WorldWideScience

Sample records for hangars

  1. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEAMBASU Gabriel George

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the maintenance process that is done on an airplane, at a certain period of time, or after a number of flight hours or cycles and describes the checks performed behind each inspection. The first part of research describes the aircraft maintenance process that has to be done after an updated maintenance manual according with aircraft type, followed by a short introduction about maintenance hangar. The second part of the paper presents a hangar design with a foldable roof and walls, which can be folded or extended, over an airplane when a maintenance process is done, or depending on weather condition.

  2. Hangar de madera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews, H. J.

    1962-05-01

    Full Text Available El nuevo hangar de madera, construido y proyectado por la empresa Beves and Co., tiene una luz libre de 45,7 m. Su propietario, la Overseas Aviation Lte., lo utiliza para proteger los aviones que esta Compañía dispone en el aeropuerto de Gatwick (Inglaterra. Después de considerar la solución metálica y estructura de hormigón se decidió proyectar el hangar basándose en una serie de pórticos paralelos, de madera en láminas y sin apoyos intermedios. Aunque económicamente presenta ventajas sobre otros materiales, su ligereza tenía gran importancia en este caso, pues el terreno del campo en que se halla situado no tiene gran capacidad resistente y, además, se contaba con gastos mínimos de conservación y una resistencia elevada contra el incendio.

  3. Hangar con alas, Los Angeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1961-04-01

    Full Text Available Formando parte de su programa, la TWA ha construido recientemente un hangar para servicio y reparaciones de su flota aérea de naves ordinarias y de aviones de reacción en el aeropuerto internacional de Los Angeles (Estados Unidos. El proyecto de esta obra se encargó a la empresa constructora Holmes & Narver, Inc.

  4. Hangar Fire Suppression Utilizing Novec 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    fuel fires in aircraft hangars. A 30×30×8-ft concrete-and-steel test structure was constructed for this test series. Four discharge assemblies...that agent concentration in the test structure exceeded the required extinguishing concentration for at least 5 min after discharge. Two fire ...involved suppression of a 4.6-gal, approximately 5-ft diameter, Jet-A pool fire . Both fires were successfully extinguished by the Novec 1230 discharge

  5. Aeropuerto de Nueva York. Nuevo hangar para reactores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1960-09-01

    Full Text Available El nuevo hangar del Aeropuerto Internacional de Idlewild, de Nueva York (EE. UU., proyectado y construido bajo la dirección del Port of New York Authority, destinado a los servicios de líneas aéreas extranjeras, está formado por una estructura central metálica, que constituye el cuerpo resistente del hangar.

  6. Assembling the Gossamer Albatross II in hangar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Gossamer Albatross II is seen here being assembled in a hangar at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The original Gossamer Albatross is best known for completing the first completely human powered flight across the English Channel on June 12, 1979. The Albatross II was the backup craft for the Channel flight. The aircraft was fitted with a small battery-powered electric motor and flight instruments for the NASA research program in low-speed flight. NASA completed its flight testing of the Gossamer Albatross II and began analysis of the results in April, 1980. During the six week program, 17 actual data gathering flights and 10 other flights were flown here as part of the joint NASA Langley/Dryden flight research program. The lightweight craft, carrying a miniaturized instrumentation system, was flown in three configurations; using human power, with a small electric motor, and towed with the propeller removed. Results from the program contributed to data on the unusual aerodynamic, performance, stability, and control characteristics of large, lightweight aircraft that fly at slow speeds for application to future high altitude aircraft. The Albatross' design and research data contributed to numerous later high altitude projects, including the Pathfinder.

  7. Grumman OV-1C in hangar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Grumman OV-1C in the hangar used at the time by the Army at Edwards Air Force Base. This OV-1C Mohawk, serial #67-15932, was used in a joint NASA/US Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity (USAAEFA) program to study a stall-speed warning system in the early 1980s. NASA designed and built an automated stall-speed warning system which presented both airspeed and stall speed to the pilot. Visual indication of impending stall would be displayed to the pilot as a cursor or pointer located on a conventional airspeed indicator. In addition, an aural warning at predetermined stall margins was presented to the pilot through a voice synthesizer. The Mohawk was developed by Grumman Aircraft as a photo observation and electronic reconnaissance aircraft for the US Marines and the US Army. The OV-1 entered production in October 1959 and served the US Army in Europe, Korea, the Viet Nam War, Central and South America, Alaska, and during Desert Shield/Desert Storm in the Middle East. The Mohawk was retired from service in September 1996. 133 OV-1Cs were built, the 'C' designating the model which used an IR (infrared) imaging system to provide reconnaissance.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

  9. DAST Being Calibrated for Flight in Hangar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    DAST-2, a modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone, undergoes calibration in a hangar at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. After the crash of the first DAST vehicle, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II (serial # 72-1558) with the rebuilt ARW-1 (ARW-1R) wing. The DAST-2 made a captive flight aboard the B-52 on October 29, 1982, followed by a free flight on November 3, 1982. During January and February of 1983, three launch attempts from the B-52 had to be aborted due to various problems. Following this, the project changed the launch aircraft to a DC-130A. Two captive flights occurred in May 1983. The first launch attempt from the DC-130 took place on June 1, 1983. The mothership released the DAST-2, but the recovery system immediately fired without being commanded. The parachute then disconnected from the vehicle, and the DAST-2 crashed into a farm field near Harper Dry Lake. Wags called this the 'Alfalfa Field Impact Test.' These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and

  10. Hangar en el aeropuerto de Francfort - Alemania Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1972-04-01

    Full Text Available This huge hangar has been built for Deutsche Lufthansa to accommodate six planes of the Boeing 747 type, or even larger, and covers some 30,000 square meters of ground, with a free height of 22 meters and a door 21,5 meters high, with possibilities for future extension. The design, which is described in the article, was the winner of a competition. It is original and very functional, consisting basically of vertical elements in unfaced, reinforced concrete, with a hanging roof of lightweight, prestressed concrete, and was the design which offered the greatest advantages economically and technically, and from the point of view of easy extension.Este hangar, de grandes dimensiones, se ha construido, por la Deutsche Lufthansa, para alojar seis aviones del tipo Boeing 747 o mayores y tiene unos 30.000 m2 de superficie, 22 m de altura libre y puerta de 21,50 m de altura útil, con posibilidades de ampliaciones futuras. Convocado el correspondiente concurso, se eligió la solución que se expone en el artículo. Consiste, fundamentalmente, en elementos verticales, de diseño original y muy funcional, de hormigón armado visto, y cubierta colgada, de hormigón ligero pretensado, dado que era la que ofrecía mayores ventajas desde un triple punto de vista: económico, técnico y de posible y fácil ampliación.

  11. 78 FR 37527 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposition of Hangars 2 and 3, Fort Wainwright, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... Statement (EIS) for the disposition of two historic hangars at Fort Wainwright (FWA). The Draft EIS analyzes and evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed disposition options for two historic World War II-era hangars (Hangars 2 and 3) and supporting infrastructure located on the Main Post...

  12. Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck Fire Protection: History and Current Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darwin, Robert L; Bowman, Howard L; Hunstad, Mary; Leach, William B; Williams, Frederick W

    2005-01-01

    .... Next, a review of firefighting systems, including the firefighting agents currently in use, as well as the current tactics for fighting fires on the flight deck and the hangar deck, is provided...

  13. Converting Hangar High Expansion Foam Systems to Prevent Cockpit Damage: Full-Scale Validation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AFCEC-CO-TY-TR-2018-0001 CONVERTING HANGAR HIGH EXPANSION FOAM SYSTEMS TO PREVENT COCKPIT DAMAGE: FULL-SCALE VALIDATION TESTS Gerard G...manufacturer, or otherwise does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation , or approval by the United States Air Force. The views and...09-2017 Final Test Report May 2017 Converting Hangar High Expansion Foam Systems to Prevent Cockpit Damage: Full-Scale Validation Tests N00173-15-D

  14. A Seismic Isolation Application Using Rubber Bearings; Hangar Project in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesigur, Haluk; Cili, Feridun

    2008-01-01

    Seismic isolation is an effective design strategy to mitigate the seismic hazard wherein the structure and its contents are protected from the damaging effects of an earthquake. This paper presents the Hangar Project in Sabiha Goekcen Airport which is located in Istanbul, Turkey. Seismic isolation system where the isolation layer arranged at the top of the columns is selected. The seismic hazard analysis, superstructure design, isolator design and testing were based on the Uniform Building Code (1997) and met all requirements of the Turkish Earthquake Code (2007). The substructure which has the steel vertical trusses on facades and RC H shaped columns in the middle axis of the building was designed with an R factor limited to 2.0 in accordance with Turkish Earthquake Code. In order to verify the effectiveness of the isolation system, nonlinear static and dynamic analyses are performed. The analysis revealed that isolated building has lower base shear (approximately 1/4) against the non-isolated structure

  15. F-16XL Ship #2 in hangar for Laminar Flow Glove mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's two-seat F-16XL research aircraft is shown in the modification hangar at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during installation of a titanium 'glove' on the upper surface of its modified left wing. The aircraft subsequently concluded a 13 month-long, 45-flight research program which investigated drawing off a small portion of the boundary-layer air in order to provide laminar -- or smooth -- flow over a major portion of a wing flying at supersonic speeds. A turbo-compressor in the aircraft's fuselage provided suction to draw air through more than 10 million tiny laser-drilled holes in the glove via a manifold system employing 20 valves. Data obtained during the program could assist designers of future high-speed aircraft in developing a more efficient civil transport.

  16. Environmental Assessment for the Construction of a Three-Bay Multi-Aircraft Hangar Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Years 2005 through 2009: VOCE = .016 * Trips NOxE = .015 * Trips PM10E = .0022 * Trips COE = .262 * Trips Appendix A: Air Quality January 2008...Final EA for the Construction of a Three-Bay Multi-Aircraft Hangar Page A-9 Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma Years 2010 and beyond: VOCE = .012...Trips NOxE = .013 * Trips PM10E = .0022 * Trips COE = .262 * Trips To convert from pounds per day to tons per year: VOC (tons/year) = VOCE

  17. Modeling, Analysis, and Preservation Techniques for Historic Reinforced Concrete Structures in Seismic Prone Regions Case Study: Augusta Airship Hangar, Sicily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, Kelly; Whyte, Catherine; Reiner, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the world there are hundreds of historic monuments and structures considered to be invaluable and irreplaceable. They are symbols of cultural identity and a means of educating people about history. Preservation of historic monuments and structures is therefore an important part of safeguarding these cultural heritage sites so that they retain their value for future generations.This report discusses a procedure for the investigation of seismic hazards in existing buildings and possible steps that can be taken to avoid damage caused by these hazards. The Augusta Airship Hangar located in Sicily, will be used as a case study however the topics addressed in this paper can be applied to other structures of historic value around the world.First state-of-the-art scanning procedures were used to create scale digital models that were imported into a structural analysis program. Within this program dynamic analyses were performed on the model based on actual ground motions taken close to the site. This data was used to determine the period and mode shapes of the structure. Then a nonlinear analysis, including a static pushover analysis, was implemented on a two-dimensional model of the structural frame. From this analysis the failure mechanisms of the structure were revealed with relation to an allowable roof displacement. The structural integrity of the structure was evaluated based on pre-defined performance goals. Finally multiple suggestions were made how the Augusta Airship Hangar might be repaired and strengthened so that this structure will not be destroyed should an earthquake occur.The results of our study show that historic structures, despite their age, can still be strong and ductile. Also there are a multitude of effective preservation and retrofit techniques that can be used to strengthen these historic structures, should an earthquake occur. Through this study, the Augusta Airship Hangar has proven to be not only a historic symbol for Sicily but

  18. Ampliación del hangar n° 2 Aeropuerto de Madrid-Barajas España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabera García, Antonio

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available The necessity to carry out maintenance work on Iberia's AIRBUS planes obligates this company to enlarge hangar n.° 2, up till now intended for standard type planes. After a study of diverse proposals: isostatic double-supported beam, mixed portico of reinforced concrete and metal beam, etc. and taking into account the limitations of height and the obligation of air space, call for a structure with a maximum thickness of 6,50 m, the solution was adopted of a latticed metalic beam of 125,60 of length (110,60 m between axes of supports and two projections of 7,5 m anchored in the foundations, 3,00 m wide and 6,50 m thick. The beam was partially prefabricated in the factory and it took seven days to position it.La necesidad de realizar trabajos de mantenimiento de los aviones AIRBUS de Iberia obligaron a esta compañía a ampliar el hangar nº 2 hasta ahora destinado a aviones de tipo medio. Después del estudio de diversas propuestas: viga biapoyada isostática, pórtico mixto de hormigón armado y viga metálica, etc., y teniendo en cuenta las limitaciones de altura y la de servidumbre del espacio aéreo, que obligaban a una estructura de 6,50 m de canto máximo, se adoptó la solución de una viga metálica de celosía de 125,60 m de longitud (110,60 m entre ejes de apoyos y dos voladizos de 7,5 m anclados al cimiento, 3,00 m de ancho y 6,50 m de canto. La viga se prefabricó parcialmente en taller y el izado duró siete días.

  19. Flight Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in a Setup Simulating that Proposed for Captive-Flight Tests in a Hangar, TED No. NACA DE 368

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Powell M., Jr.

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale free-flight model of the Convair XFY-1 airplane in test setups representing the setup proposed for use in the first flight tests of the full-scale airplane in the Moffett Field airship hangar. The investigation was conducted in two parts: first, tests with the model flying freely in an enclosure simulating the hangar, and second, tests with the model partially restrained by an overhead line attached to the propeller spinner and ground lines attached to the wing and tail tips. The results of the tests indicated that the airplane can be flown without difficulty in the Moffett Field airship hangar if it does not approach too close to the hangar walls. If it does approach too close to the walls, the recirculation of the propeller slipstream might cause sudden trim changes which would make smooth flight difficult for the pilot to accomplish. It appeared that the tethering system proposed by Convair could provide generally satisfactory restraint of large-amplitude motions caused by control failure or pilot error without interfering with normal flying or causing any serious instability or violent jerking motions as the tethering lines restrained the model.

  20. Energy Conservation: Heating Navy Hangars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    temperature, IF Tf Inside air temperature 1 foot above the floor, OF T. Inside design temperature, IF To Hot water temperature setpoint , OF TON Chiller ...systems capable of optimizing energy usage base-wide. An add-on to an existing large scale EMCS is probably the first preference, followed by single...the building comfort conditions are met during hours of building occupancy. 2. Optimized Start/Stop turns on equipment at the latest possible time and

  1. An Investigation into the Effects of the Hangar Queen Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    .... By consolidating the studies performed on cannibalizations (CANNs) and the HQ program, this paper attempts to provide an understanding of the rationale and effects/benefits of the different HQ thresholds...

  2. Surface-Tolerant Coatings for Aircraft Hangars, Flight Control Tower, and Deluge Tanks at Fort Campbell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    to chalking. Fluorinated polymers are recognized as the most durable coatings in terms of preservation of appearance. Architectural building panels...phosphate) 19.4 Percent by Weight Film-Former phenolic varnish 55.3 Percent by Weight Antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) 0.43 Percent

  3. 76 FR 70978 - Environmental Impact Statement for Disposition of Hangars 2 and 3, Fort Wainwright, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Ladd Field World War II National Historic Landmark (NHL). The Department of the Army will use the... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The decision to be made by the Army is regarding the disposition of two historic...

  4. Energy Conservation and Management Study of Aircraft Hangars at Selected Air Force Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    0 C 00 > >0 s- M2 ol F)0 - LD -0C ) 4 C C -c0 c,- -- 41 a) *-’.T 𔃺 (n L Z >-l L. o- C) ( ~ ~L) C:oaa > Z 4 . - 0 0 oL co~ (jI 0 C’. cnCD CC 00-’ 0 n...current gas policy discourages the use of gas-fired devices. Special variance must be obtained to use the recommended heaters. Another observation is

  5. Delta XTE Spacecraft Solar Panel Deployment, Hangar AO at Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The footage shows technicians in the clean room checking and adjusting the deployment mechanism of the solar panel for XTE spacecraft. Other scenes show several technicians making adjustments to software for deployment of the solar panels.

  6. Review of Hangar Door Design of Mountain Home AFB (MHAFB) Refurbished Non-Destructive Inspection (NDI) Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    Blonetics Corporation, Newark Metrology Operations, complies with the requirements of the current version of ISO / IEC 17025 on the date of...requirements of the current version of ISOIIEC 17025 on the date of calibration. 2. This report may not be reproduced, except rn full, without

  7. Modeling & Verifying Aircraft Paint Hangar Airflow to Reduce Green House Gas and Energy Usage while Protecting Occupational Health Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-30

    violations have the potential for significant fines and costs associated with remediation. 2.2.5 Social Acceptance OSHA managers and industrial...Exposure Limit OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PEL Permissible Exposure Limit PETTT Productivity Enhancement, Technology Transfer and...and Health Administration ( OSHA ) non-compliance concerns that could surface, though unrelated to this project. Because the project team could not

  8. Finding of No Significant Impact: Environmental Assessment Construction of Hangar Addition Building 820 Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ished pursuant to the ational Environmental Policy Act (NEP A), the Counci l on Enviro nmenta l Quality (CEQ) regula tions implement ing the EPA...Tinker AFB or the surrounding area. Earth Resources: The maJonty o f soils in the VICJntty of the Proposed Action have been previously distu rbed...tenn. minor soil dis turbance as a result o f the proposed demolition and construction ac tivities. These activ ities will be miti gated through

  9. 77 FR 14584 - Notice of Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Approvals and Disapprovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    .... Insulation of hangars 661, 662, 663, 665, and 666. Hangar tail dock; 665 electrical/insulation; water study. Electrical/insulation of hangars 661, 663, 664, 666, and 667. Hangar improvements: hangars 664, 665, 667, and... vehicle. Plow truck with broom and deicing equipment. Sand truck replacement. Airfield loader. Fire truck...

  10. Evaluation of eleven years of area monitoring for external dose rate in a deposit of radioactive waste at the ore treatment unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S.; Oliveira, S.Q. de; Py Junior, D.A.; Silva, A.C.A.; Garcia Filho, O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A., E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ, (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria. Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais; Pereira, J.R.S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    At Ore Treatment Unit (UTM, in Portuguese) situated in Pocos de Caldas, MG, there is a deposit of about 40 tons radioactive waste produced decades ago from Santo Amaro deactivated plant (SAP) and then from NUCLEMON that processed monazite sands to extract rare earth elements. This waste contains uranium and thorium and it is stored in six hangars. This study aims to analyze the dose rates in the hangars from 2002 to 2012. Annually, two samples were obtained, for a total of 24 samples. The results showed the highest doses rates at UTM, ranging from 0.5 to 409.8 μSv h{sup -}'1 for the total set of samples. The averages extended from 0.96 μSv h{sup -1} in hangar C-02 up to 282.64 μSv h{sup -1} in hangar C-05. Considering each hangar separately, the results were as follows: hangar C-01 average 30.34 μSv h{sup -1}, ranging from 6.2 to 71.7 μSv h{sup -1}; hangar C-02 average 0.96 μSv h{sup -1} (min-max 0.5 to 2.51 μSv h{sup -1}); hangar C-05 average 282.64 μSv h{sup -1} (min-max 3.7 to 409.8 μSv h{sup -1}); hangar C-06 average 188.92 μSv h{sup -1} (min-max 1.85 to 338.0 μSv h{sup -1}); hangar C-07, average 172.05 μSv h{sup -1} (min-max 1.95 to 283.0 μSv h{sup -1}) and hangar C-09, average 122.59 μSv h{sup -1} (min-max 1.11 to 277.0 μSv h{sup -1}). ANOVA test indicated that the dose rates averages in the six hangars are different (F{sub calc} of 70.90 higher F{sub crit} of 2.28), and the Tukey test allowed to group the hangars in the following sequence: C-05> C-06 = C-07> C-09> C-01 = C-02. (author)

  11. Evaluation of eleven years of area monitoring for external dose rate in a deposit of radioactive waste at the ore treatment unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Oliveira, S.Q. de; Py Junior, D.A.; Silva, A.C.A.; Garcia Filho, O.

    2013-01-01

    At Ore Treatment Unit (UTM, in Portuguese) situated in Pocos de Caldas, MG, there is a deposit of about 40 tons radioactive waste produced decades ago from Santo Amaro deactivated plant (SAP) and then from NUCLEMON that processed monazite sands to extract rare earth elements. This waste contains uranium and thorium and it is stored in six hangars. This study aims to analyze the dose rates in the hangars from 2002 to 2012. Annually, two samples were obtained, for a total of 24 samples. The results showed the highest doses rates at UTM, ranging from 0.5 to 409.8 μSv h - '1 for the total set of samples. The averages extended from 0.96 μSv h -1 in hangar C-02 up to 282.64 μSv h -1 in hangar C-05. Considering each hangar separately, the results were as follows: hangar C-01 average 30.34 μSv h -1 , ranging from 6.2 to 71.7 μSv h -1 ; hangar C-02 average 0.96 μSv h -1 (min-max 0.5 to 2.51 μSv h -1 ); hangar C-05 average 282.64 μSv h -1 (min-max 3.7 to 409.8 μSv h -1 ); hangar C-06 average 188.92 μSv h -1 (min-max 1.85 to 338.0 μSv h -1 ); hangar C-07, average 172.05 μSv h -1 (min-max 1.95 to 283.0 μSv h -1 ) and hangar C-09, average 122.59 μSv h -1 (min-max 1.11 to 277.0 μSv h -1 ). ANOVA test indicated that the dose rates averages in the six hangars are different (F calc of 70.90 higher F crit of 2.28), and the Tukey test allowed to group the hangars in the following sequence: C-05> C-06 = C-07> C-09> C-01 = C-02. (author)

  12. Compliance with Electrical and Fire Protection Standards of U.S. Controlled and Occupied Facilities in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    evaluate the entire system from the Pump House to all hangars on Yankee, Sierra and Zulu to make all repairs and recertify the systems and have a...system from the Pump House to all hangars on Yankee, Sierra and Zulu to make all repairs and recertify the systems and have a contract to perform O...entire system from the Pump House to all hangars on Yankee, Sierra and Zulu to make all repairs and recertify the systems and have a contract to

  13. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  14. Airborne Test Bed Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory operates the main hangar on the Hanscom Air Force Base flight line. This very large building (~93,000sqft) accommodates the Laboratory's airborne test...

  15. 77 FR 22376 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Grant Assurances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... established after December 30, 1987, will be expended by it for the capital or operating costs of the airport... structures (such as runways, taxiways, aprons, terminal buildings, hangars, and roads), including all... the Airport and Airway Trust Fund. * * * * * Issued in Washington, DC on April 10, 2012. Benito De...

  16. 76 FR 485 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... comments received, and other information. The street address for the Docket Office (telephone 800-647-5527... history of airplanes subject to those regulations, and existing maintenance practices for fuel tank... is made under normally available lighting conditions such as daylight, hangar lighting, flashlight...

  17. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid Coil Passes Test

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    First they secured anything magnetic: metal tools, nuts and bolts, tables. Then they cleared the magnet assembly building, as big as an airplane hangar, and locked it tight. Before turning on the magnet for its maiden test, they waited till the dead of night so no one else would be around.

  18. Transport of one SC coil through the village of Meyrin

    CERN Multimedia

    1956-01-01

    The energizing coils of the Synchro-cyclotron magnet were manufactured in Belgium before travelling to Basel in Switzerland by boat and continuing by road to Geneva. The first coil reached Geneva in December 1955, with the second following in early 1956. The coils were stored in a hangar at the Geneva airport before they were brought to CERN in May 1956.

  19. 78 FR 62012 - Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-11

    ... facility would be constructed within a historic airplane hangar complex on Floyd Bennett Field, which is... and groups; newspapers and libraries in the project area; and parties to this proceeding. Paper copy... particular project is considered a ``Comment on a Filing.'' (3) You may file a paper copy of your comments at...

  20. Your Freedom to Fly - AOPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    at 8:30 a.m. EST on Tuesday, May 29. Already a member? Please login below for an enhanced experience & Medical AOPA Hangar Store AOPA Logo Join Renew AOPA Credit Card Donate Foundation Login Travel Membership Join Now Renew Membership Benefits Products and Discounts AOPA Super Cub Sweepstakes Login Travel

  1. Operational Procedures for Powering Up, Powering Down, and Configuring the Qualification Model of the FLTSATCOM Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    effect , otherwise field is blank. ra - routing address in octal cmdv - command value in octal 118 nn - optional: number of times to repeat if CX request...Processing Equipment AE Hangar AE at Eastern i-zt Range AEA Auxiliary Electronics Assembly AFETR Air Force Eastern Test Range AFSCF Air Force Satellite

  2. The effect of air dried conditions on mechanical and physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... small dimension wooden material is used and this affects the cost of ... The first serious application of laminating technique ... buildings, stock hangar, farms and stables constructions ... resistant lamine elements to air dried condition were easy .... the other was organic solvent water repellent protim WR230.

  3. KSC-03PD-2322

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The STS-114 crew is welcomed to Hangar AF, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, by Joseph Chaput, with United Space Alliance. The crew, from left, are Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi, Commander Eileen Collins, Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson and (partially hidden) Pilot James Kelly. Noguchi is with the Japanese space agency NASDA. On the mission, the crew will carry the MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and External Stowage Platform 2 to the International Space Station. The MPLM will contain supplies and equipment. Another goal of the mission is to remove and replace a Control Moment Gyro. Launch date for mission STS-114 is under review. Hangar AF is the site where SRB Retrieval Ships return the spent solid rocket boosters after a Shuttle launch. The SRBs are lifted from the water and placed on rail cars to begin the disassembly and refurbishment process.

  4. Programmatic Environmental Assessment Addressing the Development, Use, and Maintenance of Military Training Areas at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    and training. The structures include a large hangar, three steel structures, and one Quonset hut- style structure. A records review indicates these...composition. Soils are the unconsolidated materials overlying bedrock or other parent material. Soils typically are described in terms of their complex...Years of Experience: 21 Michelle Bare 377 MSG/CEIE – NEPA Contract Support General Studies Years of Experience: 26 Sharon Newman Gulf South

  5. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  6. Fleet Sizing Analysis Methodologies for the Royal Australian Navy’s Combat Helicopter Replacement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Organisation 506 Lorimer St Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 Australia Telephone: 1300 DEFENCE (1300 333 363) Fax: (03) 9626 7999 © Commonwealth of...tails can become ‘hangar queens ’: i.e., tails that have achieved their hours and have been awaiting maintenance for a long time. These tails are...Organisation 506 Lorimer St Fishermans Bend Victoria 3207 Australia 6a. DSTO NUMBER DSTO-TR-2886 6b. AR NUMBER AR-015-695 6c. TYPE OF REPORT

  7. Capital Improvement Program Environmental Assessment, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Counsel • Air Force Office of Special Investigations • Air Force Audit Agency • Boeing Aerospace Operations Inc . • Defense Security Service...this corresponds to a factor of 10 in relative sound energy (Bolt, Beranek, and Meuman, Inc . 1973). Table 4-1 shows the dBA scale of commons...configuration for the B-47. Intact -Interior shop upgraded for Nike Hercules in 1961. 5020 Field Maintenance Hangar Large Aircraft Maintenance Dock

  8. Environmental Assessment: Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Command (CERDEC) Flight Activity Facility at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    portions of the original Lakehurst Proving Ground operations, specifically a goat pasture and associated farm buildings, were located within the project...would continue to receive fuel from the centrally managed fuel farm operation located south of Hangar 6. • The facility would connect to existing...Rounds Road. An undated map6 from the Lakehurst Proving Ground era depicts the project study area as a fenced goat pasture. 3.2.1 Zoning and

  9. Diversité de variétés, de production et de conservation de mangues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    planteurs pratiquent le séchage traditionnel. (Figure 17A) à l'air libre, sur les nattes à même le sol, sur les hangars ou sur les toits de case (77,99%) et la transformation de mangues en sirop ou en confiture (4,99%). Ces mangues séchées (Figure 17B) sont vendues sur les marchés locaux ou dans les centres urbains, et ...

  10. Navy DDG-51 and DDG-1000 Destroyer Programs: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Capability Build 16 Combat System upgrade as well as testing of the AMDR minimum track range requirement against supersonic, sea- skimming ASCM threat...the Navy awarded a fixed price contract to Bath Iron Works for a steel deckhouse, hangar, and aft peripheral vertical launching system for the third...and that originally planned for the CG(X). The ships reflected in this program have been priced based on continuation of the existing DDG 51 re

  11. DATABASE OF MIGRATION AND REPLICATION WITH ORACLE GOLDEN GATE

    OpenAIRE

    Suharjito Suharjito; Raymond Raymond; Ida Ratna

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this research is to analyze and design a database configuration of migration and replication in PT Metro Batavia. Research methodologies used in this research are data collecting, analysis and design model. Data collecting method is conducted with library research and direct survey in the company. Analysis method is conducted by analyzing hangar system, migration and reflection process and the available problems. Design method is conducted by designing a prototype for migrati...

  12. Aplikasi Migrasi Database dan Replikasi Bi-Directional

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Yoseph Ricky

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to analyze and design a migration and replication configurations in an enterprise using several methods such as literary study and direc survey to the company; analysis on hangar systems, process migration and replication as well as existing problems; and a prototype design for migration process implementated with Oracle SQL Developer and replication process implementated with Oracle GoldenGate. The study resluts ini a prototype for migration and replication configuration proc...

  13. Removal of Perfluorooctanoic Acid from Water Using Primitive, Conventional and Novel Carbonaceous Sorbent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyfluoroalkyl Substances ( PFAS ), like perfluorooctanoic acid, have been used for the last 50 years in a wide variety of industrial processes and...The Department of Defense (DoD) has used PFAS -based Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) at fire training facilities and aircraft hangars. These AFFFs have...contaminated approximately 600 sites classified as fire training facilities with PFAS (Huang, 2013). This study focused on testing the most likely

  14. Developing an entry strategy for Swedish markets : Study for the case company

    OpenAIRE

    Vuoti, Saana

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is made for an international hangar door manufacturer. The purpose of the thesis is to help the managers of the company with creating an entry strategy to Swedish markets. Even the company has experience in international business each market area is different and the marketing research has to be done carefully before starting to develop promotion mix and practices to apply when dealing with Swedish customers. The outcome of the thesis will be an entry strategy that will help to fi...

  15. Application of image based measurement techniques for the investigation of aeroengine performance on a commercial aircraft in ground operation

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Andreas; Geisler, Reinhard; Schanz, Daniel; Agocs, Janos; Pallek, Dieter; Schroll, Michael; Klinner, Joachim; Beversdorff, Manfred; Voges, Melanie; Willert, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of the flow and sound field upstream and downstream of a full scale aeroengine is aimed at providing important reference data required for reliable modeling and prediction. In this regard a wide variety of contactless and non-invasive laser optical and acoustic measurement techniques have matured in recent years to allow their application on full scale aircraft. Within a measurement campaign involving an Airbus A320 DLR research aircraft inside a sound-attenuating hangar at ...

  16. Insonorización en el aeropuerto de Hamburgo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havemann, H. Konrad

    1963-04-01

    Full Text Available Airports, especially the older ones, are faced with the problem of sound intensity. At the time of their construction most of them were situated in sparesely inhabited zones. But the expansion of the urban radius of the large cities has extended the residential areas to the neighbourhood of the airports, and this has given rise to the problem of sound abatement since it is obviously necessary to reduce as far as possible the nuisance which excessive noise creates to the local population. To overcome one aspect of the problem, the construction of a soundproof hangar has been initiated at Hamburg, so that the noise which the engines make, during their warmingup period, can be controlled. The airliners will be inside this hanger during the period of tuning up, or warming up of the engines. The tests of this hangar, under working conditions, have proved satisfactory. The general structure is of prestressed concrete, with strong transversal portal frames. A number of accoustical plates have been supported from the roof, and they will act as sound absorbers. The exterior aspect of the building is original, showing a powerful design of strong lines.Los aeropuertos, particularmente los más antiguos, presentan actualmente el problema del ruido, ya que cuando se construyeron se hallaban enclavados en zonas apenas habitadas. La expansión y diario crecimiento del radio urbano de las grandes ciudades lleva los barrios residenciales a las inmediaciones de los aeropuertos y, con ello, aparece el problema de la insonorización, pues deben evitarse, o por lo menos atenuar, las molestias que los ruidos excesivos crean en las zonas de habitación. Para dar solución a este estado de cosas se ha emprendido, en Hamburgo, la construcción de un hangar de insonorización de los ruidos que los aparatos modernos hacen al poner sus motores en marcha. El tiempo de calentamiento de motores, espera, etc., lo pasará el aparato en marcha en el interior de este hangar. Los

  17. Measurement Capabilities of the DOE ARM Aerial Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Kluzek, C. D.; Chand, D.; Pekour, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites in three important climatic regimes that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties. ARM also operates mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months) to investigate understudied climate regimes around the globe. Finally, airborne observations by ARM's Aerial Facility (AAF) enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval algorithm development, and model evaluation that is not possible using ground-based techniques. AAF started out in 2007 as a "virtual hangar" with no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments owned by ARM. In this mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, the Battelle owned G-1 aircraft was included in the ARM facility. The G-1 is a large twin turboprop aircraft, capable of measurements up to altitudes of 7.5 km and a range of 2,800 kilometers. Furthermore the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of seventeen new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also heavily engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments. In the presentation we will showcase science applications based on measurements from recent field campaigns such as CARES, CALWATER and TCAP.

  18. Sea Fighter Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    which is used by the model to drive the normal activities of the crew (Figure C.1-2). These routines consist of a sequential list of high- level...separately. Figure C.1-3: Resources & Logic Sheet C.1.1.4 Scenario The scenario that is performed during a model run is a sequential list of all...were marked with a white fore and aft lineup stripe on both landing spots. Current Sea Fighter design does not provide a hangar; however, there

  19. KSC-03PD-1526

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Reporters at the dedication ceremony of a NASA hangar at the San Jose, Costa Rica, airport observe the WB-57f takeoff for its sixth Costa Rican flight. KSC and NASA researchers are testing the Aircraft-based Volcanic Emission Mass Spectrometer (AVEMS) that determines the presence and concentration of various chemicals. It is being tested in flights over the Turrialba volcano in Costa Rica, and in the crater, sampling and analyzing fresh volcanic gases in their natural chemical state. The AVEMS system has been developed for use in the Space Shuttle program, to detect toxic gas leaks and emissions in the Shuttles aft compartment and the crew compartment.

  20. Operational Test Instrumentation Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    System. A topographic, transit-level measuring system, instrumented with altimeter, clinometers, compasses , and an alidade, plane table, and stadia rod...dual hangar 250 x 135 feet with two door openings, 80 feet each. There is no compass swing base, no electronic landing aids, ro aircraft wash or...month) of SDG &E) Haybarn Canyon 15,000 6,183,870 Lan Pulgas 1,500 433,890 Las Pulgas Well #41621 100 4,258 Las Pulgas Well #41611 150 7,548 Las Flores

  1. NOAA-L satellite is mated to Apogee Kick Motor at Vandenberg AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., workers oversee the mating of the Apogee Kick Motor (below) to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite above. NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. NOAA-L satellite arrives at Vandenberg AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Outside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., a crated National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite is lowered to the ground before being moved inside. NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. KSC-03PD-2332

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. STS-114 Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi, who is with the Japanese space agency NASDA, poses on the deck of one of the SRB Retrieval Ships docked at Hangar AF on the Banana River. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly and Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson toured the ships. Mission STS-114 will carry the MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and External Stowage Platform 2 to the International Space Station. The MPLM will contain supplies and equipment. Another goal of the mission is to remove and replace a Control Moment Gyro. Launch date for mission STS-114 is under review.

  2. KSC-03PD-2333

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. STS-114 Pilot James Kelly talks with Bren Wade, captain of the Liberty Star, one of the SRB Retrieval Ships docked at Hangar AF on the Banana River. Kelly and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson toured the ships. Noguchi is with the Japanese space agency NASDA. Mission STS-114 will carry the MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and External Stowage Platform 2 to the International Space Station. The MPLM will contain supplies and equipment. Another goal of the mission is to remove and replace a Control Moment Gyro. Launch date for mission STS-114 is under review.

  3. M.I.N.G., Mars Investment for a New Generation: Robotic construction of a permanently manned Mars base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Jeff; Beeman, Randy; Brown, Susan; Calhoun, John; Hill, John; Howorth, Lark; Mcfaden, Clay; Nguyen, Paul; Reid, Philip; Rexrode, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    A basic procedure for robotically constructing a manned Mars base is outlined. The research procedure was divided into three areas: environment, robotics, and habitat. The base as designed will consist of these components: two power plants, communication facilities, a habitat complex, and a hangar, a garage, recreation and manufacturing facilities. The power plants will be self-contained nuclear fission reactors placed approx. 1 km from the base for safety considerations. The base communication system will use a combination of orbiting satellites and surface relay stations. This system is necessary for robotic contact with Phobos and any future communication requirements. The habitat complex will consist of six self-contained modules: core, biosphere, science, living quarters, galley/storage, and a sick bay which will be brought from Phobos. The complex will be set into an excavated hole and covered with approximately 0.5 m of sandbags to provide radiation protection for the astronauts. The recreation, hangar, garage, and manufacturing facilities will each be transformed from the four one-way landers. The complete complex will be built by autonomous, artificially intelligent robots. Robots incorporated into the design are as follows: Large Modular Construction Robots with detachable arms capable of large scale construction activities; Small Maneuverable Robotic Servicers capable of performing delicate tasks normally requiring a suited astronaut; and a trailer vehicle with modular type attachments to complete specific tasks; and finally, Mobile Autonomous Rechargeable Transporters capable of transferring air and water from the manufacturing facility to the habitat complex.

  4. Inhalation exposure to jet fuel (JP8) among U.S. Air Force personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristen W; Proctor, Susan P; Ozonoff, Al; McClean, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    As jet fuel is a common occupational exposure among military and civilian populations, this study was conducted to characterize jet fuel (JP8) exposure among active duty U.S. Air Force personnel. Personnel (n = 24) were divided a priori into high, moderate, and low exposure groups. Questionnaires and personal air samples (breathing zone) were collected from each worker over 3 consecutive days (72 worker-days) and analyzed for total hydrocarbons (THC), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and naphthalene. Air samples were collected from inside the fuel tank and analyzed for the same analytes. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the exposure data. Our results show that the correlation of THC (a measure of overall JP8 inhalation exposure) with all other analytes was moderate to strong in the a priori high and moderate exposure groups combined. Inhalation exposure to all analytes varied significantly by self-reported JP8 exposure (THC levels higher among workers reporting JP8 exposure), a priori exposure group (THC levels in high group > moderate group > low group), and more specific job task groupings (THC levels among workers in fuel systems hangar group > refueling maintenance group > fuel systems office group > fuel handling group > clinic group), with task groupings explaining the most between-worker variability. Among highly exposed workers, statistically significant job task-related predictors of inhalation exposure to THC indicated that increased time in the hangar, working close to the fuel tank (inside > less than 25 ft > greater than 25 ft), primary job (entrant > attendant/runner/fireguard > outside hangar), and performing various tasks near the fuel tank, such as searching for a leak, resulted in higher JP8 exposure. This study shows that while a priori exposure groups were useful in distinguishing JP8 exposure levels, job task-based categories should be considered in epidemiologic study designs to improve exposure classification. Finally

  5. Brote de histoplasmosis en la Escuela de Cadetes de la Base Aérea de Morón, Provincia de Buenos Aires, República Argentina Histoplasmosis outbreak in Morón, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Negroni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe un brote de histoplasmosis que afectó a 6 cadetes de la Fuerza Aérea Argentina, sin antecedentes patológicos previos. Todos consultaron por problemas respiratorios después de haber limpiado un hangar. En ese recinto se encontraron abundantes deyecciones de animales, presuntamente de palomas y murciélagos. Los pacientes sufrieron fiebre, mialgias, taquipnea y tos no productiva. Las radiografías y tomografías de tórax mostraron imágenes pulmonares micronodulares, engrosamiento de los tabiques interalveolares y adenopatías hiliares. Todos tuvieron una evolución favorable y no requirieron tratamiento antifúngico. Las pruebas de inmunodifusión y contrainmunoelectroforesis con antígenos de Histoplasma capsulatum fueron positivas, al igual que las intradermorreacciones con histoplasmina. Se recogieron 5 muestras de tierra del lugar, las que fueron inoculadas por vía intraperitoneal a 20 hámsteres. De los cultivos de hígado y bazo de dichos animales se consiguió aislar la fase micelial de H. capsulatum. La cepa aislada se comparó con las obtenidas de 12 pacientes argentinos utilizando perfiles genéticos y se observó un clado único con más de 96% de similitud, lo que confirma la homogeneidad de las cepas argentinas. Si bien la histoplasmosis es endémica en la Pampa húmeda, este es el primer brote totalmente documentado al sur del paralelo 34°.An histoplasmosis outbreak affecting 6 previously healthy Air Force cadets is herein presented. The patients suffered from fever and respiratory symptoms after having cleaned an abandoned hangar soiled with pigeons and bat droppings. They all presented fever, myalgia, tachypnea, and nonproductive cough. Chest X-ray and CT scan studies showed disseminated reticulonodular images affecting both lungs. Hiliar adenomegalies were also observed. All patients achieved a favourable outcome without antifungal treatment. Both serologic tests searching for specificic antibodies

  6. KSC-03PD-1525

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At the airport in San Jose, Costa Rica, the NASA hangar is dedicated. The speaker is Hermann Faith, executive director, Costa Rica-USA (CRUSA) Foundation. At the table are (from left) Dr. Jorge Andres Diaz, head scientiest CARTA mission; Gary Shelton, NASA deployment manager; Dr. Pedro Leon, general director, National Center for Advanced Technology (CENAT); Dr. Rogelio Pardo, minister of science and tchnology; John Danilovioch, U.S. ambassador to Costa Rica; and Lic. Vilma Lopez, subdirector, Civil Aviation (DGAC). NASA KSC has been testing its Aircraft-based Volcanic Emission Mass Spectrometer (AVEMS) in flights over the Turrialba volcano and in the crater, sampling and analyzing fresh volcanic gases in their natural chemical state. The AVEMS system has been developed for use in the Space Shuttle program, to detect toxic gas leaks and emissions in the Shuttles aft compartment and the crew compartment.

  7. Management of radioactive waste generated from the use of radiation sources in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, L.

    2000-01-01

    Activities associated with collection, transportation and disposal of low-medium activity solid and liquid RAW and spent radiation sources in the country are performed by 'Radon' enterprise. On the territory the following facilities are placed: 14 storage facilities for solid RAW disposal - 10 of them are filled and closed; 14 storage facilities for temporary liquid RAW storage - 2 of them are filled and closed; 14 storage facilities for spent radiation sources - 4 of them are closed. There are storage facilities in Kiev and Kharkov for solid RAW with capacity reserve of approximately 50% and hangar type storage facility in Lvov with capacity reserve - 90%. For all facilities licenses are issued. During 1999 SNRA has analyzed the fulfilment of the license conditions

  8. F-16XL Ship #2 Laminar Flow Glove mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's two-seat F-16XL research aircraft is shown in the modification hangar at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during installation of a titanium 'glove' on the upper surface of its modified left wing. The aircraft subsequently carried out a 13-month-long, 45-flight research program which investigated drawing off a small part of the boundary-layer air in order to provide laminar--or smooth--flow over a major portion of a wing flying at supersonic speeds. A turbo-compressor in the aircraft's fuselage provided suction to draw air through more than 10 million tiny laser-drilled holes in the glove via a manifold system employing 20 valves. Data obtained during the program could assist designers of future aircraft in developing a more efficient high-speed civil transport.

  9. Ceremony celebrates 50 years of rocket launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Ceremony celebrates 50 years of rocket launches PL00C-10364.12 At the 50th anniversary ceremony celebrating the first rocket launch from pad 3 on what is now Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Norris Gray waves to the audience. Gray was part of the team who successfully launched the first rocket, known as Bumper 8. The ceremony was hosted by the Air Force Space & Missile Museum Foundation, Inc. , and included launch of a Bumper 8 model rocket, presentation of a Bumper Award to Florida Sen. George Kirkpatrick by the National Space Club; plus remarks by Sen. Kirkpatrick, KSC's Center Director Roy Bridges, and the Commander of the 45th Space Wing, Brig. Gen. Donald Pettit. Also attending the ceremony were other members of the original Bumper 8 team. A reception followed at Hangar C. Since 1950 there have been a total of 3,245 launches from Cape Canaveral.

  10. Franco Bonaudi 1928-2008

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The famous photograph taken during the first interactions in the ISR in 1971. Kjell Johnsen speaks into the microphone. Franco Bonaudi can be seen on the far left. Franco Bonaudi, one of the true pioneers of CERN’s accelerators, passed away on 21 December 2008. In 1951, Franco Bonaudi was a young research engineer specialising in electronics and radiofrequency at the Politecnico di Torino, when he was invited by Edoardo Amaldi, one of the founders of CERN, to consider working for the provisional organisation that became known as CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Accepting the challenge, he was sent to Liverpool in July 1952 to work with the study group led by Cornelius Bakker for the first CERN accelerator, the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC). After two years in Liverpool, he joined the rest of the newly appointed staff in the Geneva Airport hangar, where the future SC Divis...

  11. The FUSE satellite is encased in a canister before being moved to the Launch Pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), the last segment is lifted over the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite already encased in a protective canister. The satellite will next be moved to Launch Pad 17A, CCAS, for its scheduled launch June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE was developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., to investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  12. KSC-04PD-2187

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Technicians at NASAs Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), help guide the Swift spacecraft being lowered onto a payload attach fitting, the interface between the spacecraft and the second stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi- wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. Swift is expected to observe more than 200 gamma-ray bursts the most comprehensive study of GRB afterglows to date during its 2-year mission. Swift is scheduled to launch in November from Launch Pad 17-A at CCAFS.

  13. KSC-04PD-2186

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Technicians at NASAs Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), help guide the Swift spacecraft being lowered onto a payload attach fitting, the interface between the spacecraft and the second stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi- wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. Swift is expected to observe more than 200 gamma-ray bursts the most comprehensive study of GRB afterglows to date during its 2-year mission. Swift is scheduled to launch in November from Launch Pad 17-A at CCAFS.

  14. KSC-03PD-2331

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. While touring the SRB Retrieval Ship Freedom Star, STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi point at something on the Banana River. Noguchi is with the Japanese space agency NASDA. The ships routinely are docked at Hangar AF on the river. On their mission, the crew which also includes Pilot James Kelly and Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson will carry the MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and External Stowage Platform 2 to the International Space Station. The MPLM will contain supplies and equipment. Another goal of the mission is to remove and replace a Control Moment Gyro. Launch date for mission STS-114 is under review.

  15. KSC-03PD-2334

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The STS-114 crew poses on deck with the captain of the Liberty Star, one of the SRB Retrieval Ships docked at Hangar AF on the Banana River. From left are Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi, Capt. Bren Wade, Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson. Noguchi is with the Japanese space agency NASDA. Mission STS-114 will carry the MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and External Stowage Platform 2 to the International Space Station. The MPLM will contain supplies and equipment. Another goal of the mission is to remove and replace a Control Moment Gyro. Launch date for mission STS-114 is under review.

  16. Opinion presented on the behalf of the Commission for Economic Affairs on the finance bill project for 2015 (nr 2234) - Volume III - ecology, sustainable development and mobility - energy. Nr 2262

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistel, Marie-Noelle

    2014-01-01

    After a presentation of budgetary allocations for energy, this report discusses the participation of agriculture to energy transition, particularly with the emergence of farmers who are also energy producers (development of photovoltaic on agricultural hangars, development of anaerobic digestion supported by public policies), and the development of a French model of anaerobic digestion oriented towards circular economy (reasons for supporting anaerobic digestion, solutions to boost the sector). The last part addresses the management of consumption by farmers and how to take a new energy problematic into account: as agriculture is a sector highly dependent on energy and with a high consumption of fossil energies, efforts are made to reduce this consumption and improve energy efficiency by means of the energy performance plan

  17. The Space Station as a Construction Base for Large Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using the Space Station as a construction site for large space structures is examined. An overview is presented of the results of a program entitled Definition of Technology Development Missions (TDM's) for Early Space Stations - Large Space Structures. The definition of LSS technology development missions must be responsive to the needs of future space missions which require large space structures. Long range plans for space were assembled by reviewing Space System Technology Models (SSTM) and other published sources. Those missions which will use large space structures were reviewed to determine the objectives which must be demonstrated by technology development missions. The three TDM's defined during this study are: (1) a construction storage/hangar facility; (2) a passive microwave radiometer; and (3) a precision optical system.

  18. Aeropuerto internacional de Kansas City – (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivett, -

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available The four new terminals of this airport are low, circular modules, entirely transparent due to the extensive use of glass. The main purpose of the project has been to minimize the walking distance for the passengers, reducing it to one sixth of the normal distance at the present airports. In the centre of the groups of terminals a multifunctional complex has been erected, consisting of: control tower —extension of the previous one— which is 60 m and has become one of the highest in the world: airport administration offices; office complex power plant, situated in the lower part of the unit. In all the buildings concrete has been utilized as basic material in structures and various construction elements; additional features are insulating glass panels on the facades and parquet for the floors. Further constructions at the airport are: a hotel with 600 rooms, shopping centers, exhibition halls, hangars, storage premises and a parking space.Las cuatro nuevas terminales de este aeropuerto son construcciones circulares, de baja altura, totalmente diáfanas gracias al uso masivo del vidrio. El objetivo principal del proyecto fue minimizar las distancias a recorrer por los pasajeros, reduciéndolas una sexta parte de lo normal en los aeropuertos actuales. En el centro del grupo de terminales se ha levantado un complejo multifuncional compuesto por: torre de control —ampliación de la antigua— que con sus 60 m se ha convertido en una de las más altas del mundo; oficinas administrativas del departamento de aviación; central de información meteorológica; y planta técnica de servicios e instalaciones, situada en la parte baja del complejo. En todos los edificios se ha utilizado el hormigón como material base en estructuras y distintos elementos constructivos. Se complementa con los paneles aislantes, de vidrio, empleados en las fachadas, y con el parquet que cubre todos los suelos. Otras construcciones del aeropuerto son: un hotel

  1. Aerospace News: Space Shuttle Commemoration. Volume 2, No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The complex space shuttle design was comprised of four components: the external tank, two solid rocket boosters (SRB), and the orbiter vehicle. Six orbiters were used during the life of the program. In order of introduction into the fleet, they were: Enterprise (a test vehicle), Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour. The space shuttle had the unique ability to launch into orbit, perform on-orbit tasks, return to earth and land on a runway. It was an orbiting laboratory, International Space Station crew delivery and supply replenisher, satellite launcher and payload delivery vehicle, all in one. Except for the external tank, all components of the space shuttle were designed to be reusable for many flights. ATK s reusable solid rocket motors (RSRM) were designed to be flown, recovered, and the metal components reused 20 times. Following each space shuttle launch, the SRBs would parachute into the ocean and be recovered by the Liberty Star and Freedom Star recovery ships. The recovered boosters would then be received at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Hangar AF facility for disassembly and engineering post-flight evaluation. At Hangar AF, the RSRM field joints were demated and the segments prepared to be returned to Utah by railcar. The segments were then shipped to ATK s facilities in Clearfield for additional evaluation prior to washout, disassembly and refurbishment. Later the refurbished metal components would be transported to ATK s Promontory facilities to begin a new cycle. ATK s RSRMs were manufactured in Promontory, Utah. During the Space Shuttle Program, ATK supported NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center whose responsibility was for all propulsion elements on the program, including the main engines and solid rocket motors. On launch day for the space shuttle, ATK s Launch Site Operations employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) provided lead engineering support for ground operations and NASA s chief engineer. It was ATK s responsibility

  2. HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly and Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway

  3. Ensuring the 50 year life of a fissile material container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.; Towne, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Sandia was presented with an opportunity in 1993 to design containers for the long term storage and transport of fissile material. This program was undertaken at the direction of the US Department of Energy and in cooperation with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory which were tasked with developing the internal fixturing for the contents. The hardware is being supplied by Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and the packaging will occur at Mason and Hangar Corporation's Pantex Plant. The unique challenge was to design a container that could be sealed with the fissile material contents; and, anytime during the next 50 years, the container could be transported with only the need for the pre-shipment leak test. This required not only a rigorous design capable of meeting the long term storage and transportation requirements, but also resulted in development of a surveillance program to ensure that the container continues to perform as designed over the 50-year life. This paper addresses the design of the container, the testing that was undertaken to demonstrate compliance with US radioactive materials transport regulations, and the surveillance program that has been initiated to ensure the 50-year performance

  4. HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

    2005-02-01

    Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

  5. Responding effectively to fuel spills at airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Fuel spills are among the most frequent causes of emergency calls faced by airport firefighters. Most fuel spills are a result of human error and careless procedures. They always constitute an emergency and require fast, efficient action to prevent disaster. A fuel spill is an accidental release of fuel, in this case, from an aircraft fuel system, refueling vehicle or refueling system. A normal release of a few drops of fuel associated with a disconnection or other regular fueling operations should not be classified as a fuel spill. However, anytime fuel must be cleaned up and removed from an area, a fuel spill has occurred. Volatile fuels pose significant threats to people, equipment, facilities and cargo when they are released. Anyone near a spill, including ramp workers, fueling personnel and aircraft occupants, are in danger if the fuel ignites. Buildings and equipment in a spill area, such as terminals, hangars, aircraft, fuel trucks and service equipment also are at risk. An often neglected point is that aircraft cargo also is threatened by fuel spills

  6. DATABASE OF MIGRATION AND REPLICATION WITH ORACLE GOLDEN GATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharjito Suharjito

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research is to analyze and design a database configuration of migration and replication in PT Metro Batavia. Research methodologies used in this research are data collecting, analysis and design model. Data collecting method is conducted with library research and direct survey in the company. Analysis method is conducted by analyzing hangar system, migration and reflection process and the available problems. Design method is conducted by designing a prototype for migration process with the implementation of Oracle SQL Developer and replication process with implementation of Oracle Golden Gate. The result of this research is a prototype for configuration of migration and replication process by using Oracle Golden Gate, which can produce two sets of identical data for the purpose of backup and recovery, and also design a simple tool that is expected to help active-active or active-passive replication process. The conclusion of this research is migration process of MySQL database to Oracle database by using Oracle Golden Gate hasn’t been conducted, because Oracle Golden Gate still has bug related to binary log, so database of migration is conducted by using Oracle Golden Gate. However, replication of bi-directional in between database of Oracle by using Oracle SQL Developer can guarantee data availability and reduce work burden from primary database.

  7. Aplikasi Migrasi Database dan Replikasi Bi-Directional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Yoseph Ricky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze and design a migration and replication configurations in an enterprise using several methods such as literary study and direc survey to the company; analysis on hangar systems, process migration and replication as well as existing problems; and a prototype design for migration process implementated with Oracle SQL Developer and replication process implementated with Oracle GoldenGate. The study resluts ini a prototype for migration and replication configuration processes using Oracle's Golden Gate which can produce two sets of identical data for backup and recovery. Also a simple tool is designed to assist active-active replication process as well as active-passive one. The migration process from MySQL database to Oracle database using Oracle GoldenGate can not be done because GoldenGate Oracle has bugs related to the binary log, so database migration is done using Oracle SQL Developer. However, bi-directional replication between Oracle database using Oracle GoldenGate can ensure data availability and reduce the workload of primary database. 

  8. M.I.N.G., Mars Investment for a New Generation: Robotic construction of a permanently manned Mars base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Jeff; Beeman, Randy; Brown, Susan; Calhoun, John; Hill, John; Howorth, Lark; McFaden, Clay; Nguyen, Paul; Reid, Philip; Rexrode, Stuart

    1989-05-01

    A basic procedure for robotically constructing a manned Mars base is outlined. The research procedure was divided into three areas: environment, robotics, and habitat. The base as designed will consist of these components: two power plants, communication facilities, a habitat complex, and a hanger, a garage, recreation and manufacturing facilities. The power plants will be self-contained nuclear fission reactors placed approx. 1 km from the base for safety considerations. The base communication system will use a combination of orbiting satellites and surface relay stations. This system is necessary for robotic contact with Phobos and any future communication requirements. The habitat complex will consist of six self-contained modules: core, biosphere, science, living quarters, galley/storage, and a sick bay which will be brought from Phobos. The complex will be set into an excavated hole and covered with approximately 0.5 m of sandbags to provide radiation protection for the astronauts. The recreation, hangar, garage, and manufacturing facilities will each be transformed from the four one-way landers. The complete complex will be built by autonomous, artificially intelligent robots. Robots incorporated into the design are as follows: Large Modular Construction Robots with detachable arms capable of large scale construction activities; Small Maneuverable Robotic Servicers capable of performing delicate tasks normally requiring a suited astronaut; and a trailer vehicle with modular type attachments to complete specific tasks; and finally, Mobile Autonomous Rechargeable Transporters capable of transferring air and water from the manufacturing facility to the habitat complex.

  9. Breaking the ground for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Have you noticed that Building 135 has disappeared from the Meyrin site? The old hangar used by the transport service – now located on the Prévessin site – has been removed to make room for the civil engineering work for the High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) installations. The work began at the end of August and it will not be long before new buildings start to appear in the ISOLDE premises.   Beamlines in the ISOLDE Hall. HIE-ISOLDE is a major upgrade, which will make the 44-year-old ISOLDE an internationally unique facility capable of accelerating heavy radioactive elements like no other. This important feature will allow the large ISOLDE scientific community to set up new experiments and explore the nuclear structure over the entire nuclear chart. A new superconducting linear accelerator, new beam lines and improved targets will replace the current installations. The cost of the upgrade is estimated at around 36 million Swiss francs. It will be ...

  10. Space Station Freedom - What if...?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Jerry

    1992-10-01

    The use of novel structural designs and the Energia launch system of the Commonwealth of Independent States for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program is evaluated by means of a concept analysis. The analysis assumes that: (1) Energia is used for all cargo and logistics resupply missions; (2) the shuttles are launched from the U.S.; and (3) an eight-person assured crew return vehicle is available. This launch/supply scenario reduces the deployment risk from 30 launches to a total of only eight launches reducing the cost by about 15 billion U.S. dollars. The scenario also significantly increases the expected habitable and storage volumes and decreases the deployment time by three years over previous scenarios. The specific payloads are given for Energia launches emphasizing a proposed design for the common module cluster that incorporates direct structural attachment to the truss at midspan. The design is shown to facilitate the accommodation of additional service hangars and to provide a more efficient program for spacecraft habitable space.

  11. The new building for Linac4 is ready ahead of schedule

    CERN Multimedia

    Francesco Poppi

    2010-01-01

    When various teams work together efficiently to achieve a common goal, not only are projects successfully completed but they may ever be ready before the deadline. On 22 October, after two years of civil engineering work and about two months ahead of schedule, the building that will host the new Linac4 was unveiled in the presence of the Director-General and of Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology.   Entrance to new Linac 4 tunnel. For the time being, the new two-storey 3000 m2 building looks like a huge empty hangar. Very soon, though, the ground floor will start to be filled with the technical equipment and the klystrons. The Linac4 itself will be installed in the tunnel excavated below the ground. “Being 12 metres underground, deep inside what remains of the old “Mount Citron”, the tunnel provides excellent shielding for the new accelerator”, says Maurizio Vretenar, Linac4 Project Leader. The tunnel will be connected to the PS Booster...

  12. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  13. Linajes férreos: uso tipológico de precedentes ferroviarios en Albert Kahn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pancorbo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Los edificios industriales de la primera época de Kahn iniciaron un proceso sinérgico con los procesos de montaje, dependiendo cada vez más de la producción en cadena fordista, la cual puede homologarse, en su motricidad lineal, a la de un tren. Así, se llega a mostrar que las numerosas naves de montaje de vehículos para Ford o Packard son edificios de producción industrial y a la vez terminales de carga y descarga ferroviaria. Existió por tanto un interesante trasvase de elementos  tipológicos de las construcciones ferroviarias a la arquitectura industrial de Kahn, lo cual se analiza a través de ejemplos característicos como las terminales, las freighthouses, las trainsheds, los depots o las  enginehouses. El otro gran tipo constructivo de claro linaje ferroviario fueron los puentes metálicos norteamericanos, que a su vez fueron asimilados en las grandes estructuras de naves y hangares. Con ellos se aportaron soluciones a problemas de luces hasta entonces desconocidas, sugiriéndose un papel destacado, tanto aquí como en otros casos, en el empleo de voladizos.

  14. Estudio de impacto ambiental de un aeródromo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Orea, Domingo

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Airports and aerodromes are transport infrastructures which, apart from contributing to the mobility of people and goods, favor social development, since they promote new activities, stimulate local initiatives and reassess bordering areas. This article presents a synthesis of the Environmental Impact Study of a future aerodrome, whose design project is way at present. The aerodrome is submitted to the EIA administrative procedure due to the currently applicable specific legislation: R.D. 1302/86. The technical document submitted for study is the special plan of the aerodrome. One of the basic criteria in the conception of airports and private airfields is the compatibility with the habitability of the environment as well as with the ecological and landscape conditions. This criteria should play a part in the orientation of the runways, trajectory of the taking off and landing maneuvers..., even in the location and design og the parking spaces, hangars and other facilities. This idea suggests the design be conceived with environmental-friendly sensibility, right from the initial stages, without leaving the responsibility of this issue to the environmental study impact. The present study has its own style of approaching the dissemination, consisting of the idea that the reader will find the methodological aspects more useful than the technical data which are of consequence only in the handling of the different project stages. The aspects which are also considered important for the reader are those which allowed the team of editors to form their criteria on the issues of expenses, environmental benefits of the design, its acceptability, etc. The methodology applied is a classical one, in accordance with the requirements of the EIA regulations.

    Los aeropuertos y aeródromos son infraestructuras de transporte que, además de contribuir a la movilidad de las personas y mercancías, fomentan el desarrollo porque promocionan nuevas

  15. Waste management in the Institute for Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca' - Belgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, J.; Avramovic, I.; Plecas, I.; Mandic, M.; Goldammer, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences served for many years as the only Yugoslav (Serbia and Montenegro) nuclear institute. Therefore, it acted for many years as national storage facility for the radioactive waste from all institutional (medical, military, etc.) activities. The interim storage was situated within the Vinca Institute historically at several different places. The main fraction of the wastes is stored in two metallic hangars. In addition, underground stainless steel tanks in concrete shields have been constructed to accept all processed liquid waste from the research reactor RA. The current situation of the interim storage facilities is not satisfactory. However, the principle limitation for improvements of the waste management at the Vinca Institute lies in the fact that long-term solutions cannot be addressed at the moment. Plans for a final repository for radioactive waste do not exist yet in the Serbia and Montenegro. Consequently, waste management can only address an interim solution. In order to conduct all waste management activities in a safe manner, an overall strategy and study for improvement/rearrangement of radioactive waste storage facilities was developed which addresses all wastes and their management. The IAEA is providing assistance to these activities. This support includes a project which has been initiated by the IAEA to improve the waste management at the Vinca Institute. This paper describes the current status of the development of this overall strategy and study for improvement/rearrangement of radioactive waste storage facilities. The information available and the current status of the development of concepts for the processing and storage of the waste are summarised. (author)

  16. Effect of helicopter transport on neurological outcomes in a mouse model of embolic stroke with reperfusion: AIR-MICE pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leira, Enrique C; Zaheer, Asgar; Schnell, Thomas; Torner, James C; Olalde, Heena M; Pieper, Andrew A; Ortega-Gutierrez, Santiago; Nagaraja, Nandakumar; Marks, Nancy L; Adams, Harold P

    2015-10-01

    Patients often suffer a stroke at a significant distance from a center capable of delivering endovascular therapy, thus requiring rapid transport by helicopter emergency medical services while receiving a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator infusion that was initiated locally. But little is known about how a helicopter flight may impact the safety and efficacy of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator-induced reperfusion and patient outcomes. To establish a new animal method to address with fidelity the safety and overall effect of helicopter emergency medical services during thrombolysis. Prospective randomized open blinded end-point study of an actual helicopter flight exposure. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were treated with a 10 mg/kg recombinant tissue plasminogen activator infusion two-hours after an embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion. Mice were randomized in pairs to simultaneously receive the infusion during a local helicopter flight or in a ground hangar. Eighteen mice (nine pairs) were analyzed. The paired t-test analysis showed nonsignificant smaller infarction volumes in the helicopter-assigned animals (mean pair difference 33 mm(3) , P = 0·33). The amount of hemorrhagic transformation between the helicopter and ground groups was 4·08 vs. 4·56 μl, respectively (paired t-test, P = 0·45). This study shows that helicopter emergency medical services do not have an inherent adverse effect on outcome in a mouse model of ischemic stroke with reperfusion. These results endorse the safety of the practice of using helicopter emergency medical services in stroke patients. The observed potential synergistic effect of helicopter-induced factors, such as vibration and changes in altitude, with reperfusion merits further exploration in animal experimental models and in stroke patients. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Occupational exposure to airborne particles and other pollutants in an aviation base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Bernabei, Manuele; Avino, Pasquale; Stabile, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The occupational exposure to airborne particles and other pollutants in a high performance jet engine airport was investigated. Three spatial scales were considered: i) a downwind receptor site, ii) close to the airstrip, iii) personal monitoring. Particle number, surface area, mass concentrations and distributions were measured as well as inorganic and organic fractions, ionic fractions and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Particle number distribution measured at a receptor site presents a mode of 80 nm and an average total concentration of 6.5 × 10 3 part. cm −3 ; the chemical analysis shows that all the elements may be attributed to long-range transport from the sea. Particle number concentrations in the proximity of the airstrip show short term peaks during the working day mainly related to takeoff, landing and pre-flight operations of jet engines. Personal exposure of workers highlights a median number concentration of 2.5 × 10 4 part. cm −3 and 1.7 × 10 4 part. cm −3 for crew chief and hangar operator. - Highlights: ► Air quality measures were performed at different spatial scales in an aviation base. ► Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons was estimated. ► Particles at downwind receptor site show a marine origin typical of a coastal site. ► Main exposure peaks are related to pre-flight operations of jet engine aircrafts. ► Crew chief are exposed to highest concentrations even if these were not worrisome. - A negligible impact of a high performance jet engine airport, in terms of airborne particles and other pollutants, was measured through an experimental campaign at three spatial scales.

  18. Five biomedical experiments flown in an Earth orbiting laboratory: Lessons learned from developing these experiments on the first international microgravity mission from concept to landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, C. M.; Lashbrook, J. J.; Callahan, P. X.; Schaefer, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    There are numerous problems associated with accommodating complex biological systems in microgravity in the flexible laboratory systems installed in the Orbiter cargo bay. This presentation will focus upon some of the lessons learned along the way from the University laboratory to the IML-1 Microgravity Laboratory. The First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission contained a large number of specimens, including: 72 million nematodes, US-1; 3 billion yeast cells, US-2; 32 million mouse limb-bud cells, US-3; and 540 oat seeds (96 planted), FOTRAN. All five of the experiments had to undergo significant redevelopment effort in order to allow the investigator's ideas and objectives to be accommodated within the constraints of the IML-1 mission. Each of these experiments were proposed as unique entities rather than part of the mission, and many procedures had to be modified from the laboratory practice to meet IML-1 constraints. After a proposal is accepted by NASA for definition, an interactive process is begun between the Principal Investigator and the developer to ensure a maximum science return. The success of the five SLSPO-managed experiments was the result of successful completion of all preflight biological testing and hardware verification finalized at the KSC Life Sciences Support Facility housed in Hangar L. The ESTEC Biorack facility housed three U.S. experiments (US-1, US-2, and US-3). The U.S. Gravitational Plant Physiology Facility housed GTHRES and FOTRAN. The IML-1 mission (launched from KSC on 22 Jan. 1992, and landed at Dryden Flight Research Facility on 30 Jan. 1992) was an outstanding success--close to 100 percent of the prelaunch anticipated science return was achieved and, in some cases, greater than 100 percent was achieved (because of an extra mission day).

  19. In the Hot Seat: STS-115 Lightning Strike Stand Down Debate - NASA Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Lizette; Stevens, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    There is no way the PIC's could have seen any current' was the gist of Mike Griffin's assessment. Griffin was the NASA Administrator at the time. The buck stopped at his desk. Holding a napkin out to Pat Lampton, Griffin showed Lampton the calculations he'd made over dinner that predicted that the Pyrotechnic Initiator Controllers (PIC's) at the base of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) were fine. A lightning strike the day before, the worst ever experienced with a Space Shuttle on the launch pad, caused a halt to the launch count down as technicians, engineers, and managers scrambled identify any damage to the launch system. SRB technicians and engineers assessed the data against their Lightning Strike Re-Test Requirements, determining that all but one of the requirements could be checked if they resumed the countdown. For the one remaining requirement, testing the integrity of the PIC's would require 96 hours to set up, test, and reassemble. The engineers were convinced that there was no way to do calculations to show the PIC's were okay. The only option was to stand down. It was SRB Deputy Project Manager (PM) Pat Lampton's responsibility to decide what the SRB project position needed to be to certify that their hardware was safe to fly. He had to communicate that decision to the Mission Management Team (MMT) as a Go or No Go position to resume the count down. If the answer was Go they could still meet a delayed, but acceptable launch schedule. If the answer was No Go, rescheduling the launch would be a grueling shuffling of hardware, personnel, and mission timelines to accommodate Russian missions to the Space Station, supplies for the launch, and personnel manning launch operations. On top of that, Hurricane Ernesto was spinning off the coast of Florida, threatening the need for the Shuttle to roll back to the hangar if they waited too long.

  20. Prevention of radioactive gas seeping into buildings through constructive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R.A.; Gapurova, O.U.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: One of possible method of realization of the terrorist acts is using gases and liquids, which easily permeate through the constructive materials of walls, floor, ceiling, roof, etc. into buildings by the capillary action of the pores. Toxic volatile organic compounds, organic and inorganic gases, radioactive elements, especially, which emits alpha particles can be used as the dangerous substances. Increased ventilation may help in removing the gases, but can actually increase the gases level by increasing the suction through the pores of concrete. If the gases and liquids are soluble in water and are easily volatilized from it, they can also get by groundwater up to underground structures and penetrate inside through opening and pores in concrete or pushed by hydrostatic pressure. The purpose of this work is creating a method to reduce concentration of toxic and radioactive gases in homes, buildings, underground buildings, tunnels, hangars, garages, bomb shelters, etc. The most effective method to prevent penetration of radionuclides into premises of buildings and underground structures through walls, roofs, floors is using special chemicals, which seal micropores inside the construction materials against gases. Worked out chemicals which consist of blend of polymeric compounds are described in the paper. Radioactive gases permeability in constructive materials after treatment by chemicals was studied. Influence of types of cement, sand and gypsum, preliminary treatment by different chemicals, different types of polymeric compounds, time between treatments, moisture of materials, time between preparation of chemicals and treatment of materials (aging of chemicals), time between treatment of concrete and testing (aging of treated concrete) were examined. Experiments have shown that our method allows reducing the coefficient of gas permeability 200 - 400 times

  1. Low intensity natural gas infrared in sports centres; L'infrarouge a basse intensite au gaz naturel dans les centres sportifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajoie, S. [Gaz Metropolitain, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2002-09-30

    Infrared devices are being employed more and more for heating buildings. They were traditionally used to heat large spaces higher than 3 metres, such as aviation hangars and industrial buildings. Natural gas infrared devices have found other applications, namely in sports centres, due in large part to the energy efficiency and the resulting comfort. There are three types of infrared devices: low intensity or low intensity tubes, high intensity, and catalytic infrared. Each type of device possesses specific characteristics and applications. For example, infrared tubes are used to uniformly heat a specific area. High intensity devices possess a more intense heat and concentrated in a confined space. Catalytic devices do not have flames, and they can be used in industrial drying processes and thermoforming. In the case of skating rinks, the use of low intensity natural gas infrared tubes is ideal. They reduce the crossed effects of ice cooling load and the spectators need for heat. This is due to infrared acting more on mass (spectators and bleachers) than ambient air. The author described the situation at the Val d'Or arena, Quebec where an energy saving project was initiated two years ago, involving the installation for one of the ice surfaces, of movement sensors to turn off infrared tubes when the rink is unoccupied. The payback period for such equipment is short. The case of the Soccerplex at Lachine, part of the larger City of Montreal, was also discussed. This sports centre comprises indoor soccer fields with 30 foot-high ceilings and large area covering 66,000 square feet (3 soccer fields). Once again, low intensity natural gas infrared tubes were installed and have proved successful.

  2. Augmented reality application utility for aviation maintenance work instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourcho, John Bryan

    Current aviation maintenance work instructions do not display information effectively enough to prevent costly errors and safety concerns. Aircraft are complex assemblies of highly interrelated components that confound troubleshooting and can make the maintenance procedure difficult (Drury & Gramopadhye, 2001). The sophisticated nature of aircraft maintenance necessitates a revolutionized training intervention for aviation maintenance technicians (United States General Accounting Office, 2003). Quite simply, the paper based job task cards fall short of offering rapid access to technical data and the system or component visualization necessary for working on complex integrated aircraft systems. Possible solutions to this problem include upgraded standards for paper based task cards and the use of integrated 3D product definition used on various mobile platforms (Ropp, Thomas, Lee, Broyles, Lewin, Andreychek, & Nicol, 2013). Previous studies have shown that incorporation of 3D graphics in work instructions allow the user to more efficiently and accurately interpret maintenance information (Jackson & Batstone, 2008). For aircraft maintenance workers, the use of mobile 3D model-based task cards could make current paper task card standards obsolete with their ability to deliver relevant, synchronized information to and from the hangar. Unlike previous versions of 3D model-based definition task cards and paper task cards, which are currently used in the maintenance industry, 3D model based definition task cards have the potential to be more mobile and accessible. Utilizing augmented reality applications on mobile devices to seamlessly deliver 3D product definition on mobile devices could increase the efficiency, accuracy, and reduce the mental workload for technicians when performing maintenance tasks (Macchiarella, 2004). This proposal will serve as a literary review of the aviation maintenance industry, the spatial ability of maintenance technicians, and benefits of

  3. Theseus First Flight - May 24, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft shows off its high aspect-ratio wing as it lifts off from Rogers Dry Lake during its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to

  4. Theseus in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The twin pusher propeller-driven engines of the Theseus research aircraft can be clearly seen in this photo, taken during a 1996 research flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite

  5. Theseus on Take-off for First Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft takes off for its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden

  6. Theseus Assembly Sequence #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here assembling the tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change

  7. Theseus Assembly Sequence #3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft being assembled at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was

  8. Theseus Waits on Lakebed for First Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA) waits on the lakebed before its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental

  9. Theseus Engine Being Unloaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here unloading an engine of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change

  10. Theseus Assembly Sequence #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft being assembled at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was

  11. Theseus Tail Being Unloaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft is seen here being unloaded at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements

  12. Theseus Nose and Pod Cones Being Unloaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here unloading the nose and pod cones of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental

  13. New method of reducing radon levels in homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R.A.; Gapurova, O.U.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radon is a naturally occurring gas seeping into homes and underground structures (buildings, tunnels, hangars, garages, etc.) from the surrounding soil through walls, floor, etc. and emanating from construction materials such as concrete, granite, etc. The level of radon is especially great in regions with the heightened content of uranium in soil and water and with geological breaks of the earth's crust. Concentrations of uranium higher than 10 g per ton of soil have been found in 14 percent of territory of Uzbekistan. As a result, for instance, concentration of radon 10-100 times exceeds the regulation level in 14 percent of premises in Tashkent, 41 percent of premises in Almalik town and 44 percent in Yangiabad town. The purpose of this work was creating a method to reduce concentration of radon gas in buildings and underground structures. We suppose that the most effective technique is a treatment of walls, floors, etc. of basement and underground structures by special chemicals which seal micropores inside the construction materials. Sealing the pores stops radon diffusion and in addition, it blocks another radon pathway - water migration and emanation from concrete, gypsum or other construction materials. In the paper polymeric silico organic compounds are investigated and selected as the chemicals to prevent radon seeping indoors. Gas (air, Ar, Rn 222, H 2 O) permeability of concrete and gypsum after treatment by chemicals has been examined. Influence of types of cement and sand, preliminary treatment by different chemicals, different types of polymeric silico organic compounds, time between treatments, moisture of concrete, time between preparation of chemicals and treatment of concrete (aging of chemicals), time between treatment of concrete and testing (aging of treated concrete) have been examined. Surfaces of the samples were treated by spray. Experiments have shown that chosen method of treatment of the construction materials allows reducing

  14. Novel technique of reducing radon levels in living premises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R.A.; Gapurova, O.U.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radon is a naturally occurring gas seeping into homes and underground structures (buildings, tunnels, hangars, garages, etc.) from the surrounding soil through walls, floor, etc. and emanating from construction materials such as concrete, granite, etc. The level of radon is especially great in regions with the higher content of uranium in soil and water and with geological breaks of the Earth's crust. Concentrations of uranium higher than 10 g per ton of soil have been found in 14% of territory of Uzbekistan. As a result, for instance, concentration of radon 10-100 times exceeds the regulation level in 14% of premises in Tashkent, 41% of premises in Almalik town and 44% in Yangiabad town. The purpose of this work was creating a method to reduce concentration of radon gas in buildings and underground structures. We suppose that the most effective technique is a treatment of walls, floors, etc. of basement and underground structures by special chemicals which seal micropores inside the construction materials. Sealing the pores stops radon diffusion and, in addition, it blocks another radon pathway - water migration and emanation from concrete, gypsum or other construction materials. In the paper polymeric silicoorganic compounds are investigated and selected as the chemicals to prevent radon seeping indoors. Gas (air, Ar, Rn-222, H 2 O) permeability of concrete and gypsum after treatment by chemicals has been examined. Influence of types of cement and sand, preliminary treatment by different chemicals, different types of polymeric silicoorganic compounds, time between treatments, moisture of concrete, time between preparation of chemicals and treatment of concrete (ageing of chemicals), time between treatment of concrete and testing (ageing of treated concrete) have been examined. Surfaces of the samples were treated by spray. Experiments have shown that chosen method of treatment of the construction materials allows reducing the coefficient of gas

  15. Infrared survey of 50 buildings constructed during 100 years: thermal performances and damage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1995-03-01

    Different building constructions and craftsmanship give rise to different thermal performance and damage conditions. The building stock of most industrial countries consists of buildings of various age, and constructions, from old historic buildings with heavy stone or wooden construction, to new buildings with heavy or light concrete construction, or modern steel or wooden construction. In this paper the result from a detailed infrared survey of 50 buildings from six Swedish military camps is presented. The presentation is limited to a comparison of thermal performance and damage conditions of buildings of various ages, functions, and constructions, of a building period of more than 100 years. The result is expected to be relevant even to civilian buildings. Infrared surveys were performed during 1992-1993, with airborne, and mobile short- and longwave infrared systems, out- and indoor thermography. Interpretation and analysis of infrared data was performed with interactive image and analyzing systems. Field inspections were carried out with fiber optics system, and by ocular inspections. Air-exchange rate was measured in order to quantify air leakages through the building envelope, indicated in thermograms. The objects studied were single-family houses, barracks, office-, service-, school- and exercise buildings, military hotels and restaurants, aircraft hangars, and ship factory buildings. The main conclusions from this study are that most buildings from 1880 - 1940 have a solid construction with a high quality of craftsmanship, relatively good thermal performance, due to extremely thick walls, and adding insulation at the attic floor. From about 1940 - 1960 the quality of construction, thermal performance and craftsmanship seem to vary a lot. Buildings constructed during the period of 1960 - 1990 have in general the best thermal performance due to a better insulation capacity, however, also one finds here the greatest variety of problems. The result from this

  16. The Need and Opportunity for an Integrated Research, Development and Testing Station in the Alaskan High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, J. O.; Ivey, M.; Helsel, F.; Dexheimer, D.; Cahill, C. F.; Bendure, A.; Lucero, D. A.; Roesler, E. L.

    2016-12-01

    and hangar for UAS. World-class Arctic research requires year-round access and facilities. The US currently conducts most Arctic research at stations outside the US. A US Arctic Station network enables monitoring that is specific to the US Arctic, to predict and understand impacts that affect people, communities and the planet.

  17. The Need and Opportunity for an Integrated Research, Development and Testing Center in the Alaskan High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, J. O.; Ivey, M.; Helsel, F.; Dexheimer, D.; Lucero, D. A.; Cahill, C. F.; Roesler, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    hangar for UAS. World-class Arctic research requires year-round access and facilities. The US currently conducts most Arctic research at stations outside the US. A US High Arctic Station network enables monitoring that is specific to the US Arctic, to predict and understand impacts that affect people, communities and the planet.

  18. The Waypoint Planning Tool: Real Time Flight Planning for Airborne Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M.; Goodman, H. M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hall, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Earth science research utilizes both spaceborne and airborne real time observations in the planning and operations of its field campaigns. The coordination of air and space components is critical to achieve the goals and objectives and ensure the success of an experiment. Spaceborne imagery provides regular and continual coverage of the Earth and it is a significant component in all NASA field experiments. Real time visible and infrared geostationary images from GOES satellites and multi-spectral data from the many elements of the NASA suite of instruments aboard the TRMM, Terra, Aqua, Aura, and other NASA satellites have become norm. Similarly, the NASA Airborne Science Program draws upon a rich pool of instrumented aircraft. The NASA McDonnell Douglas DC-8, Lockheed P3 Orion, DeHavilland Twin Otter, King Air B200, Gulfstream-III are all staples of a NASA’s well-stocked, versatile hangar. A key component in many field campaigns is coordinating the aircraft with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving, dynamic weather conditions. Given the variables involved, developing a good flight plan that meets the objectives of the field experiment can be a challenging and time consuming task. Planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objectives is complex task because it is much more than flying from point A to B. Flight plans typically consist of flying a series of transects or involve dynamic path changes when “chasing” a hurricane or forest fire. These aircraft flight plans are typically designed by the mission scientists then verified and implemented by the navigator or pilot. Flight planning can be an arduous task requiring frequent sanity checks by the flight crew. This requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Scientists at the University of Alabama-Huntsville and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool

  19. MODELING OF CONVECTIVE STREAMS IN PNEUMOBASIC OBJECTS (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents modeling for investigation of aerodynamic processes on area sections (including a group of complex constructional works for different regimes of drop and wind streams  and  temperature  conditions  and  in  complex  constructional  works  (for  different regimes of heating and ventilation. There were developed different programs for innovation problems solution in the field of heat and mass exchange in three-dimensional space of pres- sures-speeds-temperatures of оbjects.The field of uses of pneumobasic objects: construction and roof of tennis courts, hockey pitches, swimming pools , and also exhibitions’ buildings, circus buildings, cafes, aqua parks, studios, mobile objects of medical purposes, hangars, garages, construction sites, service sta- tions and etc. Advantages of such objects are the possibility and simplicity of multiple instal- lation and demolition works. Their large-scale implementation is determined by temperature- moisture conditions under the shells.Analytical and calculating researches, real researches of thermodynamic parameters of heat and mass exchange, multifactorial processes of air in pneumobasic objects, their shells in a wide range of climatic parameters of air (January – December in the Republic of Belarus, in many geographical latitudes of many countries have shown that the limit of the possibility of optimizing wind loads, heat flow, acoustic effects is infinite (sports, residential, industrial, warehouse, the military-technical units (tanks, airplanes, etc.. In modeling of convective flows in pneumobasic objects (part 1 there are processes with higher dynamic parameters of the air flow for the characteristic pneumobasic object, carried out the calculation of the velocity field, temperature, pressure at the speed of access of air through the inflow holes up to 5 m/sec at the moments of times (20, 100, 200, 400 sec. The calculation was performed using the developed mathematical

  20. Sources of Artefacts in Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becek, K.; Borkowski, A.

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, much attention has been devoted to digital elevation models (DEMs) produced using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). This has been triggered by the relative novelty of the InSAR method and its world-famous product—the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM. However, much less attention, if at all, has been paid to sources of artefacts in SRTM. In this work, we focus not on the missing pixels (null pixels) due to shadows or the layover effect, but rather on outliers that were undetected by the SRTM validation process. The aim of this study is to identify some of the causes of the elevation outliers in SRTM. Such knowledge may be helpful to mitigate similar problems in future InSAR DEMs, notably the ones currently being developed from data acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. We analysed many cross-sections derived from SRTM. These cross-sections were extracted over the elevation test areas, which are available from the Global Elevation Data Testing Facility (GEDTF) whose database contains about 8,500 runways with known vertical profiles. Whenever a significant discrepancy between the known runway profile and the SRTM cross-section was detected, a visual interpretation of the high-resolution satellite image was carried out to identify the objects causing the irregularities. A distance and a bearing from the outlier to the object were recorded. Moreover, we considered the SRTM look direction parameter. A comprehensive analysis of the acquired data allows us to establish that large metallic structures, such as hangars or car parking lots, are causing the outliers. Water areas or plain wet terrains may also cause an InSAR outlier. The look direction and the depression angle of the InSAR system in relation to the suspected objects influence the magnitude of the outliers. We hope that these findings will be helpful in designing the error detection routines of future InSAR or, in fact, any microwave aerial- or space-based survey. The

  1. SOURCES OF ARTEFACTS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR INTERFEROMETRY DATA SETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Becek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, much attention has been devoted to digital elevation models (DEMs produced using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR. This has been triggered by the relative novelty of the InSAR method and its world-famous product—the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM DEM. However, much less attention, if at all, has been paid to sources of artefacts in SRTM. In this work, we focus not on the missing pixels (null pixels due to shadows or the layover effect, but rather on outliers that were undetected by the SRTM validation process. The aim of this study is to identify some of the causes of the elevation outliers in SRTM. Such knowledge may be helpful to mitigate similar problems in future InSAR DEMs, notably the ones currently being developed from data acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. We analysed many cross-sections derived from SRTM. These cross-sections were extracted over the elevation test areas, which are available from the Global Elevation Data Testing Facility (GEDTF whose database contains about 8,500 runways with known vertical profiles. Whenever a significant discrepancy between the known runway profile and the SRTM cross-section was detected, a visual interpretation of the high-resolution satellite image was carried out to identify the objects causing the irregularities. A distance and a bearing from the outlier to the object were recorded. Moreover, we considered the SRTM look direction parameter. A comprehensive analysis of the acquired data allows us to establish that large metallic structures, such as hangars or car parking lots, are causing the outliers. Water areas or plain wet terrains may also cause an InSAR outlier. The look direction and the depression angle of the InSAR system in relation to the suspected objects influence the magnitude of the outliers. We hope that these findings will be helpful in designing the error detection routines of future InSAR or, in fact, any microwave aerial- or space

  2. NASA Tech Briefs, October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Topics discussed include: Detection of Chemical Precursors of Explosives; Detecting Methane From Leaking Pipelines and as Greenhouse Gas in the Atmosphere; Onboard Sensor Data Qualification in Human-Rated Launch Vehicles; Rugged, Portable, Real-Time Optical Gaseous Analyzer for Hydrogen Fluoride; A Probabilistic Mass Estimation Algorithm for a Novel 7-Channel Capacitive Sample Verification Sensor; Low-Power Architecture for an Optical Life Gas Analyzer; Online Cable Tester and Rerouter; A Three-Frequency Feed for Millimeter-Wave Radiometry; Capacitance Probe Resonator for Multichannel Electrometer; Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules; Fabrication of Single Crystal MgO Capsules; Inflatable Hangar for Assembly of Large Structures in Space; Mars Aqueous Processing System; Hybrid Filter Membrane; Design for the Structure and the Mechanics of Moballs; Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer; Cascading Tesla Oscillating Flow Diode for Stirling Engine Gas Bearings; Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator; Ultra-Compact Motor Controller; Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium; Wideband Single-Crystal Transducer for Bone Characterization; Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores; Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method; Laser-Ranging Transponders for Science Investigations of the Moon and Mars; Ka-Band Waveguide Three-Way Serial Combiner for MMIC Amplifiers; Structural Health Monitoring with Fiber Bragg Grating and Piezo Arrays; Low-Gain Circularly Polarized Antenna with Torus-Shaped Pattern; Stereo and IMU- Assisted Visual Odometry for Small Robots; Global Swath and Gridded Data Tiling; GOES-R: Satellite Insight; Aquarius iPhone Application; Monitoring of International Space Station Telemetry Using Shewhart Control Charts; Theory of a Traveling Wave Feed for a Planar Slot Array Antenna; Time Manager Software for a Flight Processor; Simulation of Oxygen Disintegration and Mixing With Hydrogen

  3. Theseus Landing Following Maiden Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft shows off its high aspect-ratio wing as it comes in for a landing on Rogers Dry Lake after its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able

  4. Theseus Take-off from Rogers Dry Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft shows off its high aspect-ratio wing in this rear view of the aircraft as it takes off on its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able

  5. Aeropuerto de Orly, accesos y pistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genet, P.

    1963-02-01

    Full Text Available Paris airport consists of the whole set of air transport facilities, commercial and civil, which are being exploited at the two main airport terminals of Le Bourget and Orly. Le Bourget became inadequate to cope with the growing air traffic which the size of Paris demanded, and as the surrounding zone did not allow it to be sufficiently enlarged, the further development was concentrated at Orly. This airport was begun before the last world war, and was continued, and even improved, during the war itself, by the German occupation authorities. Even so, the layout was too small to adapt the runways and services to present day and probable future requirements, and allow for additional development. Orly had both the installations and area to be suitable for the further development that was visualised. Hence a totally new project of new buildings and improvements to old ones was put in hand. The size of the project, and the changes in the approaches made it necessary to carry out this project in a series of stages. Of all this work, the most important was: runways and platforms, approach runways, terminal station, conservation and repair facilities, hangars, and finally the approaches to the airport, including the bypass to number 7 national roadway. This paper describes all this work, attention being concentrated on the approaches, and within this heading, special reference has been made to the subways, since the above mentioned bypass traverses the airport through artificial tunnels, over which operates the full load of aircraft landing on the main east west runway. A brief account is also given of the pavement tests, in which prestressed concrete was utilised, as well as a description of the methods adopted inside the tunnels to reduce the noise level, and to illuminate them.El aeropuerto de París constituye el conjunto de los servicios aéreos, de tipo comercial y civil, que se vienen explotando en los dos aeropuertos base o principales: Le

  6. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in it's hangar at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, following its arrival on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of

  7. ER-2 #809 on the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) with pilot Dee Porter prepari

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Lockheed Martin pilot Dee Porter climbs up the ladder wearing a heavy tan pressure suit, preparing to board NASA ER-2 #809 at Kiruna, Sweden, for the third flight in the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment. Assisting him is Jim Sokolik, a Lockheed Martin life support technician. Number 809, one of Dryden's two high-flying ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft, a civilian variant of Lockheed's U-2, and another NASA flying laboratory, Dryden's DC-8, were based north of the Arctic Circle in Kiruna, Sweden during the winter of 2000 to study ozone depletion as part of the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). A large hangar built especially for research, 'Arena Arctica' housed the instrumented aircraft and the scientists. Scientists have observed unusually low levels of ozone over the Arctic during recent winters, raising concerns that ozone depletion there could become more widespread as in the Antarctic ozone hole. The NASA-sponsored international mission took place between November 1999 and March 2000 and was divided into three phases. The DC-8 was involved in all three phases returning to Dryden between each phase. The ER-2 flew sample collection flights between January and March, remaining in Sweden from Jan. 9 through March 16. 'The collaborative campaign will provide an immense new body of information about the Arctic stratosphere,' said program scientist Dr. Michael Kurylo, NASA Headquarters. 'Our understanding of the Earth's ozone will be greatly enhanced by this research.' ER-2s bearing tail numbers 806 and 809 are used as airborne science platforms by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main

  8. Substituição total do milho por sorgo e óleo de abatedouro avícola em dietas para frangos de corte Total replacement of corn by sorghum and slaughterhouse poultry oil in broiler diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitória Régia Ramos de Albuquerque Rocha

    2008-01-01

    pigmentos.This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of total replacement of corn by sorghum and crecent levels of slaugherhouse poultry oil (PO on performance and carcass characteristics and yield of broilers. A total of 260 chicks one day-old, males, Cobb strain, was allotted to the following treatments: a corn based reference ration, and four sorghum based diets with the inclusion levels of 0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5% of PO according to the growing phases (from 1 to 7 days, 8 to 21 days, 22 to 33 days and 34 to 42 days. The experimental desing was in radomized blocks, with two blocks, where the parameter for blocks was the sense of the hangar, two replicates per block, with 13 birds per pen and five treatments. The inclusion of PO in the sorghum based diet linearly increased feed intake (FI, except during the first phase, and showed a linear effect on weight gain, that increased in the phases from 1 to 7 days, 22 to 33 days, and 1 to 42 days. Feed conversion (FC and viability did not showed differences in the studied phases. The absolute weight at slaughter broilers lineally increased with the addition PO in the diet. The weights and yield hot carcass, cold carcass, freezing 24 hours carcass, prime cuts, edible visceras, abdominal fat was not influenced by the diets. Carcass pigmentation did not show difference by the addition of PO in the sorghum based diet. The sorghum could totally replacement corn, from the day 8, because did not negatively affect performance and carcass yield. The addition of up to 7.5% of PO in the sorghum based diet provide carcass production with yield similar to those fed corn soybean meal based diets, but the addition of pigments is important.

  9. First ALMA Transporter Ready for Challenging Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The first of two ALMA transporters -- unique vehicles designed to move high-tech radio-telescope antennas in the harsh, high-altitude environment of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array -- has been completed and passed its initial operational tests. The 130-ton machine moves on 28 wheels and will be able to transport a 115-ton antenna and set it down on a concrete pad within millimeters of a prescribed position. ALMA Transporter The ALMA Transporter on a Test Run CREDIT: ESO Click on image for high-resolution file (244 KB) The ALMA transporter rolled out of its hangar and underwent the tests at the Scheuerle Fahrzeugfabrik company site near Nuremberg, Germany. The machine is scheduled for delivery at the ALMA site in Chile by the end of 2007, and a second vehicle will follow about three months later. ALMA is a giant, international observatory under construction in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile at an elevation of 16,500 feet. Using at least 66 high-precision antennas, with the possibility of increasing the number in the future, ALMA will provide astronomers with an unprecedented ability to explore the Universe as seen at wavelengths of a few millimeters to less than a millimeter. By moving the antennas from configurations as compact as 150 meters to as wide as 15 kilometers, the system will provide a zoom-lens ability for scientists. "The ability to move antennas to reconfigure the array is vital to fulfilling ALMA's scientific mission. The operations plan calls for moving antennas on a daily basis to provide the flexibility that will be such a big part of ALMA's scientific value. That's why the transporters are so important and why this is such a significant milestone," said Adrian Russell, North American Project Manager for ALMA. "The ALMA antennas will be assembled and their functionality will be verified at a base camp, located at an altitude of 2900 meters (9500 feet) and the transporters will in a first step bring the telescopes up to the