorite + 17% EDTA, (2) bidistilled water, and (3) no irrigation. After root canal preparation, high-resolution scans of the teeth were accomplished, and free software packages were used to register and quantify the amount of accumulated hard-tissue debris in either canal space or isthmus areas. Canal preparation without irrigation resulted in 34.6% of its volume filled with hard-tissue debris, whereas the use of bidistilled water or NaOCl followed by EDTA showed a reduction in the percentage volume of debris to 16% and 11.3%, respectively. The closer the distance to the isthmus area was the larger the amount of accumulated debris regardless of the irrigating protocol used. Through the present method, it was possible to calculate the volume of hard-tissue debris in the isthmuses and in the root canal space. Free-software packages used for image reconstruction, registering, and analysis have shown to be promising for end-user application. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Studies on the method for determination of fluoride concentration in rat hard tissues by neutron activation analysis using 20F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakakura, Tadao

    1991-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis method (non disruptive analysis, short time period measurement) has been recognized as a high precision analysis of fluoride concentration in hard tissue. Heat neutron irradiation analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) method was used to investigate 20 F concentration. Results were as follows. F concentration in a dried material of hard tissue using INAA method can be fixed by measuring the 20 F's energy peak for 10 seconds after neutron irradiation under 1 x 10 n/cm 2 ·s for 10 seconds. Non responding time that is caused by short half reduction time of 20 F can be recovered enough by a revise calculation. Reproducibility of measured fluoride concentration using INAA method was well stabilized. Rat hard tissue which takes no fluoride can be determined fluoride concentration without sodium restriction. Femur fluoride concentrations using INAA method had significant correlation with conventional microdiffusion analysis method (r=0.997, regression line: Y=1.13X + 2.98). Increase of fluoride density in dentine of rat molars under growing period according to fluoride intake was 1/3 of femurs and mandibles. (author)

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite-Resorbable Polymer Composites for Hard Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebner, Kristopher Robert

    Autografts are the orthopedic "gold standard" for repairing bone voids. Autografts are osteoconductive and do not elicit an immune response, but they are in short supply and require a second surgery to harvest the bone graft. Allografts are currently the most common materials used for the repair of segmental defects in hard tissue. Unlike autografts, allografts can cause an undesirable immune response and the possibility of disease transmission is a major concern. As an alternative to the above approaches, recent research efforts have focused on the use of composite materials made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioresorbable polymers, such as poly-L-lactide (PLLA). Recent results have shown that the surface hydroxides on HA can initiate the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide and other lactones creating a composite with superior interfacial strength. This thesis demonstrates that the surface of porous biologically derived HA substrates, such as coralline HA and trabecular bone, can be used to initiate the ROP of L-lactide and other lactones from the vapor phase. This process increases the strength of the porous scaffold through the deposition of a thin, uniform polymer coating, while maintaining the porous structure. The kinetics of the chemical vapor deposition polymerization (CVDP) are described using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The reaction temperature and monomer vapor pressure are found to affect the rate of the polymerization. Also described in this thesis is the preparation of a porous polymer scaffold that mimics the structure of demineralized bone matrix (DBM). This demineralized bone matrix simulant (DBMS) is created using anorganic bovine bone as a template to initiate the polymerization of various lactones, followed by the removal of the HA scaffold. This material retained its shape and exhibits mechanical properties superior to DBM. Finally it is shown that HA can be used to initiate the ROP of a-caprolactam and the biocompatibility

  14. Design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes: Hard tissue scaffolding biomaterials and physically crosslinked elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelewski, Tomasz

    The work in this thesis is divided into two main parts. The first part examines the synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazenes as potential scaffolding materials usable for hard tissue repair. The goal of this work was to design polymers containing acidic functional groups in an attempt to encourage the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite when the polymer is exposed to simulated body fluids. The second part examines the development of a new polymeric architecture which generates elastomeric properties without the use of traditional covalent or physical crosslinks. The goal was to examine the effects of this new architecture on the physical and mechanical properties of the final polymers. Chapter 1 provides a general background for the two main focus areas mentioned above. More specifically: a brief explanation is provided of the necessary physical and chemical properties of a suitable hard tissue engineering scaffolding substrate, and the basis of those requirements; together with an examination of the traditional ways in which elastomeric properties are introduced into a polymeric sample. Chapter 2 details the design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes bearing phosphonic acid and phosphoester side groups using two different routes. The first route utilized a linker unit which was functionalized with phosphoesters prior to its attachment to the polyphosphazene backbone, while the second route involved attachment of the same linking group to the polyphosphazene backbone before the introduction of the phosphoester moieties. In both cases, the samples were treated with iodotrimethylsilane to cleave the ester bonds and afford the parent phosphonic acid. Both routes proved successful. However, varying difficulties were encountered for each route. In Chapter 3 we examine the ability of the phosphonic acid functionalized polyphosphazenes described in Chapter 2 to mineralize calcium hydroxyapatite when exposed to simulated body fluid, which has the same ion

  15. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pmicrostructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (p<0.05) in metal-ceramic bond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microtomography evaluation of dental tissue wear surface induced by in vitro simulated chewing cycles on human and composite teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bedini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a 3D microtomography display of tooth surfaces after in vitro dental wear tests has been obtained. Natural teeth have been compared with prosthetic teeth, manufactured by three different polyceramic composite materials. The prosthetic dental element samples, similar to molars, have been placed in opposition to human teeth extracted by paradontology diseases. After microtomography analysis, samples have been subjected to in vitro fatigue test cycles by servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. After the fatigue test, each sample has been subjected again to microtomography analysis to obtain volumetric value changes and dental wear surface images. Wear surface images were obtained by 3D reconstruction software and volumetric value changes were measured by CT analyser software. The aim of this work has been to show the potential of microtomography technique to display very clear and reliable wear surface images. Microtomography analysis methods to evaluate volumetric value changes have been used to quantify dental tissue and composite material wear.

  17. Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Human Dental Pulp Tissues Sequentially Differentiate into Definitive Endoderm and Hepatocyte-Like Cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Jin; Kang, Young-Hoon; Shivakumar, Sarath Belame; Bharti, Dinesh; Son, Young-Bum; Choi, Yong-Ho; Park, Won-Uk; Byun, June-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    We previously described a novel tissue cryopreservation protocol to enable the safe preservation of various autologous stem cell sources. The present study characterized the stem cells derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues (hDPSCs-cryo) and analyzed their differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE) and hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro . Human dental pulp tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were cryopreserved as per a slow freezing tissue cryopreservation protocol for at least a year. Characteristics of hDPSCs-cryo were compared to those of stem cells from fresh dental pulps (hDPSCs-fresh). hDPSCs-cryo were differentiated into DE cells in vitro with Activin A as per the Wnt3a protocol for 6 days. These cells were further differentiated into HLCs in the presence of growth factors until day 30. hDPSCs-fresh and hDPSCs-cryo displayed similar cell growth morphology, cell proliferation rates, and mesenchymal stem cell character. During differentiation into DE and HLCs in vitro , the cells flattened and became polygonal in shape, and finally adopted a hepatocyte-like shape. The differentiated DE cells at day 6 and HLCs at day 30 displayed significantly increased DE- and hepatocyte-specific markers at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. In addition, the differentiated HLCs showed detoxification and glycogen storage capacities, indicating they could share multiple functions with real hepatocytes. These data conclusively show that hPDSCs-cryo derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues can be successfully differentiated into DE and functional hepatocytes in vitro . Thus, preservation of dental tissues could provide a valuable source of autologous stem cells for tissue engineering.

  18. Dental pulp stem cells immobilized in alginate microspheres for applications in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanafi, M M; Ramesh, A; Gupta, P K; Bhonde, R R

    2014-07-01

    To immobilize dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in alginate microspheres and to determine cell viability, proliferation, stem cell characteristics and osteogenic potential of the immobilized DPSCs. Human DPSCs isolated from the dental pulp were immobilized in 1% w/v alginate microspheres. Viability and proliferation of immobilized DPSCs were determined by trypan blue and MTT assay, respectively. Stem cell characteristics of DPSCs post immobilization were verified by labelling the cells with CD73 and CD90. Osteogenic potential of immobilized DPSCs was assessed by the presence of osteocalcin. Alizarin red staining and O-cresolphthalein complexone method confirmed and quantified calcium deposition. A final reverse transcriptase PCR evaluated the expression of osteogenic markers - ALP, Runx-2 and OCN. More than 80% of immobilized DPSCs were viable throughout the 3-week study. Proliferation appeared controlled and consistent unlike DPSCs in the control group. Presence of CD73 and CD90 markers confirmed the stem cell nature of immobilized DPSCs. The presence of osteocalcin, an osteoblastic marker, was confirmed in the microspheres on day 21. Mineralization assays showed high calcium deposition indicating elevated osteogenic potential of immobilized DPSCs. Osteogenic genes- ALP, Runx-2 and OCN were also upregulated in immobilized DPSCs. Surprisingly, immobilized DPSCs in the control group cultured in conventional stem cell media showed upregulation of osteogenic genes and expressed osteocalcin. Dental pulp stem cells immobilized in alginate hydrogels exhibit enhanced osteogenic potential while maintaining high cell viability both of which are fundamental for bone tissue regeneration. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Regulatory Effects of Long Noncoding RNA-ANCR on Dental Tissue-Derived Stem Cells

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    Qian Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA have been recognized as important regulators in diverse biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, stem cell proliferation, and differentiation. Previous study has demonstrated that lncRNA-ANCR (antidifferentiation ncRNA plays a key role in regulating the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs. However, little is known about the role of ANCR in regulating other types of dental tissue-derived stem cells (DTSCs behaviours (including proliferation and multiple-potential of differentiation. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of lncRNA-ANCR on the proliferation and differentiation (including osteogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation of DTSCs, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, PDLSCs, and stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP by downregulation of lncRNA-ANCR. We found that downregulation of ANCR exerted little effect on proliferation of DPSCs and SCAP but promoted the osteogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation of DTSCs. These data provide an insight into the regulatory effects of long noncoding RNA-ANCR on DTSCs and indicate that ANCR is a very important regulatory factor in stem cell differentiation.

  20. Effect of the irradiance distribution from light curing units on the local micro-hardness of the surface of dental resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenel, Thomas; Hausnerová, Berenika; Steinhaus, Johannes; Price, Richard B T; Sullivan, Braden; Moeginger, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    An inhomogeneous irradiance distribution from a light-curing unit (LCU) can locally cause inhomogeneous curing with locally inadequately cured and/or over-cured areas causing e.g. monomer elution or internal shrinkage stresses, and thus reduce the lifetime of dental resin based composite (RBC) restorations. The aim of the study is to determine both the irradiance distribution of two light curing units (LCUs) and its influence on the local mechanical properties of a RBC. Specimens of Arabesk TOP OA2 were irradiated for 5, 20, and 80s using a Bluephase® 20i LCU in the Low mode (666mW/cm(2)), in the Turbo mode (2222mW/cm(2)) and a Celalux® 2 (1264mW/cm(2)). The degree of conversion (DC) was determined with an ATR-FTIR. The Knoop micro-hardness (average of five specimens) was measured on the specimen surface after 24h of dark and dry storage at room temperature. The irradiance distribution affected the hardness distribution across the surface of the specimens. The hardness distribution corresponded well to the inhomogeneous irradiance distributions of the LCU. The highest reaction rates occurred after approximately 2s light exposure. A DC of 40% was reached after 3.6 or 5.7s, depending on the LCU. The inhomogeneous hardness distribution was still evident after 80s of light exposure. The irradiance distribution from a LCU is reflected in the hardness distribution across the surface. Irradiance level of the LCU and light exposure time do not affect the pattern of the hardness distribution--only the hardness level. In areas of low irradiation this may result in inadequate resin polymerization, poor physical properties, and hence premature failure of the restorations as they are usually much smaller than the investigated specimens. It has to be stressed that inhomogeneous does not necessarily mean poor if in all areas of the restoration enough light intensity is introduced to achieve a high degree of cure. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by

  1. Immediate placement of dental implants in the esthetic zone : a systematic review and pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W; den Hartog, Laurens; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    Background: Research interest on immediate placement of dental implants has shifted from implant survival toward optimal preservation of soft and hard tissues. The aim of this study is to systematically assess the condition of implant survival, peri-implant hard and soft tissue changes, esthetic

  2. Incremental growth of therizinosaurian dental tissues: implications for dietary transitions in Theropoda

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    Khai Button

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations document functional and phylogenetic signals in the histology of dinosaur teeth. In particular, incremental lines in dentin have been used to determine tooth growth and replacement rates in several dinosaurian clades. However, to date, few studies have investigated the dental microstructure of theropods in the omnivory/herbivory spectrum. Here we examine dental histology of Therizinosauria, a clade of large-bodied theropods bearing significant morphological evidence for herbivory, by examining the teeth of the early-diverging therizinosaurian Falcarius utahensis, and an isolated tooth referred to Suzhousaurus megatherioides, a highly specialized large-bodied representative. Despite attaining some of the largest body masses among maniraptoran theropod dinosaurs, therizinosaurian teeth are diminutive, measuring no more than 0.90 cm in crown height (CH and 0.38 cm in crown base length (CBL. Comparisons with other theropods and non-theropodan herbivorous dinosaurs reveals that when controlling for estimated body mass, crown volume in therizinosaurians plots most closely with dinosaurs of similar dietary strategy as opposed to phylogenetic heritage. Analysis of incremental growth lines in dentin, observed in thin sections of therizinosaurian teeth, demonstrates that tooth growth rates fall within the range of other archosaurs, conforming to hypothesized physiological limitations on the production of dental tissues. Despite dietary differences between therizinosaurians and hypercarnivorous theropods, the types of enamel crystallites present and their spatial distribution—i.e., the schmelzmuster of both taxa—is limited to parallel enamel crystallites, the simplest form of enamel and the plesiomorphic condition for Theropoda. This finding supports previous hypotheses that dental microstructure is strongly influenced by phylogeny, yet equally supports suggestions of reduced reliance on oral processing in omnivorous

  3. Age-related changes of dental pulp tissue after experimental tooth movement in rats

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    Martina Von Böhl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the effect of orthodontic tooth movement on the dental pulp in adolescents is reversible and that it has no long-lasting effect on pulpal physiology. However, it is not clear yet if the same conclusion is also valid for adult subjects. Thus, in two groups of rats, aged 6 and 40 weeks respectively, 3 molars at one side of the maxilla were moved together in a mesial direction with a standardized orthodontic appliance delivering a force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as a control. Parasagittal histological sections were prepared after tooth movement for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The pulp tissue was characterized for the different groups, with special emphasis on cell density, inflammatory cells, vascularity, and odontoblasts. Dimensions of dentin and the pulpal horns was determined and related with the duration of orthodontic force application and age ware evaluated. We found that neither in young nor in adult rats, force application led to long-lasting or irreversible changes in pulpal tissues. Dimensional variables showed significant age-related changes. In conclusion, orthodontic tooth movement per se has no long-lasting or irreversible effect on pulpal tissues, neither in the young nor in the adult animals.

  4. Effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Lin Meng

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage.Methods: Patients with pulpal and periapical diseases who received root canal therapy in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively analyzed, and according to the different root canal filling materials they used, they were divided into epoxy group and bioceramic group who used epoxy paste and bioceramic paste as root canal filling materials respectively. Before and after treatment, gingival crevicular fluid was collected respectively to determine the levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress products, cell apoptosis molecules and protease-related molecules.Results: 2 weeks after treatment, IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of epoxy group were not significantly different from those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of bioceramic group were significantly higher than those before treatment while Bcl-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels were significantly lower than those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid were significantly different between two groups of patients after treatment.Conclusion:Epoxy paste for dental restoration causes less damage to periodontal tissue than bioceramic paste.

  5. Effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Lin Meng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage. Methods: Patients with pulpal and periapical diseases who received root canal therapy in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively analyzed, and according to the different root canal filling materials they used, they were divided into epoxy group and bioceramic group who used epoxy paste and bioceramic paste as root canal filling materials respectively. Before and after treatment, gingival crevicular fluid was collected respectively to determine the levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress products, cell apoptosis molecules and protease-related molecules. Results: 2 weeks after treatment, IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of epoxy group were not significantly different from those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of bioceramic group were significantly higher than those before treatment while Bcl-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels were significantly lower than those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid were significantly different between two groups of patients after treatment. Conclusion: Epoxy paste for dental restoration causes less damage to periodontal tissue than bioceramic paste.

  6. Concomitant multipotent and unipotent dental pulp progenitors and their respective contribution to mineralised tissue formation

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    S Dimitrova-Nakov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon in vitro induction or in vivo implantation, the stem cells of the dental pulp display hallmarks of odontoblastic, osteogenic, adipogenic or neuronal cells. However, whether these phenotypes result from genuine multipotent cells or from coexistence of distinct progenitors is still an open question. Furthermore, determining whether a single cell-derived progenitor is capable of undergoing a differentiation cascade leading to tissue repair in situ is important for the development of cell therapy strategies. Three clonal pulp precursor cell lines (A4, C5, H8, established from embryonic ED18 first molars of mouse transgenic for a recombinant plasmid adeno-SV40, were induced to differentiate towards the odonto/osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic programme. Expression of phenotypic markers of each lineage was evaluated by RT-PCR, histochemistry or immunocytochemistry. The clones were implanted into mandibular incisors or calvaria of adult mice. The A4 clone was capable of being recruited towards at least 3 mesodermal lineages in vitro and of contributing to dentin-like or bone formation, in vivo, thus behaving as a multipotent cell. In contrast, the C5 and H8 clones displayed a more restricted potential. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that isolated monopotent and multipotent clones could be distinguished by a differential expression of CD90. Altogether, isolation of these clonal lines allowed demonstrating the coexistence of multipotential and restricted-lineage progenitors in the mouse pulp. These cells may further permit unravelling specificities of the different types of pulp progenitors, hence facilitating the development of cell-based therapies of the dental pulp or other cranio-facial tissues.

  7. A systematic review on soft-to-hard tissue ratios in orthognathic surgery part II: Chin procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel Moragas, Joan; Oth, Olivier; Büttner, Michael; Mommaerts, Maurice Y

    2015-10-01

    Precise soft-to-hard tissue ratios in orthofacial chin procedures are not well established. The aim of this study was to determine useful soft-to-hard tissue ratios for planning the magnitude of sliding genioplasty (chin osteotomy), osseous chin recontouring and alloplastic chin augmentation. A systematic review of English and non-English articles using PubMed central, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Science Citation Index, Elsevier Science Direct Complete, Highwire Press, Springer Standard Collection, SAGE premier 2011, DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals, Sweetswise, Free E-Journals, Ovid Lippincott Williams & Wilkins total Access Collection, Wiley Online Library Journals, and Cochrane Plus databases from their onset until July 2014. Additional studies were identified by searching the references. Search terms included soft tissue, ratios, genioplasty, mentoplasty, chin, genial AND advancement, augmentation, setback, retrusion, impaction, reduction, vertical deficit, widening, narrowing, and expansion. Study selection criteria were as follows: only academic publications; human patients; no reviews; systematic reviews or meta-analyses; no cadavers; no syndromic patients; no pathology at the chin or mandible region; only articles of level of evidence from I to IV; number of patients must be cited in the articles; hard-to-soft tissue ratios must be cited in the articles or at least are able to be calculated with the quantitative data available in the article; if all patients of one article have had bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) performed along with chin osteotomy, there should be an independent group evaluation of the data concerning to the chin; and no restriction regarding the size of the group. Independent extraction of articles by two authors using predefined data fields, including study quality indicators (level of evidence). The search identified 22 articles. Eleven additional articles were found in their reference sections. Of these, two were

  8. Influence of mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralized tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woloszyk, A.; Holsten Dircksen, S.; Bostanci, N.; Müller, R.; Hofmann, S.; Mitsiadis, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells

  9. Soft tissue management for dental implants: what are the most effective techniques? A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Maghaireh, Hassan; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Ziounas, Ioannis; Worthington, Helen V

    2012-01-01

    This review is based on a Cochrane systematic review entitled 'Interventions for replacing missing teeth: management of soft tissues for dental implants' published in The Cochrane Library (see http:// www.cochrane.org/ for information). Cochrane systematic reviews are regularly updated to include new research, and in response to comments and criticisms from readers. If you wish to comment on this review, please send your comments to the Cochrane website or to Marco Esposito. The Cochrane Library should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. The results of a Cochrane review can be interpreted differently, depending on people's perspectives and circumstances. Please consider the conclusions presented carefully. They are the opinions of the review authors, and are not necessarily shared by the Cochrane Collaboration. To evaluate whether flapless procedures are beneficial for patients and which is the ideal flap design, whether soft tissue correction/augmentation techniques are beneficial for patients and which are the best techniques, whether techniques to increase the peri-implant keratinised mucosa are beneficial for patients and which are the best techniques, and which are the best suturing techniques/ materials. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to the 9th of June 2011 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of rootform osseointegrated dental implants, with a follow-up of at least 6 months after function, comparing various techniques to handle soft tissues in relation to dental implants. Primary outcome measures were prosthetic failures, implant failures and biological complications. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted at least in duplicate and independently by two or more review authors. The statistical unit was the patient and not the prosthesis, the procedure or the implant. RESULTS were expressed

  10. Generation of radicals in hard biological tissues under the action of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexander P.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Sobol, Emil N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Lunina, Elena V.; Zhitnev, Yurii N.; Markaryan, Galina L.; Lunin, Valerii V.

    2002-07-01

    The formation of radicals upon UV and IR laser irradiation of some biological tissues and their components was studied by the EPR technique. The radical decay kinetics in body tissue specimens after their irradiation with UV light were described by various models. By the spin trapping technique, it was shown that radicals were not produced during IR laser irradiation of cartilaginous tissue. A change in optical absorption spectra and the dynamics of optical density of cartilaginous tissue, fish scale, and a collagen film under exposure to laser radiation in an air, oxygen, and nitrogen atmosphere was studied.

  11. Relative Composition of Fibrous Connective and Fatty/Glandular Tissue in Connective Tissue Grafts Depends on the Harvesting Technique but not the Donor Site of the Hard Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertl, Kristina; Pifl, Markus; Hirtler, Lena; Rendl, Barbara; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Whether the composition of palatal connective tissue grafts (CTGs) varies depending on donor site or harvesting technique in terms of relative amounts of fibrous connective tissue (CT) and fatty/glandular tissue (FGT) is currently unknown and is histologically assessed in the present study. In 10 fresh human cadavers, tissue samples were harvested in the anterior and posterior palate and in areas close to (marginal) and distant from (apical) the mucosal margin. Mucosal thickness, lamina propria thickness (defined as the extent of subepithelial portion of the biopsy containing ≤25% or ≤50% FGT), and proportions of CT and FGT were semi-automatically estimated for the entire mucosa and for CTGs virtually harvested by split-flap (SF) preparation minimum 1 mm deep or after deepithelialization (DE). Palatal mucosal thickness, ranging from 2.35 to 6.89 mm, and histologic composition showed high interindividual variability. Lamina propria thickness (P >0.21) and proportions of CT (P = 0.48) and FGT (P = 0.15) did not differ significantly among the donor sites (anterior, posterior, marginal, apical). However, thicker palatal tissue was associated with higher FGT content (P tissue composition in the hard palate, DE-harvested CTG contains much larger amounts of CT and much lower amounts of FGT than SF-harvested CTG, irrespective of the harvesting site.

  12. Ectopic Hard Tissue Formation by Odonto/Osteogenically In Vitro Differentiated Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghye; Song, Je Seon; Jeon, Mijeong; Shin, Dong Min; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-07-01

    There have been many attempts to use the pulp tissue from human deciduous teeth for dentin or bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of deciduous teeth pulp stem cells (DTSCs) on their in vivo hard tissue-forming potential. DTSCs were isolated from extracted deciduous teeth using the outgrowth method. These cells were exposed to odonto/osteogenic stimuli for 4 and 8 days (Day 4 and Day 8 groups, respectively), while cells in the control group were cultured in normal medium. The in vitro differentiated DTSCs and the control DTSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice with macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate and sacrificed at 8 weeks post-implantation. The effect of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The in vivo effect was evaluated by qualitative RT-PCR, assessment of ALP activity, histologic analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. The amount of hard tissue was greater in Day 4 group than Day 8 group (p = 0.014). However, Day 8 group generated lamellar bone-like structure, which was immunonegative to anti-human dentin sialoprotein with significantly low expression level of DSPP compared with the control group (p = 0.008). This study demonstrates that odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs enhances the formation of bone-like tissue, instead of dentin-like tissue, when transplanted subcutaneously using MBCP as a carrier. The odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs may be an effective modification that enhances in vivo bone formation by DTSCs.

  13. Comparative assessment of the interfacial soft and hard tissues investing implants and natural teeth in the macaque mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Toh, Chooi Gait; Romanos, Georgios E; Ng, Kok Han

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative qualitative and quantitative assessment of the interfacial soft and hard tissues investing implants and natural teeth. The test sample consisted of six adult healthy male Macaca fascicularis with three-unit splinted crowns, each crown supported by an Ankylos screw-shaped titanium implant. These implants were placed in the mandibular premolar-second molar region, one side by an immediate-loading (IL) and the other by delayed-loading (DL) protocol. The animals were sacrificed after 3 months of functional loading. Another two monkeys with natural dentition served as controls. Nondecalcified sections were prepared for assessment of optical intensities (OI) under a confocal laser scanning microscope. In both the test (IL and DL) and control, the soft tissue complexes demonstrated a highly fluorescent keratinized layer and diminished cytoplasmic and enhanced membranous fluorescence in the remaining epithelium. Peri-implant mucosa was further characterized by an intense fluorescence at the junctional epithelium-implant interface and in the stromal mononuclear infiltrate. Connective tissue contact and periodontal ligament were weakly fluorescent. In hard tissues, a high fluorescence was observed in peri-implant woven bone and along the implant-bone interface. Mean OI was significantly higher in peri-implant woven bone than around teeth (P  0.05). Present findings suggest that peri-implant woven bone is highly mineralized, while the peri-implant and gingival mucosa share structural similarities. Optical intensities of interfacial tissues investing implants and teeth are related to their biological properties.

  14. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre E-mail: andre.gahleitner@univie.ac.at; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement.

  15. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, Andre; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement

  16. Enamel tissue engineering using subcultured enamel organ epithelial cells in combination with dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki J; Shinmura, Yuka; Shinohara, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    We describe a strategy for the in vitro engineering of enamel tissue using a novel technique for culturing enamel organ epithelial (EOE) cells isolated from the enamel organ using 3T3-J2 cells as a feeder layer. These subcultured EOE cells retain the capacity to produce enamel structures over a period of extended culture. In brief, enamel organs from 6-month-old porcine third molars were dissociated into single cells and subcultured on 3T3-J2 feeder cell layers. These subcultured EOE cells were then seeded onto a collagen sponge in combination with primary dental pulp cells isolated at an early stage of crown formation, and these constructs were transplanted into athymic rats. After 4 weeks, complex enamel-dentin structures were detected in the implants. These results show that our culture technique maintained ameloblast lineage cells that were able to produce enamel in vivo. This novel subculture technique provides an important tool for tooth tissue engineering. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Effect of hydralazine on duration of soft tissue local anesthesia following dental treatment: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakheran Esfahani, Omid; Pouraboutaleb, Mohammad Fazel; Khorami, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged numbness following routine dental treatments can cause difficulties in speaking and swallowing and may result in inadvertent biting of soft tissues. Local injection of vasodilator agents may represent a solution to this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal injection of hydralazine hydrochloride (HCl) on the duration of oral soft tissue anesthesia after routine dental treatment. This randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial included 50 patients who received inferior alveolar nerve block (2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine) for simple restorative treatment. Upon completion of the dental treatment, patients randomly received a hydralazine HCl or sham injection in the same site as the local anesthetic injection. The reversal time to normal sensation of soft tissues (lips, tongue, and perioral skin) was evaluated and reported every 5 minutes by the patients, who followed an assessment protocol that they were taught in advance of treatment. Median recovery times in the hydralazine group and the sham group were 81.4 (SD, 3.6) and 221.8 (SD, 6.3) minutes, respectively. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the duration of soft tissue anesthesia in the 2 groups was significantly different (P local anesthetic-induced soft tissue numbness and the related functional problems.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from inflamed dental pulpal and gingival tissue: a potential application for bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Laura; Mauceri, Rodolfo; Coppola, Antonina; Pitrone, Maria; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Campisi, Giuseppina; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Giordano, Carla

    2017-08-01

    Chronic periodontal disease is an infectious disease consisting of prolonged inflammation of the supporting tooth tissue and resulting in bone loss. Guided bone regeneration procedures have become common and safe treatments in dentistry, and in this context dental stem cells would represent the ideal solution as autologous cells. In this study, we verified the ability of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) harvested from periodontally affected teeth to produce new mineralized bone tissue in vitro, and compared this to cells from healthy teeth. To characterize DPSCs and GMSCs, we assessed colony-forming assay, immunophenotyping, mesenchymal/stem cell phenotyping, stem gene profiling by means of flow cytometry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The effects of proinflammatory cytokines on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and differentiation potential were investigated. We also observed participation of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) and actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) during osteogenic differentiation. DPSCs and GMSCs were successfully isolated both from periodontally affected dental tissue and controls. Periodontally affected dental MSCs proliferated faster, and the inflamed environment did not affect MSC marker expressions. The calcium deposition was higher in periodontally affected MSCs than in the control group. Proinflammatory cytokines activate a cytoskeleton remodeling, interacting with HSPs including HSP90 and HSPA9, thioredoxin-1, and ADFs such as as profilin-1, cofilin-1, and vinculin that probably mediate the increased acquisition in the inflamed environment. Our findings provide evidence that periodontally affected dental tissue (both pulp and gingiva) can be used as a source of MSCs with intact stem cell properties. Moreover, we demonstrated that the osteogenic capability of DPSCs and GMSCs in the test group was not only preserved but increased by the overexpression of

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Polycaprolactone / Layered Double Hydroxide Nanocomposite for Hard Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baradaran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the use of nanomaterials in bone tissue engineering scaffold has been considered due to its imitating the structure of natural bone tissue which contains a nanocomposite structure mixed with a three-dimensional matrix. In the meantime, Polycaprol actone has been used as a bio-polymer in bone tissue engineering applications as a scaffold. The aim of this study is to develop porous scaffolds made of polycaprol actone/layered double hydroxide biocomposite, with appropriate mechanical, bioactive and biological properties, for bone tissue engineering application. The nanocomposite scaffolds were fabricated by the particulate leaching method and freeze-drying method. In this study, MG63 cells (osteosarcoma was investigated for cellular study. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed uniform distribution of ceramic phase in polycaprol actone matrix. The results of mechanical tests showed the increase in young’s modulus after addition of ceramic phase. The microscopic investigations demonstrated that the pores generated after addition of ceramic phase and the average size of pores was as large as 100-600μm. Also by the addition of LDH, the hydrophilicity of PCL increased but the rate of hydroxyapatite formation was delayed due to presence of magnesium ions. The cell culture experiments confirmed the attachment and proliferation of cells on the scaffolds. The results showed that the fabricated scaffolds have the potential to be used in cancellous bone tissue engineering.

  20. Staged Hard and Soft Tissue Reconstruction Followed by Implant Supported Restoration in the Aesthetic Zone: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Harinath; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; Tadepalli, Anupama; Ponnaiyan, Deepa

    2017-04-01

    Alveolar ridge deficiency is a common clinical consequence following tooth loss due to chronic periodontitis complicating ideal implant placement. Advanced hard and soft tissue augmentation procedures have been developed in the recent past with predictable clinical outcomes. A male patient presented with a Grade III mobile upper right central incisor associated with advanced bone loss and soft tissue deficit. Following extraction of tooth #11, socket augmentation was done using an autogenous cortico-cancellous block graft and subsequent soft tissue augmentation was done with palatal connective tissue graft. At the end of six months, a tapered self tapping implant fixture was placed with adequate primary stability and after eight weeks, second stage implant surgery was done with the Misch technique in order to recreate papillae and the implant was prosthetically restored. The alveolar ridge was adequately recontoured following the staged surgical protocol. The implant was well integrated at the end of 15 months. Execution of sequential surgical procedures in a highly deficient edentulous site made it possible to achieve of optimal pink and white aesthetics with stable implant supported fixed prosthesis.

  1. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp and follicle tissue of human third molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadegary Z

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: In the last decade, several studies have reported the isolation of stem cell population from different dental sources, while their mesenchymal nature is still controversial. The aim of this study was to isolate stem cells from mature human dental pulp and follicle and to determine their mesenchymal nature before differentiation based on the ISCT (International Society for Cellular Therapy criteria."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, intact human third molars extracted due to prophylactic or orthodontic reasons were collected from patients aged 18-25. After tooth extraction, dental pulp and follicle were stored at 4°C in RPMI 1640 medium containing antibiotics. Dental pulp and follicle were prepared in a sterile condition and digested using an enzyme solution containing 4mg/ml collagenase I and dispase (ratio: 1:1. The cells were then cultivated in α-MEM medium. Passage-3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of CD34, CD45, CD 73, CD90 and CD105 surface markers."nResults: Dental pulp and follicle were observed to grow in colony forming units, mainly composed of a fibroblast-like cell population. Flow cytometry results showed that dental pulp and follicle are highly positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105 (mesenchymal stem cell markers and are negative for hematopoietic markers such as CD34 and CD 45."nConclusion: In this study we were able to successfully confirm that dental pulp and follicle stem cells isolated from permanent third molars have a mesenchymal nature before differentiation. Therefore, these two sources can be considered as an easy accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for stem cell research and tissue engineering.

  2. Potential Role of Dentin Sialoprotein by Inducing Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Mineralization for Dental Tissue Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Guo-Hua; Yang, Guo-Bin; Wu, Li-An; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein, a unique marker of dentinogenesis and plays a vital role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin mineralization. Recently, studies have shown that DSP induces differentiation and mineralization of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental papilla mesenchymal cells in vitro and rescues dentin deficiency and increases enamel mineralization in animal models.The hypothesis: DSP as a nature therapeutic agent stimu...

  3. Investigations of soft and hard tissues in oral cavity by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarova, Violeta Dimitrova; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Makita, Shuichi; Hori, Yasuaki; Voeffray, Jean-Baptiste; Itoh, Masahide; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Tamura, Masami; Nanbu, Toshiyuki

    2006-02-01

    Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) systems for dental measurements are demonstrated. Two systems have been developed. The first system is fiber based Michelson interferometer with super luminescent diodes at 1310 nm and 100 nm FWHM as a light source. The sensitivity of the system was 106 dB with depth measurement range in air of 2.5 mm. The second systems is a fiber based Mach-Zehnder interferometer with wavelength scanning laser as light source at center wavelength of 1310 nm, wavelength range of 110 nm and scanning rate of 20 KHz. The sensitivity of the system is 112 dB and depth measurement range in air is 6 mm. Both systems can acquire real-time three dimensional (3-D) images in the range of several second. The systems were applied for early caries detection in tooth, for diagnostics of tooth condition after operational tooth treatment, and for diagnostics of the alveolar bone structure. In-vivo measurements were performed on two volunteers. The systems were able to detect discontinuities in tooth and resin filling after tooth treatment. In addition early carries lesion was detected in one of the volunteers. The 3-D profile of the alveolar bone was acquired for first time with non-contact method.

  4. A Novel Strategy to Engineer Pre-Vascularized Full-Length Dental Pulp-like Tissue Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athirasala, Avathamsa; Lins, Fernanda; Tahayeri, Anthony; Hinds, Monica; Smith, Anthony J; Sedgley, Christine; Ferracane, Jack; Bertassoni, Luiz E

    2017-06-12

    The requirement for immediate vascularization of engineered dental pulp poses a major hurdle towards successful implementation of pulp regeneration as an effective therapeutic strategy for root canal therapy, especially in adult teeth. Here, we demonstrate a novel strategy to engineer pre-vascularized, cell-laden hydrogel pulp-like tissue constructs in full-length root canals for dental pulp regeneration. We utilized gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels with tunable physical and mechanical properties to determine the microenvironmental conditions (microstructure, degradation, swelling and elastic modulus) that enhanced viability, spreading and proliferation of encapsulated odontoblast-like cells (OD21), and the formation of endothelial monolayers by endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). GelMA hydrogels with higher polymer concentration (15% w/v) and stiffness enhanced OD21 cell viability, spreading and proliferation, as well as endothelial cell spreading and monolayer formation. We then fabricated pre-vascularized, full-length, dental pulp-like tissue constructs by dispensing OD21 cell-laden GelMA hydrogel prepolymer in root canals of extracted teeth and fabricating 500 µm channels throughout the root canals. ECFCs seeded into the microchannels successfully formed monolayers and underwent angiogenic sprouting within 7 days in culture. In summary, the proposed approach is a simple and effective strategy for engineering of pre-vascularized dental pulp constructs offering potentially beneficial translational outcomes.

  5. Scientific Instrument for a Controlled Choice of Optimal Photon Energy Spectrum: A Comparison Between Calculational Methods and Laboratory Irradiations of Comparable Hard Tissue Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.; Sandborg, M.; Eckerdal, O.; Alm Carlsson, G.

    1998-01-01

    Basic performance parameters are defined and analysed in order to optimise physical image quality in relation to the energy imparted to the patient in dental radiology. Air cavities were embedded in well-defined multi material, hard tissue phantoms to represent various objects in dento-maxillo-facial examinations. Basic performance parameters were: object contrast (C), energy imparted (ε) to the patient, signal-to-noise ration (SNR), C 2 /ε (film) and (SNR) / ε (digital imaging system) as functions of HVL (half-value layer), used to describe the photon energy spectrum. For the film receptor, the performance index C 2 /ε is maximum (optimal) at HVL values of 1.5-1.7 mm Al in the simulated Incisive, Premolar and Molar examinations. Other imaging tasks (examinations), not simulated here, may require other optimal HVL. For the digital imaging system (Digora) the performance index (SNR) 2 /ε, theoretically calculated, indicates that a lower value of HVL is optimal than with film as receptor. However, due to the limited number of bits (8 bits) in the analogue to digital converter (ADC) contrast resolution is degraded and calls for use of higher photon energies (HVL). Customised optimisations with proper concern for patient category, type of examination, diagnostic task is the ultimate goal of this work. The conclusions stated above give some general advice on the appropriate choice of photon energy spectrum (HVL). In particular situations, it may be necessary to use more dose demanding kV settings (lower HVL) in order to get sufficient image quality for the diagnostic task. (author)

  6. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  7. Detection of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria and Others Cultivable Facultative Bacteria in Dental Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio de Souza Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To detect for the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB and evaluate the possible association between SRB and cultivable facultative bacterial of oral sites with different periodontal conditions. Methods: The study was carried out on 9 samples from different oral sites in 8 patients (two samples were collected from the same patient. Material was collected using modified Postgate E culture medium, indicated for the growth and isolation of SRB. In addition, a reducing solution for anaerobic bacteria was used as a transport solution for facultative bacteria and identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Results: SRB was found in 3 patient samples: the first in a root fragment, the second in a root fragment and a healthy tooth with vertical bone loss and a mobility degree of 3; and the third in a healthy tooth extracted for orthodontic treatment. In the final patient, the cultivable facultative species Lactobacillus casei was identified. Other facultative bacterial species were identified in patient 5 (Kurthia Gibsonii and patient 7 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusions: The detection of SRB in different dental tissues with distinct periodontal features demonstrated that new studies need to be developed in order to determine the true role of SRB in the oral microbiota. In addition, it was possible to verify the presence of Lactobacillus casei together with SRB in one sample.

  8. Influence of steel implant surface microtopography on soft and hard tissue integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Klöppel, H; Wieling, R; Sprecher, C M; Richards, R G

    2018-02-01

    After implantation of an internal fracture fixation device, blood contacts the surface, followed by protein adsorption, resulting in either soft-tissue adhesion or matrix adhesion and mineralization. Without protein adsorption and cell adhesion under the presence of micro-motion, fibrous capsule formation can occur, often surrounding a liquid filled void at the implant-tissue interface. Clinically, fibrous capsule formation is more prevalent with electropolished stainless steel (EPSS) plates than with current commercially pure titanium (cpTi) plates. We hypothesize that this is due to lack of micro-discontinuities on the standard EPSS plates. To test our hypothesis, four EPSS experimental surfaces with varying microtopographies were produced and characterized for morphology using the scanning electron microscope, quantitative roughness analysis using laser profilometry and chemical analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Clinically used EPSS (smooth) and cpTi (microrough) were included as controls. Six plates of each type were randomly implanted, one on both the left and right intact tibia of 18 white New Zealand rabbits for 12 weeks, to allow for a surface interface study. The results demonstrate that the micro-discontinuities on the upper surface of internal steel fixation plates reduced the presence of liquid filled voids within soft-tissue capsules. The micro-discontinuities on the plate under-surface increased bony integration without the presence of fibrous tissue interface. These results support the hypothesis that the fibrous capsule and the liquid filled void formation occurs mainly due to lack of micro-discontinuities on the polished smooth steel plates and that bony integration is increased to surfaces with higher amounts of micro-discontinuities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 705-715, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroe Ohnishi, Yasuaki Oda and Hajime Ohgushi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells. A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  11. Bone up: craniomandibular development and hard-tissue biomineralization in neonate mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Khari D; Weiss-Bilka, Holly E; McGough, Elizabeth B; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    The presence of regional variation in the osteogenic abilities of cranial bones underscores the fact that the mechanobiology of the mammalian skull is more complex than previously recognized. However, the relationship between patterns of cranial bone formation and biomineralization remains incompletely understood. In four strains of mice, micro-computed tomography was used to measure tissue mineral density during perinatal development in three skull regions (calvarium, basicranium, mandible) noted for variation in loading environment, embryological origin, and ossification mode. Biomineralization levels increased during perinatal ontogeny in the mandible and calvarium, but did not increase in the basicranium. Tissue mineral density levels also varied intracranially, with density in the mandible being highest, in the basicranium intermediate, and in the calvarium lowest. Perinatal increases in, and elevated levels of, mandibular biomineralization appear related to the impending postweaning need to resist elevated masticatory stresses. Similarly, perinatal increases in calvarial biomineralization may be linked to ongoing brain expansion, which is known to stimulate sutural bone formation in this region. The lack of perinatal increase in basicranial biomineralization could be a result of earlier developmental maturity in the cranial base relative to other skull regions due to its role in supporting the brain's mass throughout ontogeny. These results suggest that biomineralization levels and age-related trajectories throughout the skull are influenced by the functional environment and ontogenetic processes affecting each region, e.g., onset of masticatory loads in the mandible, whereas variation in embryology and ossification mode may only have secondary effects on patterns of biomineralization. Knowledge of perinatal variation in tissue mineral density, and of normal cranial bone formation early in development, may benefit clinical therapies aiming to correct

  12. Fabrication and evaluation of silica-based ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghzade, Sorour; Emadi, Rahmatollah; Tavangarian, Fariborz; Naderi, Mozhgan

    2017-02-01

    In recent decades, bone scaffolds have received a great attention in biomedical applications due to their critical roles in bone tissue regeneration, vascularization, and healing process. One of the main challenges of using scaffolds in bone defects is the mechanical strength mismatch between the implant and surrounding host tissue which causes stress shielding or failure of the implant during the course of treatment. In this paper, space holder method was applied to synthesize diopside/forsterite composite scaffolds with different diopside content. During the sintering process, NaCl, as spacer agent, gradually evaporated from the system and produced desirable pore size in the scaffolds. The results showed that adding 10wt.% diopside to forsterite can enormously improve the bioactivity, biodegradability, and mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds. The size of crystals and pores of the obtained scaffolds were measured to be in the range 70-100nm and 100-250μm, respectively. Composite scaffolds containing 10wt.% diopside showed similar compressive strength and Young's modulus (4.36±0.3 and 308.15±7MPa, respectively) to that of bone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hard and soft tissue changes following alveolar ridge preservation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBeth, Neil; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Donos, Nikolaos; Mardas, Nikos

    2017-08-01

    Two focused questions were addressed within this systematic review. Q1) What is the effect of alveolar ridge preservation on linear and volumetric alveolar site dimensions, keratinised measurements, histological characteristics and patient-based outcomes when compared to unassisted socket healing. Q2) What is the size effect of these outcomes in three different types of intervention (guided bone regeneration, socket grafting and socket seal). An electronic search (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register LILACS, Web of Science) and hand-search was conducted up to June 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT); with unassisted socket healing as controls: were eligible in the analysis for Q1. RCTs, CCTs and large prospective case series with or without an unassisted socket healing as control group were eligible in the analysis for Q2. Nine papers (8 RCTs and 1 CCTs) were included in the analysis for Q1 and 37 papers (29 RCTs, 7 CCTs and 1 case series) for Q2. The risk for bias was unclear or high in most of the studies. Q1: the standardised mean difference (SMD) in vertical mid-buccal bone height between ARP and a non-treated site was 0.739 mm (95% CI: 0.332 to 1.147). The SMD when proximal vertical bone height and horizontal bone width was compared was 0.796mm (95% CI: -1.228 to 0.364) and 1.198 mm (95% CI: -0.0374 to 2.433). Examination of ARP sites revealed significant variation in vital and trabecular bone percentages and keratinised tissue width and thickness. Adverse events were routinely reported, with three papers reporting a high level of complications in the test and control groups and two papers reporting greater risks associated with ARP. No studies reported on variables associated with the patient experience in either the test or the control group. Q2: A pooled effect reduction (PER) in mid-buccal alveolar ridge height of -0.467 mm (95% CI: -0.866 to -0.069) was recorded for GBR procedures and -0.157 mm (95% CI

  14. Electrospun PVA/HAp nanocomposite nanofibers: biomimetics of mineralized hard tissues at a lower level of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyeong-Man; Asran, Ashraf Sh; Michler, Georg H; Simon, Paul; Kim, Jeong-Sook

    2008-12-01

    Based on the biomimetic approaches the present work describes a straightforward technique to mimic not only the architecture (the morphology) but also the chemistry (the composition) of the lowest level of the hierarchical organization of bone. This technique uses an electrospinning (ES) process with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles. To determine morphology, crystalline structures and thermal properties of the resulting electrospun fibers with the pure PVA and PVA/HAp nanocomposite (NC) before electrospinning various techniques were employed, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, FT-IR spectroscopy was carried out to analyze the complex structural changes upon undergoing electrospinning as well as interactions between HAp and PVA. The morphological and crystallographic investigations revealed that the rod-like HAp nanoparticles exhibit a nanoporous morphology and are embedded within the electrospun fibers. A large number of HAp nanorods are preferentially oriented parallel to the longitudinal direction of the electrospun PVA fibers, which closely resemble the naturally mineralized hard tissues of bones. Due to abundant OH groups present in PVA and HAp nanorods, they strongly interact via hydrogen bonding within the electrospun PVA/HAp NC fibers, which results in improved thermal properties. The unique physiochemical features of the electrospun PVA/HAp NC nanofibers prepared by the ES process will open up a wide variety of future applications related to hard tissue replacement and regeneration (bone and dentin), not limited to coating implants.

  15. Electrospun PVA/HAp nanocomposite nanofibers: biomimetics of mineralized hard tissues at a lower level of complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyeong-Man; Asran, Ashraf Sh; Michler, Georg H [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, D-06099 Halle/S (Germany); Simon, Paul [Max-Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kim, Jeong-Sook [Department of Dental Technology, Daegu Health College, 702-722 Daegu (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: gyeong.kim@physik.uni-halle.de

    2008-12-01

    Based on the biomimetic approaches the present work describes a straightforward technique to mimic not only the architecture (the morphology) but also the chemistry (the composition) of the lowest level of the hierarchical organization of bone. This technique uses an electrospinning (ES) process with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles. To determine morphology, crystalline structures and thermal properties of the resulting electrospun fibers with the pure PVA and PVA/HAp nanocomposite (NC) before electrospinning various techniques were employed, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, FT-IR spectroscopy was carried out to analyze the complex structural changes upon undergoing electrospinning as well as interactions between HAp and PVA. The morphological and crystallographic investigations revealed that the rod-like HAp nanoparticles exhibit a nanoporous morphology and are embedded within the electrospun fibers. A large number of HAp nanorods are preferentially oriented parallel to the longitudinal direction of the electrospun PVA fibers, which closely resemble the naturally mineralized hard tissues of bones. Due to abundant OH groups present in PVA and HAp nanorods, they strongly interact via hydrogen bonding within the electrospun PVA/HAp NC fibers, which results in improved thermal properties. The unique physiochemical features of the electrospun PVA/HAp NC nanofibers prepared by the ES process will open up a wide variety of future applications related to hard tissue replacement and regeneration (bone and dentin), not limited to coating implants.

  16. Tissue Engineering of Necrotic Dental Pulp of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis in Dogs: Radiographic and Histological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashiry, Eman A; Alamoudi, Najlaa M; El Ashiry, Mahmoud K; Bastawy, Hagar A; El Derwi, Douaa A; Atta, Hazem M

    2018-05-15

    To evaluate tissue engineering technology to regenerate pulp-dentin like tissues in pulp canals of immature necrotic permanent teeth with apical periodontitis in dogs. The study was performed on 36 teeth in 12 dogs. The experiment was carried out using split mouth design. In each dog 3 teeth were selected for implementing the study procedure. Apical periodontitis was induced in Group A and B teeth. Group (A): immature upper left 2 nd permanent incisors that were transplanted with a construct of autologous dental pulp stem cells with growth factors seeded in a chitosn hydrogel scaffold. Group (B): immature upper right 2 nd permanent incisor that received only growth factors with scaffold. A third tooth in each dog was selected randomly for isolation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Both groups were closed with a double coronal seal of white MTA (Mineral trioxide aggregate) and glass ionomer cement. Both groups were monitored radiographically for 4 months and histologically after sacrificing the animals. There was no statistically significant difference in radiographic findings between group (A) and group (B) for healing of radiolucencies, while there was statistically significant difference between group (A) and group (B) regarding radicular thickening, root lengthening and apical closure. Histologically, group (A) teeth showed regeneration of pulp-dentin like tissue while group (B) teeth did not show any tissue regeneration. Dental pulp stem cells and growth factors incorporated in chitosan hydrogel are able to regenerate pulp-dentine like tissue and help in complete root maturation of non-vital immature permanent teeth with apical periodontitis in dogs.

  17. Effect of laser beam on temperature distribution on artificial cylindrical shaped hard tissue bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Akhras, M.-Ali H.; Qaseer, Mohammad-Khair; Albiss, B. A.; Gezawa, Umar S.

    2018-02-01

    Samples from fresh lamb chest bones were made in cylindrical shapes to study the time variation of temperature T as functions of the cylindrical radius and depth when its front surface exposed to a laser beam of 110Mw power and 642nm wavelength. The laser beam was directed at the center of the front surface of the horizontal cylinder. The measurements were done in vacuum and at atmospheric pressure. Our data reveal the linear variation of T with time, followed by a gradual increase before it reaches a plateau value at higher time. This sort of behavior independent of the radius or the depth where the temperature was measured. Moreover, the maximum variation occurs on the front surface where the laser beam was hitting and diminishes gradually with depth deep inside the cylinder. Data at atmospheric pressure showed less changes in temperature. The temperature distribution in bone due to laser irradiation is very important for a rational use of laser therapy as well as in the surgery to minimizes the thermal tissue damage.

  18. Human bone hardness seems to depend on tissue type but not on anatomical site in the long bones of an old subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Caroline; Zwierzak, Iwona; Baleani, Massimiliano; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesised that among different human subjects, the bone tissue quality varies as a function of the bone segment morphology. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the quality, evaluated in terms of hardness of packages of lamellae, of cortical and trabecular bones, at different anatomical sites within the human skeleton. The contralateral six long bones of an old human subject were indented at different levels along the diaphysis and at both epiphyses of each bone. Hardness value, which is correlated to the degree of mineralisation, of both cortical and trabecular bone tissues was calculated for each indentation location. It was found that the cortical bone tissue was harder (+18%) than the trabecular one. In general, the bone hardness was found to be locally highly heterogeneous. In fact, considering one single slice obtained for a bone segment, the coefficient of variation of the hardness values was up to 12% for cortical bone and up to 17% for trabecular bone. However, the tissue hardness was on average quite homogeneous within and among the long bones of the studied donor, although differences up to 9% among levels and up to 7% among bone segments were found. These findings seem not to support the mentioned hypothesis, at least not for the long bones of an old subject.

  19. The effects of prostaglandin E2 in growing rats - Increased metaphyseal hard tissue and cortico-endosteal bone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Ueno, K.; Deng, Y. P.; Woodbury, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The role of in vivo prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in bone formation is investigated. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 223-267 g were injected subcutaneously with 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mg of PGE2-kg daily for 21 days. The processing of the tibiae for observation is described. Radiographs and histomorphometric analyses are also utilized to study bone formation. Body weight, weights of soft tissues and bones morphometry are evaluated. It is observed that PGE2 depressed longitudinal bone growth, increased growth cartilage thickness, decreased degenerative cartilage cell size and cartilage cell production, and significantly increased proximal tibial metaphyseal hard tissue mass. The data reveal that periosteal bone formation is slowed down at higher doses of PGE2 and endosteal bone formation is slightly depressed less than 10 days post injection; however, here is a late increase (10 days after post injection) in endosteal bone formation and in the formation of trabecular bone in the marrow cavity of the tibial shaft. It is noted that the effects of PGE2 on bone formation are similar to the responses of weaning rats to PGE2.

  20. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  1. A lateral cephalometric study of the hard- and soft tissue profile around the face in the mixed dentition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Rae; Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1978-01-01

    A study was made investigate a relationship existing in the dentoskeletal framework and the soft tissue profile around the face, and compared the sexual differences between boys and girls having the normal occlusion in the mixed dentition. The lateral cephalograms were composed of 67 boys aged 10.3 years and 68 girls aged 10.4 years, respectively. By means of the lateral cephalograms, both the hard-and soft tissue structures were simultaneously analyzed, measured and evaluated by introducing the several reference items: S-N plane, palatal plane, mandibular plane, N-A line and A-P line for the dentoskeletal structures and N'-P' line for the soft tissue, and the 21 measuring points for the both structures. The significant findings were as follows: 1. In general the boys showed the larger nasal component dimension than did the girls, but the length and height of nose(N'-Prn and NA-Prn) showed the significant sexual difference among those when evaluated statistically. 2. The lip-thickness was found to be minimal in the region of nasion, greater in the region of pogonion, and much greater in the region of point A in the both sexes, but the only thickness over point A(A-A') showed the significant sexual difference statistically. 3. The upper and lower lip position were found to be located anteriorly to the esthetic line in the both sexes, but upper lip position showed the significant sexual difference when evaluated statistically. 4. The regions of nose and upper lip had a tendency not to be following the underlying skeletal profile.

  2. Cryopreserved Dental Pulp Tissues of Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth Is a Feasible Stem Cell Resource for Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Akiyama, Kentaro; Hoshino, Yoshihiro; Song, Guangtai; Kukita, Toshio; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Shi, Songtao; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Human exfoliated deciduous teeth have been considered to be a promising source for regenerative therapy because they contain unique postnatal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) with self-renewal capacity, multipotency and immunomodulatory function. However preservation technique of deciduous teeth has not been developed. This study aimed to evaluate that cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of human exfoliated deciduous teeth is a retrievable and practical SHED source for cell-based therapy. SHED isolated from the cryopreserved deciduous pulp tissues for over 2 years (25–30 months) (SHED-Cryo) owned similar stem cell properties including clonogenicity, self-renew, stem cell marker expression, multipotency, in vivo tissue regenerative capacity and in vitro immunomodulatory function to SHED isolated from the fresh tissues (SHED-Fresh). To examine the therapeutic efficacy of SHED-Cryo on immune diseases, SHED-Cryo were intravenously transplanted into systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) model MRL/lpr mice. Systemic SHED-Cryo-transplantation improved SLE-like disorders including short lifespan, elevated autoantibody levels and nephritis-like renal dysfunction. SHED-Cryo amended increased interleukin 17-secreting helper T cells in MRL/lpr mice systemically and locally. SHED-Cryo-transplantation was also able to recover osteoporosis bone reduction in long bones of MRL/lpr mice. Furthermore, SHED-Cryo-mediated tissue engineering induced bone regeneration in critical calvarial bone-defect sites of immunocompromised mice. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-Cryo transplantation on immune and skeletal disorders was similar to that of SHED-Fresh. These data suggest that cryopreservation of dental pulp tissues of deciduous teeth provide a suitable and desirable approach for stem cell-based immune therapy and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. PMID:23251621

  3. Estudio in vitro sobre los efectos de la cocaína sobre los tejidos duros del diente In vitro study on the effects of cocaine on the hard tissues of the tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduvigis Solórzano Navarro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de los derivados de la cocaína es un problema de salud pública en continuo crecimiento. Estas drogas son frecuentemente frotadas sobre la mucosa gingival, pero sus efectos son poco conocidos y de difícil diagnóstico. Con este trabajo se pretende demostrar in vitro, que la aplicación por frotación de la cocaína sobre la superficie dentaria produce erosión del esmalte. Se seleccionaron 30 dientes sanos, distribuidos aleatoriamente en 3 grupos, a los cuales se frotó sobre la superficie vestibular clorhidrato de cocaína, basuco y limón (grupo control respectivamente, durante 40 semanas. Las lesiones más características observadas fueron fractura y pérdida de sustancia dura, demostrando así que la aplicación tópica y continua de drogas en cavidad bucal produce lesiones en los tejidos duros del diente.The use of cocaine derivatives is an increasingly growing public health problem. These drugs are frequently rubbed on the gingival mucosa, but their efffects are little known and difficult to be diagnosed. This paper pretends to prove in vitro that the rubbing of cocaine on the dental surface produces enamel erosion. 30 healthy teeth were selected and distributed at random into 3 groups that were rubbed cocaine hydrochloride, bazuko and lemon (control group on the vestibular surface, respectively, during 40 weeks. The most observed characteristic lesions were fracture and loss of the dental hard substance, which showed that the topical and continual application of drugs on the oral cavity causes lesions in the hard tissues of the tooth.

  4. The effect of subcrestal placement of the polished surface of ITI implants on marginal soft and hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerle, C H; Brägger, U; Bürgin, W; Lang, N P

    1996-06-01

    In order to achieve esthetically more satisfying results, it has been proposed to place ITI implants with their border between the rough and smooth surfaces below the level of the alveolar crest, thereby obtaining a submucosally located implant shoulder following healing. The aim of the present experimental study was to clinically and radiographically evaluate the tissue response to the placement of one-stage transmucosal implants with the border between the rough and the smooth surfaces sunk by 1 mm into a subcrestal location. 11 patients underwent comprehensive dental care including the placement of 2 implants of the ITI Dental Implant System in the same quadrant (test and control). Randomly assigned control implants were placed according to the manufacturer's instructions, i.e. the border between the rough titanium plasma-sprayed and the smooth polished surfaces precisely at the alveolar crest. At the test implant the apical border of the polished surface was placed approximately 1 mm below the alveolar crest. Probing bone levels were assessed at implant placement (baseline), 4 and 12 months later. Modified plaque and modified gingival indices were recorded at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 12 months. Clinical probing depth and "attachment" levels were measured at 4 and 12 months. All parameters were assessed at 6 sites around each implant. The mean for each implant was calculated and used for analysis. The Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test and the Student t-test were applied to detect differences over time and between the test and control implants. At baseline, a mean difference in probing bone level of -0.86 mm (SD 0.43 mm, p placed more deeply. Both test and control implants lost a significant amount of clinical bone height during the first 4 months (test 1.16 mm, p placed under standard conditions, the bone adjacent to the polished surface of more deeply placed ITI implants is also lost over time. From a biological point of view, the placement of the border between

  5. Immediate postoperative outcome of orthognathic surgical planning, and prediction of positional changes in hard and soft tissue, independently of the extent and direction of the surgical corrections required

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Ole; Bjørn-Jørgensen, Jens; Hermund, Niels Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    orthognathic correction using the computerised, cephalometric, orthognathic, surgical planning system (TIOPS). Preoperative cephalograms were analysed and treatment plans and prediction tracings produced by computerised interactive simulation. The planned changes were transferred to models and finally...... with the presently included soft tissue algorithms, the current study shows relatively high mean predictability of the immediately postoperative hard and soft tissue outcome, independent of the extent and direction of required orthognathic correction. Because of the relatively high individual variability, caution...

  6. Influence of different types of light on the response of the pulp tissue in dental bleaching: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Francine; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; de Oliveira Gallinari, Marjorie; Terayama, Amanda Miyuki; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; de Castilho Jacinto, Rogério; Sivieri-Araújo, Gustavo; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo

    2018-05-01

    This systematic review (PROSPERO register: CRD42016053140) investigated the influence of different types of light on the pulp tissue during dental bleaching. Two independent authors conducted a systematic search and risk of bias evaluations. An electronic search was undertaken (PubMed/Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other databases) until May 2017. The population, intervention, comparison, outcomes (PICO) question was: "Does the light in dental bleaching change the response of the pulp to the bleaching procedure?" The intervention involved pulp tissue/cells after bleaching with light, while the comparison involved pulp tissue/cells after bleaching without light. The primary outcome was the inflammation/cytotoxicity observed in pulp after bleaching. Out of 2210 articles found, 12 articles were included in the review; four were in vivo studies (one study in dogs/others in human), and eight were in vitro studies (cell culture/with artificial pulp chamber or not). The light source used was halogen, light-emitting diode (LED), and laser. Only one in vivo study that used heat to simulate light effects showed significant pulp inflammation. Only two in vitro studies demonstrated that light influenced cell metabolism; one using halogen light indicated negative effects, and the other using laser therapy indicated positive effects. Given that animal and in vitro studies have been identified, there remain some limitations for extrapolation to the human situation. Furthermore, different light parameters were used. The effects of dental bleaching on the pulp are not influenced by different types of light, but different light parameters can influence these properties. There is insufficient evidence about the influence of different types of light on inflammation/cytotoxicity of the pulp.

  7. [Comparative study of expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 mRNA during the hard tissue formation of mouse tooth development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J; Gao, Y

    2001-07-01

    To observe and compare the expression pattern of Msx-1, Msx-2 mRNA during the different stages of hard tissue formation in the first mandibular molar of mouse and investigate the relationship between the two genes. First mandibular molar germs from 1, 3, 7 and 14-days old mouse were separated and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed on the total RNA of them using Msx-1, Msx-2 specific primers separately. Expression of both genes were detected during the different stages of hard tissue formation in the mouse first mandibular molars, but there was some interesting differences in the quantitiy between the two genes. Msx-1 transcripts appeared at the 1 day postnatally, and increase through 3 day, 7 day, then maximally expressed at 14 days postnatally; while Msx-2 mRNA was seen and expressed maximally at the 3 days postnatally, then there was a gradual reduction at 7 days, and 14 days postnatally. The homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 may play a role in the events of the hard tissue formation. The complementary expression pattern of them during the specific stage of hard tissue formation indicates that there may be some functional redundancy between them during the biomineralization.

  8. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α: A Potential Factor for the Enhancement of Osseointegration between Dental Implants and Tissue-Engineered Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duohong Zou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tissue-engineered bones are widely utilized to protect healthy tissue, reduce pain, and increase the success rate of dental implants. one of the most challenging obstacles lies in obtaining effective os-seointegration between dental implants and tissue-engineered structures. Deficiencies in vascularization, osteogenic factors, oxygen, and other nutrients inside the tissue-engineered bone during the early stages following implantation all inhibit effective osseointe-gration. Oxygen is required for aerobic metabolism in bone and blood vessel tissues, but oxygen levels inside tissue-engineered bone are not suf-ficient for cell proliferation. HIF-1α is a pivotal regulator of hypoxic and ischemic vascular responses, driving transcriptional activation of hundreds of genes involved in vascular reactivity, angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and osteogenesis.The hypothesis: Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α seems a potential factor for the enhancement of osseointegration between dental implants and tissue-engineered bone.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Enhancement of HIF-1α protein expression is recognized as the most promising approach for angiogenesis, because it can induce multiple angiogenic targets in a coordinated manner. Therefore, it will be a novel potential therapeutic methods targeting HIF-1α expression to enhance osseointegration be-tween dental implants and tissue-engineered bone.

  9. Investigations of some elements distribution in dental tissues by INAA as a function of ecological and some other parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draskovic, R.J.; Jacimovic, Lj.; Stojicevic, M.; Pajic, P.; Filipovic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Distribution of some elements (Hg, Zn, Sb, Co and Sc) in dental tissues (enamel, dentine, pulp) has been investiaated by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Teeth samples were taken from patients living in different regions (mine and mineralized areas, plain), taking into account the following parameters: ecological conditions, age of patients, stomatological operations and use of local cosmetic preparations containig mercury. Samples of vegetation (beech, moss, pine) from two locations belonging to regions of mineralized areas also were analyzed. Results of our investigations are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. [Ru(bipy)3]2+ nanoparticle-incorporate dental light cure resin to promote photobiomodulation therapy for enhanced vital pulp tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Rodrigo C.; Young, Nicholas; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2018-02-01

    The use of nanoparticle on dental light cure resin is not new, currently several compounds (nanoadditives) are used to promote better communication between the restorative material and biological tissues. The interest for this application is growing up to enhance mechanical proprieties to dental tissue cells regeneration. Bioactive nanoparticles and complex compounds with multiple functions are the major target for optimizing the restorative materials. In this work, we incorporate [Ru(bipy)3]2+ nanoparticles, that absorbs energy at 450 nm (blue-light) and emits strongly at 620 nm (red-light), in PLGA Microspheres and insert it in Dental Light Cure Resin to promote the Photobiomodulation Therapy (PBM) effects to accelerate dental pulp repair by in vitro using cytotoxicity and proliferation assay.

  11. Design and implementation of therapeutic ultrasound generating circuit for dental tissue formation and tooth-root healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon Tiong Ang; Scurtescu, C; Wing Hoy; El-Bialy, T; Ying Yin Tsui; Jie Chen

    2010-02-01

    Biological tissue healing has recently attracted a great deal of research interest in various medical fields. Trauma to teeth, deep and root caries, and orthodontic treatment can all lead to various degrees of root resorption. In our previous study, we showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances the growth of lower incisor apices and accelerates their rate of eruption in rabbits by inducing dental tissue growth. We also performed clinical studies and demonstrated that LIPUS facilitates the healing of orthodontically induced teeth-root resorption in humans. However, the available LIPUS devices are too large to be used comfortably inside the mouth. In this paper, the design and implementation of a low-power LIPUS generator is presented. The generator is the core of the final intraoral device for preventing tooth root loss and enhancing tooth root tissue healing. The generator consists of a power-supply subsystem, an ultrasonic transducer, an impedance-matching circuit, and an integrated circuit composed of a digital controller circuitry and the associated driver circuit. Most of our efforts focus on the design of the impedance-matching circuit and the integrated system-on-chip circuit. The chip was designed and fabricated using 0.8- ¿m high-voltage technology from Dalsa Semiconductor, Inc. The power supply subsystem and its impedance-matching network are implemented using discrete components. The LIPUS generator was tested and verified to function as designed and is capable of producing ultrasound power up to 100 mW in the vicinity of the transducer's resonance frequency at 1.5 MHz. The power efficiency of the circuitry, excluding the power supply subsystem, is estimated at 70%. The final products will be tailored to the exact size of teeth or biological tissue, which is needed to be used for stimulating dental tissue (dentine and cementum) healing.

  12. The use of a DNA stabilizer in human dental tissues stored under different temperature conditions and time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    TERADA, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; da SILVA, Luiz Antonio Ferreira; GALO, Rodrigo; de AZEVEDO, Aline; GERLACH, Raquel Fernanda; da SILVA, Ricardo Henrique Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the use of a reagent to stabilize the DNA extracted from human dental tissues stored under different temperature conditions and time intervals. Material and Methods A total of 161 teeth were divided into two distinct groups: intact teeth and isolated dental pulp tissue. The samples were stored with or without the product at different time intervals and temperature. After storage, DNA extraction and genomic DNA quantification were performed using real-time PCR; the fragments of the 32 samples that represented each possible condition were analyzed to find the four pre-selected markers in STR analysis. Results The results of the quantification showed values ranging from 0.01 to 10,246.88 ng/μL of DNA. The statistical difference in the quantity of DNA was observed when the factors related to the time and temperature of storage were analyzed. In relation to the use of the specific reagent, its use was relevant in the group of intact teeth when they were at room temperature for 30 and 180 days. The analysis of the fragments in the 32 selected samples was possible irrespective of the amount of DNA, confirming that the STR analysis using an automated method yields good results. Conclusions The use of a specific reagent showed a significant difference in stabilizing DNA in samples of intact human teeth stored at room temperature for 30 and 180 days, while the results showed no justification for using the product under the other conditions tested. PMID:25141206

  13. Three-dimensional hard and soft tissue imaging of the human cochlea by scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Tinne

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the application of scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT for visualization of anatomical structures inside the human cochlea ex vivo. SLOT is a laser-based highly efficient microscopy technique which allows for tomographic imaging of the internal structure of transparent specimens. Thus, in the field of otology this technique is best convenient for an ex vivo study of the inner ear anatomy. For this purpose, the preparation before imaging comprises decalcification, dehydration as well as optical clearing of the cochlea samples in toto. Here, we demonstrate results of SLOT imaging visualizing hard and soft tissue structures with an optical resolution of down to 15 μm using extinction and autofluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, the internal structure can be analyzed nondestructively and quantitatively in detail by sectioning of the three-dimensional datasets. The method of X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (μCT has been previously applied to explanted cochlea and is solely based on absorption contrast. An advantage of SLOT is that it uses visible light for image formation and thus provides a variety of contrast mechanisms known from other light microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence or scattering. We show that SLOT data is consistent with μCT anatomical data and provides additional information by using fluorescence. We demonstrate that SLOT is applicable for cochlea with metallic cochlear implants (CI that would lead to significant artifacts in μCT imaging. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the capability of SLOT for resolution visualization of cleared human cochleae ex vivo using multiple contrast mechanisms and lays the foundation for a broad variety of additional studies.

  14. Whole-field macro- and micro-deformation characteristic of unbound water-loss in dentin hard tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenning; Nadeau, Bobby; Yu, Kevin; Shao, Xinxing; He, Xiaoyuan; Goh, M Cynthia; Kishen, Anil

    2018-04-06

    High-resolution deformation measurements in a functionally graded hard tissue such as human dentin are essential to understand the unbound water-loss mediated changes and their role in its mechanical integrity. Yet a whole-field, 3-dimensional (3D) measurement and characterization of fully hydrated dentin in both macro- and micro-scales remain to be a challenge. This study was conducted in 2 stages. In stage-1, a stereo-digital image correlation approach was utilized to determine the water-loss and load-induced 3D deformations of teeth in a sagittal section over consecutively acquired frames, from a fully hydrated state to nonhydrated conditions for a period up to 2 hours. The macroscale analysis revealed concentrated residual deformations at the dentin-enamel-junction and the apical regions of root in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules. Significant difference in the localized deformation characteristics was observed between the inner and outer aspects of the root dentin. During quasi-static loadings, further increase in the residual deformation was observed in the dentin. In stage-2, dentin microstructural variations induced by dynamic water-loss were assessed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing that the dynamic water-loss induced distention of dentinal tubules with concave tubular edges, and concurrent contraction of intertubular dentin with convex profile. The findings from the current macro- and micro-scale analysis provided insight on the free-water-loss induced regional deformations and ultrastructural changes in human dentin. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Work Hard / Play Hard

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, J.; Johnson, V.; Henckel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Work Hard / Play Hard was a participatory performance/workshop or CPD experience hosted by interdisciplinary arts atelier WeAreCodeX, in association with AntiUniversity.org. As a socially/economically engaged arts practice, Work Hard / Play Hard challenged employees/players to get playful, or go to work. 'The game changes you, you never change the game'. Employee PLAYER A 'The faster the better.' Employer PLAYER B

  16. A First Step in De Novo Synthesis of a Living Pulp Tissue Replacement Using Dental Pulp MSCs and Tissue Growth Factors, Encapsulated within a Bioinspired Alginate Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoj, Manasi; Zhang, Chengfei; Green, David W

    2015-07-01

    A living, self-supporting pulp tissue replacement in vitro and for transplantation is an attractive yet unmet bioengineering challenge. Our aim is to create 3-dimensional alginate-based microenvironments that replicate the shape of gutta-percha and comprise key elements for the proliferation of progenitor cells and the release of growth factors. An RGD-bearing alginate framework was used to encapsulate dental pulp stem cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a ratio of 1:1. The alginate hydrogel also retained and delivered 2 key growth factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-121 and fibroblast growth factor, in a sufficient amount to induce proliferation. A method was then devised to replicate the shape of gutta-percha using RGD alginate within a custom-made mold of thermoresponsive N-isopropylacrylamide. Plugs of alginate containing different permutations of growth factor-based encapsulates were tested and evaluated for viability, proliferation, and release kinetics between 1 and 14 days. According to scanning electron microscopic and confocal microscopic observations, the encapsulated human endothelial cells and dental pulp stem cell distribution were frequent and extensive throughout the length of the construct. There were also high levels of viability in all test environments. Furthermore, cell proliferation was higher in the growth factor-based groups. Growth factor release kinetics also showed significant differences between them. Interestingly, the combination of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor synergize to significantly up-regulate cell proliferation. RGD-alginate scaffolds can be fabricated into shapes to fill the pulp space by simple templating. The addition of dual growth factors to cocultures of stem cells within RGD-alginate scaffolds led to the creation of microenvironments that significantly enhance the proliferation of dental pulp stem cell/human umbilical vein endothelial cell combinations. Copyright

  17. Tooth Tissue Engineering: The Importance of Blood Products as a Supplement in Tissue Culture Medium for Human Pulp Dental Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciolaro, Ricardo Luiz; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Novo, Neil Ferreira; Juliano, Yara; Pallos, Debora; Yelick, Pamela Crotty; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    One of the goals in using cells for tissue engineering (TE) and cell therapy consists of optimizing the medium for cell culture. The present study compares three different blood product supplements for improved cell proliferation and protection against DNA damage in cultured human dental pulp stem cells for tooth TE applications. Human cells from dental pulp were first characterized as adult stem cells (ectomesenchymal mixed origin) by flow cytometry. Next, four different cell culture conditions were tested: I, supplement-free; II, supplemented with fetal bovine serum; III, allogeneic human serum; and IV, autologous human serum. Cultured cells were then characterized for cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and colony-forming units (CFU) capability. After 28 days in culture, the comet assay was performed to assess possible damage in cellular DNA. Our results revealed that Protocol IV achieved higher cell proliferation than Protocol I (p = 0.0112). Protocols II and III resulted in higher cell proliferation than Protocol I, but no statistical differences were found relative to Protocol IV. The comet assay revealed less cell damage in cells cultured using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. The damage percentage observed on Protocol II was significantly higher than all other protocols. CFUs capability was highest using Protocol IV (p = 0.0018) and III, respectively, and the highest degree of mineralization was observed using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. Protocol IV resulted in significantly improved cell proliferation, and no cell damage was observed. These results demonstrate that human blood product supplements can be used as feasible supplements for culturing adult human dental stem cells.

  18. In vitro assessment of the composition and microhardness of hard tissues of oral cavity submitted to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Wilber Edison Bernaola

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Radiotherapy is extremely important for the treatment of malignant lesions of the head and neck region, however, exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to systemic or local complications during and after radiation treatment. Among these immediate local complications are the oral cavity xerostomia and the consequent oral mucositis. Regarding late complications produced by radiation, tooth decay of radiation and osteoradionecrosis are included, which are considered dose-dependent lesions, with high incidence in recent decades and difficult to manage, although these appear after completion of treatment and under the influence of local factors. The methodology proposed in this study consists in evaluating the effect of gamma radiation after irradiation of the samples, using the dose used in patients suffering with head and neck cancer. The samples were obtained from human enamel and root dentin; and swine mandibular bone, which were previously polished, and then submitted to the analysis of the initial surface microhardness of all groups. Subsequently, the samples were irradiated in a dose rate of 4 Gy per day, completing a total dose of 72 Gy. Finally, the samples were submitted to surface microhardness analysis after irradiation, which presented statistically significant results from the Student t, ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests referred to the difference of the mean of the initial and final values of each study group with a significant value of p = 0.00 (<0.05). Regarding the morphological analysis in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the deleterious effect of gamma irradiation was evidenced as structural cracks, breaks and superficial fractures of the analyzed tissues and the biochemical analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection technique using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR - FTIR) showed degradation of inorganic components and denaturation of organic compounds; whereby, the effect of gamma irradiation on the hard tissues of the oral

  19. Interdisciplinary approach to enhance the esthetics of maxillary anterior region using soft- and hard-tissue ridge augmentation in conjunction with a fixed partial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Shaleen; Chouksey, Ajay; Bele, Anand; Vishnoi, Rahul

    2018-01-01

    Favorable esthetics is one of the most important treatment outcomes in dentistry, and to achieve this, interdisciplinary approaches are often required. Ridge deficiencies can be corrected for both, soft- and hard-tissue discrepancies. To overcome such defects, not only a variety of prosthetic options are at our disposal but also several periodontal plastic surgical techniques are available as well. Various techniques have been described and revised, over the year to correct ridge defects. For enhancing soft-tissue contours in the anterior region, the subepithelial connective tissue graft is the treatment of choice. A combination of alloplastic bone graft in adjunct to connective tissue graft optimizes ridge augmentation and minimizes defects. The present case report describes the use of vascular interpositional connective tissue graft in combination with alloplastic bone graft for correction of Seibert's Class III ridge deficiency followed by a fixed partial prosthesis to achieve a better esthetic outcome.

  20. Interdisciplinary approach to enhance the esthetics of maxillary anterior region using soft- and hard-tissue ridge augmentation in conjunction with a fixed partial prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaleen Khetarpal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Favorable esthetics is one of the most important treatment outcomes in dentistry, and to achieve this, interdisciplinary approaches are often required. Ridge deficiencies can be corrected for both, soft- and hard-tissue discrepancies. To overcome such defects, not only a variety of prosthetic options are at our disposal but also several periodontal plastic surgical techniques are available as well. Various techniques have been described and revised, over the year to correct ridge defects. For enhancing soft-tissue contours in the anterior region, the subepithelial connective tissue graft is the treatment of choice. A combination of alloplastic bone graft in adjunct to connective tissue graft optimizes ridge augmentation and minimizes defects. The present case report describes the use of vascular interpositional connective tissue graft in combination with alloplastic bone graft for correction of Seibert's Class III ridge deficiency followed by a fixed partial prosthesis to achieve a better esthetic outcome.

  1. A finite element evaluation of mechanical function for 3 distal extension partial dental prosthesis designs with a 3-dimensional nonlinear method for modeling soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshinori; Kanbara, Ryo; Ochiai, Kent T; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical evaluation of the function of partial removable dental prostheses with 3-dimensional finite element modeling requires the accurate assessment and incorporation of soft tissue behavior. The differential behaviors of the residual ridge mucosa and periodontal ligament tissues have been shown to exhibit nonlinear displacement. The mathematic incorporation of known values simulating nonlinear soft tissue behavior has not been investigated previously via 3-dimensional finite element modeling evaluation to demonstrate the effect of prosthesis design on the supporting tissues. The purpose of this comparative study was to evaluate the functional differences of 3 different partial removable dental prosthesis designs with 3-dimensional finite element analysis modeling and a simulated patient model incorporating known viscoelastic, nonlinear soft tissue properties. Three different designs of distal extension removable partial dental prostheses were analyzed. The stress distributions to the supporting abutments and soft tissue displacements of the designs tested were calculated and mechanically compared. Among the 3 dental designs evaluated, the RPI prosthesis demonstrated the lowest stress concentrations on the tissue supporting the tooth abutment and also provided wide mucosa-borne areas of support, thereby demonstrating a mechanical advantage and efficacy over the other designs evaluated. The data and results obtained from this study confirmed that the functional behavior of partial dental prostheses with supporting abutments and soft tissues are consistent with the conventional theories of design and clinical experience. The validity and usefulness of this testing method for future applications and testing protocols are shown. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetenkov D.Ye.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  3. [Changes of dentin, dental pulp and periodontium tissue in tail-suspended rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lin-tian; Wen, Ling-ying; Luo, Ya-ning; Hu, Pei-zhen; Jiang, Wei-zhong; Wu, Xing-yu

    2003-08-01

    To investigate the metabolic changes of calcium and phosphorus in dentin, dental pulp and periodontium in tail-suspended rats, and the functions of TGF-beta 1, c-fos, collagen-I and collagen IV in dentin, dental pulp and periodontium. Relative percentage contents of Ca, P in dentin, dental pulp and periodontium were measured with scanning electron microscope and energy spectrum analytical system in 3 groups of rats. The expression of TGF-beta 1, c-fos, collagen-I and collagen IV were also observed. In the suspension group, the relative percentage content of Ca declined significantly, while P increased slightly. There were no significant differences of Ca, P in alveolar bone. The expressions of TGF-beta 1, c-fos and collagen-I declined, but the expression of collagen-IV in pulp vessel increased. There were no significant changes of expressions of TGF-beta 1, c-fos, collagen-I and collagen-IV in the vicinity of PDL. After adopting artificial countermeasures, the above expressions restored partly. Weightlessness might cause abnormal mineralization in dentin, and 1.5 G artificial countermeasures could eliminate the above changes of mineral metabolism. The poor mineralization of dentin might be associated with the reduced secretion of TGF-beta 1, c-fos and collagen-I in tail-suspended rats.

  4. Chemical and physical analysis on hard tissues after irradiation with short pulse Nd:YAG laser; Alteracoes quimicas e fisicas de tecidos duros irradiados por laser de neodimio chaveado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Andrea Antunes

    2003-07-01

    This work reports on a study that was designed to investigate chemical, physical and morphological alterations in the dental enamel surface. The influence of application of laser in enamel surface by microscopic technical, X-ray fluorescence for chemical analysis, physical property as well as hardness and thermal analysis with Nd:YAG laser is also pointed out. A prototype of Nd:YAG (Q-switched) laser developed at the Center of Lasers and Applications - Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, aiming applications in the Medical Sciences that typical wavelength of 1.064 nm was used. The modifications in human dental enamel chemical composition for major and trace elements are here outlined. The accuracy of procedures was performed by analysis of natural hydroxyapatite as standard reference material. The identification and quantification of the chemical elements presented in the dental tissue samples were performed trough EDS, XRF and INAA. We determined the rate Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) for different techniques. We performed an analysis in different regions of the surface and for different areas allowing a description of the chemical change in the total area of the specimen and the assessment of the compositional homogeneity of the each specimen. A comparison between XRF and INAA is presented. Based on morphological analysis of the irradiated surfaces with short pulse Nd:YAG laser we determined the area surrounded by the irradiation for the parameters for this thesis, and this technique allowed us to visualize the regions of fusion and re-solidification. The energy densities ranged from 10 J/cm{sup 2} to 40 J/cm{sup 2}, with pulse width of 6, 10 e 200 ns, and repetition rates of 5 and 7 Hz. In this thesis, FTIR-spectroscopy is used to analyze powder of mineralized tissue as well as enamel, dentine, root and cementum for human and bovine teeth after irradiation with short-pulse Nd:YAG laser. Characteristic spectra were obtained for the proteins components and

  5. Hard and Soft Tissue Changes Following Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis and Mandibular Setback with Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawane, Shilpa S; Andrade, Neelam N

    2016-12-01

    (1) To highlight the role of intraoral submerged device in distraction osteogenesis (DO) of patients requiring two jaw surgeries for the correction of severe developmental maxillary hypoplasia (MH) and mandibular prognathism (MP) (2) To analyse the hard and soft tissue changes following maxillary DO and mandibular setback with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) in patients with severe MH and MP requiring two jaw surgeries. During the period Jan 2004 to Dec 2006, five patients with severe developmental MH along with MP were treated. In 1st stage maxillary distraction was done. Distraction started on 6th postoperative day, 1 mm distraction was carried out for 10-15 days on either side. Serial radiographs were taken immediate postoperative period for baseline comparison, post-distraction and at the end of distraction. After a period of 3-4 months of distraction 2nd stage was done. In 2nd stage, mandibular setback was done with BSSO and distractors were removed under general anesthesia. Radiographs were taken immediately and at 4 months post-operatively. Cephalometric tracings were carried out preoperatively, post DO and finally after mandibular setback with BSSO. The mean horizontal movement of maxilla was 11.4 mm at ANS and 9.6 mm at A point. Upper incisor edge was advanced by 8.8 mms. SNA increased by 8.4° and SNB decreased by 4.6°. Nasal projection advanced by 4°. Nasolabial angle normalized in all patients, mean change achieved was 10.8°. Upper lip moved forward by 5.4 mm. Lower lip moved backward by 5.4 mm. Mandible positioned backward by 4 mm at B point. No vertical change occurred in the position of A, ANS and upper incisor edges. Mean increase in skeletal angle of convexity was 26.4°. Concave profile was significantly changed to convex in all patients. Maxillary DO and mandibular setback with BSSO was associated with improved facial balance and esthetics.

  6. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  7. Dental Fluorosis and Catalase Immunoreactivity of the Brain Tissues in Rats Exposed to High Fluoride Pre- and Postnatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Şirin; Uyar-Bozkurt, Süheyla; Haznedaroğlu, Eda; Menteş, Ali

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated dental fluorosis of the incisors and immunoreactivity in the brain tissues of rats given chronic fluoride doses pre- and postnatally. Female rats were given drinking water with 0, 30 or 100 ppm fluoride ad libitum throughout gestation and the nursing period. In addition, 63 male offspring were treated with the same water regimens as the mothers after weaning and were followed for 1, 3 or 5 months. The upper and lower incisors were collected, and all teeth were examined under a stereomicroscope and scored by two blinded examiners using a modified rodent enamel fluorosis index. Cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar brain samples were evaluated morphologically and immunohistochemically. All fluoride-treated pups were born with low body weight (p = 0.001). All animals from the fluoride groups had enamel fluorosis with defects of various degrees. The increase in the dental fluorosis scores in the fluoride treatment groups was significant (p fluoride groups was significantly higher than that in the controls after 1, 3 and 5 months (p toxicity of fluoride.

  8. Is dental erosion really a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, N; Jaeggi, T; Lussi, A

    2012-09-01

    Dental erosion is the non-carious dental substance loss induced by direct impact of exogenous or endogenous acids. It results in a loss of dental hard tissue, which can be serious in some groups, such as those with eating disorders, in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and also in persons consuming high amounts of acidic drinks and foodstuffs. For these persons, erosion can impair their well-being, due to changes in appearance and/or loss of function of the teeth, e.g., the occurrence of hypersensitivity of teeth if the dentin is exposed. If erosion reaches an advanced stage, time- and money-consuming therapies may be necessary. The therapy, in turn, poses a challenge for the dentist, particularly if the defects are diagnosed at an advanced stage. While initial and moderate defects can mostly be treated non- or minimally invasively, severe defects often require complex therapeutic strategies, which often entail extensive loss of dental hard tissue due to preparatory measures. A major goal should therefore be to diagnose dental erosion at an early stage, to avoid functional and esthetic impairments as well as pain sensations and to ensure longevity of the dentition.

  9. Guided tissue regeneration ensures osseointegration of dental implants placed into extraction sockets. An experimental study in monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, L; Gotfredsen, K; Hjørting-Hansen, E

    1991-01-01

    on the buccal and palatal aspects of the maxillary molars in both sides of the jaw. The second molars were then extracted and self tapping titanium implants of the screw type (Astra Dental Implants) were inserted into the sockets of the largest roots. In the coronal portion of the sockets, a void was always...... present between the implant and the socket walls. In one side of the jaw, a membrane (Gore-Tex Augmentation Material) was adjusted to cover the implant. The implant in the other side of the jaw served as control and was only covered by the tissue flaps. Microscopic analysis after 3 months of healing...... technique can secure complete osseointegration of implants inserted immediately into extraction sockets....

  10. Anisotropic local physical properties of human dental enamel in comparison to properties of some common dental filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Lars; Hartmann, Christiane D; Rödiger, Matthias; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-11-01

    A major aspect in evaluating the quality of dental materials is their physical properties. Their properties should be a best fit of the ones of dental hard tissues. Manufacturers give data sheets for each material. The properties listed are characterized by a specific value. This assumes (but does not prove) that there is no direction dependence of the properties. However, dental enamel has direction-dependent properties which additionally vary with location in the tooth. The aim of this paper is to show the local direction dependence of physical properties like the elastic modulus or the thermal expansion in dental hard tissues. With this knowledge the 'perfect filling/dental material' could be characterized. Enamel sections of ∼400-500 μm thickness have been cut with a diamond saw from labial/buccal to palatal/lingual (canine, premolar and molar) and parallel to labial (incisor). Crystallite arrangements have been measured in over 400 data points on all types of teeth with x-ray scattering techniques, known from materials science. X-ray scattering measurements show impressively that dental enamel has a strong direction dependence of its physical properties which also varies with location within the tooth. Dental materials possess only little or no property direction dependence. Therefore, a mismatch was found between enamel and dental materials properties. Since dental materials should possess equal (direction depending) properties, worthwhile properties could be characterized by transferring the directional properties of enamel into a property 'wish list' which future dental materials should fulfil. Hereby the 'perfect dental material' can be characterized.

  11. Oro-Dental Health Status and Salivary Characteristics in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mashayekhi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children suffering from decreased renal function may demand unique considerations regarding special oral and dental conditions they are encountered to. It is mentioned that renal function deterioration may affect the hard or soft tissues of the mouth. Havingknowledge about the high prevalence of dental defects, calculus, gingival hyperplasia, modified salivary composition and tissue responses to the dental plaque may aid the physician and the dentist to help nurture the patient with chronic renal failure through the crisis, with an aesthetically satisfying and functioning dentition.

  12. Bio-inspired dental fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhle, Hans; Bunk, Oliver; Buser, Stefan; Krastl, Gabriel; Zitzmann, Nicola U.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weiger, Roland; Müller, Bert

    2009-08-01

    Human teeth are anisotropic composites. Dentin as the core material of the tooth consists of nanometer-sized calcium phosphate crystallites embedded in collagen fiber networks. It shows its anisotropy on the micrometer scale by its well-oriented microtubules. The detailed three-dimensional nanostructure of the hard tissues namely dentin and enamel, however, is not understood, although numerous studies on the anisotropic mechanical properties have been performed and evaluated to explain the tooth function including the enamel-dentin junction acting as effective crack barrier. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a spatial resolution in the 10 μm range allows determining the size and orientation of the constituents on the nanometer scale with reasonable precision. So far, only some dental materials, i.e. the fiber reinforced posts exhibit anisotropic properties related to the micrometer-size glass fibers. Dental fillings, composed of nanostructures oriented similar to the natural hard tissues of teeth, however, do not exist at all. The current X-ray-based investigations of extracted human teeth provide evidence for oriented micro- and nanostructures in dentin and enamel. These fundamental quantitative findings result in profound knowledge to develop biologically inspired dental fillings with superior resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks.

  13. The prevalence and intensity of the main dental diseases in children of Simferopol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushma N.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At present, despite the availability of modern effective oral hygiene means and prevention of dental diseases, which reduced their intensity, disease prevalence remains high. One method of dental caries preventing in children aged 6-7 years is a fissure sealing of molars, the most vulnerable areas of the newly erupted teeth, having a number of problems associated with a complex fissures relief. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of dental diseases and their development trends, as well as indicators of electrometric fissures of teeth in children aged 6-7 years of Simferopol. 87 children aged 6-7 years (first classes schools in Simferopol were examined. In this case, assessed the state of hard dental tissues (CFt, CFf, CFDt, CFDf, cavities, fillings, chalk spots, depigmentation, complications in the structure of lesions, the state of periodontal tissue (PMA%, bleeding, Schiller-Pisarev test, CPITN and oral hygiene (Silness-Loe, Stallard were examined. For diagnosing electrometry of hard tissues of dental fissures DentEst apparatus was used. Studies of major dental diseases and electrometric indicators of hard tissues of molars fissures in children under study testifies to a high caries incidence in temporary and permanent teeth and a tendency to increase of caries prevalence of permanent occlusion in these children, poor oral hygiene and the need to develop and implement treatment and preventive measures that not allow the development of caries process in the teeth of permanent occlusion.

  14. 针对组织工程多孔生物陶瓷的组织学技术优化探讨%Technique improvement of hard tissue slicing of bioceramic scaffold materials applied in bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林; 智伟; 桑力; 张成栋; 李金雨; 张聪; 娄延举; 夏天; 翁杰

    2013-01-01

    目的 改进硬组织切片技术以适应生物陶瓷材料在骨组织工程中的研究.方法 探索硬组织切片的厚度、漂片温度、裱片方法、烤片温度和时间的最佳组合,针对阳离子防脱载玻片的使用条件进行反复比较,通过改进操作流程中的关键技术和需避免的问题,摸索出阳离子载玻片在硬组织切片裱片中的最佳应用条件,克服了硬组织切片制作技术中标本易破碎、切片易脱落及染色时染料容易吸附的缺点.结果 通过技术探索与改进,生物陶瓷支架材料体内植入后的类骨修复体标本的硬组织切片能保持其杂化后的组织结构与比较完整的材料结构,可进行Masson三色染色、苏木精-伊红(HE)及甲苯胺蓝染色.染色后镜下观察显示支架内杂化生长的组织结构完整、细胞形态清晰、切片质量好、生物陶瓷支架脱片少.荧光显微镜可观察到类骨修复体钙沉积现象完整.结论 改善了传统硬组织切片技术处理生物陶瓷材料时易于破坏组织-材料结构的缺点.改进的硬组织切片技术适应生物陶瓷材料在骨组织工程领域研究.%Objective Purpose To improve the hard tissue slicing technology to adapt to the study of the bioceramic materials in bone tissue engineering.Methods Purpose To improve the hard tissue slicing technology to adapt to the study of the bioceramic materials in bone tissue engineering.Results The improved techniques in hard tissue slicing could keep the morphosis and structure of hybrid tissues,and easily stain with Masson,HE and toluidine blue.The stained hard tissue slicing had an intact tissue structure,clear cell form,good slicing quality,little shedding.Fluorescence microscope showed an intact calcium deposition of homologous bone restoration.Conclusion The method overcome the shortcomings of easy to destroy the tissue-material structure happened in the traditional hard tissue slicing of bioceramic materials

  15. Investigation of composition and structure of spongy and hard bone tissue using FTIR spectroscopy, XRD and SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Akhras, M.-Ali H.; Hasan Qaseer, M. K.; Albiss, B. A.; Alebrhim, M. Anwar; Gezawa, Umar S.

    2018-02-01

    Valuable structural and chemical features can be obtained for spongy and hard bone by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A better understanding of chemical and structural differences between spongy and hard bone is a very important contributor to bone quality. Our data according to IR data showed that the collagen cross-links occurred to be higher in spongy bone, and crystallinity was lower in spongy bone. Deconvolution of the infrared band near 870 cm-1 reveals evidence for A2-type carbonate substitution on hydroxyapatite of spongy bone in addition to the A and B type carbonate substitution that are also found in hard bone. IR and XRD data confirmed the results of each other since full width at half maximum of 002-apatite pattern of XRD showed that the crystallinity was lower in spongy bone. The microstructure was examined by using scanning electron microscope and the result showed that the lattice of thin threads in spongy bone and is less dense than hard bone.

  16. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  17. Skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes in Class III patients treated with fixed appliances and lower premolar extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Al-Khateeb, Susan N

    2011-05-01

    Mild Class III malocciusions can be treated by upper incisor proclination and lower incisor retroclination following extraction of the lower first premolars. To compare the skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes in Class III patients treated with fixed appliances, Class III traction and lower first premolar extractions with the changes in a group of untreated Class III patients. The Treatment group consisted of 30 Class III patients (Mean age 13.69 +/- 1.48 years) who were treated by upper and lower fixed appliances, Class III intermaxillary traction and lower first premolar extractions for 2.88 +/- 1.12 years. The Control group consisted of 20 untreated Class III patients (Mean age 13.51 +/- 0.95) matched for age and gender. The T1 to T2 changes in the treated and untreated groups were compared using a paired t-test while differences between the two groups were compared with an independent t-test. During treatment, the upper incisors were proclined about 1 degree and the lower incisors were retroclined 8 degrees. Small, but statistically significant changes in SNB, Wits and the overlying soft tissues accompanied the changes in incisor inclination. At the end of treatment a positive overbite and overjet were achieved. The increase in lower facial height in the Treatment group was comparable with the change in the Control group. A range of mild to moderate Class III malocclusions can be treated by dentoalveolar compensation.

  18. Encapsulated dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells in an injectable and biodegradable scaffold for applications in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Xu, Xingtian; Chee, Winston W L; Schricker, Scott R; Shi, Songtao

    2013-11-01

    Bone grafts are currently the major family of treatment options in modern reconstructive dentistry. As an alternative, stem cell-scaffold constructs seem to hold promise for bone tissue engineering. However, the feasibility of encapsulating dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells in scaffold biomaterials such as alginate hydrogel remains to be tested. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to: (1) develop an injectable scaffold based on oxidized alginate microbeads encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells in the microbeads both in vitro and in vivo. Microbeads with diameters of 1 ± 0.1 mm were fabricated with 2 × 10(6) stem cells/mL of alginate. Microbeads containing PDLSCs, GMSCs, and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as a positive control were implanted subcutaneously and ectopic bone formation was analyzed by micro CT and histological analysis at 8-weeks postimplantation. The encapsulated stem cells remained viable after 4 weeks of culturing in osteo-differentiating induction medium. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the stem cells. In vivo, ectopic mineralization was observed inside and around the implanted microbeads containing the immobilized stem cells. These findings demonstrate for the first time that immobilization of PDLSCs and GMSCs in alginate microbeads provides a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Comparative Analysis Between Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue and Dental Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Giuliani, Patricia; Pierdomenico, Laura; Marchisio, Marco; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Quaresima, Raimondo; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2017-06-01

    White adipose tissue is a source of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) that are actively studied for their possible therapeutic use in bone tissue repair/remodeling. To better appreciate the osteogenic potential of these cells, we compared some properties of MSCs from human subcutaneous adipose tissue [subcutaneous-adipose stromal cells (S-ASCs)] and dental pulp stem cell (DPSCs) of third-impacted molars, the latter representing a well-established MSC source. Both undifferentiated cell types showed similar fibroblast-like morphology and mesenchymal marker expression. However, undifferentiated S-ASCs displayed a faster doubling time coupled to greater proliferation and colony-forming ability than DPSCs. Also, the osteogenic differentiation of S-ASCs was greater than that of DPSCs, as evaluated by the higher levels of expression of early osteogenic markers Runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2) and alkaline phosphatase at days 3-14 and of extracellular matrix mineralization at days 14-21. Moreover, S-ASCs showed a better colonization of the titanium scaffold. In addition, we investigated whether S-ASC osteogenic commitment was enhanced by adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) stimulation, as previously shown for DPSCs. Although A1R expression was constant during DPSC differentiation, it increased in S-ASC at day 21 from osteogenesis induction. Accordingly, A1R stimulation by the agonist 2-chloro-N 6 -cyclopentyl-adenosine, added to the cultures at each medium change, stimulated proliferation only in differentiating DPSC and enhanced the osteogenic differentiation earlier in DPSCs than in S-ASCs. These effects were counteracted by cell pretreatment with a selective A1R antagonist. Thus, our findings suggest that S-ASCs could be advantageously used in regenerative orthopedics/dentistry, and locally released or exogenously added purines may play a role in bone repair/remodeling, even though this aspect should be more thoroughly evaluated.

  1. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Janeczek, Maciej; Herman, Katarzyna; Fita, Katarzyna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk-Zaj?c, Ma?gorzata; Czajczy?ska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piesiak-Pa?czyszyn, Dagmara; Kosior, Piotr; Dobrzy?ski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved fo...

  2. Digital dissection - using contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning to elucidate hard- and soft-tissue anatomy in the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-04-01

    Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft- and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular their cranial soft tissues, are essentially absent from the literature. Here, we digitally dissect, identify, and document the soft-tissue anatomy of the Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) in detail, using the new approach of contrast-enhanced computed tomography using Lugol's iodine. The architecture of different muscle systems (adductor, depressor, ocular, hyoid, neck musculature), neurovascular, and other soft-tissue structures is three-dimensionally visualised and described in unprecedented detail. The three-dimensional model is further presented as an interactive PDF to facilitate the dissemination and accessibility of anatomical data. Due to the digital nature of the data derived from the computed tomography scanning and segmentation processes, these methods hold the potential for further computational analyses beyond descriptive and illustrative proposes. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  3. WHO water quality standards Vs Synergic effect(s) of fluoride, heavy metals and hardness in drinking water on kidney tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasana, Hewa M. S.; Perera, Gamage D. R. K.; Gunawardena, Panduka De S.; Fernando, Palika S.; Bandara, Jayasundera

    2017-02-01

    Despite WHO standards, waterborne diseases among the human being are rising alarmingly. It is known that the prolong exposure to contaminated water has major impact on public health. The effect of chemical contaminations in drinking water on human being is found to be chronic rather than acute and hence can be defined “consumption of contaminated drinking water could be a silent killer”. As the WHO recommended water quality standards are only for individual element and synergic effects of trace metals and anions have not been considered, investigation of synergic effects of trace metals and anions and their effect on human being is of prime important research. By an animal trial, we investigated the synergic effect(s) of heavy metals, aluminium, arsenic, fluoride and hardness in drinking water on kidney tissues of mice. Our investigation strongly suggests existing of a synergic effect especially among Cd, F and hardness of water which could lead to severe kidney damage in mice, even at WHO maximum recommended levels. Hence, the synergic effect(s) of trace metals, fluoride and hardness present in drinking water should be investigated meticulously when stipulating the water quality at WHO maximum recommended levels.

  4. Soft and Hard Tissue Changes Following Immediate Placement or Immediate Restoration of Single-Tooth Implants in the Esthetic Zone: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Xiao, Li-Qun; Su, Mei-Ying; Mei, Yan; Shi, Bin

    This systematic review aimed to compare immediate protocols with conventional protocols of single-tooth implants in terms of changes in the surrounding hard and soft tissue in the esthetic area. Electronic and manual searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, and other data systems for research articles published between January 2001 and December 2014. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on hard and or soft tissue characteristics following a single-tooth implant were included. Based on the protocol used in each study, the included studies were categorized into three groups to assess the relationships between the factors and related esthetic indexes. Variables such as marginal bone level changes (mesial, distal, and mean bone level), peri-implant soft tissue changes (papilla level, midbuccal mucosa, and probing depth), and other esthetic indices were taken into consideration. The data were analyzed using RevMan version 5.3, Stata 12, and GRADEpro 3.6.1 software. A total of 13 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Four studies examined immediate implant placement, five studies examined immediate implant restoration, and four studies examined immediate loading. Comparing the bone level changes following immediate and conventional restoration, no significant differences were found in the bone level of the mesial site (standard mean difference [SMD] = -0.04 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.25 to 0.17 mm), the distal site (SMD = -0.15 mm; 95% CI: -0.38 to 0.09 mm), and the mean bone level changes (SMD = 0.05 mm; 95% CI: -0.18 to 0.27 mm). The difference in the marginal bone level changes between immediate and conventional loading was also not statistically significant (SMD = -0.05 mm; 95% CI: -0.15 to 0.06 mm for the mesial site and SMD = -0.02 mm; 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.05 mm for the distal site). Soft tissue changes following immediate and conventional restoration reported no significant differences in the papillae level of the mesial site (SMD = 0

  5. Effects of surface hydrophilicity and microtopography on early stages of soft and hard tissue integration at non-submerged titanium implants: an immunohistochemical study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Frank; Ferrari, Daniel; Herten, Monika; Mihatovic, Ilja; Wieland, Marco; Sager, Martin; Becker, Jürgen

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of surface hydrophilicity and microtopography on soft and hard tissue integration at non-submerged titanium implants. Implantation of conventional sand-blasted large grit and acid-etched (SLA) and chemically modified SLA (modSLA) titanium implants with differently structured transmucosal surfaces (SLA implants: machined [M-SLA] or SLA [SLA-SLA]; modSLA implants: mod acid-etched [modA] [modA-modSLA] or modSLA [modSLA-modSLA]) was performed bilaterally in the upper and lower jaws of 15 beagle dogs. The animals were sacrificed after 1, 4, 7, 14, or 28 days. Tissue reactions were assessed histomorphometrically and immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibodies to transglutaminase II (angiogenesis) and osteocalcin. Although the junctional epithelium commonly was separated from M-SLA and SLA-SLA implants by a gap, the epithelial cells appeared to be in close contact with modA-modSLA surfaces after 14 days of healing. Moreover, modA-modSLA and modSLA-modSLA groups showed a well-vascularized subepithelial connective tissue exhibiting collagen fibers that started to extend and attach partially perpendicular to the implant surface. The highest and statistically significant mean bone-to-implant contact areas were observed in the modA-modSLA and modSLA-modSLA groups at days 7, 14, and 28. Within the limits of this study, it may be concluded that soft and hard tissue integration was influenced mainly by surface hydrophilicity rather than by microtopography.

  6. Human Dental Pulp-Derived Cells Produce Bone-Like Tissue and Exhibit Bone Cell-Like Responsiveness to Mechanical Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, David Christian Evar; Melsen, Birte; Bindslev, Dorthe Arenholt

    2010-01-01

    and characterize cell lines from human 3rd molar dental pulp tissue to determine whether human dental pulp-derived cells (DPCs) are osteogenic and responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) in vitro. Methods: Human DPCs used for this study were characterized by measuring proliferation....... We also assessed bone formation by DPCs on hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate granules after subcutaneous implantation in mice. Results: We found that DPCs are intrinsically mechanosensitive and, like osteogenic cells, respond to PFF-induced fluid shear stress. Implantation of DPCs resulted...... remodeling in vivo, and therefore provide a promising new tool for regenerative dentistry, for example mineralized tissue engineering to restore bone defects in relation to periodontitis, periimplantatis and orofacial surgery. Experiments in progress have proven that DPCSs are also useful for assessing...

  7. A Miniature Swine Model for Stem Cell-Based De Novo Regeneration of Dental Pulp and Dentin-Like Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Liu, Jie; Yu, Zongdong; Chen, Chao-An; Aksel, Hacer; Azim, Adham A; Huang, George T-J

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this study was to establish mini-swine as a large animal model for stem cell-based pulp regeneration studies. Swine dental pulp stem cells (sDPSCs) were isolated from mini-swine and characterized in vitro. For in vivo studies, we first employed both ectopic and semi-orthotopic study models using severe combined immunodeficiency mice. One is hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) model for pulp-dentin complex formation, and the other is tooth fragment model for complete pulp regeneration with new dentin depositing along the canal walls. We found that sDPSCs are similar to their human counterparts exhibiting mesenchymal stem cell characteristics with ability to form colony forming unit-fibroblastic and odontogenic differentiation potential. sDPSCs formed pulp-dentin complex in the HA/TCP model and showed pulp regeneration capacity in the tooth fragment model. We then tested orthotopic pulp regeneration on mini-swine including the use of multi-rooted teeth. Using autologous sDPSCs carried by hydrogel and transplanted into the mini-swine root canal space, we observed regeneration of vascularized pulp-like tissue with a layer of newly deposited dentin-like (rD) tissue or osteodentin along the canal walls. In some cases, dentin bridge-like structure was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis detected the expression of nestin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, and bone sialoprotein in odontoblast-like cells lining against the produced rD. We also tested the use of allogeneic sDPSCs for the same procedures. Similar findings were observed in allogeneic transplantation. This study is the first to show an establishment of mini-swine as a suitable large animal model utilizing multi-rooted teeth for further cell-based pulp regeneration studies.

  8. Radiation-induced dental caries, prevention and treatment - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishtha; Pal, Manoj; Rawat, Sheh; Grewal, Mandeep S; Garg, Himani; Chauhan, Deepika; Ahlawat, Parveen; Tandon, Sarthak; Khurana, Ruparna; Pahuja, Anjali K; Mayank, Mayur; Devnani, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancers (HNCs) involves radiotherapy. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNCs are prone to dental complications. Radiotherapy to the head and neck region causes xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction which dramatically increases the risk of dental caries and its sequelae. Radiation therapy (RT) also affects the dental hard tissues increasing their susceptibility to demineralization following RT. Postradiation caries is a rapidly progressing and highly destructive type of dental caries. Radiation-related caries and other dental hard tissue changes can appear within the first 3 months following RT. Hence, every effort should be focused on prevention to manage patients with severe caries. This can be accomplished through good preoperative dental treatment, frequent dental evaluation and treatment after RT (with the exception of extractions), and consistent home care that includes self-applied fluoride. Restorative management of radiation caries can be challenging. The restorative dentist must consider the altered dental substrate and a hostile oral environment when selecting restorative materials. Radiation-induced changes in enamel and dentine may compromise bonding of adhesive materials. Consequently, glass ionomer cements have proved to be a better alternative to composite resins in irradiated patients. Counseling of patients before and after radiotherapy can be done to make them aware of the complications of radiotherapy and thus can help in preventing them.

  9. Development of a novel anisotropic self-inflating tissue expander: in vivo submucoperiosteal performance in the porcine hard palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Marc C; Bucknall, David G; Czernuszka, Jan T; Pigott, David W; Goodacre, Timothy E E

    2012-01-01

    The advent of self-inflating hydrogel tissue expanders heralded a significant advance in the reconstructive potential of this technique. Their use, however, is limited by their uncontrolled isotropic (i.e., uniform in all directions) expansion. Anisotropy (i.e., directional dependence) was achieved by annealing a hydrogel copolymer of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-vinyl pyrrolidone) under a compressive load for a specified time period. The expansion ratio is dictated by the percentage of vinyl pyrrolidone content and the degree of compression. The expansion rate is modified by incorporating the polymer within a silicone membrane. The in vivo efficacy of differing prototype devices was investigated in juvenile pigs under United Kingdom Home Office Licence. The devices were implanted within a submucoperiosteal pocket in a total of six porcine palates; all were euthanized by 6 weeks after implantation. A longitudinal volumetric assessment of the expanded tissue was conducted, in addition to postmortem analysis of the bony and mucoperiosteal palatal elements. Uncoated devices caused excessive soft-tissue expansion that resulted in mucoperiosteal ulceration, thus necessitating animal euthanasia. The silicone-coated devices produced controlled soft-tissue expansion over the 6-week study period. There was a statistically significant increase in the volume of expanded soft tissue with no evidence of a significant acute inflammatory response to the implant, although peri-implant capsule formation was observed. Attenuation of the bony palatal shelf was noted. A unique anisotropic hydrogel device capable of controlled expansion has been developed that addresses a number of the shortcomings of the technology hitherto available.

  10. The induction of dentin bridge-like structures by constructs of subcultured dental pulp-derived cells and porous HA/TCP in porcine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yusuke; Honda, Masaki J; Ohshima, Hayato; Tonomura, Akiko; Ohara, Takayuki; Itaya, Toshimitsu; Kagami, Hideaki; Ueda, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate dentin-bridge formation in teeth following the transplantation of dental pulp-derived cells seeded on hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) scaffolds. The dental pulp tissues were removed from the extracted first molar teeth of miniature pigs and single cell populations were subcultured. Second-passage cells that had alkaline phosphatase activity were combined with scaffolds. Cell-scaffold constructs were placed in contact with the exposed pulp tissue. The dimensions of the exposed pulp site were approximately 1-2.5 mm in diameter and 2-3 mm in depth from the tooth surface. After placing the constructs, the tooth was restored with composite resin. Six weeks after transplantation, hard tissue formation was observed on the pulp tissue in histology. Dentinal tubule-like structures were observed in most of the hard tissue generated, and columnar cells, which showed positive immunoreactions with dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and heat shock protein (HSP)-25, were aligned beneath the hard tissues. When only scaffolds were placed on the pulp tissues, particles of hard tissue were formed, however dentinal tubule-like structures and odontoblasts were not observed despite the formation of hard tissue. In conclusion, the implantation of dental pulp constructs into pulp exposed stimulates the formation of calcified dentin-like structures.

  11. Assessment of the amount of tooth wear on dental casts and intra-oral photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Wetselaar-Glas, M.J.M.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial condition, leading to the loss of dental hard tissues. Many grading scales are available to assess the amount of tooth wear, one of which is the tooth wear evaluation system (TWES). A grading scale can be used chairside, on casts and on photographs. The aim was to test

  12. Fiscal 1998 regional consortium R and D project (Regional consortium field). Report on R and D of production technology of hybrid-type biocompatible hard tissue replacing materials (1st fiscal year); 1998 nendo chiiki konsoshiamu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki konsoshiamu bun'ya (hybrid gata seitai yugo kinosei kososhiki daitai sozai seizo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This project aims at development of high-strength high- biocompatible {beta}-type Ti alloy with lower modulli of elasticity composed of non-toxic elements, phosphate calcium ceramics for improving the biocompatibility and coating technology, and establishment of production technology of hybrid-type biocompatible hard tissue replacing materials. In fiscal 1998, the project promoted the following: Design of high-biocompatible {beta}-type Ti alloy materials, development of thermomechanical treatment for improving dynamic characteristics of such alloy, survey on practical melting and casting technologies and dental precision casting process, evaluation of the biocompatibility of the alloy by cytotoxicity, selection of tools for precision machining and surface finishing, control of contents, orientation and precipitation of biocompatible crystals such as {beta}- Ca(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} fibers for further improvement of the biocompatibility. This paper also outlines the survey results on the market needs, market size and market share for the feasibility of these materials. (NEDO)

  13. Computational cell quantification in the human brain tissues based on hard x-ray phase-contrast tomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieber, Simone E.; Bikis, Christos; Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Thalmann, Peter; Chicherova, Natalia; Rack, Alexander; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Zanette, Irene; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Cell visualization and counting plays a crucial role in biological and medical research including the study of neurodegenerative diseases. The neuronal cell loss is typically determined to measure the extent of the disease. Its characterization is challenging because the cell density and size already differs by more than three orders of magnitude in a healthy cerebellum. Cell visualization is commonly performed by histology and fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are limited to resolve complex microstructures in the third dimension. Phase- contrast tomography has been proven to provide sufficient contrast in the three-dimensional imaging of soft tissue down to the cell level and, therefore, offers the basis for the three-dimensional segmentation. Within this context, a human cerebellum sample was embedded in paraffin and measured in local phase-contrast mode at the beamline ID19 (ESRF, Grenoble, France) and the Diamond Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK). After the application of Frangi-based filtering the data showed sufficient contrast to automatically identify the Purkinje cells and to quantify their density to 177 cells per mm3 within the volume of interest. Moreover, brain layers were segmented in a region of interest based on edge detection. Subsequently performed histological analysis validated the presence of the cells, which required a mapping from the two- dimensional histological slices to the three-dimensional tomogram. The methodology can also be applied to further tissue types and shows potential for the computational tissue analysis in health and disease.

  14. The mechanical heterogeneity of the hard callus influences local tissue strains during bone healing: a finite element study based on sheep experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, A; Liu, Y; Witt, F; Manjubala, I; Sander, O; Epari, D R; Fratzl, P; Duda, G N; Weinkamer, R

    2011-02-03

    During secondary fracture healing, various tissue types including new bone are formed. The local mechanical strains play an important role in tissue proliferation and differentiation. To further our mechanobiological understanding of fracture healing, a precise assessment of local strains is mandatory. Until now, static analyses using Finite Elements (FE) have assumed homogenous material properties. With the recent quantification of both the spatial tissue patterns (Vetter et al., 2010) and the development of elastic modulus of newly formed bone during healing (Manjubala et al., 2009), it is now possible to incorporate this heterogeneity. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of this heterogeneity on the strain patterns at six successive healing stages. The input data of the present work stemmed from a comprehensive cross-sectional study of sheep with a tibial osteotomy (Epari et al., 2006). In our FE model, each element containing bone was described by a bulk elastic modulus, which depended on both the local area fraction and the local elastic modulus of the bone material. The obtained strains were compared with the results of hypothetical FE models assuming homogeneous material properties. The differences in the spatial distributions of the strains between the heterogeneous and homogeneous FE models were interpreted using a current mechanobiological theory (Isakson et al., 2006). This interpretation showed that considering the heterogeneity of the hard callus is most important at the intermediate stages of healing, when cartilage transforms to bone via endochondral ossification. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of the structure of human dental tissue at multiple length scales using high energy synchrotron X-ray SAXS/WAXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2011-10-01

    High energy (>50keV) synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline I12 JEEP at the Diamond Light Source (DLS, Oxford, UK). Although a complete human tooth could be studied, in the present study attention was focused on coupons from the region of the Dentin-Enamel Junction (DEJ). Simultaneous high energy SAXS/WAXS measurements were carried out. Quantitative analysis of the results allows multiple length scale characterization of the nano-crystalline structure of dental tissues. SAXS patterns analysis provide insight into the mean thickness and orientation of hydroxyapatite particles, while WAXS (XRD) patterns allow the determination of the crystallographic unit cell parameters of the hydroxyapatite phase. It was found that the average particle thickness determined from SAXS interpretation varies as a function of position in the vicinity of the DEJ. Most mineral particles are randomly orientated within dentin, although preferred orientation emerges and becomes stronger on approach to the enamel. Within the enamel, texture is stronger than anywhere in the dentin, and the determination of lattice parameters can be accomplished by Pawley refinement of the multiple peak diffraction pattern. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using high energy synchrotron X-ray beams for the characterization of human dental tissues. This opens up the opportunity of studying thick samples (e.g., complete teeth) in complex sample environments (e.g., under saline solution). This opens new avenues for the application of high energy synchrotron X-ray scattering to dental research.

  16. Characterization of a posed smile and evaluation of facial attractiveness by panel perception and its correlation with hard and soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Smriti; Sidhu, Maninder Singh; Prabhakar, Mona; Kochhar, Anuraj Singh

    2012-01-01

    To examine whether specific hard and soft tissue had any effect on smile characteristics and to ascertain the opinions of laypersons and clinicians in evaluating facial attractiveness among different occlusions. Photographs of posed smiles, along with profiles and full faces, of 76 patients with different occlusions were captured, and a lateral cephalogram of each subject was traced. These photographs were judged by a panel of 10 clinicians and 10 laypersons on a 5-point visual analog scale. Quantitative measurements were carried out on the smile images for 14 smile characteristics. The effect of hard and soft tissue on these characteristics was also examined. The upper vermilion lip thickness was affected by Pt.A-UI and E-line to upper lip, while the lower vermilion lip thickness was affected by lower anterior facial height. FMA had a significant positive effect on gingival display (P ≤ .05). This meant that an increase in FMA also caused the gingival display to increase. The nasolabial angle showed a significant positive effect on incisal display, while FMA showed a negative effect on intercanine width. Lower facial height and FMA had a significant negative effect on the smile index. A correlation was found between the judgments of clinicians and laypersons. Both judged Class I relationships to be the most attractive. FMA was found to have a positive effect on the amount of gingival display. It was also observed that patients with Class II Division 1 relationships had the thickest lips compared with patients having other types of occlusions. Class III patients exhibited no gingival display on smile. Patients with Class I showed the maximum smile width, while patients with Class III showed the least amount of buccal corridor.

  17. Hard alpha-keratin degradation inside a tissue under high flux X-ray synchrotron micro-beam: a multi-scale time-resolved study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Emilie; Gourrier, Aurélien; Doucet, Jean; Briki, Fatma

    2010-04-01

    X-rays interact strongly with biological organisms. Synchrotron radiation sources deliver very intense X-ray photon fluxes within micro- or submicro cross-section beams, resulting in doses larger than the MGy. The relevance of synchrotron radiation analyses of biological materials is therefore questionable since such doses, million times higher than the ones used in radiotherapy, can cause huge damages in tissues, with regard to not only DNA, but also proteic and lipid organizations. Very few data concerning the effect of very high X-ray doses in tissues are available in the literature. We present here an analysis of the structural phenomena which occur when the model tissue of human hair is irradiated by a synchrotron X-ray micro-beam. The choice of hair is supported by its hierarchical and partially ordered keratin structure which can be analysed inside the tissue by X-ray diffraction. To assess the damages caused by hard X-ray micro-beams (1 microm(2) cross-section), short exposure time scattering SAXS/WAXS patterns have been recorded at beamline ID13 (ESRF) after various irradiation times. Various modifications of the scattering patterns are observed, they provide fine insight of the radiation damages at various hierarchical levels and also unexpectedly provide information about the stability of the various hierarchical structural levels. It appears that the molecular level, i.e. the alpha helices which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds and the alpha-helical coiled coils which are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, is more sensitive to radiation than the supramolecular architecture of the keratin filament and the filament packing within the keratin associated proteins matrix, which is stabilized by disulphide bonds. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. General characteristics of dental morbidity in children against orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovach I.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A wide spread of orthodontic treatment showed a fairly high risk of complications developed from the use of various devices. The aim of our study was to determine the general characteristics of dental morbidity in children with orthodontic treatment. According to the survey the most common pathologies in children with orthodontic problems are dental caries (87,8-92,9% and chronic catarrhal gingivitis (81.2-84.1%. The prevalence of different types of diseases of the mucous membrane and soft tissues of the oral cavity in children surveyed was 30.5-32.9%. Non-caries lesions of dental hard tissues occurred in 39.5-40.9% of the children surveyed, local enamel hypoplasia was observed in 42.9%, systemic enamel hypoplasia made up 17.8%, signs of hypersensitivity of enamel were found in 9.6%, and the wedge defects – in two children.

  19. Applications of Nanomaterials in Dental Science: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Jitendra; Singh, Shivani; Lale, Shantanu V; Mishra, Monu; Koul, Veena; Kharbanda, P

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized health care industry in a large scale and its applications are a boon to modern medicine and dental science. It is expected to pervade and further revolutionize the art and science of dentistry and may well have important applications spanning all the aspects of oral diseases, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Materials science in dentistry has embraced the technology to produce nanomaterials that are being used in caries inhibitors, antimicrobial resins, hard tissue remineralizing agents, targeted drug delivery, scaffolds, bio-membranes, nanocrystalline hydroxyl apatite, restorative cements, adhesion promoters and boosters, bioactive glass, tissue conditioners, reinforced methacrylate resins, root canal disinfectants, friction free orthodontic arch wires and nano composites life. These upcoming technologies have potential to bring about significant benefits in the form of improvement in dental science and to society. The present review presents the latest recent developments in this interdisciplinary field bridging nanotechnology and dental science.

  20. Technical advances in the sectioning of dental tissue and of on-section cross-linked collagen detection in mineralized teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhrao, Sim K; Sloan, Alastair J; Smith, Emma L; Archer, Charles W

    2010-08-01

    Immunohistochemical detection of cross-linked fibrillar collagens in mineralized tissues is much desired for exploring the mechanisms of biomineralization in health and disease. Mineralized teeth are impossible to section when embedded in conventional media, thus limiting on-section characterization of matrix proteins by immunohistochemistry. We hypothesized that by using an especially formulated acrylic resin suitable for mineralized dental tissues, not only sectioning of teeth would be possible, but also our recently developed immunofluorescence labeling technique would be amenable to fully calcified tissues for characterization of dentinal fibrillar collagens, which remains elusive. The hypothesis was tested on fixed rodent teeth embedded in Technovit 9100 New. It was possible to cut thin (1 mum) sections of mineralized teeth, and immunofluorescence characterization of cross-linked type I fibrillar collagen was selected due to its abundance in dentine. Decalcified samples of teeth embedded in paraffin wax were also used to compare immunolabeling from either method using the same immunoreagents in equivalent concentrations. In the decalcified tissue sections, type I collagen labeling in the dentine along the tubules was "patchy" and the signal in the predentine was very weak. However, enhanced signal in mineralized samples with type I collagen was detected not only in the predentine but also at the limit between intertubular dentine, within the elements of the enamel organ and subgingival stroma. This report offers advances in sectioning mineralized dental tissues and allows the application of immunofluorescence not only for on-section protein detection but importantly for detecting cross-linked fibrous collagens in both soft and mineralized tissue sections.

  1. β-pyrophosphate: A potential biomaterial for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasiou, A.D., E-mail: a.anastasiou@leeds.ac.uk [School of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Strafford, S. [Leeds Dental School, Worsley Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Posada-Estefan, O. [Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thomson, C.L. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Hussain, S.A. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Cambridge Graphene Centre, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Edwards, T.J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Malinowski, M. [Leeds Dental School, Worsley Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Hondow, N. [School of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Metzger, N.K.; Brown, C.T.A. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Routledge, M.N. [Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Brown, A.P. [School of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Duggal, M.S. [Leeds Dental School, Worsley Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Jha, A. [School of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-01

    Tooth hypersensitivity is a growing problem affecting both the young and ageing population worldwide. Since an effective and permanent solution is not yet available, we propose a new methodology for the restoration of dental enamel using femtosecond lasers and novel calcium phosphate biomaterials. During this procedure the irradiated mineral transforms into a densified layer of acid resistant iron doped β-pyrophosphate, bonded with the surface of eroded enamel. Our aim therefore is to evaluate this densified mineral as a potential replacement material for dental hard tissue. To this end, we have tested the hardness of β-pyrophosphate pellets (sintered at 1000 °C) and its mineral precursor (brushite), the wear rate during simulated tooth-brushing trials and the cytocompatibility of these minerals in powder form. It was found that the hardness of the β-pyrophosphate pellets is comparable with that of dental enamel and significantly higher than dentine while, the brushing trials prove that the wear rate of β-pyrophosphate is much slower than that of natural enamel. Finally, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests suggest that iron doped β-pyrophosphate is cytocompatible and therefore could be used in dental applications. Taken together and with the previously reported results on laser irradiation of these materials we conclude that iron doped β-pyrophosphate may be a promising material for restoring acid eroded and worn enamel. - Highlights: • A novel procedure for the restoration of dental enamel is introduced. • Fe-doped ß-pyrophosphate is evaluated as potential biomaterial for enamel restoration. • Fe-doped ß-pyrophosphate found to have the same hardness as natural enamel and dramatically lower wear rate. • Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests suggest that Fe-doped ß-pyrophosphate is safe for dental applications.

  2. β-pyrophosphate: A potential biomaterial for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasiou, A.D.; Strafford, S.; Posada-Estefan, O.; Thomson, C.L.; Hussain, S.A.; Edwards, T.J.; Malinowski, M.; Hondow, N.; Metzger, N.K.; Brown, C.T.A.; Routledge, M.N.; Brown, A.P.; Duggal, M.S.; Jha, A.

    2017-01-01

    Tooth hypersensitivity is a growing problem affecting both the young and ageing population worldwide. Since an effective and permanent solution is not yet available, we propose a new methodology for the restoration of dental enamel using femtosecond lasers and novel calcium phosphate biomaterials. During this procedure the irradiated mineral transforms into a densified layer of acid resistant iron doped β-pyrophosphate, bonded with the surface of eroded enamel. Our aim therefore is to evaluate this densified mineral as a potential replacement material for dental hard tissue. To this end, we have tested the hardness of β-pyrophosphate pellets (sintered at 1000 °C) and its mineral precursor (brushite), the wear rate during simulated tooth-brushing trials and the cytocompatibility of these minerals in powder form. It was found that the hardness of the β-pyrophosphate pellets is comparable with that of dental enamel and significantly higher than dentine while, the brushing trials prove that the wear rate of β-pyrophosphate is much slower than that of natural enamel. Finally, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests suggest that iron doped β-pyrophosphate is cytocompatible and therefore could be used in dental applications. Taken together and with the previously reported results on laser irradiation of these materials we conclude that iron doped β-pyrophosphate may be a promising material for restoring acid eroded and worn enamel. - Highlights: • A novel procedure for the restoration of dental enamel is introduced. • Fe-doped ß-pyrophosphate is evaluated as potential biomaterial for enamel restoration. • Fe-doped ß-pyrophosphate found to have the same hardness as natural enamel and dramatically lower wear rate. • Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests suggest that Fe-doped ß-pyrophosphate is safe for dental applications.

  3. Wear characteristics of current aesthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM materials: two-body wear, gloss retention, roughness and Martens hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörmann, Werner H; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Ender, Andreas; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Mehl, Albert

    2013-04-01

    This study determined the two-body wear and toothbrushing wear parameters, including gloss and roughness measurements and additionally Martens hardness, of nine aesthetic CAD/CAM materials, one direct resin-based nanocomposite plus that of human enamel as a control group. Two-body wear was investigated in a computer-controlled chewing simulator (1.2 million loadings, 49N at 1.7Hz; 3000 thermocycles 5/50°C). Each of the 11 groups consisted of 12 specimens and 12 enamel antagonists. Quantitative analysis of wear was carried out with a 3D-surface analyser. Gloss and roughness measurements were evaluated using a glossmeter and an inductive surface profilometer before and after abrasive toothbrushing of machine-polished specimens. Additionally Martens hardness was measured. Statistically significant differences were calculated with one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance). Statistically significant differences were found for two-body wear, gloss, surface roughness and hardness. Zirconium dioxide ceramics showed no material wear and low wear of the enamel antagonist. Two-body wear of CAD/CAM-silicate and -lithium disilicate ceramics, -hybrid ceramics and -nanocomposite as well as direct nanocomposite did not differ significantly from that of human enamel. Temporary polymers showed significantly higher material wear than permanent materials. Abrasive toothbrushing significantly reduced gloss and increased roughness of all materials except zirconium dioxide ceramics. Gloss retention was highest with zirconium dioxide ceramics, silicate ceramics, hybrid ceramics and nanocomposites. Temporary polymers showed least gloss retention. Martens hardness differed significantly among ceramics, between ceramics and composites, and between resin composites and acrylic block materials as well. All permanent aesthetic CAD/CAM block materials tested behave similarly or better with respect to two-body wear and toothbrushing wear than human enamel, which is not true for temporary polymer CAD

  4. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  5. A Comparison in Mechanical Properties of Cermets of Calcium Silicate with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V Alloys for Hard Tissues Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Sumit; Shirazi, Seyed Farid Seyed; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yau, Yat-Huang; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of calcium silicate (CS) content on composition, compressive mechanical properties, and hardness of CS cermets with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys sintered at 1200°C. The powder metallurgy route was exploited to prepare the cermets. New phases of materials of Ni16Ti6Si7, CaTiO3, and Ni31Si12 appeared in cermet of Ti-55Ni with CS and in cermet of Ti-6Al-4V with CS, the new phases Ti5Si3, Ti2O, and CaTiO3, which were emerged during sintering at different CS content (wt%). The minimum shrinkage and density were observed in both groups of cermets for the 50 and 100 wt% CS content, respectively. The cermets with 40 wt% of CS had minimum compressive Young's modulus. The minimum of compressive strength and strain percentage at maximum load were revealed in cermets with 50 and 40 wt% of CS with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V cermets, respectively. The cermets with 80 and 90 wt% of CS showed more plasticity than the pure CS. It concluded that the composition and mechanical properties of sintered cermets of Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V with CS significantly depend on the CS content in raw cermet materials. Thus, the different mechanical properties of the cermets can be used as potential materials for different hard tissues replacements. PMID:25538954

  6. A Comparison in Mechanical Properties of Cermets of Calcium Silicate with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V Alloys for Hard Tissues Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim Ataollahi Oshkour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of calcium silicate (CS content on composition, compressive mechanical properties, and hardness of CS cermets with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys sintered at 1200°C. The powder metallurgy route was exploited to prepare the cermets. New phases of materials of Ni16Ti6Si7, CaTiO3, and Ni31Si12 appeared in cermet of Ti-55Ni with CS and in cermet of Ti-6Al-4V with CS, the new phases Ti5Si3, Ti2O, and CaTiO3, which were emerged during sintering at different CS content (wt%. The minimum shrinkage and density were observed in both groups of cermets for the 50 and 100 wt% CS content, respectively. The cermets with 40 wt% of CS had minimum compressive Young’s modulus. The minimum of compressive strength and strain percentage at maximum load were revealed in cermets with 50 and 40 wt% of CS with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V cermets, respectively. The cermets with 80 and 90 wt% of CS showed more plasticity than the pure CS. It concluded that the composition and mechanical properties of sintered cermets of Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V with CS significantly depend on the CS content in raw cermet materials. Thus, the different mechanical properties of the cermets can be used as potential materials for different hard tissues replacements.

  7. Fiber optic-based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.

    1998-09-01

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity. We have produced, using this scanning device, in vivo cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers. Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento- enamel junction, were visible in all the images. The cemento- enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identified in approximately two thirds of the images. These images represent, or our knowledge, the first in vivo OCT images of human dental tissue.

  8. Collagen hydrogels incorporated with surface-aminated mesoporous nanobioactive glass: Improvement of physicochemical stability and mechanical properties is effective for hard tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-12-01

    Collagen (Col) hydrogels have poor physicochemical and mechanical properties and are susceptible to substantial shrinkage during cell culture, which limits their potential applications in hard tissue engineering. Here, we developed novel nanocomposite hydrogels made of collagen and mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles (mBGns) with surface amination, and addressed the effects of mBGn addition (Col:mBG = 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) and its surface amination on the physicochemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogels. The amination of mBGn was shown to enable chemical bonding with collagen molecules. As a result, the nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited a significantly improved physicochemical and mechanical stability. The hydrolytic and enzymatic degradation of the Col-mBGn hydrogels were slowed down due to the incorporation of mBGn and its surface amination. The mechanical properties of the hydrogels, specifically the resistance to loading as well as the stiffness, significantly increased with the addition of mBGn and its aminated form, as assessed by a dynamic mechanical analysis. Mesenchymal stem cells cultivated within the Col-mBGn hydrogels were highly viable, with enhanced cytoskeletal extensions, due to the addition of surface aminated mBGn. While the Col hydrogel showed extensive shrinkage (down to ∼20% of initial size) during a few days of culture, the shrinkage of the mBGn-added hydrogel was substantially reduced, and the aminated mBGn-added hydrogel had no observable shrinkage over 21 days. Results demonstrated the effective roles of aminated mBGn in significantly improving the physicochemical and mechanical properties of Col hydrogel, which are ultimately favorable for applications in stem cell culture for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  10. How are teeth better than bone? An investigation of dental tissue diagenesis and state of preservation at a histological scale (with photo catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege I. Hollund

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Teeth are often the preferred substrate for isotopic and genetic assays in archaeological research. Teeth can yield isotopic signals from different periods of an individual's lifetime, useful in dietary reconstruction, climate research, and investigation into mobility of people and animals in the past. Additionally, it is generally accepted that teeth preserve biomolecules (e.g. DNA, collagen and isotopic signals better. Despite the importance of dental tissue in archaeological research, no systematic study has been carried out concerning diagenetic alterations at histological scale. This article reports the results of a thorough histological characterisation of post-mortem alterations observed in 34 ancient teeth. Such alterations are well described in bone whereas similar analyses of teeth are scant and highlight the need for diagenetic screening before analysis. Micrographs have been made, illustrating typical diagenetic features occurring within the dental tissues cementum, dentine and enamel including bioerosion, cracking, etching and staining. The photo catalogue produced can be used within fields such as archaeology, forensics and palaeontology.

  11. Is the Level of Nitric Oxide in the Dental Follicular Tissues of Impacted Third Molars With a History of Recurrent Pericoronitis a True Marker of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendek, Meltem Karsiyaka; Şenses, Fatma; Kisa, Üçler; Aksoy, Nurkan; Tekin, Umut

    2017-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an indicator of oxidative stress in several tissues. Its role in dental follicular (DF) tissues of impacted third molars with a history of recurrent pericoronitis is not well elucidated. The present study compared NO levels between inflamed and noninflamed DF tissues of impacted third molars with a history of recurrent pericoronitis. A cross-sectional study was designed. The study sample included inflamed DF tissues (test group) with certain local inflammatory symptoms, such as pain, tenderness, swelling, and erythema and noninflamed DF tissues (control group) without local inflammatory symptoms of impacted mandibular third molars. Each patient contributed only 1 specimen to the samples. All tissues samples were biochemically investigated for NO levels as an indicator of oxidative stress. The primary predictor variable was inflammatory status; secondary predictor variables were age and gender. The primary outcome variable was NO level. Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted. The test group consisted of 57 patients (28 men, 29 women; mean age, 23.28 ± 5.16 yr) and the control group consisted of 57 patients (30 men, 27 women; mean age, 23.02 ± 5.42 yr). No relevant intergroup differences were noted for demographic findings such as age and gender. NO levels were significantly higher in inflamed DF tissues of impacted third molars than in noninflamed DF tissues (P stress and the necessity to remove impacted mandibular third molars with a history of recurrent pericoronitis. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative evaluation of soft and hard tissue dimensions in the anterior maxilla using radiovisiography and cone beam computed tomography: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Mallikarjun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess and compare the thickness of gingiva in the anterior maxilla using radiovisiography (RVG and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and its correlation with the thickness of underlying alveolar bone. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study included 10 male subjects in the age group of 20–45 years. Materials and Methods: After analyzing the width of keratinized gingiva of the maxillary right central incisor, the radiographic assessment was done using a modified technique for RVG and CBCT, to measure the thickness of both the labial gingiva and labial plate of alveolar bone at 4 predetermined locations along the length of the root in each case. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation test, with the help of statistical software (SPSS V13. Results: No statistically significant differences were obtained in the measurement made using RVG and CBCT. The results of the present study also failed to reveal any significant correlation between the width of gingiva and the alveolar bone in the maxillary anterior region. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that both CBCT and RVG can be used as valuable tools in the assessment of the soft and hard tissue dimensions.

  13. Degradation and in vitro cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite-coated biodegradable porous iron for hard tissue scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurizzati Mohd Daud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes degradation and cell–material interaction studies on hydroxyapatite (HA-coated biodegradable porous iron proposed for hard tissue scaffolds. Porous iron scaffolds are expected to serve as an ideal platform for bone regeneration. To couple their inherent mechanical strength, pure HA and HA/poly(ε-caprolactone (HA/PCL were coated onto porous iron using dip coating technique. The HA/PCL mixture was prepared to provide a more stable and flexible coating than HA alone. Degradation of the samples was evaluated by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation. Human skin fibroblast (HSF and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC were put in contact with the samples and their interaction was observed. Results showed that coated samples degraded ∼10 times slower (0.002 mm/year for HA/PCL-Fe, 0.003 mm/year for HA-Fe than the uncoated ones (0.031 mm/year, indicating an inhibition effect of the coating on degradation. Both HSF and hMSC maintained high viability when in contact with the coated samples (100–110% control for hMSC during 2–5 days of incubation, indicating the effect of HA in enhancing cytocompatibility of the surface. This study provided early evidence of the potential translation of biodegradable porous iron scaffolds for clinical use in orthopedic surgery. However, further studies including in vitro and in vivo tests are necessary.

  14. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  16. Comparison of Gingiva, Dental Pulp, and Periodontal Ligament Cells From the Standpoint of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, Koji; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Suda, Hideaki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    The specific properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in oral tissues still remain unknown though their existence has been previously reported. We collected gingiva, dental pulp, and periodontal ligament tissues from removed teeth and isolated MSCs. These MSCs were compared in terms of their yields per tooth, surface epitopes, and differentiation potentials by patient-matched analysis. For in vivo calcification analysis, rat gingival and dental pulp cells mounted on β-tricalcium phospateTCP were transplanted into the perivertebral muscle of rats for 6 weeks. Gingival cells and dental pulp cells showed higher yield per tooth than periodontal ligament cells (n=6, ppulp cells expressed MSC markers such as CD44, CD90, and CD166. Gingival and dental pulp cells obtained phenotypes of chondrocytes and adipocytes in vitro. Approximately 60% of the colonies of gingival cells and 40% of the colonies of dental pulp cells were positively stained with alizarin red in vitro, and both gingival and dental pulp cells were calcified in vivo. We clarified properties of MSCs derived from removed teeth. We could obtain a high yield of MSCs with osteogenic potential from gingiva and dental pulp. These results indicate that gingiva and dental pulp are putative cell sources for hard tissue regeneration. PMID:26858852

  17. Electron microscopy of octacalcium phosphate in the dental calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakei, Mitsuo; Sakae, Toshiro; Yoshikawa, Masayoshi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to morphologically demonstrate the presence of octacalcium phosphate in the dental calculus by judging from the crystal lattice image and its rapid transformation into apatite crystal, as part of our serial studies on biomineral products. We also aimed to confirm whether the physical properties of octacalcium phosphate are identical with those of the central dark lines observed in crystals of ordinary calcifying hard tissues. Electron micrographs showed that crystals of various sizes form in the dental calculus. The formation of each crystal seemed to be closely associated with the organic substance, possibly originating from degenerated microorganisms at the calcification front. Many crystals had an 8.2-A lattice interval, similar to that of an apatite crystal. Furthermore, some crystals clearly revealed an 18.7-A lattice interval and were vulnerable to electron bombardment. After electron beam exposure, this lattice interval was quickly altered to about half (i.e. 8.2 A), indicating structural conversion. Consequently, a number of apatite crystals in the dental calculus are possibly created by a conversion mechanism involving an octacalcium phosphate intermediate. However, we also concluded that the calcification process in the dental calculus is not similar to that of ordinary calcifying hard tissues.

  18. 'In vitro' assessment to instrumented indentation hardness tests in enamel of bovine teeth, before and after dental bleaching by laser; Avaliacao in vitro' de ensaios instrumentados de dureza em esmalte de dente bovino, antes e apos clareamento dental a laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto Junior, Francisco Meira

    2004-07-01

    The laser enamel bleaching is a common used procedure due to its satisfactory esthetic results. The possible changes on the dental structures caused by the bleaching technique are of great importance. The enamel superficial microhardness changes through instrumented indentation hardness on bovine teeth were analyzed in this present study. The samples were divided in two halves, one being the control and the other irradiated with a diode laser (808 nm) or with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) to activate the Whiteness HP bleaching gel (hydrogen peroxide at 35%). It was possible to conclude that there was a statistical significant increase on the enamel superficial microhardness (Group I, sample 1 and Group II, sample 1) despite this increase did not seem to indicate a concern regarding the enamel surface resistance change. There was not a significant statistical change on the enamel microhardness on the other samples. The final conclusion is that there was no superficial enamel morphological change after these treatments. (author)

  19. Reproducibility of the pink esthetic score--rating soft tissue esthetics around single-implant restorations with regard to dental observer specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Peter; Lobert, Markus; Dhom, Günter

    2008-01-01

    The pink esthetic score (PES) evaluates the esthetic outcome of soft tissue around implant-supported single crowns in the anterior zone by awarding seven points for the mesial and distal papilla, soft-tissue level, soft-tissue contour, soft-tissue color, soft-tissue texture, and alveolar process deficiency. The aim of this study was to measure the reproducibility of the PES and assess the influence exerted by the examiner's degree of dental specialization. Fifteen examiners (three general dentists, three oral maxillofacial surgeons, three orthodontists, three postgraduate students in implant dentistry, and three lay people) applied the PES to 30 implant-supported single restorations twice at an interval of 4 weeks. Using a 0-1-2 scoring system, 0 being the lowest, 2 being the highest value, the maximum achievable PES was 14. At the second assessment, the photographs were scored in reverse order. Differences between the two assessments were evaluated with the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (R). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for comparisons of differences between the ratings. A significance level of p esthetic restorations showed the smallest deviations. Orthodontists were found to have assigned significantly poorer ratings than any other group. The assessment of postgraduate students and laypersons were the most favorable. The PES allows for a more objective appraisal of the esthetic short- and long-term results of various surgical and prosthetic implant procedures. It reproducibly evaluates the peri-implant soft tissue around single-implant restorations and results in good intra-examiner agreement. However, an effect of observer specialization on rating soft-tissue esthetics can be shown.

  20. Soft skills and dental education

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, M. A. G.; Abu Kasim, N. H.; Naimie, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses ...

  1. Microradiographic investigations on experimentally provoked structural alterations in hard tooth tissues after sealing with plastic material in places where caries is apt to develop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falten, E.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was, after sealing three areas in extracted human teeth: fissures, dental necksand approximate areas and subsequent exposure to experimentally produced cariogenous noxae, to establish possible alterations in the area of transition between sealed and unsealed dental enamal. This would provide a further decision-taking aid with regard to the question whether also the remaining parts where caries is apt to develop should be sealed. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...

  3. Effect of miR-146a/bFGF/PEG-PEI Nanoparticles on Inflammation Response and Tissue Regeneration of Human Dental Pulp Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Inflammation in dental pulp cells (DPCs initiated by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in dental pulp necrosis. So far, whether there is a common system regulating inflammation response and tissue regeneration remains unknown. miR-146a is closely related to inflammation. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is an important regulator for differentiation. Methods. To explore the effect of miR-146a/bFGF on inflammation and tissue regeneration, polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine (PEG-PEI was synthesized, and physical characteristics were analyzed by dynamic light scattering and gel retardation analysis. Cell absorption, transfection efficiency, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Alginate gel was combined with miR-146a/PEG-PEI nanoparticles and bFGF. Drug release ratio was measured by ultraviolet spectrophotography. Proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of DPCs with 1 μg/mL LPS treatment were determined. Results. PEG-PEI prepared at N/P 2 showed complete gel retardation and smallest particle size and zeta potential. Transfection efficiency of PEG-PEI was higher than lipo2000. Cell viability decreased as N/P ratio increased. Drug release rate amounted to 70% at the first 12 h and then maintained slow release afterwards. Proliferation and differentiation decreased in DPCs with LPS treatment, whereas they increased in miR-146a/bFGF gel group. Conclusions. PEG-PEI is a promising vector for gene therapy. miR-146a and bFGF play critical roles in inflammation response and tissue regeneration of DPCs.

  4. Novel resorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: from the parent phosphate glass to its bone-like macroporous derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretcanu, Oana; Baino, Francesco; Verné, Enrica; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    One of the major challenges of hard tissue engineering research focuses on the development of scaffolds that can match the mechanical properties of the host bone and resorb at the same rate as the bone is repaired. The aim of this work was the synthesis and characterization of a resorbable phosphate glass, as well as its application for the fabrication of three dimensional (3-D) scaffolds for bone regeneration. The glass microstructure and behaviour upon heating were analysed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy. The glass solubility was investigated according to relevant ISO standards using distilled water, simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl as testing media. The glass underwent progressive dissolution over time in all three media but the formation of a hydroxyapatite-like layer was also observed on the samples soaked in SBF and Tris-HCl, which demonstrated the bioactivity of the material. The glass powder was used to fabricate 3-D macroporous bone-like glass-ceramic scaffolds by adopting polyethylene particles as pore formers: during thermal treatment, the polymer additive was removed and the sintering of glass particles was allowed. The obtained scaffolds exhibited high porosity (87 vol.%) and compressive strength around 1.5 MPa. After soaking for 4 months in SBF, the scaffolds mass loss was 76 wt.% and the pH of the solution did not exceed the 7.55 value, thereby remaining in a physiological range. The produced scaffolds, being resorbable, bioactive, architecturally similar to trabecular bone and exhibiting interesting mechanical properties, can be proposed as promising candidates for bone repair applications.

  5. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  6. Adipose tissue-deprived stem cells acquire cementoblast features treated with dental follicle cell conditioned medium containing dentin non-collagenous proteins in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Xiujie; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Li; Liu, Luchuan; Deng, Manjing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study we examine the effects of dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs) on differentiation of ADSCs. → We examined that ADSCs treated with dNCPs/DFCCM underwent morphological changes and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. → dNCPs/DFCCM enhanced the mineralization behaviour and mineralization-related marker expression of ADSCs. → ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are easily harvested and show excellent pluripotency potential, have generated considerable interest in regenerative medicine. In this study, the differentiation of ADSCs was assessed after treatment with dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). ADSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and high proliferative capacity. However, after treatment with dNCPs/DFCCM, ADSCs changed from a fibroblast-like to cementoblast-like morphology and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. Alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro mineralization behaviour of ADSCs were significantly enhanced. Mineralization-related markers including cementum attachment protein, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteonectin were detected at mRNA or protein levels, whereas dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin sialoprotein were not detected, implying a cementoblast-like phenotype. These results demonstrate that ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment and could be a potential source of cementogenic cells for periodontal regeneration.

  7. Adipose tissue-deprived stem cells acquire cementoblast features treated with dental follicle cell conditioned medium containing dentin non-collagenous proteins in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Xiujie; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Li [Department of Stomatology, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Changjiang Branch Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400042 (China); Liu, Luchuan, E-mail: liuluchuan1957@126.com [Department of Stomatology, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Changjiang Branch Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400042 (China); Deng, Manjing, E-mail: iradeng@163.com [Department of Stomatology, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Changjiang Branch Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} In this study we examine the effects of dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs) on differentiation of ADSCs. {yields} We examined that ADSCs treated with dNCPs/DFCCM underwent morphological changes and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. {yields} dNCPs/DFCCM enhanced the mineralization behaviour and mineralization-related marker expression of ADSCs. {yields} ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are easily harvested and show excellent pluripotency potential, have generated considerable interest in regenerative medicine. In this study, the differentiation of ADSCs was assessed after treatment with dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). ADSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and high proliferative capacity. However, after treatment with dNCPs/DFCCM, ADSCs changed from a fibroblast-like to cementoblast-like morphology and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. Alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro mineralization behaviour of ADSCs were significantly enhanced. Mineralization-related markers including cementum attachment protein, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteonectin were detected at mRNA or protein levels, whereas dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin sialoprotein were not detected, implying a cementoblast-like phenotype. These results demonstrate that ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment and could be a potential source of cementogenic cells for periodontal regeneration.

  8. Children acceptance of laser dental treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazea, Andreea; Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the dental anxiety level and the degree of acceptance of laser assisted pedodontic treatments from the children part. Also, we want to underline the advantages of laser use in pediatric dentistry, to make this technology widely used in treating dental problems of our children patients. Methods: Thirty pediatric dental patients presented in the Department of Pedodontics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Victor Babeş", Timişoara were evaluated using the Wong-Baker pain rating scale, wich was administered postoperatory to all patients, to assess their level of laser therapy acceptance. Results: Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFPS) has good validity and high specificity; generally it's easy for children to use, easy to compare and has good feasibility. Laser treatment has been accepted and tolerated by pediatric patients for its ability to reduce or eliminate pain. Around 70% of the total sample showed an excellent acceptance of laser dental treatment. Conclusions: Laser technology is useful and effective in many clinical situations encountered in pediatric dentistry and a good level of pacient acceptance is reported during all laser procedures on hard and soft tissues.

  9. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  10. Effects of holmium laser on dental structure in vivo: thermal evaluation and histological analysis on pulpal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strefezza, Claudia

    2001-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that Ho:YLF laser is capable of inducing physical and chemical changes on dental surfaces treated for caries prevention. The temperature in the pulp chamber was in vitro evaluated to as a function of the power and frequency of the laser irradiation. The purpose of this work is to verify the occurrence of pulp inflammation after Ho:YLF laser irradiation using different parameters in rabbits' teeth. The premolars and molars of ten rabbits (NZB) were divided in two groups according to the irradiation energy values of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at 2.065μm wave length, frequency of O,5Hz and pulse length of 250μs. An group A teeth were irradiated with using ten pulses of 334mJ/pulse of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at O.5Hz, and group B, with 512mJ/pulse. Animals were killed by transcardiac perfusion and the samples were prepared for histopathological analysis. The in vitro temperature monitoring revealed an increase of 1 deg C for the 334mJ/pulse energy and 4.5 deg C for the 512mJ/pulse energy. SEM observations showed the occurrence of melting and resolidification in dental surface. From the in vivo analysis it can be concluded that both employed laser parameters did not induce to any inflammatory response from the pulp. (author)

  11. Algorithm of first-aid management of dental trauma for medics and corpsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Yehuda

    2008-12-01

    In order to fill the discrepancy between the necessity of providing prompt and proper treatment to dental trauma patients, and the inadequate knowledge among medics and corpsmen, as well as the lack of instructions in first-aid textbook and manuals, and after reviewing the dental literature, a simple algorithm for non-professional first-aid management for various injuries to hard (teeth) and soft oral tissues, is presented. The recommended management of tooth avulsion, subluxation and luxation, crown fracture and lip, tongue or gingival laceration included in the algorithm. Along with a list of after-hour dental clinics, this symptoms- and clinical-appearance-based algorithm is suited to tuck easily into a pocket for quick utilization by medics/corpsmen in an emergency situation. Although the algorithm was developed for the usage of military non-dental health-care providers, this method could be adjusted and employed in the civilian environment as well.

  12. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy as a Tool for the Characterization of Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyana S. Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When the tooth is exposed to acidic environments, an irreversible loss of dental hard tissue occurs in a process called dental erosion. In this work, the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM was used to probe the consumption of protons at the vicinity of a tooth surface with a platinum microelectrode fixed at −0.5 (V versus Ag/AgCl/KCl(sat. SECM approach curves were recorded to assess the extent of diffusion in the solution close to the tooth substrate. SECM images clearly demonstrated that the acid erosion process is very fast at solution pH values in the range between 3 and 4.

  13. Influence of Nd:YAG laser on the bond strength of self-etching and conventional adhesive systems to dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimoto, A K; Cunha, L A; Yui, K C K; Huhtala, M F R L; Barcellos, D C; Prakki, A; Gonçalves, S E P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin of total and self-etch adhesives when the laser was applied over the adhesives, before they were photopolymerized, in an attempt to create a new bonding layer by dentin-adhesive melting. One-hundred twenty bovine incisors were ground to obtain flat surfaces. Specimens were divided into two substrate groups (n=60): substrate E (enamel) and substrate D (dentin). Each substrate group was subdivided into four groups (n=15), according to the surface treatment accomplished: X (Xeno III self-etching adhesive, control), XL (Xeno III + laser Nd:YAG irradiation at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental), S (acid etching + Single Bond conventional adhesive, Control), and SL (acid etching + Single Bond + laser Nd:YAG at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental). The bonding area was delimited with 3-mm-diameter adhesive tape for the bonding procedures. Cylinders of composite were fabricated on the bonding area using a Teflon matrix. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C/48 h and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; substrate, adhesive, and treatment) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed significant differences for the substrate, adhesive system, and type of treatment: lased or unlased (penamel groups were X=20.2 ± 5.61, XL=23.6 ± 4.92, S=20.8 ± 4.55, SL=22.1 ± 5.14 and for the dentin groups were X=14.1 ± 7.51, XL=22.2 ± 6.45, S=11.2 ± 5.77, SL=15.9 ± 3.61. For dentin, Xeno III self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with Single Bond total-etch adhesive; Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with control (unlased). Nd:YAG laser application prior to photopolymerization of adhesive systems significantly increased the bond strength to dentin.

  14. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Woloszyk

    Full Text Available Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%, while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV% significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL. Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x and Collagen type I (1.7x was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and

  15. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszyk, Anna; Holsten Dircksen, Sabrina; Bostanci, Nagihan; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2014-01-01

    Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%), while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV%) significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL). Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x) and Collagen type I (1.7x) was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and rapid bone

  16. Deep bite malocclusion: exploration of the skeletal and dental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhateja, N.K.; Fida, M.; Shaikh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Correction of deep bite is crucial for maintenance of dental hard and soft tissue structures and for prevention of temporomandibular joint disorders. Exploration of underlying skeletal and dental factors is essential for efficient and individualized treatment planning. To date etiological factors of dental and skeletal deep bite have not been explored in Pakistani orthodontic patients. The objectives of this study were to explore frequencies of dental and skeletal etiological factors in deep bite patients and to determine correlations amongst dental and skeletal etiological factors of deep bite. Methods: The study included a total of 113 subjects (males=35; females=78) with no craniofacial syndromes or prior orthodontic treatment. Pre-treatment orthodontic records were used to evaluate various dental and skeletal parameters. Descriptive statistics of each parameter were calculated. The various study parameters were correlated using Pearson's Correlation. Results: Deep curve of Spee was most frequently seen factor of dental deep bite (72.6%), followed by increased coronal length of upper incisors (28.3%), retroclined upper incisors (17.7%), retroclined lower incisors (8%) and increased coronal length of lower incisors (5.3%). Decreased gonial angle was most commonly found factor of skeletal deep bite (43.4%), followed by decreased mandibular plane angle (27.4%) and maxillary plane's clockwise rotation (26.5%). Frankfort mandibular plane angle and gonial angle showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.66, p=0.000). Conclusions: Reduced gonial angle is most frequently seen skeletal factor, signifying the importance of angulation and growth of ramus in development of deep bite. Deep curve of Spee is most frequently seen dental etiological component in deep bite subjects, hence signifying the importance of intruding the lower anterior teeth. (author)

  17. Effect of adhesive system application for cavities prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium scandium gallium garnet laser on rat dental pulp tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mayo; Suzuki, Masaya; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    We examined the effects of adhesive systems under study applied for a laser-cut cavity using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser on rat dental pulp at 24 h and 14 days postoperatively. Group 1, laser-cut cavities were treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; group 2, pretreated with a phosphoric-acid, and then treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; group 3, pretreated with a phosphoric-acid and sodium-hypochlorite, and then treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; and group 4, treated with an all-in-one adhesive. A flowable resin composite was used as filling material for each cavity treated with each group. A glass-ionomer-cement was used as a control. The following items were evaluated: pulp-tissue-disorganization (PTD), inflammatory-cell-infiltration (ICI), tertiary-dentin-formation (TDF), and bacterial-penetration (BP). The results were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. No significant differences were observed among the experimental groups for all parameters after 24 h and 14 days (P > 0.05). The majority of the specimens showed PTD with edema formation after 24 h; however, all the specimens demonstrated pulpal healing with TDF after 14 days. On the parameter of TDF, all groups showed significant differences between the two postoperative periods (P < 0.01). On the parameter of ICI, a significant difference was found between the two postoperative periods in group 4 (P < 0.05). No specimens showed BP. The pretreatment on the cavity prepared with the laser using phosphoric-acid or sodium-hypochlorite did not affect the dental pulp healing of rat tooth.

  18. Effect of low-level laser therapy on tissue repair after dental extraction in rats administered zoledronic acid and dexamethasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, João Batista Blessmann; Camilotti, Renata Stifelman; Jasper, Juliana; Casagrande, Liliane Cristina Onofre; Maito, Fábio Luiz Dal Moro

    2017-05-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are being increasingly used for the treatment of metabolic and oncological pathologies involving the skeletal system. Because of the severity of the BP associated osteonecrosis of the jaws, the difficulties of treatment, and patient discomfort, additional support methods for their management are needed. Laser therapy has an easy handling, photobiostimulator effect on tissues healing, so it can be considered a preferred therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of low-level laser therapy in the 685- and 830-nm wavelength in the healing process of the bone and soft tissues in rats under BP therapy [zoledronic acid (ZA)] and dexamethasone concomitantly that underwent a surgery for the extraction of upper molars. There were statistically significant differences in the clinical evaluation of the wound and the weight of the animals. Regarding the histological evaluation, it was possible to observe the different maturations of the healing stage between groups. The effect of drug therapy with ZA and dexamethasone in the bone tissue repair process induces osteonecrosis of the jaw in rats and slows down the healing process. In the laser groups, at the stipulated dosimetry, a positive influence on the bone and soft tissue repair process was observed.

  19. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  20. The effects of healing abutments of different size and anatomic shape placed immediately in extraction sockets on peri-implant hard and soft tissues. A pilot study in foxhound dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Patricia J; Mareque-Bueno, Javier; Boquete-Castro, Ana; Aguilar-Salvatierra Raya, Antonio; Martínez-González, José M; Calvo-Guirado, José L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to compare the effects of narrow, concave-straight and wide anatomic healing abutments on changes to soft tissues and crestal bone levels around implants immediately placed into extraction sockets in foxhound dogs. Forty-eight titanium implants (Bredent Medical GMBH, Germany) of the same dimensions were placed in six foxhound dogs. They were divided into two groups (n = 24): test (implants with anatomic abutment) and control (implants with concave-straight abutment). The implants were inserted randomly in the post extraction sockets of P2 , P3 , P4, and M1 bilaterally in six dogs. After eight and twelve weeks, the animals were sacrificed and samples extracted containing the implants and the surrounding soft and hard tissues. Soft tissue and crestal bone loss (CBL) were evaluated by histology and histomorphometry. All implants were clinically and histologically osseointegrated. Healing patterns were examined microscopically at eight and twelve weeks. After eight and twelve weeks, for hard tissues, the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact (IS-C) was higher for control group in the lingual aspect with statistical significance (P < 0.05). For soft tissues (STL), the distance from the top of the peri-implant mucosa to the apical portion of the junction epithelium (PM-Je) was significantly less on the lingual aspect in the test group (with wider abutment) at eight and twelve weeks (P < 0.05). The distance from the top of the apical portion of the junction epithelium to the first bone-to-implant contact (Je-C) was significantly higher in the test group (wider abutment) in the lingual aspect at eight and twelve weeks (P < 0.05). There was no connective tissue contact with any abutment surface. Within the limitations of this animal study, anatomic healing abutments protect soft and hard tissues and reduce crestal bone resorption compared with concave-straight healing abutments. © 2014 John Wiley

  1. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  2. Fiducial-based fusion of 3D dental models with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Amir H; Hannam, Alan G; Fels, Sidney

    2018-04-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in study of maxillofacial structures. While MRI is the modality of choice for soft tissues, it fails to capture hard tissues such as bone and teeth. Virtual dental models, acquired by optical 3D scanners, are becoming more accessible for dental practice and are starting to replace the conventional dental impressions. The goal of this research is to fuse the high-resolution 3D dental models with MRI to enhance the value of imaging for applications where detailed analysis of maxillofacial structures are needed such as patient examination, surgical planning, and modeling. A subject-specific dental attachment was digitally designed and 3D printed based on the subject's face width and dental anatomy. The attachment contained 19 semi-ellipsoidal concavities in predetermined positions where oil-based ellipsoidal fiducial markers were later placed. The MRI was acquired while the subject bit on the dental attachment. The spatial position of the center of mass of each fiducial in the resultant MR Image was calculated by averaging its voxels' spatial coordinates. The rigid transformation to fuse dental models to MRI was calculated based on the least squares mapping of corresponding fiducials and solved via singular-value decomposition. The target registration error (TRE) of the proposed fusion process, calculated in a leave-one-fiducial-out fashion, was estimated at 0.49 mm. The results suggest that 6-9 fiducials suffice to achieve a TRE of equal to half the MRI voxel size. Ellipsoidal oil-based fiducials produce distinguishable intensities in MRI and can be used as registration fiducials. The achieved accuracy of the proposed approach is sufficient to leverage the merged 3D dental models with the MRI data for a finer analysis of the maxillofacial structures where complete geometry models are needed.

  3. Regulation of Dental Enamel Shape and Hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, J.P.; Papagerakis, P.; Smith, C.E.; Fisher, D.C.; Rountrey, A.N.; Zheng, L.; Hu, J.C.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions guide tooth development through its early stages and establish the morphology of the dentin surface upon which enamel will be deposited. Starting with the onset of amelogenesis beneath the future cusp tips, the shape of the enamel layer covering the crown is determined by five growth parameters: the (1) appositional growth rate, (2) duration of appositional growth (at the cusp tip), (3) ameloblast extension rate, (4) duration of ameloblast extension, and (5) spreading rate of appositional termination. Appositional growth occurs at a mineralization front along the ameloblast distal membrane in which amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) ribbons form and lengthen. The ACP ribbons convert into hydroxyapatite crystallites as the ribbons elongate. Appositional growth involves a secretory cycle that is reflected in a series of incremental lines. A potentially important function of enamel proteins is to ensure alignment of successive mineral increments on the tips of enamel ribbons deposited in the previous cycle, causing the crystallites to lengthen with each cycle. Enamel hardens in a maturation process that involves mineral deposition onto the sides of existing crystallites until they interlock with adjacent crystallites. Neutralization of acidity generated by hydroxyapatite formation is a key part of the mechanism. Here we review the growth parameters that determine the shape of the enamel crown as well as the mechanisms of enamel appositional growth and maturation. PMID:20675598

  4. Effect of dental adhesives on the exudative phase of the inflammatory process in subcutaneous tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagem-Filho Halim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular changes in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats induced by dentin bonding systems (one step was studied and compared to those induced by saline solution (negative control and Furacin (positive control, during the exudative phase of the inflammatory process. Twenty mg/kg of Evan's blue were injected intravenously in the vein of the rats' penises; 0.1 ml of each substance tested was inoculated in the subcutaneous tissue. After a 3 hour period the animals were sacrificed and their skins were excised and punched out with a standard steel 2.5 cm in diameter. The specimens were immediately immersed in 8 ml of formamide and taken to a double boiler for 72 hours at 37ºC, to remove the dye. The liquid containing the overflowed dye was filtered, analyzed in the spectrophotometer (620 nm and classified according to the criteria established by Nagem-Filho, Pereira (1976. After statistical analysis, the irritative potential of the substances was ranked as follows: Furacin (severe > Single Bond and Bond 1 (moderate - no significant differences between the dentin bonding systems tested > saline solution (not significant as regards the irritation degree.

  5. Caring for cancer patients in the general dental office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, I.

    1989-01-01

    Modern therapeutic modalities and emphasis on early detection have made oral cancer a treatable, and in many cases, a curable disease. The role of the dentist in cancer patient management is two-fold. Early detection of oral lesions during routine dental examination has been shown to be a significant factor in cancer diagnosis. The dentist's other role comes after cancer treatment, specifically therapeutic radiation. Ionizing radiation can have permanent effects on both hard and soft tissues. Prescription and use of fluoride gel in topical applicators can aid in assuring oral health for post-cancer patients

  6. Oral rehabilitation of segmental mandibulectomy patient with osseointegrated dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of oral cancer lesions results in explicit aesthetic and functional disfigurement, including facial deformity, loss of hard and soft tissue, impaired speech, swallowing and mastication, which modify the patient′s self-image and quality-of-life. Recent advances in head and neck reconstruction techniques and dental implant based prosthetic rehabilitation may significantly improve the quality-of-life and self-esteem for such post-surgery patients. This clinical report describes rehabilitation of oral cancer patient having segmental mandibulectomy with implant-supported fixed partial denture.

  7. Diagnóstico y epidemiología de erosión dental Diagnosis and epidemiology of dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claudia Fajardo Santacruz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available La erosión dental es la pérdida localizada, crónica y patológica de tejido duro dental. Ésta es causada por soluciones químicas las cuales entran en contacto con los dientes. La apariencia de los dientes erosionados es suave, sedosa y brillante, a veces mate, la superficie del esmalte tiene una ausencia de periquimatíes y esmalte intacto en el margen gingival. Se ha hipotetizado que la banda de esmalte preservado a lo largo del margen vestibular y lingual pudiera ser debido a que algunos remanentes de placa podían actuar como una barrera de difusión para los ácidos. Un diagnóstico temprano de este daño del tejido duro dental es de importancia clínica. El objetivo de este artículo es mostrar algunos aspectos básicos de erosión dental en términos de diagnóstico y epidemiología. Este documento enfatiza sobre factores de riesgo extrínsecos los cuales son discutidos con respecto a su relevancia para el desarrollo de erosión dental. Salud UIS 2011; 43 (2: 179-189Dental erosion is a pathologic, chronic, localized loss of dental hard tissue. It is caused by chemical solutions which come into contact with the teeth. The appearance of eroded teeth is smoothing, silky-glazed, sometimes dull, the enamel surface has an absence of perikymata and intact enamel on the gingival margin. It has been hypothesized that the preserved enamel band along the oral and facial gingival margin could be due to some plaque remnants could act as a diffusion barrier for acids. Early diagnosis of this damage of dental hard tissue is of clinical importance. The aim of this article is to show some basic aspects of dental erosion in terms of diagnosis and epidemiology. This paper emphasize on extrinsic risk factors which are discussed with respect to their relevance for the development of dental erosion. Salud UIS 2011; 43 (2: 179-189

  8. Standard hardness conversion tables for metals relationship among brinell hardness, vickers hardness, rockwell hardness, superficial hardness, knoop hardness, and scleroscope hardness

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 Conversion Table 1 presents data in the Rockwell C hardness range on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, Knoop hardness, and Scleroscope hardness of non-austenitic steels including carbon, alloy, and tool steels in the as-forged, annealed, normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions provided that they are homogeneous. 1.2 Conversion Table 2 presents data in the Rockwell B hardness range on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, Knoop hardness, and Scleroscope hardness of non-austenitic steels including carbon, alloy, and tool steels in the as-forged, annealed, normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions provided that they are homogeneous. 1.3 Conversion Table 3 presents data on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, and Knoop hardness of nickel and high-nickel alloys (nickel content o...

  9. Hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, J.P.; Boving, H.J.; Hintermann, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many processes have been developed which are variations and/or combinations of the basic CVD and PVD methods. The main difference between these two families of deposition techniques is that the CVD is an elevated temperature process (≥ 700 C), while the PVD on the contrary, is rather a low temperature process (≤ 500 C); this of course influences the choice of substrates and properties of the coating/substrate systems. Fundamental aspects of the vapor phase deposition techniques and some of their influences on coating properties will be discussed, as well as the very important interactions between deposit and substrate: diffusions, internal stress, etc. Advantages and limitations of CVD and PVD respectively will briefly be reviewed and examples of applications of the layers will be given. Parallel to the development and permanent updating of surface modification technologies, an effort was made to create novel characterisation methods. A close look will be given to the coating adherence control by means of the scratch test, at the coating hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation, at the coating wear resistance by means of a pin-on-disc tribometer, and at the surface quality evaluation by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Finally, main important trends will be highlighted. (orig.)

  10. Lack of cytotoxicity by Trustwater Ecasol™ used to maintain good quality dental unit waterline output water in keratinocyte monolayer and reconstituted human oral epithelial tissue models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, M A

    2010-11-01

    We previously showed that residual treatment of dental chair unit (DCU) supply water using the electrochemically-activated solution Trustwater Ecasol™ (2.5 ppm) provided an effective long-term solution to the problem of dental unit waterline (DUWL) biofilm resulting in DUWL output water quality consistently superior to potable water.

  11. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  12. Does Laser Surgery Interfere with Optical Nerve Identification in Maxillofacial Hard and Soft Tissue?—An Experimental Ex Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Bergauer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The protection of sensitive structures (e.g., nerves from iatrogenic damage is of major importance when performing laser surgical procedures. Especially in the head and neck area both function and esthetics can be affected to a great extent. Despite its many benefits, the surgical utilization of a laser is therefore still limited to superficial tissue ablation. A remote feedback system which guides the laser in a tissue-specific way would provide a remedy. In this context, it has been shown that nerval structures can be specifically recognized by their optical diffuse reflectance spectra both before and after laser ablation. However, for a translation of these findings to the actual laser ablation process, a nerve protection within the laser pulse is of utmost significance. Thus, it was the aim of the study to evaluate, if the process of Er:YAG laser surgery—which comes with spray water cooling, angulation of the probe (60° and optical process emissions—interferes with optical tissue differentiation. For the first time, no stable conditions but the ongoing process of laser tissue ablation was examined. Therefore, six different tissue types (nerve, skin, muscle, fat, cortical and cancellous bone were acquired from 15 pig heads. Measurements were performed during Er:YAG laser ablation. Diffuse reflectance spectra (4500, wavelength range: 350–650 nm where acquired. Principal component analysis (PCA and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA were calculated for classification purposes. The clinical highly relevant differentiation between nerve and bone was performed correctly with an AUC of 95.3% (cortial bone respectively 92.4% (cancellous bone. The identification of nerve tissue against the biological very similar fat tissue yielded good results with an AUC value of 83.4% (sensitivity: 72.3%, specificity: of 82.3%. This clearly demonstrates that nerve identification by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy works reliably in the ongoing process of

  13. Polarization sensitive camera for the in vitro diagnostic and monitoring of dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Anke; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Lussi, Adrian; Meier, Christoph

    Due to a frequent consumption of acidic food and beverages, the prevalence of dental erosion increases worldwide. In an initial erosion stage, the hard dental tissue is softened due to acidic demineralization. As erosion progresses, a gradual tissue wear occurs resulting in thinning of the enamel. Complete loss of the enamel tissue can be observed in severe clinical cases. Therefore, it is essential to provide a diagnosis tool for an accurate detection and monitoring of dental erosion already at early stages. In this manuscript, we present the development of a polarization sensitive imaging camera for the visualization and quantification of dental erosion. The system consists of two CMOS cameras mounted on two sides of a polarizing beamsplitter. A horizontal linearly polarized light source is positioned orthogonal to the camera to ensure an incidence illumination and detection angles of 45°. The specular reflected light from the enamel surface is collected with an objective lens mounted on the beam splitter and divided into horizontal (H) and vertical (V) components on each associate camera. Images of non-eroded and eroded enamel surfaces at different erosion degrees were recorded and assessed with diagnostic software. The software was designed to generate and display two types of images: distribution of the reflection intensity (V) and a polarization ratio (H-V)/(H+V) throughout the analyzed tissue area. The measurements and visualization of these two optical parameters, i.e. specular reflection intensity and the polarization ratio, allowed detection and quantification of enamel erosion at early stages in vitro.

  14. Cephalometric analysis of hard and soft tissues in a 12-year-old syndromic child: A case report and update on dentofacial features of Crouzon syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nagaraju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon syndrome or craniofacial dysostosis is a rare syndrome characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia and exophthalmia. The abnormalities found in this syndrome change too much from case to case depending on the suture fusion order. We report a case of a 12 year old child and a mother showing variations in the dentofacial tissues clinically and radiographically. Subsequently, the application of digital software [Dolphin Imaging 11] enabled us to solve out the case as Crouzon syndrome by analyzing the skeletal and soft tissue alterations. An update of the effects of this syndrome on various systems and dentofacial features with emphasis on tooth abnormalities is documented.

  15. Analysis of dental abfractions by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjan, Enikö; Mărcăuţeanu, Corina; Bratu, Dorin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negruţiu, Meda; Ionita, Ciprian; Topală, Florin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-02-01

    Aim and objectives. Abfraction is the pathological loss of cervical hard tooth substance caused by biomechanical overload. High horizontal occlusal forces result in large stress concentrations in the cervical region of the teeth. These stresses may be high enough to cause microfractures in the dental hard tissues, eventually resulting in the loss of cervical enamel and dentin. The present study proposes the microstructural characterization of these cervical lesions by en face optical coherence tomography (eFOCT). Material and methods: 31 extracted bicuspids were investigated using eFOCT. 24 teeth derived from patients with active bruxism and occlusal interferences; they presented deep buccal abfractions and variable degrees of occlusal pathological attrition. The other 7 bicuspids were not exposed to occlusal overload and had a normal morphology of the dental crowns. The dental samples were investigated using an eFOCT system operating at 1300 nm (B-scan at 1 Hz and C-scan mode at 2 Hz). The system has a lateral resolution better than 5 μm and a depth resolution of 9 μm in tissue. OCT images were further compared with micro - computer tomography images. Results. The eFOCT investigation of bicuspids with a normal morphology revealed a homogeneous structure of the buccal cervical enamel. The C-scan and B-scan images obtained from the occlusal overloaded bicuspids visualized the wedge-shaped loss of cervical enamel and damage in the microstructure of the underlaying dentin. The high occlusal forces produced a characteristic pattern of large cracks, which reached the tooth surface. Conclusions: eFOCT is a promising imaging method for dental abfractions and it may offer some insight on the etiological mechanism of these noncarious cervical lesions.

  16. Soft tissue behavior around dental implants placed in fresh extraction sockets and immediately restored in esthetic area: a preliminary short-term evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Antonio BRESCOVITT

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the behavior of the peri-implant soft margin after immediate implant placement with immediate function, by (1 direct clinical measurements of peri-implant soft margin height and thickness, (2 measurements of peri-implant soft margin height on photographs and (3 the perception of dental professionals regarding the results considering esthetic parameters. Material and method The study included 8 patients with central or lateral incisors indicated to be extracted. Direct measurements of peri-implant soft margin height and thickness were done immediately before extraction (T0 and 1 (T1, 4 (T2, 8 (T3 and 12 (T4 months after the flapless insertion of the implant. Photographs were taken at the same time intervals. A questionnaire was filled in by implantology professionals regarding their visual perception of color and peri-implant soft margin architecture and harmony in the implant region using the photographs obtained at T4. Result The clinical results showed significant changes to the height of the peri-implant soft margin, but the photographic results did not show significant changes for this measurement. The thickness of the attached gingiva was maintained during all the observation period. Of the professionals interviewed, 35.2% noticed an altered peri-implant soft margin color of the implant region, 39.8% noticed a change in the peri-implant soft margin architecture and 12.5% noticed a change in the peri-implant soft margin harmony. Conclusion The soft tissues around immediate implants changed during this period, but did not affect the aesthetic outcome and in the opinion of professionals, the aesthetic results were satisfactory for these cases.

  17. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and red...

  18. Multiple-level porous polymer monoliths with interconnected cellular topology prepared by combining hard sphere and emulsion templating for use in bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paljevac, M.; Gradišnik, L.; Lipovšek, S.; Maver, U.; Kotek, Jiří; Krajnc, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2018), s. 1-8, č. článku 1700306. ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : bone tissue engineering * hierarchical materials * polymer scaffolds Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2016

  19. Dental-derived Stem Cells and whole Tooth Regeneration: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dannan, Aous

    2009-01-01

    The need for new dental tissue-replacement therapies is evident in recent reports which reveal startling statistics regarding the high incidence of tooth decay and tooth loss. Recent advances in the identification and characterization of dental stem cells, and in dental tissue-engineering strategies, suggest that bioengineering approaches may successfully be used to regenerate dental tissues and whole teeth. Interest in dental tissue-regeneration applications continues to increase as clinical...

  20. DENTAL PULP STEM CELLS AND HUMAN PERIAPICAL CYST MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN BONE TISSUE REGENERATION: COMPARISON OF BASAL AND OSTEOGENIC DIFFERENTIATED GENE EXPRESSION OF A NEWLY DISCOVERED MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL LINEAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, M; Falisi, G; Amantea, M; Rastelli, C; Paduano, F; Marrelli, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is an interesting field of biomedicine. The most recent studies are aimed to achieve a bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) taken from more accessible sites: oral and dental tissues have been widely investigated as a rich accessible source of MSCs. Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) and human Periapical Cysts Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hPCy-MSCs) represent the new generation MSCs. The aim of this study is to compare the gene expression of these two innovative cell types to highlight the advantages of their use in bone regeneration. The harvesting, culturing and differentiating of cells isolated from dental pulp as well as from periapical cystic tissue were carried out as described in previously published reports. qRT-PCR analyses were performed on osteogenic genes in undifferentiated and osteogenic differentiated cells of DPSC and hPCy-MSC lineage. Real-time RT-PCR data suggested that both DPSCs and hPCy-MSCs cultured in osteogenic media are able to differentiate into osteoblast/odontoblast-like cells: however, some differences indicated that DPSCs seem to be directed more towards dentinogenesis, while hPCy-MSCs seem to be directed more towards osteogenesis.

  1. Dental impression technique using optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Barua, Souman; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Gabor, Alin Gabriel; Zaharia, Cristian; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2018-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: The use of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a non-invasive and high precision quantitative information providing tool has been well established by researches within the last decade. The marginal discrepancy values can be scrutinized in optical biopsy made in three dimensional (3D) micro millimetre scale and reveal detailed qualitative and quantitative information of soft and hard tissues. OCT-based high resolution 3D images can provide a significant impact on finding recurrent caries, restorative failure, analysing the precision of crown preparation, and prosthetic elements marginal adaptation error with the gingiva and dental hard tissues. During the CAD/CAM process of prosthodontic restorations, the circumvent of any error is important for the practitioner and the technician to reduce waste of time and material. Additionally, OCT images help to achieve a new or semi-skilled practitioner to analyse their crown preparation works and help to develop their skills faster than in a conventional way. The aim of this study is to highlight the advantages of OCT in high precision prosthodontic restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 25 preparations of frontal and lateral teeth were performed for 7 different patients. The impressions of the prosthetic fields were obtained both using a conventional optoelectronic system (Apolo Di, Syrona) and a Spectral Domain using OCT (Dental prototype, working at 860 nm). For the conventional impression technique the preparation margins were been prelevated by gingival impregnated cords. No specific treatments were performed by the OCT impression technique. RESULTS: The scanning performed by conventional optoelectronic system proved to be quick and accurate in terms of impression technology. The results were represented by 3D virtual models obtained after the scanning procedure was completed. In order to obtain a good optical impression a gingival retraction cord was inserted between the prepared tooth and the gingival

  2. A Competition between Care Teams Improved Recording of Diagnoses in Primary Dental Care: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Jouko; Kauppila, Timo; Suominen, Lasse; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    A playful competition was launched in a primary dental health care system to improve the recording of diagnoses into an electronic patient chart system and to study what diagnoses were used in primary dental care. This was a longitudinal follow-up study with public sector primary dental care practices in a Finnish city. A one-year-lasting playful competition between the dental care teams was launched and the monthly percentage of dentists' visits with recorded diagnosis before, during, and after the intervention was recorded. The assessed diagnoses were recorded with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Before the competition, the level of diagnosis recordings was practically zero. At the end of this intervention, about 25% of the visits had a recorded diagnosis. Two years after the competition, this percentage was 35% without any additional measures. The most frequent diagnoses were dental caries (K02, 38.6%), other diseases of hard tissues of teeth (K03, 14.8%), and diseases of pulp and periapical tissues (K04, 11.4%). Commitment to the idea that recording of diagnoses was beneficial improved the recording of dental diagnoses. However, the diagnoses obtained did not accurately reflect the reputed prevalence of oral diseases in the Finnish population.

  3. A Competition between Care Teams Improved Recording of Diagnoses in Primary Dental Care: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouko Kallio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A playful competition was launched in a primary dental health care system to improve the recording of diagnoses into an electronic patient chart system and to study what diagnoses were used in primary dental care. Methods. This was a longitudinal follow-up study with public sector primary dental care practices in a Finnish city. A one-year-lasting playful competition between the dental care teams was launched and the monthly percentage of dentists’ visits with recorded diagnosis before, during, and after the intervention was recorded. The assessed diagnoses were recorded with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. Results. Before the competition, the level of diagnosis recordings was practically zero. At the end of this intervention, about 25% of the visits had a recorded diagnosis. Two years after the competition, this percentage was 35% without any additional measures. The most frequent diagnoses were dental caries (K02, 38.6%, other diseases of hard tissues of teeth (K03, 14.8%, and diseases of pulp and periapical tissues (K04, 11.4%. Conclusions. Commitment to the idea that recording of diagnoses was beneficial improved the recording of dental diagnoses. However, the diagnoses obtained did not accurately reflect the reputed prevalence of oral diseases in the Finnish population.

  4. Er:YAG Laser Dental Treatment of Patients Affected by Epidermolysis Bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Galeotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Er:YAG laser used for treating hard dental tissue in patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB. Methods. We report two cases of EB in which an Er:YAG laser was used for conservative treatments. In the first case, the Er:YAG laser (2,940 μm, 265 mJ, 25 Hz was used to treat caries on a deciduous maxillary canine in an 8-year-old male patient affected by dystrophic EB. In the second case, we treated a 26-year-old female patient, affected by junctional EB, with generalized enamel hypoplasia, and an Er:YAG laser (2,940 μm, 265 mJ, 25 Hz was used to remove the damaged enamel on maxillary incisors. Results. The use of the Er:YAG laser, with the appropriate energy, was effective in the selective removal of carious tissue and enamel hypoplasia. During dental treatment with the Er:YAG laser, patients required only a few interruptions due to the absence of pain, vibration, and noise. Conclusions. Laser treatment of hard dental tissues is a valuable choice for patients affected by EB since it is less invasive compared to conventional treatment, resulting in improved patient compliance.

  5. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  6. Augmentation of the hard palate thin masticatory mucosa in the potential connective tissue donor sites using two collagen materials-Clinical and histological comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Wojciech; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Botzenhart, Ute; Gedrange, Tomasz; Ziętek, Marek

    2016-11-01

    Due to the similarity of keratinized gingival and palatal mucosa the latter can pose as a potential donor site for gingival recession coverage. However, its availability is restricted and a thin transplant bears the risk of being rejected. The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical and histological results of thin palatal mucosa augmentation, using lyophilized Biokol ® xenogenous collagen sponge and a suspension of xenogenous Gel 0 ® pure collagen with non-augmented tissue from the same patients. Ten patients simultaneously underwent bilateral augmentation procedures using Biokol ® and Gel 0 ® collagen material. The donor sites were augmented 8 weeks prior to the harvesting of the connective tissue graft (CTG) for the gingival recession coverage procedures. Prior to the implantation of the collagen material and during the course of harvesting the augmented CTG, tissue specimens were taken for histological examination. Prior to the commencement of the study and after it, the parameters of palatal gingival thickness at 4mm (PGT1), and at 8mm apical to the gingival margin (PGT2) around the teeth neighboring the operating fields were determined. In both groups the palatal mucosa had thickened significantly in both measuring sites. An intergroup comparison revealed greater thickening of the masticatory mucosa in the Biokol ® group at both measuring points. The histological image of the grafts, obtained from sites augmented using both test methods, revealed a typical pattern of mature fibrous connective tissue. No epithelial cells were found. Augmentation of thin masticatory mucosa using Biokol ® or Gel 0 ® collagen materials resulted in a significant thickening of the mucosa, which could be demonstrated to be greater in the first group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  8. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  9. Nonlinear finite element analyses: advances and challenges in dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, N; Ona, M; Suzuki, T; Igarashi, Y

    2008-07-01

    To discuss the development and current status of application of nonlinear finite element method (FEM) in dentistry. The literature was searched for original research articles with keywords such as nonlinear, finite element analysis, and tooth/dental/implant. References were selected manually or searched from the PUBMED and MEDLINE databases through November 2007. The nonlinear problems analyzed in FEM studies were reviewed and categorized into: (A) nonlinear simulations of the periodontal ligament (PDL), (B) plastic and viscoelastic behaviors of dental materials, (C) contact phenomena in tooth-to-tooth contact, (D) contact phenomena within prosthodontic structures, and (E) interfacial mechanics between the tooth and the restoration. The FEM in dentistry recently focused on simulation of realistic intra-oral conditions such as the nonlinear stress-strain relationship in the periodontal tissues and the contact phenomena in teeth, which could hardly be solved by the linear static model. The definition of contact area critically affects the reliability of the contact analyses, especially for implant-abutment complexes. To predict the failure risk of a bonded tooth-restoration interface, it is essential to assess the normal and shear stresses relative to the interface. The inclusion of viscoelasticity and plastic deformation to the program to account for the time-dependent, thermal sensitive, and largely deformable nature of dental materials would enhance its application. Further improvement of the nonlinear FEM solutions should be encouraged to widen the range of applications in dental and oral health science.

  10. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  11. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Dean Jan

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins.

  12. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  13. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Lesions among Dental Patients with Mixed Habits in Salem District - A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, R.; Mohan, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The practice of betel nut chewing with or without tobacco is still practiced in south india, salem inspite of its harmful effects. Methodology: 200 Patients visiting the outpatient department, Oral medicine and radiology from Aug 2015 to Aug 2016. Result and Conclusion: In our study, 3 women were exclusively churut smokers. Thirty-eight percent of the dental patients were beedi smoker, 32% were tobacco chewers, 12% were both betel nut and tobacco chewers, 8% were exclusively betel nut chewers, 1% of the dental population were exclusively churut smokers. Mean age group of the study population is 50.2 (14.4). There are 28 females and 172 males in the study group. Chi-square test revealed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001) between males and females based on soft-tissue findings and no statistically significant difference (P = 0.572) between males and females based on distribution of hard-tissue findings. PMID:29284937

  14. Development, characterisation and biocompatibility testing of a cobalt-containing titanium phosphate-based glass for engineering of vascularized hard tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Ho [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Hye-sun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Lakhkar, Nilay J. [Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, 256 Gray' s Inn Road, London WC1X 8LD (United Kingdom); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Myoung-Seon [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, Jonathan C. [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, 256 Gray' s Inn Road, London WC1X 8LD (United Kingdom); Wall, Ivan B., E-mail: i.wall@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and WCU Research Center of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01

    There is a continuing need to develop scaffold materials that can promote vascularisation throughout the tissue engineered construct. This study investigated the effect of cobalt oxide (CoO) doped into titanium phosphate glasses on material properties, biocompatibility and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by osteoblastic MG63 cells. Glasses composed of (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 45}(Na{sub 2}O){sub 20}(TiO{sub 2}){sub 05}(CaO){sub 30−x}(CoO){sub x}(x = 0, 5, 10, and 15 mol%) were fabricated and the effect of Co on physicochemical properties including density, glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), degradation rate, ion release, and pH changes was assessed. The results showed that incorporation of CoO into the glass system produced an increase in density with little change in T{sub g}. It was then confirmed that the pH did not change significantly when CoO was incorporated in the glass, and stayed constant at around 6.5–7.0 throughout the dissolution study period of 336 h. Ion release results followed a specific pattern with increasing amounts of CoO. In general, although incorporation of CoO into a titanium phosphate glass increased its density, other bulk and surface properties of the glass did not show any significant changes. Cell culture studies performed using MG63 cells over a 7-day period indicated that the glasses provide a stable surface for cell attachment and are biocompatible. Furthermore, VEGF secretion was significantly enhanced on all glasses compared with standard tissue culture plastic and Co doping enhanced this effect further. In conclusion, the developed Co-doped glasses are stable and biocompatible and thus offer enhanced potential for engineering vascularized tissue. - Highlights: ► Phosphate-based glasses can be successfully doped with cobalt oxide. ► The resulting glass is highly stable with low degradation rate. ► Co-doped glasses are biocompatible but do not favour cell proliferation. ► Osteoblastic MG63 cells

  15. Effects of Ceramic Density and Sintering Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of a Novel Polymer-Infiltrated Ceramic-Network Zirconia Dental Restorative (Filling) Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyan; Sun, Jian

    2018-05-10

    BACKGROUND Polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) dental material is a new and practical development in orthodontics. Sintering is the process of forming a stable solid mass from a powder by heating without melting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of a PICN zirconia dental material. MATERIAL AND METHODS A dense zirconia ceramic and four PICN zirconia dental materials, with varying porosities, were sintered at three different temperatures; 12 PICN zirconia dental materials based on these porous ceramics were prepared, as well as a pure polymer. After the specimen preparation, flexural strength and elastic modulus values were measured using the three-point bending test, and fracture toughness were determined by the single-edge notched beam (SENB) method. The Vickers hardness test method was used with an indentation strength (IS) test. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the ceramic surface and the fracture surface. RESULTS Mechanical properties of the PICN dental materials, including flexural strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness, were more similar to the properties of natural teeth when compared with traditional dental ceramic materials, and were affected by the density and sintering temperature. SEM showed that the porous ceramic network became cohesive and that the length of cracks in the PICN dental material was reduced. CONCLUSIONS PICN zirconia dental materials were characterized by similar mechanical properties to natural dental tissues, but further studies are required continue to improve the similarities with natural human enamel and dentin.

  16. Treatment of radiation dental caries with fixed dental prosthetic constructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dachev, B [Vissh Meditsinski Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of clinical observations for many years the author established that the covering of the teeth, progressively developing radiation caries, with crowns of precious metal and plastics is a safe way for their protection. The crown isolates the teeth from the saliva with its changed composition, quantity and changed pH. A prophylactic effect is obtained with the covering of the morbid teeth with radiation caries, concerning the possibilities of osteoradionecrosis development, due to the restriction of the ways of secondary infection penetration. The carried out treatment with fixed crowns preserves the anatomical teeth shape, radiation caries stops its development and the masticatory function of the dentition is recovered. After radiation treatment in the maxillofacial region with hard dental tissues affection which cannot be restored by way of ordinary definite fillings--indications for crown covering exist. The carried out observations reveal that complex cares are necessary in the radiation caries treatment on the part of specialists in therapeutic and orthopedic stomatology with consultations with radiologists. (auth)

  17. Traumatic dental injuries in a university hospital: a four-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Rahimi-Nedjat, Roman; Weusmann, Jens; Azaripour, Adriano; Walter, Christian; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-11-04

    Traumatic dental injuries present complex injuries of the dentoalveolar system. Aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and patterns of traumatic dental injuries in a University dental emergency service over four years. A retrospective investigation on all dental trauma patients presenting at the dental emergency service of the University Medical Center Mainz, Germany between 01/2010 and 12/2013 was conducted. Demographic data, the cause and type of trauma and the initial therapy were analyzed. Out of 16,301 patients, 1,305 patients (8 %; average age 14.7 years ±15.7; 60.1 % male, 39.9 % female) came due to trauma. 63.9 % of the traumas occurred on weekends. The most frequent reason for injuries was falls (54.6 %). No correlation could be found between the cause and the kind of trauma. In 48.6 % of the cases only one tooth was involved, in 33.5 % two. The permanent dentition was traumatized in 56.6 % of cases, the deciduous teeth in 41.1 %. The most frequently affected tooth was the central upper incisor (61.0 %). Hard-tissue injuries were significantly more frequent in the permanent dentition, while periodontal injuries were seen significantly more often in the deciduous dentition. Eight percent of all patients seeking help at the dental emergency service presented with trauma, meaning that dental traumatology is one of the major topics in emergencies. To improve the quality of care, further public education, expert knowledge among dental professionals and a well-structured emergency service are necessary.

  18. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of freeze cast hydroxyapatite-gelatin scaffolds with dexamethasone loaded PLGA microspheres for hard tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, Farnaz, E-mail: Farnaz_ghorbani.1991@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tehran Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P. O. Box: 4515/775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nojehdehian, Hanieh, E-mail: hanieh.nojehdehyan@gmail.com [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamanian, Ali, E-mail: a-zamanian@merc.ac.ir [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box: 14155-4777, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-gelatin scaffolds incorporated with dexamethasone-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres were synthesized by freeze casting technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated a unidirectional microstructure and a decrease in the pore size as a function of temperature gradient. Higher amounts of HA resulted in a decrease in the pore size. According to the results, at lower cooling rates, the formation of a lamellar structure decreased the mechanical strength, but at the same time, enhanced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. On the other hand, higher weight ratios of HA increased the compressive strength, and reduced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. The results obtained by furrier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and bioactivity analysis illustrated that the interactions of the materials support the apatite formation in the simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Based on the obtained results, the synthesized composite scaffolds have the necessary mechanical and physicochemical features to support the regeneration of defects and to maintain their stability during the neo-tissue formation. - Highlights: • Freeze casting technique created unidirectional lamellar type microstructure. • Unidirectional microstructure of samples improved mechanical behavior, absorption, biodegradation rate and release behavior. • Hydroxyapatite-gelatin scaffolds demonstrated bioactive behavior and support new apatite layer formation. • Controlled release rate provided by dexamethasone loaded PLGA microspheres.

  19. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of freeze cast hydroxyapatite-gelatin scaffolds with dexamethasone loaded PLGA microspheres for hard tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Farnaz; Nojehdehian, Hanieh; Zamanian, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-gelatin scaffolds incorporated with dexamethasone-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres were synthesized by freeze casting technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated a unidirectional microstructure and a decrease in the pore size as a function of temperature gradient. Higher amounts of HA resulted in a decrease in the pore size. According to the results, at lower cooling rates, the formation of a lamellar structure decreased the mechanical strength, but at the same time, enhanced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. On the other hand, higher weight ratios of HA increased the compressive strength, and reduced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. The results obtained by furrier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and bioactivity analysis illustrated that the interactions of the materials support the apatite formation in the simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Based on the obtained results, the synthesized composite scaffolds have the necessary mechanical and physicochemical features to support the regeneration of defects and to maintain their stability during the neo-tissue formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium field. Third year report. R and D of the manufacturing technology of hybrid type biocompatible hard tissue substituting materials; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium bun'ya. Hybrid gata seitai yugo kinosei kososhiki daitai sozai seizo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 3 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    As instrument materials substituting for hard tissue such as tooth root and artificial hip joint, the technology development is being proceeded with of the use of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys coated by hydroxy apatite. Studies were made in the following 6 fields: 1) design of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys, system control and dynamic evaluation; 2) development of high efficiency calcium phosphate ceramics (hydroxy apatite) and development of surface coating technology; 3) development of melting casting technology of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys; 4) biological evaluation of biocompatibility of high-biocompatible {beta} Ti alloys and completion of dental precision casting technology; 5) basic research on affinity of low rigidity Ti alloys (trial manufacture); 6) development of technology of precision processing and precision finishing processing of alloys. In 5), in the test on affinity of the trial-manufactured alloys, stainless steel and existing Ti alloys, it was verified that the trial-manufactured alloys were excellent in affinity. (NEDO)

  1. Performance of Er:YAG laser ablation of hard bone under different irrigation water cooling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Bernal, Lina M.; Shayeganrad, Gholamreza; Kosa, Gabor; Zelechowski, Marek; Rauter, Georg; Friederich, Niklaus; Cattin, Philippe C.; Zam, Azhar

    2018-02-01

    The biological applicability of the Erbium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser in surgical processes is so far limited to hard dental tissues. Using the Er:YAG laser for bone ablation is being studied since it has shown good performance for ablating dental hard tissues at the wavelength 2.94 μm, which coincides with the absorption peak of water, one of the main components of hard tissue, like teeth and bone. To obtain a decent performance of the laser in the cutting process, we aim at examining the influence of sequenced water jet irrigation on both, the ablation rate and the prevention of carbonization while performing laser ablation of bone with fixed laser parameters. An Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm wavelength, 940 mJ energy per pulse, 400 μs pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate is used for the ablation of a porcine femur bone under different pulsed water jet irrigation conditions. We used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans to determine the geometry of the ablated areas. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used for qualitative observations for the presence of carbonization and micro-fractures on the ablated surfaces. We evaluate the performance of the laser ablation process for the different water jet conditions in terms of the ablation rate, quantified by the ablated volume per second and the ablation efficiency, calculated as the ablated volume per pulse energy. We provide an optimized system for laser ablation which delivers the appropriate amount of water to the bone and consequently, the bone is ablated in the most efficient way possible without carbonization.

  2. Fractures after multimodality treatment of soft tissue sarcomas with isolated limb perfusion and radiation; likely to occur and hard to heal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinen, J M; Jutte, P C; Been, L B; Pras, E; Hoekstra, H J

    2018-04-24

    Treatment associated fractures (TAFs) are known severe side effects after surgery and radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). There is no literature about TAF after multimodality treatment with isolated limb perfusion (ILP) for locally advanced STS. This study aimed to analyze predictive factors, treatment and outcome for TAF after multimodality treatment with ILP. Out of 126 consecutive patients undergoing ILP after 1991 till now, 25 patients were excluded due to no surgery or direct amputation at initial surgery. Therefore, 101 patients were at risk and 12 developed a TAF (12%). The majority of tumors was located at the upper leg and knee (N = 60), and 11 patients developed a TAF (18%) after median 28 (5-237) months. Twenty-five tumors were located at the lower leg, and 1 patient developed a TAF after 12 months (4%). No patients with a tumor at the upper extremities (N = 16) developed a TAF. Ten out of 12 patients with a fracture received adjuvant RT with a dose of 50 Gy, and a median boost dose of 18 (10-20) Gy. Predictive factors were periosteal stripping, age over 65 years at time of treatment and tumor size after ILP ≥10 cm. Multivariate analysis showed periosteal stripping and tumor size after ILP ≥10 cm as significant predictive factors. The majority of the fractures were treated with intramedullary nailing. Only one of 12 patients without radiotherapy reached bone union (8%). The median survival after developing TAF was 18 (1-195) months. The overall risk of TAF after multimodality treatment with ILP was relatively high with 15% at ten years. The incidence of TAF for patients with tumors located at the thigh and knee after resection with periosteal stripping and radiotherapy was even >50%. The treatment of these fractures is challenging due to the high non-union rate, requiring an extensive orthopedic oncological TAF experience. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical

  3. [Fragmentary osteotomy of maxilla back parts for dentoalveolar lengthening as preparation stage before dental prosthetics making on implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniuk, A N; Mokhirev, M A

    2010-01-01

    Conditions for dental implantation are not always ideal that decrease the method possibilities and makes surgeons-implantologists to resort to additional interventions in order to increase the hard and soft tissues volume in the region of the planned implantation. Considerably rare an implantologist comes across with abutment tissues surplus when considerable dentoalveolar lengthening happens with expressed diminution of interalveolar distance. Orthognatic surgery as the method of surgical correction of expressed dentoalveolar lengthening of some teeth group is the most effective when there is no possibility to such deformation elimination by other methods - orthodontic or prosthetic.

  4. A comparative study of the effectiveness of early and delayed loading of short tissue-level dental implants with hydrophilic surfaces placed in the posterior section of the mandible-A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiecki, Arkadiusz; Botzenhart, Ute; Seeliger, Julia; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Biocev, Peter; Dominiak, Marzena

    2017-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the primary and secondary stability of tissue-level short dental titanium implants with polished necks and hydrophilic surfaces of two different designs and manufacturers. The first implant system used (SPI ® ELEMENT RC INICELL titanium implants, Thommen Medical AG, Grenchen, Switzerland), allowed functional loading 6 weeks after its placement, whereas the second implant system (RN SLActiv ® tissue-level titanium implants, Straumann GmbH, Fribourg, Germany), was loaded after 15 weeks. The degree of primary and secondary stability was determined using an Osstell ISQ measuring device. Marginal bone loss (MBL) was evaluated radiographically 12 and 24 weeks after implantation and the Wachtel's healing index as well as the patient's satisfaction with the treatment was registered on a VAS scale. The intergroup comparison revealed significant differences in terms of primary stability as well as differences in MBL 3 months after the procedure, but no significant differences could be found after 6 months and for secondary stability. The primary stability was significantly higher for Thommen ® compared to Straumann ® implants. Insertion of short dental implants with a hydrophilic conditioned surface significantly shortens patient treatment time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Dental phenotype in Jalili syndrome due to a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in the CNNM4 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans U Luder

    Full Text Available Jalili syndrome denotes a recessively inherited combination of an eye disease (cone-rod dystrophy and a dental disorder (amelogenesis imperfecta, which is caused by mutations in the CNNM4 gene. Whereas the ophthalmic consequences of these mutations have been studied comprehensively, the dental phenotype has obtained less attention. A defective transport of magnesium ions by the photoreceptors of the retina is assumed to account for the progressive visual impairment. Since magnesium is also incorporated in the mineral of dental hard tissues, we hypothesized that magnesium concentrations in defective enamel resulting from mutations in CNNM4 would be abnormal, if a similar deficiency of magnesium transport also accounted for the amelogenesis imperfecta. Thus, a detailed analysis of the dental hard tissues was performed in two boys of Kosovan origin affected by Jalili syndrome. Retinal dystrophy of the patients was diagnosed by a comprehensive eye examination and full-field electroretinography. A mutational analysis revealed a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in CNNM4, a genetic defect which had already been identified in other Kosovan families and putatively results in loss-of-function of the protein. The evaluation of six primary teeth using light and scanning electron microscopy as well as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that dental enamel was thin and deficient in mineral, suggesting a hypoplastic/hypomineralized type of amelogenesis imperfecta. The reduced mineral density of enamel was accompanied by decreased amounts of calcium, but significantly elevated levels of magnesium. In dentin, however, a similar mineral deficiency was associated with reduced magnesium and normal calcium levels. It is concluded that the c.1312 dupC mutation of CNNM4 results in mineralization defects of both enamel and dentin, which are associated with significantly abnormal magnesium concentrations. Thus, we could not disprove the hypothesis that a

  6. Dental students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-08-01

    In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental students, amongst other non-qualified individuals, to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental students have part-time employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental students their opinion about the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental students at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by e-mail. Within 1 month, two reminders were sent. The response was 44% (427 students). Of the responding students, 71% had paid employment in addition to their study. Twenty-five per cent of all students worked in a dental practice, usually 8 h a week. Study year and age were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were providing chair side assistance, giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning. The self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was positively related to study year and working in a dental practice. Hardly any information about the requirements of the IHCP Act with regard to delegation of tasks was provided by the employer. Many Dutch dental students work in a dental practice, taking over a variety of tasks. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was relatively high, many dental students expressed the need for more detailed information about the legal aspects of their tasks.

  7. Implementation of new technologies in U.S. dental school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Sheri A; Murad, Aseel; Hunt, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    With dentistry rapidly evolving as new technologies are developed, this study aimed to identify the penetration of emerging dental technologies into the curricula of U.S. dental schools and to explore whether certain school characteristics affected adoption of these technologies. A 19-question survey was sent to the academic deans of all 62 U.S. dental schools. In addition to questions about characteristics of the school, the survey asked respondents to indicate where in their curricula the technology was incorporated: preclinical didactic, preclinical laboratory, clinical didactic, and/or clinical patient experience. Of 62 eligible schools, 33 useable responses were received, for a 52% response rate. The results showed that the greatest overall penetration of dental technologies was in preclinical didactic courses and the lowest was in the preclinical laboratory. Specific technologies implemented in the largest percentage of responding schools were digital radiography and rotary endodontics. The technologies with the lowest penetration were CAD/CAM denture fabrication and hard tissue lasers. These results suggest that the incorporation of technology into dental schools is following that of private practice as the most widely adopted technologies were those with the greatest acceptance and use in private practice. Among the respondents, factors such as class size and age of the school had greater impact on incorporation of technology than funding source and geographic location.

  8. Dental erosion, an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease: the experience of a center for digestive physiology in Southeastern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Roesch-Ramos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental erosion (DE is the loss of the hard tissues of the tooth produced by the action of gastric juice, pepsin and acid on the dental enamel, its frequency ranges from 5to 53.41%. In Mexico there are no reports on the frequency and possible association. Objective: To establish the prevalence of dental erosion and its relationship to GERD. Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, descriptive and comparative study was conducted in 60patients diagnosed with GERD and 60healthy patients at the Institute of Medical and Biological Research of the Universidad Veracruzana in Veracruz city. Anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, oral hygiene, alcohol consumption, smoking, ED index and Index of decayed/missing dental pieces/sealed and correlation between severity of ED and GERD were analyzed. Results: 78.67% of patients with GERD had ED, 23.33% corresponded to grade 0, 41.67% to N1, N2and 23.33% to 11.67% to N3. Predominance of females (2.3:1. The mean age was 50.92± 13.52years. The severity of dental erosion was significantly related to the severity of reflux, halitosis, CPO index and poor eating habits. There was no statistically significant difference in the other variables analyzed. Conclusions: Dental erosion has a high frequency in patients with GERD and reflux characteristics are directly related to their severity and therefore should be considered as a manifestation of GERD extraesophageal.

  9. Dental erosion, an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The experience of a center for digestive physiology in Southeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Ramos, Laura; Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Remes-Troche, José María; Romero-Sierra, Graciela; Mata-Tovar, Carlos de Jesús; Azamar-Jácome, Amyra Ali; Barranca-Enríquez, Antonia

    2014-02-01

    Dental erosion (DE) is the loss of the hard tissues of the tooth produced by the action of gastric juice, pepsin and acid on the dental enamel, its frequency ranges from 5 to 53.41 %. In Mexico there are no reports on the frequency and possible association. To establish the prevalence of dental erosion and its relationship to GERD. Prospective, observational, descriptive and comparative study was conducted in 60 patients diagnosed with GERD and 60 healthy patients at the Institute of Medical and Biological Research of the Universidad Veracruzana in Veracruz city. Anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, oral hygiene, alcohol consumption, smoking, ED index and Index of decayed/missing dental pieces/sealed and correlation between severity of ED and GERD were analyzed. 78.67 % of patients with GERD had ED, 23.33 % corresponded to grade 0, 41.67 % to N1, N2 and 23.33 % to 11.67 % to N3. Predominance of females (2,3:1). The mean age was 50.92 +/- 13.52 years. The severity of dental erosion was significantly related to the severity of reflux, halitosis, CPO index and poor eating habits. There was no statistically significant difference in the other variables analyzed. Dental erosion has a high frequency in patients with GERD and reflux characteristics are directly related to their severity and therefore should be considered as a manifestation of GERD extraesophageal.

  10. Dental magnetic resonance imaging: making the invisible visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Moeller, Steen; Prasad, Hari S; Garwood, Michael; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2011-06-01

    Clinical dentistry is in need of noninvasive and accurate diagnostic methods to better evaluate dental pathosis. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of a recently developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, called SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT), to visualize dental tissues. Three in vitro teeth, representing a limited range of clinical conditions of interest, imaged using a 9.4T system with scanning times ranging from 100 seconds to 25 minutes. In vivo imaging of a subject was performed using a 4T system with a 10-minute scanning time. SWIFT images were compared with traditional two-dimensional radiographs, three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning, gradient-echo MRI technique, and histological sections. A resolution of 100 μm was obtained from in vitro teeth. SWIFT also identified the presence and extent of dental caries and fine structures of the teeth, including cracks and accessory canals, which are not visible with existing clinical radiography techniques. Intraoral positioning of the radiofrequency coil produced initial images of multiple adjacent teeth at a resolution of 400 μm. SWIFT MRI offers simultaneous three-dimensional hard- and soft-tissue imaging of teeth without the use of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it has the potential to image minute dental structures within clinically relevant scanning times. This technology has implications for endodontists because it offers a potential method to longitudinally evaluate teeth where pulp and root structures have been regenerated. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of holmium laser on dental structure in vivo: thermal evaluation and histological analysis on pulpal tissue; Efeitos in vivo do laser de holmio em estrutura dental: monitoracao termica e analise histologica do tecido pulpar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strefezza, Claudia

    2001-07-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that Ho:YLF laser is capable of inducing physical and chemical changes on dental surfaces treated for caries prevention. The temperature in the pulp chamber was in vitro evaluated to as a function of the power and frequency of the laser irradiation. The purpose of this work is to verify the occurrence of pulp inflammation after Ho:YLF laser irradiation using different parameters in rabbits' teeth. The premolars and molars of ten rabbits (NZB) were divided in two groups according to the irradiation energy values of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at 2.065{mu}m wave length, frequency of O,5Hz and pulse length of 250{mu}s. An group A teeth were irradiated with using ten pulses of 334mJ/pulse of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at O.5Hz, and group B, with 512mJ/pulse. Animals were killed by transcardiac perfusion and the samples were prepared for histopathological analysis. The in vitro temperature monitoring revealed an increase of 1 deg C for the 334mJ/pulse energy and 4.5 deg C for the 512mJ/pulse energy. SEM observations showed the occurrence of melting and resolidification in dental surface. From the in vivo analysis it can be concluded that both employed laser parameters did not induce to any inflammatory response from the pulp. (author)

  12. Effects of holmium laser on dental structure in vivo: thermal evaluation and histological analysis on pulpal tissue; Efeitos in vivo do laser de holmio em estrutura dental: monitoracao termica e analise histologica do tecido pulpar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strefezza, Claudia

    2001-07-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that Ho:YLF laser is capable of inducing physical and chemical changes on dental surfaces treated for caries prevention. The temperature in the pulp chamber was in vitro evaluated to as a function of the power and frequency of the laser irradiation. The purpose of this work is to verify the occurrence of pulp inflammation after Ho:YLF laser irradiation using different parameters in rabbits' teeth. The premolars and molars of ten rabbits (NZB) were divided in two groups according to the irradiation energy values of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at 2.065{mu}m wave length, frequency of O,5Hz and pulse length of 250{mu}s. An group A teeth were irradiated with using ten pulses of 334mJ/pulse of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at O.5Hz, and group B, with 512mJ/pulse. Animals were killed by transcardiac perfusion and the samples were prepared for histopathological analysis. The in vitro temperature monitoring revealed an increase of 1 deg C for the 334mJ/pulse energy and 4.5 deg C for the 512mJ/pulse energy. SEM observations showed the occurrence of melting and resolidification in dental surface. From the in vivo analysis it can be concluded that both employed laser parameters did not induce to any inflammatory response from the pulp. (author)

  13. Development of a method based on inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Muynck, David; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2009-01-01

    A method, based on the use of a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry instrument equipped with a quadrupole-based collision/reaction cell (dynamic reaction cell, DRC), was developed for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental (enamel and dentine) tissue. The use of NH 3 , introduced at a gas flow rate of 0.8 mL min -1 in the dynamic reaction cell, combined with a rejection parameter q (RPq) setting of 0.65, allows interference-free determination of calcium via its low-abundant isotopes 42 Ca, 43 Ca and 44 Ca, and of strontium via its isotopes 86 Sr and 88 Sr that are freed from overlap due to the occurrence of ArCa + and/or Ca 2 + ions. Also the determination of phosphorus ( 31 P, mono-isotopic) was shown to be achievable using the same dynamic reaction cell operating conditions. The bone certified reference materials NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash and NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal were used for validation of the measurement protocol that was shown capable of providing accurate and reproducible results. Detection limits of P, Ca and Sr in dental tissue digests were established as 3 μg L -1 for P, 2 μg L -1 for Ca and 0.2 μg L -1 for Sr. This method can be used to simultaneously (i) evaluate the impact of diagenesis on the elemental and isotopic composition of buried skeletal tissue via its Ca/P ratio and (ii) determine its Sr concentration. The measurement protocol was demonstrated as fit-for-purpose by the analysis of a set of teeth of archaeological interest for their Ca/P ratio and Sr concentration.

  14. The use of the X-ray investigation for dental caries diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecetkova, A.; Ondrasovicova, J.

    2008-01-01

    Caries is defect of the hard dental tissue which is cause by cariogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity. New classification of caries is D1, D2, D3 and D4. D1 is caries in the first layer of enamel. D2 is caries in the second layer of enamel till the margin of dentine ( caries superficial ). D3 is caries in the first layer of dentine ( caries media ).D4 is caries on the top of pulp chamber ( caries pulpae proxima ). One of the most frequently used methods of radiography to detect of caries is bitewing ( BTW ) radiography. (authors)

  15. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  16. Soft tissue changes from maxillary distraction osteogenesis versus orthognathic surgery in patients with cleft lip and palate--a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hannah Daile P; Cheung, Lim Kwong

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare the soft tissue changes after maxillary advancement using conventional orthognathic surgery (CO) and distraction osteogenesis (DO) in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). The study group of 39 CLP patients with maxillary hypoplasia underwent either CO or DO with 4 to 10 mm of maxillary advancement. Lateral cephalographs were taken preoperatively and postoperatively at regular intervals. A series of skeletal, dental, and soft tissue landmarks was used to evaluate the changes in the soft tissue and the correlation of hard and soft tissue changes and ratios. Significant differences were found between the CO and DO patients at A point in both maxillary advancement and downgrafting in the early follow-up period. On soft tissue landmarks of pronasale, subnasale, and labial superius, significant differences were found between the 2 groups at 6 months postoperatively only with maxillary advancement. There was better correlation of hard and soft tissue changes with maxillary advancement. The nasal projection was significantly different between the 2 groups at the early and intermediate period. There was much more consistent hard to soft tissue ratios in maxillary advancement with DO than with CO. Both CO and DO can induce significant soft tissue changes of the upper lip and nose, particularly with maxillary advancement. DO generates more consistent hard to soft tissue ratios. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental erosion--an overview with emphasis on chemical and histopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, A; Schlueter, N; Rakhmatullina, E; Ganss, C

    2011-01-01

    The quality of dental care and modern achievements in dental science depend strongly on understanding the properties of teeth and the basic principles and mechanisms involved in their interaction with surrounding media. Erosion is a disorder to which such properties as structural features of tooth, physiological properties of saliva, and extrinsic and intrinsic acidic sources and habits contribute, and all must be carefully considered. The degree of saturation in the surrounding solution, which is determined by pH and calcium and phosphate concentrations, is the driving force for dissolution of dental hard tissue. In relation to caries, with the calcium and phosphate concentrations in plaque fluid, the 'critical pH' below which enamel dissolves is about 5.5. For erosion, the critical pH is lower in products (e.g. yoghurt) containing more calcium and phosphate than plaque fluid and higher when the concentrations are lower. Dental erosion starts by initial softening of the enamel surface followed by loss of volume with a softened layer persisting at the surface of the remaining tissue. Dentine erosion is not clearly understood, so further in vivo studies, including histopathological aspects, are needed. Clinical reports show that exposure to acids combined with an insufficient salivary flow rate results in enhanced dissolution. The effects of these and other interactions result in a permanent ion/substance exchange and reorganisation within the tooth material or at its interface, thus altering its strength and structure. The rate and severity of erosion are determined by the susceptibility of the dental tissues towards dissolution. Because enamel contains less soluble mineral than dentine, it tends to erode more slowly. The chemical mechanisms of erosion are also summarised in this review. Special attention is given to the microscopic and macroscopic histopathology of erosion. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Soft skills and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, M A G; Abu Kasim, N H; Naimie, Z

    2013-05-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses the different soft skills, how they are taught and assessed and the issues that need to be addressed in their teaching and assessment. The use of the module by the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya for development of soft skills for institutions of higher learning introduced by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Functional role of EMMPRIN in the formation and mineralisation of dental matrix in mouse molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Xing, Guofang; Hou, Liwen; Bao, Jing; Chen, Yuqing; Jiao, Ting; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2015-02-01

    Our previous research has shown that the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is expressed during and may function in the early development of tooth germs. In the present study, we observed the specific expression of EMMPRIN in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during the middle and late stages of tooth germ development using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, to extend our understanding of the function of EMMPRIN in odontogenesis, we used an anti-EMMPRIN function-blocking antibody to remove EMMPRIN activity in tooth germ culture in vitro. Both the formation and mineralisation of dental hard tissues were suppressed in the tooth germ culture after the abrogation of EMMPRIN. Meanwhile, significant reductions in VEGF, MMP-9, ALPL, ameloblastin, amelogenin and enamelin expression were observed in antibody-treated tooth germ explants compared to control and normal serum-treated explants. The current results illustrate that EMMPRIN may play a critical role in the processing and maturation of the dental matrix.

  20. Differentiation ability of rat postnatal dental pulp cells in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The current rapid progression in stem cell research has enhanced our knowledge of dental tissue regeneration. In this study, rat dental pulp cells were isolated and their differentiation ability was evaluated. First, dental pulp cells were obtained from maxillary incisors of male Wistar rats.

  1. A retrospective evaluation of traumatic dental injury in children who applied to the dental hospital, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, M E; Ozmen, B; Koyuturk, A E; Tokay, U; Kasap, P; Guler, D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze traumatic dental injuries in children visiting the dental hospital emergency department in Samsun of Turkey, in the period from 2007 to 2011. Data of age, gender, causes of dental trauma, injured teeth, type of dental injuries, the application period, the dental treatments, and traumatic dental injuries according to the seasons were obtained from the records at dental hospital. Of all 320 patients with traumatic dental injury, 205 were boys and 115 were girls with a boys/girls ratio 1.78:1. Traumatic dental injury was observed more frequently in the 7-12 age groups: 52.5% in girls and 67.8% in boys. Falls are the major cause of traumatic dental injury in the age group 6-12 (51.4%). Sport activities are a common cause of traumatic dental injury in the 7-12 age group (34.2%). Patients visited a dentist within approximately 2 h (57.1%). The upper anterior teeth were subjected to trauma more frequently than the lower anterior teeth. The maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth, and the mandibular canins were the least affected teeth. In primary teeth, avulsion was the most common type of dental injury (23%); on the other hand, enamel fractures were the most common type of dental injury (30.6%) observed in permanent teeth. In the primary dentition, the most commonly performed treatments were dental examination and prescribing (70%). The most common treatment choices in permanent teeth were restoration and dental examination (49.7 and 15.8%, respectively). The results of the study show that the emergency intervention to traumatized teeth is important for good prognosis of teeth and oral tissues. Therefore, the parents should be informed about dental trauma in schools, and dental hospital physicians should be subjected to postgraduate training.

  2. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  3. Hydrothermal treatment for TiN as abrasion resistant dental implant coating and its fibroblast response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xingling; Xu, Lingli; Munar, Melvin L.; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Dental implant made of pure titanium (Ti) is prone to scratch and abrasion during routine oral hygiene procedures. This results an increase in surface roughness and therefore, facilitates the adhesion of bacteria. In severe cases, this could lead to peri-implantitis. To overcome this problem, surface modification of Ti is necessary to improve its abrasion resistance. Besides, a strong implant–gingiva interface should also be guaranteed to prevent the adhesion of bacteria. In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) coating was first prepared with gas nitriding to increase surface hardness of pure the substrate. Then, the TiN was hydrothermally treated in CaCl 2 solution in order to improve its soft tissue biocompatibility. The effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on surface properties of TiN was investigated and its biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using NIH3T3 fibroblast cell. It was determined that 120 °C was the critical temperature for the hydrothermal treatment condition. Treatment below 120 °C could incorporate Ca into TiN surface, oxidize TiN surface partially and then improve the wettability while preserving its morphology and hardness. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were improved and cell spreading was enhanced on hydrothermally treated specimens compared with untreated ones. Improved wettability, Ca incorporation and negative surface due to interstitial N were believed to be the main reasons. Hydrothermal treatment is expected to make TiN a promising dental implant coating with excellent abrasion resistance and good soft tissue affinity. - Highlights: • Ca was incorporated into TiN surface while not sacrificing its hardness. • Interstitial N due to oxidation promoted Ca adsorption and cell adhesion. • Hydrothermal treatment makes TiN a promising coating for dental implant

  4. Hydrothermal treatment for TiN as abrasion resistant dental implant coating and its fibroblast response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xingling, E-mail: shixingling1985@hotmail.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Xu, Lingli [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Munar, Melvin L.; Ishikawa, Kunio [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Dental implant made of pure titanium (Ti) is prone to scratch and abrasion during routine oral hygiene procedures. This results an increase in surface roughness and therefore, facilitates the adhesion of bacteria. In severe cases, this could lead to peri-implantitis. To overcome this problem, surface modification of Ti is necessary to improve its abrasion resistance. Besides, a strong implant–gingiva interface should also be guaranteed to prevent the adhesion of bacteria. In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) coating was first prepared with gas nitriding to increase surface hardness of pure the substrate. Then, the TiN was hydrothermally treated in CaCl{sub 2} solution in order to improve its soft tissue biocompatibility. The effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on surface properties of TiN was investigated and its biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using NIH3T3 fibroblast cell. It was determined that 120 °C was the critical temperature for the hydrothermal treatment condition. Treatment below 120 °C could incorporate Ca into TiN surface, oxidize TiN surface partially and then improve the wettability while preserving its morphology and hardness. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were improved and cell spreading was enhanced on hydrothermally treated specimens compared with untreated ones. Improved wettability, Ca incorporation and negative surface due to interstitial N were believed to be the main reasons. Hydrothermal treatment is expected to make TiN a promising dental implant coating with excellent abrasion resistance and good soft tissue affinity. - Highlights: • Ca was incorporated into TiN surface while not sacrificing its hardness. • Interstitial N due to oxidation promoted Ca adsorption and cell adhesion. • Hydrothermal treatment makes TiN a promising coating for dental implant.

  5. RESULTS OF QUALITY COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN WITH BLOOD CLOTTING (PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gavrilenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment methods for diseases of teeth hard tissues and periodontium for children with blood clotting pathology are described in modern literature. But in practice we are faced with the problem of providing dental treatment for these children. Work of pediatric dentist is prevented by the risk of bleeding, fear of dental procedures, child’s psychoemotional tension and refusal of treatment because of bleeding. Taking into account the specificity of blood clotting pathology, surgical methods of dental treatment prevail for these children, which is evidenced by the early loss of deciduous and permanent teeth, occlusal surface disturbances, dentoalveolar anomalies, inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues. Aim. To evaluate the level of dental care for children with the diseases of blood clotting. Materials and methods. 120 children between 2 and 18 years old with blood clotting disorders (hemophilia A, B, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopathy were examined. Children were divided into groups: I group – 2-5 years old (40 children, II group – 6-10 years old (40 children, III group – 11-18 years old (40 children, according to the periods of tooth development, with an equal number of children in groups according to diagnoses. Clinical examination was carried out according to the standard scheme, including the analysis of complaints, anamnesis of treatment at the dentist, objective data with the use of statistical method of masticatory efficiency (according to N.I. Agapov, the level of dental care (according to P.A. Leus. Results. During clinical dental examination of children with blood clotting pathology it was found that destruction of crowns of maxillary front teeth, the first deciduous molars and the second deciduous molars, as well as their loss, prevails in the temporary occlusion. During the examination of 2-5 years old children with blood clotting pathology, loss of less than 25% of masticatory efficiency was revealed for 25

  6. Nuclear analytical methods for trace element studies in calcified tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M.A.; Chaudhry, M.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Various nuclear analytical methods have been developed and applied to determine the elemental composition of calcified tissues (teeth and bones). Fluorine was determined by prompt gamma activation analysis through the 19 F(p,ag) 16 O reaction. Carbon was measured by activation analysis with He-3 ions, and the technique of Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was applied to simultaneously determine Ca, P, and trace elements in well-documented teeth. Dental hard tissues, enamel, dentine, cement, and their junctions, as well as different parts of the same tissue, were examined separately. Furthermore, using a Proton Microprobe, we measured the surface distribution of F and other elements on and around carious lesions on the enamel. The depth profiles of F, and other elements, were also measured right up to the amelodentin junction

  7. Human dental enamel and dentin structural effects after Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Darlon Martíns; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; de Mendonça, Adriano Augusto Melo; Elossais, André Afif; Saad, José Roberto Cury; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-05-01

    Ideally projected to be applied on soft tissues, infrared lasers were improved by restorative dentistry to be used in hard dental tissues cavity preparations--namely enamel and dentin. This paper evidentiates the relevant aspects of infrared Erbium laser's action mechanism and its effects, and characterizes the different effects deriving from the laser's beams emission. The criteria for use and selection of optimal parameters for the correct application of laser systems and influence of supporting factors on the process, such as water amount and its presence in the ablation process, protection exerted by the plasma shielding and structural factors, which are indispensable in dental tissues cavity preparation related to restorative technique, are subordinated to optical modifications caused by the interaction of the energy dissipated by these laser light emission systems in the targeted tissue substrate. Differences in the action of infrared Erbium laser system in regard to the nature of the ablation process and variations on the morphological aspects observed in the superficial structure of the target tissue irradiated, may be correlated to the structural optical modifications of the substrate produced by an interaction of the energy propagated by laser systems.

  8. In vitro assessment of the composition and microhardness of hard tissues of oral cavity submitted to gamma irradiation; Avaliacao in vitro da composicao e microdureza dos tecidos duros da cavidade bucal submetidos a irradiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Wilber Edison Bernaola

    2017-11-01

    Clinical Radiotherapy is extremely important for the treatment of malignant lesions of the head and neck region, however, exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to systemic or local complications during and after radiation treatment. Among these immediate local complications are the oral cavity xerostomia and the consequent oral mucositis. Regarding late complications produced by radiation, tooth decay of radiation and osteoradionecrosis are included, which are considered dose-dependent lesions, with high incidence in recent decades and difficult to manage, although these appear after completion of treatment and under the influence of local factors. The methodology proposed in this study consists in evaluating the effect of gamma radiation after irradiation of the samples, using the dose used in patients suffering with head and neck cancer. The samples were obtained from human enamel and root dentin; and swine mandibular bone, which were previously polished, and then submitted to the analysis of the initial surface microhardness of all groups. Subsequently, the samples were irradiated in a dose rate of 4 Gy per day, completing a total dose of 72 Gy. Finally, the samples were submitted to surface microhardness analysis after irradiation, which presented statistically significant results from the Student t, ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests referred to the difference of the mean of the initial and final values of each study group with a significant value of p = 0.00 (<0.05). Regarding the morphological analysis in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the deleterious effect of gamma irradiation was evidenced as structural cracks, breaks and superficial fractures of the analyzed tissues and the biochemical analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection technique using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR - FTIR) showed degradation of inorganic components and denaturation of organic compounds; whereby, the effect of gamma irradiation on the hard tissues of the oral

  9. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human t...

  10. A comparative evaluation of dental caries status among hearing-impaired and normal children of Malda, West Bengal, evaluated with the Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sudipta; Kundu, Goutam; Maiti, Shyamal Kumar; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Bazmi, Badruddin Ahamed; Mukhopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the major modern-day diseases of dental hard tissue. It may affect both normal and hearing-impaired children. This study is aimed to evaluate and compare the prevalence of dental caries in hearing-impaired and normal children of Malda, West Bengal, utilizing the Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST). In a cross-sectional, case-control study of dental caries status of 6-12-year-old children was assessed. Statistically significant difference was found in studied (hearing-impaired) and control group (normal children). In the present study, caries affected hearing-impaired children found to be about 30.51% compared to 15.81% in normal children, and the result was statistically significant. Regarding individual caries assessment criteria, nearly all subgroups reflect statistically significant difference except sealed tooth structure group, internal caries-related discoloration in dentin, and distinct cavitation into dentine group, and the result is significant at P caries effected hearing-impaired children found about 30.51% instead of 15.81% in normal children, and the result was statistically significant (P caries assessment criteria, nearly all subgroups reflect statistically significant difference except sealed tooth structure group, internal caries-related discoloration in dentin, and distinct cavitation into dentine group. Dental health of hearing-impaired children was found unsatisfactory than normal children when studied in relation to dental caries status evaluated with CAST.

  11. Can tissues be owned?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... Regulations Regarding Rendering of Clinical Forensic Medicine ... 1 Special Interest Research Group on Biotechnology and Medical Law of the College of Law, University of ... persons for the following medical and dental purposes: ... tissue to the international market were taking tissue without consent.

  12. [Nutrition, diet and dental health--de- and remineralisation of teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imfeld, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    There is little if any evidence that nutrition during the time of tooth formation has any clinically significant effect on caries susceptibility of erupted teeth in man. Caries, erosion and demastication are not nutritional diseases. They are, however, diet-related diseases because erupted teeth are subject to local chemical and mechanical effects of the diet contacting the teeth. Caries is the result of a chronic undermining demineralisation of the teeth by organic acids that are produced by the bacteria of the dental biofilm while fermenting carbohydrates from the human diet. Dental erosion is the result of a chronic localised loss of dental hard tissue etched away from the surface by acids derived from the diet or from gastric reflux. The physicochemical grounds of de- and remineralisation of teeth are explained using detailed diagrams. Initial caries lesions without cavitation of the surface can remineralise (heal) under conditions of low cariogenic diet and good oral hygiene. However, once the surface has broken and cavitation occurred, there is no alternative to restorative dental therapy because remineralisation is no more possible.

  13. Pre-Radiation dental considerations and management for head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufta, Kenneth; Forman, Michael; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sollecito, Thomas P; Panchal, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) is accompanied by a high rate of morbidity, and complications can have a lifelong, profound impact on both patients and caregivers. Radiation-related injury to the hard and soft tissue of the head and neck can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to provide patent-specific guidelines for managing the oral health and related side effects of HNC patients treated with radiation therapy. Based on reviewed articles retrieved on the PubMed database, guidelines for management of the oral health of this patient population were organized into three separate categories: cancer, patient, and dentition. The location, type, and staging of the cancer, along with the radiation used to treat the cancer significantly impact dental treatment. Several unique patient characteristics such as motivation, presence of support system, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and race have all been found to affect outcomes. Dental disease and available supportive dental management was found to significantly impact treatment and quality of life in this patient population. By comprehensively assessing unique cancer, patient, and dental-related factors, this review provides individualized evidence-based guidelines on the proper management of this complex and vulnerable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by dental resin monomers

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Ji Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Zhu, Tingting; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental resin monomers that are leached from the resin matrix due to incomplete polymerization can affect the viability and various functions of oral tissues and cells. In this study, the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were examined. To mimic clinical situations, dental pulp cells were treated with resin monomers for 24?h prior to the analysis of alkaline p...

  15. Cariology Education in Canadian Dental Schools: Where Are We? Where Do We Need to Go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, Svetlana; Girard, Félix; Fontana, Margherita

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document cariology education across Canadian dental schools. Ten faculty members who supervise cariology education at each of the ten Canadian dental schools were invited to participate in the study in 2016. An adapted version of the European Organization for Caries Research-Association for Dental Education in Europe cariology curriculum group questionnaire was used. Representatives of all ten dental schools completed the questionnaire, for a 100% response rate. In four schools, cariology and restorative dentistry were taught by the same department. Five schools had didactic/laboratory courses focusing primarily on cariology as well as a specific written curriculum. Six schools provided cariology-related hands-on workshops/laboratories before students started working with patients. In teaching cariology, seven institutions included dental hard tissues defects. The following caries detection methods were addressed didactically in cariology education: visual (10/10 total schools), tactile (9/10), International Caries Detection and Assessment System criteria (6/10), caries activity assessment (9/10), radiographic (10/10), and other detection tools (8/10). Seven schools charted activity of carious lesions in clinic. Only one school used the concept of caries risk assessment regularly in clinic. Clinical cariology teaching was carried out mostly by private dentists hired as clinical instructors (7/10) and faculty members involved in didactic cariology education (9/10). Calibration of faculty members for caries detection criteria was reported by only one school. The main concern reported by all institutions was the difficulty of implementing didactic instruction on cariology into clinical training. This study found that contemporary cariology concepts are in the process of being implemented in didactic education across Canadian dental schools, but all schools lacked appropriate integration of cariology education into clinical training. These

  16. Diabetes induces metabolic alterations in dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Mariana Ferreira; Ganzerla, Emily; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nicolau, José

    2008-10-01

    Diabetes can interfere in tissue nutrition and can impair dental pulp metabolism. This disease causes oxidative stress in cells and tissues. However, little is known about the antioxidant system in the dental pulp of diabetics. Thus, it would be of importance to study this system in this tissue in order to verify possible alterations indicative of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate some parameters of antioxidant system of the dental pulp of healthy (n = 8) and diabetic rats (n = 8). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin in rats. Six weeks after diabetes induction, a pool of the dental pulp of the 4 incisors of each rat (healthy and diabetic) was used for the determination of total protein and sialic acid concentrations and catalase and peroxidase activities. Data were compared by a Student t test (p pulps from both groups presented similar total protein concentrations and peroxidase activity. Dental pulps of diabetic rats exhibited significantly lower free, conjugated, and total sialic acid concentrations than those of control tissues. Catalase activity in diabetic dental pulps was significantly enhanced in comparison with that of control pulps. The result of the present study is indicative of oxidative stress in the dental pulp caused by diabetes. The increase of catalase activity and the reduction of sialic acid could be resultant of reactive oxygen species production.

  17. Effect of prophylactic treatments on the superficial roughness of dental tissues and of two esthetic restorative materials Efeito de tratamentos profiláticos na rugosidade superficial de tecidos dentais e de dois materiais restauradores estéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Salami

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental prophylaxis is a common way to remove dental plaque and stain, both undesirable factors in most dentistry procedures. However, besides cleaning the tooth surface, prophylactic techniques may increase the surface roughness of restorations and dental tissues, which, in turn, may result in plaque accumulation, superficial staining and superficial degradation. This study evaluated the effect of three prophylactic techniques - sodium bicarbonate jet, pumice paste and whiting paste - on the superficial roughness of two restorative materials - a composite resin and a compomer - and on the superficial roughness of two dental surfaces - enamel and cementum/dentin - through rugosimetric and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. Statistical analysis of the rugosimetric data showed that the use of pumice paste on enamel produced a significantly smoother surface than the natural surface. However, comparing the effect of the three techniques, prophylaxis with the pumice paste produced a rougher surface than did the other techniques as regards enamel and cementum/dentin probably due to its abrasiveness. On composite resin, the pumice paste only produced a rougher surface than did the whiting paste. On compomer, all of the applied treatments produced similar results. Based on rugosimetric and SEM analysis, we could conclude that the prophylactic treatments employed did not improve roughness of the studied surfaces. As to the effects of the techniques, they were different depending on the surfaces on which the prophylactic treatments were applied.A profilaxia dental é uma prática comum para a remoção de placa bacteriana e outros indutos que dificultam a realização dos procedimentos restauradores. Entretanto, como efeito secundário à limpeza, pode-se ter uma superfície mais rugosa e sujeita a manchamentos e degradações. O presente estudo avaliou os efeitos de três técnicas de profilaxia - jato de bicarbonato de sódio, pasta de pedra

  18. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  19. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  20. Will mineral trioxide aggregate replace calcium hydroxide in treating pulpal and periodontal healing complications subsequent to dental trauma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakland, Leif K; Andreasen, Jens O

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has over the last two decades begun to take the place of calcium hydroxide (CH) in the treatment of a variety of pulpal and periodontal healing complications following dental trauma. These conditions include teeth with: (i) exposed pulps, (ii) immature roots......, the quality of such induced hard tissues, and finally the dentin weakening effect of CH, which in some instances lead to cervical root fractures in immature teeth. MTA appears, from a relatively few clinical studies, to overcome these shortcomings of CH. The lack of long-term clinical studies, however, may...

  1. Human dental pulp cell culture and cell transplantation with an alginate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumabe, Shunji; Nakatsuka, Michiko; Kim, Gi-Seup; Jue, Seong-Suk; Aikawa, Fumiko; Shin, Je-Won; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2006-02-01

    Many studies on tissue stem cells have been conducted in the field of regenerative medicine, and some studies have indicated that cultured dental pulp mesenchymal cells secrete dentin matrix. In the present study we used alginate as a scaffold to transplant subcultured human dental pulp cells subcutaneously into the backs of nude mice. We found that when beta-glycerophosphate was added to the culture medium, dentin sialophosphoprotein mRNA coding dentin sialoprotein (DSP) was expressed. An increase in alkaline phosphatase, which is an early marker for odontoblast differentiation, was also demonstrated. At 6 weeks after implantation the subcutaneous formation of radio-opaque calcified bodies was observed in situ. Immunohistochemical and fine structure studies identified expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, and DSP in the mineralizing transplants. Isolated odontoblast-like cells initiated dentin-like hard tissue formation and scattered autolyzing apoptotic cells were also observed in the transplants. The study showed that subcultured dental pulp cells actively differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and induce calcification in an alginate scaffold.

  2. Isolated rat dental pulp cell culture and transplantation with an alginate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shiro; Kumabe, Shunji; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2006-05-01

    Many studies have been conducted on tissue stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine, and cultured dental pulp mesenchymal cells have been reported to secrete dentin matrix. In the present study we used alginate as a scaffold to transplant subcultured rat dental-pulp-derived cells subcutaneously into the back of nude mice. We found that when beta-glycerophosphate was added to the culture medium, the mRNA of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene coding dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) was expressed, and an increase in alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of odontoblast differentiation, was also demonstrated. Six weeks after implantation, subcutaneous formation of radiopaque calcified bodies was observed in situ. Immunohistochemical and fine structure studies identified expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, and DSP in the mineralizing transplants, and isolated odontoblast-like cells began to form dentin-like hard tissue formation. Scattered autolyzing apoptotic cells were also observed in the transplants. The study showed that subcultured rat dental-pulp-derived cells actively differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and induce calcification in an alginate scaffold.

  3. Differences of isolated dental stem cells dependent on donor age and consequences for autologous tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Manuela; Steindorff, Marina M; Strempel, Jürgen F; Winkel, Andreas; Kühnel, Mark P; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-06-01

    Autologous therapy via stem cell-based tissue regeneration is an aim to rebuild natural teeth. One option is the use of adult stem cells from the dental pulp (DPSCs), which have been shown to differentiate into several types of tissue in vitro and in vivo, especially into tooth-like structures. DPSCs are mainly isolated from the dental pulp of third molars routinely extracted for orthodontic reasons. Due to the extraction of third molars at various phases of life, DPSCs are isolated at different developmental stages of the tooth. The present study addressed the question whether DPSCs from patients of different ages were similar in their growth characteristics with respect to the stage of tooth development. Therefore DPSCs from third molars of 12-30 year-old patients were extracted, and growth characteristics, e.g. doubling time and maximal cell division potential were analysed. In addition, pulp and hard dental material weight were recorded. Irrespective of the age of patients almost all isolated cells reached 40-60 generations with no correlation between maximal cell division potential and patient age. Cells from patients <22 years showed a significantly faster doubling time than the cells from patients ≥22 years. The age of patients at the time of stem cell isolation is not a crucial factor concerning maximal cell division potential, but does have an impact on the doubling time. However, differences in individuals regarding growth characteristics were more pronounced than age-dependent differences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of oro-dental anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalamah, M; Baroudi, K

    2016-04-19

    Practitioners and policy-makers need information about the relative frequency of dental anomalies among children in their region. This study investigated the prevalence of different oral anomalies among schoolchildren in Sana'a city, Yemen. A sample of 1000 private and public schoolchildren aged 4-12 years were examined by the same examiner using disposable tongue blades. The total prevalence of oral anomalies was 15.1%, most commonly in boys (male:female ratio 3.2:1) aged 7-12 years. The most prevalent dental anomaly related to hard tissues was tooth hypoplasia (2.8%), followed by hypocalcification (2.6%), then microdontia (0.5%), macrodontia (0.4%), hypodontia (0.4%), supernumerary teeth (0.3%), tooth transposition (0.3%), dental fusion (0.2%) and gemination (0.2%). The most prevalent soft tissues anomaly was fissured tongue (4.0%), followed by ankyloglossia (1.8%), geographic tongue (0.9%), macroglossia (0.4%) and hairy tongue (0.3%). Appropriate measures need to be taken early to mitigate the negative impact and later costs of treatment of anomalies.

  5. [Aftercare for durability and profitability of single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; van Loveren, C; van der Maarel-Wierink, C D; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2013-01-01

    An important aim ofa treatment with single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses is a durable and profitable treatment outcome. That requires aftercare, too. First, the frequency of routine oral examinations should be assessed, using an individual risk profile. The objectives of the routine oral examinations are the prevention and, when necessary, the treatment of pathological conditions and complications. With regard to prevention, attention should be paid to information and instruction, oral biofilm and calculus, non-functional activities, hard tooth tissues, periodontal and peri-implant tissues, and saliva. Subsequently, it can be determined whether the intended durability and profitability have been achieved or can still be achieved, whether or not through indicated adjustments. Special attention should be paid to endodontically treated teeth. Restorative, repair or replacement treatments may be indicated in case ofcomplications, such as loose single- or multi-unitfixed dental prosthesis, fracture of a fixed dental prosthesis unit, lost tooth pulp vitality, tooth root fracture, and implant or implant abutment problems.

  6. Dental pulp stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Luciano; Cordeiro, Mabel M; Nör, Silvia A; Nör, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. This characteristic facilitates ex vivo expansion and enhances the translational potential of these cells. Notably, the dental pulp is arguably the most accessible source of postnatal stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  7. Laser diagnostic and therapy of dental caries: the clinic point of view; Laser diagnostico e tratamento da carie dental: uma visao clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Priscila Faria

    2001-07-01

    Dental caries's diagnosis is a major dentistry problem from the clinic point of view. The laser beam on the region of 655 nm induces the fluorescence of the compounds present in the hard tissue, quantifying differences between sound and carious enamel and dentine. Diagnodent (Kavo, Germany), showed to be effective regarding dental caries's diagnosis in the present research sampling. The Er:YAG laser (Kavo Key Laser 2, Germany) performed efficient cavity preparations in caries lesions of I and V class type, using up energies that ranged from 300 mJ to 350 mJ with 4 Hz repetition rate for the enamel; and from 250 mJ to 300 mJ with 4 Hz repetition rate for the dentine, and with 80 mJ with 6 Hz of repetition rate for laser conditioning. In the Er:YAG laser preparations no patient was anesthetized even when there were deeper cavities, and the maximum degree of pain ( which ranged from 0 to 10) was 4. In the control group with conventional high-speed drill two patients were anesthetized and the maximum degree of pain was 7. Restorations performed by conventional method of composite were equally satisfying both in caries groups of I and V class type and in the control group. The laser application in the operative dentistry office as a new method of diagnosis and dental preparations should be a good alternative to the use of the conventional dental drill. Nevertheless, dentistry practice has a lot to improve from technology progress, as well as new researches on laser dentistry are necessary in a long term. New types of lasers will come about and will increasingly improve the dental practice assistance and procedures quality. (author)

  8. Laser diagnostic and therapy of dental caries: the clinic point of view; Laser diagnostico e tratamento da carie dental: uma visao clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Priscila Faria

    2001-07-01

    Dental caries's diagnosis is a major dentistry problem from the clinic point of view. The laser beam on the region of 655 nm induces the fluorescence of the compounds present in the hard tissue, quantifying differences between sound and carious enamel and dentine. Diagnodent (Kavo, Germany), showed to be effective regarding dental caries's diagnosis in the present research sampling. The Er:YAG laser (Kavo Key Laser 2, Germany) performed efficient cavity preparations in caries lesions of I and V class type, using up energies that ranged from 300 mJ to 350 mJ with 4 Hz repetition rate for the enamel; and from 250 mJ to 300 mJ with 4 Hz repetition rate for the dentine, and with 80 mJ with 6 Hz of repetition rate for laser conditioning. In the Er:YAG laser preparations no patient was anesthetized even when there were deeper cavities, and the maximum degree of pain ( which ranged from 0 to 10) was 4. In the control group with conventional high-speed drill two patients were anesthetized and the maximum degree of pain was 7. Restorations performed by conventional method of composite were equally satisfying both in caries groups of I and V class type and in the control group. The laser application in the operative dentistry office as a new method of diagnosis and dental preparations should be a good alternative to the use of the conventional dental drill. Nevertheless, dentistry practice has a lot to improve from technology progress, as well as new researches on laser dentistry are necessary in a long term. New types of lasers will come about and will increasingly improve the dental practice assistance and procedures quality. (author)

  9. Catalase activity in healthy and inflamed pulp tissues of permanent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-02

    Nov 2, 2015 ... pulps, which is due to pulpitis in comparison to healthy dental pulp. Key words: .... human dental pulp cells by Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide. J Endod ... Biology of disease: Free radicals and tissue injury.

  10. Comprehensive hard materials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive Hard Materials deals with the production, uses and properties of the carbides, nitrides and borides of these metals and those of titanium, as well as tools of ceramics, the superhard boron nitrides and diamond and related compounds. Articles include the technologies of powder production (including their precursor materials), milling, granulation, cold and hot compaction, sintering, hot isostatic pressing, hot-pressing, injection moulding, as well as on the coating technologies for refractory metals, hard metals and hard materials. The characterization, testing, quality assurance and applications are also covered. Comprehensive Hard Materials provides meaningful insights on materials at the leading edge of technology. It aids continued research and development of these materials and as such it is a critical information resource to academics and industry professionals facing the technological challenges of the future. Hard materials operate at the leading edge of technology, and continued res...

  11. Effect of local administration of platelet-rich plasma and guided tissue regeneration on the level of bone resorption in early dental implant insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duka Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Osseointegration is a result of cellular migration, differentiation, bone formation, and bone remodeling on the surface of an implant. Each of these processes depends on platelets and blood coagulum. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is used to improve osseointegration and stability of implants. The aim of the research was to test the influence that PRP and guided tissue regeneration in bone defects have on bone defect filling and the level of bone resorption in early implant insertion. Methods. This experimental study included 10 dogs. A total of 40 BCT implants were inserted, 4 in each dog (two on the left side and two on the right side, with guided tissue regeneration. Radiologic analyses were done immediately after the insertion and 10 weeks after the insertion. Bone defect filling was measured by a graduated probe 10 weeks after the implant insertion. The following protocols were tested: I - PRP in combination with bovine deproteinized bone (BDB and resorptive membrane of bovine origin (RBDM, II - BDB + RBDM, III - PRP + RBDM and IV - RBDM. Results. The applied protocols affected differently the bone defect filling and the level of bone resorption. Significantly better results (the lowest bone resorption were achieved with protocol I (PRP + BDB + RBDM in comparison with protocols III (PRP + RBDM and IV (RBDM, but not with protocol II (BDB + RBDM. On the other hand, no significant difference was found among protocols II (BDB + RBDM, III (PRP + RBDM and IV (RBDM in the level of bone tissue resorption. Conslusion. The bone defect filling was largest and the level of bone resorption was lowest in the protocol with PRP applied in combination with BDB and RBDM.

  12. The use of neutron radiography and microdensitometry in the study of instrumental effectiveness on dental tissue in the process of mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulcain, J.M.; Tamisier, J.; Espie, J.H.; Masse, R.; Laporte, A.

    1983-01-01

    In this study, neutron-radiography is used as a non-destructive method of exposing the peripheral part of the root canal which, in the course of endodontic treatment, is to be removed by root therapy instruments. Samples are treated with an agent of contrast with high screen power for neutrons: gadolinium which is used in the form of a citrate solution, it slowly diffuses through non-mineralized structures and settles like the other rare earths on the interface of mineralized tissues and of those in the process of mineralization, in this case, dentin and predentin. This mechanism is on occasion controlled by the richness of proteoglycans in this tissue. Once the samples are saturated, a neutron-radiographic image is made, then analyzed by microdensitometry so as to obtain a quantitative parameter. After instrumentation of the samples, a new neutron-radiographic image, and a new microdensitometric analysis are made. The results thus obtained make it possible to quantify the effectiveness of the various instruments available for endodontic treatments. (Auth.)

  13. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosio