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Sample records for haplotype mismatched natural

  1. Correlation between haplotype of apolipoprotein B gene and natural longevity persons in Uygur Nationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated the correlation between polymorphisms and haplotypes in the apolipoprotein B (apoB) gene (SP-I/D, XbaI-RFLP, VNTR) and natural longevity persons among the Uygur people in Xin-jiang. For this purpose, 191 healthy Uygur individuals aged above 90 from Hetian area of Xinjiang were recruited, and another 53 persons aged 65—70 from the same nationality, the same region and with the same gender ratio, served as the control group. Genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP, PCR-RFLP and PCR-sequencing methods. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the frequencies of X+X+ genotype, M and L alleles and the genetypes composed of M and L were significantly higher in the longevity group than in the control group. In haplotype analyses, we found that, in the long-lived people, the frequency of haplotypes composed of the X+ and M alleles was significantly higher whereas the frequency of haplotypes composed of the X- and S alleles was significantly lower (both P<0.05) I than those of their controls. These results indicated that the S allele, SS genotype and X+-S, D-S, D-X+-S haplotypes were the possible adverse factors, whereas the M, L alleles, X+X+, MM, ML, LL genotypes and I-X+-M, X+-M haplotypes were the possibe protective factors for the naturally long-lived Uygur people in China.

  2. Correlation between haplotype of apolipoprotein B gene and natural longevity persons in Uygur Nationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG WenXi; QIU ChangChun; CHENG ZuHeng; ZHOU WenYu; GU MingLiang; XU Qun; FANG MingWu; NIU WenQuan

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated the correlation between polymorphisms and haplotypes in the apolipoprotein B (apoB) gene (SP-I/D, XbaI-RFLP, VNTR) and natural longevity persons among the Uygur people in Xinjiang. For this purpose, 191 healthy Uygur individuals aged above 90 from Hetian area of Xinjiang were recruited, and another 53 persons aged 65-70 from the same nationality, the same region and with the same gender ratio, served as the control group. Genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP, PCR-RFLP and PCR-sequencing methods. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the frequencies of X+X+ genotype, M and L alleles and the genetypes composed of M and L were significantly higher in the longevity group than in the control group. In haplotype analyses, we found that, in the long-lived people, the frequency of haplotypes composed of the X+ and M alleles was significantly higher whereas the frequency of haplotypes composed of the X- and S alleles was significantly lower (both P<0.05) I than those of their controls. These results indicated that the S allele, SS genotype and X+-S, D-S, D-X+-S haplotypes were the possible adverse factors, whereas the M, L alleles, X+X+, MM, ML, LL genotypes and I-X+-M, X+-M haplotypes were the possibe protective factors for the naturally long-lived Uygur people in China.

  3. Combining haplotypers

    CERN Document Server

    Kääriäinen, Matti; Lappalainen, Sampsa; Mielikäinen, Taneli

    2007-01-01

    Statistically resolving the underlying haplotype pair for a genotype measurement is an important intermediate step in gene mapping studies, and has received much attention recently. Consequently, a variety of methods for this problem have been developed. Different methods employ different statistical models, and thus implicitly encode different assumptions about the nature of the underlying haplotype structure. Depending on the population sample in question, their relative performance can vary greatly, and it is unclear which method to choose for a particular sample. Instead of choosing a single method, we explore combining predictions returned by different methods in a principled way, and thereby circumvent the problem of method selection. We propose several techniques for combining haplotype reconstructions and analyze their computational properties. In an experimental study on real-world haplotype data we show that such techniques can provide more accurate and robust reconstructions, and are useful for out...

  4. Genome patterns of selection and introgression of haplotypes in natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus.

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    Fabian Staubach

    Full Text Available General parameters of selection, such as the frequency and strength of positive selection in natural populations or the role of introgression, are still insufficiently understood. The house mouse (Mus musculus is a particularly well-suited model system to approach such questions, since it has a defined history of splits into subspecies and populations and since extensive genome information is available. We have used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typing arrays to assess genomic patterns of positive selection and introgression of alleles in two natural populations of each of the subspecies M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. Applying different statistical procedures, we find a large number of regions subject to apparent selective sweeps, indicating frequent positive selection on rare alleles or novel mutations. Genes in the regions include well-studied imprinted loci (e.g. Plagl1/Zac1, homologues of human genes involved in adaptations (e.g. alpha-amylase genes or in genetic diseases (e.g. Huntingtin and Parkin. Haplotype matching between the two subspecies reveals a large number of haplotypes that show patterns of introgression from specific populations of the respective other subspecies, with at least 10% of the genome being affected by partial or full introgression. Using neutral simulations for comparison, we find that the size and the fraction of introgressed haplotypes are not compatible with a pure migration or incomplete lineage sorting model. Hence, it appears that introgressed haplotypes can rise in frequency due to positive selection and thus can contribute to the adaptive genomic landscape of natural populations. Our data support the notion that natural genomes are subject to complex adaptive processes, including the introgression of haplotypes from other differentiated populations or species at a larger scale than previously assumed for animals. This implies that some of the admixture found in inbred strains of mice

  5. Transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes correlate with mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a natural population of Silene vulgaris

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    Olson Matthew S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although rapid changes in copy number and gene order are common within plant mitochondrial genomes, associated patterns of gene transcription are underinvestigated. Previous studies have shown that the gynodioecious plant species Silene vulgaris exhibits high mitochondrial diversity and occasional paternal inheritance of mitochondrial markers. Here we address whether variation in DNA molecular markers is correlated with variation in transcription of mitochondrial genes in S. vulgaris collected from natural populations. Results We analyzed RFLP variation in two mitochondrial genes, cox1 and atp1, in offspring of ten plants from a natural population of S. vulgaris in Central Europe. We also investigated transcription profiles of the atp1 and cox1 genes. Most DNA haplotypes and transcription profiles were maternally inherited; for these, transcription profiles were associated with specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. One individual exhibited a pattern consistent with paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA; this individual exhibited a transcription profile suggestive of paternal but inconsistent with maternal inheritance. We found no associations between gender and transcript profiles. Conclusions Specific transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were associated with specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a natural population of a gynodioecious species S. vulgaris. Our findings suggest the potential for a causal association between rearrangements in the plant mt genome and transcription product variation.

  6. Effects of TMEM154 haplotypes 1 and 3 on susceptibility to ovine progressive pneumonia virus following natural exposure in sheep.

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    Leymaster, K A; Chitko-McKown, C G; Clawson, M L; Harhay, G P; Heaton, M P

    2013-11-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) adversely affect production and well-being of sheep and goats throughout much of the world. The SRLV, including ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in North America, cause lifetime infections, and management procedures to eradicate or reduce disease prevalence are costly. Variants of ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) affect susceptibility to OPPV. The primary experimental objective was to estimate additive and dominance effects of TMEM154 haplotypes 1 and 3 on susceptibility to OPPV infection following natural exposure. A group of 187 trial lambs was born and raised by mature, infected ewes to ensure natural exposure to OPPV. Parents of trial lambs were heterozygous for haplotypes 1 and 3, producing lambs with diplotypes "1 1," "1 3," and "3 3." A group of 20 sentinel lambs was born and raised by mature, uninfected ewes that were diplotype "1 1." Sentinel lambs had diplotypes "1 1" and "1 3," being sired by the same set of rams as trial lambs. Trial and sentinel lambs were comingled during the experiment. Lambs were weaned at 60 d of age, bled 1 wk after weaning, and thereafter at intervals of 4 or 5 wk until 9 mo of age when OPPV infection status was determined by use of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Only 1 sentinel lamb became infected. Infection status of trial lambs was analyzed using logistic regression procedures to account for the binary nature of infection status and random effects of sires. Effects of sex, type of birth, type of rearing, age of dam, breed type of dam, and sires were not detected (P>0.20). Infection status was affected by diplotype of lamb (P=0.005), with additive (P=0.002) and dominance (P=0.052) effects identified. Predicted probabilities of infection for lambs with diplotypes "1 1," "1 3," and "3 3" were 0.094, 0.323, and 0.346, respectively. Confidence intervals for probabilities of infection for diplotypes "1 3" and "3 3" were similar, but distinct from diplotype

  7. HLA Haplotype Mismatch Transplants and Posttransplant Cyclophosphamide

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    Andrea Bacigalupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of high dose posttransplant cyclophosphamide (PT-CY introduced by the Baltimore group approximately 10 years ago has been rapidly adopted worldwide and is becoming a standard for patients undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical (HAPLO transplants. PT-CY has been used following nonmyeloablative as well as myeloablative conditioning regimens, for bone marrow or peripheral blood grafts, for patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Retrospective comparisons of HAPLO grafts with conventional sibling and unrelated donor grafts have been published and suggest comparable outcome. The current questions to be answered include the use of PT-CY for sibling and unrelated donors transplant, possibly in the context of prospective randomized trial.

  8. Detection of NAM-A1 Natural Variants in Bread Wheat Reveals Differences in Haplotype Distribution between a Worldwide Core Collection and European Elite Germplasm

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    Fabien Cormier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In wheat, remobilization of nitrogen absorbed before anthesis and regulation of monocarpic senescence is a major issue in breeding for nutrient use efficiency. We identified natural variants of NAM-A1, a gene having the same role as its well-characterized homoeolog NAM-B1, a NAC transcription factor associated with senescence kinetics and nutrient remobilization to the grain. Differences in haplotype frequencies between a worldwide core collection and a panel of European elite varieties were assessed and discussed. Moreover, hypotheses for the loss of function of the most common haplotype in elite European germplasm are discussed.

  9. The dual nature of mismatch repair as antimutator and mutator: for better or for worse

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    Sara Thornby Bak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly under attack by a number of both exogenous and endogenous agents that challenge its integrity. Among the mechanisms that have evolved to counteract this deleterious action, mismatch repair (MMR has specialized in removing DNA biosynthetic errors that occur when replicating the genome. Malfunction or inactivation of this system results in an increase in spontaneous mutability and a strong predisposition to tumor development. Besides this key corrective role, MMR proteins are involved in other pathways of DNA metabolism such as mitotic and meiotic recombination and processing of oxidative damage. Surprisingly, MMR is also required for certain mutagenic processes. The mutagenic MMR has beneficial consequences contributing to the generation of a vast repertoire of antibodies through class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation processes. However, this non-canonical mutagenic MMR also has detrimental effects; it promotes repeat expansions associated with neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases and may contribute to cancer/disease-related aberrant mutations and translocations. The reaction responsible for replication error correction has been the most thoroughly studied and it is the subject to numerous reviews. This review describes briefly the biochemistry of MMR and focuses primarily on the non-canonical MMR activities described in mammals as well as emerging research implicating interplay of MMR and chromatin.

  10. The Mismatch among Students' Views about Nature of Science, Acceptance of Evolution, and Evolutionary Science Understandings

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    Cavallo, Ann M. L.; White, Kevin J.; McCall, David

    2011-01-01

    This study explored interrelationships among high school students' views about nature of science (NOS), acceptance of evolution, and conceptual understanding of evolution, and the extent to which these may have shifted from pre- to post-instruction on evolutionary theory. Eighty-one students enrolled in ninth-grade Biology responded to…

  11. The Mismatch among Students' Views about Nature of Science, Acceptance of Evolution, and Evolutionary Science Understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Ann M. L.; White, Kevin J.; McCall, David

    2011-01-01

    This study explored interrelationships among high school students' views about nature of science (NOS), acceptance of evolution, and conceptual understanding of evolution, and the extent to which these may have shifted from pre- to post-instruction on evolutionary theory. Eighty-one students enrolled in ninth-grade Biology responded to…

  12. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway

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    Sibel Kucukyildirim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10−10 per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways.

  13. Haplotypes in the lipoprotein lipase gene influence fasting insulin and discovery of a new risk haplotype.

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    Goodarzi, Mark O; Taylor, Kent D; Guo, Xiuqing; Hokanson, John E; Haffner, Steven M; Cui, Jinrui; Chen, Yii-Der I; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Bergman, Richard N; Rotter, Jerome I

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies of Mexican Americans described association of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene haplotypes with insulin sensitivity/resistance and atherosclerosis. The most common haplotype (haplotype 1) was protective, whereas the fourth most common haplotype (haplotype 4) conferred risk for insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. In this study of Hispanics in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study Family Study, we sought to replicate LPL haplotype association with insulin sensitivity/resistance. LPL haplotypes based on 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed for association with indexes of insulin sensitivity and other metabolic and adiposity measures. This study was conducted in the general community of San Antonio, Texas, and San Luis Valley, Colorado. Participants in this study were 978 members of 86 Hispanic families. LPL haplogenotype, metabolic phenotypes, and adiposity were measured in this study. The haplotype structure was identical with that observed in prior studies. Among 978 phenotyped subjects, haplotype 1 was associated with decreased fasting insulin (P = 0.01), and haplotype 4 was associated with increased fasting insulin (P = 0.02) and increased visceral fat mass (P = 0.002). Insulin sensitivity, derived from iv glucose tolerance testing, tended (P > 0.1) to be higher with haplotype 1 (S(I) = 1.72) and lower with haplotype 4 (S(I)=1.38). Haplotype 2 was associated with increases in fasting insulin, triglycerides (TGs), TG to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio, and apolipoprotein B (P = 0.01-0.04). This study independently replicates our prior results of LPL haplotypes 1 and 4 as associated with measures of insulin sensitivity and resistance, respectively. Haplotype 4 may confer insulin resistance by increasing visceral fat. Haplotype 2 was identified as a new risk haplotype, suggesting the complex nature of LPL's effect on features of the insulin resistance syndrome.

  14. Natural variation in host-specific nodulation of pea is associated with a haplotype of the SYM37 LysM-type receptor-like kinase.

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    Li, Ronghui; Knox, Maggie R; Edwards, Anne; Hogg, Bridget; Ellis, T H Noel; Wei, Gehong; Downie, J Allan

    2011-11-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, which nodulates pea and vetch, makes a mixture of secreted nodulation signals (Nod factors) carrying either a C18:4 or a C18:1 N-linked acyl chain. Mutation of nodE blocks the formation of the C18:4 acyl chain, and nodE mutants, which produce only C18:1-containing Nod factors, are less efficient at nodulating pea. However, there is significant natural variation in the levels of nodulation of different pea cultivars by a nodE mutant of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae. Using recombinant inbred lines from two pea cultivars, one which nodulated relatively well and one very poorly by the nodE mutant, we mapped the nodE-dependent nodulation phenotype to a locus on pea linkage group I. This was close to Sym37 and PsK1, predicted to encode LysM-domain Nod-factor receptor-like proteins; the Sym2 locus that confers Nod-factor-specific nodulation is also in this region. We confirmed the map location using an introgression line carrying this region. Our data indicate that the nodE-dependent nodulation is not determined by the Sym2 locus. We identified several pea lines that are nodulated very poorly by the R. leguminosarum bv. viciae nodE mutant, sequenced the DNA of the predicted LysM-receptor domains of Sym37 and PsK1, and compared the sequences with those derived from pea cultivars that were relatively well nodulated by the nodE mutant. This revealed that one haplotype (encoding six conserved polymorphisms) of Sym37 is associated with very poor nodulation by the nodE mutant. There was no such correlation with polymorphisms at the PsK1 locus. We conclude that the natural variation in nodE-dependent nodulation in pea is most probably determined by the Sym37 haplotype.

  15. Effects of NKG2D haplotypes on the cell-surface expression of NKG2D protein on natural killer and CD8 T cells of peripheral blood among atomic-bomb survivors.

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    Imai, Kazue; Hayashi, Tomonori; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Nakachi, Kei

    2012-06-01

    NKG2D is a primary activating receptor that triggers cell-mediated cytotoxicity in NK cells against tumor and virus-infected cells. We previously identified the NKG2D haplotypes in the natural killer gene complex region on chromosome 12p. Two major haplotype alleles, LNK1 and HNK1, were closely related to low and high natural cytotoxic activity phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, the haplotype of HNK1/HNK1 has revealed a decreased risk of cancer compared with LNK1/LNK1. In the present study, using flow cytometry, we evaluated the functional effects of NKG2D haplotypes and five htSNPs in terms of the cell-surface expression of NKG2D protein on NK and CD8 T cells of peripheral blood among 732 atomic-bomb survivors. NKG2D expression on NK cells showed significant increases, in the order of LNK1/LNK1, LNK1/HNK1 and HNK1/HNK1 haplotypes (p for trend=0.003), or with major homozygous, heterozygous, and minor homozygous genotypes for individual htSNPs (p for trend=0.02-0.003). The same trend was observed for NKG2D expression on CD8 T cells. Our findings indicate that the NKG2D haplotypes are associated with the expression levels of NKG2D protein on NK and CD8 T cells, resulting in inter-individual variations in human cytotoxic response. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Haplotypes versus genotypes on pedigrees

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    Kirkpatrick Bonnie B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing will soon produce haplotype data for individuals. For pedigrees of related individuals, sequencing appears to be an attractive alternative to genotyping. However, methods for pedigree analysis with haplotype data have not yet been developed, and the computational complexity of such problems has been an open question. Furthermore, it is not clear in which scenarios haplotype data would provide better estimates than genotype data for quantities such as recombination rates. Results To answer these questions, a reduction is given from genotype problem instances to haplotype problem instances, and it is shown that solving the haplotype problem yields the solution to the genotype problem, up to constant factors or coefficients. The pedigree analysis problems we will consider are the likelihood, maximum probability haplotype, and minimum recombination haplotype problems. Conclusions Two algorithms are introduced: an exponential-time hidden Markov model (HMM for haplotype data where some individuals are untyped, and a linear-time algorithm for pedigrees having haplotype data for all individuals. Recombination estimates from the general haplotype HMM algorithm are compared to recombination estimates produced by a genotype HMM. Having haplotype data on all individuals produces better estimates. However, having several untyped individuals can drastically reduce the utility of haplotype data.

  17. Pure Parsimony Xor Haplotyping

    CERN Document Server

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given SNP. Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  18. Pure parsimony xor haplotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper, we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  19. Malaria haplotype frequency estimation.

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    Wigger, Leonore; Vogt, Julia E; Roth, Volker

    2013-09-20

    We present a Bayesian approach for estimating the relative frequencies of multi-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes in populations of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum by using microarray SNP data from human blood samples. Each sample comes from a malaria patient and contains one or several parasite clones that may genetically differ. Samples containing multiple parasite clones with different genetic markers pose a special challenge. The situation is comparable with a polyploid organism. The data from each blood sample indicates whether the parasites in the blood carry a mutant or a wildtype allele at various selected genomic positions. If both mutant and wildtype alleles are detected at a given position in a multiply infected sample, the data indicates the presence of both alleles, but the ratio is unknown. Thus, the data only partially reveals which specific combinations of genetic markers (i.e. haplotypes across the examined SNPs) occur in distinct parasite clones. In addition, SNP data may contain errors at non-negligible rates. We use a multinomial mixture model with partially missing observations to represent this data and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the haplotype frequencies in a population. Our approach addresses both challenges, multiple infections and data errors.

  20. Computation over Mismatched Channels

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    Karamchandani, Nikhil; Diggavi, Suhas

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of distributed computation of a target function over a multiple-access channel. If the target and channel functions are matched (i.e., compute the same function), significant performance gains can be obtained by jointly designing the computation and communication tasks. However, in most situations there is mismatch between these two functions. In this work, we analyze the impact of this mismatch on the performance gains achievable with joint computation and communication designs over separation-based designs. We show that for most pairs of target and channel functions there is no such gain, and separation of computation and communication is optimal.

  1. Association between Gene Haplotypes and Growth Traits in Japanese Hinai-dori Crossbred Chickens

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    Hideaki Takahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL for body weight and average daily gain in a common region between ADL0198 (chr 1: 171.7 Mb and ABR0287 (chr 1: 173.4 Mb on chicken chromosome 1 in an F2 resource population produced by crossing low- and high-growth lines of the Hinai-dori breed. Motilin receptor (MLNR is a candidate gene affecting growth traits in the region. In this study, we genotyped polymorphisms of the MLNR gene and investigated its association with growth traits in a Hinai-dori F2 intercross population. All the exons of the MLNR gene in the parental population were subjected to PCR amplification, nucleotide sequenced and haplotypes identified. To distinguish resultant diplotype individuals in the F2 population, a mismatch amplification mutation assay was performed. Three haplotypes (Haplotypes 1–3 were accordingly identified. Six genotypes produced by the combination of three haplotypes (Haplotype 1, 2, and 3 were examined in order to identify associations between MLNR haplotypes and growth traits. The data showed that Haplotype 1 was superior to Haplotype 2 and 3 in body weight at 10 and 14 weeks of age, average daily gain between 4 and 10 weeks, 10 and 14 weeks, and 0 and 14 weeks of age in female in F2 females. It was concluded that MLNR is a useful marker of growth traits and could be used to develop strategies for improving growth traits in the Hinai-dori breed.

  2. Mammalian mismatch repair

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    Pena Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2012-01-01

    A considerable surge of interest in the mismatch repair (MMR) system has been brought about by the discovery of a link between Lynch syndrome, an inherited predisposition to cancer of the colon and other organs, and malfunction of this key DNA metabolic pathway. This review focuses on recent...... advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of canonical MMR, which improves replication fidelity by removing misincorporated nucleotides from the nascent DNA strand. We also discuss the involvement of MMR proteins in two other processes: trinucleotide repeat expansion and antibody maturation...

  3. Mapping Haplotype-haplotype Interactions with Adaptive LASSO

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    Li Ming

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic etiology of complex diseases in human has been commonly viewed as a complex process involving both genetic and environmental factors functioning in a complicated manner. Quite often the interactions among genetic variants play major roles in determining the susceptibility of an individual to a particular disease. Statistical methods for modeling interactions underlying complex diseases between single genetic variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs have been extensively studied. Recently, haplotype-based analysis has gained its popularity among genetic association studies. When multiple sequence or haplotype interactions are involved in determining an individual's susceptibility to a disease, it presents daunting challenges in statistical modeling and testing of the interaction effects, largely due to the complicated higher order epistatic complexity. Results In this article, we propose a new strategy in modeling haplotype-haplotype interactions under the penalized logistic regression framework with adaptive L1-penalty. We consider interactions of sequence variants between haplotype blocks. The adaptive L1-penalty allows simultaneous effect estimation and variable selection in a single model. We propose a new parameter estimation method which estimates and selects parameters by the modified Gauss-Seidel method nested within the EM algorithm. Simulation studies show that it has low false positive rate and reasonable power in detecting haplotype interactions. The method is applied to test haplotype interactions involved in mother and offspring genome in a small for gestational age (SGA neonates data set, and significant interactions between different genomes are detected. Conclusions As demonstrated by the simulation studies and real data analysis, the approach developed provides an efficient tool for the modeling and testing of haplotype interactions. The implementation of the method in R codes can be

  4. Mapping haplotype-haplotype interactions with adaptive LASSO.

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    Li, Ming; Romero, Roberto; Fu, Wenjiang J; Cui, Yuehua

    2010-08-27

    The genetic etiology of complex diseases in human has been commonly viewed as a complex process involving both genetic and environmental factors functioning in a complicated manner. Quite often the interactions among genetic variants play major roles in determining the susceptibility of an individual to a particular disease. Statistical methods for modeling interactions underlying complex diseases between single genetic variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) have been extensively studied. Recently, haplotype-based analysis has gained its popularity among genetic association studies. When multiple sequence or haplotype interactions are involved in determining an individual's susceptibility to a disease, it presents daunting challenges in statistical modeling and testing of the interaction effects, largely due to the complicated higher order epistatic complexity. In this article, we propose a new strategy in modeling haplotype-haplotype interactions under the penalized logistic regression framework with adaptive L1-penalty. We consider interactions of sequence variants between haplotype blocks. The adaptive L1-penalty allows simultaneous effect estimation and variable selection in a single model. We propose a new parameter estimation method which estimates and selects parameters by the modified Gauss-Seidel method nested within the EM algorithm. Simulation studies show that it has low false positive rate and reasonable power in detecting haplotype interactions. The method is applied to test haplotype interactions involved in mother and offspring genome in a small for gestational age (SGA) neonates data set, and significant interactions between different genomes are detected. As demonstrated by the simulation studies and real data analysis, the approach developed provides an efficient tool for the modeling and testing of haplotype interactions. The implementation of the method in R codes can be freely downloaded from http://www.stt.msu.edu/~cui/software.html.

  5. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection.

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    Hussin, Julie; Nadeau, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Labuda, Damian

    2010-01-28

    Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  6. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection

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    Lefebvre Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. Results The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. Conclusions We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  7. Understanding Y haplotype matching probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Charles H

    2014-01-01

    The Y haplotype population-genetic terrain is better explored from a fresh perspective rather than by analogy with the more familiar autosomal ideas. For haplotype matching probabilities, versus for autosomal matching probabilities, explicit attention to modelling - such as how evolution got us where we are - is much more important while consideration of population frequency is much less so. This paper explores, extends, and explains some of the concepts of "Fundamental problem of forensic mathematics - the evidential strength of a rare haplotype match". That earlier paper presented and validated a "kappa method" formula for the evidential strength when a suspect matches a previously unseen haplotype (such as a Y-haplotype) at the crime scene. Mathematical implications of the kappa method are intuitive and reasonable. Suspicions to the contrary raised in rest on elementary errors. Critical to deriving the kappa method or any sensible evidential calculation is understanding that thinking about haplotype population frequency is a red herring; the pivotal question is one of matching probability. But confusion between the two is unfortunately institutionalized in much of the forensic world. Examples make clear why (matching) probability is not (population) frequency and why uncertainty intervals on matching probabilities are merely confused thinking. Forensic matching calculations should be based on a model, on stipulated premises. The model inevitably only approximates reality, and any error in the results comes only from error in the model, the inexactness of the approximation. Sampling variation does not measure that inexactness and hence is not helpful in explaining evidence and is in fact an impediment. Alternative haplotype matching probability approaches that various authors have considered are reviewed. Some are based on no model and cannot be taken seriously. For the others, some evaluation of the models is discussed. Recent evidence supports the adequacy of

  8. Functionality and opposite roles of two interleukin 4 haplotypes in immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovazzi, G; Medeiros, M C; Pigossi, S C; Finoti, L S; Souza Moreira, T M; Mayer, M P A; Zanelli, C F; Valentini, S R; Rossa-Junior, C; Scarel-Caminaga, R M

    2017-01-01

    Cytokines expression can be influenced by polymorphisms in their respective coding genes. We associated the CTI/TTD haplotype (Hap-1) and TCI/CCI haplotype (Hap-2) in the IL4 gene formed by the −590, +33 and variable number of tandem repeat polymorphisms with the severity of chronic periodontitis in humans. The functionality of these IL4 haplotypes in the response of immune cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) with Ionomycin and IL-1β (as inflammatory stimuli) was evaluated. Gene expression (quantitative real-time PCR), profile of secreted cytokines (multiplex) and phenotypic polarization of T cells (flow cytometry) were the outcomes assessed. Green fluorescent protein reporter plasmid constructs containing specific IL4 haplotype were transiently transfected into JM cells to assess the influence of the individual haplotypes on promoter activity. In response to inflammatory stimuli the immune cells from Hap-1 haplotype had increased expression of anti-inflammatory IL4; conversely, the Hap-2 haplotype showed higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The haplotype CTI proved to be the most important for the regulation of IL4 promoter, regardless of the nature of the inflammatory stimulation; whereas the polymorphism in the promoter region had the least functional effect. In conclusion, IL4 haplotypes studied are functional and trigger opposite immune responses: anti-inflammatory (Hap-1) and pro-inflammatory (Hap-2). In addition, we identified the CTI haplotype as the main responsible for the regulation of IL4 transcriptional activity. PMID:28053321

  9. Fetal male lineage determination by analysis of Y-chromosome STR haplotype in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Santa Rita, Ticiane Henriques; Chianca, Camilla Figueiredo; Velasco, Lara Francielle Ribeiro; de Sousa, Claudia Ferreira; Nery, Lídia Freire Abdalla; Costa, Sandra Santana Soares

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the fetus Y-STR haplotype in maternal plasma during pregnancy and estimate, non-invasively, if the alleged father and fetus belong to the same male lineage. The study enrolled couples with singleton pregnancies and known paternity. All participants signed informed consent and the local ethics committee approved the study. Peripheral blood was collected in EDTA tubes (mother) and in FTA paper (father). Maternal plasma DNA was extracted by using NucliSens EasyMAG. Fetal gender was determined by qPCR targeting DYS-14 in maternal plasma and it was also confirmed after the delivery. From all included volunteers, the first consecutive 20 mothers bearing male fetuses and 10 mothers bearing female fetuses were selected for the Y-STR analysis. The median gestational age was 12 weeks (range 12-36). All DNA samples were subjected to PCR amplification by PowerPlex Y23, ampFLSTR Yfiler, and two in-house multiplexes, which together accounts for 27 different Y-STR. The PCR products were detected with 3500 Genetic Analyzer and they were analyzed using GeneMapper-IDX. Fetuses' haplotypes (Yfiler format) were compared to other 5328 Brazilian haplotypes available on Y-chromosome haplotypes reference database (YHRD). As a result, between 22 and 27 loci were successfully amplified from maternal plasma in all 20 cases of male fetuses. None of the women bearing female fetuses had a falsely amplified Y-STR haplotype. The haplotype detected in maternal plasma completely matched the alleged father haplotype in 16 out of the 20 cases. Four cases showed single mismatches and they did not configure exclusions; 1 case showed a mutation in the DYS 458 locus due to the loss of one repeat unit and 3 cases showed one DYS 385I/II locus dropout. All mismatches were confirmed after the delivery. Seventeen fetuses' haplotypes were not found in YHRD and one of them had a mutation, which corresponded to the paternity probability of 99.9812% and 95.7028%, respectively

  10. Approximation properties of haplotype tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreiseitl Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are locations at which the genomic sequences of population members differ. Since these differences are known to follow patterns, disease association studies are facilitated by identifying SNPs that allow the unique identification of such patterns. This process, known as haplotype tagging, is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem and analyzed in terms of complexity and approximation properties. Results It is shown that the tagging problem is NP-hard but approximable within 1 + ln((n2 - n/2 for n haplotypes but not approximable within (1 - ε ln(n/2 for any ε > 0 unless NP ⊂ DTIME(nlog log n. A simple, very easily implementable algorithm that exhibits the above upper bound on solution quality is presented. This algorithm has running time O((2m - p + 1 ≤ O(m(n2 - n/2 where p ≤ min(n, m for n haplotypes of size m. As we show that the approximation bound is asymptotically tight, the algorithm presented is optimal with respect to this asymptotic bound. Conclusion The haplotype tagging problem is hard, but approachable with a fast, practical, and surprisingly simple algorithm that cannot be significantly improved upon on a single processor machine. Hence, significant improvement in computatational efforts expended can only be expected if the computational effort is distributed and done in parallel.

  11. Geographic distribution of haplotype diversity at the bovine casein locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moazami-Goudarzi Katy

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic diversity of the casein locus in cattle was studied on the basis of haplotype analysis. Consideration of recently described genetic variants of the casein genes which to date have not been the subject of diversity studies, allowed the identification of new haplotypes. Genotyping of 30 cattle breeds from four continents revealed a geographically associated distribution of haplotypes, mainly defined by frequencies of alleles at CSN1S1 and CSN3. The genetic diversity within taurine breeds in Europe was found to decrease significantly from the south to the north and from the east to the west. Such geographic patterns of cattle genetic variation at the casein locus may be a result of the domestication process of modern cattle as well as geographically differentiated natural or artificial selection. The comparison of African Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds allowed the identification of several Bos indicus specific haplotypes (CSN1S1*C-CSN2*A2-CSN3*AI/CSN3*H that are not found in pure taurine breeds. The occurrence of such haplotypes in southern European breeds also suggests that an introgression of indicine genes into taurine breeds could have contributed to the distribution of the genetic variation observed.

  12. In Vivo Characterization of Human APOA5 Haplotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chapman-Helleboid, Audrey; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    Increased plasma triglycerides concentrations are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies support a reproducible genetic association between two minor haplotypes in the human apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) and increased plasma triglyceride concentrations. We thus sought to investigate the effect of these minor haplotypes (APOA5*2 and APOA5*3) on ApoAV plasma levels through the precise insertion of single-copy intact APOA5 haplotypes at a targeted location in the mouse genome. While we found no difference in the amount of human plasma ApoAV in mice containing the common APOA5*1 and minor APOA5*2 haplotype, the introduction of the single APOA5*3 defining allele (19W) resulted in 3-fold lower ApoAV plasma levels consistent with existing genetic association studies. These results indicate that S19W polymorphism is likely to be functional and explain the strong association of this variant with plasma triglycerides supporting the value of sensitive in vivo assays to define the functional nature of human haplotypes.

  13. HaplotypeCN: copy number haplotype inference with Hidden Markov Model and localized haplotype clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Jen Lin

    Full Text Available Copy number variation (CNV has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states.

  14. HaplotypeCN: Copy Number Haplotype Inference with Hidden Markov Model and Localized Haplotype Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states. PMID:24849202

  15. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.R.; Bull, P.C.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, the authors have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, the authors have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. The authors have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. The authors have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Identification of a 10/10 matched donor for patients with an uncommon haplotype is unlikely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J A; Gibbens, Y; Tram, K; Kempenich, J; Novakovich, J; Buck, K; Dehn, J

    2017-02-01

    Despite over 6 million subjects contributing to the National Marrow Donor Program human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequency reference data (HFD), haplotypes cannot be predicted from the HLA assignments of some patients searching for an unrelated donor (URD) in the Be The Match Registry®. We aimed to determine the incidence of these patient searches and whether haplotypes lacking from the HFD can be found among the low-resolution typed URD pool. New NMDP searches with uncommon patient haplotypes (UPH), defined as a lack of haplotype pairs in any single ethnic group in the HFD based upon HLA-A˜C˜B˜DRB1˜DQB1, were identified. Each search had up to 20 potential 10/10 or 8/8 URDs typed to determine the likelihood of an allele match. The incidence of patient searches without haplotype pairs in a single ethnic group in the HFD was 1.2% (N=144 out of 12,172) and a majority of these patients (117; 81%) had one uncommon haplotype previously uncharacterized in the HFD. Non-White patients had the highest incidence of UPH. Importantly, no patients with UPH had a 10/10 URD identified. The transplant rate among UPH patients was 15%, and a majority of these patients utilized cord blood units as their transplant stem cell source. Therefore, the HLA HFD that informs the HapLogic matching algorithm is thorough as UPH patient searches were infrequent. Since such patients are highly unlikely to have a fully 10/10 matched URD identified, this study supports the identification of alternative stem cell sources including cord blood or a mismatched URD early in the search process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Lujan

    Full Text Available The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  18. Scale Mismatches in Management of Urban Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Alfsen-Norodom

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban landscapes constitute the future environment for most of the world’s human population. An increased understanding of the urbanization process and of the effects of urbanization at multiple scales is, therefore, key to ensuring human well-being. In many conventional natural resource management regimes, incomplete knowledge of ecosystem dynamics and institutional constraints often leads to institutional management frameworks that do not match the scale of ecological patterns and processes. In this paper, we argue that scale mismatches are particularly pronounced in urban landscapes. Urban green spaces provide numerous important ecosystem services to urban citizens, and the management of these urban green spaces, including recognition of scales, is crucial to the well-being of the citizens. From a qualitative study of the current management practices in five urban green spaces within the Greater Stockholm Metropolitan Area, Sweden, we found that 1 several spatial, temporal, and functional scales are recognized, but the cross-scale interactions are often neglected, and 2 spatial and temporal meso-scales are seldom given priority. One potential effect of the neglect of ecological cross-scale interactions in these highly fragmented landscapes is a gradual reduction in the capacity of the ecosystems to provide ecosystem services. Two important strategies for overcoming urban scale mismatches are suggested: 1 development of an integrative view of the whole urban social–ecological landscape, and 2 creation of adaptive governance systems to support practical management.

  19. On String Matching with Mismatches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Nicolae

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider several variants of the pattern matching with mismatches problem. In particular, given a text \\(T=t_1 t_2\\cdots t_n\\ and a pattern \\(P=p_1p_2\\cdots p_m\\, we investigate the following problems: (1 pattern matching with mismatches: for every \\(i, 1\\leq i \\leq n-m+1\\ output, the distance between \\(P\\ and \\(t_i t_{i+1}\\cdots t_{i+m-1}\\; and (2 pattern matching with \\(k\\ mismatches: output those positions \\(i\\ where the distance between \\(P\\ and \\(t_i t_{i+1}\\cdots t_{i+m-1}\\ is less than a given threshold \\(k\\. The distance metric used is the Hamming distance. We present some novel algorithms and techniques for solving these problems. We offer deterministic, randomized and approximation algorithms. We consider variants of these problems where there could be wild cards in either the text or the pattern or both. We also present an experimental evaluation of these algorithms. The source code is available at http://www.engr.uconn.edu/\\(\\sim\\man09004/kmis.zip.

  20. Haplotype block structure is conserved across mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, Victor; Smits, Bart M G; van de Belt, Jose; Verheul, Mark; Hubner, Norbert; Cuppen, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variation in genomes is organized in haplotype blocks, and species-specific block structure is defined by differential contribution of population history effects in combination with mutation and recombination events. Haplotype maps characterize the common patterns of linkage disequilibrium i

  1. Estimating haplotype effects for survival data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas; Martinussen, Torben; Silver, J

    2010-01-01

    Genetic association studies often investigate the effect of haplotypes on an outcome of interest. Haplotypes are not observed directly, and this complicates the inclusion of such effects in survival models. We describe a new estimating equations approach for Cox's regression model to assess haplo...

  2. Most parsimonious haplotype allele sharing determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiaofen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "common disease – common variant" hypothesis and genome-wide association studies have achieved numerous successes in the last three years, particularly in genetic mapping in human diseases. Nevertheless, the power of the association study methods are still low, in particular on quantitative traits, and the description of the full allelic spectrum is deemed still far from reach. Given increasing density of single nucleotide polymorphisms available and suggested by the block-like structure of the human genome, a popular and prosperous strategy is to use haplotypes to try to capture the correlation structure of SNPs in regions of little recombination. The key to the success of this strategy is thus the ability to unambiguously determine the haplotype allele sharing status among the members. The association studies based on haplotype sharing status would have significantly reduced degrees of freedom and be able to capture the combined effects of tightly linked causal variants. Results For pedigree genotype datasets of medium density of SNPs, we present two methods for haplotype allele sharing status determination among the pedigree members. Extensive simulation study showed that both methods performed nearly perfectly on breakpoint discovery, mutation haplotype allele discovery, and shared chromosomal region discovery. Conclusion For pedigree genotype datasets, the haplotype allele sharing status among the members can be deterministically, efficiently, and accurately determined, even for very small pedigrees. Given their excellent performance, the presented haplotype allele sharing status determination programs can be useful in many downstream applications including haplotype based association studies.

  3. Haplotype block structure is conserved across mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Guryev

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in genomes is organized in haplotype blocks, and species-specific block structure is defined by differential contribution of population history effects in combination with mutation and recombination events. Haplotype maps characterize the common patterns of linkage disequilibrium in populations and have important applications in the design and interpretation of genetic experiments. Although evolutionary processes are known to drive the selection of individual polymorphisms, their effect on haplotype block structure dynamics has not been shown. Here, we present a high-resolution haplotype map for a 5-megabase genomic region in the rat and compare it with the orthologous human and mouse segments. Although the size and fine structure of haplotype blocks are species dependent, there is a significant interspecies overlap in structure and a tendency for blocks to encompass complete genes. Extending these findings to the complete human genome using haplotype map phase I data reveals that linkage disequilibrium values are significantly higher for equally spaced positions in genic regions, including promoters, as compared to intergenic regions, indicating that a selective mechanism exists to maintain combinations of alleles within potentially interacting coding and regulatory regions. Although this characteristic may complicate the identification of causal polymorphisms underlying phenotypic traits, conservation of haplotype structure may be employed for the identification and characterization of functionally important genomic regions.

  4. Scale Mismatches in Social-Ecological Systems: Causes, Consequences, and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme S. Cumming

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Scale is a concept that transcends disciplinary boundaries. In ecology and geography, scale is usually defined in terms of spatial and temporal dimensions. Sociological scale also incorporates space and time, but adds ideas about representation and organization. Although spatial and temporal location determine the context for social and ecological dynamics, social-ecological interactions can create dynamic feedback loops in which humans both influence and are influenced by ecosystem processes. We hypothesize that many of the problems encountered by societies in managing natural resources arise because of a mismatch between the scale of management and the scale(s of the ecological processes being managed. We use examples from southern Africa and the southern United States to address four main questions: (1 What is a "scale mismatch?" (2 How are scale mismatches generated? (3 What are the consequences of scale mismatches? (4 How can scale mismatches be resolved? Scale mismatches occur when the scale of environmental variation and the scale of social organization in which the responsibility for management resides are aligned in such a way that one or more functions of the social-ecological system are disrupted, inefficiencies occur, and/or important components of the system are lost. They are generated by a wide range of social, ecological, and linked social-ecological processes. Mismatches between the scales of ecological processes and the institutions that are responsible for managing them can contribute to a decrease in social-ecological resilience, including the mismanagement of natural resources and a decrease in human well-being. Solutions to scale mismatches usually require institutional changes at more than one hierarchical level. Long-term solutions to scale mismatch problems will depend on social learning and the development of flexible institutions that can adjust and reorganize in response to changes in ecosystems. Further research is

  5. Responses of Transmembrane Peptide and Lipid Chains to Hydrophobic Mismatch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lei; LI Jian-tao; QI Hai-yan; LI Fei

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic mismatch between the hydrophobic length of membrane proteins and hydrophobic thickness of membranes is a crucial factor in controlling protein function and assembly.We combined fluorescence with circular dichroism(CD) and attenuated total reflection infrared(ATR-IR) spectroscopic methods to investigate the behaviors of the peptide and lipids under hydrophobic mismatch using a model peptide from the fourth transmembrane domain of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp 1),the phosphatidylcholines(PCs) and phosphatidylglycerols(PGs) with different lengths of acyl chains(14:0,16:0 and 18:0).In all PG lipid membranes,the peptide forms stable α-helix structure,and the helix axis is parallel to lipid chains.The helical span and orientation hardly change in varying thickness of PG membranes,while the lipid chains can deform to accommodate to the hydrophobic surface of embedded peptide.By comparison,the helical structures of the model peptide in PC lipid membranes are less stable.Upon incorporation with PC lipid membranes,the peptide can deform itself to accommodate to the hydrophobic thickness of lipid membranes in response to hydrophobic mismatch.In addition,hydrophobic mismatch can increase the aggregation propensity of the peptide in both PC and PG lipid membranes and the peptide in PC membranes has more aggregation tendency than that in PG membranes.

  6. Discriminating DNA mismatches by electrochemical and gravimetric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouz, Zouhour; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Ommezine, Asma; Rebhi, Lamia; Yaakoubi, Nourdin; Kalfat, Rafik; Othmane, Ali

    2013-10-15

    A silicon nitride functionalized electrode and a 104 MHz lithium tantalate (LiTaO₃) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor have been used to investigate target-probe recognition processes. Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements have been considered to monitor hybridization of single base mismatch (SBM) in synthetic oligonucleotides and single-nucleotide polymorphisms ApoE in real clinical genotypes. Obvious discrimination of SBM in nucleotides has been shown by both gravimetric and electrochemical techniques, without labeling nor amplification. Investigations on mismatches nature and position have also been considered. For guanine-adenine (GA), guanine-thymine (GT) and guanine-guanine (GG) mismatches, the sensors responses present a dependence upon positions. Considering the capacitance variations and hybridization rates, results showed that gravimetric transduction is more sensitive than electrochemical one. Moreover, the highest value of GT hybridization rate (in the middle position) was found in accordance with the nearest-neighbor model, where the considered configuration appears as the most thermodynamically stable. For the real samples, where the electrochemical transduction, by combining capacitance and flat-band potential measurements, were found more sensitive, the results show that the realized sensor permits an unambiguous discrimination of recognition between fully complementary, non-complementary and single base mismatched targets, and even between the combination of differently matched strands.

  7. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  8. The nature of the transition mismatches with Watson-Crick architecture: the G*·T or G·T* DNA base mispair or both? A QM/QTAIM perspective for the biological problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    This study provides the first accurate investigation of the tautomerization of the biologically important guanine*·thymine (G*·T) DNA base mispair with Watson-Crick geometry, involving the enol mutagenic tautomer of the G and the keto tautomer of the T, into the G·T* mispair (∆G = .99 kcal mol(-1), population = 15.8% obtained at the MP2 level of quantum-mechanical theory in the continuum with ε = 4), formed by the keto tautomer of the G and the enol mutagenic tautomer of the T base, using DFT and MP2 methods in vacuum and in the weakly polar medium (ε = 4), characteristic for the hydrophobic interfaces of specific protein-nucleic acid interactions. We were first able to show that the G*·T↔G·T* tautomerization occurs through the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer along two antiparallel O6H···O4 and N1···HN3 H-bonds and is assisted by the third N2H···O2 H-bond, that exists along the entire reaction pathway. The obtained results indicate that the G·T* base mispair is stable from the thermodynamic point of view complex, while it is dynamically unstable structure in vacuum and dynamically stable structure in the continuum with ε = 4 with lifetime of 6.4·10(-12) s, that, on the one side, makes it possible to develop all six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations, but, on the other side, it is by three orders less than the time (several ns) required for the replication machinery to forcibly dissociate a base pair into the monomers during DNA replication. One of the more significant findings to emerge from this study is that the short-lived G·T* base mispair, which electronic interaction energy between the bases (-23.76 kcal mol(-1)) exceeds the analogical value for the G·C Watson-Crick nucleobase pair (-20.38 kcal mol(-1)), "escapes from the hands" of the DNA replication machinery by fast transforming into the G*·T mismatch playing an indirect role of its supplier during the DNA replication. So

  9. How well do HapMap haplotypes identify common haplotypes of genes? A comparison with haplotypes of 334 genes resequenced in the environmental genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jack A; Xu, Zong-Li; Kaplan, Norman L; Morris, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of the International HapMap Project is the identification of common haplotypes in genes. However, HapMap uses an incomplete catalogue of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and might miss some common haplotypes. We examined this issue using data from the Environmental Genome Project (EGP) which resequenced 335 genes in 90 people, and thus, has a nearly complete catalogue of gene SNPs. The EGP identified a total of 45,243 SNPs, of which 10,780 were common SNPs (minor allele frequency >or=0.1). Using EGP common SNP genotype data, we identified 1,459 haplotypes with frequency >or=0.05 and we use these as "benchmark" haplotypes. HapMap release 16 had genotype information for 1,573 of 10,780 (15%) EGP common SNPs. Using these SNPs, we identified common HapMap haplotypes (frequency >or=0.05) in each of the four HapMap ethnic groups. To compare common HapMap haplotypes to EGP benchmark haplotypes, we collapsed benchmark haplotypes to the set of 1,573 SNPs. Ninety-eight percent of the collapsed benchmark haplotypes could be found as common HapMap haplotypes in one or more of the four HapMap ethnic groups. However, collapsing benchmark haplotypes to the set of SNPs available in HapMap resulted in a loss of haplotype information: 545 of 1,459 (37%) benchmark haplotypes were uniquely identified, and only 25% of genes had all their benchmark haplotypes uniquely identified. We resampled the EGP data to examine the effect of increasing the number of HapMap SNPs to 5 million, and estimate that approximately 40% of common SNPs in genes will be sampled and that half of the genes will have sufficient SNPs to identify all common haplotypes. This inability to distinguish common haplotypes of genes may result in loss of power when examining haplotype-disease association.

  10. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  11. Zero energy buildings and mismatch compensation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Marszal, Anna Joanna; Heiselberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes an overall energy system approach to analysing the mismatch problem of zero energy and zero emission buildings (ZEBs). The mismatch arises from hourly differences in energy production and consumption at the building level and results in the need for exchange of electricity via...... of the energy production unit. Based on historical data for the electricity supply area in western Denmark, this paper makes a first attempt to quantify mismatch compensation factors. The results indicate that such compensation factors are a little below one for buildings with photovoltaics (PV) and a little...... the public grid even though the building has an annual net-exchange of zero. This paper argues that, when looked upon from the viewpoint of the overall electricity supply system, a mismatch can be both negative and positive. Moreover, there are often both an element of levelling out mismatches between...

  12. Haplotype-phenotype relationships of paraoxonase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Chan, Wendy; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Wetmur, James G

    2005-03-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an enzyme with multiple activities, including detoxification of organophosphates. It is believed to be important in preventing neurotoxic damage and has also been implicated in atherosclerosis. The PON1 gene contains five common polymorphisms, three in the promoter (-909G > C, -162A > G, -108C > T) and two in the coding region (M55L, Q192R) with varying but incomplete linkage disequilibrium. Our previous study showed that functional polymorphisms in PON1 were strongly associated with enzymatic activity in both pregnant women [26-30 weeks of gestation] and neonates. However, there was substantial overlapping of enzyme activities between genotypes. In this study, we investigated whether haplotype (genotype + phase) information would strengthen the genotype-phenotype relationship for PON1. The study consisted of a multiethnic population of 402 mothers and 229 neonates. Haplotypes were imputed by two widely used programs, PHASE and tagSNPs, which yielded very similar results. There were seven haplotypes with a frequency of 5% or higher in at least one ethnic group of the study population. Haplotype composition varied substantially with respect to ethnicity. Haplotypes in Caucasians and African-Americans showed the largest difference, and Caribbean Hispanics seemed to be a mixture of Caucasian and African ancestry. Collectively, the genetic (genotype or haplotype) contribution to PON1 enzymatic activity (measured as phenylacetate hydrolysis) was greater in neonates compared with mothers. Specifically, 16.6% of PON1 variability was explained by genotypes in mothers compared with 30.9% in neonates. Haplotype information offered a slightly increased power in predicting PON1 activity; they explained 35.5% and 19.3% of PON1 variability in neonates and mothers, respectively.

  13. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailliet, G; Rothhammer, F; Carnese, F R; Bravi, C M; Bianchi, N O

    1994-07-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicate that most or all full-blooded Amerindians cluster in one of four different mitochondrial haplotypes that are considered to represent the founder maternal lineages of Paleo-Indians. We have studied the mtDNA diversity in 109 Amerindians belonging to 3 different tribes, and we have reanalyzed the published data on 482 individuals from 18 other tribes. Our study confirms the existence of four major Amerindian haplotypes. However, we also found evidence supporting the existence of several other potential founder haplotypes or haplotype subsets in addition to the four ancestral lineages reported. Confirmation of a relatively high number of founder haplotypes would indicate that early migration into America was not accompanied by a severe genetic bottleneck.

  14. Mismatching Perspectives and Pacific Transculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Holden Rønning

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased critical consciousness and awareness of interculturality in a global and glocal context at the beginning of the twenty-first century has increasingly used the concept of transculturation when discussing modernities. Politically transculturation can be used to describe processes of negotiation in contemporary society that lead to social awareness and solidarity, as well as ensuring the continuity of societies. The fusing of cultural forms leads to a mismatching of perspectives, hence some critics have preferred to use the terms translation and/or transliteracy to describe this concept. Transculturation is related to the “normal processes of artistic borrowing and influence, by which any culture makes part of its contribution to the conversation of mankind,” as Les Murray maintained, and “it engages multiple lines of difference simultaneously” with overlapping boundaries (Rogers 491. Referring to various authors and linking it to cultural appropriation and border crossings, this article examines how the narrative expression of Both Sides of the Moon, to cite the title of Alan Duff’s book, is a key feature of Pacific writing, in an area where centuries of migration from near and far have exposed different cultures to each other on social, political, linguistic and aesthetic levels. These ‘contact zones’, to use Mary Pratt’s words, provide the reader with constantly moving translated identities, cultural hybridity and a use of language that has a highly local significance in a global context.

  15. HIV-1 Vif adaptation to human APOBEC3H haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Marcel; Brayton, Bonnie; Letko, Michael; Maio, Susan M; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Barbour, Jason D; Simon, Viviana

    2013-10-16

    Several human APOBEC3 deaminases can inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro. HIV-1 Vif counteracts this restriction by targeting APOBEC3 for proteasomal degradation. Human APOBEC3H (A3H) is highly polymorphic, with natural variants differing considerably in anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To examine HIV-1 adaptation to variation in A3H activity in a natural infection context, we determined the A3H haplotypes and Vif sequences from 76 recently infected HIV-1 patients. We detected A3H-specific Vif changes suggesting viral adaptation. The patient-derived Vif sequences were used to engineer viruses that specifically differed in their ability to counteract A3H. Replication of these Vif-variant viruses in primary T cells naturally expressing active or inactive A3H haplotypes showed that endogenously expressed A3H restricts HIV-1 replication. Proviral DNA from A3H-restricted viruses showed high levels of G-to-A mutations in an A3H-specific GA dinucleotide context. Taken together, our data validate A3H expressed at endogenous levels as a bona fide HIV-1 restriction factor.

  16. Haplotyping as perfect phylogeny: a direct approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafna, Vineet; Gusfield, Dan; Lancia, Giuseppe; Yooseph, Shibu

    2003-01-01

    A full haplotype map of the human genome will prove extremely valuable as it will be used in large-scale screens of populations to associate specific haplotypes with specific complex genetic-influenced diseases. A haplotype map project has been announced by NIH. The biological key to that project is the surprising fact that some human genomic DNA can be partitioned into long blocks where genetic recombination has been rare, leading to strikingly fewer distinct haplotypes in the population than previously expected (Helmuth, 2001; Daly et al., 2001; Stephens et al., 2001; Friss et al., 2001). In this paper we explore the algorithmic implications of the no-recombination in long blocks observation, for the problem of inferring haplotypes in populations. This assumption, together with the standard population-genetic assumption of infinite sites, motivates a model of haplotype evolution where the haplotypes in a population are assumed to evolve along a coalescent, which as a rooted tree is a perfect phylogeny. We consider the following algorithmic problem, called the perfect phylogeny haplotyping problem (PPH), which was introduced by Gusfield (2002) - given n genotypes of length m each, does there exist a set of at most 2n haplotypes such that each genotype is generated by a pair of haplotypes from this set, and such that this set can be derived on a perfect phylogeny? The approach taken by Gusfield (2002) to solve this problem reduces it to established, deep results and algorithms from matroid and graph theory. Although that reduction is quite simple and the resulting algorithm nearly optimal in speed, taken as a whole that approach is quite involved, and in particular, challenging to program. Moreover, anyone wishing to fully establish, by reading existing literature, the correctness of the entire algorithm would need to read several deep and difficult papers in graph and matroid theory. However, as stated by Gusfield (2002), many simplifications are possible and the

  17. Three Novel Haplotypes of Theileria bicornis in Black and White Rhinoceros in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiende, M Y; Kivata, M W; Jowers, M J; Makumi, J N; Runo, S; Obanda, V; Gakuya, F; Mutinda, M; Kariuki, L; Alasaad, S

    2016-02-01

    Piroplasms, especially those in the genera Babesia and Theileria, have been found to naturally infect rhinoceros. Due to natural or human-induced stress factors such as capture and translocations, animals often develop fatal clinical piroplasmosis, which causes death if not treated. This study examines the genetic diversity and occurrence of novel Theileria species infecting both black and white rhinoceros in Kenya. Samples collected opportunistically during routine translocations and clinical interventions from 15 rhinoceros were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a nested amplification of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene fragments of Babesia and Theileria. Our study revealed for the first time in Kenya the presence of Theileria bicornis in white (Ceratotherium simum simum) and black (Diceros bicornis michaeli) rhinoceros and the existence of three new haplotypes: haplotypes H1 and H3 were present in white rhinoceros, while H2 was present in black rhinoceros. No specific haplotype was correlated to any specific geographical location. The Bayesian inference 50% consensus phylogram recovered the three haplotypes monophyleticly, and Theileria bicornis had very high support (BPP: 0.98). Furthermore, the genetic p-uncorrected distances and substitutions between T. bicornis and the three haplotypes were the same in all three haplotypes, indicating a very close genetic affinity. This is the first report of the occurrence of Theileria species in white and black rhinoceros from Kenya. The three new haplotypes reported here for the first time have important ecological and conservational implications, especially for population management and translocation programs and as a means of avoiding the transport of infected animals into non-affected areas.

  18. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  19. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA.

  20. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  1. Haplotypes, sub-haplotypes and geographical distribution in Omani patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suha Mustafa Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that patients homozygous for the sickle cell disease (SCD mutation have an identical genotype, the severity of the disease can be extremely variable. The hemoglobin (Hb S mutation has been described on five different haplotypes with different clinical expression. Identifying the genotypes, haplotypes and sub-haplotypes of the β gene cluster in Oman needs to be studied in more details to establish a correlation between the genotype/haplotype and phenotype diversity observed in SCD patients for prognostic purposes, accurate diagnosis and thus planning for the best tailored treatment. We have investigated 125 HbS homozygotes from different parts of Oman and determined their haplotypes and sub-haplotypes and correlated this to the hematological and clinical expression. We have found 11 haplotype combinations differently distributed in the country, with the Asian/Asian HbS haplotype being the most predominant. Sub-haplotypes was only found among patients with CAR/OmanI haplotype. As expected, the correlation between haplotypes, sub-haplotypes and disease severity was mainly associated with HbF expression. Our study on haplotype/phenotype correlation has shown which major haplotypes occur in the different regions of Oman. Furthermore, neither the haplotype or sub-haplotype nor the HbF alone appeared to be fully associable with the variable clinical phenotypes. External factors do occur and are associated with the expression of the disease.  尽管镰状细胞突变病(SCD)患者拥有相同的基因类型,但患者的病患程度却大相径庭。血红蛋白(Hb)S突变有五种不同的单体型,各种类型在临床表现上也不相同。为了识别在阿曼地区β基因簇的基因型、单体型,亚单体型,需要研究更多以SCD患者预后为目的,关于其观察到的基因型、单体型,表型多样性之间联系的更多细节,以便作出准确的诊断,为各

  2. Determination of haplotypes at structurally complex regions using emulsion haplotype fusion PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson Jess

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotyping and massively-parallel sequencing projects result in a vast amount of diploid data that is only rarely resolved into its constituent haplotypes. It is nevertheless this phased information that is transmitted from one generation to the next and is most directly associated with biological function and the genetic causes of biological effects. Despite progress made in genome-wide sequencing and phasing algorithms and methods, problems assembling (and reconstructing linear haplotypes in regions of repetitive DNA and structural variation remain. These dynamic and structurally complex regions are often poorly understood from a sequence point of view. Regions such as these that are highly similar in their sequence tend to be collapsed onto the genome assembly. This is turn means downstream determination of the true sequence haplotype in these regions poses a particular challenge. For structurally complex regions, a more focussed approach to assembling haplotypes may be required. Results In order to investigate reconstruction of spatial information at structurally complex regions, we have used an emulsion haplotype fusion PCR approach to reproducibly link sequences of up to 1kb in length to allow phasing of multiple variants from neighbouring loci, using allele-specific PCR and sequencing to detect the phase. By using emulsion systems linking flanking regions to amplicons within the CNV, this led to the reconstruction of a 59kb haplotype across the DEFA1A3 CNV in HapMap individuals. Conclusion This study has demonstrated a novel use for emulsion haplotype fusion PCR in addressing the issue of reconstructing structural haplotypes at multiallelic copy variable regions, using the DEFA1A3 locus as an example.

  3. Haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies from nuclear families with only one parent available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qin; Flury, Christine; Simianer, Henner

    2006-01-01

    Recent literature has suggested that haplotype inference through close relatives, especially from nuclear families can be an alternative strategy in determining the linkage phase. In this paper, haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies via expectation maximization (EM) algorithm including nuclear families with only one parent available is proposed. Parent and his (her) child are treated as parent-child pair with one shared haplotype. This reduces the number of potential haplotype pairs for both parent and child separately, resulting in a higher accuracy of the estimation. In a series of simulations, the comparisons of PHASE, GENEHUNTER, EM-based approach for complete nuclear families and our approach are carried out. In all situations, EM-based approach for trio data is comparable but slightly worse error rate than PHASE, our approach is slightly better and much faster than PHASE for incomplete trios, the performance of GENEHUNTER is very bad in simple nuclear family settings and dramatically decreased with the number of markers being increased. On the other hand, the comparison result of different sampling designs demonstrates that sampling trios is the most efficient design to estimate haplotype frequencies in populations under same genotyping cost.

  4. Educational Mismatches and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Both Vertical and Horizontal Mismatches in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholphirul, Piriya

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Educational mismatches constitute negative impacts on labor markets in most countries, Thailand is no exception. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the degree of educational mismatch in Thailand and its impacts on labor market outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: This study analyzes data obtained from Thailand's Labor Force Survey…

  5. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  6. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Bharti, Vineet; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch---near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  7. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Walshe, J.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  8. Mismatch and noise in modern IC processes

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Component variability, mismatch, and various noise effects are major contributors to design limitations in most modern IC processes. Mismatch and Noise in Modern IC Processes examines these related effects and how they affect the building block circuits of modern integrated circuits, from the perspective of a circuit designer.Variability usually refers to a large scale variation that can occur on a wafer to wafer and lot to lot basis, and over long distances on a wafer. This phenomenon is well understood and the effects of variability are included in most integrated circuit design with the use

  9. An analytical study of mismatched complementary media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Lin; Ma, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    Complementary media (CM) interacting with arbitrarily situated obstacles are usually less discussed. In this paper, an analytical framework based on multiple scattering theory is established for analyzing such a mismatched case. As examples, CM-based devices, i.e., a superlens and superscatterer, are discussed. From an analysis, the cancellation mechanism of the mismatched CM is studied. In addition, numerical results are provided for illustration. Moreover, further study shows that such cancellation effects might rely on specific conditions. Actually, the conclusions are not restricted to any specific frequencies; they could be extended to many other areas including applications to active cloaking, antennas, and wireless power transfer.

  10. Fast and accurate haplotype frequency estimation for large haplotype vectors from pooled DNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliadis Alexandros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, the first phase of a genome wide association study (GWAS includes genotyping across hundreds of individuals and validation of the most significant SNPs. Allelotyping of pooled genomic DNA is a common approach to reduce the overall cost of the study. Knowledge of haplotype structure can provide additional information to single locus analyses. Several methods have been proposed for estimating haplotype frequencies in a population from pooled DNA data. Results We introduce a technique for haplotype frequency estimation in a population from pooled DNA samples focusing on datasets containing a small number of individuals per pool (2 or 3 individuals and a large number of markers. We compare our method with the publicly available state-of-the-art algorithms HIPPO and HAPLOPOOL on datasets of varying number of pools and marker sizes. We demonstrate that our algorithm provides improvements in terms of accuracy and computational time over competing methods for large number of markers while demonstrating comparable performance for smaller marker sizes. Our method is implemented in the "Tree-Based Deterministic Sampling Pool" (TDSPool package which is available for download at http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~anastas/tdspool. Conclusions Using a tree-based determinstic sampling technique we present an algorithm for haplotype frequency estimation from pooled data. Our method demonstrates superior performance in datasets with large number of markers and could be the method of choice for haplotype frequency estimation in such datasets.

  11. The S haplotype-specific F-box protein gene, SFB, is defective in self-compatible haplotypes of Prunus avium and P. mume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Koichiro; Yamane, Hisayo; Watari, Akiko; Kakehi, Eiko; Ikeda, Kazuo; Hauck, Nathanael R; Iezzoni, Amy F; Tao, Ryutaro

    2004-08-01

    Many Prunus species, including sweet cherry and Japanese apricot, of the Rosaceae, display an S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI). The specificity of this outcrossing mechanism is determined by a minimum of two genes that are located in a multigene complex, termed the S locus, which controls the pistil and pollen specificities. SFB, a gene located in the S locus region, encodes an F-box protein that has appropriate S haplotype-specific variation to be the pollen determinant in the self-incompatibility reaction. This study characterizes SFBs of two self-compatible (SC) haplotypes, S(4') and S(f), of Prunus. S(4') of sweet cherry is a pollen-part mutant (PPM) that was produced by X-ray irradiation, while S(f) of Japanese apricot is a naturally occurring SC haplotype that is considered to be a PPM. DNA sequence analysis revealed defects in both SFB(4') and SFB(f). A 4 bp deletion upstream from the HVa coding region of SFB(4') causes a frame-shift that produces transcripts of a defective SFB lacking the two hypervariable regions, HVa and HVb. Similarly, the presence of a 6.8 kbp insertion in the middle of the SFB(f) coding region leads to transcripts for a defective SFB lacking the C-terminal half that contains HVa and HVb. As all reported SFBs of functional S haplotypes encode intact SFB, the fact that the partial loss-of-function mutations in SFB are present in SC mutant haplotypes of Prunus provides additional evidence that SFB is the pollen S gene in GSI in Prunus.

  12. Game, set, match for factor VIII mismatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Connie H

    2015-08-13

    In this issue of Blood, Gunasekera et al provide evidence that the high rate of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors seen in black hemophilia A (HA) patients is not due to a mismatch between the structure of treatment products and FVIII genotypes common in blacks.

  13. Distributivity and Agreement mismatches in Serbian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosnic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a truth value judgment study done on two types of numerals in the Serbian numerical system and corresponding verbal agreement mismatch that is characteristic for the numerals in question. Recent work on agreement and distributivity suggests that singular verbal marking promotes d

  14. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-García, A.; Prieto, A. I.; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J.; Alonso, N.; Cantillon, D.; Costas, C.; Pérez-Lago, L.; Zegeye, E. D.; Herranz, M.; Plociński, P.; Tonjum, T.; García de Viedma, D.; Paget, M.; Waddell, S. J.; Rojas, A. M.; Doherty, A. J.; Blázquez, J.

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS–MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS–MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature. PMID:28128207

  15. Genomic sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' haplotype C and its comparison with haplotype A and B genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapalainen, Minna; Schott, Thomas; Thompson, Sarah M.; Smith, Grant R.; Nissinen, Anne I.; Pirhonen, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Haplotypes A and B of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (CLso) are associated with diseases of solanaceous plants, especially Zebra chip disease of potato, and haplotypes C, D and E are associated with symptoms on apiaceous plants. To date, one complete genome of haplotype B and two high quality draft genomes of haplotype A have been obtained for these unculturable bacteria using metagenomics from the psyllid vector Bactericera cockerelli. Here, we present the first genomic sequences obtained for the carrot-associated CLso. These two genomic sequences of haplotype C, FIN114 (1.24 Mbp) and FIN111 (1.20 Mbp), were obtained from carrot psyllids (Trioza apicalis) harboring CLso. Genomic comparisons between the haplotypes A, B and C revealed that the genome organization differs between these haplotypes, due to large inversions and other recombinations. Comparison of protein-coding genes indicated that the core genome of CLso consists of 885 ortholog groups, with the pan-genome consisting of 1327 ortholog groups. Twenty-seven ortholog groups are unique to CLso haplotype C, whilst 11 ortholog groups shared by the haplotypes A and B, are not found in the haplotype C. Some of these ortholog groups that are not part of the core genome may encode functions related to interactions with the different host plant and psyllid species. PMID:28158295

  16. The effect of genealogy-based haplotypes on genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Fernando, Rohan L.; Su, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic prediction uses two sources of information: linkage disequilibrium between markers and quantitative trait loci, and additive genetic relationships between individuals. One way to increase the accuracy of genomic prediction is to capture more linkage disequilibrium by regression...... on haplotypes instead of regression on individual markers. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of genomic prediction using haplotypes based on local genealogy information. Methods A total of 4429 Danish Holstein bulls were genotyped with the 50K SNP chip. Haplotypes were constructed using...... local genealogical trees. Effects of haplotype covariates were estimated with two types of prediction models: (1) assuming that effects had the same distribution for all haplotype covariates, i.e. the GBLUP method and (2) assuming that a large proportion (pi) of the haplotype covariates had zero effect...

  17. Circuit mismatch influence on performance of paralleling silicon carbide MOSFETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Pham, Cam

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on circuit mismatch influence on performance of paralleling SiC MOSFETs. Power circuit mismatch and gate driver mismatch influences are analyzed in detail. Simulation and experiment results show the influence of circuit mismatch and verify the analysis. This paper aims to give...... suggestions on paralleling discrete SiC MOSFETs and designing layout of power modules with paralleled SiC MOSFETs dies....

  18. iHAP – integrated haplotype analysis pipeline for characterizing the haplotype structure of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Yun Ping

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of genotype data from large-scale efforts that catalog the genetic variants of different populations have given rise to new avenues for multifactorial disease association studies. Recent work shows that genotype data from the International HapMap Project have a high degree of transferability to the wider population. This implies that the design of genotyping studies on local populations may be facilitated through inferences drawn from information contained in HapMap populations. Results To facilitate analysis of HapMap data for characterizing the haplotype structure of genes or any chromosomal regions, we have developed an integrated web-based resource, iHAP. In addition to incorporating genotype and haplotype data from the International HapMap Project and gene information from the UCSC Genome Browser Database, iHAP also provides capabilities for inferring haplotype blocks and selecting tag SNPs that are representative of haplotype patterns. These include block partitioning algorithms, block definitions, tag SNP definitions, as well as SNPs to be "force included" as tags. Based on the parameters defined at the input stage, iHAP performs on-the-fly analysis and displays the result graphically as a webpage. To facilitate analysis, intermediate and final result files can be downloaded. Conclusion The iHAP resource, available at http://ihap.bii.a-star.edu.sg, provides a convenient yet flexible approach for the user community to analyze HapMap data and identify candidate targets for genotyping studies.

  19. Representation and Processing of Lexical Tone and Tonal Variants : Evidence from the Mismatch Negativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Chen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pronunciation variation is ubiquitous in the speech signal. Different models of lexical representation have been put forward to deal with speech variability, which differ in the level as well as the nature of mental representation. We present the first mismatch negativity (MMN) study investigating t

  20. Haplotype mapping of a diploid non-meiotic organism using existing and induced aneuploidies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Legrand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Haplotype maps (HapMaps reveal underlying sequence variation and facilitate the study of recombination and genetic diversity. In general, HapMaps are produced by analysis of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP segregation in large numbers of meiotic progeny. Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, is an obligate diploid that does not appear to undergo meiosis. Thus, standard methods for haplotype mapping cannot be used. We exploited naturally occurring aneuploid strains to determine the haplotypes of the eight chromosome pairs in the C. albicans laboratory strain SC5314 and in a clinical isolate. Comparison of the maps revealed that the clinical strain had undergone a significant amount of genome rearrangement, consisting primarily of crossover or gene conversion recombination events. SNP map haplotyping revealed that insertion and activation of the UAU1 cassette in essential and non-essential genes can result in whole chromosome aneuploidy. UAU1 is often used to construct homozygous deletions of targeted genes in C. albicans; the exact mechanism (trisomy followed by chromosome loss versus gene conversion has not been determined. UAU1 insertion into the essential ORC1 gene resulted in a large proportion of trisomic strains, while gene conversion events predominated when UAU1 was inserted into the non-essential LRO1 gene. Therefore, induced aneuploidies can be used to generate HapMaps, which are essential for analyzing genome alterations and mitotic recombination events in this clonal organism.

  1. Architectural mismatch issues in identity management deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Schaarup

    2010-01-01

    Integrating Commercial Off-The-Shelf products in a company's software product portfolio offers business value, but introduces challenges from a software architecture perspective. In this paper, the research challenges in relation to identity management in the Danish municipality administration...... system called Opus, are outlined. Opus BRS is the identity management part of Opus. Opus integrates SAP, legacy mainframe systems, and other third party systems of the individual municipality. Each of these systems define their own software architecture and access control model, leading to architectural...... mismatch with an impact on security, usability, and maintainability. The research project is discussed and access control and identity provisioning are recognized as the major areas of interest in relation to the mismatch challenges. The project is carried out in close cooperation with KMD, one...

  2. Topologically clustering: a method for discarding mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Dazhi; Gao, Chenqiang; Tian, Jinwen

    2007-11-01

    Wide baseline stereo correspondence has become a challenging and attractive problem in computer vision and its related applications. Getting high correct ratio initial matches is a very important step of general wide baseline stereo correspondence algorithm. Ferrari et al. suggested a voting scheme called topological filter in [3] to discard mismatches from initial matches, but they didn't give theoretical analysis of their method. Furthermore, the parameter of their scheme was uncertain. In this paper, we improved Ferraris' method based on our theoretical analysis, and presented a novel scheme called topologically clustering to discard mismatches. The proposed method has been tested using many famous wide baseline image pairs and the experimental results showed that the developed method can efficiently extract high correct ratio matches from low correct ratio initial matches for wide baseline image pairs.

  3. Mechanisms and functions of DNA mismatch repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo MinLi

    2008-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a highly conserved biological pathway that plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability. The specificity of MMR is primarily for base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion mispairs generated dur-ing DNA replication and recombination. MMR also suppresses homeologous recombination and was recently shown to play a role in DNA damage signaling in eukaryotic cells. Escherichia coli MutS and MutL and their eukaryotic homo-logs, MutSα and MutLα, respectively, are key players in MMR-associated genome maintenance. Many other protein components that participate in various DNA metabolic pathways, such as PCNA and RPA, are also essential for MMR. Defects in MMR are associated with genome-wide instability, predisposition to certain types of cancer including he-reditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, resistance to certain chemotherapeutic agents, and abnormalities in meiosis and sterility in mammalian systems.

  4. Effects of Mismatched Parameter on Chaotic Synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGJiang-hua; FANGJin-qing

    2003-01-01

    Chaos-based security communication has become one of the most interesting hot subjects for research of chaotic theory in real world since. In recent years, secure communication via synchronized chaos has been intensely studied. However, in practical application it is difficult to construct two complete identical chaotic systems since there are many reasons to induce parameter mismatch between two systems (response system and drive system).

  5. Skill mismatch and overeducation in transition economies

    OpenAIRE

    Kupets, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Large imbalances between the supply and demand for skills in transition economies are driven by rapid economic restructuring, misalignment of the education system with labor market needs, and underdeveloped adult education and training systems. The costs of mismatches can be large and long-lasting for workers, firms, and economies, with long periods of overeducation implying a loss of human capital for individuals and ineffective use of resources for the economy. To make informed decisions, p...

  6. Haplotyping using a combination of polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and haplotype-specific PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huitong; Li, Shaobin; Liu, Xiu; Wang, Jiqing; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G H

    2014-12-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may have an impact on phenotype, but it may also be influenced by multiple SNPs within a gene; hence, the haplotype or phase of multiple SNPs needs to be known. Various methods for haplotyping SNPs have been proposed, but a simple and cost-effective method is currently unavailable. Here we describe a haplotyping approach using two simple techniques: polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and haplotype-specific PCR. In this approach, individual regions of a gene are analyzed by PCR-SSCP to identify variation that defines sub-haplotypes, and then extended haplotypes are assembled from the sub-haplotypes either directly or with the additional use of haplotype-specific PCR amplification. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by haplotyping ovine FABP4 across two variable regions that contain seven SNPs and one indel. The simplicity of this approach makes it suitable for large-scale studies and/or diagnostic screening.

  7. A fast and accurate algorithm for diploid individual haplotype reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingli; Liang, Binbin

    2013-08-01

    Haplotypes can provide significant information in many research fields, including molecular biology and medical therapy. However, haplotyping is much more difficult than genotyping by using only biological techniques. With the development of sequencing technologies, it becomes possible to obtain haplotypes by combining sequence fragments. The haplotype reconstruction problem of diploid individual has received considerable attention in recent years. It assembles the two haplotypes for a chromosome given the collection of fragments coming from the two haplotypes. Fragment errors significantly increase the difficulty of the problem, and which has been shown to be NP-hard. In this paper, a fast and accurate algorithm, named FAHR, is proposed for haplotyping a single diploid individual. Algorithm FAHR reconstructs the SNP sites of a pair of haplotypes one after another. The SNP fragments that cover some SNP site are partitioned into two groups according to the alleles of the corresponding SNP site, and the SNP values of the pair of haplotypes are ascertained by using the fragments in the group that contains more SNP fragments. The experimental comparisons were conducted among the FAHR, the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms by using the haplotypes on chromosome 1 of 60 individuals in CEPH samples, which were released by the International HapMap Project. Experimental results under different parameter settings indicate that the reconstruction rate of the FAHR algorithm is higher than those of the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms, and the running time of the FAHR algorithm is shorter than those of the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms. Moreover, the FAHR algorithm has high efficiency even for the reconstruction of long haplotypes and is very practical for realistic applications.

  8. Functional Haplotypes in Interleukin 4 Gene Associated with Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Rossa, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) is an infectious inflammatory disease that affects tooth-supporting structures and in which dental plaque bacteria, immune mechanisms and genetic predisposition play important roles. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a key anti-inflammatory cytokine with relevant action in imbalances in inflamed periodontal tissue. Individuals carrying the TCI/CCI genotype (S-haplotype) of the IL-4 gene are 5 times more susceptible to CP, whereas the CTI/TTD genotype (P-haplotype) confers protection against CP. Compared with the S-haplotype, subjects with the P-haplotype produce higher levels of the IL-4 protein after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the functionality of IL-4 haplotypes in immune cells to obtain insight into the influence of these genetic variations in regulating immune responses to CP-associated bacteria. Peripheral blood was collected from 6 subjects carrying each haplotype, and their immune cells were challenged with periodontopathogens to compare responses of the different haplotypes with regard to gene expression, protein secretion and the immunophenotype of T helper responses. We found higher IL-4 mRNA and protein levels in the P-haplotype, which also presented higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, cells from S-haplotype subjects responded with higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. S-haplotype individuals exhibited significantly greater polarization toward the Th1 phenotype, whereas the P-haplotype was associated with an attenuated response to periodontopathogens, with suggestive skewing toward Th2/M2 phenotypes. In conclusion, IL-4 genetic variations associated with susceptibility to or protection against chronic periodontitis are directly associated with influencing the response of immune cells to periodontopathogens. PMID:28114408

  9. MutS recognition: Multiple mismatches and sequence context effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Joshi; Basuthkar J Rao

    2001-12-01

    Escherichia coli MutS is a versatile repair protein that specifically recognizes not only various types of mismatches but also single stranded loops of up to 4 nucleotides in length. Specific binding, followed by the next step of tracking the DNA helix that locates hemi-methylated sites, is regulated by the conformational state of the protein as a function of ATP binding/hydrolysis. Here, we study how various molecular determinants of a heteroduplex regulate mismatch recognition by MutS, the critical first step of mismatch repair. Using classical DNase I footprinting assays, we demonstrate that the hierarchy of MutS binding to various types of mismatches is identical whether the mismatches are present singly or in multiples. Moreover, this unique hierarchy is indifferent both to the differential level of DNA helical flexibility and to the unpaired status of the mismatched bases in a heteroduplex. Surprisingly, multiple mismatches exhibit reduced affinity of binding to MutS, compared to that of a similar single mismatch. Such a reduction in the affinity might be due to sequence context effects, which we established more directly by studying two identical single mismatches in an altered sequence background. A mismatch, upon simply being flipped at the same location, elicits changes in MutS specific contacts, thereby underscoring the importance of sequence context in modulating MutS binding to mismatches.

  10. The discrete Laplace exponential family and estimation of Y-STR haplotype frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Estimating haplotype frequencies is important in e.g. forensic genetics, where the frequencies are needed to calculate the likelihood ratio for the evidential weight of a DNA profile found at a crime scene. Estimation is naturally based on a population model, motivating the investigation of the F...... on a normal computer. This method was implemented in the freely available open source software R that is supported on Linux, MacOS and MS Windows....

  11. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome.

  12. An overview of the haplotype problems and algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yuzhong; XU Yun; ZHANG Qiangfeng; CHEN Guoliang

    2007-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP),as the most common form of genetic variation,has been widely studied to help analyze the possible association between diseases and genomes.To gain more information,SNPs on a single chromosome are usually studied together,which constitute a haplotype.Gaining haplotypes from biological experiments is usually very costly and time-consuming,which causes people to develop efficient methods to determine haplotypes from the computational angle.Many problems and algorithms about haplotypes have been proposed to reduce the cost of studies of disease association.In general,four categories of problems are widely researched:the haplotype assembly problem,the haplotype inference problem,the haplotype block partition problem,and the haplotype tagging SNP selection problem.The former two problems have been well reviewed by many researchers,whereas the latter two have not been comprehensively surveyed to our knowledge.In this paper,we try to make a detailed introduction to the four problems,especially the latter two.

  13. Reconstruction of N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotypes using PHASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Klaus; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Samimi, Mirabutaleb; Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) by PCR/RFLP methods yields in a considerable percentage ambiguous results. To resolve this methodical problem a statistical approach was applied. PHASE v2.1.1, a statistical program for haplotype reconstruction was used to estimate haplotype pairs from NAT2 genotyping data, obtained by the analysis of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for Caucasians. In 1,011 out of 2,921 (35%) subjects the haplotype pairs were clearcut by the PCR/RFLP data only. For the majority of the data the applied method resulted in a multiplicity (2-4) of possible haplotype pairs. Haplotype reconstruction using PHASE v2.1.1 cleared this ambiguity in all cases but one, where an alternative haplotype pair was considered with a probability of 0.029. The estimation of the NAT2 haplotype is important because the assignment of the NAT2 alleles *12A, *12B, *12C or *13 to the rapid or slow NAT2 genotype has been discussed controversially. A clear assignment is indispensable in surveys of human bladder cancer caused by aromatic amine exposures. In conclusion, PHASE v2.1.1 software allowed an unambiguous haplotype reconstruction in 2,920 of 2,921 cases (>99.9%).

  14. A method for haplotype inference in general pedigrees without recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ChunKao; WANG ZhiPeng; QIU XiaoTian; ZHANG Qin

    2007-01-01

    The abundance of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) makes the haplotype-based method instead of single-maker-oriented method the main approach to association studies on QTL mapping. The key problem in haploptype-based method is how to reconstruct haplotypes from genotype data. Directly assaying haplotypes in diploid individuals by experimental methods is too expensive, therefore the in silico haplotyping-determination methods are the major choice at the present. This paper presents a rapid and reliable algorithm for haplotype reconstruction for tightly linked SNPs in general pedigrees. It is based on six rules and consists of three steps. First, the parental origins of alleles in offspring are assigned conditional on genotypes in parent-offspring trios; second, the redundant haplotypes are eliminated based on the six rules; and finally, the most likely haplotype combinations are chosen via maximum likelihood method. Our method was verified and compared with PEDPHASE by simulated data with different pedigree sizes, numbers of loci, and proportions of missing genotypes. The result shows that our algorithm was superior to PEDPHASE in terms of computing time and accuracy of haplotype estimation. The computing time for 100 runs was 10-15 times less and the accuracy was 4%-10% higher than PEDPHASE. The result also indicates that our method was very robust and was hardly affected by pedigree size, number of loci, and proportion of missing genotypes.

  15. Restriction digestion method for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    A restriction digestion method has been developed for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc., an economically important pest of solanaceous crops. This method differentiates the four known potato psyllid haplotypes by utilizing restriction enzyme digestion of a portion of the ...

  16. Distribution of QPY and RAH haplotypes of granzyme B gene in distinct Brazilian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bernadelli Garcia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The cytolysis mediated by granules is one of the most important effector functions of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Recently, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified at exons 2, 3, and 5 of the granzyme B gene, resulting in a haplotype in which three amino acids of mature protein Q48P88Y245 are changed to R48A88H245, which leads to loss of cytotoxic activity of the protein. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of these polymorphisms in Brazilian populations. METHODS: We evaluated the frequency of these polymorphisms in Brazilian ethnic groups (white, Afro-Brazilian, and Asian by sequencing these regions. RESULTS: The allelic and genotypic frequencies of SNP 2364A/G at exon 2 in Afro-Brazilian individuals (42.3% and 17.3% were significantly higher when compared with those in whites and Asians (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0007, respectively. The polymorphisms 2933C/G and 4243C/T also were more frequent in Afro-Brazilians but without any significant difference regarding the other groups. The Afro-Brazilian group presented greater diversity of haplotypes, and the RAH haplotype seemed to be more frequent in this group (25%, followed by the whites (20.7% and by the Asians (11.9%, similar to the frequency presented in the literature. CONCLUSIONS: There is a higher frequency of polymorphisms in Afro-Brazilians, and the RAH haplotype was more frequent in these individuals. We believe that further studies should aim to investigate the correlation of this haplotype with diseases related to immunity mediated by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and if this correlation is confirmed, novel treatment strategies might be elaborated.

  17. Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indian individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Jacob O; Mackenzie, Alexandra P; Adey, Andrew; Hiatt, Joseph B; Patwardhan, Rupali P; Sudmant, Peter H; Ng, Sarah B; Alkan, Can; Qiu, Ruolan; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Haplotype information is essential to the complete description and interpretation of genomes, genetic diversity and genetic ancestry. Although individual human genome sequencing is increasingly routine, nearly all such genomes are unresolved with respect to haplotype. Here we combine the throughput of massively parallel sequencing with the contiguity information provided by large-insert cloning to experimentally determine the haplotype-resolved genome of a South Asian individual. A single fosmid library was split into a modest number of pools, each providing ∼3% physical coverage of the diploid genome. Sequencing of each pool yielded reads overwhelmingly derived from only one homologous chromosome at any given location. These data were combined with whole-genome shotgun sequence to directly phase 94% of ascertained heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into long haplotype blocks (N50 of 386 kilobases (kbp)). This method also facilitates the analysis of structural variation, for example, to anchor novel insertions to specific locations and haplotypes.

  18. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD.

  19. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates.

  20. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-01

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  1. Is it time to move mismatch negativity into the clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in the 1970s, the mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential has improved our understanding of pre-attentive detection of rule violations, which is a fundamental cognitive process considered by some a form of "primitive intelligence". The body of research to date ranges from animal studies (i.e. when investigating the neural mechanisms and pharmacological properties of MMN generation) to researching the psychophysiological nature of human consciousness. MMN therefore offers the possibility to detect abnormal functioning in the neural system involved in MMN generation, such as it occurs in some neurodevelopmental disorders or patients in vegetative state. While the clinical research data holds considerable promise for translation into clinical practice, standardization and normative data of an optimized (i.e. disorder-specific) MMN recording algorithm is needed in order for MMN to become a valuable clinical investigation tool.

  2. Resolution of Mismatched Overlap Holliday Junction Intermediates by the Tyrosine Recombinase IntDOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Yoneji, Sumiko; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2017-05-15

    CTnDOT is an integrated conjugative element found in Bacteroides species. CTnDOT contains and transfers antibiotic resistance genes. The element integrates into and excises from the host chromosome via a Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate as part of a site-specific recombination mechanism. The CTnDOT integrase, IntDOT, is a tyrosine recombinase with core-binding, catalytic, and amino-terminal (N) domains. Unlike well-studied tyrosine recombinases, such as lambda integrase (Int), IntDOT is able to resolve Holliday junctions containing heterology (mismatched bases) between the sites of strand exchange. All known natural isolates of CTnDOT contain mismatches in the overlap region between the sites of strand exchange. Previous work showed that IntDOT was unable to resolve synthetic Holliday junctions containing mismatched bases to products in the absence of the arm-type sites and a DNA-bending protein. We constructed synthetic HJs with the arm-type sites and tested them with the Bacteroides host factor (BHFa). We found that the addition of BHFa stimulated resolution of HJ intermediates with mismatched overlap regions to products. In addition, the L1 site is required for directionality of the reaction, particularly when the HJ contains mismatches. BHFa is required for product formation when the overlap region contains mismatches, and it stimulates resolution to products when the overlap region is identical. Without this DNA bending, the N domain of IntDOT is likely unable to bind the L1 arm-type site. These findings suggest that BHFa bends DNA into the necessary conformation for the higher-order complexes, including the L1 site, that are required for product formation.IMPORTANCE CTnDOT is a mobile element that carries antibiotic resistance genes and moves by site-selective recombination and subsequent conjugation. The recombination reaction is catalyzed by an integrase IntDOT that is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. The reaction proceeds through ordered

  3. Barbed Congruence of Asymmetry and Mismatch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ju Dong; Yu-Xi Fu

    2007-01-01

    The X calculus is a model of concurrent and mobile systems. It emphasizes that communications are information exchanges. In the paper, two constructions are incorporated into the framework of the chi calculus, which are asymmetric communication and mismatch condition widely used in applications. Since the barbed bisimilarity has proved its generality and gained its popularity as an effective approach to generating a reasonable observational equivalence, we study both the operational and algebraic properties of the barbed bisimilarity in this enriched calculus. The investigation supports an improved understanding of the bisimulation behaviors of the model. It also gives a general picture of how the two constructions affect the observational theory.

  4. Visual mismatch negativity: A predictive coding view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor eStefanics

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist’s point of view in a predictive coding framework: 1 experimental protocols and procedures to control ‘refractoriness’ effects; 2 methods to control attention; 3 vMMN and veridical perception.

  5. Are molecular haplotypes worth the time and expense? A cost-effective method for applying molecular haplotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Levenstien

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Because current molecular haplotyping methods are expensive and not amenable to automation, many researchers rely on statistical methods to infer haplotype pairs from multilocus genotypes, and subsequently treat these inferred haplotype pairs as observations. These procedures are prone to haplotype misclassification. We examine the effect of these misclassification errors on the false-positive rate and power for two association tests. These tests include the standard likelihood ratio test (LRTstd and a likelihood ratio test that employs a double-sampling approach to allow for the misclassification inherent in the haplotype inference procedure (LRTae. We aim to determine the cost-benefit relationship of increasing the proportion of individuals with molecular haplotype measurements in addition to genotypes to raise the power gain of the LRTae over the LRTstd. This analysis should provide a guideline for determining the minimum number of molecular haplotypes required for desired power. Our simulations under the null hypothesis of equal haplotype frequencies in cases and controls indicate that (1 for each statistic, permutation methods maintain the correct type I error; (2 specific multilocus genotypes that are misclassified as the incorrect haplotype pair are consistently misclassified throughout each entire dataset; and (3 our simulations under the alternative hypothesis showed a significant power gain for the LRTae over the LRTstd for a subset of the parameter settings. Permutation methods should be used exclusively to determine significance for each statistic. For fixed cost, the power gain of the LRTae over the LRTstd varied depending on the relative costs of genotyping, molecular haplotyping, and phenotyping. The LRTae showed the greatest benefit over the LRTstd when the cost of phenotyping was very high relative to the cost of genotyping. This situation is likely to occur in a replication study as opposed to a whole-genome association study.

  6. Accounting for haplotype phase uncertainty in linkage disequilibrium estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulle, B; Frigessi, A; Edvardsen, H; Kristensen, V; Wojnowski, L

    2008-02-01

    The characterization of linkage disequilibrium (LD) is applied in a variety of studies including the identification of molecular determinants of the local recombination rate, the migration and population history of populations, and the role of positive selection in adaptation. LD suffers from the phase uncertainty of the haplotypes used in its calculation, which reflects limitations of the algorithms used for haplotype estimation. We introduce a LD calculation method, which deals with phase uncertainty by weighting all possible haplotype pairs according to their estimated probabilities as evaluated by PHASE. In contrast to the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm as implemented in the HAPLOVIEW and GENETICS packages, our method considers haplotypes based on the entire genetic information available for the candidate region. We tested the method using simulated and real genotyping data. The results show that, for all practical purposes, the new method is advantageous in comparison with algorithms that calculate LD using only the most probable haplotype or bilocus haplotypes based on the EM algorithm. The new method deals especially well with low LD regions, which contribute strongly to phase uncertainty. Altogether, the method is an attractive alternative to standard LD calculation procedures, including those based on the EM algorithm. We implemented the method in the software suite R, together with an interface to the popular haplotype calculation package PHASE.

  7. Maximum-likelihood estimation of haplotype frequencies in nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Tim; Knapp, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The importance of haplotype analysis in the context of association fine mapping of disease genes has grown steadily over the last years. Since experimental methods to determine haplotypes on a large scale are not available, phase has to be inferred statistically. For individual genotype data, several reconstruction techniques and many implementations of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for haplotype frequency estimation exist. Recent research work has shown that incorporating available genotype information of related individuals largely increases the precision of haplotype frequency estimates. We, therefore, implemented a highly flexible program written in C, called FAMHAP, which calculates maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) of haplotype frequencies from general nuclear families with an arbitrary number of children via the EM-algorithm for up to 20 SNPs. For more loci, we have implemented a locus-iterative mode of the EM-algorithm, which gives reliable approximations of the MLEs for up to 63 SNP loci, or less when multi-allelic markers are incorporated into the analysis. Missing genotypes can be handled as well. The program is able to distinguish cases (haplotypes transmitted to the first affected child of a family) from pseudo-controls (non-transmitted haplotypes with respect to the child). We tested the performance of FAMHAP and the accuracy of the obtained haplotype frequencies on a variety of simulated data sets. The implementation proved to work well when many markers were considered and no significant differences between the estimates obtained with the usual EM-algorithm and those obtained in its locus-iterative mode were observed. We conclude from the simulations that the accuracy of haplotype frequency estimation and reconstruction in nuclear families is very reliable in general and robust against missing genotypes.

  8. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  9. Mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae: relationship between base mismatches and transformation efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverys, J P; Méjean, V; Gasc, A M; Sicard, A M

    1983-10-01

    Genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae involves the insertion of single-stranded pieces of donor DNA into a recipient genome. Efficiencies of transformation strongly depend on the mutations (markers) carried by donor DNA. Markers are classified according to their transforming efficiencies into very high, high, intermediate, and low efficiency. The last is approximately 1/20th as efficient as the first. This marker effect is under the control of the Hex system, which is thought to correct mismatches at the donor-recipient heteroduplex stage in transformation. To investigate this effect, wild type, mutant, and revertant DNA sequences at five genetic sites within the amiA locus were determined. The results show that low-efficiency markers arise from transitional changes A . T to G . C. The transversion A . T to T . A corresponds to an intermediate-efficiency marker. Transversions G . C to T . A and G . C to C . G lead to high-efficiency markers. Among the eight possible mismatches that could exist transiently at the heteroduplex stage in transformation, only two--namely, A/G and C/C--are not corrected by the Hex system. It is noteworthy that the four possible base pairs (A . T, T . A, G . C, and C . G) have been encountered at the very same site (amiA6 site), which constitutes a good illustration of the marker effect. DNA sequence analysis also reveals that short deletions (33 or 34 bases long) are integrated with very high efficiencies. These results confirm that the Hex system corrects point mismatches harbored in donor-recipient heteroduplexes thousands of bases long. The correction pattern of the Hex system toward multiple-base mismatches has also been investigated. Its behavior toward double-base mismatches is complex, suggesting that neighboring sequences may affect the detection of mispaired bases.

  10. Molecular evolution and functional characterisation of haplotypes of an important rubber biosynthesis gene in Hevea brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthup, T K; Rajamani, A; Ravindran, M; Saha, T

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A synthase (HMGS) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway leading to natural rubber production in Hevea brasiliensis (rubber). Analysis of the structural variants of this gene is imperative to understand their functional significance in rubber biosynthesis so that they can be properly utilised for ongoing crop improvement programmes in Hevea. We report here allele richness and diversity of the HMGS gene in selected popular rubber clones. Haplotypes consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the coding and non-coding regions with a high degree of heterozygosity were identified. Segregation and linkage disequilibrium analysis confirmed that recombination is the major contributor to the generation of allelic diversity, rather than point mutations. The evolutionarily conserved nature of some SNPs was identified by comparative DNA sequence analysis of HMGS orthologues from diverse taxa, demonstrating the molecular evolution of rubber biosynthesis genes in general. In silico three-dimensional structural studies highlighting the structural positioning of non-synonymous SNPs from different HMGS haplotypes revealed that the ligand-binding site on the enzyme remains impervious to the reported sequence variations. In contrast, gene expression results indicated the possibility of association between specific haplotypes and HMGS expression in Hevea clones, which may have a downstream impact up to the level of rubber production. Moreover, haplotype diversity of the HMGS gene and its putative association with gene expression can be the basis for further genetic association studies in rubber. Furthermore, the data also show the role of SNPs in the evolution of candidate genes coding for functional traits in plants.

  11. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  12. New prediction model for probe specificity in an allele-specific extension reaction for haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) of Y chromosome mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Watkins, Norman E; Nagy, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Allele-specific extension reactions (ASERs) use 3' terminus-specific primers for the selective extension of completely annealed matches by polymerase. The ability of the polymerase to extend non-specific 3' terminal mismatches leads to a failure of the reaction, a process that is only partly understood and predictable, and often requires time-consuming assay design. In our studies we investigated haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) for the separation of male DNA mixtures. HSE is an ASER and provides the ability to distinguish between diploid chromosomes from one or more individuals. Here, we show that the success of HSE and allele-specific extension depend strongly on the concentration difference between complete match and 3' terminal mismatch. Using the oligonucleotide-modeling platform Visual Omp, we demonstrated the dependency of the discrimination power of the polymerase on match- and mismatch-target hybridization between different probe lengths. Therefore, the probe specificity in HSE could be predicted by performing a relative comparison of different probe designs with their simulated differences between the duplex concentration of target-probe match and mismatches. We tested this new model for probe design in more than 300 HSE reactions with 137 different probes and obtained an accordance of 88%.

  13. The Effect of Haplotype-Block Definitions on Inference of Haplotype-Block Structure and htSNPs Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KeyueDing; KaixinZhou; JingZhang; JoanneKnight; XuegongZhang; YanShen

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently suggested that the human genome is organized as a series of haplotype blocks, and efforts to create a genome-wide haplotype map are already underway. Several computational algorithms have been proposed to partition the genome. However, little is known about their behaviors in relation to the haplotype-block partitioning and haplotypetagging SNPs selection. Here, we present a systematic comparison of three classes of haplotype-block partition definitions, a diversity-based method, a linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based method, and a recombination-based method.The data used were derived from a coalescent simulation under both a uniform recombination model and one that assumes recombination hotspots. There were considerable differences in haplotype information loss in the measure of entropy when the partition methods were compared under different population-genetics scenarios. Under both recombination models, the results from the LD-based definition and the recombination-based definition were more similar to each other than were the results from the diversity-based definition. This work demonstrates that when undertaking haplotype-based association mapping, the choice of haplotype-block definition and SNP selection requires careful consideration.

  14. A Review for Model Plant Mismatch Measures in Process Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪; 谢磊; 宋执环

    2012-01-01

    Model is usually necessary for the design of a control loop. Due to simplification and unknown dynamics, model plant mismatch is inevitable in the control loop. In process monitoring, detection of mismatch and evaluation of its influences are demanded. In this paper several mismatch measures are presented based on different model descriptions. They are categorized into different groups from different perspectives and their potential in detection and diagnosis is evaluated. Two case studies on mixing process and distillation process demonstrate the efficacy of the framework of mismatch monitoring.

  15. Power laws for heavy-tailed distributions: modeling allele and haplotype diversity for the national marrow donor program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Slater

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT. Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth and accuracy (with respect to diversity

  16. Understanding the Consequences of Property Rights Mismatches: a Case Study of New Zealand's Marine Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Yandle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Within fisheries and natural resource management literature, there is considerable discussion about the key roles that property rights can play in building biologically and socially sustainable resource management regimes. A key point of agreement is that secure long-term property rights provide an incentive for resource users to manage the resource sustainably. However, property rights mismatches create ambiguity and conflict in resource use. Though the term mismatches is usually associated with problems in matching temporal and spatial resource characteristics with institutional characteristics, I expand it here to include problems that can arise when property rights are incompletely defined or incompletely distributed. Property rights mismatches are particularly likely to occur over marine resources, for which multiple types of resource and resource user can be engaged and managed under a variety of regulatory regimes. I used New Zealand's marine resources to examine the causes and consequences of these property rights mismatches. New Zealand is particularly interesting because its property-rights-based commercial fishing regime, in the form of individual transferable quotas, has attracted considerable positive attention. However, my review of the marine natural resource management regime from a broader property rights perspective highlights a series of problems caused by property rights mismatches, including competition for resources among commercial, customary, and recreational fishers; spatial conflict among many marine resource users; and conflicting incentives and objectives for the management of resources over time. The use of a property rights perspective also highlights some potential solutions such as the layering of institutional arrangements and the improvement of how property rights are defined to encourage long-term sustainability.

  17. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  18. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome...... of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should...... shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb...

  19. Haplotype Map of Sickle Cell Anemia in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Moumni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD. To determine the chromosomal background of βS Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5′ region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII region of two fetal (γG and γA genes and the 5′ region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 “extended haplotypes”. These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD.

  20. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in males from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Simonsen, Bo;

    2009-01-01

    A total of 272 males from Greenland were typed for 11 Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y System (Promega). A total of 146 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.9887....

  1. Short communication: casein haplotype variability in sicilian dairy goat breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigli, I; Maizon, D O; Riggio, V; Sardina, M T; Portolano, B

    2008-09-01

    In the Mediterranean region, goat milk production is an important economic activity. In the present study, 4 casein genes were genotyped in 5 Sicilian goat breeds to 1) identify casein haplotypes present in the Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana, Messinese, Derivata di Siria, and Maltese goat breeds; and 2) describe the structure of the Sicilian goat breeds based on casein haplotypes and allele frequencies. In a sample of 540 dairy goats, 67 different haplotypes with frequency >or=0.01 and 27 with frequency >or=0.03 were observed. The most common CSN1S1-CSN2-CSN1S2-CSN3 haplotype for Derivata di Siria and Maltese was FCFB (0.17 and 0.22, respectively), whereas for Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana and Messinese was ACAB (0.06, 0.23, and 0.10, respectively). According to the haplotype reconstruction, Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana, and Messinese breeds presented the most favorable haplotype for cheese production, because the casein concentration in milk of these breeds might be greater than that in Derivata di Siria and Maltese breeds. Based on a cluster analysis, the breeds formed 2 main groups: Derivata di Siria, and Maltese in one group, and Argentata dell'Etna and Messinese in the other; the Girgentana breed was between these groups but closer to the latter.

  2. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Edmond J; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  3. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Yunis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family, Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family, Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families, Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family, Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family, Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family. for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1. Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  4. Association testing by haplotype-sharing methods applicable to whole-genome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Ilja M.; Vries, André R. de; Spijker, Geert T.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Brinza, Dumitru; Zelikovsky, Alexander; Meerman, Gerard J. te

    2007-01-01

    We propose two new haplotype-sharing methods for identifying disease loci: the haplotype sharing statistic (HSS), which compares length of shared haplotypes between cases and controls, and the CROSS test, which tests whether a case and a control haplotype show less sharing than two random

  5. Shrinkage Estimators for Robust and Efficient Inference in Haplotype-Based Case-Control Studies

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yi-Hau

    2009-03-01

    Case-control association studies often aim to investigate the role of genes and gene-environment interactions in terms of the underlying haplotypes (i.e., the combinations of alleles at multiple genetic loci along chromosomal regions). The goal of this article is to develop robust but efficient approaches to the estimation of disease odds-ratio parameters associated with haplotypes and haplotype-environment interactions. We consider "shrinkage" estimation techniques that can adaptively relax the model assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg-Equilibrium and gene-environment independence required by recently proposed efficient "retrospective" methods. Our proposal involves first development of a novel retrospective approach to the analysis of case-control data, one that is robust to the nature of the gene-environment distribution in the underlying population. Next, it involves shrinkage of the robust retrospective estimator toward a more precise, but model-dependent, retrospective estimator using novel empirical Bayes and penalized regression techniques. Methods for variance estimation are proposed based on asymptotic theories. Simulations and two data examples illustrate both the robustness and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  6. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  7. Mismatch Analysis of TAB-on-Glass Connection With ACF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    element model be used in the mismatch analysis if a more accurate prediction of OLB mismatch is desired. REFERENCES 1. H. Atarashi, N. Kakimoto , H...Yamamura, N. Kakimoto , K. Naitoh, and T. Nukii, "Bare-chip face-down bonding technology using conductive particles and lightsetting adhesives:ELASTIC

  8. Influence of halo doping profiles on MOS transistor mismatch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andricciola, P.; Tuinhout, H.

    2009-01-01

    Halo implants are used in modern CMOS technology to reduce the short channel effect. However, the lateral non-uniformity of the channel doping has been proven to degenerate the mismatch performance. With this paper we want to discuss the influence of the halo profile on MOS transistor mismatch. The

  9. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  10. Mismatch-Shaped Pseudo-Passive Two-Capacitor DAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper; Moon, Un-Ku; Temes, Gabor C.

    1999-01-01

    A simple mismatch-shaping scheme is proposed for a two-capacitor DAC. Unlike in other mismatch-shaping systems, the shaped error is generated by direct filtering of a well-defined bounded signal, which can be generated as white noise. The operation is closely related to a specific digital interpo...

  11. Mismatch-Shaping Serial Digital-to-Analog Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper; Moon, Un-Ku; Temes, Gabor C.

    1999-01-01

    A simple but accurate pseudo-passive mismatch-shaping D/A converter is described. A digital state machine is used to control the switching sequence of a symmetric two-capacitor network that performs the D/A conversion. The error caused by capacitor mismatch is uncorrelated with the input signal a...

  12. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  13. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  14. Transgenic mice with -6A haplotype of the human angiotensinogen gene have increased blood pressure compared with -6G haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir; Tillinger, Andrej; Mopidevi, Brahmaraju; Pandey, Varunkumar G; Chauhan, Chetankumar K; Fiering, Steven N; Warming, Soren; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-12-24

    Hypertension is a serious risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene locus is associated with human essential hypertension. The human AGT (hAGT) gene has an A/G polymorphism at -6, and the -6A allele is associated with increased blood pressure. However, transgenic mice containing 1.2 kb of the promoter with -6A of the hAGT gene show neither increased plasma AGT level nor increased blood pressure compared with -6G. We have found that the hAGT gene has three additional SNPs (A/G at -1670, C/G at -1562, and T/G at -1561). Variants -1670A, -1562C, and -1561T almost always occur with -6A, and variants -1670G, -1562G, and -1561G almost always occur with -6G. Therefore, the hAGT gene may be subdivided into either -6A or -6G haplotypes. We show that these polymorphisms affect the binding of HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor to the promoter, and a reporter construct containing a 1.8-kb hAGT gene promoter with -6A haplotype has 4-fold increased glucocorticoid-induced promoter activity as compared with -6G haplotype. In order to understand the physiological significance of these haplotypes in an in vivo situation, we have generated double transgenic mice containing either the -6A or -6G haplotype of the hAGT gene and the human renin gene. Our ChIP assay shows that HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor have stronger affinity for the chromatin obtained from the liver of transgenic mice containing -6A haplotype. Our studies also show that transgenic mice containing -6A haplotype have increased plasma AGT level and increased blood pressure as compared with -6G haplotype. Our studies explain the molecular mechanism involved in association of the -6A allele of the hAGT gene with hypertension.

  15. A periodic table of symmetric tandem mismatches in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M; McDowell, J A; Turner, D H

    1995-03-14

    The stabilities and structures of a series of RNA octamers containing symmetric tandem mismatches were studied by UV melting and imino proton NMR. The free energy increments for tandem mismatch formation are found to depend upon both mismatch sequence and adjacent base pairs. The observed sequence dependence of tandem mismatch stability is UGGU > GUUG > GAAG > or = AGGA > UUUU > CAAC > or = CUUC approximately UCCU approximately CCCC approximately ACCA approximately AAAA, and the closing base pair dependence is 5'G3'C > 5'C3'G > 5'U3'A approximately 5'A3'U. These results differ from expectations based on models used in RNA folding algorithms and from the sequence dependence observed for folding of RNA hairpins. Imino proton NMR results indicate the sequence dependence is partially due to hydrogen bonding within mismatches.

  16. The effect of base pair mismatch on DNA strand displacement

    CERN Document Server

    Broadwater, Bo

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single base pair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration, and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term, the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage t...

  17. Heterogenous mismatch-repair status in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Veurink, Nynke; Holck, Susanne;

    2014-01-01

    , heterogenous mismatch repair protein staining in order to delineate expression patterns and underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Heterogenous staining patterns that affected at least one of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified in 14 colorectal cancers. Based on alternative...... expression patterns macro-dissected and micro-dissected tumor areas were separately analyzed for microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter methylation. RESULTS: Heterogenous retained/lost mismatch repair protein expression could be classified as intraglandular (within or in-between glandular formations....... CONCLUSIONS: Heterogenous mismatch repair status can be demonstrated in colorectal cancer. Though rare, attention to this phenomenon is recommended since it corresponds to differences in mismatch repair status that are relevant for correct classification. VIRTUAL SLIDES: The virtual slide(s) for this article...

  18. Genomic loss of mismatched human leukocyte antigen and leukemia immune escape from haploidentical graft-versus-leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Luca; Toffalori, Cristina; Ciceri, Fabio; Fleischhauer, Katharina

    2012-12-01

    Recent developments in cell processing and immunosuppressive strategies has allowed the safe infusion of high numbers of donor T cells in the context of clinical haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Haploidentical T cells display an intrinsic ability to recognize and eliminate residual patient leukemic cells, largely due to alloreactivity against the patient-specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules encoded on the mismatched haplotype. However, recent evidence has shown that leukemia, like many other tumors displaying pronounced genomic instability, is frequently able to evade this potent graft-versus-leukemia effect by undergoing de novo genomic mutations, which result in the permanent loss of only those HLA molecules targeted by haploidentical donor T-cell alloreactivity. This review summarizes the recent clinical and experimental evidence regarding this phenomenon, and its therapeutic and clinical consequences.

  19. Effects of the number of markers per haplotype and clustering of haplotypes on the accuracy of QTL mapping and prediction of genomic breeding values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Windig, J.J.; Knol, E.F.; Schrooten, C.; Vereijken, A.L.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of haplotype definition on the precision of QTL-mapping and on the accuracy of predicted genomic breeding values. In a multiple QTL model using identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities between haplotypes, various haplotype definitions were tested i.e. i

  20. The contrasting structures of mismatched DNA sequences containing looped-out bases (bulges) and multiple mismatches (bubbles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A; Lilley, D M

    1989-09-12

    We have studied the structure and reactivities of two kinds of mismatched DNA sequences--unopposed bases, or bulges, and multiple mismatched pairs of bases. These were generated in a constant sequence environment, in relatively long DNA fragments, using a technique based on heteroduplex formation between sequences cloned into single-stranded M13 phage. The mismatched sequences were studied from two points of view, viz 1. The mobility of the fragments on gel electrophoresis in polyacrylamide was studied in order to examine possible bending of the DNA due to the presence of the mismatch defect. Such bending would constitute a global effect on the conformation of the molecule. 2. Sequences in and around the mismatches were studied using enzyme and chemical probes of DNA structure. This would reveal more local structural effects of the mismatched sequences. We observed that the structures of the bulges and the multiple mismatches appear to be fundamentally different. The bulged sequences exhibited a large gel retardation, consistent with a significant bending of the DNA at the bulge, and whose magnitude depends on the number of mismatched bases. The larger bulges were sensitive to cleavage by single-strand specific nucleases, and modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate (adenines) or osmium tetroxide (thymines) in a non-uniform way, suggesting that the bulges have a precise structure that leads to exposure of some, but not all, of the bases. In contrast the multiple mismatches ('bubbles') cause very much less bending of the DNA fragment in which they occur, and uniform patterns of chemical reactivity along the length of the mismatched sequences, suggesting a less well defined, and possibly flexible, structure. The precise structure of the bulges suggests that such features may be especially significant for recognition by proteins.

  1. Detection of refuge from enemies through phenological mismatching in multitrophic interactions requires season-wide estimation of host abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstes, N.A.G.; Jong, de P.W.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of ‘‘enemy-free space’’ (EFS) refers to ways of living that reduce or eliminate the vulnerability of a species to natural enemies. It has been invoked to explain host shifts of phytophagous insects. A demonstrated cause of EFS is escape from enemies in time, through phenological mismatch

  2. High-resolution haplotype block structure in the cattle genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jungwoo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bovine HapMap Consortium has generated assay panels to genotype ~30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 501 animals sampled from 19 worldwide taurine and indicine breeds, plus two outgroup species (Anoa and Water Buffalo. Within the larger set of SNPs we targeted 101 high density regions spanning up to 7.6 Mb with an average density of approximately one SNP per 4 kb, and characterized the linkage disequilibrium (LD and haplotype block structure within individual breeds and groups of breeds in relation to their geographic origin and use. Results From the 101 targeted high-density regions on bovine chromosomes 6, 14, and 25, between 57 and 95% of the SNPs were informative in the individual breeds. The regions of high LD extend up to ~100 kb and the size of haplotype blocks ranges between 30 bases and 75 kb (10.3 kb average. On the scale from 1–100 kb the extent of LD and haplotype block structure in cattle has high similarity to humans. The estimation of effective population sizes over the previous 10,000 generations conforms to two main events in cattle history: the initiation of cattle domestication (~12,000 years ago, and the intensification of population isolation and current population bottleneck that breeds have experienced worldwide within the last ~700 years. Haplotype block density correlation, block boundary discordances, and haplotype sharing analyses were consistent in revealing unexpected similarities between some beef and dairy breeds, making them non-differentiable. Clustering techniques permitted grouping of breeds into different clades given their similarities and dissimilarities in genetic structure. Conclusion This work presents the first high-resolution analysis of haplotype block structure in worldwide cattle samples. Several novel results were obtained. First, cattle and human share a high similarity in LD and haplotype block structure on the scale of 1–100 kb. Second, unexpected

  3. [Hemoglobin beta S haplotype in the Kebili region (southern Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikha, M; Fakhfakh, F; Mseddi, S; Gargouri, J; Ghali, L; Labiadh, Z; Harrabi, M; Souissi, T; Ayadi, H

    1998-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a monogenic hereditary disease characterized by a mutation in the beta globin gene. Five major haplotypes associated with the beta S mutation have been defined: Benin, Bantu, Senegalian, Camerounian, and Arabo-Indian. Previous studies in northern Tunisia showed that sickle cell anemia was of Benin origin in this region. Patients from the south of Tunisia, mainly from the Kebili region, were not previously concerned. In this study, we have determined the beta S haplotype and evaluated phenotypical expression of the disease in 14 patients from this latter region. The use of four restriction endonucleases having polymorphic sites in the beta globin gene showed that all patients had the Benin haplotype, confirming the Benin origin of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia. This haplotype is associated with an heterogeneous expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) with extremes varying from 2.4 to 16.3% and a mean expression rate of 8.16%, which is in accordance with literature data. In spite of the haplotype homogeneity in our patients, clinical heterogeneity was noted. A unique case of alpha-thalassemia could not explain this heterogeneity. In contrast, we found a certain correlation between fetal hemoglobin expression and clinical severity.

  4. Visualization of haplotype sharing patterns in pedigree samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sulgi; Saad, Mohamad; Tsuang, Debby W; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-01-01

    A particular approach to the visualization of descent of founder DNA copies in a pedigree has been suggested, which helps to understand haplotype sharing patterns among subjects of interest. However, the approach does not provide the information in an ideal format to show haplotype sharing patterns. Therefore, we aimed to find an efficient way to visualize such sharing patterns and to demonstrate that our tool provides useful information for finding an informative subset of subjects for a sequence study. The visualization package, SharedHap, computes and visualizes a novel metric, the SharedHap proportion, which quantifies haplotype sharing among a set of subjects of interest. We applied SharedHap to simulated and real pedigree datasets to illustrate the approach. SharedHap successfully represents haplotype sharing patterns that contribute to linkage signals in both simulated and real datasets. Using the visualizations we were also able to find ideal sets of subjects for sequencing studies. Our novel metric that can be computed using the SharedHap package provides useful information about haplotype sharing patterns among subjects of interest. The visualization of the SharedHap proportion provides useful information in pedigree studies, allowing for a better selection of candidate subjects for use in further sequencing studies. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  6. The discrete Laplace exponential family and estimation of Y-STR haplotype frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Estimating haplotype frequencies is important in e.g. forensic genetics, where the frequencies are needed to calculate the likelihood ratio for the evidential weight of a DNA profile found at a crime scene. Estimation is naturally based on a population model, motivating the investigation...... of the Fisher-Wright model of evolution for haploid lineage DNA markers. An exponential family (a class of probability distributions that is well understood in probability theory such that inference is easily made by using existing software) called the 'discrete Laplace distribution' is described. We illustrate...

  7. The three-layered mismatched media diffusion equation in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xichang; Wang, Shumei; Meng, Zhaokun; Yang, Shangming

    2006-09-01

    Near-IR radiation has great potential in medical diagnosis and therapy because of the non-invasive nature of light and the selectively poisonous effect to tumors of photodynarnic treatment. Therefore, Near-IR light propagation in highly scattering biological tissue must be understudied for basic research and clinical application of biomedical optics. A tissue is multi-layered mismatched medium, but many investigators only study the diffusion equation of matched medium. they take the tissue as the same refractive index. In order to understand the light transport in tissue, We analyze the diffusion of photons three-layered mismatched medium and set up the solution of Green's function in frequency domain, we employ the extrapolated boundary condition to set up a solution of the diffusion equation. At the same time, we utilize the diffuse equation to calculate the phase in different situation

  8. Next generation haplotyping to decipher nuclear genomic interspecific admixture in Citrus species: analysis of chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Franck; Ancillo, Gema; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Luro, François; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2014-12-29

    The most economically important Citrus species originated by natural interspecific hybridization between four ancestral taxa (Citrus reticulata, Citrus maxima, Citrus medica, and Citrus micrantha) and from limited subsequent interspecific recombination as a result of apomixis and vegetative propagation. Such reticulate evolution coupled with vegetative propagation results in mosaic genomes with large chromosome fragments from the basic taxa in frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Modern breeding of these species is hampered by their complex heterozygous genomic structures that determine species phenotype and are broken by sexual hybridisation. Nevertheless, a large amount of diversity is present in the citrus gene pool, and breeding to allow inclusion of desirable traits is of paramount importance. However, the efficient mobilization of citrus biodiversity in innovative breeding schemes requires previous understanding of Citrus origins and genomic structures. Haplotyping of multiple gene fragments along the whole genome is a powerful approach to reveal the admixture genomic structure of current species and to resolve the evolutionary history of the gene pools. In this study, the efficiency of parallel sequencing with 454 methodology to decipher the hybrid structure of modern citrus species was assessed by analysis of 16 gene fragments on chromosome 2. 454 amplicon libraries were established using the Fluidigm array system for 48 genotypes and 16 gene fragments from chromosome 2. Haplotypes were established from the reads of each accession and phylogenetic analyses were performed using the haplotypic data for each gene fragment. The length of 454 reads and the level of differentiation between the ancestral taxa of modern citrus allowed efficient haplotype phylogenetic assignations for 12 of the 16 gene fragments. The analysis of the mixed genomic structure of modern species and cultivars (i) revealed C. maxima introgressions in modern mandarins, (ii) was

  9. Haplotyping a single triploid individual based on genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingli; Chen, Xixi; Li, Xianchen

    2014-01-01

    The minimum error correction model is an important combinatorial model for haplotyping a single individual. In this article, triploid individual haplotype reconstruction problem is studied by using the model. A genetic algorithm based method GTIHR is presented for reconstructing the triploid individual haplotype. A novel coding method and an effectual hill-climbing operator are introduced for the GTIHR algorithm. This relatively short chromosome code can lead to a smaller solution space, which plays a positive role in speeding up the convergence process. The hill-climbing operator ensures algorithm GTIHR converge at a good solution quickly, and prevents premature convergence simultaneously. The experimental results prove that algorithm GTIHR can be implemented efficiently, and can get higher reconstruction rate than previous algorithms.

  10. JAK2 GGCC haplotype in MPL mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietra, Daniela; Casetti, Ilaria; Da Vià, Matteo C; Elena, Chiara; Milanesi, Chiara; Rumi, Elisa

    2012-07-01

    JAK2 (V617F) is associated with a genetic predisposition to its acquisition,as it is preferentially found in subjects with a common constitutional JAK2 haplotype known as 46/1 or GGCC. A recent study suggests that a genetic predisposition to acquisition of MPL mutation may exist in sporadic patients, since an association was found with the JAK2 46/1 haplotype. We genotyped 509 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), 7% of which carrying a somatic mutation of MPL Exon 10. We found that the JAK2 GGCC haplotype was closely associated with JAK2 (V617F) (OR 1.84, P < 0.001) but not with MPL mutations (OR 0.98), suggesting a different genetic background for these molecular lesions.

  11. Modelling trial-by-trial changes in the mismatch negativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Lieder

    Full Text Available The mismatch negativity (MMN is a differential brain response to violations of learned regularities. It has been used to demonstrate that the brain learns the statistical structure of its environment and predicts future sensory inputs. However, the algorithmic nature of these computations and the underlying neurobiological implementation remain controversial. This article introduces a mathematical framework with which competing ideas about the computational quantities indexed by MMN responses can be formalized and tested against single-trial EEG data. This framework was applied to five major theories of the MMN, comparing their ability to explain trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude. Three of these theories (predictive coding, model adjustment, and novelty detection were formalized by linking the MMN to different manifestations of the same computational mechanism: approximate Bayesian inference according to the free-energy principle. We thereby propose a unifying view on three distinct theories of the MMN. The relative plausibility of each theory was assessed against empirical single-trial MMN amplitudes acquired from eight healthy volunteers in a roving oddball experiment. Models based on the free-energy principle provided more plausible explanations of trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude than models representing the two more traditional theories (change detection and adaptation. Our results suggest that the MMN reflects approximate Bayesian learning of sensory regularities, and that the MMN-generating process adjusts a probabilistic model of the environment according to prediction errors.

  12. Prion gene haplotypes of U.S. cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harhay Gregory P

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a fatal neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of a protease-resistant isoform of the prion protein. Characterizing linkage disequilibrium (LD and haplotype networks within the bovine prion gene (PRNP is important for 1 testing rare or common PRNP variation for an association with BSE and 2 interpreting any association of PRNP alleles with BSE susceptibility. The objective of this study was to identify polymorphisms and haplotypes within PRNP from the promoter region through the 3'UTR in a diverse sample of U.S. cattle genomes. Results A 25.2-kb genomic region containing PRNP was sequenced from 192 diverse U.S. beef and dairy cattle. Sequence analyses identified 388 total polymorphisms, of which 287 have not previously been reported. The polymorphism alleles define PRNP by regions of high and low LD. High LD is present between alleles in the promoter region through exon 2 (6.7 kb. PRNP alleles within the majority of intron 2, the entire coding sequence and the untranslated region of exon 3 are in low LD (18.0 kb. Two haplotype networks, one representing the region of high LD and the other the region of low LD yielded nineteen different combinations that represent haplotypes spanning PRNP. The haplotype combinations are tagged by 19 polymorphisms (htSNPS which characterize variation within and across PRNP. Conclusion The number of polymorphisms in the prion gene region of U.S. cattle is nearly four times greater than previously described. These polymorphisms define PRNP haplotypes that may influence BSE susceptibility in cattle.

  13. Detecting disease-predisposing variants: The haplotype method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, A.M.; Thomson, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    For many HLA-associated diseases, multiple alleles - and, in some cases, multiple loci - have been suggested as the causative agents. The haplotype method for identifying disease-predisposing amino acids in a genetic region is a stratification analysis. We show that, for each haplotype combination containing all the amino acid sites involved in the disease process, the relative frequencies of amino acid variants at sites not involved in disease but in linkage disequilibrium with the disease-predisposing sites are expected to be the same in patients and controls. The haplotype method is robust to mode of inheritance and penetrance of the disease and can be used to determine unequivocally whether all amino acid sites involved in the disease have not been identified. Using a resampling technique, we developed a statistical test that takes account of the nonindependence of the sites sampled. Further, when multiple sites in the genetic region are involved in disease, the test statistic gives a closer fit to the null expectation when some - compared with none - of the true predisposing factors are included in the haplotype analysis. Although the haplotype method cannot distinguish between very highly correlated sites in one population, ethnic comparisons may help identify the true predisposing factors. The haplotype method was applied to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class II DQA1-DQB1 data from Caucasian, African, and Japanese populations. Our results indicate that the combination DQA1 No. 52 (Arg predisposing) DQB1 No. 57 (Asp protective), which has been proposed as an important IDDM agent, does not include all the predisposing elements. With rheumatoid arthritis HLA class H DRB1 data, the results were consistent with the shared-epitope hypothesis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. SNP haplotype mapping in a small ALS family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dick Krueger

    Full Text Available The identification of genes for monogenic disorders has proven to be highly effective for understanding disease mechanisms, pathways and gene function in humans. Nevertheless, while thousands of Mendelian disorders have not yet been mapped there has been a trend away from studying single-gene disorders. In part, this is due to the fact that many of the remaining single-gene families are not large enough to map the disease locus to a single site in the genome. New tools and approaches are needed to allow researchers to effectively tap into this genetic gold-mine. Towards this goal, we have used haploid cell lines to experimentally validate the use of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays to define genome-wide haplotypes and candidate regions, using a small amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS family as a prototype. Specifically, we used haploid-cell lines to determine if high-density SNP arrays accurately predict haplotypes across entire chromosomes and show that haplotype information significantly enhances the genetic information in small families. Panels of haploid-cell lines were generated and a 5 centimorgan (cM short tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP genome scan was performed. Experimentally derived haplotypes for entire chromosomes were used to directly identify regions of the genome identical-by-descent in 5 affected individuals. Comparisons between experimentally determined and in silico haplotypes predicted from SNP arrays demonstrate that SNP analysis of diploid DNA accurately predicted chromosomal haplotypes. These methods precisely identified 12 candidate intervals, which are shared by all 5 affected individuals. Our study illustrates how genetic information can be maximized using readily available tools as a first step in mapping single-gene disorders in small families.

  15. Oblique effect in visual mismatch negativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endre eTakács

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether visual orientation anisotropies (known as oblique effect exist in non-attended visual changes using event-related potentials (ERP. We recorded visual mismatch negativity (vMMN which signals violation of sequential regularities. In the visual periphery unattended, task-irrelevant Gábor patches were displayed in an oddball sequence while subjects performed a tracking task in the central field. A moderate change (50° in the orientation of stimuli revealed no consistent change-related components. However we found orientation-related differences around 170 ms in occipito-temporal areas in the amplitude of the ERPs evoked by standard stimuli. In a supplementary experiment we determined the amount of orientation difference that is needed for change detection in an active, attended paradigm. Results exhibited the classical oblique effect; subjects detected 10° deviations from cardinal directions, while threshold from oblique directions was 17°. These results provide evidence that perception of change could be accomplished at significantly smaller thresholds, than what elicits vMMN. In Experiment2 we increased the orientation change to 90°. Deviant-minus-standard difference was negative in occipito-parietal areas, between 120-200 ms after stimulus onset. VMMNs to changes from cardinal angles were larger and more sustained than vMMNs evoked by changes from oblique angles. Changes from cardinal orientations represent a more detectable signal for the automatic change detection system than changes from oblique angles, thus increased vMMN to these larger deviances might be considered a variant of the magnitude of deviance effect rarely observed in vMMN studies.

  16. Communication in the Home and Classroom: Match or Mismatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Aquiles

    1985-01-01

    The article examines variations in communication of cultural-linguistic minority children at home and in school and describes a communicative match/mismatch model. Implications of educational policy and program development are noted. (CL)

  17. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  18. Classical sickle beta-globin haplotypes exhibit a high degree of long-range haplotype similarity in African and Afro-Caribbean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jallow Muminatou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sickle (βs mutation in the beta-globin gene (HBB occurs on five "classical" βs haplotype backgrounds in ethnic groups of African ancestry. Strong selection in favour of the βs allele – a consequence of protection from severe malarial infection afforded by heterozygotes – has been associated with a high degree of extended haplotype similarity. The relationship between classical βs haplotypes and long-range haplotype similarity may have both anthropological and clinical implications, but to date has not been explored. Here we evaluate the haplotype similarity of classical βs haplotypes over 400 kb in population samples from Jamaica, The Gambia, and among the Yoruba of Nigeria (Hapmap YRI. Results The most common βs sub-haplotype among Jamaicans and the Yoruba was the Benin haplotype, while in The Gambia the Senegal haplotype was observed most commonly. Both subtypes exhibited a high degree of long-range haplotype similarity extending across approximately 400 kb in all three populations. This long-range similarity was significantly greater than that seen for other haplotypes sampled in these populations (P s mutation. Conclusion Two different classical βs haplotypes, sampled from different populations, exhibit comparable and extensive long-range haplotype similarity and strong LD. This LD extends across the adjacent recombination hotspot, and is discernable at distances in excess of 400 kb. Although the multi-centric geographic distribution of βs haplotypes indicates strong subdivision among early Holocene sub-Saharan populations, we find no evidence that selective pressures imposed by falciparum malaria varied in intensity or timing between these subpopulations. Our observations also suggest that cis-acting loci, which may influence outcomes in sickle cell disease, could lie considerable distances away from β-globin.

  19. Robust Control of Urban Industrial Water Mismatching Uncertain System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Kebai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban industrial water system parameter fluctuation producing uncertainty may not occur in a control input channel, can be applied mismatching uncertain system to describe. Based on Lyapunov direct method and linear matrix inequality, design the urban industrial water mismatching uncertain system feedback stabilization robust control scheme. Avoid the defects that the feedback stabilization control method based on the matrix Riccati equation need to preset equation parameters, easier to solve and can reduce the conservative.

  20. User image mismatch in anaesthesia alarms: a cognitive systems analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, Karen E; Bergström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, principles of Cognitive Systems Engineering are used to better understand the human-machine interaction manifesting in the use of anaesthesia alarms. The hypothesis is that the design of the machine incorporates built-in assumptions of the user that are discrepant with the anaesthesiologist's self-assessment, creating 'user image mismatch'. Mismatch was interpreted by focusing on the 'user image' as described from the perspectives of both machine and user. The machine-embedded image was interpreted through document analysis. The user-described image was interpreted through user (anaesthesiologist) interviews. Finally, an analysis was conducted in which the machine-embedded and user-described images were contrasted to identify user image mismatch. It is concluded that analysing user image mismatch expands the focus of attention towards macro-elements in the interaction between man and machine. User image mismatch is interpreted to arise from complexity of algorithm design and incongruity between alarm design and tenets of anaesthesia practice. Cognitive system engineering principles are applied to enhance the understanding of the interaction between anaesthesiologist and alarm. The 'user image' is interpreted and contrasted from the perspectives of machine as well as the user. Apparent machine-user mismatch is explored pertaining to specific design features.

  1. Natural selection and population genetic structure of domain-I of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Madhumita; Maji, Ardhendu Kumar; Mitra, Mitashree; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2013-08-01

    Development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum infection is an urgent priority particularly because of widespread resistance to most traditionally used drugs. Multiple evidences point to apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) as a prime vaccine candidate directed against P. falciparum asexual blood-stages. To gain understanding of the genetic and demographic forces shaping the parasite sequence diversity in Kolkata, a part of Pfama-1 gene covering domain-I was sequenced from 100 blood samples of malaria patients. Statistical and phylogenetic analyses of the sequences were performed using DnaSP and MEGA. Very high haplotype diversity was detected both at nucleotide (0.998±0.002) and amino-acid (0.996±0.001) levels. An abundance of low frequency polymorphisms (Tajima's D=-1.190, Fu & Li's D(∗) and F(∗)=-3.068 and -2.722), unimodal mismatch distribution and a star-like median-joining network of ama-1 haplotypes indicated a recent population expansion among Kolkata parasites. The high minimum number of recombination events (Rm=26) and a significantly high dN/dS of 3.705 (PIgNAR. Alterations in the desolvation and global energies of PfAMA-1-PfRON2 interaction complexes at the hotspot contact residues were observed together with redistribution of surface electrostatic potentials at the variant alleles with respect to referent Pf3D7 sequence. Finally, a comparison of P. falciparum subpopulations in five Indian regional isolates retrieved from GenBank revealed a significant level of genetic differentiation (FST=0.084-0.129) with respect to Kolkata sequences. Collectively, our results indicated a very high allelic and haplotype diversity, a high recombination rate and a signature of natural selection favoring accumulation of non-synonymous substitutions that facilitated PfAMA-1-PfRON2 interaction and hence parasite growth in Kolkata clinical isolates.

  2. Linkage Disequilibrium Decay and Haplotype Block Structure in the Pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, A.J.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Heuven, H.C.M.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) may reveal much about domestication and breed history. Ail investigation was conducted, to analyze the extent of LD, haploblock partitioning, and haplotype diversity within haploblocks across several pig breeds from China and Europe and in European wild boar. In total, 37

  3. Rapid haplotype reconstruction in predigrees with dense marker maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windig, J.J.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Reconstruction of marker phases is not straightforward when parents are untyped. In these cases information from other relatives has to be used. In dense marker maps, however, the space of possible haplotype configurations tends to be too large for procedures such as Monte Carlo Markov chains (MCMC)

  4. Genetics of chloroquine-resistant malaria: a haplotypic view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Awasthi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and rapid spread of chloroquine resistance (CQR in Plasmodium falciparum have triggered the identification of several genetic target(s in the P. falciparum genome. In particular, mutations in the Pfcrt gene, specifically, K76T and mutations in three other amino acids in the region adjoining K76 (residues 72, 74, 75 and 76, are considered to be highly related to CQR. These various mutations form several different haplotypes and Pfcrt gene polymorphisms and the global distribution of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes in endemic and non-endemic regions of P. falciparum malaria have been the subject of extensive study. Despite the fact that the Pfcrt gene is considered to be the primary CQR gene in P. falciparum , several studies have suggested that this may not be the case. Furthermore, there is a poor correlation between the evolutionary implications of the Pfcrt haplotypes and the inferred migration of CQR P. falciparum based on CQR epidemiological surveillance data. The present paper aims to clarify the existing knowledge on the genetic basis of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes that are prevalent in worldwide populations based on the published literature and to analyse the data to generate hypotheses on the genetics and evolution of CQR malaria.

  5. Accuracy of genomic selection using different methods to define haplotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Roos, de S.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic selection uses total breeding values for juvenile animals, predicted from a large number of estimated marker haplotype effects across the whole genome. In this study the accuracy of predicting breeding values is compared for four different models including a large number of markers, at diffe

  6. Geographical distribution of a specific mitochondrial haplotype of Zymoseptoria tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh BOUKEF

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Severity of disease caused by the fungus Zymoseptoria tritici throughout world cereal growing regions has elicited much debate on the potential evolutionary mechanism conferring high adaptability of the pathogen to diverse climate conditions and different wheat hosts (Triticum durum and T. aestivum. Specific mitochondrial DNA sequence was used to investigate geographic distribution of the type 4 haplotype (mtRFLP4 within 1363 isolates of Z. tritici originating from 21 countries. The mtRFLP4 haplotype was detected from both durum and bread wheat hosts with greater frequency on durum wheat. The distribution of mtRFLP4 was limited to populations sampled from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea region. Greater frequencies of mtRFLP4 were found in Tunisia (87% and Algeria (60%. The haplotype was absent within European, Australian, North and South American populations except Argentina. While alternative hypotheses such as climatic adaptation could not be ruled out, it is postulated that mtRFLP4 originated in North Africa (e.g. Tunisia or Algeria as an adaptation to durum wheat as the prevailing cereal crop. The specialized haplotype has subsequently spread as indicated by lower frequency of occurrence in the surrounding Mediterranean countries and on bread wheat hosts.

  7. Bayesian genomic selection: the effect of haplotype lenghts and priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Trine Michelle; Janss, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Breeding values for animals with marker data are estimated using a genomic selection approach where data is analyzed using Bayesian multi-marker association models. Fourteen model scenarios with varying haplotype lengths, hyper parameter and prior distributions were compared to find the scenario ...

  8. Quantitative trait loci and the relevance of phased haplotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl

    underlying gentic control both as traditional linkage studies relying on genetic maps and as GWAS where an approach of phasing haplotypes within the QTL have been conducted to validate the regions. Overall, regions of interest have been identified for chronic pleuritis and osteochondrosis in addition to meat...

  9. Investigating developmental changes in sensory processing: visual mismatch response in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine McLaurin Cleary

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect small changes in one’s visual environment is important for effective adaptation to and interaction with a wide variety of external stimuli. Much research has studied the auditory mismatch negativity (MMN, or the brain’s automatic response to rare changes in a series of repetitive auditory stimuli. But recent studies indicate that a visual homologue to this component of the event-related potential (ERP can also be measured. While most visual mismatch response studies have focused on adult populations, few studies have investigated this response in healthy children, and little is known about the developmental nature of this phenomenon. We recorded EEG data in 22 healthy children (ages 8-12 and 20 healthy adults (ages 18-42. Participants were presented with two types of task irrelevant background images of black and gray gratings while performing a visual target detection task. Spatial frequency of the background gratings was varied with 85% of the gratings being of high spatial frequency (i.e. standard background stimulus and 15% of the images being of low spatial frequency (i.e. deviant background stimulus. Results in the adult group showed a robust mismatch response to deviant (nontarget background stimuli at around 150ms post-stimulus at occipital electrode locations. In the children, two negativities around 150ms and 230ms post-stimulus at occipital electrode locations and a positivity around 250ms poststimulus at frontocentral electrode locations were observed. In addition, larger amplitudes of P1 and longer latencies of P1 and N1 to deviant background stimuli were observed in children versus adults. These results suggest that processing of deviant stimuli presented outside the focus of attention in 8-12-year-old children differs from those in adults, and are in agreement with previous research. They also suggest that the visual mismatch response may change across the lifespan in accordance with other components of

  10. Cross-scale feedbacks and scale mismatches as influences on cultural services and the resilience of protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Kristine; De Vos, Alta; Cumming, Graeme S; Moore, Christine; Biggs, Duan

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are a central strategy for achieving global conservation goals, but their continued existence depends heavily on maintaining sufficient social and political support to outweigh economic interests or other motives for land conversion. Thus, the resilience of protected areas can be considered a function of their perceived benefits to society. Nature-based tourism (NBT), a cultural ecosystem service, provides a key source of income to protected areas, facilitating a sustainable solution to conservation. The ability of tourism to generate income depends, however, on both the scales at which this cultural service is provided and the scales at which tourists respond to services on offer. This observation raises a set of location-, context-, and scale-related questions that need to be confronted before we can understand and value cultural service provision appropriately. We combine elements of resilience analysis with a systems ecology framework and apply this to NBT in protected areas to investigate cross-scale interactions and scale mismatches. We postulate that cross-scale effects can either have a positive effect on protected area resilience or lead to scale mismatches, depending on their interactions with cross-scale feedbacks. To demonstrate this, we compare spatial scales and nested levels of institutions to develop a typology of scale mismatches for common scenarios in NBT. In our new typology, the severity of a scale mismatch is expressed as the ratio of spatial scale to institutional level, producing 25 possible outcomes with differing consequences for system resilience. We predict that greater differences between interacting scales and levels, and greater magnitudes of cross-scale interactions, will lead to greater magnitudes of scale mismatch. Achieving a better understanding of feedbacks and mismatches, and finding ways of aligning spatial and institutional scales, will be critical for strengthening the resilience of protected areas that

  11. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood.

  12. Haplotypes of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist mRNA levels and the risk of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minkelen, Rick; Wettinger, Stephanie Bezzina; de Visser, Marieke C.H.; Vos, Hans L.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Bertina, Rogier M.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background The overall effect of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) on coagulation and fibrinolysis is prothrombotic. We recently found that haplotype 5 (H5) of the gene (IL1RN) coding for the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), the natural inhibitor of IL-1, is

  13. Patterns of nucleotide sequence variation in ICAM1 and TNF genes in twelve ethnic groups of India: roles of demographic history and natural selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanghamitra Sengupta; Shabana Farheen; Neelanjana Mukherjee; Partha P. Majumder

    2007-12-01

    We have studied DNA sequence variation in and around the genes ICAM1 and TNF, which play functional and correlated roles in inflammatory processes and immune cell responses, in 12 diverse ethnic groups of India, with a view to investigating the relative roles of demographic history and natural selection in shaping the observed patterns of variation. The total numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detected at the ICAM1 and TNF loci were 29 and 12, respectively. Haplotype and allele frequencies differed significantly across populations. The site frequency spectra at these loci were significantly different from those expected under neutrality, and showed an excess of intermediate-frequency variants consistent with balancing selection. However, as expected under balancing selection, there was no significant reduction of $F_{ST}$ values compared to neutral autosomal loci. Mismatch distributions were consistent with population expansion for both loci. On the other hand, the phylogenetic network among haplotypes for the TNF locus was similar to expectations under population expansion, while that for the ICAM1 was as expected under balancing selection. Nucleotide diversity at the ICAM1 locus was an order of magnitude lower in the promoter region, compared to the introns or exons, but no such difference was noted for the TNF gene. Thus, we conclude that the pattern of nucleotide variation in these genes has been modulated by both demographic history and selection. This is not surprising in view of the known allelic associations of several polymorphisms in these genes with various diseases, both infectious and noninfectious.

  14. HLA-G variability and haplotypes detected by massively parallel sequencing procedures in the geographicaly distinct population samples of Brazil and Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Erick C; Gerasimou, Petroula; Paz, Michelle A; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Porto, Iane O P; Lima, Thálitta H A; Souza, Andréia S; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Donadi, Eduardo A; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Costeas, Paul

    2017-03-01

    The HLA-G molecule presents immunomodulatory properties that might inhibit immune responses when interacting with specific Natural Killer and T cell receptors, such as KIR2DL4, ILT2 and ILT4. Thus, HLA-G might influence the outcome of situations in which fine immune system modulation is required, such as autoimmune diseases, transplants, cancer and pregnancy. The majority of the studies regarding the HLA-G gene variability so far was restricted to a specific gene segment (i.e., promoter, coding or 3' untranslated region), and was performed by using Sanger sequencing and probabilistic models to infer haplotypes. Here we propose a massively parallel sequencing (NGS) with a bioinformatics strategy to evaluate the entire HLA-G regulatory and coding segments, with haplotypes inferred relying more on the straightforward haplotyping capabilities of NGS, and less on probabilistic models. Then, HLA-G variability was surveyed in two admixed population samples of distinct geographical regions and demographic backgrounds, Cyprus and Brazil. Most haplotypes (promoters, coding, 3'UTR and extended ones) were detected both in Brazil and Cyprus and were identical to the ones already described by probabilistic models, indicating that these haplotypes are quite old and may be present worldwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinglin Zhang

    Full Text Available Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  16. Direct Mismatch Characterization of femto-Farad Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Omran, Hesham

    2015-08-17

    Reducing the capacitance of programmable capacitor arrays, commonly used in analog integrated circuits, is necessary for low-energy applications. However, limited mismatch data is available for small capacitors. We report mismatch measurement for a 2fF poly-insulator-poly (PIP) capacitor, which is the smallest reported PIP capacitor to the best of the authors’ knowledge. Instead of using complicated custom onchip circuitry, direct mismatch measurement is demonstrated and verified using Monte Carlo Simulations and experimental measurements. Capacitive test structures composed of 9 bit programmable capacitor arrays (PCAs) are implemented in a low-cost 0:35m CMOS process. Measured data is compared to mismatch of large PIP capacitors, theoretical models, and recently published data. Measurement results indicate an estimated average relative standard deviation of 0.43% for the 2fF unit capacitor, which is better than the reported mismatch of metal-oxide-metal (MOM) fringing capacitors implemented in an advanced 32nm CMOS process.

  17. HLA Mismatching Strategies for Solid Organ Transplantation - a Balancing Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. Zachary

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HLA matching provides numerous benefits in organ transplantation including better graft function, fewer rejection episodes, longer graft survival, and the possibility of reduced immunosuppression. Mismatches are attended by more frequent rejection episodes that require increased immunosuppression that, in turn, can increase the risk of infection and malignancy. HLA mismatches also incur the risk of sensitization, which can reduce the opportunity and increase waiting time for a subsequent transplant. However, other factors such as donor age, donor type, and immunosuppression protocol, can affect the benefit derived from matching. Further, finding a well matched donor may not be possible for all patients and usually prolongs waiting time. Strategies to optimize transplantation for patients without a well matched donor should take into account the immunologic barrier represented by different mismatches: what are the least immunogenic mismatches considering the patient’s HLA phenotype; should repeated mismatches be avoided; is the patient sensitized to HLA and, if so, what are the strengths of the patient’s antibodies? This information can then be used to define the HLA type of an immunologically optimal donor and the probability of such a donor occurring. A probability that is considered to be too low, may require expanding the donor population through paired donation or modifying what is acceptable which may require employing treatment to overcome immunologic barriers such as increased immunosuppression or desensitization. Thus, transplantation must strike a balance between the risk associated with waiting for the optimal donor and the risk associated with a less than optimal donor.

  18. Absence of atypical haplotype and presence of Senegal haplotype sickle cell disease in African-descent population in the northern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento,Rafael E.; Castelo,Natália M.; Bueno,Adriana C.; Larissa Mescouto; Artemis S. N. Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is the most severe form of sickle cell disease; it presents variants that are called haplotypes βS. There are five major haplotypes βS gene: Arab-Indian/Saudi, Senegal, Benin, Bantu, and Camaroon. Objective: Characterize the presence of haplotypes in patients with SCA in Amapá. Methods: 46 sample were studied, all samples were amplified and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Resul...

  19. Inflammation, insulin resistance, and diabetes--Mendelian randomization using CRP haplotypes points upstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Brunner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Raised C-reactive protein (CRP is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. According to the Mendelian randomization method, the association is likely to be causal if genetic variants that affect CRP level are associated with markers of diabetes development and diabetes. Our objective was to examine the nature of the association between CRP phenotype and diabetes development using CRP haplotypes as instrumental variables. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We genotyped three tagging SNPs (CRP + 2302G > A; CRP + 1444T > C; CRP + 4899T > G in the CRP gene and measured serum CRP in 5,274 men and women at mean ages 49 and 61 y (Whitehall II Study. Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c were measured at age 61 y. Diabetes was ascertained by glucose tolerance test and self-report. Common major haplotypes were strongly associated with serum CRP levels, but unrelated to obesity, blood pressure, and socioeconomic position, which may confound the association between CRP and diabetes risk. Serum CRP was associated with these potential confounding factors. After adjustment for age and sex, baseline serum CRP was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.39 [95% confidence interval 1.29-1.51], HOMA-IR, and HbA1c, but the associations were considerably attenuated on adjustment for potential confounding factors. In contrast, CRP haplotypes were not associated with HOMA-IR or HbA1c (p = 0.52-0.92. The associations of CRP with HOMA-IR and HbA1c were all null when examined using instrumental variables analysis, with genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP. Instrumental variables estimates differed from the directly observed associations (p = 0.007-0.11. Pooled analysis of CRP haplotypes and diabetes in Whitehall II and Northwick Park Heart Study II produced null findings (p = 0.25-0.88. Analyses based on the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (1,923 diabetes cases, 2,932 controls using three SNPs in tight

  20. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell patients from southwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Z; Karimi, M; Haghshenass, M; Merat, A

    2003-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia in Iran is accompanied by a high level of HbF and mild clinical presentation. Here we report haplotypes of the beta gene cluster found in 81 randomly selected sickle cell patients, including 47 sickle cell anemia (SS), 17 sickle cell trait (AS), and 17 sickle/thalassemia (S/thal) from southwest Iran. We found all five common typical haplotypes as well as five atypical haplotypes in our patients. Except for four patients with homozygous Benin haplotype, none of the other African typical haplotypes were found in a homozygous state. Arab-Indian was found to be the most prevalent haplotype in the study population. This haplotype accounted for 51.1% as the homozygous form in SS patients, where 69.1% of chromosomes in these patients had the Arab-Indian haplotype. Bantu A2 was the second most prevalent haplotype among all patients. The mean %HbF in SS patients was 27.83 and in the homozygous Arab-Indian haplotype it was still higher (30.40%), while in AS patients the %HbF was only 1.20. The high %Ggamma chain (71.81) in the Arab-Indian homozygous haplotype was concomitant with the presence of an Xmn I site in both chromosomes. The presence of the Arab-Indian haplotype as the predominant haplotype might be suggestive of a gene flow to/from Saudi Arabia or India. More haplotype investigations of a normal population can clarify the high incidence of Bantu A2 haplotype in our population.

  1. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  2. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  3. Dynamic-mismatch mapping for digitally-assisted DACs

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Yongjian; van Roermund, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a novel digital calibration technique called dynamic-mismatch mapping (DMM) to improve the performance of digital to analog converters (DACs).  Compared to other techniques, the DMM technique has the advantage of calibrating all mismatch errors without any noise penalty, which is particularly useful in order to meet the demand for high performance DACs in rapidly developing applications, such as multimedia and communication systems.   ·         Discusses fundamental performance limitations of digital to analog converters and summarizes existing design/calibration techniques; ·         Introduces a novel digital calibration technique, called dynamic-mismatch mapping (DMM) to improve both static and dynamic performance of DACs; ·         Includes two state-of-the-art DAC design examples with in-depth discussion.

  4. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Moreno; Martínez, José A.; Zorella Blanco; Leidys Osorio; Patrick Hackshaw

    2002-01-01

    Seven polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were analyzed on a sample of 96 chromosomes of Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 0.479, followed by the Bantu haplotype (0.406); a minority of cases with other haplotypes was also identified: atypical Bantu A2 (0.042), Senegal (0.031), atypical Bantu A7 (0.021) and Saudi Arabia/Indian (0.021) haplotypes; however, the Cameroon haplotype was not identified in t...

  5. Fetal Hemoglobin in Sickle Cell Anemia: Genetic Studies of the Arab-Indian Haplotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo, Duyen; Bae, Harold; Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Melista, Efthymia; Safaya, Surinder; Farrar, Lindsay A.; Suliman, Ahmed M.; Albuali, Waleed H; Al Bagshi, Muneer H.; Akinsheye, Idowu; Gallagher, Patrick; Luo, Hong-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is common in the Middle East and India where the HbS gene is sometimes associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) β-globin gene (HBB) cluster haplotype. In this haplotype of sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels are 3-4 fold higher than those found in patients with HbS haplotypes of African origin. Little is known about the genetic elements that modulate HbF in AI haplotype patients. We therefor studied Saudi HbS homozygotes with the AI haplotype (mean HbF 19.2±7.0%, ...

  6. Potenciales evocados cognitivos: Utilidad de la mismatch negativity Cognitive evoked potentials: Perspectives for mismatch negativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Gurtubay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Las técnicas de potenciales evocados cognitivos están consideradas como largas y técnicamente complejas, por ello a pesar de su potencial utilidad, su uso en la práctica clínica no está muy extendida. Los recientes avances en el registro, análisis y mejoras en el software de manejo de estas señales, han reducido notablemente estos problemas. De entre todos los potenciales cognitivos es la Mismatch negativity, la que por sus especiales características en cuanto a requisitos de generación y probada utilidad clínica, destaca como la más prometedora. La capacidad de ser generada sin requerimientos atencionales la hace especialmente útil para la valoración de sujetos con bajo nivel de conciencia, sirviendo entre otras cosas, para predecir el despertar del coma. La incorporación de dicha técnica a la batería de técnicas neurofisiológicas que valoran el estado de estos sujetos va suponer una mejora sustancial en la evaluación de casos cuyo manejo en la práctica clínica es sumamente complejo.The techniques of cognitive evoked potentials are considered long and technically complex, which is why their use in clinical practice is not very widespread in spite of their potential utility. Recent advances in registering and analysis, together with improvement of the software managing these signals, have appreciably reduced these problems. Mismatch negativity stands out as the most promising of all the cognitive potentials due to its special characteristics regarding its generation requisites and its proven clinical utility. The fact that it can be generated without care requirements makes it especially useful for evaluating subjects with a low level of consciousness; it serves for predicting when they will emerge from a coma, amongst other uses. The incorporation of this technique into the arsenal of neurophysiological techniques for evaluating the state of these subjects will bring a substantial improvement in the evaluation of cases

  7. Origin of celiac disease: How old are predisposing haplotypes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Gasbarrini; Olga Rickards; Cristina Martínez-Labarga; Elsa Pacciani; Filiberto Chilleri; Lucrezia Laterza; Giuseppe Marangi; Franco Scaldaferri; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2012-01-01

    We recently presented the case of a first century AD young woman,found in the archaeological site of Cosa,showing clinical signs of malnutrition,such as short height,osteoporosis,dental enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia,indirect sign of anemia,all strongly suggestive for celiac disease (CD).However,whether these findings were actually associated to CD was not shown based on genetic parameters.To investigate her human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅱ polymorphism,we extracted DNA from a bone sample and a tooth and genotyped HLA using three HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms for DQ8,DQ2.2 and DQ2.5,specifically associated to CD.She displayed HLA DQ 2.5,the haplotype associated to the highest risk of CD.This is the first report showing the presence of a HLA haplotype compatible for CD in archaeological specimens.

  8. The frequency of an IL-18-associated haplotype in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Simon R; Humphries, Steve E; Thomas, Mark G; Ekong, Rosemary; Tarekegn, Ayele; Bekele, Endeshaw; Creemer, Olivia; Bradman, Neil; Veeramah, Krishna R

    2013-04-01

    Variation within the gene for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-18 has been associated with inter-individual differences in levels of free protein and disease risk. We investigated the frequency of function-associated IL18 gene haplotypes in an extensive sample (n=2357) of African populations from across the continent. A previously identified five tagging SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) haplotype (here designated hGTATA), known to be associated with lower levels of IL-18, was observed at a frequency of 27% in a British population of recent European ancestry, but was found at low frequency (African populations. Potentially protective variants may, as a consequence, be found at low frequency in African individuals and may confer a difference in disease risk.

  9. PRIMUS: improving pedigree reconstruction using mitochondrial and Y haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Jeffrey; Ekunwe, Lynette; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Nickerson, Deborah A; Below, Jennifer E

    2016-02-15

    PRIMUS is a pedigree reconstruction algorithm that uses estimates of genome-wide identity by descent to reconstruct pedigrees consistent with observed genetic data. However, when genetic data for individuals within a pedigree are missing, often multiple pedigrees can be reconstructed that fit the data. We report a major expansion of PRIMUS that uses mitochondrial (mtDNA) and non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplotypes to eliminate many pedigree structures that are inconsistent with the genetic data. We demonstrate that discordances in mtDNA and NRY haplotypes substantially reduce the number of potential pedigrees, and often lead to the identification of the correct pedigree. We have implemented PRIMUS updates in PERL and it is available at primus.gs.washington.edu. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. HaploForge: A Comprehensive Pedigree Drawing and Haplotype Visualisation Web Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekman, Mehmet; Medlar, Alan; Mozere, Monika; Kleta, Robert; Stanescu, Horia

    2017-08-14

    Haplotype reconstruction is an important tool for understanding the aetiology of human disease. Haplotyping infers the most likely phase of observed genotypes conditional on constraints imposed by the genotypes of other pedigree members. The results of haplotype reconstruction, when visualised appropriately, show which alleles are identical by descent despite the presence of untyped individuals. When used in concert with linkage analysis, haplotyping can help delineate a locus of interest and provide a succinct explanation for the transmission of the trait locus. Unfortunately, the design choices made by existing haplotype visualisation programs do not scale to large numbers of markers. Indeed, following haplotypes from generation to generation requires excessive scrolling back and forth. In addition, the most widely-used program for haplotype visualisation produces inconsistent recombination artefacts for the X chromosome. To resolve these issues, we developed HaploForge, a novel web application for haplotype visualisation and pedigree drawing. HaploForge takes advantage of HTML5 to be fast, portable and avoid the need for local installation. It can accurately visualise autosomal and X-linked haplotypes from both outbred and consanguineous pedigrees. Haplotypes are coloured based on identity by descent using a novel A* search algorithm and we provide a flexible viewing mode to aid visual inspection. HaploForge can currently process haplotype reconstruction output from Allegro, GeneHunter, Merlin and Simwalk. HaploForge is licensed under GPLv3 and is hosted and maintained via GitHub. Supplementary data is available from Bioinformatics online.

  11. Haplotype reconstruction error as a classical misclassification problem: introducing sensitivity and specificity as error measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lamina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statistically reconstructing haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes, can lead to falsely classified haplotypes. This can be an issue when interpreting haplotype association results or when selecting subjects with certain haplotypes for subsequent functional studies. It was our aim to quantify haplotype reconstruction error and to provide tools for it. METHODS AND RESULTS: By numerous simulation scenarios, we systematically investigated several error measures, including discrepancy, error rate, and R(2, and introduced the sensitivity and specificity to this context. We exemplified several measures in the KORA study, a large population-based study from Southern Germany. We find that the specificity is slightly reduced only for common haplotypes, while the sensitivity was decreased for some, but not all rare haplotypes. The overall error rate was generally increasing with increasing number of loci, increasing minor allele frequency of SNPs, decreasing correlation between the alleles and increasing ambiguity. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that, with the analytical approach presented here, haplotype-specific error measures can be computed to gain insight into the haplotype uncertainty. This method provides the information, if a specific risk haplotype can be expected to be reconstructed with rather no or high misclassification and thus on the magnitude of expected bias in association estimates. We also illustrate that sensitivity and specificity separate two dimensions of the haplotype reconstruction error, which completely describe the misclassification matrix and thus provide the prerequisite for methods accounting for misclassification.

  12. Neighboring extremal optimal control design including model mismatch errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hull, D.G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

    1994-11-01

    The mismatch control technique that is used to simplify model equations of motion in order to determine analytic optimal control laws is extended using neighboring extremal theory. The first variation optimal control equations are linearized about the extremal path to account for perturbations in the initial state and the final constraint manifold. A numerical example demonstrates that the tuning procedure inherent in the mismatch control method increases the performance of the controls to the level of a numerically-determined piecewise-linear controller.

  13. Advanced radar detection schemes under mismatched signal models

    CERN Document Server

    Bandiera, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive detection of signals embedded in correlated Gaussian noise has been an active field of research in the last decades. This topic is important in many areas of signal processing such as, just to give some examples, radar, sonar, communications, and hyperspectral imaging. Most of the existing adaptive algorithms have been designed following the lead of the derivation of Kelly's detector which assumes perfect knowledge of the target steering vector. However, in realistic scenarios, mismatches are likely to occur due to both environmental and instrumental factors. When a mismatched signal

  14. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm for the k-Haplotyping Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-ping Li; Ling-yun Wu; Yu-ying Zhao; Xiang-sun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The Minimum Fragments Removal (MFR) problem is one of the haplotyping problems: given a set of fragments, remove the minimum number of fragments so that the resulting fragments can be partitioned into k classes of non-conflicting subsets. In this paper, we formulate the k-MFR problem as an integer linear programming problem, and develop a dynamic programming approach to solve the k-MFR problem for both the gapless and gap cases.

  15. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  16. Whole-genome molecular haplotyping of single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, H. Christina; Wang, Jianbin; Potanina, Anastasia; Quake, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Conventional experimental methods of studying the human genome are limited by the inability to independently study the combination of alleles, or haplotype, on each of the homologous copies of the chromosomes. We developed a microfluidic device capable of separating and amplifying homologous copies of each chromosome from a single human metaphase cell. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis of amplified DNA enabled us to achieve completely deterministic, whole-genome, personal ha...

  17. Global haplotype partitioning for maximal associated SNP pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezeshk Hamid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global partitioning based on pairwise associations of SNPs has not previously been used to define haplotype blocks within genomes. Here, we define an association index based on LD between SNP pairs. We use the Fisher's exact test to assess the statistical significance of the LD estimator. By this test, each SNP pair is characterized as associated, independent, or not-statistically-significant. We set limits on the maximum acceptable proportion of independent pairs within all blocks and search for the partitioning with maximal proportion of associated SNP pairs. Essentially, this model is reduced to a constrained optimization problem, the solution of which is obtained by iterating a dynamic programming algorithm. Results In comparison with other methods, our algorithm reports blocks of larger average size. Nevertheless, the haplotype diversity within the blocks is captured by a small number of tagSNPs. Resampling HapMap haplotypes under a block-based model of recombination showed that our algorithm is robust in reproducing the same partitioning for recombinant samples. Our algorithm performed better than previously reported models in a case-control association study aimed at mapping a single locus trait, based on simulation results that were evaluated by a block-based statistical test. Compared to methods of haplotype block partitioning, we performed best on detection of recombination hotspots. Conclusion Our proposed method divides chromosomes into the regions within which allelic associations of SNP pairs are maximized. This approach presents a native design for dimension reduction in genome-wide association studies. Our results show that the pairwise allelic association of SNPs can describe various features of genomic variation, in particular recombination hotspots.

  18. Investigation of extended Y chromosome STR haplotypes in Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerenza, D; Aneli, S; Di Gaetano, C; Critelli, R; Piazza, A; Matullo, G; Culigioni, C; Robledo, R; Robino, C; Calò, C

    2017-03-01

    Y-chromosomal variation of selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 32 short tandem repeat (STR) loci was evaluated in Sardinia in three open population groups (Northern Sardinia, n=40; Central Sardinia, n=56; Southern Sardinia, n=91) and three isolates (Desulo, n=34; Benetutti, n=45, Carloforte, n=42). The tested Y-STRs consisted of Yfiler(®) Plus markers and the seven rapidly mutating (RM) loci not included in the YFiler(®) Plus kit (DYF399S1, DYF403S1ab, DYF404S1, DYS526ab, DYS547, DYS612, and DYS626). As expected, inclusion of additional Y-STR loci increased haplotype diversity (h), though complete differentiation of male lineages was impossible even by means of RM Y-STRs (h=0.99997). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that the three open populations were fairly homogeneous, whereas signs of genetic heterogeneity could be detected when the three isolates were also included in the analysis. Multidimensional scaling analysis showed that, even for extended haplotypes including RM Y-STR markers, Sardinians were clearly differentiated from populations of the Italian peninsula and Sicily. The only exception was represented by the Carloforte sample that, in accordance with its peculiar population history, clustered with Northern/Central Italian populations. The introduction of extended forensic Y-STR panels, including highly variable RM Y-STR markers, is expected to reduce the impact of population structure on haplotype frequency estimations. However, our results show that the availability of geographically detailed reference databases is still important for the assessment of the evidential value of a Y-haplotype match.

  19. beta(S)-Globin gene cluster haplotypes in the West Bank of Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarah, Fekri; Ayesh, Suhail; Athanasiou, Miranda; Christakis, John; Vavatsi, Norma

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder of the beta-globin chain. In Palestine it is accompanied by a low level of Hb F (mean 5.14%) and a severe clinical presentation. In this study, 59 Palestinian patients, homozygotes for Hb S were studied for their haplotype background. Eight polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were examined. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 88.1%, followed by a frequency of 5.1% for the Bantu haplotype. One chromosome was found to carry the Cameroon haplotype (0.85%). Three atypical haplotypes were also found (5.95%). Heterogeneity was observed in Hb F production, ranging between 1.5 and 17.0%, whereas the (G)gamma ratio was homogeneous among all haplotypes with a normal amount of about 41%. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of the Benin haplotype origin in the Mediterranean.

  20. A unified framework for haplotype inference in nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadis, Alexandros; Anastassiou, Dimitris; Wang, Xiaodong

    2012-07-01

    Many large genome-wide association studies include nuclear families with more than one child (trio families), allowing for analysis of differences between siblings (sib pair analysis). Statistical power can be increased when haplotypes are used instead of genotypes. Currently, haplotype inference in families with more than one child can be performed either using the familial information or statistical information derived from the population samples but not both. Building on our recently proposed tree-based deterministic framework (TDS) for trio families, we augment its applicability to general nuclear families. We impose a minimum recombinant approach locally and independently on each multiple children family, while resorting to the population-derived information to solve the remaining ambiguities. Thus our framework incorporates all available information (familial and population) in a given study. We demonstrate that using all the constraints in our approach we can have gains in the accuracy as opposed to breaking the multiple children families to separate trios and resorting to a trio inference algorithm or phasing each family in isolation. We believe that our proposed framework could be the method of choice for haplotype inference in studies that include nuclear families with multiple children. Our software (tds2.0) is downloadable from www.ee.columbia.edu/∼anastas/tds.

  1. The Haplotyping Problem: An Overview of Computational Models and Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Bonizzoni; Gianluca Della Vedova; Riccardo Dondi; Jing Li

    2003-01-01

    The investigation of genetic differences among humans has given evidence that mutations in DNA sequences are responsible for some genetic diseases. The most common mutation is the one that involves only a single nucleotide of the DNA sequence, which is called a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). As a consequence, computing a complete map of all SNPs occurring in the human populations is one of the primary goals of recent studies in human genomics. The construction of such a map requires to determine the DNA sequences that from all chromosomes. In diploid organisms like humans, each chromosome consists of two sequences called haplotypes. Distinguishing the information contained in both haplotypes when analyzing chromosome sequences poses several new computational issues which collectively form a new emerging topic of Computational Biology known as Haplotyping.This paper is a comprehensive study of some new combinatorial approaches proposed in this research area and it mainly focuses on the formulations and algorithmic solutions of some basic biological problems. Three statistical approaches are briefly discussed at the end of the paper.

  2. Morbidity, beta S haplotype and alpha-globin gene patterns among sickle cell anemia patients in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekile, A D; Haider, M Z

    1996-01-01

    Admission records of children with sickle cell anemia (SS), in the two main teaching hospitals in Kuwait, were reviewed for a 1-year period. The haplotypes of 92 beta s chromosomes (from 39 SS, 11 AS, 2 S beta-thalassemia [S beta-thal] and 1 SD individuals) were determined using an allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization technique, while the alpha-globin gene status of 27 SS and 33 AS individuals, i.e. 120 chromosomes, was determined with a combination of polymerase chain reaction and AS techniques. A vasooclusive crisis was the most common (60.0%) cause of hospitalization, followed by infections (20%). Hospital admissions were most common during the hottest month of the year (July). Few complications of the disease were seen among patients on follow-up; however, splenomegaly was present in 24.0%, hepatomegaly in 15.2%, gallstones in 15.2% and aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in 6.1%. Haplotype 31 (Saudi Arabia/India) is the most frequent in this community, being present in 80.4% of the chromosomes tested; Benin haplotype 19 was found in 12.0% and Bantu haplotype 20 in 6.5%. Hb F in the haplotype 31 homozygotes and heterozygotes ranged from 11.4 to 35.1% (mean 22.5 +/- 5.2%). The frequency of alpha-thal determinants in the study was 40.0%, the commonest being the -alpha 3.7-kb deletion (27.5%), the alpha 2 polyadenylation signal (AATAAA-> AATAAG) mutation (10.2%) and the IVS-I 5' end GAGGT-GAGG->GAGG pentanucleotide (5 nt) deletion (3.3%). SS patients with coexistent alpha-thal trait did not have severe recurrent infections and none had gallstones. The high frequencies of the Saudi Arabia/India beta s haplotype and alpha-thalassemia trait contribute to the mild nature of SS disease among Kuwaiti Arabs comparable to that in eastern Saudi Arabia.

  3. Definition of gene content for nine common group B haplotypes of the Caucasoid population: KIR haplotypes contain between seven and eleven KIR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrberg, Markus; Parham, Peter; Wernet, Peter

    2002-07-01

    The segregation of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ( KIR) genes was determined for a panel of 21 Caucasoid families: 23 different KIR gene patterns were found and could be assigned to combinations of 16 different haplotypes. Four loci were held in common by all haplotypes: KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, the putative pseudogene KIR3DL3 and KIR2DL2/KIR2DL3, the latter likely being alleles of one gene. Group A haplotypes, which have a unique combination of seven KIR genes, were found at 80% frequency in the family panel, the polygenic group B haplotypes at 65% frequency. KIR gene segregation was fully determined for the nine group B haplotypes, which occurred at highest frequencies in both the family panel and a panel of unrelated individuals. The group B haplotypes carried between seven and 11 KIR genes and encoded inhibitory KIR for one, two, or all three major HLA class I epitopes. Analysis of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I genotypes revealed that most, but not all, individuals possess an inhibitory KIR for a self HLA class I epitope. The number of stimulatory KIR genes in group B haplotypes varied considerably between one and five. The data show that group B haplotypes possess a broad spectrum of KIR gene patterns, which is largely complementary to the KIR gene set of group A haplotypes. The results suggest that rapid diversification of group B haplotypes is the result of pathogen-mediated selection for KIR genotypes that have more than the set of KIR genes provided by the group A haplotype.

  4. Combining an Evolution-guided Clustering Algorithm and Haplotype-based LRT in Family Association Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Su-Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the international HapMap project, many studies have been conducted to investigate the association between complex diseases and haplotype variants. Such haplotype-based association studies, however, often face two difficulties; one is the large number of haplotype configurations in the chromosome region under study, and the other is the ambiguity in haplotype phase when only genotype data are observed. The latter complexity may be handled based on an EM algorithm with family data incorporated, whereas the former can be more problematic, especially when haplotypes of rare frequencies are involved. Here based on family data we propose to cluster long haplotypes of linked SNPs in a biological sense, so that the number of haplotypes can be reduced and the power of statistical tests of association can be increased. Results In this paper we employ family genotype data and combine a clustering scheme with a likelihood ratio statistic to test the association between quantitative phenotypes and haplotype variants. Haplotypes are first grouped based on their evolutionary closeness to establish a set containing core haplotypes. Then, we construct for each family the transmission and non-transmission phase in terms of these core haplotypes, taking into account simultaneously the phase ambiguity as weights. The likelihood ratio test (LRT is next conducted with these weighted and clustered haplotypes to test for association with disease. This combination of evolution-guided haplotype clustering and weighted assignment in LRT is able, via its core-coding system, to incorporate into analysis both haplotype phase ambiguity and transmission uncertainty. Simulation studies show that this proposed procedure is more informative and powerful than three family-based association tests, FAMHAP, FBAT, and an LRT with a group consisting exclusively of rare haplotypes. Conclusions The proposed procedure takes into account the

  5. ParaHaplo 2.0: a program package for haplotype-estimation and haplotype-based whole-genome association study using parallel computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamatani Naoyuki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of haplotype-based association tests can improve the power of genome-wide association studies. Since the observed genotypes are unordered pairs of alleles, haplotype phase must be inferred. However, estimating haplotype phase is time consuming. When millions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are analyzed in genome-wide association study, faster methods for haplotype estimation are required. Methods We developed a program package for parallel computation of haplotype estimation. Our program package, ParaHaplo 2.0, is intended for use in workstation clusters using the Intel Message Passing Interface (MPI. We compared the performance of our algorithm to that of the regular permutation test on both Japanese in Tokyo, Japan and Han Chinese in Beijing, China of the HapMap dataset. Results Parallel version of ParaHaplo 2.0 can estimate haplotypes 100 times faster than a non-parallel version of the ParaHaplo. Conclusion ParaHaplo 2.0 is an invaluable tool for conducting haplotype-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The need for fast haplotype estimation using parallel computing will become increasingly important as the data sizes of such projects continue to increase. The executable binaries and program sources of ParaHaplo are available at the following address: http://en.sourceforge.jp/projects/parallelgwas/releases/

  6. Origin and dissemination of the pollen-part mutated SC haplotype which confers self-compatibility in apricot (Prunus armeniaca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halász, Júlia; Pedryc, Andrzej; Hegedus, Attila

    2007-01-01

    In China, its centre of origin, apricot (Prunus armeniaca) is self-incompatible. However, most European cultivars are self-compatible. In most cases, self-compatibility is a result of a loss-of-function mutation within the pollen gene (SFB) in the SC haplotype. Controlled pollinations performed in this work revealed that the cross 'Ceglédi óriás' (S8S9)x'Ceglédi arany' (SCS9) set well, as expected, but the reciprocal cross did not. Apricot S8, S9 and SC haplotypes were analysed using a multilevel approach including fruit set evaluation, pollen tube growth analysis, RNase activity assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and DNA sequencing of the S-RNase and SFB alleles. SFB8 was revealed to be the first known progenitor allele of a naturally occurring self-compatibility allele in Prunus, and consequently SC=The first intron of SC-RNase is a phase one intron, indicating its more recent evolutionary origin compared with the second intron. Sequence analysis of different cultivars revealed that more single nucleotide polymorphisms accumulated in SC-RNase than in SFBC. New methods were designed to allow high-throughput analysis of S genotypes of apricot cultivars and selections. S-RNase sequence data from various sources helped to elucidate the putative origin and dissemination of self-compatibility in apricot conferred by the SC haplotype.

  7. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  8. Interplay between quantum confinement and dielectric mismatch for ultrashallow dopants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, J.A.; Salfi, J.; Miwa, J.A.; Simmons, M.Y.; Rogge, S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the electronic properties of dopants near an interface is a critical challenge for nanoscale devices. We have determined the effect of dielectric mismatch and quantum confinement on the ionization energy of individual acceptors beneath a hydrogen passivated silicon (100) surface. While

  9. Supply and Demand Mismatches in Training: Can Anything Be Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Claudio de Moura; de Andrade, Antonio Cabral

    1990-01-01

    Vocational training often fails to provide what employers need and students want. To correct supply/demand mismatches requires improving feedback from employers, increasing the flow of information, bringing schools closer to businesses, rewarding institutions for successful employment of graduates, and providing incentives for entrepreneurs. (SK)

  10. Bisimulation Lattice of Asymmetric Chi Calculus with Mismatch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Xiaoju(董笑菊); Zhong Farong; Fu Yuxi

    2003-01-01

    This paper carries out a systematic investigation into the bisimulation lattice of asymmetric chi calculus with a mismatch combinator. It is shown that all the sixty three L-bisimilarities collapse to twelve distinct relations and they form a bisimulation lattice with respect to set inclusion. The top of the lattice coincides with the barbed bisimilarity.

  11. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Michel S.; Kersten, Anna W.; Frencken, Wouter G. P.

    2017-01-01

    A mismatch between the training exertion intended by a coach and the exertion perceived by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown whether coaches can accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' percep

  12. Phase mismatched optical parametric generation in semiconductor magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.; Jain, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Optical parametric generation involves the interaction of pump, signal, and idler waves satisfying law of conservation of energy. Phase mismatch parameter plays important role for the spatial distribution of the field along the medium. In this paper instead of exactly matching wave vector, a small mismatch is admitted with a degree of phase velocity mismatch between these waves. Hence the medium must possess certain finite coherence length. This wave mixing process is well explained by coupled mode theory and one dimensional hydrodynamic model. Based on this scheme, expressions for threshold pump field and transmitted intensity have been derived. It is observed that the threshold pump intensity and transmitted intensity can be manipulated by varying doping concentration and magnetic field under phase mismatched condition. A compound semiconductor crystal of n-InSb is assumed to be shined at 77 K by a 10.6μm CO2 laser with photon energy well below band gap energy of the crystal, so that only free charge carrier influence the optical properties of the medium for the I.R. parametric generation in a semiconductor plasma medium. Favorable parameters were explored to incite the said process keeping in mind the cost effectiveness and conversion efficiency of the process.

  13. Diagnostic criteria for constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmer, Katharina; Kratz, Christian P; Vasen, Hans F A;

    2014-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome is a distinct childhood cancer predisposition syndrome that results from biallelic germline mutations in one of the four MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The tumour spectrum is very broad, including mainly haematological, brain...

  14. DNA mismatch repair: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Peggy

    2012-09-14

    In this issue, Peña-Diaz et al. (2012) describe a pathway for somatic mutation in nonlymphoid cells termed noncanonical DNA mismatch repair, whereby the error-prone translesion polymerase Pol-η substitutes for high-fidelity replicative polymerases to resynthesize excised regions opposite DNA damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BEPS Action 2: Neutralizing the Effects on Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, R.; Marres, O.

    2015-01-01

    Curbing tax arbitrage is one of the main priorities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (endorsed by the G20 and the G8) ever since the public debate on base erosion fully erupted. Neutralizing the effect of hybrid mismatch arrangements has become Action No. 2 of the

  16. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  17. Channel normalization technique for speech recognition in mismatched conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available , where one wishes to use any available training data for a variety of purposes. Research into a new channel normalization (CN) technique for channel mismatched speech recognition is presented. A process of inverse linear filtering is used in order...

  18. Resolving Architectural Mismatches of COTS Through Architectural Reconciliation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Guelfi, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    The integration of COTS components into a system under development entails architectural mismatches. These have been tackled, so far, at the component level, through component adaptation techniques, but they also must be tackled at an architectural level of abstraction. In this paper we propose an

  19. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina;

    2008-01-01

    Identification of sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colon cancers is increasingly demanded for decisions on adjuvant therapies. We evaluated clinicopathologic factors for the identification of these prognostically favorable tumors. Histopathologic features in 238 consecutive colon cancers...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  20. Mismatch-shaping switching for two-capacitor DAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper; Moon, U.; Temes, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    A mismatch-shaping scheme is proposed for a two-capacitor digital-to-analogue converter (DAC). It uses a delta-sigma loop for finding the optimal switching sequence for each input word. Simulations indicate that the scheme can be used for the realisation of DACs with 16 bit linearity and SNR perf...

  1. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Michel S; Kersten, Anna W; Frencken, Wouter G

    2016-01-01

    A mismatch between the intended training exertion by the coach and the perceived exertion by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown if coaches are able to accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' p

  2. Investigating Interaural Frequency-Place Mismatches via Bimodal Vowel Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guérit, François; Santurette, Sébastien; Chalupper, Josef;

    2014-01-01

    For patients having residual hearing in one ear and a cochlear implant (CI) in the opposite ear, interaural place-pitch mismatches might be partly responsible for the large variability in individual benefit. Behavioral pitch-matching between the two ears has been suggested as a way to individuali...

  3. BEPS Action 2: Neutralizing the Effects on Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, R.; Marres, O.

    2015-01-01

    Curbing tax arbitrage is one of the main priorities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (endorsed by the G20 and the G8) ever since the public debate on base erosion fully erupted. Neutralizing the effect of hybrid mismatch arrangements has become Action No. 2 of the

  4. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  5. Mismatched feature detection with finer granularity for emotional speaker recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CHEN; Ying-chun YANG; Zhao-hui WU

    2014-01-01

    The shapes of speakers’ vocal organs change under their different emotional states, which leads to the deviation of the emotional acoustic space of short-time features from the neutral acoustic space and thereby the degradation of the speaker recognition performance. Features deviating greatly from the neutral acoustic space are considered as mismatched features, and they negatively affect speaker recognition systems. Emotion variation produces different feature deformations for different phonemes, so it is reasonable to build a fi ner model to detect mismatched features under each phoneme. However, given the difficulty of phoneme recognition, three sorts of acoustic class recognition- phoneme classes, Gaussian mixture model (GMM) tokenizer, and probabilistic GMM tokenizer- are proposed to replace phoneme recognition. We propose feature pruning and feature regulation methods to process the mismatched features to improve speaker recognition performance. As for the feature regulation method, a strategy of maximizing the between-class distance and minimizing the within-class distance is adopted to train the transformation matrix to regulate the mismatched features. Experiments conducted on the Mandarin affective speech corpus (MASC) show that our feature pruning and feature regulation methods increase the identifi cation rate (IR) by 3.64% and 6.77%, compared with the baseline GMM-UBM (universal background model) algorithm. Also, corresponding IR increases of 2.09% and 3.32% can be obtained with our methods when applied to the state-of-the-art algorithm i-vector.

  6. SKILLS MISMATCH OF THE YOUNG PEOPLE AT THE EUROPEAN LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatos Roxana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transition from school to work is a main issue with many fields of study. Studies on transition from school to work, have highlight the importance of two categories of factors at the level of the individual formal proceedings which may affect how easy it is to graduate to integrate into the labor market: 1 so far as the educational systems are transmitting specific competences as compared with those general and 2 so far as there are direct links between employers and the education system. In this way, are reduced the costs of selection and allocation for employers. A poor articulation between educational institutions and the labor market produce a high level of unmatched competences of assimilated by formal education and competencies required of the labor market (skill mismatch (Parodi et al., 2012. The surveys with European employers reflect particular difficulties that they are experiencing in employment vacancies. Investigation on the European companies in the spring of 2013 found that 40% of the firms in the EU have difficulty in finding employees with suitable qualification (CEDEFOP-European Center for the Development of the Vocational Training, 2014. Skills mismatch is a generic term that refers to various types of imbalances between skills and competences offered and those required in the labor market. Concept has become one intensely discussed and submitted to measurement in international research on the background concerns the under-utilization human resource. Numerous opinion polls with employers come to the same unexpected conclusion - that despite high unemployment many posts can't find occupants satisfactorily prepared and identify the causes: most of them criticized the lack of skills of the candidates or the absence of skills specific to the workplace. Based on the latest studies on international databases have built a set of questions that, through secondary analysis, we tried to find answers. Questions that we try to give answer

  7. Absence of atypical haplotype and presence of Senegal haplotype sickle cell disease in African-descent population in the northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E. Nascimento

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sickle cell anemia (SCA is the most severe form of sickle cell disease; it presents variants that are called haplotypes βS. There are five major haplotypes βS gene: Arab-Indian/Saudi, Senegal, Benin, Bantu, and Camaroon. Objective: Characterize the presence of haplotypes in patients with SCA in Amapá. Methods: 46 sample were studied, all samples were amplified and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Results: Bantu (61.2%, followed by Benin (26.5% and Senegal (12.2%. Conclusion: We identified three haplotypes characteristic of African ethnicity, with the presence of Senegal. In our study we found the presence of atypical haplotype, suggesting concentration and semi-isolation of the founding groups with little mixing.

  8. Microsatellite diversity and crossover regions within homozygous and heterozygous SLA haplotypes of different pig breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Asako; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawata, Hisako; Tanaka-Matsuda, Maiko; Shigenari, Atsuko; Flori, Laurence; Chardon, Patrick; Lunney, Joan K; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate microsatellite (MS) diversity and find crossover regions at 42 polymorphic MS loci in the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genomic region of 72 pigs with different well-defined homozygous and heterozygous SLA haplotypes. We analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of 42 MS markers in 23 SLA homozygous-heterozygous, common pig breeds with 12 SLA serological haplotypes and 49 National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Clawn homozygous-heterozygous miniature pigs with nine SLA serological or genotyped haplotypes including four recombinant haplotypes. In comparing the same and different haplotypes, both haplospecific patterns and allelic variations were observed at the MS loci. Some of the shared haplotype blocks extended over 2 Mb suggesting the existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the entire SLA region. Crossover regions were easily defined by the MS markers within the class I and/or III region in the NIH and Clawn recombinant haplotypes. The present haplotype comparison shows that our set of MS markers provides a fast and cost-efficient alternative, or complementary, method to the serological or sequence-based determination of the SLA alleles for the characterization of SLA haplotypes and/or the crossover regions between different haplotypes.

  9. Genome sequence, comparative analysis and haplotype structure of the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Wade, Claire M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Karlsson, Elinor K; Jaffe, David B; Kamal, Michael; Clamp, Michele; Chang, Jean L; Kulbokas, Edward J; Zody, Michael C; Mauceli, Evan; Xie, Xiaohui; Breen, Matthew; Wayne, Robert K; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ponting, Chris P; Galibert, Francis; Smith, Douglas R; DeJong, Pieter J; Kirkness, Ewen; Alvarez, Pablo; Biagi, Tara; Brockman, William; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, Chee-Wye; Cook, April; Cuff, James; Daly, Mark J; DeCaprio, David; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kellis, Manolis; Kleber, Michael; Bardeleben, Carolyne; Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Hitte, Christophe; Kim, Lisa; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Parker, Heidi G; Pollinger, John P; Searle, Stephen M J; Sutter, Nathan B; Thomas, Rachael; Webber, Caleb; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abebe, Adal; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Ait-Zahra, Mostafa; Aldredge, Tyler; Allen, Nicole; An, Peter; Anderson, Scott; Antoine, Claudel; Arachchi, Harindra; Aslam, Ali; Ayotte, Laura; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Benamara, Mostafa; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Blitshteyn, Berta; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Calixte, Nadia; Camarata, Jody; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chu, Jeffrey; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Dawoe, Tenzin; Daza, Riza; Decktor, Karin; DeGray, Stuart; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Kathleen; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dorris, Lester; Duffey, Noah; Dupes, Alan; Egbiremolen, Osebhajajeme; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Ferreira, Patricia; Fisher, Sheila; FitzGerald, Mike; Foley, Karen; Foley, Chelsea; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gage, Diane; Garber, Manuel; Gearin, Gary; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Goyette, Audra; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Healy, Claire; Hegarty, Ryan; Honan, Tracey; Horn, Andrea; Houde, Nathan; Hughes, Leanne; Hunnicutt, Leigh; Husby, M; Jester, Benjamin; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kells, Cristyn; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kieu, Alix Chinh; Kisner, Peter; Kumar, Mayank; Lance, Krista; Landers, Thomas; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Leger, Jean-Pierre; Lennon, Niall; Leuper, Lisa; LeVine, Sarah; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Jan; Major, John; Marabella, Richard; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Melnikov, Alexandre; Meneus, Louis; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Miller, Karen; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Mulrain, Leonidas; Munson, Glen; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Nguyen, Tuyen; Nguyen, Nga; Nguyen, Cindy; Nguyen, Thu; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Nyima; Norbu, Choe; Novod, Nathaniel; Nyima, Tenchoe; Olandt, Peter; O'Neill, Barry; O'Neill, Keith; Osman, Sahal; Oyono, Lucien; Patti, Christopher; Perrin, Danielle; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Rachupka, Anthony; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rameau, Rayale; Ray, Verneda; Raymond, Christina; Rege, Filip; Rise, Cecil; Rogers, Julie; Rogov, Peter; Sahalie, Julie; Settipalli, Sampath; Sharpe, Theodore; Shea, Terrance; Sheehan, Mechele; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Jianying; Shih, Diana; Sloan, Jessie; Smith, Cherylyn; Sparrow, Todd; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Stone, Sabrina; Sykes, Sean; Tchuinga, Pierre; Tenzing, Pema; Tesfaye, Senait; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Thoulutsang, Yama; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Venkataraman, Vijay; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Yang, Shuli; Yang, Xiaoping; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zainoun, Joanne; Zembek, Lisa; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S

    2005-12-08

    Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris), together with a dense map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across breeds. The dog is of particular interest because it provides important evolutionary information and because existing breeds show great phenotypic diversity for morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. We use sequence comparison with the primate and rodent lineages to shed light on the structure and evolution of genomes and genes. Notably, the majority of the most highly conserved non-coding sequences in mammalian genomes are clustered near a small subset of genes with important roles in development. Analysis of SNPs reveals long-range haplotypes across the entire dog genome, and defines the nature of genetic diversity within and across breeds. The current SNP map now makes it possible for genome-wide association studies to identify genes responsible for diseases and traits, with important consequences for human and companion animal health.

  10. Influenza virus reassortment occurs with high frequency in the absence of segment mismatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Marshall

    Full Text Available Reassortment is fundamental to the evolution of influenza viruses and plays a key role in the generation of epidemiologically significant strains. Previous studies indicate that reassortment is restricted by segment mismatch, arising from functional incompatibilities among components of two viruses. Additional factors that dictate the efficiency of reassortment remain poorly characterized. Thus, it is unclear what conditions are favorable for reassortment and therefore under what circumstances novel influenza A viruses might arise in nature. Herein, we describe a system for studying reassortment in the absence of segment mismatch and exploit this system to determine the baseline efficiency of reassortment and the effects of infection dose and timing. Silent mutations were introduced into A/Panama/2007/99 virus such that high-resolution melt analysis could be used to differentiate all eight segments of the wild-type and the silently mutated variant virus. The use of phenotypically identical parent viruses ensured that all progeny were equally fit, allowing reassortment to be measured without selection bias. Using this system, we found that reassortment occurred efficiently (88.4% following high multiplicity infection, suggesting the process is not appreciably limited by intracellular compartmentalization. That co-infection is the major determinant of reassortment efficiency in the absence of segment mismatch was confirmed with the observation that the proportion of viruses with reassortant genotypes increased exponentially with the proportion of cells co-infected. The number of reassortants shed from co-infected guinea pigs was likewise dependent on dose. With 10⁶ PFU inocula, 46%-86% of viruses isolated from guinea pigs were reassortants. The introduction of a delay between infections also had a strong impact on reassortment and allowed definition of time windows during which super-infection led to reassortment in culture and in vivo. Overall

  11. Globally dispersed Y chromosomal haplotypes in wild and domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, J R S; Hanotte, O; Drögemüller, C; Calvo, J; Godfrey, R; Coltman, D; Maddox, J F; Marzanov, N; Kantanen, J; Kijas, J W

    2006-10-01

    To date, investigations of genetic diversity and the origins of domestication in sheep have utilised autosomal microsatellites and variation in the mitochondrial genome. We present the first analysis of both domestic and wild sheep using genetic markers residing on the ovine Y chromosome. Analysis of a single nucleotide polymorphism (oY1) in the SRY promoter region revealed that allele A-oY1 was present in all wild bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), two subspecies of thinhorn sheep (Ovis dalli), European Mouflon (Ovis musimon) and the Barbary (Ammontragis lervia). A-oY1 also had the highest frequency (71.4%) within 458 domestic sheep drawn from 65 breeds sampled from Africa, Asia, Australia, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia. Sequence analysis of a second locus, microsatellite SRYM18, revealed a compound repeat array displaying fixed differences, which identified bighorn and thinhorn sheep as distinct from the European Mouflon and domestic animals. Combined genotypic data identified 11 male-specific haplotypes that represented at least two separate lineages. Investigation of the geographical distribution of each haplotype revealed that one (H6) was both very common and widespread in the global sample of domestic breeds. The remaining haplotypes each displayed more restricted and informative distributions. For example, H5 was likely founded following the domestication of European breeds and was used to trace the recent transportation of animals to both the Caribbean and Australia. A high rate of Y chromosomal dispersal appears to have taken place during the development of domestic sheep as only 12.9% of the total observed variation was partitioned between major geographical regions.

  12. Inducible nitric oxide synthase haplotype associated with migraine and aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de O S Mansur, Thiago; Gonçalves, Flavia M; Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Speciali, Jose G; Dach, Fabiola; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2012-05-01

    Migraine is a complex neurological disorder with a clear neurogenic inflammatory component apparently including enhanced nitric oxide (NO) formation. Excessive NO amounts possibly contributing to migraine are derived from increased expression and activity of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We tested the hypothesis that two functional, clinically relevant iNOS genetic polymorphisms (C(-1026)A-rs2779249 and G2087A-rs2297518) are associated with migraine with or without aura. We studied 142 healthy women without migraine (control group) and 200 women with migraine divided into two groups: 148 with migraine without aura (MWA) and 52 with aura (MA). Genotypes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction using the Taqman(®) allele discrimination assays. The PHASE 2.1 software was used to estimate the haplotypes. The A allele for the G2087A polymorphism was more commonly found in the MA group than in the MWA group (28 vs. 18%; P 0.05). The haplotype combining both A alleles for the two polymorphisms was more commonly found in the MA group than in the control group or in the MWA group (19 vs. 10 or 8%; P = 0.0245 or 0.0027, respectively). Our findings indicate that the G2087A and the C(-1026)A polymorphism in the iNOS gene affect the susceptibility to migraine with aura when their effects are combined within haplotypes, whereas the G2087A affects the susceptibility to aura in migraine patients. These finding may have therapeutic implications when examining the effects of selective iNOS inhibitors.

  13. Haplotype Map of Sickle Cell Anemia in Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Imen Moumni; Maha Ben Mustapha; Sarra Sassi; Amine Zorai; Ikbel Ben Mansour; Kais Douzi; Dorra Chouachi; Fethi Mellouli; Mohamed Bejaoui; Salem Abbes

    2014-01-01

    International audience; β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-...

  14. Mismatch Responses to Lexical Tone, Initial Consonant, and Vowel in Mandarin-Speaking Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Ying; Yen, Huei-ling; Yeh, Pei-wen; Lin, Wan-Hsuan; Cheng, Ying-Ying; Tzeng, Yu-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Chi

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how age, phonological saliency, and deviance size affect the presence of mismatch negativity (MMN) and positive mismatch response (P-MMR). This work measured the auditory mismatch responses to Mandarin lexical tones, initial consonants, and vowels in 4- to 6-year-old preschoolers using the multiple-deviant oddball…

  15. The dopamine transporter haplotype and reward-related striatal responses in adult ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogman, M.; Onnink, M.; Coolen, R.; Aarts, E.; van Kan, C; Arias Vasquez, A.; Buitelaar, J; Franke, B

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable disorder and several genes increasing disease risk have been identified. The dopamine transporter gene, SLC6A3/DAT1, has been studied most extensively in ADHD research. Interestingly, a different haplotype of this gene (formed by genetic variants in the 3' untranslated region and intron 8) is associated with childhood ADHD (haplotype 10-6) and adult ADHD (haplotype 9-6). The expression of DAT1 is highest in striatal regions...

  16. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, RuiJie; Li, Xia; Jiang, YongShuai; Liu, GuiYou; Li, ChuanXing; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Gong, BinSheng

    2009-02-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Tests, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alcoholism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1 approximately 22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes precisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with existing knowledge framework.

  17. Haplotype-based association analysis of the MAPT locus in Late Onset Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris John C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD is a common sporadic form of the illness, affecting individuals above the age of 65 yrs. A prominent hypothesis for the aetiopathology of Alzheimer's disease is that in the presence of a β-amyloid load, individuals expressing a pathogenic form of tau protein (MAPT are at increased risk for developing the disease. Genetic studies in this pursuit have, however, yielded conflicting results. A recent study showed a significant haplotype association (H1c with AD. The current study is an attempt to replicate this association in an independently ascertained cohort. Results In this report we present the findings of a haplotype analysis at the MAPT locus. We failed to detect evidence of association of the H1c haplotype at the MAPT locus with LOAD. None of the six SNPs forming the H1c haplotype showed evidence of association with disease. In addition, nested clade analysis suggested the presence of independent mutations at multiple points in the haplotype network or homoplasy at the MAPT locus. Such homoplasy can confound single SNP tests for association. We do not detect evidence that the set of SNPs forming the H1c haplotype in general or rs242557 in particular are pathogenic for LOAD. Conclusion In conclusion, we employed two contemporary haplotype analysis tools to perform haplotype association analysis at the MAPT locus. Our data suggest that the tagged SNPs forming the H1c haplotype do not have a causal role in the pathogenesis of LOAD.

  18. Native and European haplotypes of Phragmites Australis (common reed) in the central Platte River, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.; Galatowitsch, S.M.; Larson, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Phragmites australis (common reed) is known to have occurred along the Platte River historically, but recent rapid increases in both distribution and density have begun to impact habitat for migrating sandhill cranes and nesting piping plovers and least terns. Invasiveness in Phragmites has been associated with the incursion of a European genotype (haplotype M) in other areas; determining the genotype of Phragmites along the central Platte River has implications for proper management of the river system. In 2008 we sampled Phragmites patches along the central Platte River from Lexington to Chapman, NE, stratified by bridge segments, to determine the current distribution of haplotype E (native) and haplotype M genotypes. In addition, we did a retrospective analysis of historical Phragmites collections from the central Platte watershed (1902-2006) at the Bessey Herbarium. Fresh tissue from the 2008 survey and dried tissue from the herbarium specimens were classified as haplotype M or E using the restriction fragment length polymorphism procedure. The European haplotype was predominant in the 2008 samples: only 14 Phragmites shoots were identified as native haplotype E; 224 were non-native haplotype M. The retrospective analysis revealed primarily native haplotype individuals. Only collections made in Lancaster County, near Lincoln, NE, were haplotype M, and the earliest of these was collected in 1973. ?? 2011 Copyright by the Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

  19. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG RuiJie; LI Xia; JIANG YongShuai; LIU GuiYou; LI ChuanXing; ZHANG Fan; XIAO Yun; GONG BinSheng

    2009-01-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Testa, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alcoholism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1-22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes precisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with existing knowledge framework.

  20. Novel strategies to mine alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes by combining existing knowledge framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-throughout single nucleotide polymorphism detection technology and the existing knowledge provide strong support for mining the disease-related haplotypes and genes. In this study, first, we apply four kinds of haplotype identification methods (Confidence Intervals, Four Gamete Tests, Solid Spine of LD and fusing method of haplotype block) into high-throughout SNP genotype data to identify blocks, then use cluster analysis to verify the effectiveness of the four methods, and select the alco- holism-related SNP haplotypes through risk analysis. Second, we establish a mapping from haplotypes to alcoholism-related genes. Third, we inquire NCBI SNP and gene databases to locate the blocks and identify the candidate genes. In the end, we make gene function annotation by KEGG, Biocarta, and GO database. We find 159 haplotype blocks, which relate to the alcoholism most possibly on chromosome 1~22, including 227 haplotypes, of which 102 SNP haplotypes may increase the risk of alcoholism. We get 121 alcoholism-related genes and verify their reliability by the functional annotation of biology. In a word, we not only can handle the SNP data easily, but also can locate the disease-related genes pre- cisely by combining our novel strategies of mining alcoholism-related haplotypes and genes with ex- isting knowledge framework.

  1. Updated listing of haplotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Analysis of mutant PAH chromosomes has identified approximately 60 different single-base substitutions and deletions within the PAH locus. Nearly all of these molecular lesions are in strong linkage disequilibrium with specific RFLP haplotypes in different ethnic populations. Thus, haplotype analysis is not only useful for diagnostic purposes but is proving to be a valuable tool in population genetic studies of the origin and spread of phenylketonuria alleles in human populations. PCR-based methods have been developed to detect six of the eight polymorphic restriction sites used for determination of RFLP haplotypes at the PAH locus. A table of the proposed expanded haplotypes is given.

  2. On detecting incomplete soft or hard selective sweeps using haplotype structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrer-Admetlla, Anna; Liang, Mason; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand

    2014-01-01

    We present a new haplotype-based statistic (nSL) for detecting both soft and hard sweeps in population genomic data from a single population. We compare our new method with classic single-population haplotype and site frequency spectrum (SFS)-based methods and show that it is more robust, particu......We present a new haplotype-based statistic (nSL) for detecting both soft and hard sweeps in population genomic data from a single population. We compare our new method with classic single-population haplotype and site frequency spectrum (SFS)-based methods and show that it is more robust...

  3. Noise and mismatch optimization for capacitive MEMS readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Chong; Wu Qisong; Yin Tao; Yang Haigang, E-mail: yanghg@mail.ie.ac.c [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents a high precision CMOS readout circuit for a capacitive MEMS gyroscope. A continuous time topology is employed as well as the chopper noise cancelling technique. A detailed analysis of the noise and mismatch of the capacitive readout circuit is given. The analysis and measurement results have shown that thermal noise dominates in the proposed circuit, and several approaches should be used for both noise and mismatch optimization. The circuit chip operates under a single 5 V supply, and has a measured capacitance resolution of 0.2 aF/sq rootHz. With such a readout circuit, the gyroscope can accurately measure the angular rate with a sensitivity of 15.3 mV/{sup 0}/s. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  4. Noise and mismatch optimization for capacitive MEMS readout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chong; Wu Qisong; Yin Tao; Yang Haigang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a high precision CMOS readout circuit for a capacitive MEMS gyroscope. A continuous time topology is employed as well as the chopper noise cancelling technique. A detailed analysis of the noise and mismatch of the capacitive readout circuit is given. The analysis and measurement results have shown that thermal noise dominates in the proposed circuit, and several approaches should be used for both noise and mismatch optimization. The circuit chip operates under a single 5 V supply, and has a measured capacitance resolution of 0.2 aF/√Hz. With such a readout circuit, the gyroscope can accurately measure the angular rate with a sensitivity of 15.3 mV/°/s.

  5. Fuzzy Backstepping Sliding Mode Control for Mismatched Uncertain System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Q. Hou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mode controllers have succeeded in many control problems that the conventional control theories have difficulties to deal with; however it is practically impossible to achieve high-speed switching control. Therefore, in this paper an adaptive fuzzy backstepping sliding mode control scheme is derived for mismatched uncertain systems. Firstly fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed using backstepping method based on the Lyapunov function approach, which is capable of handling mismatched problem. Then fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed using T-S fuzzy model method, it can improve the performance of the control systems and their robustness. Finally this method of control is applied to nonlinear system as a case study; simulation results are also provided the performance of the proposed controller.

  6. Effect of resonant-frequency mismatch on attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2006-06-01

    Resonant perturbations are effective for harnessing nonlinear oscillators for various applications such as controlling chaos and inducing chaos. Of physical interest is the effect of small frequency mismatch on the attractors of the underlying dynamical systems. By utilizing a prototype of nonlinear oscillators, the periodically forced Duffing oscillator and its variant, we find a phenomenon: resonant-frequency mismatch can result in attractors that are nonchaotic but are apparently strange in the sense that they possess a negative Lyapunov exponent but its information dimension measured using finite numerics assumes a fractional value. We call such attractors pseudo-strange. The transition to pesudo-strange attractors as a system parameter changes can be understood analytically by regarding the system as nonstationary and using the Melnikov function. Our results imply that pseudo-strange attractors are common in nonstationary dynamical systems.

  7. A Method for Calling Copy Number Polymorphism Using Haplotypes

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    Gun Ho eJang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and copy number variation (CNV are both widespread characteristic of the human genome, but are often called separately on common genotyping platforms. To capture integrated SNP and CNV information, methods have been developed for calling allelic specific copy numbers or so called copy number polymorphism (CNP, using limited inter-marker correlation. In this paper, we proposed a haplotype-based maximum likelihood method to call CNP, which takes advantage of the valuable multi-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD information in the population. We also developed a computationally efficient EM algorithm to estimate haplotype frequencies and optimize individual CNP calls simultaneously, even at presence of missing data. Through simulations, we demonstrated our model is more sensitive and accurate in detecting various CNV regions, compared with commonly-used CNV calling methods including PennCNV, another hidden Markov model using CNP, a scan statistic, segCNV, and cnvHap. Our method often performs better in the regions with higher LD, in longer CNV regions, and in common CNV than the opposite. We implemented our method on the genotypes of 90 HapMap CEU samples and 23 patients with acute lung injury (ALI. For each ALI patient the genotyping was performed twice. The CNPs from our method show good consistency and accuracy comparable to others.

  8. Mitochondrial haplotypes associated with biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

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    Perry G Ridge

    Full Text Available Various studies have suggested that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although results are mixed. We used an endophenotype-based approach to further characterize mitochondrial genetic variation and its relationship to risk markers for Alzheimer's disease. We analyzed longitudinal data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, and late-onset Alzheimer's disease participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative with genetic, brain imaging, and behavioral data. We assessed the relationship of structural MRI and cognitive biomarkers with mitochondrial genome variation using TreeScanning, a haplotype-based approach that concentrates statistical power by analyzing evolutionarily meaningful groups (or clades of haplotypes together for association with a phenotype. Four clades were associated with three different endophenotypes: whole brain volume, percent change in temporal pole thickness, and left hippocampal atrophy over two years. This is the first study of its kind to identify mitochondrial variation associated with brain imaging endophenotypes of Alzheimer's disease. Our results provide additional evidence that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in risk for Alzheimer's disease.

  9. D-loop haplotype diversity in Brazilian horse breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianella, Patrícia; Albuquerque, Maria do Socorro Maués; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Egito, Andréa Alves do; Almeida, Leonardo Daniel; Sereno, Fabiana T P S; Carvalho, Luiz Felipe Ramos; Mariante, Arthur da Silva; McManus, Concepta Margaret

    2017-08-31

    The first horses were brought to Brazil by the colonizers after 1534. Over the centuries, these animals evolved and adapted to local environmental conditions usually unsuitable for exotic breeds, thereby originating locally adapted Brazilian breeds. The present work represents the first description of maternal genetic diversity in these horse breeds based on D-loop sequences. A D-Loop HSV-I fragment of 252 bp, from 141 horses belonging to ten Brazilian breeds / genetic groups (locally adapted and specialized breeds) were analysed. Thirty-five different haplotypes belonging to 18 haplogroups were identified with 33 polymorphic sites. Haplotype diversity (varying from 0.20 to 0.96) and nucleotide diversity (varying from 0.0039 to 0.0239) was lower for locally adapted than for specialized breeds, with the same pattern observed for FST values. Haplogroups identified in Brazilian breeds are in agreement with previous findings in South American samples. The low variability observed mainly in locally adapted breeds, indicates that, to ensure conservation of these breeds, careful reproductive management is needed. Additional genetic characterization studies are required to support accurate decision-making.

  10. Haplotypes and Sequence Variation in the Ovine Adiponectin Gene (ADIPOQ

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    Qing-Ming An

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In this study five separate regions (regions 1 to 5 of ovine ADIPOQ were analysed using PCR-SSCP. Four different PCR-SSCP patterns (A1-D1, A2-D2 were detected in region-1 and region-2, respectively, with seven and six SNPs being revealed. In region-3, three different patterns (A3-C3 and three SNPs were observed. Two patterns (A4-B4, A5-B5 and two and one SNPs were observed in region-4 and region-5, respectively. In total, nineteen SNPs were detected, with five of them in the coding region and two (c.46T/C and c.515G/A putatively resulting in amino acid changes (p.Tyr16His and p.Lys172Arg. In region-1, -2 and -3 of 316 sheep from eight New Zealand breeds, variants A1, A2 and A3 were the most common, although variant frequencies differed in the eight breeds. Across region-1 and region-3, nine haplotypes were identified and haplotypes A1-A3, A1-C3, B1-A3 and B1-C3 were most common. These results indicate that the ADIPOQ gene is polymorphic and suggest that further analysis is required to see if the variation in the gene is associated with animal production traits.

  11. Unconscious improvement in foreign language learning using mismatch negativity neurofeedback: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Kashioka, Hideki; Naruse, Yasushi; Furukawa, Masahiro; Ando, Hideyuki; Maeda, Taro

    2017-01-01

    When people learn foreign languages, they find it difficult to perceive speech sounds that are nonexistent in their native language, and extensive training is consequently necessary. Our previous studies have shown that by using neurofeedback based on the mismatch negativity event-related brain potential, participants could unconsciously achieve learning in the auditory discrimination of pure tones that could not be consciously discriminated without the neurofeedback. Here, we examined whether mismatch negativity neurofeedback is effective for helping someone to perceive new speech sounds in foreign language learning. We developed a task for training native Japanese speakers to discriminate between 'l' and 'r' sounds in English, as they usually cannot discriminate between these two sounds. Without participants attending to auditory stimuli or being aware of the nature of the experiment, neurofeedback training helped them to achieve significant improvement in unconscious auditory discrimination and recognition of the target words 'light' and 'right'. There was also improvement in the recognition of other words containing 'l' and 'r' (e.g., 'blight' and 'bright'), even though these words had not been presented during training. This method could be used to facilitate foreign language learning and can be extended to other fields of auditory and clinical research and even other senses.

  12. An unexpected sequence of events: mismatch detection in the human hippocampus.

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    Dharshan Kumaran

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to identify and react to novelty within the environment is fundamental to survival. Computational models emphasize the potential role of the hippocampus in novelty detection, its unique anatomical circuitry making it ideally suited to act as a comparator between past and present experience. The hippocampus, therefore, is viewed to detect associative mismatches between what is expected based on retrieval of past experience and current sensory input. However, direct evidence that the human hippocampus performs such operations is lacking. We explored brain responses to novel sequences of objects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, while subjects performed an incidental target detection task. Our results demonstrate that hippocampal activation was maximal when prior predictions concerning which object would appear next in a sequence were violated by sensory reality. In so doing, we establish the biological reality of associative match-mismatch computations within the human hippocampus, a process widely held to play a cardinal role in novelty detection. Our results also suggest that the hippocampus may generate predictions about how future events will unfold, and critically detect when these expectancies are violated, even when task demands do not require it. The present study also offers broader insights into the nature of essential computations carried out by the hippocampus, which may also underpin its unique contribution to episodic memory.

  13. Mismatched expressions decrease face recognition and corresponding ERP old/new effects in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Fabrice; Guillem, François; Tiberghien, Guy; Stip, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to investigate the electrophysiological (ERP) correlates of mismatched expression on face recognition in schizophrenia. Expression-change effects and associated ERPs were explored in patients with schizophrenia (n = 20) and paired comparison participants (n = 20) on a long-term face-recognition task. A facial-expression change decreased discriminability for patients with schizophrenia than for healthy participants. The patients' recognition deficit was accompanied by the absence of the midfrontal FN400 and late parietal ERP old/new effects in the mismatched-expression condition. By contrast, preserved midfrontal FN400 and late parietal ERP old/new effects were found in both groups in the unchanged-expression condition. Thus, the preserved parietal old/new effect previously observed in schizophrenia was no longer found here in the situation in which expression changes took place between the study and recognition phases. These findings suggest that, when they are not supposed to take the change of expression into account, the recognition deficit observed here in patients with schizophrenia resulted from an impairment in the mechanisms underlying the emergence, assessment, or utilization of familiarity--as indexed by the ERP old/new effects. In these natural conditions, the impact of the expression change on the implementation of retrieval processes offers new insight into schizophrenia-linked deficits in face recognition, with substantial phenomenological differences with respect to the emergence of familiarity.

  14. Effect of parameter mismatch on the dynamics of strongly coupled self sustained oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Nilaj; Jain, Aditya; Lal, Nijil; Das Gupta, Kantimay; Parmananda, Punit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental setup and an associated mathematical model to study the synchronization of two self-sustained, strongly coupled, mechanical oscillators (metronomes). The effects of a small detuning in the internal parameters, namely, damping and frequency, have been studied. Our experimental system is a pair of spring wound mechanical metronomes; coupled by placing them on a common base, free to move along a horizontal direction. We designed a photodiode array based non-contact, non-magnetic position detection system driven by a microcontroller to record the instantaneous angular displacement of each oscillator and the small linear displacement of the base, coupling the two. In our system, the mass of the oscillating pendula forms a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, leading to strong coupling of the oscillators. We modified the internal mechanism of the spring-wound "clockwork" slightly, such that the natural frequency and the internal damping could be independently tuned. Stable synchronized and anti-synchronized states were observed as the difference in the parameters was varied in the experiments. The simulation results showed a rapid increase in the phase difference between the two oscillators beyond a certain threshold of parameter mismatch. Our simple model of the escapement mechanism did not reproduce a complete 180° out of phase state. However, the numerical simulations show that increased mismatch in parameters leads to a synchronized state with a large phase difference.

  15. Mismatch between classroom furniture and anthropometric measures in Chilean schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Viviani, C A

    2010-07-01

    Children spend about five hours per day sitting down while doing their school work. Considering this as well as the potential inadequate use of school furniture, it is likely that some anatomical-functional changes and problems in the learning process may occur. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes within three different schools with the anthropometric characteristics of Chilean students in the Valparaíso region, in order to evaluate the potential mismatch between them. The sample consisted of 195 volunteer students (94 male, 101 female) of the 8th grade, ranging from 12.5 to 14.5 years of age from 3 different schools. Regarding the methodology, 6 anthropometric measures (Stature, Popliteal height, Buttock-popliteal length, Elbow height while sitting, Hip width, Thigh thickness and Subscapular height) were gathered, as well as 8 dimensions from the school furniture. For the evaluation of classroom furniture a match criterion equation was defined. After considering the existing classroom furniture dimensions in each match criterion equation, the anthropometric characteristics of the considered population were compared in order to determine the mismatch between them. Results indicated that seat height, which should be considered as the starting point for the design of classroom furniture, was appropriate for students' popliteal height in only 14% of the 2 out of the 3 schools, and 28% in the third. Seat to desk height was too high and mismatched 99% of the students in one school and 100% in the others. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the classroom's furniture was inadequate in almost all the analyzed cases and subjects. It is possible that the high mismatch percentage found between furniture and students' anthropometry can be associated to the fact that the acquisition and selection of the furniture was made without any ergonomic concern or criteria.

  16. Match mismatch processes underlie human hippocampal responses to associative novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2007-08-08

    The hippocampus has long been proposed to play a critical role in novelty detection through its ability to act as a comparator between past and present experience. A recent study provided evidence for this hypothesis by characterizing hippocampal responses to sequence novelty, a type of associative novelty where familiar items appear in a new temporal order. Here, we ask whether a hippocampal match-mismatch (i.e., comparator) mechanism operates selectively to identify the violation of predictions within the temporal domain or instead also underlies the processing of associative novelty in other domains (e.g., spatial). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a repetition paradigm in which subjects viewed sequences of objects presented in distinct locations on the screen and performed an incidental target detection task. The left hippocampus exhibited a pattern of activity consistent with that of an associative match-mismatch detector, with novelty signals generated only in conditions where one contextual component was novel and the other repeated. In contrast, right hippocampal activation signaled the presence of objects in familiar locations. Our results suggest that hippocampal match-mismatch computations constitute a general mechanism underpinning the processing of associative novelty. These findings support a model in which hippocampal mismatch signals rely critically on the recall of previous experience, a process that only occurs when novel sensory inputs overlap significantly with stored representations. More generally, the current study also offers insights into how the hippocampus automatically represents the spatiotemporal context of our experiences, a function that may relate to its role in episodic memory.

  17. Phenotypic mismatches reveal escape from arms-race coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-03-11

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were "ahead" of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race.

  18. Phenotypic mismatches reveal escape from arms-race coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T Hanifin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were "ahead" of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race.

  19. Induced Diffraction in Phase-Mismatched Second-Harmonic Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Wen-Hua; QIAN Lie-Jia; FU Xi-Quan; YANG Hua; ZHU He-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    We show analytically that in phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation,an effective diffraction is induced at the second-harmonic (SH) frequency.Numerical simulation results agree with the analytical predictions.Compared to the case of linear propagation,the effect of the overall diffraction at the SH frequency becomes doubled due to the induced diffraction,which causes an interesting result that the SH beam width will be larger than that of the fundamental field.

  20. Energy Detection of Multilevel PAM Signals with Systematic Threshold Mismatch

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    Antti Anttonen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a symbol decision problem with spectrally efficient energy detected multilevel pulse amplitude modulated (PAM signals. First, we analytically quantify the relationship between a systematic threshold mismatch and the required increase of the average signal-to-noise ratio to preserve a desired symbol error rate. For the case in which such an increase is not tolerable, we present a novel near-optimal multilevel threshold selection scheme, which is accurate for a wide range of system parameters.

  1. Genetic diversity, haplotypes and allele groups of Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Lau, Yee-Ling; Chang, Phooi-Yee; Anthony, Claudia Nisha

    2014-04-03

    The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium that can cause human malaria. Like the region II of the Duffy binding protein of P. vivax (PvDBPII), the region II of the P. knowlesi Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) plays an essential role in the parasite's invasion into the host's erythrocyte. Numerous polymorphism studies have been carried out on PvDBPII, but none has been reported on PkDBPαII. In this study, the genetic diversity, haplotyes and allele groups of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia were investigated. Blood samples from 20 knowlesi malaria patients and 2 wild monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were used. These samples were collected between 2010 and 2012. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and haplotypes of PkDBPαII were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Fifty-three PkDBPαII sequences from human infections and 6 from monkeys were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence showed 52 synonymous and 76 nonsynonymous mutations. Analysis on the rate of these mutations indicated that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 36 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 20 human and 1 monkey blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. These haplotypes were clustered into 2 distinct allele groups. The majority of the haplotypes clustered into the large dominant group. Our present study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII. Hence, the haplotypes described in this report can be considered as novel. Although a high level of genetic diversity was observed, the PkDBPαII appeared to be under purifying selection. The distribution of the haplotypes was skewed, with one dominant major and one minor

  2. Memory-based mismatch response to frequency changes in rats.

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    Piia Astikainen

    Full Text Available Any occasional changes in the acoustic environment are of potential importance for survival. In humans, the preattentive detection of such changes generates the mismatch negativity (MMN component of event-related brain potentials. MMN is elicited to rare changes ('deviants' in a series of otherwise regularly repeating stimuli ('standards'. Deviant stimuli are detected on the basis of a neural comparison process between the input from the current stimulus and the sensory memory trace of the standard stimuli. It is, however, unclear to what extent animals show a similar comparison process in response to auditory changes. To resolve this issue, epidural potentials were recorded above the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, tone frequency was used to differentiate deviants interspersed randomly among a standard tone. Mismatch responses were observed at 60-100 ms after stimulus onset for frequency increases of 5% and 12.5% but not for similarly descending deviants. The response diminished when the silent inter-stimulus interval was increased from 375 ms to 600 ms for +5% deviants and from 600 ms to 1000 ms for +12.5% deviants. In comparison to the oddball condition the response also diminished in a control condition in which no repetitive standards were presented (equiprobable condition. These findings suggest that the rat mismatch response is similar to the human MMN and indicate that anesthetized rats provide a valuable model for studies of central auditory processing.

  3. Educational mismatch in the labour market: overqualification and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Bečić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Educational mismatch as a labour market disruption has lately attracted the interest of many economic experts and scholars. This interest is spurred by considerable improvements in the educational profile of the population, combined with changes in the demand for highly-qualified workers linked to technological developments. The mismatch can appear if an increase in highly-qualified workforce supply is not accom - panied by an equal growth in the demand. Overqualification is one such type of mismatch: it means that knowledge and skills acquired during formal education remain unused in the workplace. Many economies face this problem that can have negative consequences for individuals, businesses, and the government alike. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts related to overqualification, focusing on the possible implications of this phenomenon, given that employee dissatisfaction can affect businesses and their productivity, and ultimately, the country as a whole. Systematization of previous research and analysis of the basic concepts related to overqualification can contribute to the literature in economics of education in Croatia and create a foundation for future research

  4. Current status of the Scandiatransplant acceptable mismatch program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, I D; Pedersen, F; Grunnet, N

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the Scandiatransplant Acceptable Mismatch Program (STAMP), which was set into action in 2009. The aim of STAMP is to define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) toward which the potential kidney recipient has not developed antibodies, as "acceptable mismatches" in the Scandiatransplant database. In many cases this may improve the probability for a highly immunized recipient to receive a suitable kidney graft from a deceased donor. Using data extracted from the Scandiatransplant database on the outcomes of the program after the first 3 years, 31/115 recipients included in the program have undergone transplantation. From 2008 to 2011 the mean waiting time for highly immunized patients has decreased from 42 to 37 months. Continuous evaluation and follow-up of the program is essential to improve the procedures and outcomes. Calculation of transplantability based on a given set of acceptable mismatches was added to the program in 2011, based on the historical deceased donor pool providing the possibility of a specific patient to receive a kidney through STAMP. It is still a challenge for the tissue typing laboratories to determine which detected HLA antibodies are clinical relevant. We concluded that STAMP has had the intended effects, however adjustments and improvements is an ongoing process. As an improvment of the program HLA-C was added to the STAMP search algorithm in September 2012.

  5. Semiblind Hyperspectral Unmixing in the Presence of Spectral Library Mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao; Ma, Wing-Kin; Bioucas-Dias, Jose M.; Chan, Tsung-Han

    2016-09-01

    The dictionary-aided sparse regression (SR) approach has recently emerged as a promising alternative to hyperspectral unmixing (HU) in remote sensing. By using an available spectral library as a dictionary, the SR approach identifies the underlying materials in a given hyperspectral image by selecting a small subset of spectral samples in the dictionary to represent the whole image. A drawback with the current SR developments is that an actual spectral signature in the scene is often assumed to have zero mismatch with its corresponding dictionary sample, and such an assumption is considered too ideal in practice. In this paper, we tackle the spectral signature mismatch problem by proposing a dictionary-adjusted nonconvex sparsity-encouraging regression (DANSER) framework. The main idea is to incorporate dictionary correcting variables in an SR formulation. A simple and low per-iteration complexity algorithm is tailor-designed for practical realization of DANSER. Using the same dictionary correcting idea, we also propose a robust subspace solution for dictionary pruning. Extensive simulations and real-data experiments show that the proposed method is effective in mitigating the undesirable spectral signature mismatch effects.

  6. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  7. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal, E-mail: Jainrupam1987@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain (M.P.) India-456010 (India)

    2015-07-31

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n{sub 0}, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  8. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-01

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO2 laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n0, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  9. Chronic inflammatory state in sickle cell anemia patients is associated with HBB(*)S haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Izabel C J; Rocha, Lillianne B S; Barbosa, Maritza C; Elias, Darcielle B D; Querioz, José A N; Freitas, Max Vitor Carioca; Gonçalves, Romélia P

    2014-02-01

    The chronic inflammatory state in sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with several factors such as the following: endothelial damage; increased production of reactive oxygen species; hemolysis; increased expression of adhesion molecules by leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets; and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. Genetic characteristics affecting the clinical severity of SCA include variations in the hemoglobin F (HbF) level, coexistence of alpha-thalassemia, and the haplotype associated with the HbS gene. The different haplotypes of SCA are Bantu, Benin, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian. These haplotypes are associated with ethnic groups and also based on the geographical origin. Studies have shown that the Bantu haplotype is associated with higher incidence of clinical complications than the other haplotypes and is therefore considered to have the worst prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the profile of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 in patients with SCA and also to assess the haplotypes associated with beta globin cluster S (HBB(*)S). We analyzed a total of 62 patients who had SCA and had been treated with hydroxyurea; they had received a dose ranging between 15 and 25 (20.0±0.6)mg/kg/day for 6-60 (18±3.4)months; their data were compared with those for 30 normal individuals. The presence of HbS was detected and the haplotypes of the beta S gene cluster were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Our study demonstrated that SCA patients have increased inflammatory profile when compared to the healthy individuals. Further, analysis of the association between the haplotypes and inflammatory profile showed that the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were greater in subjects with the Bantu/Bantu haplotype than in subjects with the Benin/Benin haplotype. The Bantu/Benin haplotype individuals had lower levels of cytokines than those with

  10. Study of the optimum haplotype length to build genomic relationship matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdosi, Mohammad H; Henshall, John; Tier, Bruce

    2016-09-29

    As genomic data becomes more abundant, genomic prediction is more routinely used to estimate breeding values. In genomic prediction, the relationship matrix ([Formula: see text]), which is traditionally used in genetic evaluations is replaced by the genomic relationship matrix ([Formula: see text]). This paper considers alternative ways of building relationship matrices either using single markers or haplotypes of different lengths. We compared the prediction accuracies and log-likelihoods when using these alternative relationship matrices and the traditional [Formula: see text] matrix, for real and simulated data. For real data, we built relationship matrices using 50k genotype data for a population of Brahman cattle to analyze three traits: scrotal circumference (SC), age at puberty (AGECL) and weight at first corpus luteum (WTCL). Haplotypes were phased with hsphase and imputed with BEAGLE. The relationship matrices were built using three methods based on haplotypes of different lengths. The log-likelihood was considered to define the optimum haplotype lengths for each trait and each haplotype-based relationship matrix. Based on simulated data, we showed that the inverse of [Formula: see text] matrix and the inverse of the haplotype relationship matrices for methods using one-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phased haplotypes provided coefficients of determination (R(2)) close to 1, although the estimated genetic variances differed across methods. Using real data and multiple SNPs in the haplotype segments to build the relationship matrices provided better results than the [Formula: see text] matrix based on one-SNP haplotypes. However, the optimal haplotype length to achieve the highest log-likelihood depended on the method used and the trait. The optimal haplotype length (7 to 8 SNPs) was similar for SC and AGECL. One of the haplotype-based methods achieved the largest increase in log-likelihood for SC, i.e. from -1330 when using [Formula: see text] to

  11. Does PGA external stenting reduce compliance mismatch in venous grafts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Liang-jian

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autogenous vein grafting is widely used in regular bypassing procedures. Due to its mismatch with the host artery in both mechanical property and geometry, the graft often over expands under high arterial blood pressure and forms a step-depth where eddy flow develops, thus causing restenosis, fibrous graft wall, etc. External stents, such as sheaths being used to cuff the graft, have been introduced to eliminate these mismatches and increase the patency. Although histological and immunochemical studies have shown some positive effects of the external stent, the mechanical mismatch under the protection of an external stent remains poorly analyzed. Methods In this study, the jugular veins taken from hypercholesterolemic rabbits were transplanted into the carotid arteries, and non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA fabric was used to fabricate the external stents to study the effect of the biodegradable external stent. Eight weeks after the operation, the grafts were harvested to perform mechanical tests and histological examinations. An arc tangent function was suggested to describe the relationship between pressure and cross-sectional area to analyse the compliance of the graft. Results The results from the mechanical tests indicated that grafts either with or without external stents displayed large compliance in the low-pressure range and were almost inextensible in the high-pressure range. This was very different from the behavior of the arteries or veins in vivo. The data from histological tests showed that, with external stents, collagen fibers were more compact, whilst those in the graft without protection were looser and thicker. No elastic fiber was found in either kind of grafts. Furthermore, grafts without protection were over-expanded which resulted in much bigger cross-sectional areas. Conclusion The PGA external extent contributes little to the reduction of the mechanical mismatch between the graft and its host artery

  12. Kullback-Leibler divergence for detection of rare haplotype common disease association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shili

    2015-11-01

    Rare haplotypes may tag rare causal variants of common diseases; hence, detection of such rare haplotypes may also contribute to our understanding of complex disease etiology. Because rare haplotypes frequently result from common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), focusing on rare haplotypes is much more economical compared with using rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) from sequencing, as SNPs are available and 'free' from already amassed genome-wide studies. Further, associated haplotypes may shed light on the underlying disease causal mechanism, a feat unmatched by SNV-based collapsing methods. In recent years, data mining approaches have been adapted to detect rare haplotype association. However, as they rely on an assumed underlying disease model and require the specification of a null haplotype, results can be erroneous if such assumptions are violated. In this paper, we present a haplotype association method based on Kullback-Leibler divergence (hapKL) for case-control samples. The idea is to compare haplotype frequencies for the cases versus the controls by computing symmetrical divergence measures. An important property of such measures is that both the frequencies and logarithms of the frequencies contribute in parallel, thus balancing the contributions from rare and common, and accommodating both deleterious and protective, haplotypes. A simulation study under various scenarios shows that hapKL has well-controlled type I error rates and good power compared with existing data mining methods. Application of hapKL to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) shows a strong association of the complement factor H (CFH) gene with AMD, identifying several individual rare haplotypes with strong signals.

  13. Genetic relationships among native americans based on beta-globin gene cluster haplotype frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cassia Mousinho-Ribeiro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of b-globin gene haplotypes was studied in 209 Amerindians from eight tribes of the Brazilian Amazon: Asurini from Xingú, Awá-Guajá, Parakanã, Urubú-Kaapór, Zoé, Kayapó (Xikrin from the Bacajá village, Katuena, and Tiriyó. Nine different haplotypes were found, two of which (n. 11 and 13 had not been previously identified in Brazilian indigenous populations. Haplotype 2 (+ - - - - was the most common in all groups studied, with frequencies varying from 70% to 100%, followed by haplotype 6 (- + + - +, with frequencies between 7% and 18%. The frequency distribution of the b-globin gene haplotypes in the eighteen Brazilian Amerindian populations studied to date is characterized by a reduced number of haplotypes (average of 3.5 and low levels of heterozygosity and intrapopulational differentiation, with a single clearly predominant haplotype in most tribes (haplotype 2. The Parakanã, Urubú-Kaapór, Tiriyó and Xavante tribes constitute exceptions, presenting at least four haplotypes with relatively high frequencies. The closest genetic relationships were observed between the Brazilian and the Colombian Amerindians (Wayuu, Kamsa and Inga, and, to a lesser extent, with the Huichol of Mexico. North-American Amerindians are more differentiated and clearly separated from all other tribes, except the Xavante, from Brazil, and the Mapuche, from Argentina. A restricted pool of ancestral haplotypes may explain the low diversity observed among most present-day Brazilian and Colombian Amerindian groups, while interethnic admixture could be the most important factor to explain the high number of haplotypes and high levels of diversity observed in some South-American and most North-American tribes.

  14. Numerical simulations of material mismatch and ductile crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestby, Erling

    2002-07-01

    Both the global geometry and inhomogeneities in material properties will influence the fracture behaviour of structures in presence of cracks. In this thesis numerical simulations have been used to investigate how some aspects of both these issues affect the conditions at the crack-tip. The thesis is organised in an introduction chapter, summarising the major findings and conclusions, a review chapter, presenting the main aspects of the developments in the field of fracture mechanics, and three research papers. Paper I considers the effect of mismatch in hardening exponent on the local near-tip stress field for stationary interface cracks in bi-materials under small scale yielding conditions. It is demonstrated that the stress level in the weaker material increases compared to what is found in the homogeneous material for the same globally applied load level, with the effect being of increasing importance as the crack-tip is approached. Although a coupling between the radial and angular dependence of the stress fields exists, the evolving stress field can still be normalised with the applied J. The effect on the increase in stress level can closely be characterised by the difference in hardening exponent, {delta}n, termed the hardening mismatch, and is more or less independent of the absolute level of hardening in the two materials. Paper II and Ill deal with the effects of geometry, specimen size, hardening level and yield stress mismatch in relation to ductile crack growth. The ductile crack growth is simulated through use of the Gurson model. In Paper H the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is investigated for deep cracked bend and shallow cracked tensile specimens. At small amounts of crack growth the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is small, but a more significant effect is found for larger amounts of crack growth. The crack growth resistance decreases in smaller specimens loaded in tension, whereas the opposite is

  15. Musical Aptitude Is Associated with AVPR1A-Haplotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, Liisa T.; Onkamo, Päivi; Raijas, Pirre; Karma, Kai; Järvelä, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Artistic creativity forms the basis of music culture and music industry. Composing, improvising and arranging music are complex creative functions of the human brain, which biological value remains unknown. We hypothesized that practicing music is social communication that needs musical aptitude and even creativity in music. In order to understand the neurobiological basis of music in human evolution and communication we analyzed polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A), serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), catecol-O-methyltranferase (COMT), dopamin receptor D2 (DRD2) and tyrosine hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), genes associated with social bonding and cognitive functions in 19 Finnish families (n = 343 members) with professional musicians and/or active amateurs. All family members were tested for musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test; KMT) and Carl Seashores tests for pitch (SP) and for time (ST). Data on creativity in music (composing, improvising and/or arranging music) was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. Here we show for the first time that creative functions in music have a strong genetic component (h2 = .84; composing h2 = .40; arranging h2 = .46; improvising h2 = .62) in Finnish multigenerational families. We also show that high music test scores are significantly associated with creative functions in music (p<.0001). We discovered an overall haplotype association with AVPR1A gene (markers RS1 and RS3) and KMT (p = 0.0008; corrected p = 0.00002), SP (p = 0.0261; corrected p = 0.0072) and combined music test scores (COMB) (p = 0.0056; corrected p = 0.0006). AVPR1A haplotype AVR+RS1 further suggested a positive association with ST (p = 0.0038; corrected p = 0.00184) and COMB (p = 0.0083; corrected p = 0.0040) using haplotype-based association test HBAT. The results suggest that the neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations and haplotypes in Mexican Mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámbula, E; Aguilar L, J C; Vaca, G

    2000-08-01

    In a screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in 1985 unrelated male subjects from the general population (Groups A and B) belonging to four states of the Pacific coast, 21 G-6-PD-deficient subjects were detected. Screening for mutations at the G-6-PD gene by PCR-restriction enzyme in these 21 G-6-PD-deficient subjects as well as in 14 G-6-PD-deficient patients with hemolytic anemia belonging to several states of Mexico showed two common G-6-PD variants: G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) (19 cases) and G-6-PD A-(376G/968C) (9 cases). In 7 individuals the mutations responsible for the enzyme deficiency remain to be determined. Furthermore, four silent polymorphic sites at the G-6-PD gene (PvuII, PstI, 1311, and NlaIII) were investigated in the 28 individuals with G-6-PD A- variants and in 137 G-6-PD normal subjects. As expected, only 10 different haplotypes were observed. To date, in our project aiming to determine the molecular basis of G-6-PD deficiency in Mexico, 60 unrelated G-6-PD-deficient Mexican males-25 in previous studies and 35 in the present work-have been studied. More than 75% of these individuals are from states of the Pacific coast (Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas). The results show that although G-6-PD deficiency is heterogeneous at the DNA level in Mexico, only three polymorphic variants have been observed: G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) (36 cases), G-6-PD A-(376G/968C) (13 cases), and G-6-PD Seattle(844C) (2 cases). G-6-PD A- variants are relatively distributed homogeneously and both variants explain 82% of the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency. The variant G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) represents 73% of the G-6-PD A- alleles. Our data also show that the variant G-6-PD A-(376G/968C)-which has been observed in Mexico in the context of two different haplotypes-is more common than previously supposed. The three polymorphic variants that we observed in Mexico are on the same haplotypes as found in subjects from

  17. COX-2 gene promoter haplotypes and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panguluri, Ramesh C K; Long, Layron O; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Songping; Coulibaly, Aoua; Ukoli, Flora; Jackson, Aaron; Weinrich, Sally; Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Isaacs, William; Kittles, Rick A

    2004-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key rate-limiting enzyme that converts arachidonic acid into pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. COX-2 expression is strongly correlated with increased tumor microvasculature density and plays an important role in inhibiting apoptosis, stimulating angiogenesis and promoting tumor cell metastasis and invasion. However, little is known about the role that sequence variation of the COX-2 gene contributes to prostate cancer. Thus, we searched for polymorphisms in the promoter region of the COX-2 gene using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), -1285A/G, -1265G/A, -899G/C and -297C/G, were detected and confirmed by direct sequencing. Three of the SNPs in the promoter region of COX-2 gene create at least three putative transcription factor binding sites and eliminate CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) and NF-kappa B binding sites. A case-control study of the four SNPs in African American (n = 288), Bini Nigerian (n = 264) and European American (n = 184) prostate cancer cases and age-matched controls revealed that SNP -297G was associated with a decreased risk for prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 0.49; CI = 0.2-0.9; P = 0.01]. The effect on risk was observed in both African Americans (OR = 0.51; CI = 0.2-0.9; P = 0.01) and European Americans (OR = 0.33; CI = 0.1-0.9; P = 0.02). In addition, SNPs -1265A and -899C were associated with increased prostate cancer risk in African Americans (OR = 2.72; CI = 1.3-5.8; P = 0.007 and OR = 3.67; CI = 1.4-9.9; P = 0.007, respectively). Haplotype analyses revealed modest effects on susceptibility to prostate cancer across populations. Haplotype GGCC conferred increased risk in the African American and Nigerian populations. Conversely, haplotype AGGG exhibited a negative association with prostate cancer risk in African Americans (OR = 0.4; CI = 0.1-0.9; P = 0.02) and European Americans (OR = 0.2; CI = 0.1-0.9; P = 0.03). These data

  18. Musical aptitude is associated with AVPR1A-haplotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa T Ukkola

    Full Text Available Artistic creativity forms the basis of music culture and music industry. Composing, improvising and arranging music are complex creative functions of the human brain, which biological value remains unknown. We hypothesized that practicing music is social communication that needs musical aptitude and even creativity in music. In order to understand the neurobiological basis of music in human evolution and communication we analyzed polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A, serotonin transporter (SLC6A4, catecol-O-methyltranferase (COMT, dopamin receptor D2 (DRD2 and tyrosine hydroxylase 1 (TPH1, genes associated with social bonding and cognitive functions in 19 Finnish families (n = 343 members with professional musicians and/or active amateurs. All family members were tested for musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test; KMT and Carl Seashores tests for pitch (SP and for time (ST. Data on creativity in music (composing, improvising and/or arranging music was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. Here we show for the first time that creative functions in music have a strong genetic component (h(2 = .84; composing h(2 = .40; arranging h(2 = .46; improvising h(2 = .62 in Finnish multigenerational families. We also show that high music test scores are significantly associated with creative functions in music (p<.0001. We discovered an overall haplotype association with AVPR1A gene (markers RS1 and RS3 and KMT (p = 0.0008; corrected p = 0.00002, SP (p = 0.0261; corrected p = 0.0072 and combined music test scores (COMB (p = 0.0056; corrected p = 0.0006. AVPR1A haplotype AVR+RS1 further suggested a positive association with ST (p = 0.0038; corrected p = 0.00184 and COMB (p = 0.0083; corrected p = 0.0040 using haplotype-based association test HBAT. The results suggest that the neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment

  19. Haplotypes of NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsa, Lova Satyanarayana; Rangaraju, Advithi; Vengaldas, Viswamitra; Latifi, Mona; Jahromi, Hossein Mehraban; Ananthapur, Venkateshwari; Nallari, Pratibha

    2013-01-01

    Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by systolic dysfunction, followed by heart failure necessitating cardiac transplantation. The genetic basis is well established by the identification of mutations in sarcomere and cytoskeleton gene/s. Modifier genes and environmental factors are also considered to play a significant role in the variable expression of the disease, hence various mechanisms are implicated and one such mechanism is oxidative stress. Nitric Oxide (NO), a primary physiological transmitter derived from endothelium seems to play a composite role with diverse anti-atherogenic effects as vasodilator. Three functional polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene viz., T-786C of the 5′ flanking region, 27bp VNTR in intron4 and G894T of exon 7 were genotyped to identify their role in DCM. A total of 115 DCM samples and 454 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by PCR -RFLP method. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and appropriate statistical tests were employed. A significant association of TC genotype (T-786C) with an odds ratio of 1.74, (95% CI 1.14 - 2.67, p = 0.01) was observed in DCM. Likewise the GT genotypic frequency of G894T polymorphism was found to be statistically significant (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.34–3.27, p = 0.0011), with the recessive allele T being significantly associated with DCM (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.18 - 2.30, p = 0.003). The haplotype carrying the recessive alleles of G894T and T-786C, C4bT was found to exhibit 7 folds increased risk for DCM compared to the controls. Hence C4bT haplotype could be the risk haplotype for DCM. Our findings suggest the possible implication of NOS3 gene in the disease phenotype, wherein NOS3 may be synergistically functioning in DCM associated heart failure via the excessive production of NO in cardiomyocytes resulting in decreased myocardial contractility and systolic dysfunction, a common feature of DCM

  20. Haplotypes of NOS3 gene polymorphisms in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lova Satyanarayana Matsa

    Full Text Available Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM is characterized by systolic dysfunction, followed by heart failure necessitating cardiac transplantation. The genetic basis is well established by the identification of mutations in sarcomere and cytoskeleton gene/s. Modifier genes and environmental factors are also considered to play a significant role in the variable expression of the disease, hence various mechanisms are implicated and one such mechanism is oxidative stress. Nitric Oxide (NO, a primary physiological transmitter derived from endothelium seems to play a composite role with diverse anti-atherogenic effects as vasodilator. Three functional polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3 gene viz., T-786C of the 5' flanking region, 27bp VNTR in intron4 and G894T of exon 7 were genotyped to identify their role in DCM. A total of 115 DCM samples and 454 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by PCR -RFLP method. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and appropriate statistical tests were employed. A significant association of TC genotype (T-786C with an odds ratio of 1.74, (95% CI 1.14 - 2.67, p = 0.01 was observed in DCM. Likewise the GT genotypic frequency of G894T polymorphism was found to be statistically significant (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.34-3.27, p = 0.0011, with the recessive allele T being significantly associated with DCM (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.18 - 2.30, p = 0.003. The haplotype carrying the recessive alleles of G894T and T-786C, C4bT was found to exhibit 7 folds increased risk for DCM compared to the controls. Hence C4bT haplotype could be the risk haplotype for DCM. Our findings suggest the possible implication of NOS3 gene in the disease phenotype, wherein NOS3 may be synergistically functioning in DCM associated heart failure via the excessive production of NO in cardiomyocytes resulting in decreased myocardial contractility and systolic dysfunction, a common feature of DCM

  1. Nature as Dissonant Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    concerns situations of mismatch between people and their heritage. The aim of the paper is to uncover the latent cultural dissonance in relation to nature restoration and to explain how landscape architecture could play an important role in the management of this dissonance. If one accepts that heritage...... of others, or in how landscapes sometimes are zones to accommodate different natures. In both cases the heritage production or nature restoration divides rather than unites. However, landscape architecture might provide an alternative approach to nature restoration that unites rather than divides......-evident. But who define and decide what kind of nature to restore? And is nature restoration not a contradiction in terms in our deeply cultivated landscapes? To examine these questions it makes sense to draw parallels between nature restoration and the concept of ‘dissonant heritage’ (Ashworth 2010), which...

  2. Effects of the number of markers per haplotype and clustering of haplotypes on the accuracy of QTL mapping and prediction of genomic breeding values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrooten Chris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of haplotype definition on the precision of QTL-mapping and on the accuracy of predicted genomic breeding values. In a multiple QTL model using identity-by-descent (IBD probabilities between haplotypes, various haplotype definitions were tested i.e. including 2, 6, 12 or 20 marker alleles and clustering base haplotypes related with an IBD probability of > 0.55, 0.75 or 0.95. Simulated data contained 1100 animals with known genotypes and phenotypes and 1000 animals with known genotypes and unknown phenotypes. Genomes comprising 3 Morgan were simulated and contained 74 polymorphic QTL and 383 polymorphic SNP markers with an average r2 value of 0.14 between adjacent markers. The total number of haplotypes decreased up to 50% when the window size was increased from two to 20 markers and decreased by at least 50% when haplotypes related with an IBD probability of > 0.55 instead of > 0.95 were clustered. An intermediate window size led to more precise QTL mapping. Window size and clustering had a limited effect on the accuracy of predicted total breeding values, ranging from 0.79 to 0.81. Our conclusion is that different optimal window sizes should be used in QTL-mapping versus genome-wide breeding value prediction.

  3. Effects of the number of markers per haplotype and clustering of haplotypes on the accuracy of QTL mapping and prediction of genomic breeding values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calus, Mario P L; Meuwissen, Theo H E; Windig, Jack J; Knol, Egbert F; Schrooten, Chris; Vereijken, Addie L J; Veerkamp, Roel F

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of haplotype definition on the precision of QTL-mapping and on the accuracy of predicted genomic breeding values. In a multiple QTL model using identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities between haplotypes, various haplotype definitions were tested i.e. including 2, 6, 12 or 20 marker alleles and clustering base haplotypes related with an IBD probability of > 0.55, 0.75 or 0.95. Simulated data contained 1100 animals with known genotypes and phenotypes and 1000 animals with known genotypes and unknown phenotypes. Genomes comprising 3 Morgan were simulated and contained 74 polymorphic QTL and 383 polymorphic SNP markers with an average r2 value of 0.14 between adjacent markers. The total number of haplotypes decreased up to 50% when the window size was increased from two to 20 markers and decreased by at least 50% when haplotypes related with an IBD probability of > 0.55 instead of > 0.95 were clustered. An intermediate window size led to more precise QTL mapping. Window size and clustering had a limited effect on the accuracy of predicted total breeding values, ranging from 0.79 to 0.81. Our conclusion is that different optimal window sizes should be used in QTL-mapping versus genome-wide breeding value prediction.

  4. Clarifying haplotype ambiguity of NAT2 in multi-national cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Agundez, Jose A G; Martinez, Carmen; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is the key enzyme in aromatic amine metabolism. NAT2 genotyping requires a subsequent determination of the haplotype pairs (formerly: alleles) to derive the acetylation status. The chromosomal phase of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is unclear for about 2/3 of the genotypes. We investigated NAT2 genotypes of 1,234 bladder cancer cases and 2,207 controls from Germany, Hungary, Pakistan and Venezuela plus 696 further German cancer cases. We reconstructed NAT2 haplotypes using PHASE v2.1.1. We analysed if the variability of the NAT2 haplotypes affected the haplotype reconstruction. Furthermore, we compared population haplotype frequencies in three Caucasian control cohorts (German, Hungarian, Spanish), in Pakistanis and Venezuelans and the impact on bladder cancer. We conclude that a common haplotype reconstruction is feasible, enhances precision and reliability. Hungarian controls showed the largest intra-ethnic variability whereas the Pakistanis showed a haplotype distribution typical for Caucasians. The main differences could be observed for the slow haplotypes *5B, *6A and *7B. The association of slow NAT2 genotypes with bladder cancer risk was most prominent in the Venezuelan study group.

  5. Class I gene regulation of haplotype preference may influence antiviral immunity in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Marker, O

    1989-01-01

    The lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-specific Tc response in (C3 X D2) F1 hybrids (k X d) is markedly biased in favor of the H-2d haplotype. Adoptive transfer experiments established that this haplotype preference also applied to T cell function in vivo. Using different mouse strain...

  6. Inheritance of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype in recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid M; Nielsen, Henriette S; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH) (HLA-A1, C7, B8, C4AQ0, C4B1, DR3, DQ2) is a remarkably long and conserved haplotype in the human major histocompatibility complex. It has been associated with both beneficial and detrimental effects, consistent with antagonistic pleiotr...

  7. The putative oncogene Pim-1 in the mouse: its linkage and variation among t haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J H; Phillips, S J

    1987-11-01

    Pim-1, a putative oncogene involved in T-cell lymphomagenesis, was mapped between the pseudo-alpha globin gene Hba-4ps and the alpha-crystallin gene Crya-1 on mouse chromosome 17 and therefore within the t complex. Pim-1 restriction fragment variants were identified among t haplotypes. Analysis of restriction fragment sizes obtained with 12 endonucleases demonstrated that the Pim-1 genes in some t haplotypes were indistinguishable from the sizes for the Pim-1b allele in BALB/c inbred mice. There are now three genes, Pim-1, Crya-1 and H-2 I-E, that vary among independently derived t haplotypes and that have indistinguishable alleles in t haplotypes and inbred strains. These genes are closely linked within the distal inversion of the t complex. Because it is unlikely that these variants arose independently in t haplotypes and their wild-type homologues, we propose that an exchange of chromosomal segments, probably through double crossingover, was responsible for indistinguishable Pim-1 genes shared by certain t haplotypes and their wild-type homologues. There was, however, no apparent association between variant alleles of these three genes among t haplotypes as would be expected if a single exchange introduced these alleles into t haplotypes. If these variant alleles can be shown to be identical to the wild-type allele, then lack of association suggests that multiple exchanges have occurred during the evolution of the t complex.

  8. Mapping of HLA- DQ haplotypes in a group of Danish patients with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Hermansen, Mette N; Pedersen, Merete F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A cost-effective identification of HLA- DQ risk haplotypes using the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technique has recently been applied in the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) in four European populations. The objective of the study was to map risk HLA- DQ haplotypes in a group...

  9. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes : The genetic analysis workshop 12 example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C; Beckmann, L; Majoram, P; Meerman, GT; Chang-Claude, J

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct

  10. Wolbachia infection differs among divergent mitochondrial haplotypes of Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four mitochondrial (cytrochrome oxidase I) haplotypes of the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (S'ulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), have been identified in North America: western, central, northwestern,and southwestern. A recent study found that females of the northwestern haplotype mated by males o...

  11. Haplotypes of beta S chromosomes among patients with sickle cell anemia from Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y; Kutlar, F; Kutlar, A; McKie, V C; Huisman, T H

    1986-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin and G gamma levels have been correlated with the presence or absence of eight restriction sites within the beta globin gene cluster (haplotypes) for numerous sickle cell anemia patients from Georgia. The most common haplotypes were #19 (Benin) and #20 (CAR); all patients with haplotype combinations 19/19, 20/20, and 19/20 were severely affected with low Hb F and low G gamma levels. A modified #19 beta S chromosome with a -G gamma-G gamma- globin gene arrangement, instead of -G gamma-A gamma-, was present in SS and SC newborn babies with G gamma values above 80%. Haplotype #3 (Senegal) was present among 15% of the beta S chromosomes; the two adult patients with the 3/3 combination were mildly affected with high Hb F and G gamma values. The haplotype AT with the variant A gamma T chain was a rarity. A new haplotype was found in one 17-year-old SS patient and five of his Hb S heterozygous relatives. This haplotype is associated with an increased production of Hb F in heterozygous and homozygous Hb S individuals; this Hb F contained primarily A gamma chains. A comparison was made between the different haplotypes among SS patients and normal Black individuals, and a remarkable similarity was noted in the fetal hemoglobin data for subjects with these different chromosomes.

  12. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Monti; S.X. Cohen (Serge); A. Fish (Alexander); H.H.K. Winterwerp (Herrie); A. Barendregt (Arjan); P. Friedhoff (Peter); A. Perrakis (Anastassis); A.J.R. Heck (Albert); T.K. Sixma (Titia); R.H.H. van den Heuvel (Robert); J.H.G. Lebbink (Joyce)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires ident

  13. A haplotype inference algorithm for trios based on deterministic sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliadis Alexandros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In genome-wide association studies, thousands of individuals are genotyped in hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Statistical power can be increased when haplotypes, rather than three-valued genotypes, are used in analysis, so the problem of haplotype phase inference (phasing is particularly relevant. Several phasing algorithms have been developed for data from unrelated individuals, based on different models, some of which have been extended to father-mother-child "trio" data. Results We introduce a technique for phasing trio datasets using a tree-based deterministic sampling scheme. We have compared our method with publicly available algorithms PHASE v2.1, BEAGLE v3.0.2 and 2SNP v1.7 on datasets of varying number of markers and trios. We have found that the computational complexity of PHASE makes it prohibitive for routine use; on the other hand 2SNP, though the fastest method for small datasets, was significantly inaccurate. We have shown that our method outperforms BEAGLE in terms of speed and accuracy for small to intermediate dataset sizes in terms of number of trios for all marker sizes examined. Our method is implemented in the "Tree-Based Deterministic Sampling" (TDS package, available for download at http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~anastas/tds Conclusions Using a Tree-Based Deterministic sampling technique, we present an intuitive and conceptually simple phasing algorithm for trio data. The trade off between speed and accuracy achieved by our algorithm makes it a strong candidate for routine use on trio datasets.

  14. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  15. Musical aptitude is associated with AVPR1A-haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, Liisa T; Onkamo, Päivi; Raijas, Pirre; Karma, Kai; Järvelä, Irma

    2009-05-20

    Artistic creativity forms the basis of music culture and music industry. Composing, improvising and arranging music are complex creative functions of the human brain, which biological value remains unknown. We hypothesized that practicing music is social communication that needs musical aptitude and even creativity in music. In order to understand the neurobiological basis of music in human evolution and communication we analyzed polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A), serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), catecol-O-methyltranferase (COMT), dopamin receptor D2 (DRD2) and tyrosine hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), genes associated with social bonding and cognitive functions in 19 Finnish families (n = 343 members) with professional musicians and/or active amateurs. All family members were tested for musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test; KMT) and Carl Seashores tests for pitch (SP) and for time (ST). Data on creativity in music (composing, improvising and/or arranging music) was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. Here we show for the first time that creative functions in music have a strong genetic component (h(2) = .84; composing h(2) = .40; arranging h(2) = .46; improvising h(2) = .62) in Finnish multigenerational families. We also show that high music test scores are significantly associated with creative functions in music (pmusic test scores (COMB) (p = 0.0056; corrected p = 0.0006). AVPR1A haplotype AVR+RS1 further suggested a positive association with ST (p = 0.0038; corrected p = 0.00184) and COMB (p = 0.0083; corrected p = 0.0040) using haplotype-based association test HBAT. The results suggest that the neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior.

  16. Interleukin-10 haplotypes in Celiac Disease in the Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Arquero Miguel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is a chronic disorder characterized by a pathological inflammatory response after exposure to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The HLA complex accounts for less than half of the genetic component of the disease, and additional genes must be implicated. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is an important regulator of mucosal immunity, and several reports have described alterations of IL-10 levels in celiac patients. The IL-10 gene is located on chromosome 1, and its promoter carries several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and microsatellites which have been associated to production levels. Our aim was to study the role of those polymorphisms in susceptibility to CD in our population. Methods A case-control and a familial study were performed. Positions -1082, -819 and -592 of the IL-10 promoter were typed by TaqMan and allele specific PCR. IL10R and IL10G microsatellites were amplified with labelled primers, and they were subsequently run on an automatic sequencer. In this study 446 patients and 573 controls were included, all of them white Spaniards. Extended haplotypes encompassing microsatellites and SNPs were obtained in families and estimated in controls by the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. Results No significant associations after Bonferroni correction were observed in the SNPs or any of the microsatellites. Stratification by HLA-DQ2 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 status did not alter the results. When extended haplotypes were analyzed, no differences were apparent either. Conclusion The IL-10 polymorphisms studied are not associated with celiac disease. Our data suggest that the IL-10 alteration seen in patients may be more consequence than cause of the disease.

  17. Inference of population structure using dense haplotype data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel John Lawson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of genome-wide dense variation data provides an opportunity to investigate ancestry in unprecedented detail, but presents new statistical challenges. We propose a novel inference framework that aims to efficiently capture information on population structure provided by patterns of haplotype similarity. Each individual in a sample is considered in turn as a recipient, whose chromosomes are reconstructed using chunks of DNA donated by the other individuals. Results of this "chromosome painting" can be summarized as a "coancestry matrix," which directly reveals key information about ancestral relationships among individuals. If markers are viewed as independent, we show that this matrix almost completely captures the information used by both standard Principal Components Analysis (PCA and model-based approaches such as STRUCTURE in a unified manner. Furthermore, when markers are in linkage disequilibrium, the matrix combines information across successive markers to increase the ability to discern fine-scale population structure using PCA. In parallel, we have developed an efficient model-based approach to identify discrete populations using this matrix, which offers advantages over PCA in terms of interpretability and over existing clustering algorithms in terms of speed, number of separable populations, and sensitivity to subtle population structure. We analyse Human Genome Diversity Panel data for 938 individuals and 641,000 markers, and we identify 226 populations reflecting differences on continental, regional, local, and family scales. We present multiple lines of evidence that, while many methods capture similar information among strongly differentiated groups, more subtle population structure in human populations is consistently present at a much finer level than currently available geographic labels and is only captured by the haplotype-based approach. The software used for this article, ChromoPainter and fineSTRUCTURE, is

  18. Improved haplotype analysis of human myelin basic protein short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Suzuki, T

    2000-06-01

    We report an improved haplotype analysis of the human myelin basic protein gene (MBP) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism. The polymorphic G-->A transition and 2 conventional STR polymorphisms, MBPA and MBPB, were simultaneously determined by an amplified product length polymorphism technique. After the MBPC fragments containing MBPA and MBPB were amplified, the linkage of these 2 STR loci was determined by a second amplification, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, of the isolated MBPC fragments. The present haplotype analysis dispensed with family studies for the haplotyping of MBPA and MBPB. Polymorphisms of the MBP loci studied in German and Japanese populations showed a high genomic variation. Haplotype analysis of the MBP loci showed distinct differences between the German and the Japanese populations. Consequently, haplotype analysis of the MBP loci promises to be useful in forensic identification and paternity testing.

  19. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Moreno

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were analyzed on a sample of 96 chromosomes of Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 0.479, followed by the Bantu haplotype (0.406; a minority of cases with other haplotypes was also identified: atypical Bantu A2 (0.042, Senegal (0.031, atypical Bantu A7 (0.021 and Saudi Arabia/Indian (0.021 haplotypes; however, the Cameroon haplotype was not identified in this study. Our results are in agreement with the historical records that establish Sudanese and Bantu origins for the African slaves brought into Venezuela.

  20. Single-molecule multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopy reveals directional MutS binding to mismatched bases in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cristovao (Michele); E. Sisamakis (Evangelos); M.M. Hingorani (Manju); A.D. Marx (Andreas); C.P. Jung (Caroline); P.J. Rothwell (Paul); C.A.M. Seidel (Claus A.); P. Friedhoff (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMismatch repair (MMR) corrects replication errors such as mismatched bases and loops in DNA. The evolutionarily conserved dimeric MMR protein MutS recognizes mismatches by stacking a phenylalanine of one subunit against one base of the mismatched pair. In all crystal structures of G:T mi

  1. Single-molecule multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopy reveals directional MutS binding to mismatched bases in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cristovao (Michele); E. Sisamakis (Evangelos); M.M. Hingorani (Manju); A.D. Marx (Andreas); C.P. Jung (Caroline); P.J. Rothwell (Paul); C.A.M. Seidel (Claus A.); P. Friedhoff (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMismatch repair (MMR) corrects replication errors such as mismatched bases and loops in DNA. The evolutionarily conserved dimeric MMR protein MutS recognizes mismatches by stacking a phenylalanine of one subunit against one base of the mismatched pair. In all crystal structures of G:T

  2. Polymorphism at expressed DQ and DR loci in five common equine MHC haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Binns, Matthew; Zhu, Baoli; Mohamoud, Yasmin Ali; Ahmed, Ayeda; Brooks, Samantha A; Antczak, Douglas F

    2017-03-01

    The polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQ and DR genes in five common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) haplotypes was determined through sequencing of mRNA transcripts isolated from lymphocytes of eight ELA homozygous horses. Ten expressed MHC class II genes were detected in horses of the ELA-A3 haplotype carried by the donor horses of the equine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and the reference genome sequence: four DR genes and six DQ genes. The other four ELA haplotypes contained at least eight expressed polymorphic MHC class II loci. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of genomic DNA of these four MHC haplotypes revealed stop codons in the DQA3 gene in the ELA-A2, ELA-A5, and ELA-A9 haplotypes. Few NGS reads were obtained for the other MHC class II genes that were not amplified in these horses. The amino acid sequences across haplotypes contained locus-specific residues, and the locus clusters produced by phylogenetic analysis were well supported. The MHC class II alleles within the five tested haplotypes were largely non-overlapping between haplotypes. The complement of equine MHC class II DQ and DR genes appears to be well conserved between haplotypes, in contrast to the recently described variation in class I gene loci between equine MHC haplotypes. The identification of allelic series of equine MHC class II loci will aid comparative studies of mammalian MHC conservation and evolution and may also help to interpret associations between the equine MHC class II region and diseases of the horse.

  3. Characterisation of TNF block haplotypes affecting the production of TNF and LTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J H; Temple, S E L; Kee, C; Waterer, G W; Tan, C R T; Gut, I; Price, P

    2011-02-01

    Polymorphisms in the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (particularly TNF and adjacent genes) associate with several immunopathological diseases and with susceptibility to pneumonia. The MHC is characterised by strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), so identification of loci affecting disease must be based on haplotypes. We have defined 31 tumour necrosis factor (TNF) block haplotypes (denoted FV1-31) in Caucasians, Asians and Australian Aboriginals. This study correlates the carriage of TNF block haplotypes with TNF and lymphotoxin alpha (LTA) protein production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 205 healthy Caucasian subjects, following in vitro stimulation with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae; gram-positive bacteria), Escherichia coli (E. coli; gram-negative bacteria) or TNF over 4, 8 and 24 h. Fifteen haplotypes were present at >1%, accounting for 94.5% of the cohort. The haplotypes were grouped into five families based on common alleles. Following stimulation, cells from carriers of the FV10 haplotype (family 2) produced less LTA compared with non-FV10 carriers. Carriers of the FV18 haplotype (family 4) produced more LTA than other donors. Induction of TNF by S. pneumoniae following 24 h stimulation was also greater in donors with FV18. The FV18 haplotype associated with the 44.1 MHC ancestral haplotype (HLA-A2, -C5, -B44, -DRB1*0401 and -DQB1*0301) that has few disease associations. FV16 occurred in the 8.1 MHC haplotype (HLA-A2, B8, DR3) that is associated with multiple immunopathological diseases. FV16 did not affect TNF or LTA levels. The findings suggest that many genetic variations critical in vivo are not effectively modelled by short-term cultures.

  4. β3 Integrin Haplotype Influences Gene Regulation and Plasma von Willebrand Factor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Katie E; Bray, Paul F; Grant, Peter J; Carter, Angela M

    2008-01-01

    The Leu33Pro polymorphism of the gene encoding β3 integrin (ITGB3) is associated with acute coronary syndromes and influences platelet aggregation. Three common promoter polymorphisms have also been identified. The aims of this study were to (1) investigate the influence of the ITGB3 −400C/A, −425A/C and −468G/A promoter polymorphisms on reporter gene expression and nuclear protein binding and (2) determine genotype and haplotype associations with platelet αIIbβ3 receptor density. Promoter haplotypes were introduced into an ITGB3 promoter-pGL3 construct by site directed mutagenesis and luciferase reporter gene expression analysed in HEL and HMEC-1 cells. Binding of nuclear proteins was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The association of ITGB3 haplotype with platelet αIIbβ3 receptor density was determined in 223 subjects. Species conserved motifs were identified in the ITGB3 promoter in the vicinity of the 3 polymorphisms. The GAA, GCC, AAC, AAA and ACC constructs induced ~50% increased luciferase expression relative to the GAC construct in both cell types. Haplotype analysis including Leu33Pro indicated 5 common haplotypes; no associations between ITGB3 haplotypes and receptor density were found. However, the GCC-Pro33 haplotype was associated with significantly higher vWF activity (128.6 [112.1–145.1]%) compared with all other haplotypes (107.1 [101.2–113.0]%, p=0.02). In conclusion, the GCC-Pro33 haplotype was associated with increased vWF activity but not with platelet αIIbβ3 receptor density, which may indicate ITGB3 haplotype influences endothelial function. PMID:18045606

  5. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-yan Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

  6. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-yan Sun; Qiang Li; Xi-ping Chen; Lu-yang Tao

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocogni-tion with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, re-spectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most signiifcant positive correlations were found be-tween mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most signiifcant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positive-ly associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental ifndings suggest that mismatch negativity might efifciently relfect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

  7. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind...... already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR...

  8. Quasisynchronization in Quorum Sensing Systems with Parameter Mismatches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbao Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates quasisynchronization in a communication system, which consists of cells communicating through quorum sensing. With the help of Lyapunov function method and Lur’e system approach, some sufficient conditions for quasisynchronization are presented, and a bound on the synchronization errors is derived. The obtained theoretical results show that the synchronization quality is influenced by two parameters detrimentally: the error bound depends almost linearly on the mismatches between cells and depends sensitively on the diffusion rates of the signals inward the cell membrane. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the theoretical results.

  9. Optimal control design that accounts for model mismatch errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hull, D.G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

    1995-02-01

    A new technique is presented in this paper that reduces the complexity of state differential equations while accounting for modeling assumptions. The mismatch controls are defined as the differences between the model equations and the true state equations. The performance index of the optimal control problem is formulated with a set of tuning parameters that are user-selected to tune the control solution in order to achieve the best results. Computer simulations demonstrate that the tuned control law outperforms the untuned controller and produces results that are comparable to a numerically-determined, piecewise-linear optimal controller.

  10. Phoneme discrimination and mismatch negativity in English and Japanese speakers

    OpenAIRE

    Bomba, Marie D.; Choly, David; Elizabeth W Pang

    2011-01-01

    Neural templates for phonemes in one’s native language are formed early in life; these can be modified but are difficult to form de novo. These can be examined with mismatch negativity. Three phonemic contrasts were presented to adult native English compared to Japanese speakers who acquired English later: vowels native to both languages (/i//iy/); consonant-vowel contrasts (/da//wa/) phonemic in both languages; and consonant-vowel contrasts phonemic in English but not in Japanese (/ra//la/)....

  11. Haplotype identity between individuals who share a CFTR mutation allele ''identical by descent'' : Demonstration of the usefulness of the haplotype-sharing concept for gene mapping in real populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, HG; vanderMeulen, MA; Rozen, R; Halley, DJJ; Scheffer, H; tenKate, LP; Buys, CHCM; teMeerman, GJ

    1996-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with the A455E mutation, in both the French Canadian and the Dutch population, share a common haplotype over distances of up to 25 cM. French Canadian patients with the 621+1G-->T mutation share a common haplotype of more than 14 cM. In contrast, haplotypes containing t

  12. Nature as Dissonant Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    Many former sites of land reclamation, where rivers and wetlands have been cultivated for the purpose of modern agriculture, are now subject to projects of nature restoration. In this context nature is often referred to as ‘the nature’ or simply ‘nature’ as it was something objective and self......-evident. But who define and decide what kind of nature to restore? And is nature restoration not a contradiction in terms in our deeply cultivated landscapes? To examine these questions it makes sense to draw parallels between nature restoration and the concept of ‘dissonant heritage’ (Ashworth 2010), which...... concerns situations of mismatch between people and their heritage. The aim of the paper is to uncover the latent cultural dissonance in relation to nature restoration and to explain how landscape architecture could play an important role in the management of this dissonance. If one accepts that heritage...

  13. Quantitated transcript haplotypes (QTH) of AGTR1, reduced abundance of mRNA haplotypes containing 1166C (rs5186:A>C), and relevance to metabolic syndrome traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Mohammad R; Lewis, Rohan M; Gaunt, Tom R; Cumming, Debbie V E; Rodriguez, Santiago; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew; Collins, Andrew R; Syddall, Holly E; Howell, William M; Cooper, Cyrus; Godfrey, Keith M; Cameron, Iain T; Day, Ian N M

    2007-04-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) is the main target through which angiotensin II influences cardiovascular tone, cell growth, and fluid and electrolyte balance. AGTR1 polymorphism has been reported to associate with hypertension, myocardial infarction (MI), and metabolic traits. Here we describe a novel approach to quantitation of transcript haplotypes (QTH) of AGTR1. To determine relative allelic expression from haplotypes, within-individual-between-allele ratiometric analyses in placental cDNA were developed for the transcribed SNPs rs5182:C>T (encoding p.L191) and rs5186:A>C (3'-noncoding "A1166C"). Additionally, between-individual comparisons were made using TaqMan assays applied to both homozygous and heterozygous genotypes and haplotypes. In conjunction, linkage disequilibrium (LD) and genomic haplotype associations with metabolic syndrome were examined. There was no significant difference of mRNA level for alleles of rs5182:C>T, but allele and mRNA haplotypes carrying 1166C exhibited reduced abundance. The effect was much greater in CC homozygotes than in heterozygotes. The promoter region was confirmed to be in a separate haplotype block from the AGTR1 3' region containing rs5182:C>T and rs5186:A>C. Metabolic syndrome trait associations were strongest for the 3' block generally and for the C allele of rs5186:A>C specifically. All effects were much more prominent in homozygotes, possibly reflecting interallelic interaction through feedback loops of mRNA regulation. Differential abundance of AGTR1 mRNA haplotypes may mediate clinical phenotypic observations of the AGTR1 genotype. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems’ functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay. PMID:28355281

  15. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Michel S; Kersten, Anna W; Frencken, Wouter G P

    2017-04-01

    A mismatch between the training exertion intended by a coach and the exertion perceived by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown whether coaches can accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' perceptions has not been explained. To determine the relation between intended and observed training exertion by the coach and perceived training exertion by the players and establish whether on-field training characteristics, intermittent endurance capacity, and maturity status explain the mismatch. During 2 mesocycles of 4 wk (in November and March), rating of intended exertion (RIE), rating of observed exertion (ROE), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored in 31 elite young soccer players. External and internal training loads were objectively quantified with accelerometers (PlayerLoad) and heart-rate monitors (TRIMPmod). Results of an interval shuttle-run test (ISRT) and age at peak height velocity (APHV) were determined for all players. RIE, ROE, and RPE were monitored in 977 training sessions. The correlations between RIE and RPE (r = .58; P players will do and what they actually did on the field. When doing this, they consider the intermittent endurance capacity of individual players.

  16. Somatosensory mismatch response in young and elderly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho M. Strömmer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with cognitive decline and alterations in early perceptual processes. Studies in the auditory and visual modalities have shown that the mismatch negativity (or the mismatch response, MMR, an event-related potential (ERP elicited by a deviant stimulus in a background of homogenous events, diminishes with aging and cognitive decline. However, the effects of aging on the somatosensory MMR are not known. In the current study, we recorded ERPs to electrical pulses to different fingers of the left hand in a passive oddball experiment in young (22–36 years and elderly (66–95 years adults engaged in a visual task. The MMR was found to deviants as compared to standards at two latency ranges: 180–220 ms and 250–290 ms post-stimulus onset. At 180–220 ms, within the young, the MMR was found at medial electrode sites, whereas aged did not show any amplitude difference between the stimulus types at the same latency range. At 250–290 ms, the MMR was evident with attenuated amplitude and narrowed scalp distribution among aged (Fz compared to young (fronto-centrally and lateral parietal sites. Hence, the results reveal that the somatosensory change detection mechanism is altered in aging. The somatosensory MMR can be used as a reliable measure of age-related changes in sensory-cognitive functions.

  17. Donor-Recipient Size Mismatch in Paediatric Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Donati-Bourne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. End stage renal failure in children is a rare but devastating condition, and kidney transplantation remains the only permanent treatment option. The aim of this review was to elucidate the broad surgical issues surrounding the mismatch in size of adult kidney donors to their paediatric recipients. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken on PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar for all relevant scientific articles published to date in English language. Manual search of the bibliographies was also performed to supplement the original search. Results. Size-matching kidneys for transplantation into children is not feasible due to limited organ availability from paediatric donors, resulting in prolonged waiting list times. Transplanting a comparatively large adult kidney into a child may lead to potential challenges related to the surgical incision and approach, vessel anastomoses, wound closure, postoperative cardiovascular stability, and age-correlated maturation of the graft. Conclusion. The transplantation of an adult kidney into a size mismatched paediatric recipient significantly reduces waiting times for surgery; however, it presents further challenges in terms of both the surgical procedure and the post-operative management of the patient’s physiological parameters.

  18. Reduced Sensitivity of Older Adults to Affective Mismatches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated age-related differences in emotional processing by using a paradigm of affective priming. Eighteen, right-handed, younger (mean age 22 and 15 older (mean age 68 subjects pressed buttons to indicate pleasantness of target words. The valence of each prime-target pair was congruent (e.g., win-love, incongruent (e.g., love-loss, or neutral (time-flower. Two sets of 720 prime-target pairs used either affective words or pictures as primes, and affect words as targets. We included well-matched positive and negative valence pairs in all congruent, neutral, and incongruent conditions, and controlled for possible contamination by semantic meaning, word frequency, and repetition effects. The response time (RT results revealed that young participants responded faster to the targets in affectively congruent conditions than in incongruent conditions. In older participants, the responses to target words were indifferent to all valence congruency conditions. The age effect in affective priming largely reflects reduced sensitivity to affective mismatches among older adults. Intriguingly, emotional Stroop effect and some perceptual priming have been linked to increased interferences and mismatches in older adults. The age-related changes in affective, perceptual, and semantic processes are discussed.

  19. Practical interpretation of CYP2D6 haplotypes: Comparison and integration of automated and expert calling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Kocherla, Mohan; Graydon, James S; Holford, Theodore R; Makowski, Gregory S; Goethe, John W

    2016-05-01

    We describe a population genetic approach to compare samples interpreted with expert calling (EC) versus automated calling (AC) for CYP2D6 haplotyping. The analysis represents 4812 haplotype calls based on signal data generated by the Luminex xMap analyzers from 2406 patients referred to a high-complexity molecular diagnostics laboratory for CYP450 testing. DNA was extracted from buccal swabs. We compared the results of expert calls (EC) and automated calls (AC) with regard to haplotype number and frequency. The ratio of EC to AC was 1:3. Haplotype frequencies from EC and AC samples were convergent across haplotypes, and their distribution was not statistically different between the groups. Most duplications required EC, as only expansions with homozygous or hemizygous haplotypes could be automatedly called. High-complexity laboratories can offer equivalent interpretation to automated calling for non-expanded CYP2D6 loci, and superior interpretation for duplications. We have validated scientific expert calling specified by scoring rules as standard operating procedure integrated with an automated calling algorithm. The integration of EC with AC is a practical strategy for CYP2D6 clinical haplotyping.

  20. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART.

  1. Casein haplotypes and their association with milk production traits in the Finnish Ayrshire cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmala, R; Vilkki, J; Elo, K; Mäki-Tanila, A

    1995-12-01

    Polymorphism of casein genes was studied in half-sib families of artificial insemination bulls of the Finnish Ayrshire dairy breed. Ten grandsires and 300 of their sons were genotyped for the following polymorphisms: alpha s1-casein (B, C), beta-casein (A1, A2), the microsatellite within the kappa-casein gene (ms5, ms4) and kappa-casein (A, B, E). Nine different combinations of these alleles, casein haplotypes, were found. Associations between casein haplotypes and milk production traits (milk and protein yield, fat and protein percentage and milking speed) were studied with ordinary least-squares analysis to find a direct effect of the haplotypes or an association within individual grandsire families using the granddaughter design. Estimated breeding values of sons were obtained from cow evaluation by animal model. No direct effect of the casein haplotypes on the traits was found. Within grandsire families, in one out of four families the chromosomal segment characterized by haplotype 3 (B-A2-ms4-A) was associated with an increase in milk yield (P < 0.01) and a decrease in fat percentage (P < 0.01) when contrasted with haplotype 8 (B-A1-ms4-E). The results provide evidence that in the Finnish Ayrshire breed at least one quantitative trait locus affecting the genetic variation in yields traits is segregating linked to either haplotype 3 (B-A2-ms4-A) or 8 (B-A1-ms4-E).

  2. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-03-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research.

  3. A Genome-Wide Scan for Breast Cancer Risk Haplotypes among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; John, Esther M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Deming, Sandra L.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wan, Peggy; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Chris A.; Stram, Daniel O.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) simultaneously investigating hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have become a powerful tool in the investigation of new disease susceptibility loci. Haplotypes are sometimes thought to be superior to SNPs and are promising in genetic association analyses. The application of genome-wide haplotype analysis, however, is hindered by the complexity of haplotypes themselves and sophistication in computation. We systematically analyzed the haplotype effects for breast cancer risk among 5,761 African American women (3,016 cases and 2,745 controls) using a sliding window approach on the genome-wide scale. Three regions on chromosomes 1, 4 and 18 exhibited moderate haplotype effects. Furthermore, among 21 breast cancer susceptibility loci previously established in European populations, 10p15 and 14q24 are likely to harbor novel haplotype effects. We also proposed a heuristic of determining the significance level and the effective number of independent tests by the permutation analysis on chromosome 22 data. It suggests that the effective number was approximately half of the total (7,794 out of 15,645), thus the half number could serve as a quick reference to evaluating genome-wide significance if a similar sliding window approach of haplotype analysis is adopted in similar populations using similar genotype density. PMID:23468962

  4. β-globin gene cluster haplotypes in ethnic minority populations of southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Liu, Hongxian; Huang, Kai; Lin, Keqin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jiayou; Ma, Shaohui; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2017-01-01

    The genetic diversity and relationships among ethnic minority populations of southwest China were investigated using seven polymorphic restriction enzyme sites in the β-globin gene cluster. The haplotypes of 1392 chromosomes from ten ethnic populations living in southwest China were determined. Linkage equilibrium and recombination hotspot were found between the 5′ sites and 3′ sites of the β-globin gene cluster. 5′ haplotypes 2 (+−−−), 6 (−++−+), 9 (−++++) and 3′ haplotype FW3 (−+) were the predominant haplotypes. Notably, haplotype 9 frequency was significantly high in the southwest populations, indicating their difference with other Chinese. The interpopulation differentiation of southwest Chinese minority populations is less than those in populations of northern China and other continents. Phylogenetic analysis shows that populations sharing same ethnic origin or language clustered to each other, indicating current β-globin cluster diversity in the Chinese populations reflects their ethnic origin and linguistic affiliations to a great extent. This study characterizes β-globin gene cluster haplotypes in southwest Chinese minorities for the first time, and reveals the genetic variability and affinity of these populations using β-globin cluster haplotype frequencies. The results suggest that ethnic origin plays an important role in shaping variations of the β-globin gene cluster in the southwestern ethnic populations of China. PMID:28205625

  5. Study on sickle cell disease haplotypes reveals the African origin of Amapá's population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália de Morais Castelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Sickle cell disease (SCD is a hereditary, hematologic, multifactorial disease, with high prevalence worldwide; its cause is a mutation in the sixth codon of the beta globin gene (βs.Objective:To identify the haplotypes present in people with SCD in Amapá, and relate them to African descent.Methods:We analyzed, by molecular techniques, 46 blood samples from people with SCD in Macapá, the capital of Amapá, with the purpose of obtaining information about haplotype frequency distribution, which helps understand the ethnic background of Amapá's population.Results:Our study revealed that the most frequent haplotype is Bantu (61.2%, followed by Benin (26.6% and Senegal (12.2%. Results showed statistical differences from studies conducted in other regions. A high frequency of the Senegal haplotype stands out, in comparison with some Brazilian studies.Conclusion:Amapá's results exhibit unique characteristics when compared to haplotypes in other regions, with high frequency of Senegal and Benin haplotypes, absence of atypical, Cameroon and Saudi, confirming that Brazil shows ethnic background diversity, as well as different haplotype frequencies.

  6. An Extensive Analysis of Y-Chromosomal Microsatellite Haplotypes in Globally Dispersed Human Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred; Krawczak, Michael; Excoffier, Laurent; Dieltjes, Patrick; Corach, Daniel; Pascali, Vincente; Gehrig, Christian; Bernini, Luigi F.; Jespersen, Jørgen; Bakker, Egbert; Roewer, Lutz; de Knijff, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The genetic variance at seven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci (or short tandem repeats [STRs]) was studied among 986 male individuals from 20 globally dispersed human populations. A total of 598 different haplotypes were observed, of which 437 (73.1%) were each found in a single male only. Population-specific haplotype-diversity values were .86–.99. Analyses of haplotype diversity and population-specific haplotypes revealed marked population-structure differences between more-isolated indigenous populations (e.g., Central African Pygmies or Greenland Inuit) and more-admixed populations (e.g., Europeans or Surinamese). Furthermore, male individuals from isolated indigenous populations shared haplotypes mainly with male individuals from their own population. By analysis of molecular variance, we found that 76.8% of the total genetic variance present among these male individuals could be attributed to genetic differences between male individuals who were members of the same population. Haplotype sharing between populations, ΦST statistics, and phylogenetic analysis identified close genetic affinities among European populations and among New Guinean populations. Our data illustrate that Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes are an ideal tool for the study of the genetic affinities between groups of male subjects and for detection of population structure. PMID:11254455

  7. Evaluation of logistic Bayesian LASSO for identifying association with rare haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swati; Papachristou, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that rare variants may hold the key to unraveling the genetic transmission mechanism of many common complex traits. Currently, there is a dearth of statistical methods that are powerful enough to detect association with rare haplotypes. One of the recently proposed methods is logistic Bayesian LASSO for case-control data. By penalizing the regression coefficients through appropriate priors, logistic Bayesian LASSO weeds out the unassociated haplotypes, making it possible for the associated rare haplotypes to be detected with higher powers. We used the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 simulated data to evaluate the behavior of logistic Bayesian LASSO in terms of its power and type I error under a complex disease model. We obtained knowledge of the simulation model, including the locations of the functional variants, and we chose to focus on two genomic regions in the MAP4 gene on chromosome 3. The sample size was 142 individuals and there were 200 replicates. Despite the small sample size, logistic Bayesian LASSO showed high power to detect two haplotypes containing functional variants in these regions while maintaining low type I errors. At the same time, a commonly used approach for haplotype association implemented in the software hapassoc failed to converge because of the presence of rare haplotypes. Thus, we conclude that logistic Bayesian LASSO can play an important role in the search for rare haplotypes.

  8. Predicting childhood effortful control from interactions between early parenting quality and children's dopamine transporter gene haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Sulik, Michael J; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Stover, Daryn A; Verrelli, Brian C

    2016-02-01

    Children's observed effortful control (EC) at 30, 42, and 54 months (n = 145) was predicted from the interaction between mothers' observed parenting with their 30-month-olds and three variants of the solute carrier family C6, member 3 (SLC6A3) dopamine transporter gene (single nucleotide polymorphisms in intron8 and intron13, and a 40 base pair variable number tandem repeat [VNTR] in the 3'-untranslated region [UTR]), as well as haplotypes of these variants. Significant moderating effects were found. Children without the intron8-A/intron13-G, intron8-A/3'-UTR VNTR-10, or intron13-G/3'-UTR VNTR-10 haplotypes (i.e., haplotypes associated with the reduced SLC6A3 gene expression and thus lower dopamine functioning) appeared to demonstrate altered levels of EC as a function of maternal parenting quality, whereas children with these haplotypes demonstrated a similar EC level regardless of the parenting quality. Children with these haplotypes demonstrated a trade-off, such that they showed higher EC, relative to their counterparts without these haplotypes, when exposed to less supportive maternal parenting. The findings revealed a diathesis-stress pattern and suggested that different SLC6A3 haplotypes, but not single variants, might represent different levels of young children's sensitivity/responsivity to early parenting.

  9. Association of USP26 haplotypes in men in Taiwan, China with severe spermatogenic defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I-Wen Lee; Long-Ching Kuan; Chien-Hung Lin; Hsien-An Pan; Chao-Chin Hsu; Yung-Chieh Tsai; Pao-Lin Kuo; Yen-Ni Teng

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To complete comprehensive haplotype analysis of USP26 for both fertile and infertile men. Methods: Two hundred infertile men with severe oligospermia or non-obstructive azoospermia were subjected to sequence analysis for the entire coding sequences of the USP26 gene. Two hundred men with proven fertility were genotyped by primer extension methods. Allele/genotype frequencies, linkage disequilibrium (LD) characteristics and haplotypes of fertile men were compared with infertile men. Results: The allele frequencies of five single nucleotide polymor-phisms (370-371 insACA, 494T>C, 576G>A, ss6202791C>T, 1737G>A) were significantly higher in infertile patients than control subjects. The major haplotypes in infertile men were TACCGA (28% of the population), TGCCGA (15%), TACCAA (8%), TGCCAA (6%), TATCAA (5%) and CATCAA (5%). The major haplotypes for the control subjects were TACCGA (58% of the population), CACCGA (7%), CATCGA (6%) and TGCCGA (5%). Haplotypes TGCCGA, TATCAA, CATCAA, CATCGC, TACCAA and TGCCAA were over-transmitted in patients with spermato-genic defect, whereas haplotypes TACCGA, CACCGA, and CATCGA were under-transmitted in these patients.Conclusion: Some USP26 alleles and haplotypes are associated with spermatogenic defect in the Han nationality in Taiwan, China.

  10. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging mismatch criteria to select patients for endovascular stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nishant K; Albers, Gregory W; Christensen, Søren; Marks, Michael; Hamilton, Scott; Straka, Matus; Liggins, John T P; Kemp, Stephanie; Mlynash, Michael; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G

    2014-05-01

    The Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution 2 (DEFUSE 2) study has shown that clinical response to endovascular reperfusion differs between patients with and without perfusion-diffusion (perfusion-weighted imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging, PWI-DWI) mismatch: patients with mismatch have a favorable clinical response to reperfusion, whereas patients without mismatch do not. This study examined whether alternative mismatch criteria can also differentiate patients according to their response to reperfusion. Patients from the DEFUSE 2 study were categorized according to vessel occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DWI lesion volume criteria (MRA-DWI mismatch) and symptom severity and DWI criteria (clinical-DWI mismatch). Favorable clinical response was defined as an improvement of ≥8 points on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) by day 30 or an NIHSS score of ≤1 at day 30. We assessed, for each set of criteria, whether the association between reperfusion and favorable clinical response differed according to mismatch status. A differential response to reperfusion was observed between patients with and without MRA-DWI mismatch defined as an internal carotid artery or M1 occlusion and a DWI lesionfunctional outcome in patients who met these MRA-DWI mismatch criteria (odds ratio [OR], 8.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-31.3), whereas no association was observed in patients who did not meet these criteria (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.08-3.1; P for difference between the odds, 0.01). No differential response to reperfusion was observed with other variations of the MRA-DWI or clinical-DWI mismatch criteria. The MRA-DWI mismatch is a promising alternative to DEFUSE 2's PWI-DWI mismatch for patient selection in endovascular stroke trials.

  11. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  12. Refined candidate region specified by haplotype sharing for Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac susceptibility alleles in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Kracht, S S; Esteso, G

    2010-01-01

    Infection of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab/ac is a major welfare problem and financial burden for the pig industry. Natural resistance to this infection is inherited as a Mendelian recessive trait, and a polymorphism in the MUC4 gene segregating for susceptibility....../resistance is presently used in a selection programme by the Danish pig breeding industry. To elucidate the genetic background involved in E. coli F4ab/ac susceptibility in pigs, a detailed haplotype map of the porcine candidate region was established. This region covers approximately 3.7 Mb. The material used...... for the study is a three generation family, where the founders are two Wild boars and eight Large White sows. All pigs have been phenotyped for susceptibility to F4ab/ac using an adhesion assay. Their haplotypes are known from segregation analysis using flanking markers. By a targeted approach, the candidate...

  13. Haplotype analysis in Huntington desease provides insights into mechanisms of CAG repeat expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew, S.E.; Goldberg, Y.P.; Squitieri, F. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is one of 7 disorders now known to be caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat. The HD mutation is a polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat in the 5{prime} region of a novel gene that expands beyond the normal range of 10-35 repeats in persons destined to develop the disease. Haplotype analysis of other dynamic mutation disorders such as myotonic dystrophy and Fragil X have suggested that a rare ancestral expansion event on a normal chromosome is followed by subsequent expansion events, resulting in a pool of chromosomes in the premutation range, which is inherently unstable and prone to further multiple expansion events leading to disease range chromosomes. Haplotype analysis of 67 HD and 84 control chromosomes using 5 polymorphic markers, both intragenic and 5{prime} to the disease mutation, demonstrate that multiple haplotypes underlie HD. However, 94% of the chromosomes can be grouped under two major haplotypes. These two haplotypes are also present in the normal population. A third major haplotype is seen on 38% of normal chromosomes but rarely on HD chromosomes (6%). CAG lengths on the normal chromosomes with the two haplotypes seen in the HD population are higher than those seen on the normal chromosomes with the haplotype rarely seen on HD chromosomes. Furthermore, in populations with a diminished frequency of HD, CAG length on normal chromosomes is significantly less than other populations with higher prevalence rates for HD. These data suggest that CAG length on normal chromosomes may be a significant factor contributing to repeat instability that eventually leads to chromosomes with CAG repeat lengths in the HD range. Haplotypes on the HD chromosomes are identical to those normal chromosomes which have CAG lengths in the high range of normal, suggesting that further expansions of this pool of chromosomes leads to chromosomes with CAG repeat sizes within the disease range, consistent with a multistep model.

  14. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: genetic studies of the Arab-Indian haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Duyen; Bae, Harold; Steinberg, Martin H; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Baldwin, Clinton T; Melista, Efthymia; Safaya, Surinder; Farrer, Lindsay A; Al-Suliman, Ahmed M; Albuali, Waleed H; Al Bagshi, Muneer H; Naserullah, Zaki; Akinsheye, Idowu; Gallagher, Patrick; Luo, Hong-yuan; Chui, David H K; Farrell, John J; Al-Ali, Amein K; Alsultan, Abdulrahman

    2013-06-01

    Sickle cell anemia is common in the Middle East and India where the HbS gene is sometimes associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) β-globin gene (HBB) cluster haplotype. In this haplotype of sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels are 3-4 fold higher than those found in patients with HbS haplotypes of African origin. Little is known about the genetic elements that modulate HbF in AI haplotype patients. We therefore studied Saudi HbS homozygotes with the AI haplotype (mean HbF 19.2±7.0%, range 3.6 to 39.6%) and employed targeted genotyping of polymorphic sites to explore cis- and trans- acting elements associated with high HbF expression. We also described sequences which appear to be unique to the AI haplotype for which future functional studies are needed to further define their role in HbF modulation. All cases, regardless of HbF concentration, were homozygous for AI haplotype-specific elements cis to HBB. SNPs in BCL11A and HBS1L-MYB that were associated with HbF in other populations explained only 8.8% of the variation in HbF. KLF1 polymorphisms associated previously with high HbF were not present in the 44 patients tested. More than 90% of the HbF variance in sickle cell patients with the AI haplotype remains unexplained by the genetic loci that we studied. The dispersion of HbF levels among AI haplotype patients suggests that other genetic elements modulate the effects of the known cis- and trans-acting regulators. These regulatory elements, which remain to be discovered, might be specific in the Saudi and some other populations where HbF levels are especially high.

  15. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington dos Santos Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5'ε, HindIII-Gγ, HindIII-ªγ, HincII-'ψβ1 and HincII-3''ψβ1 were analyzed in three populations (n = 114 from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the "quilombo community", from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+----,3(----+,4(-+--+and6(-++-+onthe βA chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (-++++and 14 (++--+, were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16 had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin and CAR (Central African Republic, with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil.

  16. Genetic and molecular characterization of three novel S-haplotypes in sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Potter, Daniel; Tao, Ryutaro; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge; Iezzoni, Amy F

    2008-01-01

    Tetraploid sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) exhibits gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) whereby the specificity of self-pollen rejection is controlled by alleles of the stylar and pollen specificity genes, S-RNase and SFB (S haplotype-specific F-box protein gene), respectively. As sour cherry selections can be either self-compatible (SC) or self-incompatible (SI), polyploidy per se does not result in SC. Instead the genotype-dependent loss of SI in sour cherry is due to the accumulation of non-functional S-haplotypes. The presence of two or more non-functional S-haplotypes within sour cherry 2x pollen renders that pollen SC. Two new S-haplotypes from sour cherry, S(33) and S(34), that are presumed to be contributed by the P. fruticosa species parent, the complete S-RNase and SFB sequences of a third S-haplotype, S(35), plus the presence of two previously identified sweet cherry S-haplotypes, S(14) and S(16) are described here. Genetic segregation data demonstrated that the S(16)-, S(33)-, S(34)-, and S(35)-haplotypes present in sour cherry are fully functional. This result is consistent with our previous finding that 'hetero-allelic' pollen is incompatible in sour cherry. Phylogenetic analyses of the SFB and S-RNase sequences from available Prunus species reveal that the relationships among S-haplotypes show no correspondence to known organismal relationships at any taxonomic level within Prunus, indicating that polymorphisms at the S-locus have been maintained throughout the evolution of the genus. Furthermore, the phylogenetic relationships among SFB sequences are generally incongruent with those among S-RNase sequences for the same S-haplotypes. Hypotheses compatible with these results are discussed.

  17. Low enzymatic activity haplotypes of the human catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: enrichment for marker SNPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Nackley

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is an enzyme that plays a key role in the modulation of catechol-dependent functions such as cognition, cardiovascular function, and pain processing. Three common haplotypes of the human COMT gene, divergent in two synonymous and one nonsynonymous (val(158met position, designated as low (LPS, average (APS, and high pain sensitive (HPS, are associated with experimental pain sensitivity and risk of developing chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. APS and HPS haplotypes produce significant functional effects, coding for 3- and 20-fold reductions in COMT enzymatic activity, respectively. In the present study, we investigated whether additional minor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, accruing in 1 to 5% of the population, situated in the COMT transcript region contribute to haplotype-dependent enzymatic activity. Computer analysis of COMT ESTs showed that one synonymous minor SNP (rs769224 is linked to the APS haplotype and three minor SNPs (two synonymous: rs6267, rs740602 and one nonsynonymous: rs8192488 are linked to the HPS haplotype. Results from in silico and in vitro experiments revealed that inclusion of allelic variants of these minor SNPs in APS or HPS haplotypes did not modify COMT function at the level of mRNA folding, RNA transcription, protein translation, or enzymatic activity. These data suggest that neutral variants are carried with APS and HPS haplotypes, while the high activity LPS haplotype displays less linked variation. Thus, both minor synonymous and nonsynonymous SNPs in the coding region are markers of functional APS and HPS haplotypes rather than independent contributors to COMT activity.

  18. Analysis of SNPs and haplotypes in vitamin D pathway genes and renal cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Karami

    Full Text Available In the kidney vitamin D is converted to its active form. Since vitamin D exerts its activity through binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR, most genetic studies have primarily focused on variation within this gene. Therefore, analysis of genetic variation in VDR and other vitamin D pathway genes may provide insight into the role of vitamin D in renal cell carcinoma (RCC etiology. RCC cases (N = 777 and controls (N = 1,035 were genotyped to investigate the relationship between RCC risk and variation in eight target genes. Minimum-p-value permutation (Min-P tests were used to identify genes associated with risk. A three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP sliding window was used to identify chromosomal regions with a False Discovery Rate of <10%, where subsequently, haplotype relative risks were computed in Haplostats. Min-P values showed that VDR (p-value = 0.02 and retinoid-X-receptor-alpha (RXRA (p-value = 0.10 were associated with RCC risk. Within VDR, three haplotypes across two chromosomal regions of interest were identified. The first region, located within intron 2, contained two haplotypes that increased RCC risk by approximately 25%. The second region included a haplotype (rs2239179, rs12717991 across intron 4 that increased risk among participants with the TC (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.09-1.57 haplotype compared to participants with the common haplotype, TT. Across RXRA, one haplotype located 3' of the coding sequence (rs748964, rs3118523, increased RCC risk 35% among individuals with the variant haplotype compared to those with the most common haplotype. This study comprehensively evaluated genetic variation across eight vitamin D pathway genes in relation to RCC risk. We found increased risk associated with VDR and RXRA. Replication studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  19. The Investigation of Haplotype Phasing Efficiency at the PAH Gene Region in Iranian Family Trios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Fazeli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The haplotype phasing is more useful than genotyping markers independently at carrier detection and prena­tal diagnosis of diseases. The PAH gene region contains several markers used in detection of PKU disease. In the present study, the efficiency of BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotype phasing in Iranian family trios was investigated. Then, this informa­tion was compared with those obtained for unrelated individuals."nMethods: Blood samples were collected from 20 healthy family trios and 60 unrelated individuals. The genomic DNA was ex­tracted by use of salting-out procedure. The two markers BglII and EcoRI were genotyped by use of PCR-RFLP. The geno­type of VNTR marker was identified by use of PCR and electrophoresis. The genotyping data obtained from family trios was used to infer haplotype phase. We also compared this data with results obtained from a widely used method for hap­lotype frequency inference from unrelated individuals, the PHASE program."nResults: The haplotype phase of all members was only ascertained at eight family trios.  The comparison of this data with the results obtained by use of PHASE program showed that eight haplotypes [211, 221, 215, 216, 214, 121, 225 and 111] were in­formative haplotypes in Iranian population."nConclusion: Since diversity of BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotypes was high in Iranian population, haplotype phasing at family trios was difficult. The results of this study showed that the genotyping data obtained from family trios could not provide enough information for BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotype phasing at Iranian PKU families and the genotyping of other family mem­bers was necessary at most cases.

  20. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington dos Santos Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5'ε, HindIII-Gγ, HindIII-ªγ, HincII-'ψβ1 and HincII-3''ψβ1 were analyzed in three populations (n = 114 from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the "quilombo community", from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+----,3(----+,4(-+--+and6(-++-+onthe βA chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (-++++and 14 (++--+, were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16 had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin and CAR (Central African Republic, with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil.

  1. IL-10 and TNF-α promoter haplotypes are associated with childhood Crohn's disease location

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rocio Sanchez; Emile Levy; Florin Costea; Daniel Sinnett

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the distribution and frequencies of the genotypes and haplotypes of the genes encoding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-10 in childhood Crohn's disease (CD) and to assess the impact of the corresponding DNA variants on clinical and disease phenotypes. METHODS: Ten variants in GR, TNF-α and IL-10 were genotyped in 113 childhood CD cases and 95 healthy subjects, both of French-Canadian origin. RESULTS: For the GR polymorphisms (R23K and N363S) and IL-10 variants in the 5'flanking region (-1082 G > A, -819 T > C and -592 A > C), no difference was observed in allele and genotype frequencies between CD patients and controls. At the haplotype level, we found three IL-10 haplotypes previously described in Caucasians (GCC, ACC and ATA) and three novel haplotypes only present in IBD patients. When we analyzed the haplotype distribution with the anatomical location of the disease, the GCC haplotype was associated with the colonic and the ACC haplotype with the terminal ileum location, respectively. The genotyping of five polymorphisms in the promoter region of the TNF-α gene (-1031 T > C, -863 A > C, -857 T > C, -308 A > G and -238 A > G) revealed a significant overrepresentation of homozygous -1031 CC among CD patients (OR = 9.9) and an association with the colonic location. For TNF-α, eleven haplotypes were inferred, including two frequent ones, TCCGG and CACGG, which were significantly observed more frequently in controls and cases, respectively. CONCLUSION: This is one of the first studies investigating the association between haplotype structure and disease location in a CD pediatric cohort. Our results will help to increase our understanding of the genetic determinants of childhood CD.

  2. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Silva, Wellington; de Nazaré Klautau-Guimarães, Maria; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2010-07-01

    Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5' ε, HindIII-(G) γ, HindIII-(A) γ, HincII- ψβ1 and HincII-3' ψβ1) were analyzed in three populations (n = 114) from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the "quilombo community", from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+ - - - -), 3 (- - - - +), 4 (- + - - +) and 6 (- + + - +) on the β(A) chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (- + + + +) and 14 (+ + - - +), were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16) had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease) were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin) and CAR (Central African Republic), with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil.

  3. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of epitaxial growth on a (111) layer with mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J.-C. S.

    1997-04-01

    A high-temperature deposition of adatoms on a substrate with or without lattice mismatch from -10% to +10%, followed by slow cooling to a given temperature, is simulated by means of a Monte Carlo algorithm with Lennard-Jones interatomic pair potentials. Stranski-Krastanov growth is always observed with a lateral island size controlled by the lattice mismatch, while the deposition mode acts strongly on the island slope. Complete healing of the island structure never occurs before the tenth layer. The interlayer distance undergoes oscillations as a function of the layer number. This is observed for a ±10% mismatch as well as for a -5% mismatch.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor gene haplotype structure and steroid therapy outcome in IBD patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessica; Mwinyi; Christa; Wenger; Jyrki; J; Eloranta; Gerd; A; Kullak-Ublick

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/ NR3C1) gene haplotypes influence the steroid therapy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We sequenced all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR3C1 gene in 181 IBD patients, determined the single nucleotide polymorphisms, and predicted the NR3C1 haplotypes. Furthermore, we investigated whether certain NR3C1 haplotypes are significantly associated with steroid therapy outcomes. RESULTS: We detected 13 NR3C1 variants, whi...

  6. The role of antigens and HLA class I haplotypes in indigenous women in Tashkent with hysteromyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landish Isanbaeva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunogenetic analysis on HLA I class in 177 indigenous women with uterine myoma showed the positive association in the risk of uterine fibroids with antigens HLA-B8/B22 and haplotype A28/B22; antigens HLA-A28, Cw5 and haplotype B17-Sw5 played role of auxiliary markers. HLA-antigens A2, B35, Cw4 and haplotypes A2-B35, B5-Cw4 showed the negative association. Carrying immunogenetic studies may be useful to search for individual genes involved in the determination of the disease - uterine fibroids, especially among patients with hereditary anamnesis.

  7. γA gene repeats polymorphism for the analysis of haplotypes of abnormal hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejat Akar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to analyze γ A gene repeat polymorphism for the analysis of haplotypes of hemoglobin (Hb variants such as Hb S, Hb D-Punjab, Hb O-Arab. Sickle cell cases had mainly Benin and Arab/Indian haplotype. We found three different haplotypes among Hb S, Hb O Arab and Hb D-Punjab cases. We named these three variants as Anatolian-1 and Anatolian-2 and Asian. Our data revealed that Hb O Arab may arise twice one from Asia and the other from Europe.

  8. HLA class II haplotypes distinctly associated with vaso-occlusion in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Najat; Al-Ola, Khadija; Al-Subaie, Abeer M; Ali, Muhallab E; Al-Irhayim, Zaid; Al-Irhayim, A Qader; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the association of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes with sickle cell anemia vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). DRB1*100101 was positively associated, while DRB1*140101, DRB1*150101, and DQB1*060101 were negatively associated, with VOC. Both susceptible (DRB1*100101-DQB1*050101) and protective (DRB1*110101-DQB1*030101 and DRB1*150101-DQB1*060101) haplotypes were identified, indicating that HLA class II haplotypes influence VOC risk.

  9. Effect of maturation on suprasegmental speech processing in full- and preterm infants: a mismatch negativity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragó, Anett; Honbolygó, Ferenc; Róna, Zsófia; Beke, Anna; Csépe, Valéria

    2014-01-01

    Infants born prematurely are at higher risk for later linguistic deficits present in delayed or atypical processing of phonetic and prosodic information. In order to be able to specify the nature of this atypical development, it is important to investigate the role of early experience in language perception. According to the concept of Gonzalez-Gomez and Nazzi (2012) there is a special intrauterine sensitivity to the prosodic features of languages that should have a special role in language acquisition. Therefore, we may also assume that pre- and full-term infants having months difference in intrauterine experience show different maturation patterns of processing prosodic and phonetic information present at word level. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of these differences on word stress pattern vs. phoneme information processing. Two age groups of infants (6 and 10 month-olds) were included in our study. 21 of 46 of the total of infants investigated were prematurely born with low birth weight. We used the mismatch negativity (MMN) event related brain potential (ERP) component, a widely used electrophysiological correlate of acoustic change detection, for testing the assumed developmental changes of phoneme and word stress discrimination. In a passive oddball paradigm we used a word as standard, a pseudo-word as phoneme deviant, and an illegally uttered word as stress deviant. Our results showed no differences in MMN responses in the phoneme deviant condition between the groups, meaning a relatively intact maturation of phoneme processing of preterm infants as compared to their contemporaries. However, the mismatch responses measured in the stress condition revealed significant between-group differences. These results strengthen the view that the total length of intrauterine experience influences the time of emergence of prosodic processing.

  10. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  11. Salt tolerance underlies the cryptic invasion of North American salt marshes by an introduced haplotype of the common reed Phragmites australis (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Edward A.; Glenn, Edward P.; Brown, J. Jed; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Nelson, Stephen G.

    2005-01-01

    A distinct, non-native haplotype of the common reed Phragmites australis has become invasive in Atlantic coastal Spartina marshes. We compared the salt tolerance and other growth characteristics of the invasive M haplotype with 2 native haplotypes (F and AC) in greenhouse experiments. The M haplotype retained 50% of its growth potential up to 0.4 M NaCl, whereas the F and AC haplotypes did not grow above 0.1 M NaCl. The M haplotype produced more shoots per gram of rhizome tissue and had higher relative growth rates than the native haplotypes on both freshwater and saline water treatments. The M haplotype also differed from the native haplotypes in shoot water content and the biometrics of shoots and rhizomes. The results offer an explanation for how the M haplotype is able to spread in coastal salt marshes and support the conclusion of DNA analyses that the M haplotype is a distinct ecotype of P. australis.

  12. Haplotype structure of the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene in 814 Danish Caucasian subjects and association with body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Kamp; Nielsen, Morten; Koefoed, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    with body mass index (BMI). The SNPs showed organization into 13 distinct haplotypes and 41 haplotype pairs. The study identified four common haplotypes: ACCCC (10.1 +/- 0.3 %), ACCCG (27.9 +/- 0.3 %), GCCAC (10.8 +/- 0.1 %) and GGCCG (41.0 +/- 0.2 %) (frequencies (SD), seen in 91 % of the population....... In the total population (mean age +/- SD: 50 +/- 16 years), BMI was not related to haplotype pairs, individual SNPs or allelic haplotypes. However, in subjects ... to individual SNPs. In subjects subjects (BMI

  13. The population genomics of archaeological transition in west Iberia: Investigation of ancient substructure using imputation and haplotype-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniano, Rui; Cassidy, Lara M; Ó'Maoldúin, Ros; McLaughlin, Russell; Silva, Nuno M; Manco, Licinio; Fidalgo, Daniel; Pereira, Tania; Coelho, Maria J; Serra, Miguel; Burger, Joachim; Parreira, Rui; Moran, Elena; Valera, Antonio C; Porfirio, Eduardo; Boaventura, Rui; Silva, Ana M; Bradley, Daniel G

    2017-07-01

    We analyse new genomic data (0.05-2.95x) from 14 ancient individuals from Portugal distributed from the Middle Neolithic (4200-3500 BC) to the Middle Bronze Age (1740-1430 BC) and impute genomewide diploid genotypes in these together with published ancient Eurasians. While discontinuity is evident in the transition to agriculture across the region, sensitive haplotype-based analyses suggest a significant degree of local hunter-gatherer contribution to later Iberian Neolithic populations. A more subtle genetic influx is also apparent in the Bronze Age, detectable from analyses including haplotype sharing with both ancient and modern genomes, D-statistics and Y-chromosome lineages. However, the limited nature of this introgression contrasts with the major Steppe migration turnovers within third Millennium northern Europe and echoes the survival of non-Indo-European language in Iberia. Changes in genomic estimates of individual height across Europe are also associated with these major cultural transitions, and ancestral components continue to correlate with modern differences in stature.

  14. Excap: maximization of haplotypic diversity of linked markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Kahles

    Full Text Available Genetic markers, defined as variable regions of DNA, can be utilized for distinguishing individuals or populations. As long as markers are independent, it is easy to combine the information they provide. For nonrecombinant sequences like mtDNA, choosing the right set of markers for forensic applications can be difficult and requires careful consideration. In particular, one wants to maximize the utility of the markers. Until now, this has mainly been done by hand. We propose an algorithm that finds the most informative subset of a set of markers. The algorithm uses a depth first search combined with a branch-and-bound approach. Since the worst case complexity is exponential, we also propose some data-reduction techniques and a heuristic. We implemented the algorithm and applied it to two forensic caseworks using mitochondrial DNA, which resulted in marker sets with significantly improved haplotypic diversity compared to previous suggestions. Additionally, we evaluated the quality of the estimation with an artificial dataset of mtDNA. The heuristic is shown to provide extensive speedup at little cost in accuracy.

  15. Haplotype and missing data inference in nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Cutler, David J

    2004-08-01

    Determining linkage phase from population samples with statistical methods is accurate only within regions of high linkage disequilibrium (LD). Yet, affected individuals in a genetic mapping study, including those involving cases and controls, may share sequences identical-by-descent stretching on the order of 10s to 100s of kilobases, quite possibly over regions of low LD in the population. At the same time, inferring phase from nuclear families may be hampered by missing family members, missing genotypes, and the noninformativity of certain genotype patterns. In this study, we reformulate our previous haplotype reconstruction algorithm, and its associated computer program, to phase parents with information derived from population samples as well as from their offspring. In applications of our algorithm to 100-kb stretches, simulated in accordance to a Wright-Fisher model with typical levels of LD in humans, we find that phase reconstruction for 160 trios with 10% missing data is highly accurate (>90%) over the entire length. Furthermore, our algorithm can estimate allelic status for missing data at high accuracy (>95%). Finally, the input capacity of the program is vast, easily handling thousands of segregating sites in > or = 1000 chromosomes.

  16. Haplotype variation in founders of the Mauremys annamensis population kept in European Zoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Somerova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The critically endangered Annam leaf turtle Mauremys annamensis faces extinction in nature. Because of that, the conservation value of the population kept in European zoos becomes substantial for reintroduction programmes. We sampled 39 specimens of M. annamensis from European zoos and other collections (mainly founders, imports and putatively unrelated individuals, and also four specimens of Mauremys mutica for comparison. In each animal, we sequenced 817 bp of the mitochondrial ND4 gene and 940 bp of the nuclear R35 intron that were used as phylogenetic markers for Mauremys mutica-annamensis group by previous authors. The sequences of the R35 intron, which are characteristic for M. annamensis and which clearly differ from those characteristic for M. mutica and/or other Mauremys species, were mutually shared by all of the examined M. annamensis. They also possessed mitochondrial haplotypes belonging to the annamensis subclades I and II, distinctness of which was clearly confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Thus, both nuclear and mitochondrial markers agreed in the unequivocal assignment of the examined individuals to M. annamensis. Although no obvious hybrids were detected within the founders of the captive population, further careful genetic evaluation using genom-wide markers is required to unequivocally confirm this result.

  17. Singapore Genome Variation Project: a haplotype map of three Southeast Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Sim, Xueling; Ong, Rick T H; Tan, Adrian K S; Chen, Jieming; Tantoso, Erwin; Small, Kerrin S; Ku, Chee-Seng; Lee, Edmund J D; Seielstad, Mark; Chia, Kee-Seng

    2009-11-01

    The Singapore Genome Variation Project (SGVP) provides a publicly available resource of 1.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 268 individuals from the Chinese, Malay, and Indian population groups in Southeast Asia. This online database catalogs information and summaries on genotype and phased haplotype data, including allele frequencies, assessment of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and recombination rates in a format similar to the International HapMap Project. Here, we introduce this resource and describe the analysis of human genomic variation upon agglomerating data from the HapMap and the Human Genome Diversity Project, providing useful insights into the population structure of the three major population groups in Asia. In addition, this resource also surveyed across the genome for variation in regional patterns of LD between the HapMap and SGVP populations, and for signatures of positive natural selection using two well-established metrics: iHS and XP-EHH. The raw and processed genetic data, together with all population genetic summaries, are publicly available for download and browsing through a web browser modeled with the Generic Genome Browser.

  18. The mismatch between the cultures of journalism and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelbspan, R.

    2000-06-01

    This presentation provided some insight into the journalist's perspective on climate change with particular consideration to the way the U.S. media portrays the issue. The author draws on thirty years of experience in journalism when he portrays the economic and political aspects of climate change along with the critical issues of journalism ethics as they relate to the coverage of the climate crisis. This paper also highlighted the campaign of deception by the fossil fuel lobby in the United States. The objective of this presentation is to address the link between inadequate media coverage and the lack of a political constituency in the United States regarding this issue. It was emphasized that there is a communication mismatch between science and journalism. Some suggestions were presented which would help scientists communicate their ideas to the press more effectively.

  19. Role of mismatch in mechanical properties in cancer cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Julian; Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the mechanical stiffness of cells and their interaction with their surroundings undergo remarkable changes during tumor progression. An intriguing experimental result in this area suggests that the mismatch in the elasticity and adhesive properties between cancer cells and cells that have not yet transformed may lead to enhanced cancer cell motility in a binary cell population. Motivated by this, we study the mechanical response and dynamics of a binary system of active and deformable particles using Langevin Dynamics simulations. We characterize their motility by studying particle trajectories, mean square displacements and correlation functions. Our study may provide an understanding of the interplay of mechanical and statistical mechanical properties underlying the enhanced motility of cancer cells during metastasis. This work was partially supported by a D-RIG grant from the College of Science at Rochester Institute of Technology.

  20. Mismatch negativity during attend and ignore conditions in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, V A; Friedman, D; Ritter, W

    1997-09-01

    Mismatch negativities (MMNs) of the event-related potential to deviant tones and environmental sounds were recorded during active and ignore oddball sequences in young and elderly controls and patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (PAD). MMNs were smaller in the PAD waveforms compared to those of the controls, suggesting a degraded sensory memory trace in these subjects; however, under ignore conditions, environmental sounds elicited robust MMNs in the PAD group along with N2b and novelty P3 components in similar fashion to controls. As N2b and P3 are usually elicited by attended stimuli, these data suggest that in the PAD subjects, the highly deviant events involuntarily captured attention, perhaps reflecting the activation of an attentional switching mechanism. Because this passive switching is thought to reflect activation of a mechanism located in the frontal lobes, the data suggest that this putative frontal lobe mechanism is relatively intact in the early stages of the disease.

  1. On Capacity Regions of Interference Channels with Mismatched Local Views

    CERN Document Server

    Kao, David T -H

    2011-01-01

    We study the capacity regions of two-user interference channels where transmitters base their transmission decisions on local views of the channel state. Under the local view model, each transmitter knows only a subset of the four channel gains, which may be mismatched from the other transmitter. We consider a set of seven local views, and find that for five out of the seven local views, TDMA is sufficient to achieve the capacity region of the deterministic interference channel. Conversely for these five views, no policy can achieve a rate point outside the TDMA region without inducing a corner case of sub-TDMA performance in another channel state. The common trait shared by the two remaining local views - those with the potential to outperform TDMA - is transmitter knowledge of the outgoing interference link, emphasizing its importance in creating opportunities to use more advanced schemes. Our conclusions are extended to bounded gap characterizations of the capacity region for the Gaussian interference chan...

  2. Three perspectives on the mismatch between measures of material poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hick, Rod

    2015-03-01

    The two most prominent measures of material poverty within contemporary European poverty analysis are low income and material deprivation. However, it is by now well-known that these measures identify substantially different people as being poor. In this research note, I seek to demonstrate that there are at least three ways to understand the mismatch between low income and material deprivation, relating to three different forms of identification: identifying poor households, identifying groups at risk of poverty and identifying trends in material poverty over time. Drawing on data from the British Household Panel Survey, I show that while low income and material deprivation identify very different households as being poor, and display distinct trends over time, in many cases they identify the same groups at being at risk of material poverty.

  3. Concentrative meditation enhances preattentive processing: a mismatch negativity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Narayanan; Baijal, Shruti

    2007-10-29

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigm that is an indicator of preattentive processing was used to study the effects of concentrative meditation. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga meditation is a yogic exercise practiced in an ordered sequence beginning with breathing exercises, and ending with concentrative (Sahaj Samadhi) meditation. Auditory MMN waveforms were recorded at the beginning and after each of these practices for meditators, and equivalently after relaxation sessions for the nonmeditators. Overall meditators were found to have larger MMN amplitudes than nonmeditators. The meditators also exhibited significantly increased MMN amplitudes immediately after meditation suggesting transient state changes owing to meditation. The results indicate that concentrative meditation practice enhances preattentive perceptual processes, enabling better change detection in auditory sensory memory.

  4. ADAPTIVE CALIBRATION OF I AND Q MISMATCH IN QUADRATURE RECEIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xuexian; Hou Zifeng; Zhang Qunying; Ning Yanqing

    2002-01-01

    The mismatch of in-phase and quadrature channels in quadrature receiver affects and constrains radar detection performance in coherent radar. It is necessary to keep the in-phase and quadrature branches symmetrical. In this letter, an adaptive method to detect imbalance parameters is derived by means of evaluating channel errors from the received signal sequences.No matter how the bias degree of the gain and phase errors in I/Q channels are, the proposed adaptive scheme can obtain good calibration results. And the required calculations are only a few multiplications and additions. No need of a special test signal, the introduced method is simple to implement and easy to operate.

  5. Mismatch of Cultural Dimensions in an Urban Medical Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Malone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify cultural dimensions and their potential mismatches between attending physicians and their residents and medical students. Methods. We surveyed faculty and students, both undergraduates and postgraduate resident physicians, at the SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, using Hofstede’s VSM-08 questionnaire, and calculated cultural dimensions, including the Power-Distance Index (PDI, Individualism (IDV, Masculinity (MAS, Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI, and Long-term Outlook (LTO. Correlations between faculty and student demographic data and cultural dimensions were calculated (SPSS. Results. There were 237 student and resident respondents and 96 faculty respondents. Comparing all faculty and student respondents, significant differences were found in four of five cultural dimensions, with faculty scoring higher in MAS, and lower in PDI, IDV, UAI, and LTO. Conclusions. These differences may be important in the design and implementation of a medical educational curriculum, and, particularly, in the measurement and evaluation of educational outcomes.

  6. Structural Study of Mismatched Disila-Crown Ether Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Reuter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mismatched complexes of the alkali metals cations Li+ and Na+ were synthesized from 1,2-disila[18]crown-6 (1 and 2 and of K+ from 1,2,4,5-tetrasila[18]crown-6 (4. In these alkali metal complexes, not all crown ether O atoms participate in the coordination, which depicts the coordination ability of the C-, Si/C-, and Si-bonded O atoms. Furthermore, the inverse case—the coordination of the large Ba2+ ion by the relatively small ligand 1,2-disila[15]crown-5—was investigated, yielding the dinuclear complex 5. This structure represents a first outlook on sandwich complexes based on hybrid crown ethers.

  7. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Variale

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571–1582 (1999 and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999, p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  8. Performance of mismatched Viterbi receiver on satellite channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, D.; Omura, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a satellite communication system using a Viterbi receiver. Here we have a bandlimited nonlinear channel where both uplink and downlink are taken into account as well as the effect of Intersymbol Interference, phase and time synchronization errors. In order that ISI can be combatted effectively, we use a Viterbi demodulator which is designed for the satellite channel when there is no uplink noise. The Viterbi demodulator for the channels with large memory is too complex to be implemented. To reduce the complexity, a Viterbi demodulator with memory shorter than the true channel memory is used. The objective of this paper is to analyze the performance degradation of this 'Mismatched Viterbi Receiver' due to the uplink noise and memory truncation, and to understand how the time and phase synchronization errors influence the performance.

  9. An Index-Mismatch Scattering Approach to Optical Limiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Ferris, Kim F.; Windisch, Charles F.; Bozlee, Brian J.; Risser, Steven M.; Van Swam, Simone L.

    2001-08-01

    A densely packed bed of alkaline earth fluoride particles percolated by a fluid medium has been investigated as a potential index-matched optical limiter in the spirit of a Christiansen-Shelyubskii filter. Marked optical limiting was observed through this transparent medium under conditions where the focused second-harmonic output of a Q-swtiched Nd: YAG laser was on the order of about 1 J/cm2. An open-aperture Z-scan technique was used to quantify the limiting behavior. In this case, the mechanism of optical limiting is thought to be a nonlinear shift in the fluid index of refraction, resulting in an index mismatch between the disparate phases at high laser fluence.

  10. Efficient and reproducible identification of mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Halvarsson, Britta;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of mismatch-repair (MMR) defective colon cancer is clinically relevant for diagnostic, prognostic and potentially also for treatment predictive purposes. Preselection of tumors for MMR analysis can be obtained with predictive models, which need to demonstrate ease...... of application and favorable reproducibility. METHODS: We validated the MMR index for the identification of prognostically favorable MMR deficient colon cancers and compared performance to 5 other prediction models. In total, 474 colon cancers diagnosed ≥ age 50 were evaluated with correlation between...... and efficiently identifies MMR defective colon cancers with high sensitivity and specificity. The model shows stable performance with low inter-observer variability and favorable performance when compared to other MMR predictive models....

  11. Transgenic Mice with −6A Haplotype of the Human Angiotensinogen Gene Have Increased Blood Pressure Compared with −6G Haplotype*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir; Tillinger, Andrej; Mopidevi, Brahmaraju; Pandey, Varunkumar G.; Chauhan, Chetankumar K.; Fiering, Steven N.; Warming, Soren; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is a serious risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene locus is associated with human essential hypertension. The human AGT (hAGT) gene has an A/G polymorphism at −6, and the −6A allele is associated with increased blood pressure. However, transgenic mice containing 1.2 kb of the promoter with −6A of the hAGT gene show neither increased plasma AGT level nor increased blood pressure compared with −6G. We have found that the hAGT gene has three additional SNPs (A/G at −1670, C/G at −1562, and T/G at −1561). Variants −1670A, −1562C, and −1561T almost always occur with −6A, and variants −1670G, −1562G, and −1561G almost always occur with −6G. Therefore, the hAGT gene may be subdivided into either −6A or −6G haplotypes. We show that these polymorphisms affect the binding of HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor to the promoter, and a reporter construct containing a 1.8-kb hAGT gene promoter with −6A haplotype has 4-fold increased glucocorticoid-induced promoter activity as compared with −6G haplotype. In order to understand the physiological significance of these haplotypes in an in vivo situation, we have generated double transgenic mice containing either the −6A or −6G haplotype of the hAGT gene and the human renin gene. Our ChIP assay shows that HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor have stronger affinity for the chromatin obtained from the liver of transgenic mice containing −6A haplotype. Our studies also show that transgenic mice containing −6A haplotype have increased plasma AGT level and increased blood pressure as compared with −6G haplotype. Our studies explain the molecular mechanism involved in association of the −6A allele of the hAGT gene with hypertension. PMID:20978123

  12. Mitochondrial DNA haplotyping of Testudo graeca on both continental sides of the Straits of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Y; Mateo, J A; Andreu, A C; Díaz-Paniagua, C; Diez, A; Bautista, J M

    2000-01-01

    Testudo graeca is an endangered species of tortoise that inhabits Mediterranean areas of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Western populations are found on both sides of the Straits of Gibraltar. The effects of geographical isolation on genetic divergence were assessed by the sequence analysis of two mitochondrial DNA regions of the 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes. Four different haplotypes were identified. A single haplotype was shared by all Spanish and some east Moroccan specimens. Two haplotypes were unique to the west Moroccan T. graeca populations and allowed the clear discrimination between individual specimens found west of the Moulouya River. Phylogenetic analysis based on the estimation of nucleotide sequence distances of the haplotypes suggests an African origin for the Spanish populations and a subspecies status for the west Moroccan pool.

  13. Haplotypes on pig chromosome 3 distinguish metabolically healthy from unhealthy obese individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Simona Denise; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Pant, Sameer D.

    2017-01-01

    association (GWA) to identify loci with effect on blood lipid levels. The most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used for linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analyses. Three separate haploblocks which influence the ratio between high density lipoprotein cholesterol...

  14. Analysis of 24 Y-STR haplotype data in a Chinese Han population from Guangdong Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Chu-chu; Li, Ran; Liu, Hong; Ou, Xue-ling; Li, Hai-xia; Sun, Hong-yu

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the genetic polymorphisms of 24 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci in 885 unrelated Chinese Han male individuals from Guangdong Province, using a domestic AGCU Y24 STR kit. A total of 878 different haplotypes were observed at the 24 Y-STR loci; among them, 871 haplotypes were unique and 7 haplotypes occurred twice. The overall haplotype diversity was 0.99998 and the discrimination capacity was 99.2%. The gene diversity values ranged from 0.4354 at DYS438 to 0.9606 at DYS385a/b. Population relationships between the Guangdong Han population and seven other published Chinese populations were evaluated by Rst values and visualized in a two multi-dimensional scaling plot. The results showed the 24 Y-STR loci are highly polymorphic in Guangdong Han population and of great value in forensic application.

  15. Atypical beta(s) haplotypes are generated by diverse genetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M A; Silva, W A; Dalle, B; Gualandro, S; Hutz, M H; Lapoumeroulie, C; Tavella, M H; Araujo, A G; Krieger, J E; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    2000-02-01

    The majority of the chromosomes with the beta(S) gene have one of the five common haplotypes, designated as Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian haplotypes. However, in every large series of sickle cell patients, 5-10% of the chromosomes have less common haplotypes, usually referred to as "atypical" haplotypes. In order to explore the genetic mechanisms that could generate these atypical haplotypes, we extended our analysis to other rarely studied polymorphic markers of the beta(S)-gene cluster, in a total of 40 chromosomes with uncommon haplotypes from Brazil and Cameroon. The following polymorphisms were examined: seven restriction site polymorphisms of the epsilongammadeltabeta-cluster, the pre-(G)gamma framework sequence including the 6-bp deletion/insertion pattern, HS-2 LCR (AT)xR(AT)y and pre-beta (AT)xTy repeat motifs, the GC/TT polymorphism at -1105-1106 of (G)gamma-globin gene, the C/T polymorphism at -551 of the beta-globin gene, and the intragenic beta-globin gene framework. Among the Brazilian subjects, the most common atypical structure (7/16) was a Bantu 3'-subhaplotype associated with different 5'-sequences, while in two chromosomes a Benin 3'-subhaplotype was associated with two different 5'-subhaplotypes. A hybrid Benin/Bantu configuration was also observed. In three chromosomes, the atypical haplotype differed from the typical one by the change of a single restriction site. In 2/134 chromosomes identified as having a typical Bantu RFLP-haplotype, a discrepant LCR repeat sequence was observed, probably owing to a crossover 5' to the epsilon-gene. Among 80 beta(S) chromosomes from Cameroon, 22 were associated with an atypical haplotype. The most common structure was represented by a Benin haplotype (from the LCR to the beta-gene) with a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In two cases a Bantu LCR was associated with a Benin haplotype and a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In three other cases, a more complex

  16. Phenological mismatch and the effectiveness of assisted gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadgymar, Susana M; Weis, Arthur E

    2017-06-01

    The persistence of narrowly adapted species under climate change will depend on their ability to migrate apace with their historical climatic envelope or to adapt in place to maintain fitness. This second path to persistence can only occur if there is sufficient genetic variance for response to new selection regimes. Inadequate levels of genetic variation can be remedied through assisted gene flow (AGF), that is the intentional introduction of individuals genetically adapted to localities with historic climates similar to the current or future climate experienced by the resident population. However, the timing of reproduction is frequently adapted to local conditions. Phenological mismatch between residents and migrants can reduce resident × migrant mating frequencies, slowing the introgression of migrant alleles into the resident genetic background and impeding evolutionary rescue efforts. Focusing on plants, we devised a method to estimate the frequency of resident × migrant matings based on flowering schedules and applied it in an experiment that mimicked the first generation of an AGF program with Chamaecrista fasciculata, a prairie annual, under current and expected future temperature regimes. Phenological mismatch reduced the potential for resident × migrant matings by 40-90%, regardless of thermal treatment. The most successful migrant sires were the most resident like in their flowering time, further biasing the genetic admixture between resident and migrant populations. Other loci contributing to local adaptation-heat-tolerance genes, for instance-may be in linkage disequilibrium with phenology when residents and migrants are combined into a single mating pool. Thus, introgression of potentially adaptive migrant alleles into the resident genetic background is slowed when selection acts against migrant phenology. Successful AGF programs may require sustained high immigration rates or preliminary breeding programs when phenologically matched migrant

  17. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  18. Beta-thalassemia and beta[A] globin gene haplotypes in Mexican mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Arámbula, A R; Bustos, R; Casas-Castañeda, M; Gutiérrez, E; Perea, F J; Thein, S L; Ibarra, B

    1997-04-01

    B-globin haplotypes of 20 beta-thalassemia (beta-thal) and 87 beta(A) Mexican mestizo chromosomes were analyzed to ascertain the origin of the beta-thal alleles and the frequencies and distribution of the beta(A) haplotypes among northwestern Mexican mestizos. Sixteen beta-thal chromosomes carried six Mediterranean alleles [five codon 39 C-->T; two IVS1:1 G-->A; two IVS1:5 G-->A; three IVS1:110 G(A; one codon 11 (-T) and three (deltabeta)zero-thal]; the remaining four were linked to three rare alleles (two -28 A-->C and one each: -87 C-->T and initiation codon ATG-->GTG). Among the 87 beta(A) chromosomes, 17 different 5' haplotypes with frequencies for 1, 3, 2 and 5 of 39.0%, 17. 2%, 9.2% and 6.9%, respectively, were observed. The beta-haplotype analysis showed that 13 out of 16 Mediterranean chromosomes could easily be explained by gene migration; however, one codon 39 associated with haplotype 4 (----+ +-), one IVS1:1 with haplotype 1(+----++) and one IVS1:5 G-->A, may represent separate mutational events. Analysis of the rare alleles showed that the -28 A-->C mutation was associated with the commonest beta(A) haplotype in Mexican mestizos, Mediterraneans and the total world population; therefore an independent origin cannot be ruled out. The -87 C-->T and initiation codon ATG-->GTG were found with beta-haplotypes different from the reported ones, suggesting an indigenous origin.

  19. Prognostic importance of VEGF-A haplotype combinations in a stage II colon cancer population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Frifeldt, Sanne; Fredslund, Rikke; Lindebjerg, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients.......To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients....

  20. An Efficient Trio-Based Mini-Haplotyping Method for Genetic Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Talebi; Mona Entezam; Neda Mohajer; Golnaz-Ensieh Kazemi-sefat; Masoumeh Razipour; Somayeh Ahmadloo; Aria Setoodeh; Mohammad Keramatipour

    2016-01-01

    Objective The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus has high linkage disequilibrium. Haplotypes related to this locus may thus be considered sufficiently informative for genetic diagnosis and carrier screening using multi-allelic markers. In this study, we present an efficient method for haplotype analysis of PAH locus using multiplexing dyes. In addition, we explain how to resolve the dye shift challenge in multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping. Materials and Methods One...

  1. Fetal Haemoglobin and β-globin Gene Cluster Haplotypes among Sickle Cell Patients in Chhattisgarh

    OpenAIRE

    Bhagat, Sanjana; Patra, Pradeep Kumar; Thakur, Amar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Foetal Haemoglobin (HbF) is the best-known genetic modulator of sickle cell anaemia, which varies dramatically in concentration in the blood of these patients. The patients with SCA display a remarkable variability in the disease severity. High HbF levels and the β-globin gene cluster haplotypes influence the clinical presentation of sickle cell disease. To identify the genetic modifiers which influence the disease severity, we conducted a β-globin haplotype analysis in the sickle...

  2. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-α-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30%–80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained vir...

  3. Haplotypes of the porcine peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene are associated with backfat thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blöcker Helmut

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-inducible transcription factors. It is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene (PPARD has been assigned to a region on porcine chromosome 7, which harbours a quantitative trait locus for backfat. Thus, PPARD is considered a functional and positional candidate gene for backfat thickness. The purpose of this study was to test this candidate gene hypothesis in a cross of breeds that were highly divergent in lipid deposition characteristics. Results Screening for genetic variation in porcine PPARD revealed only silent mutations. Nevertheless, significant associations between PPARD haplotypes and backfat thickness were observed in the F2 generation of the Mangalitsa × Piétrain cross as well as a commercial German Landrace population. Haplotype 5 is associated with increased backfat in F2 Mangalitsa × Piétrain pigs, whereas haplotype 4 is associated with lower backfat thickness in the German Landrace population. Haplotype 4 and 5 carry the same alleles at all but one SNP. Interestingly, the opposite effects of PPARD haplotypes 4 and 5 on backfat thickness are reflected by opposite effects of these two haplotypes on PPAR-δ mRNA levels. Haplotype 4 significantly increases PPAR-δ mRNA levels, whereas haplotype 5 decreases mRNA levels of PPAR-δ. Conclusion This study provides evidence for an association between PPARD and backfat thickness. The association is substantiated by mRNA quantification. Further studies are required to clarify, whether the observed associations are caused by PPARD or are the result of linkage disequilibrium with a causal variant in a neighbouring gene.

  4. The association between paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme 4 gene haplotype and diastolic blood pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建平; 王晓滨; 陈常忠; 徐新; 洪雪梅; 徐希平; 高炜; 霍勇

    2004-01-01

    Background In a previously identified locus linked to hypertension on chromosome 15q, we identified three blood pressure candidate genes: insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor gene (IGF1R), myocyte specific enhancer factor 2A gene (MEF2A), and paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme 4 gene (PACE4). In this study, we tested their associations with hypertension using haplotype analysis.Methods A total of 288 unrelated individuals, including 163 high diastolic blood pressure (DBP) subjects and 125 normal DBP subjects were enrolled in this case-control study. Twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the three genes were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Haplotype analysis was accomplished in the following stages: (1) pair-wise linkage disequilibrium test among SNPs on the same gene was performed to explore blocks in which recombination is very unlikely to happen; (2) Estimation-Maximization algorithm was applied to estimate haplotype frequencies in each block; (3) the chi-square test was used to examine the specific haplotype difference, and a permutation test was used to examine the overall haplotype profile difference between cases and controls in each block.Results An estimated haplotype "CCCCG" frequency in the haplotype block on the PACE4 gene was significantly higher in high DBP cases than in controls (P<0.01). The overall estimated haplotype profile in this block was also significantly different between the cases and the controls (P<0.001). This association indicates. Conclusions This study for the first time demonstrated that PACE4 gene may play an important role in the regulation of DBP. This association indicates that variations influencing DBP resides in or near this genomic region.

  5. Mining of haplotype-based expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chunxian; Gmitter Jr, Fred G

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the most abundant variations in a genome, have been widely used in various studies. Detection and characterization of citrus haplotype-based expressed sequence tag (EST) SNPs will greatly facilitate further utilization of these gene-based resources. Results In this paper, haplotype-based SNPs were mined out of publicly available citrus expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from different citrus cultivars (genotypes) individually and collectively for...

  6. Educational mismatches for second generation migrants. An analysis of applied science graduates in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, Swantje; Meng, Christoph; Nollen, Romy

    2016-01-01

    Educational mismatches, i.e. diferences between the education attained and required for a job have been found to negatively affect earnings and job satisfaction and thus lead to a lower return to education. In this paper we aim to see whether immigrants are more prone to educational mismatches and

  7. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ Bound to RNA Mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Anna J.; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA, but also in RNA. PMID:23968195

  8. Analytical Expressions for Harmonic Distortion at Low Frequencies due to Device Mismatch in CMOS Current Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1999-01-01

    One of the origins of harmonic distortion in current mirrors is the inevitable mismatch between the mirror transistors. In this brief we examine both single current mirrors and complementary class AB current mirrors and develop analytical expressions for the mismatch induced harmonic distortion. ...

  9. Are Educational Mismatches Responsible for the "Inequality Increasing Effect" of Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budria, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks whether educational mismatches can account for the positive association between education and wage inequality found in the data. We use two different data sources, the European Community Household Panel and the Portuguese Labour Force Survey, and consider several types of mismatch, including overqualification, underqualification…

  10. Phenological mismatch and ontogenetic diet shifts interactively affect offspring condition in a passerine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samplonius, Jelmer M.; Kappers, Elena F.; Brands, Stef; Both, Christiaan

    1. Climate change may cause phenological asynchrony between trophic levels, which can lead to mismatched reproduction in animals. Although indirect effects of mismatch on fitness are well described, direct effects on parental prey choice are not. Moreover, direct effects of prey variation on

  11. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-04

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity.

  12. A mismatch characterization and simulation environment for weak-to-strong inversion CMOS transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde-Ramirez, J.; Vicente-Sanchez, G.; Serrano-Gotarredona, T.; Linares-Barranco, B.

    2005-06-01

    Mismatch analysis and simulation is crucial for modern analog design with submicron technologies, where transistors tend to be biased in weak and moderate inversion regions because of the down shrinking of power supply voltage. For optimum analog design where speed, power consumption, area, noise, and accuracy need to be carefully traded off, it is crucial to have available a precise estimation of transistor mismatch in order to avoid overdesign and consequently sacrify unnecessarily speed, power consumption, and area. In this paper we will provide experimental mismatch measurements of different 0.35um CMOS technologies. Each technology has been characterized for a large number of transistor sizes (25-30), by sweeping different width and length values. A large number of transistor curves are measured ranging over different possible biasing conditions. A recent mismatch model will be used to fit the data, and extract electrical parameters. Some of those parameters will be used to adjust the measured mismatch. As a result, a set of standard deviations and correlation coefficients result for the statistical characterization of the mismatch responsible parameters. The resulting electrical parameters, and statistical mismatch parameters are then used in the Spectre simulator of Cadence design environment, to implement the mismatch models using the AHDL behavioral level Spectre description language. The paper shows good agreement between measured data, predicted data, and simulated data.

  13. Rare missense variants within a single gene form yin yang haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David

    2016-01-01

    Yin yang haplotype pairs differ at every SNP. They would not be accounted for by population models that incorporate sequential mutation, with or without recombination. Previous reports have claimed that there is a tendency for common SNPs to form yin yang haplotypes more often than would be expected by sequential mutation or by a random sample of all possible haplotypic arrangements of alleles. In the course of analysing next-generation sequencing data, instances of yin yang haplotypes being formed by very rare variants within a single gene were observed. As an example, this report describes a completely yin yang haplotype formed by eight rare missense variants in the ABCA13 gene. Of 1000 genome subjects, 21 have a copy of the alternate allele at all eight of these positions and a single subject is homozygous for all of them. None of the other 1070 subjects possesses any of the altetrnates. Thus, the eight alternate alleles are always found together and never occur separately. The existence of such yin yang haplotypes has important implications for statistical methods for analysing rare variants. Also, they may be of use for gaining a better understanding of the history of human populations.

  14. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in Hungarian Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Bodoki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness. Our aim was to identify a correlation between VDR polymorphisms or haplotypes and myositis. We studied VDR-BsmI, VDR-ApaI, VDR-TaqI, and VDR-FokI polymorphisms and haplotypes in 89 Hungarian poly-/dermatomyositis patients (69 females and 93 controls (52 females. We did not obtain any significant differences for VDR-FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI genotypes and allele frequencies between patients with myositis and healthy individuals. There was no association of VDR polymorphisms with clinical manifestations and laboratory profiles in myositis patients. Men with myositis had a significantly different distribution of BB, Bb, and bb genotypes than female patients, control male individuals, and the entire control group. Distribution of TT, Tt, and tt genotypes was significantly different in males than in females in patient group. According to four-marker haplotype prevalence, frequencies of sixteen possible haplotypes showed significant differences between patient and control groups. The three most frequent haplotypes in patients were the fbAt, FBaT, and fbAT. Our findings may reveal that there is a significant association: Bb and Tt genotypes can be associated with myositis in the Hungarian population we studied. We underline the importance of our result in the estimated prevalence of four-marker haplotypes.

  15. Mitochondrial haplotypes reveal a strong genetic structure for three Indian sheep breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, V C; Kadoo, N Y; Sainani, M N; Meadows, J R S; Kijas, J W; Gupta, V S

    2007-10-01

    This survey represents the first characterization of mitochondrial DNA diversity within three breeds of Indian sheep (two strains of the Deccani breed, as well as the Bannur and Garole breeds) from different geographic regions and with divergent phenotypic characteristics. A 1061-bp fragment of the mitochondrial genome spanning the control region, a portion of the 12S rRNA gene and the complete phenyl tRNA gene, was sequenced from 73 animals and compared with the corresponding published sequence from European and Asian breeds and the European Mouflon (Ovis musimon). Analysis of all 156 sequences revealed 73 haplotypes, 52 of which belonged to the Indian breeds. The three Indian breeds had no haplotypes in common, but one Indian haplotype was shared with European and other Asian breeds. The highest nucleotide and haplotype diversity was observed in the Bannur breed (0.00355 and 0.981 respectively), while the minimum was in the Sangamneri strain of the Deccani breed (0.00167 and 0.882 respectively). All 52 Indian haplotypes belonged to mitochondrial lineage A. Therefore, these Indian sheep are distinct from other Asian and European breeds studied so far. The relationships among the haplotypes showed strong breed structure and almost no introgression among these Indian breeds, consistent with Indian sheep husbandry, which discourages genetic exchange between breeds. These results have implications for the conservation of India's ovine biodiversity and suggest a common origin for the breeds investigated.

  16. Genome-wide mapping of IBD segments in an Ashkenazi PD cohort identifies associated haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacic, Vladimir; Ozelius, Laurie J; Clark, Lorraine N; Bar-Shira, Anat; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Gurevich, Tanya; Gusev, Alexander; Kedmi, Merav; Kenny, Eimear E; Liu, Xinmin; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Mirelman, Anat; Raymond, Deborah; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Desnick, Robert J; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward R; Ostrer, Harry; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir; Darvasi, Ariel; Peter, Inga; Guha, Saurav; Lencz, Todd; Giladi, Nir; Marder, Karen; Pe'er, Itsik; Bressman, Susan B; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2014-09-01

    The recent series of large genome-wide association studies in European and Japanese cohorts established that Parkinson disease (PD) has a substantial genetic component. To further investigate the genetic landscape of PD, we performed a genome-wide scan in the largest to date Ashkenazi Jewish cohort of 1130 Parkinson patients and 2611 pooled controls. Motivated by the reduced disease allele heterogeneity and a high degree of identical-by-descent (IBD) haplotype sharing in this founder population, we conducted a haplotype association study based on mapping of shared IBD segments. We observed significant haplotype association signals at three previously implicated Parkinson loci: LRRK2 (OR = 12.05, P = 1.23 × 10(-56)), MAPT (OR = 0.62, P = 1.78 × 10(-11)) and GBA (multiple distinct haplotypes, OR > 8.28, P = 1.13 × 10(-11) and OR = 2.50, P = 1.22 × 10(-9)). In addition, we identified a novel association signal on chr2q14.3 coming from a rare haplotype (OR = 22.58, P = 1.21 × 10(-10)) and replicated it in a secondary cohort of 306 Ashkenazi PD cases and 2583 controls. Our results highlight the power of our haplotype association method, particularly useful in studies of founder populations, and reaffirm the benefits of studying complex diseases in Ashkenazi Jewish cohorts.

  17. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Haplotypes Are Associated with Preeclampsia in Maya Mestizo Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Olguín, Lizbeth; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Ramírez Regalado, Belem; Fernández, Genny; Canto, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a specific disease of pregnancy and believed to have a genetic component. The aim of this study was to investigate if three polymorphisms in eNOS or their haplotypes are associated with preeclampsia in Maya mestizo women. A case-control study was performed where 127 preeclamptic patients and 263 controls were included. Genotyped and haplotypes for the -768T→C, intron 4 variants, Glu298Asp of eNOS were determined by PCR and real-time PCR allelic discrimination. Logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI) was used to test for associations between genotype and preeclampsia under recessive, codominant and dominant models. Pairwise linkage disequilibrium between single nucleotide polymorphisms was calculated by direct correlation r2, and haplotype analysis was conducted. Women homozygous for the Asp298 allele showed an association of preeclampsia. In addition, analysis of the haplotype frequencies revealed that the -786C-4b-Asp298 haplotype was significantly more frequent in preeclamptic patients than in controls (0.143 vs. 0.041, respectively; OR = 3.01; 95% CI = 1.74–5.23; P = 2.9 × 10−4). Despite the Asp298 genotype in a recessive model associated with the presence of preeclampsia in Maya mestizo women, we believe that in this population the -786C-4b-Asp298 haplotype is a better genetic marker. PMID:21897002

  18. Extended haplotypes in rheumatoid arthritis and preliminary evidence for an interaction with immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, A; Briggs, D; Welsh, K; Jacoby, R; Williamson, E; Jones, V

    1986-06-01

    The incidence of extended haplotypes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex was compared between 20 probands with RA, their unaffected family members, and 42 controls. One haplotype only, HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2, was significantly increased in the patient group, whereas HLA-B7 BfS C4A*3 C4B*1 DR2 GLO1, which was the most common haplotype in the control groups, was absent. The immunoglobulin allotype Glm(2) was significantly increased in frequency in the RA patients, and analysis showed that of the seven patients carrying Bw62-DR4, five were G1m(2) positive. Further, the increase in frequency of the phenotype Gm(1,2,17,21,3,5,23) was also significant and was carried by two of four probands with the extended haplotype HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2 and by one proband also bearing this haplotype but with a null allele at the C4A locus. The striking association of G1m(2) and Bw62 with DR4 in our patients suggests that in interaction of immunoglobulin genes with DR4 is stronger when DR4 is associated with particular haplotypes rather than with DR4 in general.

  19. Contribution of haplotypes across the fibrinogen gene cluster to variation in risk of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannila, Maria Nastase; Eriksson, Per; Lundman, Pia; Samnegård, Ann; Boquist, Susanna; Ericsson, Carl-Göran; Tornvall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Silveira, Angela

    2005-03-01

    Fibrinogen has consistently been recognized as an independent predictor of myocardial infarction (MI). Multiple mechanisms link fibrinogen to MI; therefore disentangling the factors underlying variation in plasma fibrinogen concentration is essential. Candidate regions in the fibrinogen gamma (FGG), alpha (FGA) and beta (FGB) genes were screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Several novel SNPs were detected in the FGG and FGA genes in addition to the previously known SNPs in the fibrinogen genes. Tight linkage disequilibrium extending over various physical distances was observed between most SNPs. Consequently, eight SNPs were chosen and determined in 377 postinfarction patients and 387 healthy individuals. None of the SNPs were associated with plasma fibrinogen concentration or MI. Haplotype analyses revealed a consistent pattern of haplotypes associated with variation in risk of MI. Of the four haplotypes inferred using the FGA -58G>A and FGG 1299 +79T>C SNPs, the most frequent haplotype, FGG-FGA*1 (prevalence 46.6%), was associated with increased risk of MI (OR 1.51; 95%CI 1.18, 1.93), whereas the least frequent haplotype, FGG-FGA*4 (11.8%), was associated with lower risk of MI (OR 0.79 95%CI 0.64, 0.98). In conclusion, fibrinogen haplotypes, but not SNPs in isolation, are associated with variation in risk of MI.

  20. Triad of Risk for Late Onset Alzheimer’s: Mitochondrial Haplotype, APOE Genotype and Chromosomal Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Brinton, Roberta D.

    2016-01-01

    Brain is the most energetically demanding organ of the body, and is thus vulnerable to even modest decline in ATP generation. Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are associated with decline in mitochondrial function, e.g., Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and multiple neuropathies. Genetic variances in the mitochondrial genome can modify bioenergetic and respiratory phenotypes, at both the cellular and system biology levels. Mitochondrial haplotype can be a key driver of mitochondrial efficiency. Herein, we focus on the association between mitochondrial haplotype and risk of late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). Evidence for the association of mitochondrial genetic variances/haplotypes and the risk of developing LOAD are explored and discussed. Further, we provide a conceptual framework that suggests an interaction between mitochondrial haplotypes and two demonstrated risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype and chromosomal sex. We posit herein that mitochondrial haplotype, and hence respiratory capacity, plays a key role in determining risk of LOAD and other age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Further, therapeutic design and targeting that involve mitochondrial haplotype would advance precision medicine for AD and other age related neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Minor differences in haplotype frequency estimates can produce very large differences in heterogeneity test statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ke

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tests for association between a haplotype and disease are commonly performed using a likelihood ratio test for heterogeneity between case and control haplotype frequencies. Using data from a study of association between heroin dependence and the DRD2 gene, we obtained estimated haplotype frequencies and the associated likelihood ratio statistic using two different computer programs, MLOCUS and GENECOUNTING. We also carried out permutation testing to assess the empirical significance of the results obtained. Results Both programs yielded similar, though not identical, estimates for the haplotype frequencies. MLOCUS produced a p value of 1.8*10-15 and GENECOUNTING produced a p value of 5.4*10-4. Permutation testing produced a p value 2.8*10-4. Conclusion The fact that very large differences occur between the likelihood ratio statistics from the two programs may reflect the fact that the haplotype frequencies for the combined group are not constrained to be equal to the weighted averages of the frequencies for the cases and controls, as they would be if they were directly observed rather than being estimated. Minor differences in haplotype frequency estimates can result in very large differences in the likelihood ratio statistic and associated p value.

  2. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (F ST = 0) and SAMOVA (F ST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding.

  3. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Gutiérrez-López

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations and genetic origin (based on a previous study. We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038. Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80 with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1 for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach and four genetic groups (genetic approach. This common haplotype (ancient derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (FST = 0 and SAMOVA (FST = 0.04393 results. One population (Mazatán showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding.

  4. Slam haplotype 2 promotes NKT but suppresses Vγ4+ T-cell activation in coxsackievirus B3 infection leading to increased liver damage but reduced myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sally Ann; Roberts, Brian; Moussawi, Mohamad; Boyson, Jonathan E

    2013-02-01

    There are two major haplotypes of signal lymphocytic activation molecule (Slam) in inbred mouse strains, with the Slam haplotype 1 expressed in C57Bl/6 mice and the Slam haplotype 2 expressed in most other commonly used inbred strains, including 129 mice. Because signaling through Slam family receptors can affect innate immunity [natural killer T cell (NKT) and γ-δ T-cell receptor], and innate immunity can determine susceptibility to coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection, the present study evaluated the response of C57Bl/6 and congenic B6.129c1 mice (expressing the 129-derived Slam locus) to CVB3. CVB3-infected C57Bl/6 male mice developed increased myocarditis but reduced hepatic injury compared with infected B6.129c1 mice. C57Bl/6 mice also had increased γδ(+) and CD8(+)interferon-γ(+) cells but decreased numbers of NKT (T-cell receptor β chain + mCD1d tetramer(+)) and CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells compared with B6.129c1 mice. C57Bl/6 mice were infected with CVB3 and treated with either α-galactosylceramide, an NKT cell-specific ligand, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide/PBS). Mice treated with α-galactosylceramide showed significantly reduced myocarditis. Liver injuries, as determined by alanine aminotransferase levels in plasma, were increased significantly, confirming that NKT cells are protective for myocarditis but pathogenic in the liver.

  5. Linkage Study Revealed Complex Haplotypes in a Multifamily due to Different Mutations in CAPN3 Gene in an Iranian Ethnic Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojbafan, Marzieh; Tonekaboni, Seyed Hassan; Abiri, Maryam; Kianfar, Soudeh; Sarhadi, Ameneh; Nilipour, Yalda; Tavakkoly-Bazzaz, Javad; Zeinali, Sirous

    2016-07-01

    Calpainopathy is an autosomal recessive form of limb girdle muscular dystrophies which is caused by mutation in CAPN3 gene. In the present study, co-segregation of this disorder was analyzed with four short tandem repeat markers linked to the CAPN3 gene. Three apparently unrelated Iranian families with same ethnicity were investigated. Haplotype analysis and sequencing of the CAPN3 gene were performed. DNA sample from one of the patients was simultaneously sent for next-generation sequencing. DNA sequencing identified two mutations. It was seen as a homozygous c.2105C>T in exon 19 in one family, a homozygous novel mutation c.380G>A in exon 3 in another family, and a compound heterozygote form of these two mutations in the third family. Next-generation sequencing also confirmed our results. It was expected that, due to the rare nature of limb girdle muscular dystrophies, affected individuals from the same ethnic group share similar mutations. Haplotype analysis showed two different homozygote patterns in two families, yet a compound heterozygote pattern in the third family as seen in the mutation analysis. This study shows that haplotype analysis would help in determining presence of different founders.

  6. Refined candidate region specified by haplotype sharing for Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac susceptibility alleles in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, M; Kracht, S S; Esteso, G; Cirera, S; Edfors, I; Archibald, A L; Bendixen, C; Andersson, L; Fredholm, M; Jørgensen, C B

    2010-02-01

    Infection of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab/ac is a major welfare problem and financial burden for the pig industry. Natural resistance to this infection is inherited as a Mendelian recessive trait, and a polymorphism in the MUC4 gene segregating for susceptibility/resistance is presently used in a selection programme by the Danish pig breeding industry. To elucidate the genetic background involved in E. coli F4ab/ac susceptibility in pigs, a detailed haplotype map of the porcine candidate region was established. This region covers approximately 3.7 Mb. The material used for the study is a three generation family, where the founders are two Wild boars and eight Large White sows. All pigs have been phenotyped for susceptibility to F4ab/ac using an adhesion assay. Their haplotypes are known from segregation analysis using flanking markers. By a targeted approach, the candidate region was subjected to screening for polymorphisms, mainly focusing on intronic sequences. A total of 18 genes were partially sequenced, and polymorphisms were identified in GP5, CENTB2, APOD, PCYT1A, OSTalpha, ZDHHC19, TFRC, ACK1, MUC4, MUC20, KIAA0226, LRCH3 and MUC13. Overall, 227 polymorphisms were discovered in the founder generation. The analysis revealed a large haplotype block, spanning at least 1.5 Mb around MUC4, to be associated with F4ab/ac susceptibility.

  7. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  8. Compensation of IQ mismatch in optical PDM-OFDM coherent receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hwan Seok; Chang, Sun Hyok; Kim, Kwangjoon

    2010-10-01

    The performance enhancements based on Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization procedure (GSOP) for compensating IQ mismatch in coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) systems are investigated. We analytically explore IQ mismatch in optical OFDM systems and investigate the impacts of phase and amplitude IQ mismatch on required optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) for the different values of data mapping and polarization multiplexing. The impacts of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) resolution and the number of samples in GSOP are also evaluated. The results show that the GSOP operation efficiently compensate IQ mismatch induced performance degradations regardless of the amount of IQ phase mismatch, density of data mapping, and polarization multiplexing.

  9. Electrochemical Investigation of Interaction between a Bifunctional Probe and GG Mismatch Duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-01-01

    A bifunctional probe (FecNC), containing a recognition part and an electrochemical active center, was applied to electrochemical detection of GG mismatch duplexes. The preparation of gold electrodes modified by mismatch and complementatry duplexes was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and optimized for better detection in terms of self-assembly time, hybridization time, and incubation time. The interaction between FecNC and DNA duplexes modified on the surface of a gold electrode was explored by square wave voltammetry (SWV) and EIS. The results showed that the DNA duplexes with GG mismatch on the surface of a gold electrode was easily detected by the largest electrochemical signal of the bifunctional probe because of its selective binding to GG mismatches. The bifunctional probe could offer a simple, effective electrochemical detection of GG mismatches, and theoretical bases for development of electrochemical biosensors. Further, the method would be favorable for diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  10. Sequence Variants and Haplotype Analysis of Cat ERBB2 Gene: A Survey on Spontaneous Cat Mammary Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara; Bastos, Estela; Baptista, Cláudia S.; Sá, Daniela; Caloustian, Christophe; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Gärtner, Fátima; Gut, Ivo G.; Chaves, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The human ERBB2 proto-oncogene is widely considered a key gene involved in human breast cancer onset and progression. Among spontaneous tumors, mammary tumors are the most frequent cause of cancer death in cats and second most frequent in humans. In fact, naturally occurring tumors in domestic animals, more particularly cat mammary tumors, have been proposed as a good model for human breast cancer, but critical genetic and molecular information is still scarce. The aims of this study include the analysis of the cat ERBB2 gene partial sequences (between exon 17 and 20) in order to characterize a normal and a mammary lesion heterogeneous populations. Cat genomic DNA was extracted from normal frozen samples (n = 16) and from frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded mammary lesion samples (n = 41). We amplified and sequenced two cat ERBB2 DNA fragments comprising exons 17 to 20. It was possible to identify five sequence variants and six haplotypes in the total population. Two sequence variants and two haplotypes show to be specific for cat mammary tumor samples. Bioinformatics analysis predicts that four of the sequence variants can produce alternative transcripts or activate cryptic splicing sites. Also, a possible association was identified between clinicopathological traits and the variant haplotypes. As far as we know, this is the first attempt to examine ERBB2 genetic variations in cat mammary genome and its possible association with the onset and progression of cat mammary tumors. The demonstration of a possible association between primary tumor size (one of the two most important prognostic factors) and the number of masses with the cat ERBB2 variant haplotypes reveal the importance of the analysis of this gene in veterinary medicine. PMID:22489125

  11. The favorable role of homozygosity for killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR A haplotype in patients with advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio La Nasa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interim positron emission tomography after 2 cycles of ABVD (iPET-2 is a good predictor of outcome in advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma. So far, there are no other prognostic biomarkers capable of identifying chemotherapy refractory patients with comparable accuracy. Despite the considerable amount of evidence suggesting that antitumor immune surveillance is downregulated in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, few data exist on the impairment of natural killer cell function and the role of their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs. Methods We investigated KIR gene frequencies, KIR haplotypes, and KIR-ligand combinations in a cohort of 135 patients with advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma and 221 healthy controls. We furthermore evaluated the correlation of KIR genes and KIR haplotypes with the achievement of negative iPET-2. Results In the cohort of patients, the 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival were 93.6 and 79 %, respectively. Homozygosity for KIR A haplotype and the HLA-C1 KIR ligand (KIR-AA/C1C1 was significantly higher in healthy controls (15.7 vs. 4.8 %, p = 0.001. The KIR-AA genotype resulted to have a significant predictive power for achieving iPET-2 negativity (p = 0.039. Conclusions Homozygosity for KIR A haplotype offers protection against classic Hodgkin lymphoma. The association found for the KIR-AA genotype and achievement of negative iPET-2 suggests that KIR-AA could be used in clinical practice to enhance the chemosensitivity predictive power of iPET-2. Our results point to the possibility of adapting treatment strategies based on the combination of KIR biomarkers and PET scan.

  12. Enhanced annealing of mismatched oligonucleotides using a novel melting curve assay allows efficient in vitro discrimination and restriction of a single nucleotide polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many SNP discrimination strategies employ natural restriction endonucleases to discriminate between allelic states. However, SNPs are often not associated with a restriction site and therefore, a number of attempts have been made to generate sequence-adaptable restriction endonucleases. In this study, a simple, sequence-adaptable SNP discrimination mechanism between a 'wild-type' and 'mutant' template is demonstrated. This model differs from other artificial restriction endonuclease models as cis- rather than trans-orientated regions of single stranded DNA were generated and cleaved, and therefore, overcomes potential issues of either inefficient or non-specific binding when only a single variant is targeted. Results A series of mismatch 'bubbles' that spanned 0-5-bp surrounding a point mutation was generated and analysed for sensitivity to S1 nuclease. In this model, generation of oligonucleotide-mediated ssDNA mismatch 'bubbles' in the presence of S1 nuclease resulted in the selective degradation of the mutant template while maintaining wild-type template integrity. Increasing the size of the mismatch increased the rate of mutant sequence degradation, until a threshold above which discrimination was lost and the wild-type sequence was degraded. This level of fine discrimination was possible due to the development of a novel high-resolution melting curve assay to empirically determine changes in Tm (~5.0°C per base-pair mismatch and to optimise annealing conditions (~18.38°C below Tm of the mismatched oligonucleotide sets. Conclusions The in vitro 'cleavage bubble' model presented is sequence-adaptable as determined by the binding oligonucleotide, and hence, has the potential to be tailored to discriminate between any two or more SNPs. Furthermore, the demonstrated fluorometric assay has broad application potential, offering a rapid, sensitive and high-throughput means to determine Tm and annealing rates as an alternative

  13. Phylogeographic analyses of Phragmites australis in China: Native distribution and habitat preference of the haplotype that invaded North America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Xing AN; Qian WANG; Ji YANG; Jian-Quan LIU

    2012-01-01

    Phragmites australis is a cosmopolitan clonal species,but one haplotype from Eurasia has become highly invasive in North America.This article describes an investigation of the phylogeographic composition of 77 populations from China,based on the sequencing of two chloroplast non-coding DNA regions.A total of 11 haplotypes were detected,based on the sequence alignments of two chloroplast DNA fragments from 421 sampled individuals.Six of these haplotypes were completely new,and did not correspond to any of this species' 27 previously known haplotypes.The invasive haplotype M and haplotypes O and P were shown to occur frequently.Haplotype O is widely distributed across all regions and probably represents the primitive haplotype of this species.In contrast,P is mainly distributed in the humid eastern and northeastern regions of China,whereas M is more frequent in western and northwestern China— arid habitats with low precipitation.Between eastern and northeastern and western and northwestern regions,there was distinct genetic differentiation; the former region has a higher genetic diversity than the latter.The high occurrence of haplotype M in western China suggests that it prefers more arid habitats.These findings shed new light on the native distribution,adaptation,and habitat preference of haplotype M,which invaded North America.

  14. Class II genes of miniature swine. II. Molecular identification and characterization of B (beta) genes from the SLAc haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, K; Sachs, D H; Germana, S; el-Gamil, M; Hirsch, F; Gustafsson, K; LeGuern, C

    1990-01-01

    Genomic clones corresponding to class II beta genes of the SLAc haplotype of miniature swine have been isolated and characterized. These genes have been grouped into seven non-overlapping clusters on the basis of restriction mapping. Ordering of exons within each cluster was accomplished by hybridization of Southern blots of restriction fragments with exon-specific probes. The two clusters (clusters 2 and 3) encoding the DRB and DQB genes were identified on the basis of hybridization with locus-specific 3' untranslated cDNA probes. Cluster 4 contained exons of both DOB and DQB genes, the basis for which remains to be determined. The remaining four clusters (1, 5, 6, 7) were identified as containing DP, DR, and DO coding sequences, respectively, on the basis of sequence analysis. The porcine class II region appears very similar to that of man in number and nature of the class II genes identified and in the intron/exon organization of corresponding genes.

  15. Effects of IL-10 haplotype and atomic bomb radiation exposure on gastric cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Ito, Reiko; Cologne, John; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Imai, Kazue; Yoshida, Kengo; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Ohishi, Waka; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakachi, Kei

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the cancers that reveal increased risk of mortality and incidence in atomic bomb survivors. The incidence of gastric cancer in the Life Span Study cohort of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) increased with radiation dose (gender-averaged excess relative risk per Gy = 0.28) and remains high more than 65 years after exposure. To assess a possible role of gene-environment interaction, we examined the dose response for gastric cancer incidence based on immunosuppression-related IL-10 genotype, in a cohort study with 200 cancer cases (93 intestinal, 96 diffuse and 11 other types) among 4,690 atomic bomb survivors participating in an immunological substudy. Using a single haplotype block composed of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (comprising the major haplotype allele IL-10-ATTA and the minor haplotype allele IL-10-GGCG, which are categorized by IL-10 polymorphisms at -819A>G and -592T>G, +1177T>C and +1589A>G), multiplicative and additive models for joint effects of radiation and this IL-10 haplotyping were examined. The IL-10 minor haplotype allele(s) was a risk factor for intestinal type gastric cancer but not for diffuse type gastric cancer. Radiation was not associated with intestinal type gastric cancer. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the haplotype-specific excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation was statistically significant only in the major homozygote category of IL-10 (ERR = 0.46/Gy, P = 0.037), whereas estimated ERR for radiation with the minor IL-10 homozygotes was close to 0 and nonsignificant. Thus, the minor IL-10 haplotype might act to reduce the radiation related risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. The results suggest that this IL-10 haplotyping might be involved in development of radiation-associated gastric cancer of the diffuse type, and that IL-10 haplotypes may explain individual differences in the radiation-related risk of gastric cancer. © 2013 by Radiation Research Society

  16. Common haplotype dependency of high G gamma-globin gene expression and high Hb F levels in beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Labie, D; Pagnier, J.; Lapoumeroulie, C; Rouabhi, F; Dunda-Belkhodja, O; Chardin, P; Beldjord, C; Wajcman, H; Fabry, M E; Nagel, R L

    1985-01-01

    We have studied 42 homozygous beta-thalassemia patients from Algeria and 34 sickle cell anemia patients from Senegal and Benin, determining the relationship between haplotypes, Hb F, and G gamma-globin/A gamma-globin ratios. Populations selected have a high frequency of haplotype homozygotes because of consanguinity (Algeria) and geographic homogeneity (West Africa). We find in beta-thalassemia patients, that haplotype IX in haplotypic homozygotes and heterozygotes, haplotype III in heterozyg...

  17. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R B; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are kno...... to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain...

  18. Powerful haplotype-based Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests for tightly linked loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Gao Mao

    Full Text Available Recently, there have been many case-control studies proposed to test for association between haplotypes and disease, which require the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE assumption of haplotype frequencies. As such, haplotype inference of unphased genotypes and development of haplotype-based HWE tests are crucial prior to fine mapping. The goodness-of-fit test is a frequently-used method to test for HWE for multiple tightly-linked loci. However, its degrees of freedom dramatically increase with the increase of the number of loci, which may lack the test power. Therefore, in this paper, to improve the test power for haplotype-based HWE, we first write out two likelihood functions of the observed data based on the Niu's model (NM and inbreeding model (IM, respectively, which can cause the departure from HWE. Then, we use two expectation-maximization algorithms and one expectation-conditional-maximization algorithm to estimate the model parameters under the HWE, IM and NM models, respectively. Finally, we propose the likelihood ratio tests LRT[Formula: see text] and LRT[Formula: see text] for haplotype-based HWE under the NM and IM models, respectively. We simulate the HWE, Niu's, inbreeding and population stratification models to assess the validity and compare the performance of these two LRT tests. The simulation results show that both of the tests control the type I error rates well in testing for haplotype-based HWE. If the NM model is true, then LRT[Formula: see text] is more powerful. While, if the true model is the IM model, then LRT[Formula: see text] has better performance in power. Under the population stratification model, LRT[Formula: see text] is still more powerful. To this end, LRT[Formula: see text] is generally recommended. Application of the proposed methods to a rheumatoid arthritis data set further illustrates their utility for real data analysis.

  19. Haplotype association analyses in resources of mixed structure using Monte Carlo testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomewide association studies have resulted in a great many genomic regions that are likely to harbor disease genes. Thorough interrogation of these specific regions is the logical next step, including regional haplotype studies to identify risk haplotypes upon which the underlying critical variants lie. Pedigrees ascertained for disease can be powerful for genetic analysis due to the cases being enriched for genetic disease. Here we present a Monte Carlo based method to perform haplotype association analysis. Our method, hapMC, allows for the analysis of full-length and sub-haplotypes, including imputation of missing data, in resources of nuclear families, general pedigrees, case-control data or mixtures thereof. Both traditional association statistics and transmission/disequilibrium statistics can be performed. The method includes a phasing algorithm that can be used in large pedigrees and optional use of pseudocontrols. Results Our new phasing algorithm substantially outperformed the standard expectation-maximization algorithm that is ignorant of pedigree structure, and hence is preferable for resources that include pedigree structure. Through simulation we show that our Monte Carlo procedure maintains the correct type 1 error rates for all resource types. Power comparisons suggest that transmission-disequilibrium statistics are superior for performing association in resources of only nuclear families. For mixed structure resources, however, the newly implemented pseudocontrol approach appears to be the best choice. Results also indicated the value of large high-risk pedigrees for association analysis, which, in the simulations considered, were comparable in power to case-control resources of the same sample size. Conclusions We propose hapMC as a valuable new tool to perform haplotype association analyses, particularly for resources of mixed structure. The availability of meta-association and haplotype-mining modules in

  20. Functional promoter haplotypes of interleukin-18 condition susceptibility to severe malarial anemia and childhood mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyona, Samuel B; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Raballah, Evans; Ouma, Collins; Were, Tom; Davenport, Gregory C; Konah, Stephen N; Vulule, John M; Hittner, James B; Gichuki, Charity W; Ong'echa, John M; Perkins, Douglas J

    2011-12-01

    Severe malarial anemia (SMA) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children residing in regions where Plasmodium falciparum transmission is holoendemic. Although largely unexplored in children with SMA, interleukin-18 (IL-18) is important for regulating innate and acquired immunity in inflammatory and infectious diseases. As such, we selected two functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-18 promoter (-137G→C [rs187238] and -607C→A [rs1946518]) whose haplotypes encompass significant genetic variation due to the presence of strong linkage disequilibrium among these variants. The relationship between the genotypes/haplotypes, SMA (hemoglobin [Hb], sickle cell trait, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, HIV-1, and bacteremia revealed that carriage of the -607AA genotype was associated with protection against SMA (odds ratio [OR] = 0.440 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 0.21 to 0.90], P = 0.031) in children with acute infection. In contrast, carriers of the -137G/-607C (GC) haplotype had increased susceptibility to SMA (OR = 2.050 [95% CI = 1.04 to 4.05], P = 0.039). Measurement of IL-18 gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes demonstrated that elevated IL-18 transcripts were associated with reduced hemoglobin concentrations (ρ = -0.293, P = 0.010) and that carriers of the "susceptible" GC haplotype had elevated IL-18 transcripts (P = 0.026). Longitudinal investigation of clinical outcomes over a 3-year follow-up period revealed that carriers of the rare CC haplotype (∼1% frequency) had 5.76 times higher mortality than noncarriers (P = 0.001). Results presented here demonstrate that IL-18 promoter haplotypes that condition elevated IL-18 gene products during acute infection are associated with increased risk of SMA. Furthermore, carriage of the rare CC haplotype significantly increases the risk of childhood mortality.

  1. IL7Rα expression and upregulation by IFNβ in dendritic cell subsets is haplotype-dependent.

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    Fiona C McKay

    Full Text Available The IL7Rα gene is unequivocally associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS. Haplotype 2 (Hap 2 confers protection from MS, and T cells and dendritic cells (DCs of Hap 2 exhibit reduced splicing of exon 6, resulting in production of relatively less soluble receptor, and potentially more response to ligand. We have previously shown in CD4 T cells that IL7Rα haplotypes 1 and 2, but not 4, respond to interferon beta (IFNβ, the most commonly used immunomodulatory drug in MS, and that haplotype 4 (Hap 4 homozygotes have the highest risk of developing MS. We now show that IL7R expression increases in myeloid cells in response to IFNβ, but that the response is haplotype-dependent, with cells from homozygotes for Hap 4 again showing no response. This was shown using freshly derived monocytes, in vitro cultured immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and by comparing homozygotes for the common haplotypes, and relative expression of alleles in heterozygotes (Hap 4 vs not Hap 4. As for T cells, in all myeloid cell subsets examined, Hap 2 homozygotes showed a trend for reduced splicing of exon 6 compared to the other haplotypes, significantly so in most conditions. These data are consistent with increased signaling being protective from MS, constitutively and in response to IFNβ. We also demonstrate significant regulation of immune response, chemokine activity and cytokine biosynthesis pathways by IL7Rα signaling in IFNβ -treated myeloid subsets. IFNβ-responsive genes are over-represented amongst genes associated with MS susceptibility. IL7Rα haplotype may contribute to MS susceptibility through reduced capacity for IL7Rα signalling in myeloid cells, especially in the presence of IFNβ, and is currently under investigation as a predictor of therapeutic response.

  2. Identification of the Mislabeled Breast Cancer Samples by Mitochondrial DNA Haplotyping

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    Xiaogang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The task to identify whether an archival malignant tumor specimen had been mislabeled or interchanged is a challenging one for forensic genetics. The nuclear DNA (nDNA markers were affected by the aberration of tumor cells, so they were not suitable for personal identification when the tumor tissues were tested. In this study, we focused on a new solution - mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism (mtSNP haplotyping by a multiplex SNaPshot assay. To validate our strategy of haplotyping with 25 mtSNPs, we analyzed 15 pairs of cancerous/healthy tissues taken from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. The haplotypes of all the fifteen breast cancer tissues were matched with their paired breast tissues. The heteroplasmy at 2 sites, 14783A/G and 16519C/T was observed in one breast tissue, which indicated a mixture of related mitochondrial haplotypes. However, only one haplotype was retained in the paired breast cancer tissue, which could be considered the result of proliferation of tumor subclone. The allele drop-out and allele drop-in were observed when 39 STRs and 20 tri-allelic SNPs of nDNA were applied. Compared to nDNA markers applied, 25 mtSNPs were more stable without interference from aberrance of breast cancer. Also, two cases were presented where the investigation of haplotype with 25 mtSNPs was used to prove the origin of biopsy specimen with breast cancer. The mislabeling of biopsy specimen with breast cancer could be certified in one case but could not be supported in the other case. We highlight the importance of stability of mtSNP haplotype in breast cancer. It was implied that our multiplex SNaPshot assay with 25 mtSNPs was a useful strategy to identify mislabeled breast cancer specimen.

  3. Role of CYP1A1 haplotypes in modulating susceptibility to coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Sana Venkata Vijaya; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Saumya, Kankanala; Rao, Damera Seshagiri; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the role of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) haplotypes in modulating susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD), a case-control study was conducted by enrolling 352 CAD cases and 282 healthy controls. PCR-RFLP, multiplex PCR, competitive ELISA techniques were employed for the analysis of CYP1A1 [ml (T-->C), m2 (A-->G) and m4 (C-->A)] haplotypes, glutathione-S-transferase (GST)T1/GSTM1 null variants and plasma 8-oxo-2'deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) respectively. Two CYP1A1 haplotypes, i.e. CAC and TGC showed independent association with CAD risk, while all-wild CYP1A1 haplotype i.e. TAC showed reduced risk for CAD. All the three variants showed mild linkage disequilibrium (D': 0.05 to 0.17). GSTT1 null variant also exerted independent association with CAD risk (OR: 2.53, 95% CI 1.55-4.12). Among the conventional risk factors, smoking showed synergetic interaction with CAC haplotype of CYP1A1 and GSTT1 null genotype in inflating CAD risk. High risk alleles of this pathway showed dose-dependent association with percentage of stenosis and number of vessels affected. Elevated 8-oxodG levels were observed in subjects with CYP1A1 CAC haplotype and GSTT1 null variant. Multiple linear regression model of these xenobiotic variants explained 36% variability in 8-oxodG levels. This study demonstrated the association of CYP1A1 haplotypes and GSTT1 null variant with CAD risk and this association was attributed to increased oxidative DNA damage.

  4. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Leland J.; Im, KyungAh; Borg, Brian; Yang, Huiying; Liang, T. Jake

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-α-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30%–80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained viral response (SVR) to therapy for chronic HCV infection. We observed the IL-6 T-T-G-G-G-G-C-A-G-A haplotype to be associated with a lower risk of achieving SVR among Caucasian Americans (CAs) (RR=0.80; 95%C.I.: 0.66– 0.98; p=0.0261). Using a sliding window approach, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.79; 95%C.I.: 0.66–0.94; p=0.0081), as was the rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G)-rs2069830-(C) haplotype (RR=0.78; 95%C.I.: 0.66–0.94; p=0.0065) among CAs. Overall, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was independently associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.78; 95% C.I.: 0.62–1.0; p=0.0489) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Our findings further illustrate the complexity of IL-6 genetic regulation and the potential importance of haplotypes on IL-6 expression. Our findings provide additional support for the potential importance of genetic variation in the IL-6 gene and the response to HCV therapy. PMID:19387461

  5. Interleukin-6 haplotypes and the response to therapy of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, L J; Im, K; Borg, B; Yang, H; Liang, T J

    2009-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects nearly 170 million individuals worldwide. Treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon-alpha-2a is successful in eradicating virus from only 30 to 80% of those treated. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine involved in the immune response to infectious agents and in vitro studies suggest that host genetic variation, particularly haplotypes, may affect IL-6 expression. We examined the contribution of haplotypes in the IL-6 gene on sustained viral response (SVR) to the therapy for chronic HCV infection. We observed the IL-6 T-T-G-G-G-G-C-A-G-A haplotype to be associated with a lower risk of achieving SVR among Caucasian Americans (CAs) ((relative risk) RR=0.80; 95% CI: 0.66-0.98; P=0.0261). Using a sliding window approach, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.66-0.94; P=0.0081), as was the rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G)-rs2069830-(C) haplotype (RR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.66-0.94; P=0.0065) among CAs. Overall, the rs1800797-(G)-rs1800796-(G)-rs1800795-(G) haplotype was independently associated with a reduced chance of SVR (RR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.62-1.0; P=0.0489) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Our findings further illustrate the complexity of IL-6 genetic regulation and the potential importance of haplotypes on IL-6 expression. Our findings provide additional support for the potential importance of genetic variation in the IL-6 gene and the response to HCV therapy.

  6. Empirical vs Bayesian approach for estimating haplotypes from genotypes of unrelated individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of the HapMap project has stimulated further development of haplotype-based methodologies for disease associations. A key aspect of such development is the statistical inference of individual diplotypes from unphased genotypes. Several methodologies for inferring haplotypes have been developed, but they have not been evaluated extensively to determine which method not only performs well, but also can be easily incorporated in downstream haplotype-based association analyses. In this paper, we attempt to do so. Our evaluation was carried out by comparing the two leading Bayesian methods, implemented in PHASE and HAPLOTYPER, and the two leading empirical methods, implemented in PL-EM and HPlus. We used these methods to analyze real data, namely the dense genotypes on X-chromosome of 30 European and 30 African trios provided by the International HapMap Project, and simulated genotype data. Our conclusions are based on these analyses. Results All programs performed very well on X-chromosome data, with an average similarity index of 0.99 and an average prediction rate of 0.99 for both European and African trios. On simulated data with approximation of coalescence, PHASE implementing the Bayesian method based on the coalescence approximation outperformed other programs on small sample sizes. When the sample size increased, other programs performed as well as PHASE. PL-EM and HPlus implementing empirical methods required much less running time than the programs implementing the Bayesian methods. They required only one hundredth or thousandth of the running time required by PHASE, particularly when analyzing large sample sizes and large umber of SNPs. Conclusion For large sample sizes (hundreds or more, which most association studies require, the two empirical methods might be used since they infer the haplotypes as accurately as any Bayesian methods and can be incorporated easily into downstream haplotype

  7. Understanding the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns of malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockham, Carinna; Piel, Frédéric B; Gupta, Sunetra; Penman, Bridget S

    2015-12-01

    The malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms, sickle-cell (β(S)) and β(0)-thalassaemia, are canonical examples of human adaptation to infectious disease. Occurring on distinct genetic backgrounds, they vary markedly in their patterns of linked genetic variation at the population level, suggesting different evolutionary histories. β(S) is associated with five classical restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotypes that exhibit remarkable specificity in their geographical distributions; by contrast, β(0)-thalassaemia mutations are found on haplotypes whose distributions overlap considerably. Here, we explore why these two polymorphisms display contrasting spatial haplotypic distributions, despite having malaria as a common selective pressure. We present a meta-population genetic model, incorporating individual-based processes, which tracks the evolution of β-globin polymorphisms on different haplotypic backgrounds. Our simulations reveal that, depending on the rate of mutation, a large population size and/or high population growth rate are required for both the β(S)- and the β(0)-thalassaemia-like patterns. However, whilst the β(S)-like pattern is more likely when population subdivision is high, migration low and long-distance migration absent, the opposite is true for β(0)-thalassaemia. Including gene conversion has little effect on the overall probability of each pattern; however, when inter-haplotype fitness variation exists, gene conversion is more likely to have contributed to the diversity of haplotypes actually present in the population. Our findings highlight how the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns exhibited by β(S) and β(0)-thalassaemia may provide important indications as to the evolution of these adaptive alleles and the demographic history of the populations in which they have evolved.

  8. Structural basis of transcription: Mismatch-specific fidelity mechanisms and paused RNA polymerase II with frayed RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sydow, J.; Brueckner, F.; Cheung, A; Damsma, G.; Dengl, S.; Lehmann, E.; Vassylyev, D.; Cramer, P

    2009-01-01

    We show that RNA polymerase (Pol) II prevents erroneous transcription in vitro with different strategies that depend on the type of DNA,RNA base mismatch. Certain mismatches are efficiently formed but impair RNA extension. Other mismatches allow for RNA extension but are inefficiently formed and efficiently proofread by RNA cleavage. X-ray analysis reveals that a T,U mismatch impairs RNA extension by forming a wobble base pair at the Pol II active center that dissociates the catalytic metal i...

  9. Characterisation of SNP haplotype structure in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes using CEPH pedigrees and statistical estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Vanessa J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokine signals and their cell-surface receptors are important modulators of HIV-1 disease and cancer. To aid future case/control association studies, aim to further characterise the haplotype structure of variation in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes. To perform haplotype analysis in a population-based association study, haplotypes must be determined by estimation, in the absence of family information or laboratory methods to establish phase. Here, test the accuracy of estimates of haplotype frequency and linkage disequilibrium by comparing estimated haplotypes generated with the expectation maximisation (EM algorithm to haplotypes determined from Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH pedigree data. To do this, they have characterised haplotypes comprising alleles at 11 biallelic loci in four chemokine receptor genes (CCR3, CCR2, CCR5 and CCRL2, which span 150 kb on chromosome 3p21, and haplotyes of nine biallelic loci in six chemokine genes [MCP-1(CCL2, Eotaxin(CCL11, RANTES(CCL5, MPIF-1(CCL23, PARC(CCL18 and MIP-1α(CCL3 ] on chromosome 17q11-12. Forty multi-generation CEPH families, totalling 489 individuals, were genotyped by the TaqMan 5'-nuclease assay. Phased haplotypes and haplotypes estimated from unphased genotypes were compared in 103 grandparents who were assumed to have mated at random. For the 3p21 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data, haplotypes determined by pedigree analysis and haplotypes generated by the EM algorithm were nearly identical. Linkage disequilibrium, measured by the D' statistic, was nearly maximal across the 150 kb region, with complete disequilibrium maintained at the extremes between CCR3-Y17Y and CCRL2-1243V. D'-values calculated from estimated haplotypes on 3p21 had high concordance with pairwise comparisons between pedigree-phased chromosomes. Conversely, there was less agreement between analyses of haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium using estimated haplotypes when

  10. Quality of Experience for Large Ultra-High-Resolution Tiled Displays with Synchronization Mismatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Sachin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates to quality of experience when viewing images, video, or other content on large ultra-high-resolution displays made from individual display tiles. We define experiments to measure vernier acuity caused by synchronization mismatch for moving images. The experiments are used to obtain synchronization mismatch acuity threshold as a function of object velocity and as a function of occlusion or gap width. Our main motivation for measuring the synchronization mismatch vernier acuity is its relevance in the application of tiled display systems, which create a single contiguous image using individual discrete panels arranged in a matrix with each panel utilizing a distributed synchronization algorithm to display parts of the overall image. We also propose a subjective assessment method for perception evaluation of synchronization mismatch for large ultra-high-resolution tiled displays. For this, we design a synchronization mismatch measurement test video set for various tile configurations for various interpanel synchronization mismatch values. The proposed method for synchronization mismatch perception can evaluate tiled displays with or without tile bezels. The results from this work can help during design of low-cost tiled display systems, which utilize distributed synchronization mechanisms for a contiguous or bezeled image display.

  11. Strong position-dependent effects of sequence mismatches on signal ratios measured using long oligonucleotide microarrays

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    Hulme Helen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an important and widely used tool. Applications include capturing genomic DNA for high-throughput sequencing in addition to the traditional monitoring of gene expression and identifying DNA copy number variations. Sequence mismatches between probe and target strands are known to affect the stability of the probe-target duplex, and hence the strength of the observed signals from microarrays. Results We describe a large-scale investigation of microarray hybridisations to murine probes with known sequence mismatches, demonstrating that the effect of mismatches is strongly position-dependent and for small numbers of sequence mismatches is correlated with the maximum length of perfectly matched probe-target duplex. Length of perfect match explained 43% of the variance in log2 signal ratios between probes with one and two mismatches. The correlation with maximum length of perfect match does not conform to expectations based on considering the effect of mismatches purely in terms of reducing the binding energy. However, it can be explained qualitatively by considering the entropic contribution to duplex stability from configurations of differing perfect match length. Conclusion The results of this study have implications in terms of array design and analysis. They highlight the significant effect that short sequence mismatches can have upon microarray hybridisation intensities even for long oligonucleotide probes. All microarray data presented in this study are available from the GEO database 1, under accession number [GEO: GSE9669

  12. Low-Complexity Estimation of CFO and Frequency Independent I/Q Mismatch for OFDM Systems

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    Jayalath ADS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available CFO and I/Q mismatch could cause significant performance degradation to OFDM systems. Their estimation and compensation are generally difficult as they are entangled in the received signal. In this paper, we propose some low-complexity estimation and compensation schemes in the receiver, which are robust to various CFO and I/Q mismatch values although the performance is slightly degraded for very small CFO. These schemes consist of three steps: forming a cosine estimator free of I/Q mismatch interference, estimating I/Q mismatch using the estimated cosine value, and forming a sine estimator using samples after I/Q mismatch compensation. These estimators are based on the perception that an estimate of cosine serves much better as the basis for I/Q mismatch estimation than the estimate of CFO derived from the cosine function. Simulation results show that the proposed schemes can improve system performance significantly, and they are robust to CFO and I/Q mismatch.

  13. A novel approach to rapid determination of betaS-globin haplotypes: sequencing of the Agamma-IVS-II region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Amy E; Walker, Aisha; Elam, Dedrey; Glendenning, Michele; Kutlar, Ferdane; Clair, Betsy; Harbin, Jeanette; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2004-01-01

    beta-Globin gene cluster haplotypes were originally determined by restriction endonuclease mapping with Southern blots of polymorphic sites around the gene cluster. Over the years, haplotyping has been found to be useful, not only in population genetics but also in predicting the severity of hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease. The sickle mutation occurs on five distinct haplotypes. The hitherto used methods are cumbersome and time-consuming, making haplotype determination a tedious procedure. We report our experience with a novel, rapid approach to haplotyping based on sequence polymorphisms in the Agamma-IVS-II region. We provide an algorithm that allows rapid assignment of the four African haplotypes carrying the sickle mutation.

  14. Mismatch repair status and synchronous metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Morton, Dion

    2015-01-01

    The causality between the metastatic potential, mismatch repair status (MMR) and survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex. This study aimed to investigate the impact of MMR in CRC on the occurrence of synchronous metastases (SCCM) and survival in patients with SCCM on a national basis....... A nationwide cohort study of 6,692 patients diagnosed with CRC between 2010 and 2012 was conducted. Data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database and merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable and multinomial...... metastases (aOR = 0.69, 95% CI:0.26-1.29, p = 0.436) were unaffected by MMR. MMR in patients with SCCM had no impact on survival (Cox: adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.54-1.06, p = 0.101; Proportional excess hazards: aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.50-1.07, p = 0.111) when adjusting for other prognostic...

  15. Mismatch negativity of ERP in cross-modal attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗跃嘉; 魏景汉

    1997-01-01

    Event-related potentials were measured in 12 healthy youth subjects aged 19-22 using the paradigm "cross-modal and delayed response" which is able to improve unattended purity and to avoid the effect of task target on the deviant components of ERP. The experiment included two conditions: (i) Attend visual modality, ignore auditory modality; (ii) attend auditory modality, ignore visual modality. The stimuli under the two conditions were the same. The difference wave was obtained by subtracting ERPs of the standard stimuli from that of the deviant stim-uli. The present results showed that mismatch negativity (MMN), N2b and P3 components can be produced in the auditory and visual modalities under attention condition. However, only MMN was observed in the two modalities un-der inattention condition. Auditory and visual MMN have some features in common: their largest MMN wave peaks were distributed respectively over their primary sensory projection areas of the scalp under attention condition, but over front

  16. Neural mechanisms of mismatch negativity dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Sehatpour, P; Hoptman, M J; Lakatos, P; Dias, E C; Kantrowitz, J T; Martinez, A M; Javitt, D C

    2017-02-07

    Schizophrenia is associated with cognitive deficits that reflect impaired cortical information processing. Mismatch negativity (MMN) indexes pre-attentive information processing dysfunction at the level of primary auditory cortex. This study investigates mechanisms underlying MMN impairments in schizophrenia using event-related potential, event-related spectral decomposition (ERSP) and resting state functional connectivity (rsfcMRI) approaches. For this study, MMN data to frequency, intensity and duration-deviants were analyzed from 69 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls. rsfcMRI was obtained from a subsample of 38 patients and 23 controls. As expected, schizophrenia patients showed highly significant, large effect size (P=0.0004, d=1.0) deficits in MMN generation across deviant types. In ERSP analyses, responses to deviants occurred primarily the theta (4-7 Hz) frequency range consistent with distributed corticocortical processing, whereas responses to standards occurred primarily in alpha (8-12 Hz) range consistent with known frequencies of thalamocortical activation. Independent deficits in schizophrenia were observed in both the theta response to deviants (P=0.021) and the alpha-response to standards (P=0.003). At the single-trial level, differential patterns of response were observed for frequency vs duration/intensity deviants, along with At the network level, MMN deficits engaged canonical somatomotor, ventral attention and default networks, with a differential pattern of engagement across deviant types (PMolecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.3.

  17. Mammalian mismatches in nucleotide metabolism: implications for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalpey, Zain; Yuen, Ada H Y; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; McGregor, Christopher G A; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2007-10-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) limits the clinical application of animal organs for xenotransplantation. Mammalian disparities in nucleotide metabolism may contribute significantly to the microvascular component in AHR; these, however remain ill-defined. We evaluated the extent of species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism. HPLC analysis was performed on venous blood samples (nucleotide metabolites) and heart biopsies (purine enzymes) from wild type mice, rats, pigs, baboons, and human donors.Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E5'N) activities were 4-fold lower in pigs and baboon hearts compared to human and mice hearts while rat activity was highest. Similar differences between pigs and humans were also observed with kidneys and endothelial cells. More than 10-fold differences were observed with other purine enzymes. AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity was exceptionally high in mice but very low in pig and baboon hearts. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was highest in baboons. Adenosine kinase (AK) activity was more consistent across different species. Pig blood had the highest levels of hypoxanthine, inosine and adenine. Human blood uric acid concentration was almost 100 times higher than in other species studied. We conclude that species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism may affect compatibility of pig organs within a human metabolic environment. Furthermore, nucleotide metabolic mismatches may affect clinical relevance of animal organ transplant models. Supplementation of deficient precursors or application of inhibitors of nucleotide metabolism (e.g., allopurinol) or transgenic upregulation of E5'N may overcome some of these differences.

  18. Parametric Adaptive Radar Detector with Enhanced Mismatched Signals Rejection Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of adaptive signal detection in the presence of Gaussian noise with unknown covariance matrix. We propose a parametric radar detector by introducing a design parameter to trade off the target sensitivity with sidelobes energy rejection. The resulting detector merges the statistics of Kelly's GLRT and of the Rao test and so covers Kelly's GLRT and the Rao test as special cases. Both invariance properties and constant false alarm rate (CFAR behavior for this detector are studied. At the analysis stage, the performance of the new receiver is assessed and compared with several traditional adaptive detectors. The results highlight better rejection capabilities of this proposed detector for mismatched signals. Further, we develop two two-stage detectors, one of which consists of an adaptive matched filter (AMF followed by the aforementioned detector, and the other is obtained by cascading a GLRT-based Subspace Detector (SD and the proposed adaptive detector. We show that the former two-stage detector outperforms traditional two-stage detectors in terms of selectivity, and the latter yields more robustness.

  19. Systematic misestimation in a vernier task arising from contrast mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Lee, Barry B; Baraas, Rigmor C

    2008-01-01

    Luminance signals mediated by the magnocellular (MC) pathway play an important role in vernier tasks. MC ganglion cells show a phase advance in their responses to sinusoidal stimuli with increasing contrast due to contrast gain control mechanisms. If the phase information in MC ganglion cell responses were utilized by central mechanisms in vernier tasks, one might expect systematic errors caused by the phase advance. This systematic error may contribute to the contrast paradox phenomenon, where vernier performance deteriorates, rather than improves, when only one of the target pair increases in contrast. Vernier psychometric functions for a pair of gratings of mismatched contrast were measured to seek such misestimation. In associated electrophysiological experiments, MC and parvocellular (PC) ganglion cells' responses to similar stimuli were measured to provide a physiological reference. The psychophysical experiments show that a high-contrast grating is perceived as phase advanced in the drift direction compared to a low-contrast grating, especially at a high drift rate (8 Hz). The size of the phase advance was comparable to that seen in MC cells under similar stimulus conditions. These results are consistent with the MC pathway supporting vernier performance with achromatic gratings. The shifts in vernier psychometric functions were negligible for pairs of chromatic gratings under the conditions tested here, consistent with the lack of phase advance both in responses of PC ganglion cells and in frequency-doubled chromatic responses of MC ganglion cells.

  20. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J.; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J.; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy—projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  1. The Visual Mismatch Negativity Elicited with Visual Speech Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Files

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN, deriving from the brain’s response to stimulus deviance, is thought to be generated by the cortex that represents the stimulus. The vMMN response to visual speech stimuli was used in a study of the lateralization of visual speech processing. Previous research suggested that the right posterior temporal cortex has specialization for processing simple non-speech face gestures, and the left posterior temporal cortex has specialization for processing visual speech gestures. Here, visual speech consonant-vowel (CV stimuli with controlled perceptual dissimilarities were presented in an electroencephalography (EEG vMMN paradigm. The vMMNs were obtained using the comparison of event-related potentials (ERPs for separate CVs in their roles as deviant versus their roles as standard. Four separate vMMN contrasts were tested, two with the perceptually far deviants (i.e., zha or fa and two with the near deviants (i.e., zha or ta. Only far deviants evoked the vMMN response over the left posterior temporal cortex. All four deviants evoked vMMNs over the right posterior temporal cortex. The results are interpreted as evidence that the left posterior temporal cortex represents speech stimuli that are perceived as different consonants, and the right posterior temporal cortex represents face gestures that may not be discriminable as different CVs.

  2. Haplotypes at LBX1 have distinct inheritance patterns with opposite effects in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

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    Rakesh Chettier

    Full Text Available Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is a clinically significant disorder with high heritability that affects 2-4% of the population. Genome-wide association studies have identified LBX1 as a strong susceptibility locus for AIS in Asian and Caucasian populations. Here we further dissect the genetic association with AIS in a Caucasian population. To identify genetic markers associated with AIS we employed a genome-wide association study (GWAS design comparing 620 female Caucasian patients who developed idiopathic scoliosis during adolescence with 1,287 ethnically matched females who had normal spinal curves by skeletal maturity. The genomic region around LBX1 was imputed and haplotypes investigated for genetic signals under different inheritance models. The strongest signal was identified upstream of LBX1 (rs11190878, P(trend = 4.18 × 10(-9, OR = 0.63[0.54-0.74]. None of the remaining SNPs pass the genome-wide significance threshold. We found rs11190870, downstream of LBX1 and previously associated with AIS in Asian populations, to be in modest linkage disequilibrium (LD with rs11190878 (r(2 = 0.40, D' = 0.81. Haplotype analysis shows that rs11190870 and rs11190878 track a single risk factor that resides on the ancestral haplotype and is shared across ethnic groups. We identify six haplotypes at the LBX1 locus including two strongly associated haplotypes; a recessive risk haplotype (TTA, Control(freq = 0.52, P = 1.25 × 10(-9, OR = 1.56, and a co-dominant protective haplotype (CCG, Control(freq = 0.28, P = 2.75 × 10(-7, OR = 0.65. Together the association signals from LBX1 explain 1.4% of phenotypic variance. Our results identify two clinically relevant haplotypes in the LBX1-region with opposite effects on AIS risk. The study demonstrates the utility of haplotypes over un-phased SNPs for individualized risk assessment by more strongly delineating individuals at risk for AIS without compromising the effect size.

  3. Haplotypes at LBX1 have distinct inheritance patterns with opposite effects in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettier, Rakesh; Nelson, Lesa; Ogilvie, James W; Albertsen, Hans M; Ward, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a clinically significant disorder with high heritability that affects 2-4% of the population. Genome-wide association studies have identified LBX1 as a strong susceptibility locus for AIS in Asian and Caucasian populations. Here we further dissect the genetic association with AIS in a Caucasian population. To identify genetic markers associated with AIS we employed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) design comparing 620 female Caucasian patients who developed idiopathic scoliosis during adolescence with 1,287 ethnically matched females who had normal spinal curves by skeletal maturity. The genomic region around LBX1 was imputed and haplotypes investigated for genetic signals under different inheritance models. The strongest signal was identified upstream of LBX1 (rs11190878, P(trend) = 4.18 × 10(-9), OR = 0.63[0.54-0.74]). None of the remaining SNPs pass the genome-wide significance threshold. We found rs11190870, downstream of LBX1 and previously associated with AIS in Asian populations, to be in modest linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs11190878 (r(2) = 0.40, D' = 0.81). Haplotype analysis shows that rs11190870 and rs11190878 track a single risk factor that resides on the ancestral haplotype and is shared across ethnic groups. We identify six haplotypes at the LBX1 locus including two strongly associated haplotypes; a recessive risk haplotype (TTA, Control(freq) = 0.52, P = 1.25 × 10(-9), OR = 1.56), and a co-dominant protective haplotype (CCG, Control(freq) = 0.28, P = 2.75 × 10(-7), OR = 0.65). Together the association signals from LBX1 explain 1.4% of phenotypic variance. Our results identify two clinically relevant haplotypes in the LBX1-region with opposite effects on AIS risk. The study demonstrates the utility of haplotypes over un-phased SNPs for individualized risk assessment by more strongly delineating individuals at risk for AIS without compromising the effect size.

  4. Comparison of linkage disequilibrium and haplotype diversity on macro- and microchromosomes in chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muir William M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken (Gallus gallus, like most avian species, has a very distinct karyotype consisting of many micro- and a few macrochromosomes. While it is known that recombination frequencies are much higher for micro- as compared to macrochromosomes, there is limited information on differences in linkage disequilibrium (LD and haplotype diversity between these two classes of chromosomes. In this study, LD and haplotype diversity were systematically characterized in 371 birds from eight chicken populations (commercial lines, fancy breeds, and red jungle fowl across macro- and microchromosomes. To this end we sampled four regions of ~1 cM each on macrochromosomes (GGA1 and GGA2, and four 1.5 -2 cM regions on microchromosomes (GGA26 and GGA27 at a high density of 1 SNP every 2 kb (total of 889 SNPs. Results At a similar physical distance, LD, haplotype homozygosity, haploblock structure, and haplotype sharing were all lower for the micro- as compared to the macrochromosomes. These differences were consistent across populations. Heterozygosity, genetic differentiation, and derived allele frequencies were also higher for the microchromosomes. Differences in LD, haplotype variation, and haplotype sharing between populations were largely in line with known demographic history of the commercial chicken. Despite very low levels of LD, as measured by r2 for most populations, some haploblock structure was observed, particularly in the macrochromosomes, but the haploblock sizes were typically less than 10 kb. Conclusion Differences in LD between micro- and macrochromosomes were almost completely explained by differences in recombination rate. Differences in haplotype diversity and haplotype sharing between micro- and macrochromosomes were explained by differences in recombination rate and genotype variation. Haploblock structure was consistent with demography of the chicken populations, and differences in recombination rates between micro

  5. A comprehensive literature review of haplotyping software and methods for use with unrelated individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Rany M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interest in the assignment and frequency analysis of haplotypes in samples of unrelated individuals has increased immeasurably as a result of the emphasis placed on haplotype analyses by, for example, the International HapMap Project and related initiatives. Although there are many available computer programs for haplotype analysis applicable to samples of unrelated individuals, many of these programs have limitations and/or very specific uses. In this paper, the key features of available haplotype analysis software for use with unrelated individuals, as well as pooled DNA samples from unrelated individuals, are summarised. Programs for haplotype analysis were identified through keyword searches on PUBMED and various internet search engines, a review of citations from retrieved papers and personal communications, up to June 2004. Priority was given to functioning computer programs, rather than theoretical models and methods. The available software was considered in light of a number of factors: the algorithm(s used, algorithm accuracy, assumptions, the accommodation of genotyping error, implementation of hypothesis testing, handling of missing data, software characteristics and web-based implementations. Review papers comparing specific methods and programs are also summarised. Forty-six haplotyping programs were identified and reviewed. The programs were divided into two groups: those designed for individual genotype data (a total of 43 programs and those designed for use with pooled DNA samples (a total of three programs. The accuracy of programs using various criteria are assessed and the programs are categorised and discussed in light of: algorithm and method, accuracy, assumptions, genotyping error, hypothesis testing, missing data, software characteristics and web implementation. Many available programs have limitations (eg some cannot accommodate missing data and/or are designed with specific tasks in mind (eg estimating

  6. A linear-time algorithm for reconstructing zero-recombinant haplotype configuration on a pedigree

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background When studying genetic diseases in which genetic variations are passed on to offspring, the ability to distinguish between paternal and maternal alleles is essential. Determining haplotypes from genotype data is called haplotype inference. Most existing computational algorithms for haplotype inference have been designed to use genotype data collected from individuals in the form of a pedigree. A haplotype is regarded as a hereditary unit and therefore input pedigrees are preferred that are free of mutational events and have a minimum number of genetic recombinational events. These ideas motivated the zero-recombinant haplotype configuration (ZRHC) problem, which strictly follows the Mendelian law of inheritance, namely that one haplotype of each child is inherited from the father and the other haplotype is inherited from the mother, both without any mutation. So far no linear-time algorithm for ZRHC has been proposed for general pedigrees, even though the number of mating loops in a human pedigree is usually very small and can be regarded as constant. Results Given a pedigree with n individuals, m marker loci, and k mating loops, we proposed an algorithm that can provide a general solution to the zero-recombinant haplotype configuration problem in O(kmn + k2m) time. In addition, this algorithm can be modified to detect inconsistencies within the genotype data without loss of efficiency. The proposed algorithm was subject to 12000 experiments to verify its performance using different (n, m) combinations. The value of k was uniformly distributed between zero and six throughout all experiments. The experimental results show a great linearity in terms of execution time in relation to input size when both n and m are larger than 100. For those experiments where n or m are less than 100, the proposed algorithm runs very fast, in thousandth to hundredth of a second, on a personal desktop computer. Conclusions We have developed the first deterministic linear

  7. Capacitor Mismatch Error Cancellation Technique for a Successive Approximation A/D Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiliang; Moon, Un-Ku; Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    An error cancellation technique is described for suppressing capacitor mismatch in a successive approximation A/D converter. At the cost of a 50% increase in conversion time, the first-order capacitor mismatch error is cancelled. Methods for achieving top-plate parasitic insensitive operation...... are described, and the use of a gain- and offset-compensated opamp is explained. SWITCAP simulation results show that the proposed 16-bit SAR ADC can achieve an SNDR of over 91 dB under non-ideal conditions, including 1% 3 sigma nominal capacitor mismatch, 10-20% randomized parasitic capacitors, 66 dB opamp...

  8. Blind Decorrelating Detection Based on Particle Swarm Optimization under Spreading Code Mismatch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jhih-Chung Chang; Chih-Chang Shen

    2014-01-01

    A way of resolving spreading code mismatches in blind multiuser detection with a particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach is proposed. It has been shown that the PSO algorithm incorporating the linear system of the decorrelating detector, which is termed as decorrelating PSO (DPSO), can significantly improve the bit error rate (BER) and the system capacity. As the code mismatch occurs, the output BER performance is vulnerable to degradation for DPSO. With a blind decorrelating scheme, the proposed blind DPSO (BDPSO) offers more robust capabilities over existing DPSO under code mismatch scenarios.

  9. A Noise and Mismatches of Delay Cells and Their Effects on DLLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gholami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Jitter is one of the most important parameters in design of delay locked loop (DLL based frequency synthesizer. In this paper noise and mismatches of conventional delay cells which are mainly used in the DLLs architecture are introduced completely. First, time domain equations related to noise and mismatches of conventional delay cells are reported. Then, these equations are used to calculate jitter of DLL due to mismatch and noise of delay cells. At last closed form equations are obtained which can be used in the designing of low jitter DLLs. To validate these equations, a conventional DLL is designed in TSMC 0.18um CMOS Technology.

  10. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extened haplotype analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Kastner, D.L.; Gruberg, L.; Pras, M. (Heller Institute for Medical Research, Tel-Hashomer (Israel))

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated MEF') is on 16p, with the gene order 16 cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-16pter. Here the authors report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families 14 Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lowest haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Phylogeography of Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata) in the Japanese Archipelago based on chloroplast DNA haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Kanako; Kaneko, Yuko; Ito, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Sakio, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Wajiro; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Setoguchi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata: Hippocastanaceae) is one of the typical woody plants that grow in temperate riparian forests in the Japanese Archipelago. To analyze the phylogeography of this plant in the Japanese Archipelago, we determined cpDNA haplotypes for 337 samples from 55 populations covering the entire distribution range. Based on 1,313 bp of two spacers, we determined ten haplotypes that are distinguished from adjacent haplotypes by one or two steps. Most of the populations had a single haplotype, suggesting low diversity. Spatial analysis of molecular variance suggested three obvious phylogeographic structures in western Japan, where Japanese horse chestnut is scattered and isolated in mountainous areas. Conversely, no clear phylogeographic structure was observed from the northern to the southern limit of this species, including eastern Japan, where this plant is more common. Rare and private haplotypes were also found in southwestern Japan, where Japanese horse chestnuts are distributed sparsely. These findings imply that western Japan might have maintained a relatively large habitat for A. turbinata during the Quaternary climatic oscillations, while northerly regions could not.

  12. Conditional likelihood methods for haplotype-based association analysis using matched case-control data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinbo; Rodriguez, Carmen

    2007-12-01

    Genetic epidemiologists routinely assess disease susceptibility in relation to haplotypes, that is, combinations of alleles on a single chromosome. We study statistical methods for inferring haplotype-related disease risk using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data from matched case-control studies, where controls are individually matched to cases on some selected factors. Assuming a logistic regression model for haplotype-disease association, we propose two conditional likelihood approaches that address the issue that haplotypes cannot be inferred with certainty from SNP genotype data (phase ambiguity). One approach is based on the likelihood of disease status conditioned on the total number of cases, genotypes, and other covariates within each matching stratum, and the other is based on the joint likelihood of disease status and genotypes conditioned only on the total number of cases and other covariates. The joint-likelihood approach is generally more efficient, particularly for assessing haplotype-environment interactions. Simulation studies demonstrated that the first approach was more robust to model assumptions on the diplotype distribution conditioned on environmental risk variables and matching factors in the control population. We applied the two methods to analyze a matched case-control study of prostate cancer.

  13. Patterns of mitochondrial haplotype diversity in the invasive pest Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooman, Leah K; Rose, Caroline J; Carraher, Colm; Suckling, D Max; Paquette, Sébastien Rioux; Ledezma, Lisa A; Gilligan, Todd M; Epstein, Marc; Barr, Norman B; Newcomb, Richard D

    2011-06-01

    The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a horticultural pest of Australia and New Zealand that has more recently invaded Hawaii, Europe, and California. A 2,216-bp region of the mitochondrial genome containing the cytochrome oxidase I and II genes was sequenced from 752 individuals. Haplotype network analyses revealed a major split between a predominantly Western Australian clade and all other samples, suggestive of either a deep genetic divergence or a cryptic species. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were highest in the country of origin, Australia, and in New Zealand populations, with evidence of haplotype sharing between New Zealand and Tasmania. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were higher in California than within the British Isles or Hawaii. From the total of 96 haplotypes, seven were found in California, of which four were private. Within California, there have been at least two introductions; based on genetic diversity we were unable to assign a likely source for a single moth found and eradicated in Los Angeles in 2007; however, our data suggest it is unlikely that Hawaii and the British Isles are sources of the major E. postvittana population found throughout the rest of the state since 2006.

  14. SNP Analysis and Haplotype Identification in Chymotrypsin Inhibitor-2 (CI-2) Gene of Barley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xiang-hui; WEI Yu-ming; JIANG Qian-tao; QI Peng-fei; ZHENG You-liang

    2009-01-01

    Barley chymotrypsin inhibitor-2 (CI-2) was considered to be a promising candidate for enhancing the nutritional value of other cereals by increasing its concentration as it is rich in lysine than any other storage protein. Also, it was proposed that CI-2 might play an important role in the inhibition of proteolytic enzymes from pests or pathogens as CI-2 can strongly inhibit chymotrypsin and subtilisin. In this study, a total of 93 CI-2 gene sequences were isolated from wild and cultivated barley. 48 SNPs and 4 indels were detected across the entire sequences. The frequency of SNPs in the non-coding region (1 out of 9 bases) was slightly higher than that in the coding region (1 out of 10.7 bases). In all, 33.3% of the candidate cSNPs resulted in amino acid changes. As a total, the 24 cSNPs resulted in 15 amino acid changes. Ten distinguishable haplotypes were detected, among which 3 haplotypes were shared in the most barley accessions, whereas the rest of the haplotypes appeared at a lower frequency. In addition, three haplotypes (haplotype 4, 8, and 9) were unique for single accessions. These results suggested that low diversity at the CI-2 locus was detected among the cultivated and wild barley.

  15. PADI4 Haplotypes in Association with RA Mexican Patients, a New Prospect for Antigen Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Guadalupe Zavala-Cerna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptidyl arginine deiminase IV (PAD 4 is the responsible enzyme for a posttranslational modification called citrullination, originating the antigenic determinant recognized by anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA. Four SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms have been described in PADI4 gene to form a susceptibility haplotype for rheumatoid arthritis (RA; nevertheless, results in association studies appear contradictory in different populations. The aim of the study was to analyze if the presence of three SNPs in PADI4 gene susceptibility haplotype (GTG is associated with ACPA positivity in patients with RA. This was a cross-sectional study that included 86 RA patients and 98 healthy controls. Polymorphisms PADI4_89, PADI4_90, and PADI4_92 in the PADI4 gene were genotyped. The susceptibility haplotype (GTG was more frequent in RA patients; interestingly, we found a new haplotype associated with RA with a higher frequency (GTC. There were no associations between polymorphisms and high scores in Spanish HAQ-DI and DAS-28, but we did find an association between RARBIS index and PADI4_89, PADI4_90 polymorphisms. We could not confirm an association between susceptibility haplotype presence and ACPA positivity. Further evidence about proteomic expression of this gene will determine its participation in antigenic generation and autoimmunity.

  16. Molecular Pathology and Haplotype Analysis of Wilson Disease in Mediterranean Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figus, Annalena; Angius, Andrea; Loudianos, Georgios; Bertini, Chiara; Dessì, Valeria; Loi, Angela; Deiana, Manila; Lovicu, Mario; Olla, Nazario; Sole, Gabriella; De Virgiliis, Stefano; Lilliu, Franco; Farci, Anna Maria Giulia; Nurchi, Annamaria; Giacchino, Raffaella; Barabino, Arrigo; Marazzi, Maria; Zancan, Lucia; Greggio, Nella A.; Marcellini, Matilde; Solinas, Antonello; Deplano, Angelo; Barbera, Cristiana; Devoto, Marcella; Ozsoylu, Sinasi; Kocak, Nurten; Akar, Nejat; Karayalcin, Selin; Mokini, Vahe; Cullufi, Paskal; Balestrieri, Angelo; Cao, Antonio; Pirastu, Mario

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed mutations and defined the chromosomal haplotype in 127 patients of Mediterranean descent who were affected by Wilson disease (WD), 39 Sardinians, 49 Italians, 33 Turks, and 6 Albanians. Haplotypes were derived by use of the microsatellite markers D13S301, D13S296, D13S297, and D13S298, which are linked to the WD locus. There were five common haplotypes in Sardinians, three in Italians, and two in Turks, which accounted for 85%, 32%, and 30% of the WD chromosomes, respectively. We identified 16 novel mutations: 8 frameshifts, 7 missense mutations, and 1 splicing defect. In addition, we detected the previously described mutations: 2302insC, 3404delC, Argl320ter, Gly944-Ser, and Hisl070Gin. Of the new mutations detected, two, the 1515insT on haplotype I and 2464delC on haplotype XVI, accounted for 6% and 13%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromosomes in the Sardinian population. Mutations H1070Q, 2302insC, and 2533delA represented 13%, 8%, and 8%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromosomes in other Mediterranean populations. The remaining mutations were rare and limited to one or two patients from different populations. Thus, WD results from some frequent mutations and many rare defects. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:8533760

  17. Molecular pathology and haplotype analysis of Wilson disease in Mediterranean populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figus, A.; Farcia, A.M.G.; Nurchi, A. [Universita degli Studi di Cagliari (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We analyzed mutations and defined the chromosomal haplotype in 127 patients of Mediterranean descent who were affected in Wilson disease (WD): 39 Sardinians, 49 Italians, 33 Turks, and 6 Albanians. Haplotypes were derived by use of the microsatellite markers D13S301, D13S296, D13S297, and D13S298, which are linked to the WD locus. There were five common haplotypes in Sardinians, three in Italians, and two in Turks, which accounted for 85%, 32%, and 30% of the WD chromosomes, respectively. We identified 16 novel mutations: 8 frameshifts, 7 missense mutations, and 1 splicing defect. In addition, we detected the previously described mutations: 2302insC, 3404delC, Arg1320ter, Gly944Ser, and His1070Gin. Of the new mutations detected, two, the 1515insT on haplotype I and 2464delC on haplotype XVI, accounted for 6% and 13%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromsomes in the Sardinian populations. Mutations H1070Q, 2302insC, and 2533delA represented 13%, 8%, and 8%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromsomes in other Mediterranean populations. The remaining mutations were rare and limited to one or two patients from different populations. Thus, WD results from some frequent mutations and many rare defects. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the South American sea lion Otaria flavescens (Shaw, 1800

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Artico

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, is widely distributed along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of South America. However, along the Brazilian coast, there are only two nonbreeding sites for the species (Refúgio de Vida Silvestre da Ilha dos Lobos and Refúgio de Vida Silvestre do Molhe Leste da Barra do Rio Grande, both in Southern Brazil. In this region, the species is continuously under the effect of anthropic activities, mainly those related to environmental contamination with organic and inorganic chemicals and fishery interactions. This paper reports, for the first time, the genetic diversity of O. flavescens found along the Southern Brazilian coast. A 287-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop was analyzed. Seven novel haplotypes were found in 56 individuals (OFA1-OFA7, with OFA1 being the most frequent (47.54%. Nucleotide diversity was moderate (π = 0.62% and haplotype diversity was relatively low (67%. Furthermore, the median joining network analysis indicated that Brazilian haplotypes formed a reciprocal monophyletic clade when compared to the haplotypes from the Peruvian population on the Pacific coast. These two populations do not share haplotypes and may have become isolated some time back. Further genetic studies covering the entire species distribution are necessary to better understand the biological implications of the results reported here for the management and conservation of South American sea lions.

  19. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the South American sea lion Otaria flavescens (Shaw, 1800).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, L O; Bianchini, A; Grubel, K S; Monteiro, D S; Estima, S C; Oliveira, L R de; Bonatto, S L; Marins, L F

    2010-09-01

    The South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, is widely distributed along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of South America. However, along the Brazilian coast, there are only two nonbreeding sites for the species (Refúgio de Vida Silvestre da Ilha dos Lobos and Refúgio de Vida Silvestre do Molhe Leste da Barra do Rio Grande), both in Southern Brazil. In this region, the species is continuously under the effect of anthropic activities, mainly those related to environmental contamination with organic and inorganic chemicals and fishery interactions. This paper reports, for the first time, the genetic diversity of O. flavescens found along the Southern Brazilian coast. A 287-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed. Seven novel haplotypes were found in 56 individuals (OFA1-OFA7), with OFA1 being the most frequent (47.54%). Nucleotide diversity was moderate (π = 0.62%) and haplotype diversity was relatively low (67%). Furthermore, the median joining network analysis indicated that Brazilian haplotypes formed a reciprocal monophyletic clade when compared to the haplotypes from the Peruvian population on the Pacific coast. These two populations do not share haplotypes and may have become isolated some time back. Further genetic studies covering the entire species distribution are necessary to better understand the biological implications of the results reported here for the management and conservation of South American sea lions.

  20. Evidence for the molecular heterogeneity of sickle cell anemia chromosomes bearing the betaS/Benin haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Samperi, Piera; Lo Nigro, Luca; Kollia, Panagoula; Schiliro, Gino; Papadakis, Manoussos N

    2005-09-01

    There are at least four distinct African and one Asian chromosomal backgrounds (haplotypes) on which the sickle cell mutation has arisen. Additionally, previous data suggest that the beta(S)/Bantu haplotype is heterogeneous at the molecular level. Here, we report the presence of the (A)gamma -499 T-->A variation in sickle cell anemia chromosomes of Sicilian and North African origin bearing the beta(S)/Benin haplotype. Being absent from North American beta(S)/Benin chromosomes, which were studied previously, this variation is indicative for the molecular heterogeneity of the beta(S)/Benin haplotype.

  1. Selection assisted by a BoLA-DR/DQ haplotype against susceptibility to bovine dermatophilosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maillard Jean-Charles

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bovine dermatophilosis is a severe skin infection of tropical ruminants inducing a severe loss in productivity and a 15% mortality rate. This disease is caused by the actinomycete bacterium Dermatophilus congolensis associated with the tick Amblyomma variegatum. Currently there are no prospects for a vaccine, and acaricide or antibiotic control is hampered by the development of chemoresistance. Animal breeders have observed that dermatophilosis susceptibility seems to be determined genetically, and we previously identified a BoLA-DRB3-DQB class II haplotype marker for high (R2 = 0.96 susceptibility to the disease. With this marker, we developed a successful eugenic selection procedure for zebu Brahman cattle in Martinique (FWI. Over a period of five years, a marked reduction in disease prevalence, from 0.76 to 0.02 was achieved, and this low level has been maintained over the last two years. The selection procedure, based on a genetic marker system targeting the highly polymorphic BoLA locus, eliminates only those individuals which are at the highest risk of contracting the disease. In the present work, we discuss the properties of this system, including the "heterozygote advantage" and the "frequency dependence" theories, and examine their involvement in the biological mechanisms at the host/pathogen interface. We speculate on the exact role of the MHC molecules in the control of the disease, how the natural selection pressure imposed by the pathogens selectively maintains MHC diversity, and how our results can be practically applied for integrated control of dermatophilosis in developing countries.

  2. The effect of tail-length mismatch in binary DMPC/DSPC lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkar, Rana; Nagao, Michihiro; Butler, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Bilayer heterogeneity has been long hypothesized to drive raft formation and promote complex functionality in lipid membranes. The highly dynamic nature of the membrane however is thought to play a critical role in this delicate balance between structure and performance. To probe the effect of lateral heterogeneity on membrane dynamics, we investigate the thermal response of unilamellar-vesicle systems of mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) with DMPC/DSPC ratios of 50/50 and 70/30. Both lipids experience a transition from an ordered gel phase, with stiff stretched tails, to a melted fluid phase, with more coiled flexible tails, as they are heated through their melting temperature, Tm(DMPC) ~ 21 °C and Tm(DSPC) ~ 51 °C. The distinct Tm's of the two lipids provide a broad gel-fluid phase with a significant mismatch (~ 20 Å) between the tail-lengths of the DMPC and DSPC molecules. The structural properties of the vesicles were determined by small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering and the collective lipid dynamics in the bilayer were investigated by neutron spin-echo (NSE) spectroscopy on selectively deuterated samples. The NSE results indicate a slowdown of thickness fluctuations in the gel-fluid coexistence phase and an intriguingly strong enhancement in the thickness fluctuation amplitude for T >Tm(DSPC) compared to our previous work on single component vesicles.

  3. Role descriptions induce gender mismatch effects in eye movements during reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eReali

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present eye-tracking study investigates the effect of gender typicality on the resolution of anaphoric personal pronouns in English. Participants read descriptions of a person performing a typically male, typically female or gender-neutral occupational activity. The description was followed by an anaphoric reference (he or she which revealed the referent's gender. The first experiment presented roles which were highly typical for men (e.g., blacksmith or for women (e.g., beautician, the second experiment presented role descriptions with a moderate degree of gender typicality (e.g., psychologist, lawyer. Results revealed a gender mismatch effect in early and late measures in the first experiment and in an early measure in the second experiment. Moreover, eye-movement data for highly typical roles correlated with explicit typicality ratings. The results are discussed from a cross-linguistic perspective, comparing natural gender languages and grammatical gender languages. An interpretation of the cognitive representation of typicality beliefs is proposed.

  4. Rapid extraction of lexical tone phonology in Chinese characters: a visual mismatch negativity study.

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    Xiao-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In alphabetic languages, emerging evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies shows the rapid and automatic activation of phonological information in visual word recognition. In the mapping from orthography to phonology, unlike most alphabetic languages in which there is a natural correspondence between the visual and phonological forms, in logographic Chinese, the mapping between visual and phonological forms is rather arbitrary and depends on learning and experience. The issue of whether the phonological information is rapidly and automatically extracted in Chinese characters by the brain has not yet been thoroughly addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We continuously presented Chinese characters differing in orthography and meaning to adult native Mandarin Chinese speakers to construct a constant varying visual stream. In the stream, most stimuli were homophones of Chinese characters: The phonological features embedded in these visual characters were the same, including consonants, vowels and the lexical tone. Occasionally, the rule of phonology was randomly violated by characters whose phonological features differed in the lexical tone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that the violation of the lexical tone phonology evoked an early, robust visual response, as revealed by whole-head electrical recordings of the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN, indicating the rapid extraction of phonological information embedded in Chinese characters. Source analysis revealed that the vMMN was involved in neural activations of the visual cortex, suggesting that the visual sensory memory is sensitive to phonological information embedded in visual words at an early processing stage.

  5. The Mismatch Negativity: An Indicator of Perception of Regularities in Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xide; Liu, Tao; Gao, Dingguo

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews music research using Mismatch Negativity (MMN). MMN is a deviation-specific component of auditory event-related potential (EPR), which detects a deviation between a sound and an internal representation (e.g., memory trace). Recent studies have expanded the notion and the paradigms of MMN to higher-order music processing such as those involving short melodies, harmony chord, and music syntax. In this vein, we firstly reviewed the evolution of MMN from sound to music and then mainly compared the differences of MMN features between musicians and nonmusicians, followed by the discussion of the potential roles of the training effect and the natural exposure in MMN. Since MMN can serve as an index of neural plasticity, it thus can be widely used in clinical and other applied areas, such as detecting music preference in newborns or assessing wholeness of central auditory system of hearing illness. Finally, we pointed out some open questions and further directions. Current music perception research using MMN has mainly focused on relatively low hierarchical structure of music perception. To fully understand the neural substrates underlying processing of regularities in music, it is important and beneficial to combine MMN with other experimental paradigms such as early right-anterior negativity (ERAN).

  6. The Mismatch Negativity: An Indicator of Perception of Regularities in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xide; Liu, Tao; Gao, Dingguo

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews music research using Mismatch Negativity (MMN). MMN is a deviation-specific component of auditory event-related potential (EPR), which detects a deviation between a sound and an internal representation (e.g., memory trace). Recent studies have expanded the notion and the paradigms of MMN to higher-order music processing such as those involving short melodies, harmony chord, and music syntax. In this vein, we firstly reviewed the evolution of MMN from sound to music and then mainly compared the differences of MMN features between musicians and nonmusicians, followed by the discussion of the potential roles of the training effect and the natural exposure in MMN. Since MMN can serve as an index of neural plasticity, it thus can be widely used in clinical and other applied areas, such as detecting music preference in newborns or assessing wholeness of central auditory system of hearing illness. Finally, we pointed out some open questions and further directions. Current music perception research using MMN has mainly focused on relatively low hierarchical structure of music perception. To fully understand the neural substrates underlying processing of regularities in music, it is important and beneficial to combine MMN with other experimental paradigms such as early right-anterior negativity (ERAN). PMID:26504352

  7. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-07-21

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers.

  8. Can we make a better match or mismatch with KIR genotyping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-12-02

    Natural killer (NK) cell function is regulated by a fine balance between numerous activating and inhibitory receptors, of which killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are among the most polymorphic and comprehensively studied. KIRs allow NK cells to recognize downregulation or the absence of HLA class I molecules on target cells (known as missing-self), a phenomenon that is commonly observed in virally infected cells or cancer cells. Because KIR and HLA genes are located on different chromosomes, in an allogeneic environment such as after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor NK cells that express an inhibitory KIR for an HLA class I molecule that is absent on recipient targets (KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch), can recognize and react to this missing self and mediate cytotoxicity. Accumulating data indicate that epistatic interactions between KIR and HLA influence outcomes in several clinical conditions. Herein, we discuss the genetic and functional features of KIR/KIR-ligand interactions in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and how these data can guide donor selection. We will also review clinical studies of adoptive NK cell therapy in leukemia and emerging data on the use of genetically modified NK cells that could broaden the scope of cancer immunotherapy.

  9. The Mismatch Negativity: An Indicator of Perception of Regularities in Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xide Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews music research using Mismatch Negativity (MMN. MMN is a deviation-specific component of auditory event-related potential (EPR, which detects a deviation between a sound and an internal representation (e.g., memory trace. Recent studies have expanded the notion and the paradigms of MMN to higher-order music processing such as those involving short melodies, harmony chord, and music syntax. In this vein, we firstly reviewed the evolution of MMN from sound to music and then mainly compared the differences of MMN features between musicians and nonmusicians, followed by the discussion of the potential roles of the training effect and the natural exposure in MMN. Since MMN can serve as an index of neural plasticity, it thus can be widely used in clinical and other applied areas, such as detecting music preference in newborns or assessing wholeness of central auditory system of hearing illness. Finally, we pointed out some open questions and further directions. Current music perception research using MMN has mainly focused on relatively low hierarchical structure of music perception. To fully understand the neural substrates underlying processing of regularities in music, it is important and beneficial to combine MMN with other experimental paradigms such as early right-anterior negativity (ERAN.

  10. Numerical simulation of CTE mismatch and thermal-structural stresses in the design of interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Geoffrey John M.

    With the ever-increasing chip complexity, interconnects have to be designed to meet the new challenges. Advances in optical lithography have made chip feature sizes available today at 70 nm dimensions. With advances in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography, X-ray Lithography, and Ion Projection Lithography it is expected that the line width will further decrease to 20 nm or less. With the decrease in feature size, the number of active devices on the chip increases. With higher levels of circuit integration, the challenge is to dissipate the increased heat flux from the chip surface area. Thermal management considerations include coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) matching to prevent failure between the chip and the board. This in turn calls for improved system performance and reliability of the electronic structural systems. Experience has shown that in most electronic systems, failures are mostly due to CTE mismatch between the chip, board, and the solder joint (solder interconnect). The resulting high thermal-structural stress and strain due to CTE mismatch produces cracks in the solder joints with eventual failure of the electronic component. In order to reduce the thermal stress between the chip, board, and the solder joint, this dissertation examines the effect of inserting wire bundle (wire interconnect) between the chip and the board. The flexibility of the wires or fibers would reduce the stress at the rigid joints. Numerical simulations of two, and three-dimensional models of the solder and wire interconnects are examined. The numerical simulation is linear in nature and is based on linear isotropic material properties. The effect of different wire material properties is examined. The effect of varying the wire diameter is studied by changing the wire diameter. A major cause of electronic equipment failure is due to fatigue failure caused by thermal cycling, and vibrations. A two-dimensional modal and harmonic analysis was simulated for the wire interconnect

  11. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junqiao

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity-mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever-improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs1-xNx and GaP1-xNx with x bandgap bowing (bowing parameters >14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also occurs between localized states and the valence band states. Soft x-ray fluorescence experiments provide direct evidence of the BAC interaction in these

  12. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Junqiao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs1-xNx and GaP1-xNx with x ~< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also

  13. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-09-09

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x} and GaP{sub 1-x}N{sub x} with x {approx}< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also occurs between

  14. Mendel-GPU: haplotyping and genotype imputation on graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary K; Wang, Kai; Stram, Alex H; Sobel, Eric M; Lange, Kenneth

    2012-11-15

    In modern sequencing studies, one can improve the confidence of genotype calls by phasing haplotypes using information from an external reference panel of fully typed unrelated individuals. However, the computational demands are so high that they prohibit researchers with limited computational resources from haplotyping large-scale sequence data. Our graphics processing unit based software delivers haplotyping and imputation accuracies comparable to competing programs at a fraction of the computational cost and peak memory demand. Mendel-GPU, our OpenCL software, runs on Linux platforms and is portable across AMD and nVidia GPUs. Users can download both code and documentation at http://code.google.com/p/mendel-gpu/. gary.k.chen@usc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. HLA-DRB1-DQB1 Haplotypes Confer Susceptibility and Resistance to Multiple Sclerosis in Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Eleonora; Sardu, Claudia; Pieroni, Enrico; Valentini, Maria; Murru, Raffaele; Costa, Gianna; Tranquilli, Stefania; Frau, Jessica; Coghe, Giancarlo; Carboni, Nicola; Floris, Matteo; Contu, Paolo; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Genetic predisposition to multiple sclerosis (MS) in Sardinia (Italy) has been associated with five DRB1*-DQB1* haplotypes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA). Given the complexity of these associations, an in-depth re-analysis was performed with the specific aims of confirming the haplotype associations; establishing the independence of the associated haplotypes; and assessing patients' genotypic risk of developing MS. Methods and Results A transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) of the DRB1*-DQB1* haplotypes in 943 trio families, confirmed a higher than expected transmission rate (over-transmission) of the *13:03-*03:01 (OR = 2.9, P = 7.6×10−3), *04:05-*03:01 (OR = 2.4, P = 4.4×10−6) and *03:01-*02:01 (OR = 2.1, P = 1.0×10−15) haplotype. In contrast, the *16:01-*05:02 (OR = 0.5, P = 5.4×10−11) and the *15:02-*06:01 (OR = 0.3, P = 1.5×10−3) haplotypes exhibited a lower than expected transmission rate (under-transmission). The independence of the transmission of each positively and negatively associated haplotype was confirmed relative to all positively associated haplotypes, and to the negatively associated *16:01-*05:02 haplotype. In patients, carriage of two predisposing haplotypes, or of protective haplotypes, respectively increased or decreased the patient's risk of developing MS. The risk of MS followed a multiplicative model of genotypes, which was, in order of decreasing ORs: *04:05-*0301/*03:01-*02:01 (OR = 4.5); *03:01-*02:01/*03:01-*02:01 (OR = 4.1); and the *16:01-*05:02/*16:01-*0502 (OR = 0.2) genotypes. Analysis of DRB1 and DQB1 protein chain residues showed that the Val/Gly residue at position 86 of the DRB1 chain was the only difference between the protective *16:01- *15:02 alleles and the predisposing *15:01 one. Similarly, the Ala/Val residue at position 38 of the DQB1 chain differentiated the positively associated *06:02 allele and the negatively associated *05

  16. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-str loci in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francez, Pablo Abdon da Costa; Ramos, Luiz Patrick Vidal; de Jesus Brabo Ferreira Palha, Teresinha; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2012-01-01

    The allelic and haplotype frequencies of 17 Y-STR loci most commonly used in forensic testing were estimated in a sample of 138 unrelated healthy males from Macapá, in the northern Amazon region of Brazil. The average gene diversity was 0.6554 ± 0.3315. 134 haplotypes of the 17 loci were observed, 130 of them unique and four present in two individuals each. The haplotype diversity index was 0.9996 + 0.0009, with the most frequent haplogroups being R1b (52.2%), E1b1b (11.6%), J2 (10.1%) and Q (7.2%). Most haplogroups of this population belonged to European male lineages (89.2%), followed by Amerindian (7.2%) and African (3.6%) lineages. PMID:22481873

  17. Data supporting the high-accuracy haplotype imputation using unphased genotype data as the references

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article is related to the research article entitled “High-accuracy haplotype imputation using unphased genotype data as the references” which reports the unphased genotype data can be used as reference for haplotyping imputation [1]. This article reports different implementation generation pipeline, the results of performance comparison between different implementations (A, B, and C and between HiFi and three major imputation software tools. Our data showed that the performances of these three implementations are similar on accuracy, in which the accuracy of implementation-B is slightly but consistently higher than A and C. HiFi performed better on haplotype imputation accuracy and three other software performed slightly better on genotype imputation accuracy. These data may provide a strategy for choosing optimal phasing pipeline and software for different studies.

  18. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  19. Visual mismatch negativity reveals automatic detection of sequential regularity violation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor eStefanics

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sequential regularities are abstract rules based on repeating sequences of environmental events, which are useful to make predictions about future events. As the processes underlying visual mismatch negativity (vMMN are sensitive to complex stimulus changes, this event-related potential component, like its auditory counterpart, may be an index of a primitive system of intelligence. Here we tested whether the visual system is capable to detect abstract sequential regularity in unattended stimulus sequences. In our first experiment we investigated the emergence of vMMN and other change-related activity to stimuli violating abstract rules. Red and green disk patterns were delivered in pairs. When in the majority of pairs the colors were identical within the pairs, deviant pairs with different colors for the second member of the pair elicited vMMN. Spatially more extended vMMN responses with longer latency were observed for deviants with 10% compared to 30% probability. In our second experiment utilizing oddball sequences, we tested the emergence of vMMN to violations of a concrete, feature-based rule of a repetition of a standard color. Deviant colors elicited a vMMN response in the oddball sequences. VMMN was larger for the second member of the pair, i.e. after a shorter stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA. This result corresponds to the expected SOA/(vMMN relationship. Our results show that the system underlying vMMN is sensitive to abstract probability rules and this component can be considered as a correlate of violated predictions about the characteristics of environmental events.

  20. Interictal lack of habituation of mismatch negativity in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Difruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Puca, F M

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to study mismatch negativity features and habituation during the interictal phase of migraine. In migraine patients, a strong negative correlation has been found between the initial amplitude of long latency auditory-evoked potentials and their amplitude increase during subsequent averaging. We studied 12 outpatients with a diagnosis of migraine without aura recorded in a headache-free interval and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers not suffering from any recurrent headache. The experiment consisted of two sequential blocks of 2000 stimulations, during which 1800 (90%) recordings for standard tones and 200 (10%) for target tones were selected for averaging. The latency of the N1 component was significantly increased in migraine patients in respect of controls in both the first and second repetitions; the MMN latency was increased in the second repetition. In the control group the MMN amplitude decreased on average by 3.2 +/- 1.4 microV in the second trial, whereas in migraine patients it showed a slight increase of 0.21 +/- 0.11 microV in the second repetition. The MMN latency relieved in the second trial was significantly correlated with the duration of illness in the migraine patients (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.69; P < 0.05). The increases in N1 latency and MMN latency and amplitude, the latter correlated with duration of illness, seemed to be due to a reduced anticipatory effect of stimulus repetition in migraine patients. This suggests that such hypo-activity of automatic cortical processes, subtending the discrimination of acoustic stimuli, may be a basic abnormality in migraine, developing in the course of the disease.

  1. MUTYH and the mismatch repair system: partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Renée C; Sijmons, Rolf H; Ou, J; Olthof, Sandra G M; Osinga, Jan; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Weiss, Marjan M; Tops, Carli M J; Hes, Frederik J; de Bock, Geertruida H; Buys, Charles H C M; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2006-03-01

    Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH-a gene encoding a base excision repair protein-are associated with an increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer. Whether monoallelic MUTYH mutations also increase cancer risk is not yet clear, although there is some evidence suggesting a slight increase of risk. As the MUTYH protein interacts with the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesised that the combination of a monoallelic MUTYH mutation with an MMR gene mutation increases cancer risk. We therefore investigated the prevalence of monoallelic MUTYH mutations in carriers of a germline MMR mutation: 40 carriers of a truncating mutation (group I) and 36 of a missense mutation (group II). These patients had been diagnosed with either colorectal or endometrial cancer. We compared their MUTYH mutation frequencies with those observed in a group of 134 Dutch colorectal and endometrial cancer patients without an MMR gene mutation (0.7%) and those reported for Caucasian controls (1.5%). In group I one monoallelic MUTYH mutation was found (2.5%). In group II five monoallelic germline MUTYH mutations were found (14%), four of them in MSH6 missense mutation carriers (20%). Of all patients with an MMR gene mutation, only those with a missense mutation showed a significantly higher frequency of (monoallelic) MUTYH mutations than the Dutch cancer patients without MMR gene mutations (P = 0.002) and the published controls (P = 0.001). These results warrant further study to test the hypothesis of mutations in MMR genes (in particular MSH6) and MUTYH acting together to increase cancer risk.

  2. Effect of aripiprazole on mismatch negativity (MMN in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhe Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cognitive deficits are considered core symptoms of the schizophrenia. Cognitive function has been found to be a better predictor of functional outcome than symptom levels. Changed mismatch negativity (MMN reflects abnormalities of early auditory processing in schizophrenia. Up to now, no studies for the effects of aripiprazole on MMN in schizophrenia have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects included 26 patients with schizophrenia, and 26 controls. Psychopathology was rated in patients with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS at baseline, after 4- and 8-week treatments with aripiprazole. Auditory stimuli for ERP consisted of 100 millisecond/1000 Hz standards, intermixed with 100 millisecond/1500 Hz frequency deviants and 250 millisecond/1000 Hz duration deviants. EEG was recorded at Fz. BESA 5.1.8 was used to perform data analysis. MMN waveforms were obtained by subtracting waveforms elicited by standards from waveforms elicited by frequency- or duration-deviant stimuli. Aripiprazole decreased all PANSS. Patients showed smaller mean amplitudes of frequency and duration MMN at baseline than did controls. A repeated measure ANOVA with sessions (i.e., baseline, 4- and 8-week treatments and MMN type (frequency vs. duration as within-subject factors revealed no significant MMN type or MMN type × session main effect for MMN amplitudes. Session main effect was significant. LSD tests demonstrated significant differences between MMN amplitudes at 8 weeks and those at both baseline and 4 weeks. There was significant negative correlation between changes in amplitudes of frequency and duration MMN and changes in PANSS total scores at baseline and follow-up periods. CONCLUSIONS: Aripiprazole improved the amplitudes of MMN. MMN offers objective evidence that treatment with the aripiprazole may ameliorate preattentive deficits in schizophrenia.

  3. Mismatch or cumulative stress : Toward an integrated hypothesis of programming effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, Esther; Schmidt, Mathias V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper integrates the cumulative stress hypothesis with the mismatch hypothesis, taking into account individual differences in sensitivity to programming. According to the cumulative stress hypothesis, individuals are more likely to suffer from disease as adversity accumulates. According to the

  4. Role of Energy-Level Mismatches in a Multi-Pathway Complex of Photosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, James; Lee, Changhyoup; Yoo, Seokwon; Jeong, Hyunseok; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2013-01-01

    Considering a multi-pathway structure in a light-harvesting complex of photosynthesis, we investigate the role of energy-level mismatches between antenna molecules in transferring the absorbed energy to a reaction center. We find a condition in which the antenna molecules faithfully play their roles: Their effective absorption ratios are larger than those of the receiver molecule directly coupled to the reaction center. In the absence of energy-level mismatches and dephasing noise, there arises quantum destructive interference between multiple paths that restricts the energy transfer. On the other hand, the destructive interference diminishes as asymmetrically biasing the energy-level mismatches and/or introducing quantum noise of dephasing for the antenna molecules, so that the transfer efficiency is greatly enhanced to near unity. Remarkably, the near-unity efficiency can be achieved at a wide range of asymmetric energy-level mismatches. Temporal characteristics are also optimized at the energy-level mismat...

  5. Enhancement of thermal stability in microwave applicators by mismatching and detuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E.M.

    1996-07-01

    Many microwave applicator systems experiencing thermal runaway can be stabilized by mismatching and/or detuning the system. The stability of the systems is discussed qualitatively and a conservative guide for adjusting microwave applicators for enhanced stability is described.

  6. Velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters via sampled position data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Huang, Chunli; Lü, Jinhu; Li, Xiong; Chen, Shihua

    2016-02-01

    Power systems are special multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and symmetric structures. This paper extends these systems to a class of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters, linear coupling function, and asymmetric structures and investigates their velocity synchronization via sampled position data. The dynamics of the agents is adopted as that of generators with mismatched parameters, while the system structures are supposed to be complex. Two distributed linear consensus protocols are designed, respectively, for multi-agent systems without or with communication delay. Necessary and sufficient conditions based on the sampling period, the mismatched parameters, the delay, and the nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix are established. It is shown that velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters can be achieved if the sampled period is chosen appropriately. Simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  7. Design of two-layer switching rule for stabilization of switched linear systems with mismatched switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan MA

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer switching architecture and a two-layer switching rule for stabilization of switched linear control systems are proposed, under which the mismatched switching between switched systems and their candidate hybrid controllers can be allowed. In the low layer, a state-dependent switching rule with a dwell time constraint to exponentially stabilize switched linear systems is given;in the high layer, supervisory conditions on the mismatched switching frequency and the mismatched switching ratio are presented, under which the closed-loop switched system is still exponentially stable in case of the candidate controller switches delay with respect to the subsystems. Different from the traditional switching rule, the two-layer switching architecture and switching rule have robustness, which in some extend permit mismatched switching between switched subsystems and their candidate controllers.

  8. Simulated growth of layers on a substrate with mismatch: structural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J. C. S.

    1996-12-01

    High temperature deposition of metallic materials on a (111) face of a fcc substrate, followed by a slow cooling down to a given temperature, is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm with Lennard-Jones interatomic pair potentials. Adsorption and growth modes on the surface are studied in order to determine whether the growth is three- or two-dimensional, according to relevant parameters such as lattice mismatch and relative atomic binding energy. For a ± 10% mismatch it is found that the Stranski-Krastanov process starts early and is later healed by the appearance of bridges between islands, after a deposition of about ten monolayers. The interlayer distance undergoes oscillations as a function of the layer number. This is observed for a ± 10% mismatch as well as for a 5% mismatch.

  9. Casein haplotypes and their association with milk production traits in Norwegian Red cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Heidi; Olsen, Hanne Gro; Hayes, Ben; Sehested, Erling; Svendsen, Morten; Nome, Torfinn; Meuwissen, Theo; Lien, Sigbjørn

    2009-02-20

    A high resolution SNP map was constructed for the bovine casein region to identify haplotype structures and study associations with milk traits in Norwegian Red cattle. Our analyses suggest separation of the casein cluster into two haplotype blocks, one consisting of the CSN1S1, CSN2 and CSN1S2 genes and another one consisting of the CSN3 gene. Highly significant associations with both protein and milk yield were found for both single SNPs and haplotypes within the CSN1S1-CSN2-CSN1S2 haplotype block. In contrast, no significant association was found for single SNPs or haplotypes within the CSN3 block. Our results point towards CSN2 and CSN1S2 as the most likely loci harbouring the underlying causative DNA variation. In our study, the most significant results were found for the SNP CSN2_67 with the C allele consistently associated with both higher protein and milk yields. CSN2_67 calls a C to an A substitution at codon 67 in beta-casein gene resulting in histidine replacing proline in the amino acid sequence. This polymorphism determines the protein variants A1/B (CSN2_67 A allele) versus A2/A3 (CSN2_67 C allele). Other studies have suggested that a high consumption of A1/B milk may affect human health by increasing the risk of diabetes and heart diseases. Altogether these results argue for an increase in the frequency of the CSN2_67 C allele or haplotypes containing this allele in the Norwegian Red cattle population by selective breeding.

  10. Establishment of a resource population of SLA haplotype-defined Korean native pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Ok; Ho, Chak-Sum; Lee, Yu-Joo; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Sung-Soo; Ko, Moon-Suck; Park, Chankyu; Smith, Douglas M; Jeon, Jin-Tae; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2010-05-01

    The highly polymorphic porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or the swine leukocyte antigens (SLA), has been repeatedly associated with variations in swine immune response to pathogens and vaccines as well as with production traits. The SLA antigens are also important targets for immunological recognition of foreign tissue grafts. We recently established a resource population of Korean native pigs as models for human transplantation and xenotransplantation research. In this study, 115 animals derived from three generations of the Korean native pigs were genotyped for three SLA class I (SLA-2, SLA-3 and SLA-1) and three SLA class II loci (DRB1, DQB1, DQA) using PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) at the allele group resolution. A total of seven SLA haplotypes (Lr-5.34, Lr-7.23, Lr-31.13, Lr-56.23, Lr-56.30, Lr-59.1, Lr-65.34), comprising six unique class I and five unique class II haplotypes, were characterized in the founding animals. Class I haplotype Lr-65.0 and class II haplotype Lr-0.34 were novel; and together with Lr-56.0 these haplotypes appeared to be breed-specific. In the progeny population, Lr-7.23 and Lr-56.30 appeared to be the most prevalent haplotypes with frequencies of 34.7% and 31.6%, respectively; the overall homozygosity was 27.4%. This resource population of SLA-defined Korean native pigs will be useful as large animal models for various transplantation and xenotransplantation experiments, as well as for dissecting the roles of SLA proteins in swine disease resistance and production traits.

  11. Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (Vkorc1 haplotype diversity in mouse priority strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Michael H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms in the vitamin K-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 gene, Vkorc1, could affect blood coagulation and other vitamin K-dependent proteins, such as osteocalcin (bone Gla protein, BGP. Here we sequenced the Vkorc1 gene in 40 mouse priority strains. We analyzed Vkorc1 haplotypes with respect to prothrombin time (PT and bone mineral density and composition (BMD and BMC; phenotypes expected to be vitamin K-dependent and represented by data in the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Findings In the commonly used laboratory strains of Mus musculus domesticus we identified only four haplotypes differing in the intron or 5' region sequence of the Vkorc1. Six haplotypes differing by coding and non-coding polymorphisms were identified in the other subspecies of Mus. We detected no significant association of Vkorc1 haplotypes with PT, BMD and BMC within each subspecies of Mus. Vkorc1 haplotype sequences divergence between subspecies was associated with PT, BMD and BMC. Conclusion Phenotypic variation in PT, BMD and BMC within subspecies of Mus, while substantial, appears to be dominated by genetic variation in genes other than the Vkorc1. This was particularly evident for M. m. domesticus, where a single haplotype was observed in conjunction with virtually the entire range of PT, BMD and BMC values of all 5 subspecies of Mus included in this study. Differences in these phenotypes between subspecies also should not be attributed to Vkorc1 variants, but should be viewed as a result of genome wide genetic divergence.

  12. On the Minimum Error Correction Problem for Haplotype Assembly in Diploid and Polyploid Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Dondi, Riccardo; Klau, Gunnar W; Pirola, Yuri; Pisanti, Nadia; Zaccaria, Simone

    2016-09-01

    In diploid genomes, haplotype assembly is the computational problem of reconstructing the two parental copies, called haplotypes, of each chromosome starting from sequencing reads, called fragments, possibly affected by sequencing errors. Minimum error correction (MEC) is a prominent computational problem for haplotype assembly and, given a set of fragments, aims at reconstructing the two haplotypes by applying the minimum number of base corrections. MEC is computationally hard to solve, but some approximation-based or fixed-parameter approaches have been proved capable of obtaining accurate results on real data. In this work, we expand the current characterization of the computational complexity of MEC from the approximation and the fixed-parameter tractability point of view. In particular, we show that MEC is not approximable within a constant factor, whereas it is approximable within a logarithmic factor in the size of the input. Furthermore, we answer open questions on the fixed-parameter tractability for parameters of classical or practical interest: the total number of corrections and the fragment length. In addition, we present a direct 2-approximation algorithm for a variant of the problem that has also been applied in the framework of clustering data. Finally, since polyploid genomes, such as those of plants and fishes, are composed of more than two copies of the chromosomes, we introduce a novel formulation of MEC, namely the k-ploid MEC problem, that extends the traditional problem to deal with polyploid genomes. We show that the novel formulation is still both computationally hard and hard to approximate. Nonetheless, from the parameterized point of view, we prove that the problem is tractable for parameters of practical interest such as the number of haplotypes and the coverage, or the number of haplotypes and the fragment lengt