WorldWideScience

Sample records for hands-on universe project

  1. Hands-on Universe - Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, R.

    2006-08-01

    The EU-HOU project aims at re-awakening the interest for science through astronomy and new technologies, by challenging middle and high schools pupils. It relies on real observations acquired through an internet-based network of robotic optical and radio telescopes or with didactical tools such as Webcam. Pupils manipulate and measure images in the classroom environment, using the specifically designed software SalsaJ, within pedagogical trans-disciplinary resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. Gathering eight European countries coordinated in France, EU-HOU is partly funded by the European Union. All its outputs are freely available on the Web, in English and the other languages involved. A European network of teachers is being developed through training sessions.

  2. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  3. Exploring quantum physics through hands-on projects

    CERN Document Server

    Prutchi, David

    2012-01-01

    Build an intuitive understanding of the principles behind quantum mechanics through practical construction and replication of original experiments With easy-to-acquire, low-cost materials and basic knowledge of algebra and trigonometry, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects takes readers step by step through the process of re-creating scientific experiments that played an essential role in the creation and development of quantum mechanics. From simple measurements of Planck's constant to testing violations of Bell's inequalities using entangled photons, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects not only immerses readers in the process of quantum mechanics, it provides insight into the history of the field--how the theories and discoveries apply to our world not only today, but also tomorrow. By immersing readers in groundbreaking experiments that can be performed at home, school, or in the lab, this first-ever, hands-on book successfully demystifies the world of quantum physics for...

  4. Results of Using Multimedia Case Studies and Open-Ended Hands-On Design Projects in an "Introduction to Engineering" Course at Hampton University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim; Le, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a revised freshman engineering course, "Introduction to Engineering," at Hampton University and the observations of the instructors during its implementation. The authors collaborated with Auburn University faculty in jointly implementing the same course material at both universities. The revised course…

  5. Geneva University: Experiments in Physics: Hands-on Creative Processes

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 3 octobre 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg «Experiments in Physics : Hands-on Creative Processes» Prof. Manfred Euler Leibniz-Institute for Mathematics and Science Education (IPN) University of Kiel, Deutschland Experiments play a variety of different roles in knowledge generation. The lecture will focus on the function of experiments as engines of intuition that foster insights into complex processes. The experimental presentations consider self-organization phenomena in various domains that range from the nanomechanics of biomolecules to perception and cognition. The inherent universality contributes to elucidating the enigmatic phenomenon of creativity. Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.       &...

  6. Hands-On Educational Programs and Projects at SICSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve the design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Some of these projects are supported by corporate sponsors, such as a space tourism research, planning and design study conducted for the owner of national U.S. hotel chain. Some have been undertaken in support of programs sponsored by the State Government of Texas, including current commercial spaceport development planning for the Texas Aerospace Commission and three counties that represent candidate spaceport sites. Other projects have been supported by NASA and the Texas Aerospace Consortium, including the design and development of SICSA's "Space Habitation Laboratory", a space station module sized environmental simulator facility which has been featured in the "NASA Select" television broadcast series. This presentation will highlight representative projects. SICSA is internationally recognized for its leadership in the field of space architecture. Many program graduates have embarked upon productive and rewarding careers with aerospace organizations throughout the world. NASA has awarded certificates of appreciation to SICSA for significant achievements contributing to its advanced design initiatives. SICSA and its work have been featured in numerous popular magazines, professional publications, and public media broadcasts in many countries. SICSA applies a very comprehensive scope of activities to the practice of space architecture. Important roles include mission planning conceptualization of orbital and planetary structures and assembly processes, and design of habitats to optimize human safety, adaptation and productivity. SICSA sponsors educational programs for upper division undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in space and experimental architecture. Many fourth year participants continue in the SICSA program throughout

  7. The Hands-On Universe: Making Sense of the Universe with All Your Senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, R.

    2018-02-01

    For the past four years, the Hands-On Universe public engagement programme has explored unconventional, interactive and multi-sensorial ways of communicating complex ideas in cosmology and astrophysics to a wide variety of audiences. The programme lead, Roberto Trotta, has reached thousands of people through food-based workshops, art and science collaborations and a book written using only the 1000 most common words in the English language. In this article, Roberto reflects in first person on what has worked well in the programme, and what has not.

  8. THE STERN PROJECT–HANDS ON ROCKETS SCIENCE FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENT

    OpenAIRE

    Schüttauf, Katharina; Stamminger, Andreas; Lappöhn, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    In April 2012, the German Aerospace Center DLR initiated a sponsorship program for university students to develop, build and launch their own rockets over a period of three years. The program designation STERN was abbreviated from the German “STudentische Experimental-RaketeN”, which translates to Student- Experimental-Rockets. The primary goal of the STERN program is to inspire students in the subject of space transportation through hands-on activities within a pro...

  9. Hands-on-Universe, Europe Bringing frontline interactive astronomy to the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, R.

    Hands-on-Universe, Europe (EU-HOU) aims at re-awakening the interest for science in the young generations through astronomy and new technologies. It relies on real observations acquired through a worldwide internet-based network of automatic telescopes or with didactical tools (webcam, radiotelescope). Pupils manipulate images in the classroom environment, using specific software within pedagogical resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. EU-HOU is freely available on the web, and trains european teachers.

  10. Increasing awareness about antibiotic use and resistance: a hands-on project for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maria João; Santos, Catarina L; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Health-promoting education is essential to foster an informed society able to make decisions about socio-scientific issues based on scientifically sustained criteria. Antibiotic resistance is currently a major public health issue. Considering that irrational antibiotic use has been associated with the development and widespread of antibiotic resistant bacteria, educational interventions to promote prudent antibiotic consumption are required. This study focuses on the outcomes of an interventional program implemented at the University of Porto, Portugal, to promote awareness about antibiotic resistance at high school levels (15-17 year old). The project Microbiology recipes: antibiotics à la carte articulates a set of wet and dry lab activities designed to promote the participants' understanding of concepts and processes underlying antibiotics' production and activity, such as the notion of mechanisms of action of antibiotics. Following a mix-method approach based on a pre-/post design, the effectiveness of this project was assessed by gathering data from surveys, direct observation and analysis of artifacts of 42 high school students (aged 15 and 16 years). The results indicate that the participants developed a more comprehensive picture of antibiotic resistance. The project was shown to promote more sophisticated conceptualizations of bacteria and antibiotics, increased awareness about the perils of antibiotic resistance, and enhanced consciousness towards measures that can be undertaken to mitigate the problem. The participants regarded their experiences as enjoyable and useful, and believed that the project contributed to improve their understanding and raise their interest about the issues discussed. Furthermore, there were also improvements in their procedural skills concerning the laboratory techniques performed. This study evidences the possibility of increasing high school students' awareness about the consequences of antibiotic resistance and the

  11. Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

  12. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  13. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment

  14. The mobile GeoBus outreach project: hands-on Earth and Mars activities for secondary schools in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ruth; Pike, Charlotte; Roper, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary schools by providing teaching resources that are not readily available to educators, to inspire young learners by incorporating new science research outcomes in teaching activities, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Just under 35,000 pupils have been involved in practical hands-on Earth science learning activities since the project began in 2012, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The resources that GeoBus brings to schools include all the materials and equipment needed to run 50 - 80 minute workshops, and half- or whole-day Enterprise Challenges and field excursions. Workshops are aimed at a class of up to 30 pupils and topics include minerals, rocks, fossils, geological time, natural resources, climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, and geological mapping. As with all GeoBus activities, the inclusion of equipment and technology otherwise unavailable to schools substantially increases the engagement of pupils in workshops. Field excursions are increasingly popular, as many teachers have little or no field trainng and feel unable to lead this type of activity. The excursions comprise half or full day sessions for up to 30 pupils and are tailored to cover the local geology or geomorphology. Enterprise Challenge are half or full day sessions for up to 100 pupils. Topics include "Journey to Mars", "Scotland's Rocks", "Drilling for Oil", and "Renewable Energy". Both of the energy Enterprise Challenges were designed to incorporates ideas and

  15. The hands-on project office guaranteeing ROI and on-time delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Kesner, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    THE THREE PILLARS OF IT DELIVERY - PROBLEM RESOLUTION, SERVICE REQUESTS, AND PROJECTSIntroduction The Business Context The Internal Economy for Investing in IT Services and ProjectsThe Three Pillars of IT Delivery Managing Service DeliveryManaging Project Commitments IT Metrics and Reporting Tools THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE BUSINESS MODELIntroduction: Revisiting the IT Organization IT Service and Project Delivery RolesThe Role of the Project Management Office: Measuring its ROI The PMO Value Proposition: An Initial ROI Estimate ALIGNMENT AND PLANNING - DOING THE RIGHT THINGS Introduction Ge

  16. Hands on CERN an education project on the Internet using real high energy particle collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, E K

    1999-01-01

    An educational project primarily aimed at teachers and 15 to 18 year- old students describing the essential features of a modern high energy physics experiment has been created. The whole education package is available on the Internet. It gives a detailed description of the physics processes involved and the Standard Model of Microcosm. Real particle collisions produced with the facilities at the European particle physics laboratory (CERN) are displayed using the platform-independent programming language Java, enabling interaction with the user. The project has been used by several groups of teachers and students, and has increased their knowledge of, and interest in, particle physics. This project complements the traditional physics education and introduces students to contemporary fundamental physics. (7 refs).

  17. Solar Collector Design Optimization: A Hands-on Project Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Dunbar P., III; Kaz, David M.; Berman, Elena A.

    2012-01-01

    A solar power collector optimization design project has been developed for use in undergraduate classrooms and/or laboratories. The design optimization depends on understanding the current-voltage characteristics of the starting photovoltaic cells as well as how the cell's electrical response changes with increased light illumination. Students…

  18. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  19. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  20. Hands-On Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  1. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics' Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course: A Hand-On Education Approach to Applied Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. B.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez, R.; Duncan, D.; Saustrup, S.

    2016-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, offers a 3-week marine geology and geophysics field course. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling and analysis. Students first participate in 3 days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work at locations that provide an opportunity to investigate coastal and continental shelf processes. Teams of students rotate between UTIG's 26' R/V Scott Petty and NOAA's 82' R/V Manta. They assist with survey design, instrumentation set up, and learn about acquisition, quality control, and safe instrument deployment. Teams also process data and analyze samples in onshore field labs. During the final week teams integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software. The course concludes with team presentations on their interpretations with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and high instructor/student ratio (sixteen students, three faculty, and three teaching assistants). Post-class, students may incorporate course data in senior honors or graduate thesis and are encouraged to publish and present results at national meetings. This course (to our knowledge) remains the only one of its kind, satisfies field experience requirements for some degree programs, and provides an alternative to land-based field courses. Alumni note the course's applicability to energy, environmental, and geotechnical industries as well as coastal restoration/management fields.

  2. Project management at a university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Joel A.

    2006-06-01

    Managing instrumentation projects, large or small, involves a number of common challenges-defining what is needed, desiging a system to provide it, producing it in an economical way, and putting it into service expeditiously. Doing these things in a university environoment provides unique challenges and opportunities not obtaining in the environment of large projects at NASA or national labs. I address this topic from the viewpoint of knowledge of two such projects, the development of OAO-2 at the University of Wisconsin and the relocation of Fairborn Observatory to the Patagonia Mountains in Arizona, as well as my own developemnt of the Tennessee State 2-m Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope. For the university environment, I argue for a more traditional management style that relies on more informal techniques than those used in large-scale projects conducted by big bureaucratic institutions. This style identifies what tasks are really necessary and eliminates as much wasteful overhead as possible. I discuss many of the formalities used in project management, such as formal reviews (PDR, CDR, etc.) and Gantt charts, and propose other ways of acheving the same results more effectively. The university environment acutely requires getting the right people to do the project, both in terms of their individual personalities, motivation, and technical skills but also in terms of their ability to get on with one another. Two critical challenges confronting those doing such projects in universities are 1) keeping the contractors on task (the major challenge to anyone doing project management) and 2) dealing with the purchasing systems in such institutions.

  3. Hands on what? The relative effectiveness of physical versus virtual materials in an engineering design project by middle school children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, David; Triona, Lara M.; Williams, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    Hands-on activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and (c) type of materials that are used (physical or virtual). We then describe an empirical study that investigates the relative effectiveness of the physical-virtual dimension. In the present study, seventh and eighth grade students assembled and tested mousetrap cars with the goal of designing a car that would go the farthest. Children were assigned to four different conditions, depending on whether they manipulated physical or virtual materials, and whether they had a fixed number of cars they could construct or a fixed amount of time in which to construct them. All four conditions were equally effective in producing significant gains in learners' knowledge about causal factors, in their ability to design optimal cars, and in their confidence in their knowledge. Girls' performance, knowledge, and effort were equal to boys' in all conditions, but girls' confidence remained below boys' throughout. Given the fact that, on several different measures, children were able to learn as well with virtual as with physical materials, the inherent pragmatic advantages of virtual materials in science may make them the preferred instructional medium in many hands-on contexts.

  4. Managing and Leading Creative Universities – Foundations of Successful Science Management: A Hands-On Guide for (Future) Academics

    OpenAIRE

    Lugmayr, Artur; Vogel, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Today’s universities are increasingly under pressure from various directions. This pressure also affects its employees, and us as scholars. Especially, future academics are often confronted with situations that they have not been trained or mentored for, or are simply lost in how to plan their careers or how to train themselves to be able to compete. This chapter compiles guidelines for future academics help them in shaping their careers. It gives an overview of different issues, such as indi...

  5. Introducing computational thinking through hands-on projects using R with applications to calculus, probability and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benakli, Nadia; Kostadinov, Boyan; Satyanarayana, Ashwin; Singh, Satyanand

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to promote computational thinking among mathematics, engineering, science and technology students, through hands-on computer experiments. These activities have the potential to empower students to learn, create and invent with technology, and they engage computational thinking through simulations, visualizations and data analysis. We present nine computer experiments and suggest a few more, with applications to calculus, probability and data analysis, which engage computational thinking through simulations, visualizations and data analysis. We are using the free (open-source) statistical programming language R. Our goal is to give a taste of what R offers rather than to present a comprehensive tutorial on the R language. In our experience, these kinds of interactive computer activities can be easily integrated into a smart classroom. Furthermore, these activities do tend to keep students motivated and actively engaged in the process of learning, problem solving and developing a better intuition for understanding complex mathematical concepts.

  6. Electric Motorboat Drag Racing: A Hands-On Physics Project that Motivates Students from Start to Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Reno

    2008-01-01

    Electric Motorboat Drag Racing is a culminating high school physics project designed to apply and bring to life many content standards for physics. Students need to be given several weeks at home to design and build their model-sized electric motorboats for the 5-meter drag racing competition down rain gutters. In the process, they are discussing…

  7. Research project at Nagoya University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Nakai, N.; Nakano, E.

    1981-01-01

    We will have a dedicated facility from General Ionex Corporation at the Radioisotope Center of Nagoya Univeriy in 1981 FY. The building to install the machine was already completed in March 1981. We have held meetings of potential users of the facility and various research proposals have been presented by the participants from many departments of the university. The present research project at Nagoya is mainly devoted to the development of radiocarbon dating by the accelerator mass spectrometry, in which most of the users are interested. There are many archeological and geological samples in Japan which have too little carbon compounds for analysis by conventional radioactivity measurements. Concentrations of 14 C in these samples can be determined by the new technique. Some of the proposals connected with radiocarbon measurements are discussed

  8. Optics and optronics in university courses for officers of the Federal Armed Forces - special curricula and hands-on lessons vs. academic requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Rothe, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    For more than two decades lessons in optics, digital image processing and optronics are compulsory optional subjects and as such integral parts of the courses in mechanical engineering at the University of the Federal Armed Forces in Hamburg. They are provided by the Chair for Measurement and Information Technology. Historically, the curricula started as typical basic lessons in optics and digital image processing and related sensors. Practical sessions originally concentrated on image processing procedures in Pascal, C and later Matlab. They evolved into a broad portfolio of practical hands-on lessons in lab and field, including high-tech and especially military equipment, but also homemaker style primitive experiments, of which the paper will give a methodical overview. A special topic - as always with optics in education - is the introduction to the various levels of abstraction in conjunction with the highly complex and wide-ranging matter squeezed into only two trimesters - instead of semesters at civil universities - for an audience being subject to strains from both study and duty. The talk will be accompanied by striking multi-media material, which will be also part of the multi-media attachment of the paper.

  9. A Hands-on Approach to Teaching Geophysics through the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez-Vasquez, R. A.; Saustrup, S.

    2017-12-01

    The three week field course is offered to graduate and upper-level undergraduate students as hands-on instruction and training for marine geology and geophysics applications. Instructors provide theoretical and technical background of high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples in the initial phase of the course. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Over the last 10 years, field sites at Freeport, Port Aransas, and Galveston, TX, and Grand Isle, LA, have provided ideal locations for students to explore and investigate coastal and continental shelf processes through the application of geophysical techniques. Students with various backgrounds work in teams of four and rotate between two marine vessels: the R/V Scott Petty, a 26' vessel owned and operated by UTIG, and the R/V Manta, an 82' vessel owned and operated by NOAA. They assist with survey design, instrumentation setup and breakdown, data acquisition, trouble-shooting, data quality control, and safe instrumentation deployment and recovery. Teams also process data and sediment samples in an onshore field lab. During the final week, students visualize, integrate and interpret data for a final project using industry software. The course concludes with final presentations and discussions wherein students examine Gulf Coast geological history and sedimentary processes with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and low instructor to student ratio (sixteen students, three faculty, and three teaching assistants). Post-class, students may incorporate course data in senior honors or graduate thesis and are encouraged to publish and present results at national meetings. This course satisfies field experience requirements for

  10. Flinders University Electric Vehicle Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the specifications and principles involved in the operation of an electric car developed by the Institute of Solar and Electochemical Energy Conversion at Flinders University in South Australia. (JR)

  11. Hands-On Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss manipulatives and hands-on investigations for Calculus involving volume, arc length, and surface area to motivate and develop formulae which can then be verified using techniques of integration. Pre-service teachers in calculus courses using these activities experience a classroom in which active learning is encouraged and…

  12. Hands-on Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  13. Hands On Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  14. The Kyoto University tandem upgrading project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Shimoura, Susumu; Takimoto, Kiyohiko; Sakaguchi, Harutaka; Kobayashi, Shinsaku

    1988-01-01

    A brief description on the Kyoto University tandem upgrading project. The project consists of replacing the old 5 MV tandem Van de Graaff by an 8UDH pelletron. The old pressure vessel and beam lines are used again without significant modification. The project is planned to be completed at the end of 1989. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of radiological workstations and web-browser-based image distribution clients for a PACS project in hands-on workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Thomas; Handgraetinger, Oliver; Voellmy, Daniel R.; Marincek, Borut; Wildermuth, Simon; Link, Juergen; Ploner, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    The methodology and outcome of a hands-on workshop for the evaluation of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) software for a multihospital PACS project are described. The following radiological workstations and web-browser-based image distribution software clients were evaluated as part of a multistep evaluation of PACS vendors in March 2001: Impax DS 3000 V 4.1/Impax Web1000 (Agfa-Gevaert, Mortsel, Belgium); PathSpeed V 8.0/PathSpeed Web (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis., USA); ID Report/ID Web (Image Devices, Idstein, Germany); EasyVision DX/EasyWeb (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, Netherlands); and MagicView 1000 VB33a/MagicWeb (Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen, Germany). A set of anonymized DICOM test data was provided to enable direct image comparison. Radiologists (n=44) evaluated the radiological workstations and nonradiologists (n=53) evaluated the image distribution software clients using different questionnaires. One vendor was not able to import the provided DICOM data set. Another vendor had problems in displaying imported cross-sectional studies in the correct stack order. Three vendors (Agfa-Gevaert, GE, Philips) presented server-client solutions with web access. Two (Siemens, Image Devices) presented stand-alone solutions. The highest scores in the class of radiological workstations were achieved by ID Report from Image Devices (p<0.005). In the class of image distribution clients, the differences were statistically not significant. Questionnaire-based evaluation was shown to be useful for guaranteeing systematic assessment. The workshop was a great success in raising interest in the PACS project in a large group of future clinical users. The methodology used in the present study may be useful for other hospitals evaluating PACS. (orig.)

  16. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

    2004-06-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

  17. A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

    This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

  18. MILLION BOOK UNIVERSAL DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECTS: INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Waghmode, S. S.

    2009-01-01

    Digital Library of India is a digital library of books, which is free-to-read, searchable, predominantly in India languages, available to everyone over the Internet. Very soon it is expected that this portal would provide a gateway to Indian Digital Libraries in Science, Arts, Culture, Music, Movies, Traditional Medicine, Palm Leaves and many more. This project is collaboration between Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Universities and Carnegie Mellon University under MILLION BOOK UNIVE...

  19. Kansas State University Libraries' OCR Labeling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierer, Joyce; Bower, Merry

    This publication describes the planning and implementation of an optical character recognition (OCR) labeling project, the first stage of Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries' program of conversion from a manual to an automated circulation system. It is noted that a telephone survey of libraries with automated circulation systems and…

  20. EXPENSES FORECASTING MODEL IN UNIVERSITY PROJECTS PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Arustamov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical model presentation of cash flows in project funding. We describe different types of expenses linked to university project activities. Problems of project budgeting that contribute most uncertainty have been revealed. As an example of the model implementation we consider calculation of vacation allowance expenses for project participants. We define problems of forecast for funds reservation: calculation based on methodology established by the Ministry of Education and Science calculation according to the vacation schedule and prediction of the most probable amount. A stochastic model for vacation allowance expenses has been developed. We have proposed methods and solution of the problems that increase the accuracy of forecasting for funds reservation based on 2015 data.

  1. Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoor, N M; Zambon, S; Castell, M V; Cooper, C; Denkinger, M; Dennison, E M; Edwards, M H; Herbolsheimer, F; Maggi, S; Sánchez-Martinez, M; Pedersen, N L; Peter, R; Schaap, L A; Rijnhart, J J M; van der Pas, S; Deeg, D J H

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person's self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between countries; (3) To examine whether physical function is a mediator in the association between clinical OA and SRH. Baseline data of the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used, which includes pre-harmonized data from six European cohort studies (n = 2709). Clinical OA was defined according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. SRH was assessed using one question: How is your health in general? Physical function was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index and Australian/Canadian OA Hand Index. The prevalence of fair-to-poor SRH ranged from 19.8 % in the United Kingdom to 63.5 % in Italy. Although country differences in the strength of the associations were observed, clinical OA of the hip, knee and hand were significantly associated with fair-to-poor SRH in five out of six European countries. In most countries and at most sites, the association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH was partly or fully mediated by physical function. Clinical OA at different sites was related to fair-to-poor SRH in the general population. Most associations were (partly) mediated by physical functioning, indicating that deteriorating physical function in patients with OA should be a point of attention in patient care.

  2. Space Sciences Education and Outreach Project of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasotkin, S.

    2006-11-01

    sergekras@mail.ru The space sciences education and outreach project was initiated at Moscow State University in order to incorporate modern space research into the curriculum popularize the basics of space physics, and enhance public interest in space exploration. On 20 January 2005 the first Russian University Satellite “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” was launched into circular polar orbit (inclination 83 deg., altitude 940-980 km). The onboard scientific complex “Tatyana“, as well as the mission control and information receiving centre, was designed and developed at Moscow State University. The scientific programme of the mission includes measurements of space radiation in different energy channels and Earth UV luminosity and lightning. The current education programme consists of basic multimedia lectures “Life of the Earth in the Solar Atmosphere” and computerized practice exercises “Space Practice” (based on the quasi-real-time data obtained from “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” satellite and other Internet resources). A multimedia lectures LIFE OF EARTH IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE containing the basic information and demonstrations of heliophysics (including Sun structure and solar activity, heliosphere and geophysics, solar-terrestrial connections and solar influence on the Earth’s life) was created for upper high-school and junior university students. For the upper-university students there a dozen special computerized hands-on exercises were created based on the experimental quasi-real-time data obtained from our satellites. Students specializing in space physics from a few Russian universities are involved in scientific work. Educational materials focus on upper high school, middle university and special level for space physics students. Moscow State University is now extending its space science education programme by creating multimedia lectures on remote sensing, space factors and materials study, satellite design and development, etc. The space

  3. Integrating Hands-On Undergraduate Research in an Applied Spatial Science Senior Level Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhavy, David L.; Unger, Daniel R.; Hung, I-Kuai; Douglass, David

    2015-01-01

    A senior within a spatial science Ecological Planning capstone course designed an undergraduate research project to increase his spatial science expertise and to assess the hands-on instruction methodology employed within the Bachelor of Science in Spatial Science program at Stephen F Austin State University. The height of 30 building features…

  4. A community sharing hands-on centers in engineer's training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jean-pierre jpt Taboy

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available As teachers in Technical Universities, we must think about the engineer's training. We need good applicants, up to date hardware and software for hand-on. Each university don't have enough money and technical people to cover the new needs. A community sharing remote hand-on centers could be a solution.

  5. Impact of an Educational Hands-on Project on the Antimicrobial, Antitumor and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Plants on Portuguese Students’ Awareness, Knowledge, and Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Manuel Azevedo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Promoting environmental and health education is crucial to allow students to make conscious decisions based on scientific criteria. The study is based on the outcomes of an Educational Project implemented with Portuguese students and consisted of several activities, exploring pre-existent Scientific Gardens at the School, aiming to investigate the antibacterial, antitumor and anti-inflammatory properties of plant extracts, with posterior incorporation in soaps and creams. A logo and a webpage were also created. The effectiveness of the project was assessed via the application of a questionnaire (pre- and post-test and observations of the participants in terms of engagement and interaction with all individuals involved in the project. This project increased the knowledge about autochthonous plants and the potential medical properties of the corresponding plant extracts and increased the awareness about the correct design of scientific experiments and the importance of the use of experimental models of disease. The students regarded their experiences as exciting and valuable and believed that the project helped to improve their understanding and increase their interest in these subjects and in science in general. This study emphasizes the importance of raising students’ awareness on the valorization of autochthonous plants and exploitation of their medicinal properties.

  6. University of Houston Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Talbot, R. W.; Hampton, D. L.; Molders, N.; Millan, R. M.; Halford, A. J.; Dunbar, B.; Morris, G. A.; Prince, J.; Gamblin, R.; Ehteshami, A.; Lehnen, J. N.; Greer, M.; Porat, I.; Alozie, M.; Behrend, C. C.; Bias, C.; Fenton, A.; Gunawan, B.; Harrison, W.; Martinez, A.; Mathur, S.; Medillin, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T. V.; Nowling, M.; Perez, D.; Pham, M.; Pina, M.; Thomas, G.; Velasquez, B.; Victor, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) is a NASA program to engage undergraduate students in rigorous scientific research, for the purposes of innovation and developing the next generation of professionals for an array of fields. The program is student led and executed from initial ideation to research to the design and deployment of scientific payloads. The University of Houston has been selected twice to participate in the USIP programs. The first program (USIP_UH I) ran from 2013 to 2016. USIP_UH II started in January of 2016, with funding starting at the end of May. USIP_UH I (USIP_UH II) at the University of Houston was (is) composed of eight (seven) research teams developing six (seven), distinct, balloon-based scientific instruments. These instruments will contribute to a broad range of geophysical sciences from Very Low Frequency recording and Total Electron Content to exobiology and ozone profiling. USIP_UH I had 12 successful launches with 9 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2015, and 4 piggyback flights with BARREL 3 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2015. USIP_UH II had 8 successful launches with 5 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2017, 3 piggyback flights with BARREL 4 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2016, and 1 flight each from CSBF and UH. The great opportunity of this program is capitalizing on the proliferation of electronics miniaturization to create new generations of scientific instruments that are smaller and lighter than ever before. This situation allows experiments to be done more cheaply which ultimately allows many more experiments to be done.

  7. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  8. The Benefits of Peer-Mentoring in Undergraduate Group Research Projects at The University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; McGraw, A. M.; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Robertson, A.; Smith, C.; Turner, J.; Biddle, L. I.; Thompson, R.

    2013-06-01

    According to the American Institute of Physics, the number of graduate students enrolled in astronomy programs in the US has been steadily increasing in the past 15 years. Research experience is one of the key factors graduate admissions committees look for when choosing students. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club is setting a new precedent in research by having students introduce other students to research. This eases the transition to research projects, and allows students to work in a comfortable setting without the sometimes-overwhelming cognitive disconnect between a professor and their students. The University of Arizona's research projects have many benefits to all students involved. It is well established that people learn a subject best when they have to teach it to others. Students leading the projects learn alongside their peers in a peer-mentoring setting. When project leaders move on in their academic career, other project members can easily take the lead. Students learn how to work in teams, practice effective communication skills, and begin the processes of conducting a full research project, which are essential skills for all budding scientists. These research projects also give students hands-on research experience that supplement and greatly expand on concepts taught in the classroom, and make them more attractive to graduate schools and REU programs.

  9. University Program Management Information System: NASA's University Program Active Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Office of Education/N.

  10. ICT and the Project Studies at Roskilde University, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Ou, Tie

    2004-01-01

    needs for qualification and reform. With distinctive philosophy and approach in education, studies at Roskilde University are organized as project work characterized by problem orientation, participant direction, exemplarity, interdisciplinarity and collaborative learning. The paper addresses how...... the increasing application of ICT is changing the educational environments at Roskilde University and, consequently, facilitating and challenging the project studies. The discussion is mainly based on an empirical research in which we observed a group of students and participated in their project work. The data...

  11. Financial Energy Conservation Projects at Independent Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    Factors affecting financial decisions for energy conservation projects at independent colleges and universities and methods that may be used when making a financial investment decision are examined, along with sources of funding for the projects. Projects that result in the conservation of energy resources might, in a time of extreme shortages,…

  12. Experience and Life History. Roskilde University Life History Project Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salling Olesen, Henning

    The Life History Project at Denmark's Roskilde University is a 5-year research project that was initiated in 1998 to examine learning and participation in adult and continuing education from a life history perspective. The project was designed to build on a broad range of qualitative interview studies and case studies into learning processes. The…

  13. Exterior LED Lighting Projects at Princeton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, William [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Murphy, Arthur T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Perrin, Tess E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    For this report, PNNL / the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studied a series of past exterior lighting projects at Princeton, in order to document Princeton’s experiences with solid-state lighting (SSL) and the lessons learned along the way, and to show how their approach to SSL projects evolved as their own learning expanded and as the products available improved in performance and sophistication.

  14. Hands-on courses in petroleum engineering improve performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Kassem, J.H.; Islam, M.R. [Regina Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    A hands-on methodology was employed to teach eight lecture-based courses in the United Arab Emirates University in which initially two petroleum engineering courses were used to test the methodology. The courses are considered to be basic to petroleum engineering. Although the courses did not have any impact on the overall student grades, the courses stimulated independent thought among students who were not previously used to this mode of thinking. Students were exposed to laboratory experiments and project works that were considered previously to be too-difficult-to-handle by undergraduate students. The course methodology was more acceptable to the female than the male population. The course methodology centered on creative thinking, questioning the establishment methods and critiquing conventional modes of thinking. Despite the differences between male and female students, overall the student population recognized that their ability to think independently and critically improved after taking the course. An appendix contains examples of learning modules. 18 refs.

  15. University knowledge exchange and the SKIN Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Djelveh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a rationale for investigating the role and contributions of universities to growth and sustainable development within the framework of the Europe 2020 Strategy (EU2020. To this extent, the literature suggests that the contemporary universities’ mission in the knowledge society relies on their capacity to promote knowledge exchange. This allows expansion of the degree of intervention of universities in society and broadening of the institutional and policy frameworks within which they operate, opening to a wider range of possible contributions of social science and humanities to the EU2020 objectives, which are not limited to education and research policies.

  16. Developing an Innovative and Creative Hands-on Lean Six Sigma Manufacturing Experiments for Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Badawi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop an innovative and creative hands-on project based on Lean Six Sigma experiments for engineering education at the College of Engineering at the University of Hail. The exercises were designed using junction box assembly to meet the following learning outcomes: 1-to provide students with solid experience on waste elimination and variation reduction and 2-to engage students in exercises related to assembly line mass production and motion study. To achieve these objectives, students were introduced to the principles of Lean manufacturing and Six Sigma through various pedagogical activities such as classroom instruction, laboratory experiments, hands-on exercises, and interactive group work. In addition, Minitab 17 statistical package and Quality Companion 3 software were used to facilitate The Lean Six Sigma exercises. The software application and hands-on manufacturing assembly were found to be extremely valuable in giving students the chance to identify which variables to control in order to minimize variation and eliminate waste. This research was funded by a grant from the Deanship of Academic Research at University of Hail for project number E-26-IC, and under the umbrella of Ministry of Education within the framework of the National Initiative on Creativity and Innovation in Saudi Universities at University of Hail.

  17. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  18. 1st Hands-on Science Science Fair

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Esteves. Z.

    2017-01-01

    In school learning of science through investigative hands-on experiments is in the core of the Hands-on Science Network vision. However informal and non-formal contexts may also provide valuable paths for implementing this strategy aiming a better e!ective science education. In May 2011, a "rst country wide “Hands-on Science’ Science Fair” was organized in Portugal with the participation of 131 students that presented 38 projects in all "elds of Science. In this communication we will pr...

  19. New Mexico State University Arrowhead Center PROSPER Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peach, James

    2012-12-31

    This document is the final technical report of the Arrowhead Center Prosper Project at New Mexico State University. The Prosper Project was a research and public policy initiative funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Prosper project (DOE Grant Number DE-NT0004397) began on October 1, 2008 (FY2009, Quarter 1) and ended on December 31, 2012 (FY2013, Quarter 1). All project milestones were completed on time and within the budget. This report contains a summary of ten technical reports resulting from research conducted during the project. This report also contains a detailed description of the research dissemination and outreach activities of the project including a description of the policy impacts of the project. The report also describes project activities that will be maintained after the end of the project.

  20. Hands-on physics displays for undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, Carl W.

    2014-07-01

    Initiated by Frank Oppenheimer in 1969, the Exploratorium in San Francisco has been the model for hands-on science museums throughout the world. The key idea has been to bring people with all levels of scientific background in contact with interesting and attractive exhibits that require the active participation of the visitor. Unfortunately, many science museums are now forced to cater primarily to very young audiences, often 8 years old or less, with predictable constraints on the intellectual depth of their exhibits. To counter this trend, the author has constructed several hands-on displays for the University of Michigan Physics Department that demonstrate: (1) magnetic levitation of pyrolytic graphite, (2) the varied magnetic induction effects in aluminum, copper and air, (3) chaotic motion of a double pendulum, (4) conservation of energy and momentum in a steel ball magnetic accelerator, (5) the diffraction pattern of red and green laser pointer beams created by CDs and DVDs, (6) a magnetic analog of the refraction of light at a dielectric boundary and (7) optical rotation of light in an aqueous fructose solution. Each of these exhibits can be constructed for something like $1000 or less and are robust enough to withstand unsupervised public use. The dynamic behavior of these exhibits will be shown in accompanying video sequences. The following story has a history that goes back quite a few years. In the late 70's, I was spending time at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center accompanied by my family that included our two grade school children. Needless to say, we much enjoyed weekend excursions to all sorts of interesting sites in the Bay Area, especially the Exploratorium, an unusual science museum created by Frank Oppenheimer that opened in 1969. The notion that exhibits would be designed specifically for "hands-on" interactions was at that time quite revolutionary. This idea captivated a number of people everywhere including a friend in Ann Arbor, Cynthia

  1. The Indiana University proton radiation therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, C.; Derenchuk, V.; Cameron, J.; Fasano, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hashemian, R.; Hornback, N.; Low, D.A.; Morphis, J.; Peterson, C.; Rosselot, D.; Sandison, G.; Shen, R.N.; Shidnia, H.

    1993-01-01

    A fixed horizontal beam line at the Indiana University cyclotron facility (IUCF) has been equipped for proton radiation therapy treatment of head, neck, and brain tumors. The complete system will be commissioned and ready to treat patients early in 1993. IUCF can produce external proton beams from 45 to 200 MeV in energy, which corresponds to a maximum range in water of 26 cm. Beam currents over 100 nA are easily attained, allowing dose rates in excess of 200 cGy/min, even for large fields. Beam spreading systems have been tested which provide uniform fields up to 20 cm in diameter. Range modulation is accomplished with a rotating acrylic device, which provides uniform depth dose distributions from 3 to 18 cm in extent. Tests have been conducted on detectors which monitor the beam position and current, and the dose symmetry. This report discusses those devices, as well as the cyclotron characteristics, measured beam properties, safety interlocks, computerized dose delivery/monitoring system, and future plans. (orig.)

  2. Western Kentucky University Research Foundation Biodiesel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [Principal Investigator; Cao, Yan [Co-Principal Investigator

    2013-03-15

    production and combustion of ethanol and 41 % by bio-diesel. Bio-diesel also releases less air pollutants per net energy gain than ethanol. Bio-diesel has advantages over ethanol due to its lower agricultural inputs and more efficient conversion. Thus, to be a viable alternative, a bio-fuel firstly should be producible in large quantities without reducing food supplies. In this aspect, larger quantity supplies of cellulose biomass are likely viable alternatives. U. S. Congress has introduced an initiative and subsequently rolled into the basic energy package, which encourages the production of fuel from purely renewable resources, biomass. Secondly, a bio-fuel should also provide a net energy gain, have environmental benefits and be economically competitive. In this aspect, bio-diesel has advantages over ethanol. The commonwealth of Kentucky is fortunate to have a diverse and abundant supply of renewable energy resources. Both Kentucky Governor Beshear in the energy plan for Kentucky "Intelligent Energy Choices for Kentucky's Future", and Kentucky Renewable Energy Consortium, outlined strategies on developing energy in renewable, sustainable and efficient ways. Smart utilization of diversified renewable energy resources using advanced technologies developed by Kentucky public universities, and promotion of these technologies to the market place by collaboration between universities and private industry, are specially encouraged. Thus, the initially question answering Governor's strategic plan is if there is any economical way to make utilization of larger quantities of cellulose and hemicellulose for production of bio-fuels, especially bio-diesel. There are some possible options of commercially available technologies to convert cellulose based biomass energy to bio-fuels. Cellulose based biomass can be firstly gasified to obtain synthesis gas (a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}), which is followed up by being converted into liquid hydrocarbon fuels or oxygenate

  3. Effectiveness of hands-on tutoring and guided self-directed learning versus self-directed learning alone to educate critical care fellows on mechanical ventilation - a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramar, Kannan; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Selim, Bernardo; Holets, Steven; Oeckler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Physicians require extensive training to achieve proficiency in mechanical ventilator (MV) management of the critically ill patients. Guided self-directed learning (GSDL) is usually the method used to learn. However, it is unclear if this is the most proficient approach to teaching mechanical ventilation to critical care fellows. We, therefore, investigated whether critical care fellows achieve higher scores on standardized testing and report higher satisfaction after participating in a hands-on tutorial combined with GSDL compared to self-directed learning alone. First-year Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (PCCM) fellows ( n =6) and Critical Care Internal Medicine (CCIM) ( n =8) fellows participated. Satisfaction was assessed using the Likert scale. MV knowledge assessment was performed by administering a standardized 25-question multiple choice pre- and posttest. For 2 weeks the CCIM fellows were exposed to GSDL, while the PCCM fellows received hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL. Ninety-three percentage (6 PCCM and 7 CCIM fellows, total of 13 fellows) completed all evaluations and were included in the final analysis. CCIM and PCCM fellows scored similarly in the pretest (64% vs. 52%, p =0.13). Following interventions, the posttest scores increased in both groups. However, no significant difference was observed based on the interventions (74% vs. 77%, p =0.39). The absolute improvement with the hands-on-tutoring and GSDL group was higher than GSDL alone (25% vs. 10%, p =0.07). Improved satisfaction scores were noted with hands-on tutoring. Hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL and GSDL alone were both associated with an improvement in posttest scores. Absolute improvement in test and satisfaction scores both trended higher in the hands-on tutorial group combined with GSDL group.

  4. Effectiveness of hands-on tutoring and guided self-directed learning versus self-directed learning alone to educate critical care fellows on mechanical ventilation – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physicians require extensive training to achieve proficiency in mechanical ventilator (MV management of the critically ill patients. Guided self-directed learning (GSDL is usually the method used to learn. However, it is unclear if this is the most proficient approach to teaching mechanical ventilation to critical care fellows. We, therefore, investigated whether critical care fellows achieve higher scores on standardized testing and report higher satisfaction after participating in a hands-on tutorial combined with GSDL compared to self-directed learning alone. Methods: First-year Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (PCCM fellows (n=6 and Critical Care Internal Medicine (CCIM (n=8 fellows participated. Satisfaction was assessed using the Likert scale. MV knowledge assessment was performed by administering a standardized 25-question multiple choice pre- and posttest. For 2 weeks the CCIM fellows were exposed to GSDL, while the PCCM fellows received hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL. Results: Ninety-three percentage (6 PCCM and 7 CCIM fellows, total of 13 fellows completed all evaluations and were included in the final analysis. CCIM and PCCM fellows scored similarly in the pretest (64% vs. 52%, p=0.13. Following interventions, the posttest scores increased in both groups. However, no significant difference was observed based on the interventions (74% vs. 77%, p=0.39. The absolute improvement with the hands-on-tutoring and GSDL group was higher than GSDL alone (25% vs. 10%, p=0.07. Improved satisfaction scores were noted with hands-on tutoring. Conclusions: Hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL and GSDL alone were both associated with an improvement in posttest scores. Absolute improvement in test and satisfaction scores both trended higher in the hands-on tutorial group combined with GSDL group.

  5. ‘‘Lend a Hand’’ Project Helps Students: Improved Spatial Visualization Skills Through Engaging in Hands-On 3-D Printed Prosthetics Project During a 9th Grade Engineering Course

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Shaunna; Talley, Kimberly

    2018-01-01

    Research shows that high spatial ability is linked to success and persistence in STEM. Empirical investigations often report a gender gap in favor of male students. The purpose of this research study was to assess changes to 9th grade engineering students’ spatial visualization skills through engagement in a nine-week collaborative 3-D printed prosthetics project embedded within their existing ‘‘Beginning Concepts of Engineering’’ course curriculum. Using concurrent mixed methods, this study ...

  6. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Exterior LED Lighting Projects at Princeton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, WIlliam E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Murphy, Arthur [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Perrin, Tess [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    This report focuses on four exterior solid-state lighting projects that have been completed at Princeton since 2008, when the University adopted a comprehensive sustainability plan. Through these initial projects – which include a parking garage, a pedestrian path, and two parking lot installations – the school’s facilities engineering staff learned important lessons about SSL technology and gained experience in dealing with the rapidly changing landscape of lighting manufacturers and their suppliers.

  7. Abstract and research accomplishments of University Coal Research Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their respective projects in time for distribution at a conference on June 13--14, 1995 at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to that request. For convenience, the 70 grants reported in this book are stored into eight technical areas, Coal Science, Coal Surface Science, Reaction Chemistry, Advanced Process Concepts, Engineering Fundamentals and Thermodynamics, Environmental Science, high Temperature Phenomena, and Special topics. Indexes are provided for locating projects by subject, principal investigators, and contracting organizations. Each extended abstract describes project objectives, work accomplished, significance to the Fossil Energy Program, and plans for the next year.

  8. Project-Oriented University – Building the Capability for Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul DOBRESCU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Global economy is increasingly a knowledge economy, making people’s skills and qualifications more important than traditional power indicators such as territory, geography, natural resources. Globalization imposes new rhythms of performance to every economic or social field. Higher education is no exception to this, since it lies at the interface with the external environment, where skills and qualifications will be used and exploited for economic benefits. Universities are under a two-fold pressure. First, they provide services, knowledge, skills for fast-moving sectors. The knowledge and skills may quickly become obsolete and irrelevant for the economy. Second, universities need to innovate and to adapt to situations of constant change. Both types of pressure force universities to develop their capability for innovation, which becomes a prerequisite for survival. The purpose of this paper is to explain the concept of projectoriented university as a type of university that explicitly uses projects to perform processes of medium to high complexity, thus allowing it to deal with the increasing turbulence and dynamics of its environments. This concept is premised on the idea that there is a connection between a university’s maturity in project management and its managerial competitiveness and innovativeness. The concept inherits the conceptual core of the model of the projectoriented company and it comprises two components. The former is concerned with the structural dimensions of project management, “the hard” component – processes, procedures, organizational structures, terminology. The latter is concerned with the social dimension of project management, the “soft” component – skills, attitudes, competences, project management culture. Empirical results are considered representative for the Romanian higher education system as a whole, with due nuances and exceptions.

  9. Teaching Hands-On Linux Host Computer Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Rose

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2003, a project to augment and improve the teaching of information assurance courses was started at IUP. Thus far, ten hands-on exercises have been developed. The exercises described in this article, and presented in the appendix, are based on actions required to secure a Linux host. Publicly available resources were used to…

  10. A Hands-On Approach to Maglev for Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Raymond T.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) can be taught to gifted students in grades 4-9 using hands-on activities that align to the National Science Standards. Principles of magnetic levitation, advantages of magnetic levitation, construction of a Maglev project, testing and evaluation of vehicles, and presentation of the unit are…

  11. University-Level Research Projects for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to provide an opportunity for high school students to participate in university-level research projects. In this case, students from Pinkerton Academy (Derry, New Hampshire) were invited to participate in efforts to catalog data from the COMPTEL experiment on NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These activities were part of a senior level honors course at Pinkerton. Although the success of this particular program was rather limited, we feel that the general concept is a sound one. In principle, the concept of partnerships between local schools and university researchers is one that could be especially attractive to soft money researchers. Programs can be carefully designed to benefit both the students and the research program.

  12. Hybrid petacomputing meets cosmology: The Roadrunner Universe project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, Salman; Pope, Adrian; Lukic, Zarija; Daniel, David; Fasel, Patricia; Desai, Nehal; Heitmann, Katrin; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Ankeny, Lee; Mark, Graham; Bhattacharya, Suman; Ahrens, James

    2009-01-01

    The target of the Roadrunner Universe project at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a set of very large cosmological N-body simulation runs on the hybrid supercomputer Roadrunner, the world's first petaflop platform. Roadrunner's architecture presents opportunities and difficulties characteristic of next-generation supercomputing. We describe a new code designed to optimize performance and scalability by explicitly matching the underlying algorithms to the machine architecture, and by using the physics of the problem as an essential aid in this process. While applications will differ in specific exploits, we believe that such a design process will become increasingly important in the future. The Roadrunner Universe project code, MC 3 (Mesh-based Cosmology Code on the Cell), uses grid and direct particle methods to balance the capabilities of Roadrunner's conventional (Opteron) and accelerator (Cell BE) layers. Mirrored particle caches and spectral techniques are used to overcome communication bandwidth limitations and possible difficulties with complicated particle-grid interaction templates.

  13. CRITICAL TEACHING WORK AS DIMENSION OF UNIVERSITY PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Leher

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the heteronomy of academic work in Brazil, particularly public higher education. It discusses the meaning of rupture of the national-developmentalist project by the irruption of the corporate-military coup and the combined process of coercion (AI-5/1968 and Decree 477/1969 and of the subordination of research and postgraduate studies to monopolistic capitalism in counterreformation of 1968, through programs to encourage science and technology geared to the concerns of bourgeois fractions that sustained the regime. Facing the processes of dispossession and alienation of academic work in the dictatorship, the study examines the organization of teaching movement, its first strikes and the centrality given to career university project of ANDES. Finally, it presents as deepening the dependent capitalism over the last three decades reoriented public university and private higher education, indicating effects on teaching work and the struggles for affirmation of the public sphere as antimercantile.

  14. The Inspiring Science Education project and the resources for HEP analysis by university students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassouliotis, Dimitris; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Vourakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The Inspiring Science Education outreach project has been running for more than two years, creating a large number of inquiry based educational resources for high-school teachers and students. Its goal is the promotion of science education in schools though new methods built on the inquiry based education techniques, involving large consortia of European partners and implementation of large-scale pilots in schools. Recent hands-on activities, developing and testing the above mentioned innovative applications are reviewed. In general, there is a lack for educational scenaria and laboratory courses earmarked for more advanced, namely university, students. At the University of Athens for the last four years, the HYPATIA on-line event analysis tool has been used as a lab course for fourth year undergraduate physics students, majoring in HEP. Up to now, the course was limited to visual inspection of a few tens of ATLAS events. Recently the course was enriched with additional analysis exercises, which involve large samples of events. The students through a user friendly interface can analyse the samples and optimize the cut selection in order to search for new physics. The implementation of this analysis is described

  15. Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science

  16. Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science.

  17. Project-based learning in geomatics at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the education in Geomatics at Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. Since its foundation in 1974 AAU has used Project-Based Learning (PBL) as its educational model. In each of the 10 semesters a project has to be carried out by a group of students. The paper presents the ideas...... behind PBL and the use of this approach in Geomatics. Some examples of project work in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing are given. Teachers and researchers at AAU recently published a book on the Aalborg PBL model, in which progress, diversity and challenges of the approach are documented....... Some of the findings in this investigation are presented. The on-campus education in Geomatics uses the Internet, and the paper informs about its application on campus. PBL is also practised at AAU's distance education programmes, which combine e-learning and weekend seminars on the campus. Experiences...

  18. Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A + A You are here Home Hands-On Skills for Caregivers Printer-friendly version When you’re ... therapist who can help you develop your transferring skills. Allow for their reality Remember to accept your ...

  19. Managing Risk and Uncertainty in Large-Scale University Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sharlissa; Shangraw, R. F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Both publicly and privately funded research projects managed by universities are growing in size and scope. Complex, large-scale projects (over $50 million) pose new management challenges and risks for universities. This paper explores the relationship between project success and a variety of factors in large-scale university projects. First, we…

  20. The Flinders University inductively driven spherical Tokamak project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The Flinders University inductive start up Spherical Tokamak (ST) program is designed with two major functions: first a target plasma for a definitive test of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive, and secondly as a target plasma to be used in development of diagnostics for the collaboration between Flinders University and the Australian National Fusion Facility. A third goal is to maintain an Australian link to the international ST community at a time when this ST approach to plasma fusion is entering a ''second generation'' phase of larger machines, following the demonstration of resilience to major disruptions on START and MEDUSA, and excellent confinement properties, and β. Modelling of the optimum operating regime consistent with power supplies available at Flinders University, and comparisons of plasmas prepared by RMF alone with ohmically heated plasmas such as START, are presented to support the need for the design of this OH hot confined target plasma approach to RMF current drive as an alternative to that of pure RMF current drive at higher powers being attempted elsewhere, should that approach not prove successful. Progress on the experiments, which now includes successful tests of the toroidal field system and the OH coil system, is reported. The RMF facility will not be available till late in 1998. The case is made for retaining the valuable equipment resources of the Flinders University plasma research group and negotiating for the transfer of these to the Australian National Fusion Facility at the completion of this project at the end of 1999

  1. University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center opportunities for improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Tara M; Waldinger, Marcy; Silver, Samuel M

    2014-02-01

    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) Opportunities for Improvement project involved a detailed patient-level medical record review, feedback to medical providers and clinical leadership, and discussion of potential predictors of discordant or delayed care. The medical record review revealed that reasons for discordant or delayed care were well documented by clinical providers, and medical comorbidity was the most common predisposing factor. Another common theme was the difficulty in obtaining treatment records for patients who received a portion of their care outside UMCCC. The project provided a valuable opportunity to examine established processes of care and data collection and consider how the newly implemented electronic health record might support future efforts aimed at improving efficiency and communication among providers.

  2. Examining Race & Racism in the University: A Class Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora E Vess

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rise of black consciousness through “Black Lives Matter” protests and recent events regarding police shootings of unarmed people of color have triggered a national dialogue on race, privilege, and discrimination. I structured my 400-level Race and Ethnicity course to build on the momentum of these conversations by incorporating a student-led race-centric research project whereby students learn and apply in-depth interview skills. Through this qualitative group project, students interviewed 31 members of the university community to investigate colorblindness, racial identity, privilege, racialized experiences, and institutional racism on their campus. In this article, I describe the project, and consider its strengths and limitations as a means of student learning about race, privilege, and discrimination in the U.S. today. I include student quotations gathered through final reflection papers to give voice to their experiences as well as a self-reflection of my experiences as part of this project, particularly as a white woman.

  3. Providing open-access online materials and hands-on sessions for GIS exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, T.; Yamauchi, H.; Hayakawa, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    Researchers of GIS (Geographical Information Systems/Sciences) in Japan have collaborated to provide materials for GIS lecture classes in universities for the last 20 years. The major outcomes include 1) a GIS core curriculum, 2) a GIS "body of knowledge" explaining the details of the curriculum, 3) a series of PowerPoint presentations, and 4) a comprehensive GIS textbook. However, materials for GIS exercises at university classes using GIS software have been limited in Japan. Therefore, we launched a project to provide such materials which will be available online and accessible by anybody. The materials cover broad basic aspects of GIS including geoscientific applications such as terrain analysis using digital elevation models. The materials utilize public-domain and open-source software packages such as QGIS and GRASS. The data used are also freely available ones such as those from the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. The use of the GitHub platform to distribute the materials allow easier online interactions by both material producers and users. Selected sets of the materials have been utilized for hands-on activities including both official university classes and public instructions. We have been updating the materials based on the opinions of people who took the hands-on courses for better GIS education. The current materials are in Japanese, but we plan to translate some of them into English.

  4. Optimizing Outcome in the University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Hamed; Hąbek, Patrycja

    2016-06-01

    Transferring inventions of academic scientists to private enterprises for the purpose of commercialization is long known as University-Industry (firm) Technology Transfer While the importance of this phenomenon is simultaneously raising in public and private sector, only a part of patented academic inventions succeed in passing the process of commercialization. Despite the fact that formal Technology Transfer process and licencing of patented innovations to third party is the main legal tool for safeguarding rights of academic inventors in commercialization of their inventions, it is not sufficient for transmitting tacit knowledge which is necessary in exploitation of transferred technology. Existence of reciprocal and complementary relations between formal and informal technology transfer process has resulted in formation of different models for university-industry organizational collaboration or even integration where licensee firms keep contact with academic inventors after gaining legal right for commercialization of their patented invention. Current paper argues that despite necessity for patents to legally pass the right of commercialization of an invention, they are not sufficient for complete knowledge transmission in the process of technology transfer. Lack of efficiency of formal mechanism to end the Technology Transfer loop makes an opportunity to create innovative interpersonal and organizational connections among patentee and licensee company. With emphasize on need for further elaboration of informal mechanisms as critical and underappreciated aspect of technology transfer process, article will try to answer the questions of how to optimize knowledge transmission process in the framework of University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects? What is the theoretical basis for university-industry technology transfer process? What are organization collaborative models which can enhance overall performance by improving transmission of knowledge in

  5. OPTIMIZING OUTCOME IN THE UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ALAVI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transferring inventions of academic scientists to private enterprises for the purpose of commercialization is long known as University-Industry (firm Technology Transfer While the importance of this phenomenon is simultaneously raising in public and private sector, only a part of patented academic inventions succeed in passing the process of commercialization. Despite the fact that formal Technology Transfer process and licencing of patented innovations to third party is the main legal tool for safeguarding rights of academic inventors in commercialization of their inventions, it is not sufficient for transmitting tacit knowledge which is necessary in exploitation of transferred technology. Existence of reciprocal and complementary relations between formal and informal technology transfer process has resulted in formation of different models for university-industry organizational collaboration or even integration where licensee firms keep contact with academic inventors after gaining legal right for commercialization of their patented invention. Current paper argues that despite necessity for patents to legally pass the right of commercialization of an invention, they are not sufficient for complete knowledge transmission in the process of technology transfer. Lack of efficiency of formal mechanism to end the Technology Transfer loop makes an opportunity to create innovative interpersonal and organizational connections among patentee and licensee company. With emphasize on need for further elaboration of informal mechanisms as critical and underappreciated aspect of technology transfer process, article will try to answer the questions of how to optimize knowledge transmission process in the framework of University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects? What is the theoretical basis for university-industry technology transfer process? What are organization collaborative models which can enhance overall performance by improving transmission of

  6. INFORMATION SUPPORT OF INNOVATION RESEARCH PROJECTS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents and illustrates by the example of the Novosibirsk State University a methodical approach to the development of information support of innovative research projects of the university, its historical background and their components. The basis of the external side of the approach is the system-innovative bibliometric analysis of foreign and Russian economic, scientific and technical literature. The author provides the method and the results of analysis of publication activity indicators for the sources presented in the Scientific Electronic Library (www.elibrary.ru for the period of 1991-2005 and 2006-2015 (April years. This analysis includes the specific words and word combinations included in the article title. This analysis allowed us to give a quantitative evaluation of motion vectors for universities researches and innovations. The internal side of the methodical approach includes a special system of planning, accounting and control of financial support of scientific activities of the NSU. The description of the system contains the details of historical background, patterns of interaction of participants, key documents and indicators, algorithms for cost calculation, and software. The foundation of a group of laboratories in NSU under the supervision of the world's leading scientists is considered as an important result of the proposed approach. A brief description of these laboratories is given.

  7. The DPACS project at the University of Trieste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, F; Inchingolo, P; Valenzin, G; Dalla Palma, L

    1997-01-01

    The DPACS project (Data and Picture Archiving and Communication System) was undertaken at the University of Trieste by the Institute of Radiology and the DEEI (Dipartimento di Elettrotecnica, Elettronica ed Informatica), in collaboration with the CRSTBS (Centro Ricerche e Studi Tecnologie Biomediche Sanitarie) of the Area Science Park and the Azienda Ospedaliera of Trieste. The main objective of this project is to create an open system for the management of clinical data and images and for the integration of health care services. The first phase is oriented toward finding an implementation strategy for the creation of a prototype DPACS system, to serve as a starting point for the realization of a distributed structure for the extension of the service, firstly to the entire structure of the Cattinara Hospital and subsequently to all the Public Health units in Trieste. After local testing, the service will finally be expanded to a wider geographical level. The intensive computerization of the Institute of Radiology furnished the most favourable environment for the verification of the prototype, as the service provided by the existing RIS (Radiology Information System) and PACS (Picture and Archiving Communication System) has long been consolidated. One of the main goals of the project, in particular, is to replace the old, by now obsolete, PACS with the DPACS services.

  8. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  9. Developing teaching skills for the internationalized university: A Danish project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.; Cozart, Stacey Marie

    not only have different first languages, they also come from different cultures, with tacit knowledge and expectations about what is expected in the multilingual and multicultural classroom in which English is the one language shared by all, and in which linguistic, cultural and educational issues all play...... complex and interlocking roles. This has created a pressing need to explore, develop and share strategies for addressing the needs of English-medium lecturers faced with the challenges and opportunities presented by the multicultural classroom. This poster will present the outcomes of a major project......As an increasing number of higher education institutions offer degree programs taught in English, university management as well as teachers on the ground realize that while the English proficiency of faculty and students is important, there is more to it than just that; students and faculty...

  10. Moscow State University physics alumni and the Soviet Atomic Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Gennadii V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, two closely related themes are addressed: (1) the role that M V Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) played in training specialists in physics for the Soviet Atomic Project, and (2) what its alumni contributed to the development of thermonuclear weapons. In its earlier stages, the Soviet Atomic Project was in acute need of qualified personnel, without whom building nuclear and thermonuclear weapons would be an impossible task, and MSU became a key higher educational institution grappled with the training problem. The first part of the paper discusses the efforts of the leading Soviet scientists and leaders of FMD (First Main Directorate) to organize the training of specialists in nuclear physics at the MSU Physics Department and, on the other hand, to create a new Physics and Technology Department at the university. As a result, a number of Soviet Government's resolutions were prepared and issued, part of which are presented in the paper and give an idea of the large-scale challenges this sphere of education was facing at the time. Information is presented for the first time on the early MSU Physics Department graduates in the structure of matter, being employed in the FMD organizations and enterprises from 1948 to 1951. The second part discusses the contribution to the development of thermonuclear weapons by the teams of scientists led by Academicians I E Tamm, A N Tikhonov, and I M Frank, and including MSU physics alumni. The paper will be useful to anyone interested in the history of Russian physics. (from the history of physics)

  11. Parts of the Whole: Hands On Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Wallace

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this column we describe a hands-on data collection lab for an introductory statistics course. The exercise elicits issues of normality, sampling, and sample mean comparisons. Based on volcanology models of tephra dispersion, this lab leads students to question the accuracy of some assumptions made in the model, particularly regarding the normality of the dispersal of tephra of identical size in a given atmospheric layer.

  12. Using mockups for hands-on training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    The presentation of Using Mockups for Hands-on Training will be a slide presentation showing slides of mockups that are used by the Westinghouse Hanford Company in Maintenance Training activities. This presentation will compare mockups to actual plant equipment. It will explain the advantages and disadvantages of using mockups. The presentation will show students using the mockups in the classroom environment and slides of the actual plant equipment. The presentation will discuss performance-based training. This part of the presentation will show slides of students doing hands-on training on aerial lifts, fork trucks, and crane and rigging applications. Also shown are mockups that are used for basic hydraulics; hydraulic torquing; refrigeration and air conditioning; valve seat repair; safety relief valve training; and others. The presentation will discuss functional duplicate equipment and simulated nonfunctional equipment. The presentation will discuss the acquisition of mockups from spare parts inventory or from excess parts inventory. The presentation will show attendees how the mockups are used to enhance the training of the Hanford Site employees and how similar mockups could be used throughout the nuclear industry

  13. The Microbiological@mind project: a public engagement initiative of Turin University bringing microbiology and health education into primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalas, Daniela; Roana, Janira; Mandras, Narcisa; Cuccu, Sonia; Banche, Giuliana; Marra, Elisa Simona; Collino, Nicoletta; Piersigilli, Giorgia; Allizond, Valeria; Tullio, Vivian; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2017-10-01

    Despite ongoing global efforts, antimicrobial resistance continues to threaten the treatment of an ever-increasing range of bacterial infections. There is substantial evidence that public education programs that foster microbial literacy amongst young school audiences may improve correct knowledge of specific health issues, such as prevention of microbial infections and responsible use of antibiotics. The aim of the Microbiological@mind project was to engage primary school students with the subject of microbiology, to promote both scientific interest and awareness towards correct behaviors that may ensure a safer lifestyle. Interactive workshops based on a full ''hands-on'' approach were carried out by an expert team from the University of Turin to over 1200 children aged 9-11 years at primary schools in Turin. A questionnaire (pre- and post-activity test) on the main topic (i.e. antibiotics) was used to assess project effectiveness. The workshops provided a useful means to strengthen the understanding of basic microbiology concepts amongst students. Students' baseline knowledge of antibiotics was quite low, as low percentages of correct answers on antibiotic action and use (5.0% and 12.1%, respectively) were found in the pre-activity tests. A significant increase (P teaching activity. Our findings support the idea that microbial literacy in early childhood through hands-on educational programs is of great importance to foster children's interest in science learning, and to provide young people with information about general and specific health-related issues, such as prudent antibiotic use, for a more responsible citizenship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Designing an Academic Project Management Program: A Collaboration between a University and a PMI Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Robin S.; Richardson, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for project management skills in industry is increasing resulting in a higher demand for project management educational programs. Universities are addressing industry demand by developing project management courses, degree offerings and certificate programs that focus on both technical and general project management skills. While…

  15. The Luneburg Sustainable University Project in International Comparison: An Assessment against North American Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Almut

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the Luneburg Sustainable University Project (the Project) in a non-European international context; to relate the project scholarly approach to selected scholarly and practice-oriented North American sustainability in higher education (SHE) methods; to analyze project innovations against North American initiatives.…

  16. Implications of Project-Based Funding of Research on Budgeting and Financial Management in Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudla, Ringa; Karo, Erkki; Valdmaa, Kaija; Kattel, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the paper is to explore--both theoretically and empirically--the implications of project-based research funding for budgeting and financial management at public universities. The theoretical contribution of the paper is to provide a synthesized discussion of the possible impacts of project-based funding on university financial…

  17. The Charlotte Action Research Project: A Model for Direct and Mutually Beneficial Community-University Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Janni; Howarth, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the Charlotte Action Research Project (CHARP), a community-university partnership founded in 2008 at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and focuses particularly on the program's unique organizational structure. Research findings of a project evaluation suggest that the CHARP model's unique…

  18. University Curriculum Project--Professors Reflect on Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Beatrice C.

    This paper describes the reflections of the university professors in eight colleges at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who were pioneers in integrating assistive technology and related content into their courses and who continue to provide leadership in curricular change. Professors from the colleges of fine and performing arts, business,…

  19. Engaged Learning through Online Collaborative Public Relations Projects across Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Amber M. K.; Brunner, Brigitta R.

    2017-01-01

    Online learning is complementing and even replacing traditional face-to-face educational models at colleges and universities across the world. Distance education offers pedagogical and resource advantages--flexibility, greater access to education, and increased university revenues. Distance education also presents challenges such as learning to…

  20. Student Learning through Hands-On Industry Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, Lingma Lu

    2014-01-01

    Learning is most effective when accompanied by doing. If someone desires to become a baseball player, being told how to play the game, watching others play and even understanding the rules of the game are mostly ineffective if the individual never "swings the bat". This paper outlines the implementation of this method (swinging the bat)…

  1. Not Just Another Evaluation: A Comparative Study of Four Educational Quality Projects at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Sara; Fogelberg, Karin; Kettis, Åsa; Lindgren, Stefan; Sandoff, Mette; Geschwind, Lars

    2014-01-01

    In this study, four recent self-initiated educational quality projects at Swedish universities are compared and analyzed. The article focuses on how the universities have handled the tension between external demands and internal norms. The aim is to contribute to an improved understanding of quality management in contemporary universities. On the…

  2. University Business Cooperation : Results of International Student Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonntag, T.R. (Tom); Schroten, B.S. (Bart); Verburg, F. (Frederique); Bazen, J.C. (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

     http://dx.doi.org/10.14261/postit/5F1BA34B-4057-418E-96A87AD8B9F13A54 In 2015 and 2016, Saxion University of Applied Sciences organized the 2nd and 3rd edition of the Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship Conference (RIEC).   Throughout Europe universities are opening up more and

  3. Implementing Projects in Calculus on a Large Scale at the University of South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Gordon A.; Campbell, Scott; Grinshpan, Arcadii; Xu, Xiaoying; Holcomb, John; Bénéteau, Catherine; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Ramachandran, Kandethody

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a program of project-based learning in Calculus courses at a large urban research university. In this program, students developed research projects in consultation with a faculty advisor in their major, and supervised by their calculus instructors. Students wrote up their projects in a prescribed format…

  4. Measuring efficiency of university-industry Ph.D. projects using best worst method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, N.; Rezaei, J.

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative Ph.D. project, carried out by a doctoral candidate, is a type of collaboration between university and industry. Due to the importance of such projects, researchers have considered different ways to evaluate the success, with a focus on the outputs of these projects. However, what

  5. Designing a hands-on brain computer interface laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Long, Laura Kathleen; Mesgarani, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Devices and systems that interact with the brain have become a growing field of research and development in recent years. Engineering students are well positioned to contribute to both hardware development and signal analysis techniques in this field. However, this area has been left out of most engineering curricula. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) based brain computer interface (BCI) laboratory course to educate students through hands-on experiments. The course is offered jointly by the Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science Departments of Columbia University in the City of New York and is open to senior undergraduate and graduate students. The course provides an effective introduction to the experimental design, neuroscience concepts, data analysis techniques, and technical skills required in the field of BCI.

  6. Progress reports on SCWR-related development projects from Chinese universities for FY2008-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, L.K.H.

    2010-02-01

    Canada is participating in the international cooperative forum on system research for two designs (supercritical water-cooled reactor, SCWR, and Very High Temperature Reactor, VHTR) of the Gen-IV nuclear reactor. The forum is referred to as the Generation-IV International Forum (or GIF). The Canadian effort focuses mainly on the SCWR. Among various GIF participants, Canada is the leader of this design and has interest mainly on the pressure-tube type reactor, which is a natural extension of the existing CANDU reactor. Several critical research areas (such as material, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, instability, critical flow, etc.) have been identified in the system-research plan for supporting the SCWR design. Collaborative projects have been established between AECL and universities in China to expedite the CANDU SCWR design. These projects focus on research areas beyond the current scope of the AECL and the NSERC/NRCan/AECL collaborative research and development (CRD) project. AECL supports these projects directly and is contributing (in-kind) the results and findings to the Canadian national program. The collaboration between AECL and Chinese universities began in 2007 July. Most projects cover the duration of three years. The Chinese universities submit their annual progress reports each year prior to the project renewal. The objective of this report is to summarize the progress on collaborative projects between AECL and Chinese universities (namely the Tsinghua University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Xi'an Jiaotong University) over the duration of 2008 July to 2009 June. (author)

  7. THE MANAGEMENT OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROJECTS: A HIGH-PRIORITY ETHICAL PROBLEM IN THE UNIVERSITY AGENDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Palencia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This work paper points out that the management of social responsibility is a high-priority project in the agenda of university organizations. Social Responsibility is reasoned as a macro university ethical project; about how the projects in the university scope have been handled and finally about how the Intellectus Model is a successful option. By means of a documentary research, it was conclude that the university organizations come dragging a culture lack from ethics, which has taken it to assume the Social Responsibility with an extencionist approach. It is recommended to assume the Social Responsibility Project as a coexistence culture and to manage it by means of the Projects Management.

  8. Summary of discussions on the next project at RCNP, Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A meeting was held in May 1985 to discuss what should be the next project of RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University, in relation with other similar projects in Japanese Universities or institutes. About 70 researchers from various universities and institutes in Japan gathered and discussed new nuclear physics projects including a 300 MeV cyclotron. Before entering discussions some short reports conserning selection of machine, requirement from physical studies or political problems were presented. And some selected commentators gave short comments for active discussions. All these reports and comments are included in this collective report. (Aoki, K.)

  9. Industry-University SBIR NDT Projects — A Critical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Eugene R.

    2007-03-01

    The Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program, funded by various United States government agencies (DOD, DOE, NSF, etc.), provides funds for Research and Development (R&D) of nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques and equipment, thereby supplying valuable money for NDT development by small businesses and stimulating cooperative university programs. A review and critical assessment of the SBIR program as related to NDT is presented and should provide insight into reasons for or against pursuing this source of R&D funding.

  10. Learning based upon projects of architectural conservation: from university to real life

    OpenAIRE

    Mileto, Camilla; Vegas López-Manzanares, Fernando; Cristini, Valentina; Diodato, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Mileto, C.; Vegas López-Manzanares, F.; Cristini, V.; Diodato, M. (2011). Learning based upon projects of architectural conservation: from university to real life. IATED. 1-8. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/50072 Senia 1 8

  11. NHS Blood Tracking Pilot: City University Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Kate; Shabestari, Omid; Adriano, Juan; Kay, Jonathan; Roudsari, Abdul

    Automation of healthcare processes is an emergent theme in the drive to increase patient safety. The Mayday Hospital has been chosen as the pilot site for the implementation of the Electronic Clinical Transfusion Management System to track blood from the point of ordering to the final transfusion. The Centre for Health Informatics at City University is carrying out an independent evaluation of the system implementation using a variety of methodologies to both formatively inform the implementation process and summatively provide an account of the lessons learned for future implementations.

  12. Mock-up experiment at Birmingham University for BNCT project of Osaka University – Neutron flux measurement with gold foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, S.; Sakai, M.; Yoshihashi, S.; Manabe, M.; Zushi, N.; Murata, I.; Hoashi, E.; Kato, I.; Kuri, S.; Oshiro, S.; Nagasaki, M.; Horiike, H.

    2015-01-01

    Mock-up experiment for development of accelerator based neutron source for Osaka University BNCT project was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. In this paper, spatial distribution of neutron flux intensity was evaluated by foil activation method. Validity of the design code system was confirmed by comparing measured gold foil activities with calculations. As a result, it was found that the epi-thermal neutron beam was well collimated by our neutron moderator assembly. Also, the design accuracy was evaluated to have less than 20% error. - Highlights: • Accelerator based neutron source for BNCT is being developed in Osaka University. • Mock-up experiment was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. • Neutronics performance of our assembly was evaluated from gold foil activation. • Gold foil activation was determined by using HPGe detectors. • Validity of the neutronics design code system was confirmed.

  13. Acts of Reciprocity: Analyzing Social Exchange in a University Theater for Social Change Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloeren, Nicole Birgit

    2010-01-01

    In this study I sought to understand the complexities of the processes of reciprocity within a theater for social change service-learning project. My sample included three university students, one university faculty member, four high school students, one high school principal, and one high school teacher. As a participant- observer, I conducted an…

  14. CURRENT STATUS OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES IN MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Bulgaria there are five medical universities: in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. Their main mission is training specialists in the fields of medicine and health care, increasing their qualification by means of postgraduate education and performing research activities. One of medical universities’ top priorities is encouraging research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the current status of research project activities in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the science competitions related to Bulgarian medical universities we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: Research projects that Bulgarian medical universities can apply for are divided into two groups – national and international. The most significant international projects are European ones since Bulgaria is an EU member state and this allows us to participate in such projects. Conclusion: Universities should strive for establishing even better conditions for encouraging application for research projects aimed at developing competent and experienced staff, even though the majority of them may not obtain approval for financing.The changes in the situation regarding Bulgarian science require the implementation and development of more research staff motivated to improve their knowledge and skills in the relevant dynamically changing competition and project field.

  15. The ExamBase Project at the University of Auckland 2001-2005

    OpenAIRE

    Holley, Rose

    2005-01-01

    Exam papers have always been a heavily used resource in University of Auckland libraries. Prior to 2001 the library provided hard copies of exam papers in all its 15 libraries. These were heavily used at all times of the year, especially in the weeks leading up to exams. In 1996 the University Library first began to explore the possibility of providing past exam papers electronically to University students and staff. In 2001 a trial pilot project was carried out, which was successful result...

  16. Moodle supporting problem-based, project-organized learning at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Møller, Brian; Enevoldsen, Lars Peter

    and efficient learning model and a trademark of Aalborg University. In 2008 some study programs started using Moodle as their learning platform. In 2011 it was decided that Moodle should be the official learning management system for Aalborg University on-campus. At the presentation we would like to share some...... of the challenges we have encountered when implementing Moodle at Aalborg University whilst keeping the problem-based, project-organized model as the pedagogical foundation....

  17. Songs of the Universe - The AstroCappella Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P. T.; Smale, K. M.; Smale, A. P.

    2004-12-01

    The AstroCappella Project is a classroom-ready collection of upbeat pop songs, lesson plans, and background information, all rich in science content. It was developed as a collaboration between working research astronomers, educators, and a contemporary vocal band. A multimedia music CD ("AstroCappella 2.0") has been produced containing 13 astronomically correct songs with original lyrics and music. Song topics range from the Sun, Moon, planets and small bodies of the Solar System, through the Doppler shift, the nearest stars, and extra-solar planets, to radio astronomy, X-ray astronomy, and the Hubble Space Telescope and Swift astronomy satellites. The CD also contains extensive CD-ROM materials including science background information, curriculum notes, lesson plans and activities for each song, images, movies, and slide shows. The songs and accompanying information have been extensively field-tested, and align to the K-12 National Science Education Standards. The AstroCappella materials are in widespread use in classrooms and homes across the US, and are supplemented with frequent live performances and teacher workshops. We describe here the history, content, and educational strategy behind the AstroCappella Project, and the plans for its future development.

  18. Characteristic Features of Innovation Project Management Aimed at University Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullin, Aydar M.; Yungblud, Valery T.; Khodyreva, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the studied issue is based on the need to develop theoretical approaches to project management at a higher educational institution taking into consideration the specifics of the subject area of the projects that ensure finding the "growth points" and addressing the long-term objectives of a university in the field of…

  19. Evaluation of the Work-Place Cooperative Project in Geography Degrees at the University of Leeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, James

    1998-01-01

    Describes the context and objective of a Work-Place Cooperative Project (WPCP) established in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds in 1995. The project presents students with business, commerce, industry, and environmental research issues that have geographical dimensions. Includes a number of examples from the WPCP. (MJP)

  20. Collaborative Projects: A Study of Paired Work in a Malaysian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Examines the project work of university students in a TESOL (Teaching of English as a Second Language) program in Malaysia. Compares phonetics and phonology projects completed by students working in pairs with those completed by students alone and reports student attitudes and strategies. (Author/LRW)

  1. Project outline of high quality electron beam generation at Waseda University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washio, M.; Hama, Y.; Kashiwagi, S.; Kuroda, R.; Kobuki, T. [Waseda Univ., Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2000-03-01

    High quality electron beam generation project has been started at Waseda University under the grant of Ministry of Education, named High-Tech Research Center Project. In the project, we will install a laser photo-cathode RF Gun system with 1.6 accelerating structure cells of s-band and a stabilized RF power source. This RF Gun is expected to produce single electron bunch up to 1 or 2nC with around 10ps pulse duration. (author)

  2. Project outline of high quality electron beam generation at Waseda University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, M.; Hama, Y.; Kashiwagi, S.; Kuroda, R.; Kobuki, T.; Hirose, T.

    2000-01-01

    High quality electron beam generation project has been started at Waseda University under the grant of Ministry of Education, named High-Tech Research Center Project. In the project, we will install a laser photo-cathode RF Gun system with 1.6 accelerating structure cells of s-band and a stabilized RF power source. This RF Gun is expected to produce single electron bunch up to 1 or 2nC with around 10ps pulse duration. (author)

  3. First Student Project at the University of Tennessee at Martin Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Lionel J.; Turner, K.; Wesner, P.

    2011-05-01

    The University of Tennessee at Martin has recently completed the construction and setup of an observatory. The dome houses a 16" Meade telescope with SBIG STL-11000M CCD. For its first project, observations of the Delta Scuti type variable SZ Lynx were taken in March and analyzed using MiraPRO. A simple ephemeris calculation was done, and compared to previous results. This project was done under the University Scholars program, a four year scholarship program which includes a faculty-mentored research project.

  4. An incremental procedure model for e-learning projects at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlke, Friedrich

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available E-learning projects at universities are produced under different conditions than in industry. The main characteristic of many university projects is that these are realized quasi in a solo effort. In contrast, in private industry the different, interdisciplinary skills that are necessary for the development of e-learning are typically supplied by a multimedia agency.A specific procedure tailored for the use at universities is therefore required to facilitate mastering the amount and complexity of the tasks.In this paper an incremental procedure model is presented, which describes the proceeding in every phase of the project. It allows a high degree of flexibility and emphasizes the didactical concept – instead of the technical implementation. In the second part, we illustrate the practical use of the theoretical procedure model based on the project “Online training in Genetic Epidemiology”.

  5. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  6. The JAERI and Universities joint project research reports on the 4th joint research project between JAERI and Universities on backend chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    In the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities on Backend Chemistry, the 4th-term researches of it were performed on sixteen themes from April of 1999 to March of 2001 under the four categories, i.e. Nuclear-chemistry and physical-chemistry properties of actinides', 'Solid state chemistry and nuclear fuel engineering of actinides', 'Solution chemistry and technologies for separation and analysis of actinides' and Treatment of radioactive waste and environmental chemistry'. The present report compiled the papers contributed to the Joint Research Project. (author)

  7. Pennsylvania: Penn State University Integrated Pest Management Project (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn State University (PSU) is the recipient of a Level II CARE cooperative agreement targeting environmental risks in Philadelphia communities. PSU is involved in developing IPM management practices recommendations and policies.

  8. Hands-on Summer Camp to Attract K-12 Students to Engineering Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Muhittin; Ren, Jianhong; Custer, Sheryl; Coleman, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This paper explains the organization and execution of a summer engineering outreach camp designed to attract and motivate high school students as well as increase their awareness of various engineering fields. The camp curriculum included hands-on, competitive design-oriented engineering projects from several disciplines: the electrical,…

  9. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  10. Math in Action. Hands-On, Minds-On Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite-Stupiansky, Sandra; Stupiansky, Nicholas G.

    1998-01-01

    Hands-on math must also involve students' minds in creative thinking. Math manipulatives must be used for uncovering, not just discovering. This paper presents guidelines for planning hands-on, minds-on math for elementary students. Suggestions include dialoging, questioning, integrating manipulatives and other tools, writing, and evaluating. (SM)

  11. HANDS-ON MATERIALS AS INVITATION TO A FANTASY WORLD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    In this article I wish to introduce an innovative use of hands-on-materials, developed by Peter Müller, a Danish elementary school teacher. The hands-on material itself consists of a collection of small plastic bears in different colors and sizes, which can be used for many different purposes among...

  12. The Universities and JAERI joint research project. The achievements and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Sadaei

    1999-01-01

    The universities and JAERI joint research project has been carried out since 13 years ago on an equivalent basis with the universities and JAERI and co-ownership of the results. This paper consists of the history and results of research project and evaluation. The significance, characteristics, themes and problems of the project are arranged. The main results and the future of the project are explained. Two large projects such as the backend chemical project and the high-degree application of radiation project have been studied. The backend chemical project consisted of four themes; the nuclear chemical researches for TRU recycle, the solid chemical research of nuclear fuel and waste, new separation method for reprocessing and waste disposal and the fundamental chemical researches for disposal waste. The high-degree application of radiation project have eight themes; effects of ion beam on organism, slow positron generation and its application to materials, ion irradiation effects on polymer materials, nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear physics of isotope using online isotope separator, shield and behavior of accelerator radiation, materials analysis by ion beam, effects of nuclear transformation product by nuclear fusion reactor radiation damage and biofunction analysis of plant using positron release nuclide. (S.Y.)

  13. Hands-on optics: an informal science education initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony M.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Arthurs, Eugene G.; Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2007-09-01

    The project is collaboration between two scientific societies, the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program is designed to bring science education enrichment to thousands of underrepresented middle school students in more than ten states, including female and minority students, who typically have not been the beneficiaries of science and engineering resources and investments. HOO provides each teacher with up to six activity modules, each containing enough materials for up to 30 students to participate in 6-8 hours of hands-on optics-related activities. Sample activities, developed by education specialists at NOAO, include building kaleidoscopes and telescopes, communicating with a beam of light, and a hit-the-target laser beam challenge. Teachers engage in two days of training and, where possible, are partnered with a local optics professional (drawn from the local rosters of SPIE and OSA members) who volunteers to spend time with the teacher and students as they explore the module activities. Through these activities, students gain experience and understanding of optics principles, as well as learning the basics of inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving skills involving optics, and how optics interfaces with other disciplines. While the modules were designed for use in informal after- school or weekend sessions, the number of venues has expanded to large and small science centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl Scouts, summer camps, family workshops, and use in the classroom.

  14. An Educational Model for Hands-On Hydrology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Nakhjiri, N.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of a hands-on modeling tool developed for students in civil engineering and earth science disciplines to help them learn the fundamentals of hydrologic processes, model calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and practice conceptual thinking in solving engineering problems. The toolbox includes two simplified hydrologic models, namely HBV-EDU and HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures. The models provide an interdisciplinary application-oriented learning environment that introduces the hydrologic phenomena through the use of a simplified conceptual hydrologic model. The toolbox can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation) are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching more advanced topics including uncertainty analysis, and ensemble simulation. Both models have been administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of hydrology.

  15. Project H.O.P.E.: Effective University Engagement with Community Afterschool Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C. Jentleson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Implemented in 2002 by the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership, Project H.O.P.E. has improved the quantity and quality of afterschool programs for the youth of Durham, NC. Project H.O.P.E. provides tutoring programs, enrichment resources, and evaluation support to non-profit community partner organizations located in the low income Durham neighborhoods surrounding Duke University. Duke University undergraduates who provide tutoring services to the Durham youth in the afterschool programs gain from valuable reciprocal service learning experiences. Project H.O.P.E. is an effective model of the mutual benefits that can be gained from effective university and community engagement in the service of at-risk students.

  16. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach. Admittedly, time constraints and clinical demands can make incorporation of physics teaching into clinical practice problematic. We created and implemented a week-long, intensive physics rotation for fledgling radiology residents and evaluated its effectiveness. The dedicated physics rotation is held for 1 week during the first month of radiology residency. It comprises three components: introductory lectures, hands-on practical clinical physics operations, and observation of clinical image production. A brief introduction of the physics pertinent to each modality is given at the beginning of each session. Hands-on experimental demonstrations are emphasized, receiving the greatest allotment of time. The residents perform experiments such as measuring radiation dose, studying the relationship between patient dose and clinical practice (eg, fluoroscopy technique), investigating the influence of acquisition parameters (kV, mAs) on radiographs, and evaluating image quality using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and gamma camera/single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography phantoms. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the rotation is based on an examination that tests the residents' grasp of basic medical physics concepts along with written course evaluations provided by each resident. The pre- and post-rotation tests show that after the physics rotation, the average correct score of 25

  17. Hands on Education Through Student-Industry Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.; Wolfson, M.; Morris, K.

    2013-09-01

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company has invested in the future generation of engineers by partially funding and mentoring CubeSat projects around the country. One CubeSat in particular, ALL-STAR, has shown how this industry/university partnership benefits both the students and their mentors. Students gain valuable insight into aspects of spacecraft design that aren't taught in classes. They also start learning about industry processes for designing, building, and testing satellites before ever working in that environment. Because of this experience, industry is getting more qualified engineers starting fresh out of college. In addition Lockheed Martin's partnership with the university will allow them to use the students to help build affordable CubeSats for internal and customer's research and development projects. The mentoring also challenges the engineers to think differently about similar problems they face every day with their larger programs in order to make the solution simple and affordable.

  18. Validation of the Arabic Version of the Group Personality Projective Test among university students in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musawi, Nu'man M

    2003-04-01

    Using confirmatory factor analytic techniques on data generated from 200 students enrolled at the University of Bahrain, we obtained some construct validity and reliability data for the Arabic Version of the 1961 Group Personality Projective Test by Cassel and Khan. In contrast to the 5-factor model proposed for the Group Personality Projective Test, a 6-factor solution appeared justified for the Arabic Version of this test, suggesting some variance between the cultural groups in the United States and in Bahrain.

  19. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES PERFORMED AT MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are five Bulgarian medical universities in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. A major priority of medical universities is to encourage research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Projects are managed by the participating organizations called “beneficiaries”. Beneficiaries develop projects, apply for finances and if approved they implement those projects.Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the organizational structure of research project activities on the macro level and on the micro level in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the separate elements of the organizational structure and to analyze the relations and interaction between them we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: During the last six years there was a significant increase in the number and the overall annual financial value of the projects performed at medical universities in Bulgaria. The reasons for such increase are: managers realizing the advantages of and benefits from the implementation of research projects ensuring high quality modernization of research units’ equipment and facilities; access to innovative technologies; development of interdisciplinary relations, etc. Benefits arising from improved results motivate us to consider as appropriate some additional investments aimed at increasing the number of team members and further optimization of the currently existing structures (research centers in charge of research with the purpose of achieving even better results in this particular field. Conclusion: The role of research project activities in medical universities’ research field is of vital importance for the educational institutions’ success. Taking into consideration the changed conditions, European possibilities and the highly competitive environment, realizing this aspect will be essential for the

  20. The Chemical Engineering behind How Carbonated Beverages Go Flat: A Hands-On Experiment for Freshmen Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    A hands-on project was developed to educate new chemical engineering students about the types of problems chemical engineers solve and to improve student enthusiasm for studying chemical engineering. In this project, students studied the phenomenon of carbonated beverages going flat. The project was implemented in 2003 and 2004 at Kansas State…

  1. The University of Rochester Atomic Energy Project quarterly report, April 1, 1950--June 30, 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, H.A.

    1950-12-31

    This quarterly progress report gives an overview of the University of Rochester Atomic Energy Project for April 1, 1950 thru June 30, 1950. Sections included are entitled (1) Biological Effects of External Radiation (X-rays and gamma rays), (2) Biological Effects of External Radiation (Infra-red and ultraviolet), (3) Biological effects of radioactive materials (polonium, radon, thoron, and miscellaneous project materials), (4) Uranium, (5) Beryllium, (7) thorium, (8) fluoride, (9) zirconium, (10) special materials, (11) Isotopes, (12) Outside services, (12) Project health, (13) Health physics, (14) Special Clinical Service, and (15) Instrumentation (Spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray and nuclear radiation detectors, x-ray diffraction, and electronics).

  2. Implementation of quality management in early stages of research and development projects at a university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehe, Sandra; Wagner, Georg; Schlanstein, Peter; Rosefort, Christiane; Kopp, Rüdger; Bensberg, Ralf; Knipp, Peter; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-04-01

    The ultimate objective of university research and development projects is usually to create knowledge, but also to successfully transfer results to industry for subsequent marketing. We hypothesized that the university technology transfer requires efficient measures to improve this important step. Besides good scientific practice, foresighted and industry-specific adapted documentation of research processes in terms of a quality management system might improve the technology transfer. In order to bridge the gap between research institute and cooperating industry, a model project has been accompanied by a project specific amount of quality management. However, such a system had to remain manageable and must not constrain the researchers' creativity. Moreover, topics and research team are strongly interdisciplinary, which entails difficulties regarding communication because of different perspectives and terminology. In parallel to the technical work of the model project, an adaptable quality management system with a quality manual, defined procedures, and forms and documents accompanying the research, development and validation was implemented. After process acquisition and analysis the appropriate amount of management for the model project was identified by a self-developed rating system considering project characteristics like size, innovation, stakeholders, interdisciplinarity, etc. Employees were trained according to their needs. The management was supported and the technical documentation was optimized. Finally, the quality management system has been transferred successfully to further projects.

  3. One Hundred Dissertations: A Review of the Morale Research Project, University of New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the use of the "staff morale questionnaires" developed at University of New England from 100 graduate student dissertations on morale in a variety of educational institutions. The project helped off-campus students develop their academic critical abilities and enabled school administrators to understand the importance of…

  4. Student Perceptions of Writing Projects in a University Differential-Equations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Christine; Latulippe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study surveyed 102 differential-equations students in order to investigate how students participating in writing projects in university-level mathematics courses perceive the benefits of writing in the mathematics classroom. Based on previous literature on writing in mathematics, students were asked specifically about the benefits…

  5. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project 6-12 Curriculum. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "University of Chicago School Mathematics Project ("UCSMP") 6-12 Curriculum" is a series of yearlong courses--(1) Transition Mathematics; (2) Algebra; (3) Geometry; (4) Advanced Algebra; (5) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry; and (6) Precalculus and Discrete Mathematics--emphasizing problem solving, real-world applications, and the use…

  6. A Community-University Exchange Project Modeled after Europe's Science Shops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Elizabeth; Ross, J. Ashleigh

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project of the Morgridge Center for Public Service at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for a new structure for community-based learning and research. It is based on the European-derived science shop model for democratizing campus-community partnerships using shared values of mutual respect and validation of…

  7. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) Algebra. WWC Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) Algebra is a one-year course covering three primary topics: (1) linear and quadratic expressions, sentences, and functions; (2) exponential expressions and functions; and (3) linear systems. Topics from geometry, probability, and statistics are integrated with the appropriate algebra.…

  8. Final Technical Report for earmark project "Atmospheric Science Program at the University of Louisville"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Timothy Edward [University of Louisville

    2014-02-11

    We have completed a 3-year project to enhance the atmospheric science program at the University of Louisville, KY (est. 2008). The goals were to complete an undergraduate atmospheric science laboratory (Year 1) and to hire and support an assistant professor (Years 2 and 3). Both these goals were met on schedule, and slightly under budget.

  9. University ESL Learners' Cross-Cultural Transitions through Web-Based Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Migyu; Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to account for East Asian learners' cross-cultural transitions to US university Intensive English classroom culture within a technology-mediated language teaching approach, PrOCALL (Project-Oriented Computer Assisted Language Learning). It explored the influence of this approach on classroom interaction patterns acquired in the…

  10. University of Michigan lecture archiving and related activities of the U-M ATLAS Collaboratory Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, J; Bhatnagar, T; Goldfarb, S; Irrer, J; McKee, S; Neal, H A

    2008-01-01

    Large scientific collaborations as well as universities have a growing need for multimedia archiving of meetings and courses. Collaborations need to disseminate training and news to their wide-ranging members, and universities seek to provide their students with more useful studying tools. The University of Michigan ATLAS Collaboratory Project has been involved in the recording and archiving of multimedia lectures since 1999. Our software and hardware architecture has been used to record events for CERN, ATLAS, many units inside the University of Michigan, Fermilab, the American Physical Society and the International Conference on Systems Biology at Harvard. Until 2006 our group functioned primarily as a tiny research/development team with special commitments to the archiving of certain ATLAS events. In 2006 we formed the MScribe project, using a larger scale, and highly automated recording system to record and archive eight University courses in a wide array of subjects. Several robotic carts are wheeled around campus by unskilled student helpers to automatically capture and post to the Web audio, video, slides and chalkboard images. The advances the MScribe project has made in automation of these processes, including a robotic camera operator and automated video processing, are now being used to record ATLAS Collaboration events, making them available more quickly than before and enabling the recording of more events

  11. Predictive models for suicidal thoughts and behaviors among Spanish University students: rationale and methods of the UNIVERSAL (University & mental health) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Maria Jesús; Castellví, Pere; Almenara, José; Lagares, Carolina; Roca, Miquel; Sesé, Albert; Piqueras, José Antonio; Soto-Sanz, Victoria; Rodríguez-Marín, Jesús; Echeburúa, Enrique; Gabilondo, Andrea; Cebrià, Ana Isabel; Miranda-Mendizábal, Andrea; Vilagut, Gemma; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Auerbach, Randy P; Kessler, Ronald C; Alonso, Jordi

    2016-05-04

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among young people. While suicide prevention is considered a research and intervention priority, longitudinal data is needed to identify risk and protective factors associate with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Here we describe the UNIVERSAL (University and Mental Health) project which aims are to: (1) test prevalence and 36-month incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors; and (2) identify relevant risk and protective factors associated with the incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among university students in Spain. An ongoing multicenter, observational, prospective cohort study of first year university students in 5 Spanish universities. Students will be assessed annually during a 36 month follow-up. The surveys will be administered through an online, secure web-based platform. A clinical reappraisal will be completed among a subsample of respondents. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors will be assess with the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI) and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Risk and protective factors will include: mental disorders, measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) and Screening Scales (CIDI-SC), and the Epi-Q Screening Survey (EPI-Q-SS), socio-demographic variables, self-perceived health status, health behaviors, well-being, substance use disorders, service use and treatment. The UNIVERSAL project is part of the International College Surveys initiative, which is a core project within the World Mental Health consortium. Lifetime and the 12-month prevalence will be calculated for suicide ideation, plans and attempts. Cumulative incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, and mental disorders will be measured using the actuarial method. Risk and protective factors of suicidal thoughts and behaviors will be analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models. The study will provide valid, innovative and useful data for developing

  12. Student perceptions of writing projects in a university differential-equations course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Christine; Latulippe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study surveyed 102 differential-equations students in order to investigate how students participating in writing projects in university-level mathematics courses perceive the benefits of writing in the mathematics classroom. Based on previous literature on writing in mathematics, students were asked specifically about the benefits of writing projects as a means to explore practical uses of mathematics, deepen content knowledge, and strengthen communication. Student responses indicated an awareness of these benefits, supporting justifications commonly cited by instructors assigning writing projects. Open-ended survey responses highlighted additional themes which students associated with writing in mathematics, including using software programs and technology, working in groups, and stimulating interest in mathematics. This study provides student feedback to support the use of writing projects in mathematics, as well as student input, which can be utilized to strengthen the impact of writing projects in mathematics.

  13. A Social Contract for University-Industry Collaboration: A Case of Project-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Tero

    This study determines a social contract for a form of university-industry collaboration to a project-based learning environment in close collaboration with industry. The author's previous studies on moral conflicts in a project-based learning (PjBL) environment and his 5-year engagement in the PjBL environment are used as background knowledge, and John Rawls' veil of ignorance is used as a method in the contract formulation. Fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for with the contract which constitutes of sets of obligations for each party, students, clients, and university (instructors) in the chosen project course. With the contract fair and impartial treatment of actors is strived for and the most dilemmatic moral conflicts are tried to be avoided. The forming of the social contract is evaluated, and implications for research and collaborations in practice are offered.

  14. Hands-on approach to teaching Earth system sciences using a information-computational web-GIS portal "Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordova, Yulia; Gorbatenko, Valentina; Martynova, Yulia; Shulgina, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    A problem of making education relevant to the workplace tasks is a key problem of higher education because old-school training programs are not keeping pace with the rapidly changing situation in the professional field of environmental sciences. A joint group of specialists from Tomsk State University and Siberian center for Environmental research and Training/IMCES SB RAS developed several new courses for students of "Climatology" and "Meteorology" specialties, which comprises theoretical knowledge from up-to-date environmental sciences with practical tasks. To organize the educational process we use an open-source course management system Moodle (www.moodle.org). It gave us an opportunity to combine text and multimedia in a theoretical part of educational courses. The hands-on approach is realized through development of innovative trainings which are performed within the information-computational platform "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/) using web GIS tools. These trainings contain practical tasks on climate modeling and climate changes assessment and analysis and should be performed using typical tools which are usually used by scientists performing such kind of research. Thus, students are engaged in n the use of modern tools of the geophysical data analysis and it cultivates dynamic of their professional learning. The hands-on approach can help us to fill in this gap because it is the only approach that offers experience, increases students involvement, advance the use of modern information and communication tools. The courses are implemented at Tomsk State University and help forming modern curriculum in Earth system science area. This work is partially supported by SB RAS project VIII.80.2.1, RFBR grants numbers 13-05-12034 and 14-05-00502.

  15. Measuring efficiency of university-industry Ph.D. projects using best worst method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Negin; Rezaei, Jafar

    A collaborative Ph.D. project, carried out by a doctoral candidate, is a type of collaboration between university and industry. Due to the importance of such projects, researchers have considered different ways to evaluate the success, with a focus on the outputs of these projects. However, what has been neglected is the other side of the coin-the inputs. The main aim of this study is to incorporate both the inputs and outputs of these projects into a more meaningful measure called efficiency. A ratio of the weighted sum of outputs over the weighted sum of inputs identifies the efficiency of a Ph.D. The weights of the inputs and outputs can be identified using a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method. Data on inputs and outputs are collected from 51 Ph.D. candidates who graduated from Eindhoven University of Technology. The weights are identified using a new MCDM method called Best Worst Method (BWM). Because there may be differences in the opinion of Ph.D. candidates and supervisors on weighing the inputs and outputs, data for BWM are collected from both groups. It is interesting to see that there are differences in the level of efficiency from the two perspectives, because of the weight differences. Moreover, a comparison between the efficiency scores of these projects and their success scores reveals differences that may have significant implications. A sensitivity analysis divulges the most contributing inputs and outputs.

  16. Network attacks and defenses a hands-on approach

    CERN Document Server

    Trabelsi, Zouheir; Al Braiki, Arwa; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The attacks on computers and business networks are growing daily, and the need for security professionals who understand how malfeasants perform attacks and compromise networks is a growing requirement to counter the threat. Network security education generally lacks appropriate textbooks with detailed, hands-on exercises that include both offensive and defensive techniques. Using step-by-step processes to build and generate attacks using offensive techniques, Network Attacks and Defenses: A Hands-on Approach enables students to implement appropriate network security solutions within a laborat

  17. THE RESEARCH PROJECTS THROUGH UNIVERSITY-BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP IN THE CONTINUOUS FORMATION OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Niurka Concepción Toledo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Economic and social development requires the establishment of strategic alliances of society to higher education. The university, based on the benefits of deep multiplier effect, has the ability and the duty to manage knowledge and transferring scientific results obtained in its substantive processes: teaching, scientific research and university extension to the productive context. In this paper the experience developed by Chemical Engineering Department of Central University “Marta Abreu” of Las Villas in which the scientific community in the industry of sugar cane is prepared to manage knowledge through university- business relationship is exposed. For this effort, an innovative process focused on the execution of research projects from scientific and technological demands set by the sugar factory "Antonio Sanchez" Aguada de Pasajeros develops. In the development of the planned actions it will be attended teacher-researchers, specialists and managers of the company and the incorporation of students in the race for the exercise of labor practice, innovative aspect of its formation, which consolidates professional preparation. The experience showed the potential offered by the connection of university science with industry through the establishment of innovative processes in knowledge management to ensure greater relevance of university substantive processes and the immediate incorporation of scientific results to the productive sector as the supreme goal of this activity.

  18. AN APPROACH TO MANAGING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ SELF-STUDY BASED ON INTERDISCIPLINARY E-PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Krasavina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There are two tendencies considerably allocated in educational process of the modern higher school: the increasing amount of time for independent work of students and the active introduction of the information and communication technologies (ICT which is followed by its continuous updating and improvement. The article contributes to the problem of managing competency-based and professionally-oriented self-study for future teachers; the suggested method combines the advantages of project-based learning and the use of ICT.Aim. The objective of the paper is to assess the efficacy of interdisciplinary e-project-based approach to managing university students’ self-study.Methods. To evaluate the efficacy of such innovative method as interdisciplinary e-projects, we use quantitative and qualitative assessment. A set of quantitative pre- and post-surveys are administered for students in order to evaluate their learning outcomes and competencies development. Students’ motivation and attitudes were evaluated through questionnaires, interviews and discussions. An expert group appraisal method was used to define assessment components. Results. The groups of didactic properties and ICT didactic functions are allocated and analysed. Types of educational projects are presented. Definition and characteristic of the interdisciplinary e-project are given. Results of the pedagogical experiment conducted in M. T. Kalashnikov Izhevsk State University are described; the technology of development among students of foreign-language and information-communication competences as the most important professional ones is approved.Scientific novelty. The method of interdisciplinary e-projects is offered; it involves a set of the educational-informative techniques and procedures realized in the electronic environment and directed to the solution of the interdisciplinary problem connected with types and tasks of vocational activity

  19. EVALUATION OF NEW PRIMARY TEACHERS ORIENTATION COURSE PROJECT LAUNCHED THROUGH ALLAMA IQBAL OPEN UNIVERSITY, ISLAMABAD PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Manzoor H. SHAH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary Education is an important stage in the education system of any country. Every developed and developing nation is keen to develop and improve its primary education. In service training of the primary school teachers is a major factor in improving primary education. In Pakistan efforts have been made from the very beginning to improve the primary education especially in the late seventy’s. Different Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs, Donors Agencies and Institutions had been involved in taking different initiatives for the improvement of the quality of primary education. New Primary Teachers Orientation Course (N-PTOC was a similar effort of the Norwegian Agency for Development Co-operation (NORAD in joint collaboration of Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad (AIOU. The major objective of the project was to improve the teaching of primary school teachers through selected microteaching skills, lesson planning, use of teaching kit and AV aids. This project was started in 1991-92 and completed in the year, 1999. Different studies were conducted which indicated that the project has an impact on the performance of the trained teachers. The present study aimed for evaluation of the N-PTOC project launched through Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad. The study is based on the documentary analysis. All the existing record of the project including different reports, documents etc. were consulted for the purpose. It was concluded that the project achieved its trainee teacher’s targets up to 70% and training of tutors and senior tutors up to 100%. Moreover the project produced a model teachers training module for the in-service training of the primary school teachers. There were some problems and challenges in its implementation including; late release of funds, shifting of targets to next semester and its non continuation by the AIOU.

  20. The TAPin electronic libraries project and the experience at the University of Birmingham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K. Mulvaney

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The TAPin Project and its implementation at the University of Birmingham is described. Local issues and key features of a hybrid approach to Networked Learner Support are addressed. The methods of NLS adopted included electronic mail and the Internet. The key role in NLS played by subject librarians is stressed. Transfer of skills to learners by means of targeted individual training and a web guide is discussed.

  1. The Opinions about Relationship between Students and Teachers in the Class of Hands-on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigultong, M.

    2018-02-01

    This research has the purpose to study on 1) Relationship between Students and Teachers in the Class of Hands - on and 2) Class Management at Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi. The research consists of collecting information from 400 students who have valid student status in 2016 at Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi. This research uses content analysis technique, Average (-X) and Standard Deviation to interpret the information. The results of the research focus on 2 topics 1) The Human relationship between Students and Teachers. The samples group had high expectations of human relationship (x=3.87). 2) Class Management. The samples group had high expectations of Class Management (x=3.88).

  2. Hands-On Mathematics: Two Cases from Ancient Chinese Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjun

    2009-01-01

    In modern mathematical teaching, it has become increasingly emphasized that mathematical knowledge should be taught by problem-solving, hands-on activities, and interactive learning experiences. Comparing the ideas of modern mathematical education with the development of ancient Chinese mathematics, we find that the history of mathematics in…

  3. Teaching DNA Fingerprinting using a Hands-on Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thatcher

    1998-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive hands-on lesson in DNA fingerprinting that can be completed in a single class period. Involves students in solving a murder in which a drop of blood is fingerprinted and matched with the blood of the murderer. (DDR)

  4. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  5. Google Earth for Landowners: Insights from Hands-on Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Google Earth is an accessible, user-friendly GIS that can help landowners in their management planning. I offered hands-on Google Earth workshops to landowners to teach skills, including mapmaking, length and area measurement, and database management. Workshop participants were surveyed at least 6 months following workshop completion, and learning…

  6. Using videos, apps and hands-on experience in undergraduate hydrology teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological sciences teaching always needs to make a link between the classroom and the outside world. This can be done with fieldwork and excursions, but the increasing availability of open educational resources gives more-and-more other options to make theory more understandable and applicable. In the undergraduate teaching of hydrology at the University of Birmingham we make use of a number of tools to enhance the hydrology 'experience' of students. Firstly, we add hydrological science videos available in the public domain to our explanations of theory. These are both visualisations of concepts and recorded demonstrations in the field or the lab. One example is the concept of catchments and travel times which has been excellently visualised by MetEd. Secondly, we use a number of mobile phone apps, which provide virtual reality information and real-time monitoring information. We use the MySoil App (by Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), British Geological Survey (BGS) and Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH)) and iGeology / iGeology3D (by BGS) to let students explore soil properties and hydrogeology of an area of interest. And we use the River Levels App (by OGL based on Environment Agency real time data) for exploring real time river levels and investigating spatial variability. Finally, we developed small hands-on projects for students to apply the theory outside the classroom. We for instance let them do simple infiltration experiments and ask them to them design a measurement plan. Evaluations have shown that students enjoy these activities and that it helps their learning. In this presentation we hope to share our experience so that the options for using open (educational) resources for hydrology teaching become more used in linking the classroom to the outside world.

  7. Flowers behind the back of the universe: A cosmic art project exploring the invisible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuri; Doser, Michael; Sakurai, Ryu; Shimoyama, Hajime; Takahashi, Ryo

    2018-05-01

    What can be seen within this universe? Since humans are not instinctively aware of the limitations of their sensorium, what is being missed is not immediately obvious. Aiming to explore with our imagination the invisible elements in the universe, we created an interactive cosmic art project in collaboration with the Gunma Astronomical Observatory, and the Polytech Festival in Moscow. In this paper, we firstly address the topic of dark matter, from the physics point of view, the concept in our project touching upon the invisible beauty in the universe, and then discuss the practical methodology for the process of making the installation. This installation was laid out based on a map of constellations from where people were able to see the antipode of Moscow, an opposite point from the venue where the installation was set, in analogy to illustrating what exists, but can not be seen. Using origami flowers - made in the course of a workshop by the visitors of the festival - as a metaphor of the beauty and transience of life, the installation seeks to deepen the awareness of participants about the numerous invisible structures in the universe. Placing them within reflective structures underlines both our reliance on technology to make the invisible visible, and the influence of the point of view on how we perceive and interpret the resulting representations. In their various forms and colors, these flowers can be seen as metaphorical mirror images of that which lies at the antipodes of our awareness: of colorful gas glowing in radio waves, supernovas in their many x-ray hues, dark matter, neutrinos, gravitational waves, dark energy. Considering both the invisible scenery of the sky and the invisible elements of beauty in the universe as lying behind the 'back' of the universe, hidden to our senses, this project explores a new way of communication between humans and the ubiquitous invisible in an artistic manner. Finally, the whole process of this project is summarized

  8. Annual Report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been operated by the University's researchers and engineers. Except for the tank opening for regular inspection we met twice the troubles which forced to change the accelerating tube. The experiences teach us that it needs about 20 days to finish the conditioning after changing the accelerating tube. A sputter ion source of new version is now being installed on the top floor. Two devices for the detection of X-rays were tested. An apparatus for bombardment of samples in air for biological and medical sciences has been successfully used. The subjects of researches on nuclear physics cover the light-ion reactions, heavy-ion reactions and nuclear spectroscopy. A special emphasis has been put on the measurements on vector- and tensor-analyzing powers in the light-ion reactions, because of a higher efficiency of the polarized ion source. Elaborate works on the heavy-ion reactions including the angular correlation patterns and excitation functions have been made in parallel. Papers of these works are now being prepared, a few having been published already. Moreover, in the University of Tsukuba, a new research system, called Special Research Project on Nuclear and Solid State Sciences Using Accelerated Beams (Nuclear and Solid State Research Project) started in 1978 and will continue for five years. In this research project, researchers from various Institutes in the University of Tsukuba, as well as visiting researchers from other institutions in Japan and from abroad, participate. Using a variety of accelerated beams, i.e. of heavy, light and polarized beams, this research project aims mainly at the high excitation, short life, transient and inhomogeneous states both in nuclear and extra-nuclear world. It covers both fundamental research in nuclear, atomic and solid state sciences as well as their application in various fields. (J.P.N.)

  9. Project for the Space Science in Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M.; Oberst, J.; Malinnikov, V.; Shingareva, K.; Grechishchev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Konopikhin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction: Based on the proposal call of the Government of Russian Federation 40 of international scientists came to Russia for developing and support-ing research capabilities of national educational institutions. Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK) and invited scientist Prof. Dr. Jurgen Oberst were awarded a grant to establish a capable research facility concerned with Planetary Geodesy, Cartography and Space Exploration. Objectives: The goals of the project are to build laboratory infrastructure, and suitable capability for MIIGAiK to participate in the planning, execution and analyses of data from future Russian planetary mis-sions and also to integrate into the international science community. Other important tasks are to develop an attractive work place and job opportunities for planetary geodesy and cartography students. For this purposes new MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab) was organized. We involved professors, researchers, PhD students in to the projects of Moon and planets exploration at the new level of Russian Space Science development. Main results: MExLab team prepare data for upcom-ing Russian space missions, such as LUNA-GLOB and LUNA-RESOURSE. We established cooperation with Russian and international partners (IKI, ESA, DLR, and foreign Universities) and actively participated in international conferences and workshops. Future works: For the future science development we investigated the old Soviet Archives and received the access to the telemetry data of the Moon rovers Lunokhod-1 and Lunokhod-2. That data will be used in education purposes and could be the perfect base for the analysis, development and support in new Russian and international missions and especially Moon exploration projects. MExLab is open to cooperate and make the consortiums for science projects for the Moon and planets exploration. Acknowledgement: Works are funded by the Rus-sian Government (Project name: "Geodesy, cartography and the

  10. A Hands-On Approach To Teaching Microcontroller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Fai Yeong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Practice and application-oriented approach in education is important, and some research on active learning and cooperative problem-solving have shown that a student will learn faster and develop communication skill, leadership and team work through these methods. This paper presents a study of student preference and performance while learning the microcontroller subject with a 2-day curriculum that emphasized on hands-on approach. The curriculum uses the PIC16F877A microcontroller and participants learned to develop basic circuits and several other applications. Programming was completed on the MPLAB platform. Results show that participants had better understanding in this subject after attending the hands-on course.

  11. Re-Thinking Sustainable Education Systems in Iceland: The Net-University Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Rennie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent economic crisis in Iceland has raised issues of the sustainability of Icelandic higher education to new levels of importance. A key strategy in relation to this economic crisis is to consider the merger of the four public universities in Iceland and to introduce a much higher enegagement with online and open delivery methods of higher education. The Net-University Project was an EU Leonardo-funded initiative to compare approaches to open and distance education in Iceland, Sweden, and Scotland, with additional lessons from Atlantic Canada. In particular, it sought to focus on the transfer of innovation in continuing university education, with particular emphasis on the development and delivery of online higher education courses throughout rural Iceland (i.e., outside of Reykjavik. The partners concentrated on how knowledge and experience about distributed and distance learning models could be transferred between the partner countries and how such models can be integrated into the education system to better support higher education and lifelong learning. There was a particular interest in the practical use of open educational resources (OER for course design and in the sharing of these course modules among university partners. Some good practice and lessons from OER use in course creation are listed.

  12. IT release management a hands-on guide

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Dave

    2011-01-01

    When implemented correctly, release management can help ensure that quality is integrated throughout the development, implementation, and delivery of services, applications, and infrastructure. This holistic, total cost of ownership approach allows for higher levels of system availability, is more cost effective to maintain, and increases overall stability, maintainability, and reliability. Filled with practical insights, IT Release Management: A Hands-on Guide clearly illustrates the effective implementation of a release process in the real world. It examines the similarities and differences

  13. Sudbury project (University of Muenster-Ontario Geological Survey): Summary of results - an updated impact model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avermann, M.; Bischoff, L.; Brockmeyer, P.; Buhl, D.; Deutsch, A.; Dressler, B. O.; Lakomy, R.; Mueller-Mohr, V.; Stoeffler, D.

    1992-01-01

    In 1984 the Ontario Geological Survey initiated a research project on the Sudbury structure (SS) in cooperation with the University of Muenster. The project included field mapping (1984-1989) and petrographic, chemical, and isotope analyses of the major stratigraphic units of the SS. Four diploma theses and four doctoral theses were performed during the project (1984-1992). Specific results of the various investigations are reported. Selected areas of the SS were mapped and sampled: Footwall rocks; Footwall breccia and parts of the sublayer and lower section of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC); Onaping Formation and the upper section of the SIC; and Sudbury breccia and adjacent Footwall rocks along extended profiles up to 55 km from the SIC. All these stratigraphic units of the SS were studied in substantial detail by previous workers. The most important characteristic of the previous research is that it was based either on a volcanic model or on a mixed volcanic-impact model for the origin of the SS. The present project was clearly directed toward a test of the impact origin of the SS without invoking an endogenic component. In general, our results confirm the most widely accepted stratigraphic division of the SS. However, our interpretation of some of the major stratigraphic units is different from most views expressed. The stratigraphy of the SS and its new interpretation is given as a basis for discussion.

  14. A Study on Using Hands-On Science Inquiries to Promote the Geology Learning of Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the geology learning performance of preservice teachers. A total of 31 sophomores (including 11 preservice teachers) from an educational university in Taiwan participated in this study. The course arrangements include class teaching and hands-on science inquiry activities. The study searches both quantitative and…

  15. Barrier Island Activity to Illustrate Hands-On Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Suzanne H.

    The department of Physics of the University of Glasgow was concerned about losing students after the end of the level 1 Physics course. The current research project started as an attempt to find out the reasons for this, but moved to investigate attitudes towards Physics at several stages during secondary school and attitudes towards science with primary pupils. Analyses of factors, which influence students' intentions towards studying Physics, were performed against the background of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, which interprets people's behaviour by considering three factors: attitude towards behaviour (advantages or disadvantages of being involved in the behaviour, e.g. studying Physics for Honours); subjective norm (approval or disapproval of important people towards engaging in the behaviour, e.g. parents, teacher, general norms of the society); perceived behavioural control (skills, knowledge, cooperation of others, abilities, efforts required to perform the behaviour). Analysis of these factors revealed some reasons for students' withdrawal from Physics after level 1 and pointed to factors which may facilitate students' persistence in the subject. A general analysis of level 1 and level 2 students' attitudes towards different aspects of the university Physics course revealed that the level 1 students' attitudes towards their university course of lectures and course of laboratories tended to be negatively polarised. Recommendations were suggested on the basis of the gathered evidence about how to make students' experience in university Physics more satisfactory for them. The data obtained from the separate analyses of females' and males' attitudes towards university Physics course have showed that attitudes of females and males were similar. The only significant difference between level 1 females and males was found to be the perceived behavioural control factor (students' attitudes towards course difficulty, attitudes towards work load in the course

  16. An archival study on the reacting plasma project (R-project) at the institute of plasma physics, Nagoya University. An interview with MATSUURA Kiyokata, professor emeritus at Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Y [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Obayashi, H; Fujita, J; Namba, C; Kimura, K; Matsuoka, K; Hanaoka, S [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    An interview record with MATSUURA Kiyokata, Professor Emeritus at Nagoya University, is given on the Reacting Plasma Project (R-project), which was proposed and investigated in 1980's by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University (IPP Nagoya). The project was planned to aim at producing a DT reacting plasma in tokamak to explore its physics and technology. But after intensive studies on design work, together with some R and D efforts and related investigations, the project could not be realized. The circumstances of the R-Project at its initiation and termination stages are the major topics of the present interview, held as a round-table talk with Prof. Matsuura, the project leader. (author)

  17. Geothermal Heat Pump System for New Student Housing Project at the University at Albany Main Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lnu, Indumathi [Univ. of Albany, NY (United States)

    2015-08-27

    University at Albany successfully designed, constructed and is operating a new student housing building that utilizes ground source heat pump (GSHP) for heating and cooling the entire 191,500SF building. The installed system consists of a well field with 150 bores, 450 feet deep and (189) terminal heat pump units for a total capacity of 358 Tons cooling and 4,300 MBtu/h heating. The building opened in Fall 2012. The annual energy use and cost intensity of the building, after the changes made during the first 2 years’ of operation is 57kBtu/SF/Year and $1.30/SF/Year respectively. This is approximately 50% lower than the other residential quads on campus, despite the fact that the quads are not air-conditioned. The total project cost from design through 3-years of operations is approximately $6 Million, out of which $5.7 Million is for construction of the GSHP system including the well field. The University received a $2.78 Million grant from the Department of Energy. The estimated utility cost savings, compared to a baseline building with conventional HVAC system, is approximately $185,000. The estimated simple payback, after grant incentives, is 15 years. Additionally, the project has created 8.5FTE equivalent jobs.

  18. Research project on accelerator-driven subcritical system using FFAG accelerator and Kyoto University critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Unesaki, Hironobu; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanigaki, Minoru; Mori, Yoshiharu; Shiroya, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Ishi, Y.; Fukumoto, Shintaro

    2005-01-01

    The KART (Kumatori Accelerator-driven Reactor Test facility) project started in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University in fiscal year 2002 with the grant by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the basis feasibility of accelerator driven system (ADS), studying the effect of incident neutron energy on the effective multiplication factor in a subcritical nuclear fuel system. For this purpose, a variable-energy FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) accelerator complex is being constructed to be coupled with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The FFAG proton accelerator complex consists of ion-beta, booster and main rings. This system aims to attain 1 μA proton beam with energy range from 20 to 150 MeV with a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The first beam from the FFAG complex is expected to be available by the end of FY 2005, and the experiment on ADS with KUCA and the FFAG complex (FFAG-KUCA experiment) will start in FY 2006. Before the FFAG-KUCA experiment starts, preliminary experiments with 14 MeV neutrons are currently being performed using a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator coupled with the KUCA. Experimental data are analyzed using continuous energy Monte-Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and MNCP-X. (author)

  19. The Windows to the Universe Project: Using the Internet to Support K-12 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L.; Johnson, R.; Bergman, J.; Russell, R.; Genyuk, J.; La Grave, M.

    2003-12-01

    The World Wide Web can be a powerful tool for reaching the public as well as students and teachers around the world, supporting both formal and informal science education. The Windows to the Universe Project, initiated in 1995, provides a case study of approaches for the use of the web to support earth and space science education and literacy efforts. Through the use of innovative approaches such as easy to use design, multi-level content, and science concepts presented in a broader background context that includes connections to culture and the humanities, Windows to the Universe is an accessible format for individuals of various ages and learning styles. A large global audience regularly uses the web site to learn about earth and space science as well as related humanities content such as myths from around the world. User surveys show that the site has over 4 millions users per year, 65 percent of which are K-12 teachers and students. Approximately 46 percent of users access the site once per week or more. Recently, we have had the opportunity to expand our efforts while we continue to update existing content based on new scientific findings and events. Earth science content on Windows to the Universe is currently growing with a new geology section and development efforts are underway to expand our space weather content with a new curriculum. Educational games allow users to learn about space in a playful context, and an online journaling tool further integrates literacy into the learning experience. In addition, we are currently translating the entire Windows to the Universe web site into Spanish. We have included educators in the project as co-designers from its inception, and by aggressively utilizing and providing professional development opportunities for teachers, the web site is now used in thousands of classrooms around the world. In the past year we have continued to support K-12 educators by adding to our suite of classroom activities and leading

  20. A Collaborative Disability Studies-based Undergraduate Art Project at Two Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Derby

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we discuss research findings from a collaborative visual arts curricular unit on ableism, which we implemented in non-Disability Studies undergraduate courses at two universities during the 2012-2013 academic year. Our project builds on previous research in which we (Derby, 2015, in press; Karr & Weida, 2013 began adding Disability Studies arts pedagogy to our undergraduate coursework. For this project, we developed a shared unit, which we implemented in a general freshman seminar course, an introductory art teaching methods course, and an upper level art education course on applied technology. Utilizing a pedagogy of transformation, we engaged students with shared resources, including lectures, readings, and videos on Disability Studies and ableism; the project culminated with each student producing and exhibiting both an artwork and an artist's statement. After reviewing the literature and describing the project and research methods, we provide a nuanced discussion of the data, especially the artwork. The data indicate that our students, who were previously unexposed to ableism, conceptualized ableism at least on an elementary level, with many students demonstrating advanced conceptualization of ableism in one or more of three categories. Our findings suggest that integrating Disability Studies into non-Disability Studies curricula on a small scale can be useful, but that results are limited by the complexities of disability. The success of the project indicates that incorporating Disability Studies into standard curricula through a pedagogy of transformation can reach typical college students who are unfamiliar with Disability Studies concepts.

  1. Hands on with ASP.NET MVC covering MVC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    MVC (Model-View-Controller) is the popular Microsoft technology which enables you to build dynamic, data-driven, mobile websites, TDD site. Hands-On with ASP.NET MVC is not only written for those who are going to have affair with MVC for the 1st time, rather it is written in such a way that even experienced professional will love reading this book. This book covers all the tiny steps on using MVC at its best. With complete practical tutorials to illustrate the concepts, you will step by step build one End to End application which covers below mentioned techniques - Controllers, Views, Models,

  2. Circuits and electronics hands-on learning with analog discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Okyere Attia, John

    2018-01-01

    The book provides instructions on building circuits on breadboards, connecting the Analog Discovery wires to the circuit under test, and making electrical measurements. Various measurement techniques are described and used in this book, including: impedance measurements, complex power measurements, frequency response measurements, power spectrum measurements, current versus voltage characteristic measurements of diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and Mosfets. The book includes end-of-chapter problems for additional exercises geared towards hands-on learning, experimentation, comparisons between measured results and those obtained from theoretical calculations.

  3. Teaching radio astrophysics the hand-on way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    Astronomy and space sciences have always been instrumental in attracting young students to physical sciences. While the lectures/demonstrations and exhibitions pertaining to space sci-ences capture the imagination of young students, these alone are not sufficient to induce them to join scientific research. In countries like India, where a large number of students take to physical sciences for under-graduate education, complex sociological factors are key issues in translating this large body of students to potential researchers. While lectures and exhibition lead to an increase in scientific awareness for these students, these do not give a feel for scien-tific research and bridge the gap between high school/college science education and high end research. In this context, a hands-on approach to astronomy education, in science research environments or closely connected to scientific institutions, offers a promising alternative. This approach has been used in optical astronomy, where inexpensive small telescopes are available, often coupling a vast network of amateur astronomy clubs to leading astronomy institutes. The non-visual and relatively more technical nature of radio astronomy has limited a similar approach in past for connecting students to space sciences using radio waveband. The tech-nological explosion in communication industry and radio connectivity in the last decade along with an expansion in engineering education makes this possible now using a hands-on approach in teaching radio astrophysics. In this presentation, the sociological factors affecting the student choice are discussed followed by a review of the efforts to bridge the above mentioned gap by various groups in the world in the last decade with a view to enumerate the best practices in a hands-on approach. A program using this approach at National Center for Radio Astrophysics is described, where the students are exposed to simple hands-on radio astronomy experiments such as spectral line

  4. Discovering SQL A Hands-On Guide for Beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Kriegel, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the SQL skills that businesses demand when hiring programmers If you're a SQL beginner, you don't just want to learn SQL basics, you also want to get some practical SQL skills you can use in the job market. This book gives you both. Covering the basics through intermediate topics with clear explanations, hands-on exercises, and helpful solutions, this book is the perfect introduction to SQL. Topics include both the current SQL:2008 standards, the upcoming SQL:2011 standards, and also how to use SQL against current releases of the most popular commercial SQL databases, such as Oracle,

  5. Teaching Power Electronics with a Design-Oriented, Project-Based Learning Method at the Technical University of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Power electronics is a fast-developing technology within the electrical engineering field. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from applying design-oriented project-based learning to switch-mode power supply design in a power electronics course at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Project-based learning (PBL) is known…

  6. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  7. University of New Hampshire's Project SMART 2017: Marine and Environmental Science for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelzer, J.; Varner, R. K.; Levergood, R.; Sullivan, F.; Palace, M. W.; Haney, J. F.; Rock, B. N.; Smith, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    The month long residential Marine and Environmental Science research program for high school students at the University of New Hampshire connects students with university researchers. This educational program provides upper level high school students who are considering majors in the earth and environmental sciences with the opportunity to perform field work and conduct authentic research. This year's program introduced students to four modules exploring topics ranging from forest ecology to island ecosystems. The unifying theme between modules was the use of spectroscopy and remote sensing as a method of assessing the characteristics of ecosystems. Students constructed their own photometers utilizing eight specific Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) spanning a wavelength range from 400 to 1200 nm. An Ultra Violet (UV) LED, four visible LEDs, and three different infrared LEDs were selected to detect light reflected by plant pigments and tissues. Students collected data using their photometers and compared results to an actual Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) reflectance data, mounted eight photometers on an unmanned aerial system (UAS) to collect forest canopy data and collected data from island rock pools. The students compared their photometer readings to data collected using a fluorometer to identify the presence of phycocyanin produced by cyanobacteria and chlorophyll produced by algae in the rock pools. Students found that the photometer data were comparable to the ASD data for several wavelengths, but recommended several changes. It was determined that to be useful for forest health assessment, two of the three infrared LEDs had the incorrect gain settings, and that for rock pool studies, the infrared LEDs were not necessary. Based on the student findings, we will refine the photometers for next year's program. The photometers constructed this summer will be utilized in high schools classes during the 2017-2018 school year. This low cost project will bring what is

  8. Getting Their Hands Dirty: Qualitative Study on Hands-on Learning for Architectural Students in Design-build Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunaibi B. Abdullah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study provides an in-depth perspective of hands-on learning through the observation and analysis of architectural students' views in a design-build program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln during the fall semester of 2008. Qualitative data was gathered from 14 participants involved in the construction of a low energy double-storey house in the city of Lincoln, Nebraska. The study inventoried the requisite characteristics of a design-build course. Participants' views and activities were studied to ascribe the qualitative benefits of hands-on learning. In addition, students' motivation towards hands-on activities were evaluated in reference to student confidence and independence levels towards their future career as architects, designers or other design-build professionals. The findings showed the design-build course could offer a specific knowledge that link between theoretical subjects and the practical expect of building contractions.

  9. Toward Reform of Egyptian Higher Education: Final Report on Cairo University/Boston University Collaboration in Counterpart Training for the Third Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shann, Mary H.; Cronin, Joseph M.

    In 1981, the Egyptian government sought assistance from the World Bank's International Developmental Agency for the Cairo Univesity-IDA Third Education Project. The World Bank loan was designated for training faculty leaders capable of modernizing instruction at Cairo University and for equipping the faculties of agriculture and medicine with…

  10. Project-Based Learning as a Vehicle for Teaching Science at the University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, A. R.; Wade, P.

    2012-12-01

    In a typical science course learning is teacher directed. Students are presented with knowledge and concepts via textbooks and lecture and then given the opportunity to apply them. Project-based learning (PBL) creates a context and reason to learn information and concepts. In PBL, learning is student directed and teacher facilitated. Students take ownership of their learning by finding, evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of resources and via interaction between each other. In PBL, the project is central rather than peripheral to the curriculum. It is not just an activity that provides examples, additional practice or applications of the course content, but rather, the vehicle through which major concepts are discovered. The PBL process requires students to do revision and reflection encouraging them to think about what and how they are learning. PBL projects also allow students to develop important life-work skills such as collaboration, communication and critical thinking within the discipline. We have employed PBL in both Liberal Arts courses for non-science majors and upper division courses for science students. Three examples will be discussed. The first will be the production of video documentaries in a non-science major course; the second, a student generated electronic textbook in a 300-level energy course for science students; and lastly, a student designed analysis project in a chemistry major capstone laboratory course. The product in each of these examples was used to deliver knowledge to others in the class as well as members of the public providing motivation for students to do high-quality work. In our examples, student documentaries are publicly screened as part of a university-wide Academic Excellence Showcase; the student generated electronic textbook is available for public use on the internet; and the results of the student designed analysis were communicated to the real-world clients via letters and reports. We will discuss

  11. Real-time development of data acquisition and analysis software for hands-on physiology education in neuroscience: G-PRIME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gus K; Johnson, Bruce R; Bonow, Robert H; Land, Bruce R; Hoy, Ronald R

    2009-01-01

    We report on the real-time creation of an application for hands-on neurophysiology in an advanced undergraduate teaching laboratory. Enabled by the rapid software development tools included in the Matlab technical computing environment (The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a team, consisting of a neurophysiology educator and a biophysicist trained as an electrical engineer, interfaced to a course of approximately 15 students from engineering and biology backgrounds. The result is the powerful freeware data acquisition and analysis environment, "g-PRIME." The software was developed from week to week in response to curriculum demands, and student feedback. The program evolved from a simple software oscilloscope, enabling RC circuit analysis, to a suite of tools supporting analysis of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission analysis in invertebrate model systems. The program has subsequently expanded in application to university courses, research, and high school projects in the US and abroad as free courseware.

  12. The Global Climate and Energy Project at Stanford University: Fundamental Research Towards Future Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Jennifer L.; Sassoon, Richard E.; Hung, Emilie; Bosshard, Paolo; Benson, Sally M.

    The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP), at Stanford University, invests in research with the potential to lead to energy technologies with lower greenhouse gas emissions than current energy technologies. GCEP is sponsored by four international companies, ExxonMobil, GE, Schlumberger, and Toyota and supports research programs in academic institutions worldwide. Research falls into the broad areas of carbon based energy systems, renewables, electrochemistry, and the electric grid. Within these areas research efforts are underway that are aimed at achieving break-throughs and innovations that greatly improve efficiency, performance, functionality and cost of many potential energy technologies of the future including solar, batteries, fuel cells, biofuels, hydrogen storage and carbon capture and storage. This paper presents a summary of some of GCEP's activities over the past 7 years with current research areas of interest and potential research directions in the near future.

  13. Realization of universal optimal quantum machines by projective operators and stochastic maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciarrino, F.; Sias, C.; Ricci, M.; De Martini, F.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal quantum machines can be implemented by linear projective operations. In the present work a general qubit symmetrization theory is presented by investigating the close links to the qubit purification process and to the programmable teleportation of any generic optimal antiunitary map. In addition, the contextual realization of the N→M cloning map and of the teleportation of the N→(M-N) universal-NOT (UNOT) gate is analyzed by a very general angular momentum theory. An extended set of experimental realizations by state symmetrization linear optical procedures is reported. These include the 1→2 cloning process, the UNOT gate and the quantum tomographic characterization of the optimal partial transpose map of polarization encoded qubits

  14. The International Universities Walking Project: development of a framework for workplace intervention using the Delphi technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Nicholas; Brown, Wendy J; Faulkner, Guy; McKenna, Jim; Murphy, Marie; Pringle, Andy; Proper, Karin; Puig-Ribera, Anna; Stathi, Aphroditi

    2009-07-01

    This paper aimed to use the Delphi technique to develop a consensus framework for a multinational, workplace walking intervention. Ideas were gathered and ranked from eight recognized and emerging experts in the fields of physical activity and health, from universities in Australia, Canada, England, The Netherlands, Northern Ireland, and Spain. Members of the panel were asked to consider the key characteristics of a successful campus walking intervention. Consensus was reached by an inductive, content analytic approach, conducted through an anonymous, three-round, e-mail process. The resulting framework consisted of three interlinking themes defined as "design, implementation, and evaluation." Top-ranked subitems in these themes included the need to generate research capacity (design), to respond to group needs through different walking approaches (implementation), and to undertake physical activity assessment (evaluation). Themes were set within an underpinning domain, referred to as the "institution" and sites are currently engaging with subitems in this domain, to provide sustainable interventions that reflect the practicalities of local contexts and needs. Findings provide a unique framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating walking projects in universities and highlight the value of adopting the Delphi technique for planning international, multisite health initiatives.

  15. Sustaining Community-University Partnerships: Lessons learned from a participatory research project with elderly Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XinQi Dong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The strength of community-engaged research has been well documented in public health literature. It is recognised as a useful approach for eliminating health disparities by linking research and practice. While the framework of community-engaged research encompasses a broad range of research collaborations, community-based participatory research (CBPR places most emphasis on involving the community as a full, equitable partner throughout the collaboration. Despite growing interest in and demand for community-university partnerships, less attention is given to the issue of partnership sustainability. The purpose of this article is to present the challenges faced in sustaining a community-university partnership when conducting a CBPR project with an elderly Chinese population in Chicago’s Chinatown. Lessons and strategies learned from the cultural and linguistic complexities of the Chinese community are also detailed. In addition, based on a well-accepted sustainability conceptual framework, we reflect on the initial stage, mid-term actions and long-term goals of developing partnership sustainability. Working with the Chinese community required trust and respect for its unique cultural values and diversity. The cultural, social and environmental contexts within which the partnership operated served as critical forces for long-term sustainability: a culturally sensitive approach is instrumental in sustaining community-university partnership. Also discussed are the significant implications for evidence-based, impact-driven partnerships to develop culturally appropriate strategies to meet the needs of diverse populations. Keywords Community-based participatory research, community health partnerships, health promotion, Chinese Americans, ageing

  16. Tribal Colleges and Universities/American Indian Research and Education Initiatives Advanced Manufacturing Technical Assistance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, Stanley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The overall goal of this project is to establish a network of TCUs with essential advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities, associated training and education programs, and private sector and federal agency partnerships to both prepare an American Indian AM workforce and create economic and employment opportunities within Tribal communities through design, manufacturing, and marketing of high quality products. Some examples of high quality products involve next generation grid components such as mechanical energy storage, cabling for distribution of energy, and electrochemical energy storage enclosures. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is tasked to provide technical advising, planning, and academic program development support for the TCU/American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) Advanced Manufacturing Project. The TCUs include Bay Mills Community College (BMCC), Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC), Navajo Technical University (NTU), Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), and Salish Kooteani College. AIHEC and Sandia, with collaboration from SIPI, will be establishing an 8-week summer institute on the SIPI campus during the summer of 2017. Up to 20 students from TCUs are anticipated to take part in the summer program. The goal of the program is to bring AM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) awareness and opportunities for the American Indian students. Prior to the summer institute, Sandia will be providing reviews on curriculum plans at the each of the TCUs to ensure the content is consistent with current AM design and engineering practice. In addition, Sandia will provide technical assistance to each of the TCUs in regards to their current AM activities.

  17. Hands on versus remote techniques in waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asquith, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear industry has many requirements for planned and uplanned physical interactions with radioactive materials or their environment. In each case a choice must be made as to whether the interaction should be made directly by the operator using a 'hands on' technique, wearing any necessary protective clothing, or by entirely remote techniques. In facilities where remote handling equipment has already been provided and planned for, remote techniques are usually the obvious choice. However in radioactive waste management and decommissioning there are many cases where unexpected requirements emerge, often for relatively short term activities, where the choice is more complex. This paper takes a look at the various factors which should be considered in order to make these decisions, an overview of the types of remote equipment available in the UK and some examples of the benefits which have resulted when remote techniques have been adopted in Britain

  18. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : interim report November 1996-Jun 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.; Johnson, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report focused on the emissions and efficiency of flares under operating conditions typical of solution gas flares. While most solution gas produced in Alberta is conserved, it is estimated that 6 per cent of these gases are flared with significant changes in the volumes flared from site to site. The median volume of flared or vented gas was approximately 60,300 m 3 /year and 95 per cent of battery sites flare and vent less than 1,000,000 m 3 /year. The goal of this project is to experimentally study the scaled-down generic pipe flares under well-controlled conditions to better understand the performance of flares. Research was conducted in a closed-loop wind tunnel to determine the effects of wind on flaring. Other objectives of the research are to develop methods for measuring the overall combustion efficiency of flares with either gaseous flare streams or those containing liquid droplets. Models for the scaling of plumes that disperse the products of combustion from flares as a function of wind speed, exit velocity and flare stack diameter were also examined. And finally, this research project measured the emissions of selected toxic compounds in both their vapor and soot phases. 38 refs., 10 tabs., 56 figs

  19. Multiobjective optimization applied to structural sizing of low cost university-class microsatellite projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanbakhsh, Ali; Franchini, Sebastián

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, there has been continuing interest in the participation of university research groups in space technology studies by means of their own microsatellites. The involvement in such projects has some inherent challenges, such as limited budget and facilities. Also, due to the fact that the main objective of these projects is for educational purposes, usually there are uncertainties regarding their in orbit mission and scientific payloads at the early phases of the project. On the other hand, there are predetermined limitations for their mass and volume budgets owing to the fact that most of them are launched as an auxiliary payload in which the launch cost is reduced considerably. The satellite structure subsystem is the one which is most affected by the launcher constraints. This can affect different aspects, including dimensions, strength and frequency requirements. In this paper, the main focus is on developing a structural design sizing tool containing not only the primary structures properties as variables but also the system level variables such as payload mass budget and satellite total mass and dimensions. This approach enables the design team to obtain better insight into the design in an extended design envelope. The structural design sizing tool is based on analytical structural design formulas and appropriate assumptions including both static and dynamic models of the satellite. Finally, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) multiobjective optimization is applied to the design space. The result is a Pareto-optimal based on two objectives, minimum satellite total mass and maximum payload mass budget, which gives a useful insight to the design team at the early phases of the design.

  20. A geoethical approach in higher education: the project RUSSADE in cooperation with Sahelian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semita, Carlo; Ferrero, Elena; Calvo, Angela; Trucchi, Gabriella

    2014-05-01

    Sahel has been plagued by a continuous process of environment degradation since the droughts of the 70s and 80s. The desertification process has a significant impact also on the natural and artificial water bodies, on the rivers flow and the river ecosystems, damaging human activities. Environmental damage exacerbates inequality by exerting a negative impact on the population, in the meantime, the inequalities of human development amplify also environmental damage. The project "RUSSADE" (Réseau des Universités Sahéliennes pour la Sécurité Alimentaire et la Durabilité Environnement), included in the EuropeAid-ACP-EU Cooperation Programme in higher education (EDULINK II), has the specific objective to enhance higher education systems through the implementation of an interdisciplinary Master. The courses are designed with a geoethical approach in order to integrate Earth and Life Sciences to give the Sahelian students technical, scientific and methodological bases and to develop the skills of managing natural resources and to improve agriculture and food security. The systemic and multidisciplinary approach will involve several fields of knowledge. The programs of the different areas are linked to each other and Italian and Sahelian teachers cooperate together both in the courses planning and in the teaching activities. The partners, three African Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) of Niger (CRESA - Abdou Moumouni University), Burkina Faso (LERNSE - Polytechnic University of Bobo-Dioulasso) and Chad (University Institute of Sciences and Techniques of Abeché), will develop an education project with the main objective to use scientific knowledge to fight hunger and poverty and to promote environmental protection in a sustainable development perspective. The quality of higher education in the management of natural resources in agriculture will improve living conditions of Sahelian people. The Master, planned with innovative connections, includes a field training

  1. Design status of the Delfi-Next nanosatellite project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, J.; Brouwer, G.F.; Gill, E.K.A.; Monna, G.L.E.; Rotteveel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Delfi-Next is the second project within the Delfi nanosatellite development program of Delft University of Technology. It will provide students hands-on experience, facilitate technology demonstration for innovative miniaturized space technology from the Dutch space sector and allow advancements in

  2. Hands-on Training Courses Using Research Reactors and Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The enhancement of nuclear science education and training in all Member States is of interest to the IAEA since many of these countries, particularly in the developing world, are building up and expanding their scientific and technological infrastructures. Unfortunately, most of these countries still lack sufficient numbers of well-educated and qualified nuclear specialists and technologists. This may arise from, amongst other things: a lack of candidates with sufficient educational background in nuclear science who would qualify to receive specialized training; a lack of institutions available for training nuclear science specialists; a lack of lecturers in nuclear related fields; and a lack of suitable educational and teaching materials. A related concern is the potential loss of valuable knowledge accumulated over many decades due to the ageing workforce. An imperative for Member States is to develop and offer suitable graduate and postgraduate academic programmes which combine study and project work so that students can attain a prerequisite level of knowledge, abilities and skills in their chosen subject area. In nearly all academic programmes, experimental work forms an essential and integral component of study to help students develop general and subject specific skills. Experimental laboratory courses and exercises can mean practical work in a conventional laboratory or an advanced facility with an operational particle accelerator or research reactor often accompanied by computer simulations and theoretical exercises. In this context, available or newly planned research reactors and particle accelerators should be seen as extremely important and indispensable components of nuclear science and technology curricula. Research reactors can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on nuclear fission and the interaction of neutrons and photons with matter, while particle accelerators can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on charged particle

  3. Conceptual Evolution and Importance of Andragogy towards the Scope Optimization of University Academic Rural Development Programs and Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Bernal Azofeifa-Bolaños

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with the objective of describing the evolution and importance of andragogical processes in the search of rural profiles committed to the university work in the development and implementation of programs and projects. Among its main contributions, the importance of knowing and teaching processes applied strictly for adults by university coordinators of programs and projects stands out. The relevance of applying this kind of knowledge will allow efficient use of institutional financial resources, particularly for the real commitment of the rural adult community towards the implementation of field activities and accomplishing, in a shorter term, the expected academic achievement. A successful project experience is described in which some andragogical strategies were applied through extension, and which produced a better participation and engagement from rural people with the projects developed by the University. Consequently, applicability of these concepts in the programs and projects of rural development promoted through universities must lay the foundation for regional rural development strategies with the ultimate goal of finding ways to improve the quality of life of people in particular scenarios.

  4. Pediatric Resident Academic Projects While on Global Health Electives: Ten Years of Experience at the University of Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Slusher, Tina M; Howard, Cynthia R; Cole, Valerie B; Gladding, Sophia P

    2017-07-01

    Many residency programs require residents to complete an academic project as part of a global health (GH) elective. However, there has been little description of the range of projects residents have pursued during GH electives or the extent to which these projects are consistent with proposed best practices. The authors conducted a document review of 67 written summaries or copies of presentations of academic projects (hereafter, summaries) completed by pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents at the University of Minnesota while on GH electives from 2005 to 2015. Two authors independently coded each summary for the type of project completed; when the project idea was generated; explicit mention of a mentor from the home institution, host institution, or both; whether a needs assessment was conducted; and whether there were plans for sustainability. Most of the 67 projects were categorized into one of three project types: quality/process improvement (28 [42%]), education (18 [27%]), or clinical research (14 [21%]). Most summaries explicitly mentioned a mentor (45 [67%]), reported conducting a needs assessment (38 [57%]), and indicated sustainability plans (45 [67%]). Of the 42 summaries that indicated the timing of idea generation, 30 (71%) indicated the idea was developed after arriving at the host site. Residents undertook a wide range of academic projects during GH electives, most commonly quality/process improvement and education projects. The projects were largely aligned with best practices, with most summaries indicating the resident worked with a mentor, conducted a needs assessment, and made plans for sustainability.

  5. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program that aims to evaluate the effectiveness in students learning the Rock Cycle theme. Prior research on both PBL and Rock Cycle was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and Rock Cycle as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies. PBL is a student-centered method based on the principle of using problems as the starting point for the acquisition of new knowledge. Problems are based on complex real-world situations. All information needed to solve the problem is initially not given. Students will identify, find, and use appropriate resources to complete the exercise. They work permanently in small groups, developing self-directed activities and increasing participation in discussions. Teacher based guidance allows students to be fully engaged in knowledge building. That way, the learning process is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected. Theme "Rock Cycle" was introduced using a problematic situation, which outlined the geological processes highlighted in "Foz do Douro" the next coastline of the school where the study was developed. The questions proposed by the students were solved, using strategies that involved the use of hands-on activities and virtual labs in Geology. The systematization of the selected theme was performed in a field excursion, implemented according to the organizational model of Nir Orion, to The "Foz do Douro" metamorphic complex. In the evaluation of the learning process, data were obtained on students' development of knowledge and competencies through the application of

  6. A Scorpion¡¯s Poison Antivenin R&D+i Project Case from a Mexican Public University.

    OpenAIRE

    Vega-Gonz¨¢lez Luis Roberto

    2012-01-01

    All over the world there is a huge complex problem caused by the sting of poisonous animals. In many countries all around the orb there are some animal species hazardous for human beings. A case from a Mexican University R&D institute- Private firm innovation project about scorpion¡¯s antivenins health area is presented. The scientific-technological allied participant organizations performed a long life cycle innovation project, which includes research and development, knowledge transference,...

  7. Continuous Improvement Implementation in the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust: A Case Study of a Continuous Improvement Programme & Project

    OpenAIRE

    Velzen, Jeena

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at identifying the extent to which the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust has fulfilled literature requirements for successful continuous improvement as exemplified by its Better for You programme and chemotherapy service improvement project. Both the theory and ideals of the continuous improvement programme, along with the actualization of these philosophies and methodologies in the context of the particular project,were compared against a framework for the enabling...

  8. Project Based Learning experiences in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; del Cura, Juan M.; Ezquerro, José M.; Lapuerta, Victoria; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the innovation activities performed in the field of space education since the academic year 2009/10 at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC), the center assigned by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations of scientific experiments on board the International Space Station. These activities have been integrated within the last year of the UPM Aerospace Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite using demonstrator satellites. In parallel, the students participate in a Project Based Learning (PBL) training process in which they work in groups to develop the conceptual design of a space mission. One student in each group takes the role of project manager, another one is responsible for the mission design and the rest are each responsible for the design of one of the satellite subsystems. A ground station has also been set up with the help of students developing their final thesis, which will allow future students to perform training sessions and learn how to communicate with satellites, how to receive telemetry and how to process the data. Several surveys have been conducted along two academic years to evaluate the impact of these techniques in engineering learning. The surveys evaluate the acquisition of specific and generic competences, as well as the students' degree of satisfaction with respect to the use of these learning methodologies. The results of the surveys and the perception of the lecturers show that PBL encourages students' motivation and improves their results. They not only acquire better technical training, but also improve their transversal skills. It is also pointed out that this methodology requires more dedication from lecturers than traditional methods.

  9. small-scale chemistry for a hands-on approach to chemistry practical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, ..... kits were acquired from South Africa (Mylab project, Northwest University). .... solve/handle the lab problems, and, even less, to explore innovative ways ..... lessons at their own pace, they were good at managing and saving time for activities like.

  10. The PIERDUB project: International Project on Education and Research in Donation at University of Barcelona: training university students about donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyalich, M; Paredes, D; Ballesté, C; Menjívar, A

    2010-01-01

    Donation and transplantation is an accepted therapeutic option when organ failure or tissue replacements are needed to save or improve the quality of life. However, in most medical schools there is no specific training for it, thus disregarding the key role of university students for the future success of the process. Knowledge diffusion about the donation procedure to clarify doubts and stimulate positive attitudes toward donation. Training university students in the donation and transplantation process. Research about the previous donation knowledge and the impact in donation indexes. Three different phases have been designed: (1) Training the University of Barcelona Health Sciences School students; (2) Training the Health Sciences School students in other faculties of Catalonia, Spain, and International; and (3) research. Since 2005, we have offered yearly an Optional Credits Course to medical students with duration of 45 hours, and two Donation days opened to health sciences students. Since 2007, promotional campaigns have been carried out in medicine and other health sciences faculties. Until now, 818 answered surveys have been collected to evaluate previous knowledge among university students. Training medical and other health sciences students in the donation process will improve quality of medical education and develop a trainer role for future professionals to help improve donation rates.

  11. Livestock Judges Training Provides Hands-On Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Scott; Harrison, Steve; Packham, Joel; Sanchez, Dawn; Jensen, Jim; Kaysen, Brett; King, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The judging of a market animal at a fair is the highlight of a youth-owned livestock project. Livestock judges are hired to evaluate youth projects at fairs. They are critical ambassadors for agriculture and influence countless youths and adults. Judges must be knowledgeable about current animal evaluation methods that support youth development.…

  12. Telescope Construction: A Hands-On Approach to Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazine, Angela R.; Albin, E.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a popular semester-long telescope making course offered at Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA. The program is tailored for junior / senior level high school students and incorporates the current educational performance standards for the state of Georgia. This course steps out of the traditional classroom environment and allows students to explore optics and astronomical concepts by constructing their own telescopes. Student telescopes follow the classic six-inch f/8 Newtonian reflector design, which has proven to be a good compromise between portability and aperture. Participants meet for a few hours, twice weekly, to build their telescopes. Over the course of the semester, raw one-inch thick Pyrex mirror blanks are ground, polished, and figured by hand into precision telescope objectives. Along the way, students are introduced to the Ronchi and Foucault methods for testing optics and once figured, completed mirrors are then chemically silvered. A plywood Dobsonian-style base is built and eventually mated with an optical tube made from a standard eight-inch concrete form tube or sonotube. An evening of star testing the optics and observation is planned at the end of the semester to insure the proper operation of each telescope. In summary, we believe that a hands-on approach to the understanding and use of optical telescopes is a great way not only to instill enthusiasm among students for the night sky, but may perhaps inspire the next generation of professional telescope makers.

  13. Astronomers' Do-It-Yourself Project Opening A New Window on the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    at 74 MHz greatly improves our knowledge of its extent and properties. This is crucial to figuring out how the halo got there in the first place," Kassim said. In the region of the Coma Cluster, the scientists made a "super" wide-field image. This image, showing an area some 15 degrees on a side, shows hundreds of radio-emitting objects, including extremely distant galaxies. Dubbed the "VLA Coma Deep Field," the image is "one of the most spectacular made recently at the VLA," Kassim said. "The amount of information obtained from only a single pointing of the VLA is awesome. Images like this will be extremely valuable in learning about the early universe," he said. All of these results came about because of the astronomers' persistence in pursuing a long-sought goal of equipping the VLA to observe at the new frequency. Erickson has been a long-time proponent of low-frequency radio astronomy. Both Perley and Kassim were Ph.D students of Erickson at the University of Maryland. The 330-MHz capability, also supported by NRL, was added to the VLA in the 1980s, and the group managed to install equipment for 74 MHz on eight of the VLA's 27 antennas a few years ago. They still wanted all the antennas equipped, however. "We knew we could use off-the-shelf components and equip antennas for about a thousand dollars each," said Perley, "but we just couldn't seem to squeeze the loose change out of anyone." Then Kassim pursuaded the Naval Research Laboratory to provide funding for the project. The astronomers then went to work to get the most performance for the money. Erickson, aided by NRL engineer Brian Hicks and Kassim, did the actual construction of 74-MHz receivers at NRL. The astronomers also worked alongside engineers and technicians, climbing on the VLA's giant dish antennas to install the new equipment. Hicks is presently constructing additional 74 MHz receivers at NRL for eventual tests on Very Long Baseline Array antennas The result, Perley said, "is not bad for a do

  14. Exposing Engineering Students to Renewable Energy through Hands-On Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggao; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Renewable energy is the most rapidly growing discipline in today's business world and is commonly viewed as the main arena for research and development in various fields. This article summarizes the work and efforts of an educational project conducted at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU). A major goal of the project was to design renewable…

  15. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, as well as the third of the Nuclear and Solid State Research Project at the University of Tsukuba. It contains the short descriptions of the activities during the period from April, 1979, to March, 1980. The 12 UD Pelletron has worked well and was utilized over 2900 hours as the time of beam on targets. The performance of the polarized ion source has been quite good, and it produced the beams of polarized protons and deuterons as well as of alpha particles. The sputter ion source (TUNIS) replaced the direct extraction duoplasmatron in most cases, and it produced the beams of isotopes of O, F, Si, Cl, Ni, Cu, etc., without gas injection. The construction of the second measuring room has been completed, and four beam courses are equipped with a general purpose scattering chamber, the devices for perturbed angular correlation, inner and outer shell ionization, and biological studies. The beam pulsing system was installed on the accelerator, and will be in operation soon. Further efforts have been made to develop detection and data processing systems. The examples of the recent researches mainly under the program of the NSSRP in various fields are enumerated. The exchange and collaboration with other institutions were active. (Kako, I.)

  16. Helwan University Project Developing Primary School Pupils' Abilities and Skills at Some Egyptian Underprivileged Areas (Slums). (Field Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tayeb, Mahmoud N.; El Nashar, Mohamed; Zeid, Mai M.; El-Sayed, Magda; Ramadan, Mohamed A.; Hamdi, Safia M.; El-Affy, Nabila; Ebeid, Amina K.; El-Marasi, Sonia S.; Abou-Elmahty, Maher

    2010-01-01

    Through directing concerted efforts and educational services of seven Faculties of Helwan University towards socially underprivileged pupils in slum areas (EL-Marg area in big Cairo) this research project had two main aims: firstly, modifying a set of arbitrary behaviors of those pupils, in a trial to develop some behavior skills associated with…

  17. Internet Technology-Based Projects in Learning and Teaching English as a Foreign Language at Yakutsk State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorshchikova, Lena; Egorova, Olga; Popova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses recent uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in fostering Internet-based projects for learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at the Faculty of Foreign Languages in Yakutsk State University, Russia. It covers the authors' experiences integrating distance education and creating educational resources…

  18. Procedural Influence on Internal and External Assessment Scores of Undergraduate Vocational and Technical Education Research Projects in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C., John; Manabete, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine the procedural influence on internal and external assessment scores of undergraduate research projects in vocational and technical education programmes in the university under study. A survey research design was used for the conduct of this study. The population consisted of 130 lecturers and 1,847 students in the…

  19. A Pre-Mobility eTandem Project for Incoming International Students at the University of Padua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggio, Lisa; Rózsavölgyi, Edit

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on a strategic partnership with students from the University of Padua and international students coming to Padua mainly in the setting of Erasmus student mobility and exchange programs. The project is designed specifically for incoming international students to facilitate their integration into the Italian higher educational…

  20. Hands-on-Entropy, Energy Balance with Biological Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy). This has enabled students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce complex biological processes and structures in order model them mathematically to account for both deterministic and probabilistic processes. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront random forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk will present a number of these exercises, with particular focus on the hands-on experiments done by the students, and will give examples of the tangible material that our students work with throughout the two-semester sequence of their course on introductory

  1. Blast a Biofilm: A Hands-On Activity for School Children and Members of the Public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Marlow

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are very common in nature and have both detrimental and beneficial effects on everyday life. Practical and hands-on activities have been shown to achieve greater learning and engagement with science by young people (1, 4, 5. We describe an interactive activity, developed to introduce microbes and biofilms to school age children and members of the public. Biofilms are common in nature and, as the favored mode of growth for microbes, biofilms affect many parts ofeveryday life. This hands-on activity highlights the key  concepts of biofilms by allowing participants to first build, then attempt to ‘blast,’ a biofilm, thus enabling the robust nature of biofilms to become apparent. We developed the blast-a-biofilm activity as part of our two-day Magnificent Microbes event, which took place at the Dundee Science Centre-Sensation in May 2010 (6. This public engagement event was run by scientists from the Division of Molecular Microbiology at the University of Dundee. The purpose of the event was to use fun and interesting activities to make both children and adults think about how fascinating microbes are. Additionally, we aimed to develop interactive resources that could be used in future events and learning environments, of which the blast-a-biofilm activity is one such resource. Scientists and policy makers in the UK believe engaging the public with research ensures that the work of universities and research institutes is relevant to society and wider social concerns and can also help scientists actively contribute to positive social change (2. The activity is aimed at junior school age children (9–11 years and adults with little or no knowledge of microbiology. The activity is suitable for use at science festivals, science clubs, and also in the classroom, where it can serve as a tool to enrich and enhance the school curriculum.

  2. STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2010-12-01

    Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant

  3. Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.

    2000-01-01

    This final report discusses the development and implementation of several educational products for K-16 teachers and students. Specifically, I received support for: (A) three K-12 Teacher workshops, Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach, and minimal Support to finish two computer-based tutorials. (B) Contact Light: An Interactive CD-ROM, and (C) Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive GIS Database. Each of these projects directly supports NASA's Strategic Plan to: "Involve the education community in our endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, enlighten inquisitive minds", and, to "communicate widely the content, relevancy, and excitement of NASA's missions and discoveries to inspire and to increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology." Attachment: Appendix A. And also article: "Aristarchus plateau: as potential lunar base site."

  4. What Are the Antecedents of Collaboration Intensity between Industry and Universities in Public Subsidized Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannito, Davide

    firms’ decision to engage in university-industry collaboration. This paper contribute to the antecedents of U-I collaboration by investigating whether a scientific oriented knowledge base is an important factor for explaining the intensity of collaborations. In line with the theory, we expect...... of citations, on the intensity of university industry collaboration, in terms of share of university collaborators. We control for program fixed effect and previous co-patenting with university. We expect a positive relationship between scientific orientation and intensity of collaboration with universities.......University-industry collaboration has attracted in the last decades an increasing attention both from scholars and public policy. An increasing number of national and European programs has been designed to increase public-private collaboration. The extensive literature on University Industry...

  5. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a

  6. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  7. All hands on deck: CREWED for technology-enabled learning

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The University of New South Wales’ (UNSW’s) Faculty of Engineering is introducing a new process for designing and developing blended and fully online (distance) courses, as part of action research to support curriculum renewal. The process, referred to as CREWED (Curriculum Renewal and E-learning Workloads: Embedding in Disciplines), is being used to develop key courses that add flexibility to student progression pathways. By integrating the design of learning activities with the planning and...

  8. Teaching Computer Security with a Hands-On Component

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy , Narayan

    2011-01-01

    Part 2: WISE 7; International audience; To address national needs for computer security education, many universities have incorporated computer and security courses into their undergraduate and graduate curricula. Our department has introduced computer security courses at both the undergraduate and the graduate level. This paper describes our approach, our experiences, and lessons learned in teaching a Computer Security Overview course.There are two key elements in the course: Studying comput...

  9. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  10. The present status of carbon 14 analysis and projects for beryllium 10 analysis at the Tandetron 1 accelerator, Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Oda, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Akiko; Niu, Etsuko [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    The operation experience in 1999 of the Tandetron accelerator age estimation system, Nagoya University, is reported, after the overview and the history of the accelerator is briefly described. Total number of carbon 14 environmental samples analyzed was 8567. The project of introducing new HVEE Tandetron for C-14 analysis, and modifying the present GIC Tandetron for Be-10 analysis is presented. Ion source shall be replaced, and the heavy ion detector shall be installed. Projected geological and archaeological studies using Be-10 are enumerated. (A. Yamamoto)

  11. U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Jerald

    2013-12-31

    The original overall objective of this activity was to undertake resource evaluation and planning for CCS projects and to describe and quantify the geologic, environmental, and economic challenges to successful development of large-scale CCS in China’s coal sector. Several project execution barriers were encountered in the course of this project, most notably a project stop/delay due to funds availability/costing restrictions from the US State Department to the US Department of Energy at the end of CY2012, which halted project execution from January 2, 2013 to April 1, 2013. At the resolution of this project delay, it was communicated to the project team that the overall project period would also be reduced, from a completion date of February 28, 2014 to December 31, 2013. The net impact of all these changes was a reduction in the project period from 24 months (3/1/2012-2/28/2014) to 22 months (3/1/2012-12/31/2013), with a 3 month stop from 1/1/2013-3/31/2013. The project team endeavored to overcome these project time impacts, focusing heavily on technoeconomic modeling that would be deliverable under Task 3 (Ordos Basin Feasibility Study), and choosing to abandon the full investigation into the Demonstration Site (Task 4) due to the reduced project time. The ultimate focus of this project changed to work with the Chinese on a carbon atlas/geologic characterization, and on mechanisms for CO2 storage options from high-quality streams within China.

  12. The University of Missouri Research Reactor HEU to LEU conversion project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, James C; Kutikkad, Kiratadas; Foyto, Leslie P; Peters, Nickie J; Solbrekken, Gary L; Kennedy, John [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Missouri (United States); Stillman, John A; Feldman, Earl E; Tzanos, Constantine P; Stevens, John G [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of five U.S. high performance research and test reactors that are actively collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to find a suitable low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel replacement for the currently required highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. A conversion feasibility study based on U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel was completed in 2009. It was concluded that the proposed LEU fuel assembly design, in conjunction with an increase in power level from 10 to 12 MWth, will (1) maintain safety margins during operation, (2) allow operating fuel cycle lengths to be maintained for efficient and effective use of the facility, and (3) preserve an acceptable level and spectrum of key neutron fluxes to meet the scientific mission of the facility. The MURR and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) team is continuing to work toward realization of the conversion. The 'Preliminary Safety Analysis Report Methodologies and Scenarios for LEU Conversion of MURR' was completed in June 2011. This report documents design parameter values critical to the Fuel Development (FD), Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) and Hydromechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF) projects. The report also provides a preliminary evaluation of safety analysis techniques and data that will be needed to complete the fuel conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR), especially those related to the U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel. Specific studies are underway to validate the proposed path to an LEU fuel conversion. Coupled fluid-structure simulations and experiments are being conducted to understand the hydrodynamic plate deformation risk for 0.965 mm (38 mil) thick fuel plates. Methodologies that were recently developed to answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request for Additional Information (RAI) regarding the MURR 2006 relicensing submittal will be used in the LEU conversion effort. Transition LEU fuel elements that will have a minimal impact on

  13. Motivations for Going to University: A Qualitative Study and Class Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heather; Carocci, Nicole; Gardner, Chris; Serroul, Alicia; Topalovic, Megan

    2014-01-01

    We explored student motivations for attending university, including how motivations may change over the course of one's postsecondary career, by conducting semi-structured interviews with 8 upper-year undergraduates. Participants were also asked to reflect back on their own experiences and provide advice for new university students. We conducted a…

  14. The Development of Professional Competences Using the Interdisciplinary Project Approach with University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Carrasco, Mònica; Francés Ortega, Jesús; de Castro Vila, Rodolfo; Castañer Vivas, Margarida; San Molina, Joan; Marti Bonmati, Joan

    2016-01-01

    This work describes an experience conducted by a group of professors from different departments at the University of Girona (Catalonia, Spain) which arose from the need for interdisciplinary work in university classrooms in order to promote competences relevant to the professional sector. As part of this experience, students from different degree…

  15. How can the curation of hands-on STEM activities power successful mobile apps and websites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello, D.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) is University of California, Berkeley's public science center. Over the last decade, the Center for Technology Innovation at LHS has partnered with many institutions to establish a strong track record of developing successful technology solutions to support STEM teaching and learning within informal environments. Curation by subject-matter experts has been at the heart of many educational technology products from LHS and its partners that are directed at educators and families. This work includes: (1) popular digital libraries for inquiry-based activities at Howtosmile.org (NSF DRL #0735007) and NASA Earth and Space science education resources at NASAwavelength.org; and novel mobile apps like DIY Sun Science (NASA NNX10AE05G) and DIY Human Body (NIH 5R25OD010543) designed to scaffold exploration of STEM phenomena at home. Both NASA Wavelength and DIY Sun Science arose out of long-term collaborations with the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), and other NASA-funded organizations, in partnership with NASA through cooperative agreements. This session will review the development, formative evaluation, and usage metrics for these two Earth and Space science-themed educational technology products directly relevant to the AGU community. Questions reviewed by presenters will include: What makes a good hands-on activity, and what essential information do educators depend on when searching for programming additions? What content and connections do families need to explore hands-on activities? How can technology help incorporate educational standards into the discovery process for learning experiences online? How do all these components drive the design and user experience of websites and apps that showcase STEM content?

  16. Proceedings of the symposium on the joint research project between JAERI and Universities. Status and perspective of the advanced radiation technology project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the Proceedings of the Symposium on the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities -Status and Perspective of the Advanced Radiation Technology Project-, held at Tokyo on January 27, 1999. After a series of conferences which had been held at the second or third year to present the main activities of this unique collaborative project system, the symposium was particularly focused on critical reviewing of the project and on its future. The scientific papers presented were the recent achievements in the themes: 1) nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear materials science with an isotope separator on-line; 2) radiation shielding and nuclear data for use of accelerators; 3) materials analysis methods using ion beams; 4) microstructure in polymer materials irradiated with ions; 5) effects of transmutation products in fusion-reactor materials; 6) physiological study of plants using positron-emitting isotopes. The new theme titled 'Development and application of micro PIXE analysis in the atmospheric pressure' was proposed. Eight panelists discussed the future of the project. The 17 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. UNIVERSAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES OF THE KHMARA’S SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PROJECT OF OPEN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr I. Bessarabov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to actual problems of the choice of technological platform and creation of a universal system of management of educational resources. The advantages of cloud technologies of distributed computing compared to server-side technologies for the purpose of creating a universal system of management of educational resources are shown. The choice of the service Google Apps for Education as a technological basis for constructing the system of management of educational resources was substantiated. It is concluded about the high efficiency of cloud technologies for creating the universal system of management of educational resources to integrate education and training on a single technology platform in projects of open education.

  18. Science &Language Teaching in Hands-on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    As announced in the paper presented in Toulouse, a trinational teacher training program addressing school teachers from France, Germany and Italy on teaching foreign languages together with science and history through Space related projects has been implemented and launched successfully. Supported by the French Ministry of Education (Académie de Nice), the bigovernmental French-German Youth Office (Office franco- allemand pour la Jeunesse) and the European Space Agency the first session was held in Cannes in October 2001 and brought together 36 language, science and history teachers, 12 from each country. Through different workshops, presentations and visits this five-day training encounter initiated the participants with Space activities and exploration as well as offering them back-up information on astronomy. It gave them furthermore the opportunity of improving their linguistic skills and of exchanging their teaching experience. The program was highly welcomed by all the participants who will meet this year in Germany for the second session devoted to establishing together bi- or trinational projects for future class encounters based on the same subjects. My paper will deal with the results of the program which have been beyond expectation and will encourage us to continue this pluridisciplinary approach of language &science teaching and extend it to other language combinations.

  19. Project Newgate: Morehead State University and Federal Youth Center Institutional Coordination and Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfleet, Morris L.

    An experimental prison program on a college campus is discussed. The purpose of the project, Project Newgate, is to find innovative ways of helping society's wrongdoers. Problems discussed are: salaries, travel expenses, communications, supplies, personnel training, admission, staff recruitment, and policy formation. (CK)

  20. Self-Leadership Change Project: The Continuation of an Ongoing Experiential Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James I.; Kern, Dave; Tewari, Jitendra; Jones, Kenneth E.; Beemraj, Eshwar Prasad; Ettigi, Chaitra Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The self-leadership change project (SLCP) is an ongoing program for senior level students at a regional university designed to provide hands-on experience in building self-management skills, which is considered a pre-requisite by many leaders and scholars (e.g. Drucker, 1996; Schaetti et al., 2008). The paper aims to discuss this issue.…

  1. Could hands-on activities and smartphone in science CLIL teaching foster motivation and positive attitudes in students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolino, Immacolata; Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivating students is one of the most challenging things we do as educators. We know that students need to be engaged to fully appreciate and learn what has been taught; the secret consists in nurturing student engagement. One of the newer ways to involve students and foster motivation in their Science learning consists in focusing on their usage and on applying knowledge and skills in their real-life. Students usually are engaged in authentic teaching pathway. Learning focusing on the experience helps teachers to improve classroom management by gathering students around a common organized activity. Hands-on activities support problem-based approaches to learning by focusing on the experience and process of investigating, proposing and creating solutions developing critical thinking skills and enlarge student's scientific glossary. We utilized in our classroom some lab activities that we learned at an ESA/GTTP Teacher training Workshop 2014 program at the Lorentz Center Leiden, Netherlands. "Cooking a comet - Ingredients for life" "Demonstration of the second Kepler's law using marbles" New media equipment, as student's own smartphones, can increase the teaching impact speaking the same language used by the students every day. They can measure magnetic fields, their GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude), and so on. In this way we can measure distances as parallax using mobile devices and simulating distance measurements in the classroom, on the school campus. The smartphone is the device with which the students answer questions, take decisions, and solve quests. Students infact can observe the Universe from their classroom and scientifically they can watch the Sun with "Google sky map" or "Star walk" are excellent tools to learn your way around the night sky .As teachers we used these apps in the classroom when Sun goes through the constellations so our students don't believe in horoscopes. This paper is focused on hands on activities and the effects of the

  2. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  3. The Role of the National and University Library of Slovenia in a Multinational Research Project (IMPACT: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Vodopivec

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the participation and the role of individual libraries acting as partners in research project consortia, dealing with digitisation issues are analysed, following the example of the National and University Library of Slovenia (NUK as a partner in the IMPACT project — Improving Access to Text. IMPACT is funded under the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission (FP7 aimed at improving automated text recognition of digitised materials from different European digital collections. To achieve the project’s objectives, a consortium of partners comprised of several European libraries, information technology and software engineering centres, and linguistic institutes was established. The consortium’s work was based on interdisciplinary collaboration in which libraries (like NUK played an important role firstly as demonstrators of tools and procedures developed within the project, and secondly as representatives of end-users’ needs and demands. Different European digitisation projects in the past have already included national libraries as project partners and the results of collaboration have been so far quite positive. A case study methodology is used for exploring several dimensions of such collaboration. First of all, the study shows that the consortium ensures libraries the economic and expert groundwork needed for the effective realization of the objectives outlined in the framework of the project. Secondly, the study shows positive results when comparing the sum total of knowledge and experience gained over the course of the project and the efforts invested in it by individual libraries. On the basis of such a success, NUK will be able to expand its digitisation plans. Other advantages include more concrete project outcomes, such as the formation of a common multinational digital collection, applicable OCR technology and metadata standardisation. A comparative study with some of NUK’s other on-going projects

  4. Building integrated pathways to independence for diverse biomedical researchers: Project Pathways, the BUILD program at Xavier University of Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozesh, Maryam; Giguette, Marguerite; Morgan, Kathleen; Johanson, Kelly; D'Amour, Gene; Coston, Tiera; Wilkins-Green, Clair

    2017-01-01

    Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically Black and Catholic university that is nationally recognized for its science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curricula. Approximately 73% of Xavier's students are African American, and about 77% major in the biomedical sciences. Xavier is a national leader in the number of STEM majors who go on to receive M.D. degrees and Ph.D. degrees in science and engineering. Despite Xavier's advances in this area, African Americans still earn about 7.5% of the Bachelor's degrees, less than 8% of the Master's degrees, and less than 5% of the doctoral degrees conferred in STEM disciplines in the United States. Additionally, although many well-prepared, highly-motivated students are attracted by Xavier's reputation in the sciences, many of these students, though bright and capable, come from underperforming public school systems and receive substandard preparation in STEM disciplines. The purpose of this article is to describe how Xavier works to overcome unequal education backgrounds and socioeconomic challenges to develop student talent through expanding biomedical training opportunities and build on an established reputation in science education. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)-funded BUILD (Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity) Program at Xavier University of Louisiana, Project Pathways , is a highly-innovative program designed to broaden the career interests of students early on, and to engage them in activities that entice them to continue their education towards biomedical research careers. Project strategies involve a transformation of Xavier's academic and non-academic programs through the redesign, supplementation and integration of academic advising, tutoring, career services, personal counseling, undergraduate research training, faculty research mentoring, and development of new biomedical and research skills courses. The Program also

  5. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  6. Introducing systems engineering to industrial design engineering students with hands-on experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Lutters-Weustink, Ilanit F.; van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Selvaraj, H.; Muthukumar, V.

    2005-01-01

    The article presents an innovative educational project to introduce systems engineering to third year students in industrial design engineering at the University of Twente. In a short period the students are confronted with new technology, namely sensors and actuators. They have to apply this

  7. Multidisciplinary Graduate Training in Social Research Methodology and Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis: A Hands-On/Hands-Off Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Claude Julie; Bourdon, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of training graduate students and researchers in qualitative and mixed-methods analysis since the mid-1990s, the authors reflect on the evolution of a multidisciplinary graduate course developed in a Canadian university since 2007. The hands-on/hands-off course design based on the use of NVivo was developed in parallel…

  8. Collaboration in research and the influential factors in Golestan University of Medical Sciences research projects (2005-2007): an academic sample from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei, Afsaneh; Qorbani, Mostafa; Rezapour, Aziz; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Asayesh, Hamid; Mansourian, Morteza; Noroozi, Mahdi; Jahahgir, Fereydoon

    2013-08-01

    Number of Iranian articles published in ISI journals has increased significantly in recent years.Despite the quantitative progress, studies performed in Iran represent low collaboration in research; therefore,we decided to evaluate collaboration in Golestan University of Medical Sciences (GOUMS) research projects. In this cross-sectional study, all GOUMS research projects that had got grants from the universitybetween 2005-2007 were studied. Among 107 research projects included in our study, 102 projects were evaluatedand checklists were completed. The researcher's questionnaire was sent to the principle investigators (n=46) of the projects and eventually 40 questionnaires were collected. The review of 102 research proposals shows that 10 projects (9.8%) have been performed in collaborationwith other organizations. Scientific outputs in these projects have been more than projects which wereconfined to the university (98% compare to 68%; p= 0.04). The total cost of the projects under study was a littlemore than 300,000 US$. In just 12 projects (11.8%) a part of the cost had been provided by organizations outsidethe university. About 50% of researchers declared that they had chosen their research topic based on their"personal interest". Only 1 project was performed by the demand of nongovernmental organizations and 12 researchersreported no collaboration in their activities. This study shows that collaboration in GOUMS research projects is low. Moreover, collaborationswith governmental and nongovernmental organizations are trivial. The scientific outputs in collaborativeresearch projects are much more than other projects.

  9. Publication of research projects for certification as medical specialists at a peruvian university, 2007-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Ticse, Ray; Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico internista endocrinólogo; magíster en Epidemiología Clínica.; Ygreda, Patricia; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico cirujano.; Samalvides, Frine; Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico infectólogo.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the frequency of publication in a scientific journal of the research projects done for medical specialty certification, a search was conducted in Google Scholar, Pubmed, biomedical databases and Peruvian medical society journals. These publications were research projects carried out by medical residents graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, to obtain the certification of medical specialist. Of 351 medical residents graduated ...

  10. Developing Research Competence in Undergraduate Students through Hands on Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe E. Davidson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based practice is the foundation of nutrition and dietetics. To effectively apply evidence-based practice, health professionals must understand the basis of research. Previous work has identified the lack of involvement of dietitians in research. As part of a curriculum redevelopment in undergraduate nutrition and dietetics courses, research skill teaching was enhanced. This study evaluated the effect of a new, year two level nutrition research methods unit on the perceived research skills of students. The unit consisted of two key components: a student-led class research project and a small group systematic literature review. Prior to commencement and on completion of the course, students completed a modified version of the Research Skills Questionnaire. Results demonstrated that self-perceived competence increased by a small degree in a set of specific research skills as well as in broader skills such as information gathering and handling, information evaluation, ability to work independently, and critical thinking. The new research unit was also evaluated highly on a student satisfaction survey. Despite these positive findings, students indicated that their general feelings towards research or a career in research were unchanged. In summary, this unit enhanced students’ perceived research skills. Further exploration of students’ attitude towards research is warranted.

  11. The Green Eating Project: web-based intervention to promote environmentally conscious eating behaviours in US university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Jessica T; Lofgren, Ingrid E; Sartini, Becky L; Greene, Geoffrey W

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an online, interactive intervention, referred to as the Green Eating (GE) Project, to motivate university students to adopt GE behaviours. The study was quasi-experimental and integrated into courses for credit/extra credit. Courses were randomly stratified into experimental or non-treatment control. The 5-week intervention consisted of four modules based on different GE topics. Participants completed the GE survey at baseline (experimental, n 241; control, n 367) and post (experimental, n 187; control, n 304). The GE survey has been previously validated and consists of Transtheoretical Model constructs including stage of change (SOC), decisional balance (DB: Pros and Cons) and self-efficacy (SE: School and Home) as well as behaviours for GE. Modules contained basic information regarding each topic and knowledge items to assess content learning. The GE Project took place at a public university in the north-eastern USA. Participants were full-time students between the ages of 18 and 24 years. The GE Project was effective in significantly increasing GE behaviours, DB Pros, SE School and knowledge in experimental compared with control, but did not reduce DB Cons or increase SE Home. Experimental participants were also more likely to be in later SOC for GE at post testing. The GE Project was effective in increasing GE behaviours in university students. Motivating consumers towards adopting GE could assist in potentially mitigating negative consequences of the food system on the environment. Future research could tailor the intervention to participant SOC to further increase the effects or design the modules for other participants.

  12. Interdisciplinary Bachelor Degrees in Federal University of Bahia: a review of the Project implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss conceptual framework, operational perspective and political-institutional features of the Interdisciplinary Bachelor Degree (BI implementation in the Federal University of Bahia, between 2009 and 2012, as compared to existing university education models which, until then, only offered disciplinary professional courses. We analyze narratives of key agents of the process, three UFBA teachers who performed administrative functions, and a BI student, engaged in the student movement. We have concluded that the perspective for the BI to become the first cycle at UFBA is on hold; support and resistance movements have accompanied it, suggesting large institutional challenges. However, the experience has led to a vigorous revision of rules and regulations naturalized for a long time and enabled reflections on the traditional concept of university education in Brazil.

  13. The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers - A SOFIA and SIRTF EPO Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, A.; Bennett, M.; Buxner, S.; Devore, E.; Keller, J.; Slater, T.; Thaller, M.; Conceptual Astronomy; Physics Education Research CAPER Team

    2003-12-01

    The SOFIA and SIRTF EPO Programs have partnered with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team in designing, evaluating, and facilitating an online program for K-12 teachers to experience multiwavelength astronomy. An aggressive approach to online course design and delivery has resulted in a highly successful learning experience for teacher-participants. Important aspects of the Invisible Universe Online will eventually be used as a part of SOFIA's Airborne Ambassadors Program for pre-flight training of educators. The Invisible Universe Online is delivered via WebCT through the Montana State University National Teacher Enhancement Network (http://btc.montana.edu/). Currently in its fourth semester, the course has served 115 K-12 teachers. This distance learning online class presents our search for astronomical origins and provides an enhanced understanding of how astronomers use all energies of light to unfold the secrets of the universe. We cover the long chain of events from the birth of the universe through the formation of galaxies, stars, and planets by focusing on the scientific questions, technological challenges, and space missions pursuing this search for origins. Through textbook and internet readings, inquiry exploration with interactive java applets, and asynchronous discussions, we help our students achieve the following course goals: develop scientific background knowledge of astronomical objects and phenomena at multiple wavelengths; understand contemporary scientific research questions related to how galaxies formed in the early universe and how stars and planetary systems form and evolve; describe strategies and technologies for using non-visible wavelengths of EM radiation to study various phenomena; and integrate related issues of astronomical science and technology into K-12 classrooms. This course is being developed, evaluated, and offered through the support of SOFIA and SIRTF EPO Programs, two NASA infrared missions

  14. Institutionalizing Large-Scale Curricular Change: The Top 25 Project at Miami University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David C.; Nadler, Marjorie Keeshan; Shore, Cecilia; Taylor, Beverley A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Now more than ever, it is urgent that colleges and universities mobilize themselves to produce graduates who are capable of being productive, creative, and responsible members of a global society. Employers want clear communicators who are strong critical thinkers and who can solve real-world problems in an ethical way. To achieve these outcomes,…

  15. Introducing Project-Based Instruction in the Saudi ESP Classroom: A Study in Qassim University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsamani, Abdul-Aziz Saleh; Daif-Allah, Ayman Sabry

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the impact of introducing an integrative pedagogical approach in the ESP classes on developing the English language vocabulary of Computer Science and Information Technology students in the College of Science, Qassim University. The study suggests a framework for an ESP course-design employing students' project…

  16. Bringing University Knowledge to Market : Experiences in the Netherlands on the Project Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geenhuizen, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    In the knowledge-based economy, the pivotal role of commercialization of university knowledge is increasingly recognized by researchers and policymakers dealing with national and regional economies. Knowledge commercialization is the process in which value is added to new knowledge in its

  17. A Simulation-Based LED Design Project in Photonics Instruction Based on Industry-University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S. -H.; Chen, M. -L.; Kuo, Y. -K.; Shen, Y. -C.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the growing industrial demand for light-emitting diode (LED) design professionals, based on industry-university collaboration in Taiwan, this paper develops a novel instructional approach: a simulation-based learning course with peer assessment to develop students' professional skills in LED design as required by industry as well as…

  18. Business in Social Work Education: A Historically Black University's Social Work Entrepreneurship Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Paul; Muhammad, Omar; Estreet, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The destabilization of the current economy has sparked increased interest in entrepreneurship, especially for underrepresented minority social work students. The entrepreneurial thinking of these social work students entering social work programs at historically Black colleges and universities needs to be fostered in a learning environment. This…

  19. Re-Thinking Sustainable Education Systems in Iceland: The Net-University Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Frank; Johannesdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2011-01-01

    The recent economic crisis in Iceland has raised issues of the sustainability of Icelandic higher education to new levels of importance. A key strategy in relation to this economic crisis is to consider the merger of the four public universities in Iceland and to introduce a much higher engagement with online and open delivery methods of higher…

  20. Project iPad: Investigating Tablet Integration in Learning and Libraries at Ryerson University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenlaub, Naomi; Gabel, Laine; Jakubek, Dan; McCarthy, Graham; Wang, Weina

    2011-01-01

    The year 2010 saw a major revolution in tablet technology with the introduction of the Apple iPad. Curious about the potential of this new technology for libraries, a group of librarians at Ryerson University in Toronto seized an opportunity to investigate the emerging role of the tablet in the daily academic lives of students. The group found…

  1. Faculty Workshops for Teaching Information Assurance through Hands-On Exercises and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Williams, Kenneth; Yu, Huiming; Rorrer, Audrey; Chu, Bei-Tseng; Yang, Li; Winters, Kathy; Kizza, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Though many Information Assurance (IA) educators agree that hands-on exercises and case studies improve student learning, hands-on exercises and case studies are not widely adopted due to the time needed to develop them and integrate them into curricula. Under the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarship for Service program, we…

  2. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  3. Shape Memory Polymers: A Joint Chemical and Materials Engineering Hands-On Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Mujan; Beck, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Hands-on experiences are excellent tools for increasing retention of first year engineering students. They also encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, a critical skill for modern engineers. In this paper, we describe and evaluate a joint Chemical and Materials Engineering hands-on lab that explores cross-linking and glass transition in…

  4. The Role of Hands-On Science Labs in Engaging the Next Generation of Space Explorers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa A. J.

    2002-01-01

    Each country participating on the International Space Station (ISS) recognizes the importance of educating the coming generation about space and its opportunities. In 2001 the St. James School in downtown Houston, Texas was approached with a proposal to renovate an unused classroom and become involved with the "GLOBE" Program and other Internet based international learning resources. This inner-city school willingly agreed to the program based on "hands-on" learning. One month after room conversion and ten computer terminals donated by area businesses connectivity established to the internet the students immediately began using the "Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)" program and the International Space Station (ISS) Program educational resources. The "GLOBE" program involves numerous scientific and technical agencies studying the Earth, who make it their goal to provide educational resources to an international community of K-12 scientist. This project was conceived as a successor to the "Interactive Elementary Space Museum for the New Millennium" a space museum in a school corridor without the same type of budget. The laboratory is a collaboration, which involved area businesses, volunteers from the NASA/Johnson Space Center ISS Outreach Program, and students. This paper will outline planning and operation of the school science laboratory project from the point of view of the schools interest and involvement and assess its success to date. It will consider the lessons learned by the participating school administrations in the management of the process and discuss some of the issues that can both promote and discourage school participation in such projects.

  5. Final Report for the ADMX Phase 2a Project at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    This is a final report of the ADMX (Axion Dark Matter eXperiment) Phase 2a program. This program is a project allowing for a sensitive axion dark-matter search at higher axion masses. The Phase 2a program also prepares the project for lower temperature anticipated in later operations. The Phase 2a program includes sensitive data-taking operations at two cavity modes, TM010 and TM020, allowing for faster data-taking operations and extending the search to higher and plausible dark-matter axion masses.

  6. The LithicUB project: A virtual lithotheque of siliceous rocks at the University of Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sánchez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The LithicUB project began in 2009 with two main objectives. The first objective was to make available to the scientific community the description and classification of a set of siliceous rocks that had been recovered from different surveys. The second to make public the lithotheque as a useful tool for archaeological research, related to the procurement and management of lithic raw materials in Prehistory. Thanks to several research projects that have been carried out, the number of samples is steadily increasing and diversifying, including siliceous rocks collected in Spain, Portugal, France, Jordan and Israel.

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF THE ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PROJECTS - A PREMISE OF INCREASING THE UNIVERSITY SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Marius TOMA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Plan for Research, Development and Innovation 2007 – 2013, called herein the National Plan II, represents the main instrument used to implement the National Strategy for Research, Development and Innovation. Universities play a unique role in the development of the knowledge-based society, through its contribution to knowledge generation, transmission, dissemination and utilization. The essential role of the university is to shape the highly qualified human resource, a process that implies a symbiosis between the education and research, the education system performances contributing in this way to a great extent to the society development. The highly qualified human resource represents an important asset of a nation. This study is dedicated to the analysis of the assessment criteria for the Exploratory Research Projects (ERP handed in the competitions in 2007, 2008, 2011 and 2012 and to highlight the importance of improving the assessment criteria in order to improve their quality.

  8. [Doctoral thesis projects for medical students? Retrospective estimation of the fraction of successfully completed medical doctoral thesis projects at Witten/Herdecke University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Janna; Schaper, Katharina; Krummenauer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The German "Dr med" plays a specific role in doctoral thesis settings since students may start the underlying doctoral project during their studies at medical school. If a Medical Faculty principally encourages this approach, then it should support the students in performing the respective projects as efficiently as possible. Consequently, it must be ensured that students are able to implement and complete a doctoral project in parallel to their studies. As a characteristic efficiency feature of these "Dr med" initiatives, the proportion of doctoral projects successfully completed shortly after graduating from medical school is proposed and illustrated. The proposed characteristic can be estimated by the time period between the state examination (date of completion of the qualifying medical examination) and the doctoral examination. Completion of the doctoral project "during their medical studies" was then characterised by a doctoral examination no later than 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination. To illustrate the estimation and interpretation of this characteristic, it was retrospectively estimated on the basis of the full sample of all doctorates successfully completed between July 2009 and June 2012 at the Department of Human Medicine at the Faculty of Health of the University of Witten/Herdecke. During the period of investigation defined, a total number of 56 doctoral examinations were documented, 30 % of which were completed within 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination (95% confidence interval 19 to 44 %). The median duration between state and doctoral examination was 27 months. The proportion of doctoral projects completed parallel to the medical studies increased during the investigation period from 14 % in the first year (July 2009 till June 2010) to 40 % in the third year (July 2011 till June 2012). Only about a third of all "Dr med" projects at the Witten/Herdecke Faculty of Health were completed during or close to

  9. LIB LAB the Library Laboratory: hands-on multimedia science communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, Aaron; Niemeyer, Kyle

    2017-11-01

    Teaching scientific research topics to K-12 audiences in an engaging and meaningful way does not need to be hard; with the right insight and techniques it can be fun to encourage self-guided STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) exploration. LIB LAB, short for Library Laboratory, is an educational video series produced by Aaron J. Fillo at Oregon State University in partnership with the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library targeted at K-12 students. Each episode explores a variety of scientific fundamentals with playful experiments and demonstrations. The video lessons are developed using evidence-based practices such as dispelling misconceptions, and language immersion. Each video includes directions for a related experiment that young viewers can conduct at home. In addition, science kits for these at-home experiments are distributed for free to students through the public library network in Benton County, Oregon. This talk will focus on the development of multimedia science education tools and several techniques that scientists can use to engage with a broad audience more effectively. Using examples from the LIB LAB YouTube Channel and collection of hands-on science demonstrations and take-home kits, this talk will present STEAM education in action. Corvallis-Benton County Public Library.

  10. Status report of the nuclear data project at McMaster University. December 1998 - present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers the state of the art of the nuclear data project, covering the chains in ENSDF data of permanent interest and the data published and submitted since 1998. The new activities, compilation data and work in progress are described, and data related publications are cited

  11. An Undergraduate Mechatronics Project Class at Philadelphia University, Jordan: Methodology and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutunji, T. A.; Saleem, A.; Rabbo, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Mechatronics is a branch of engineering whose final product should involve mechanical movements controlled by smart electronics. The design and implementation of functional prototypes are an essential learning experience for the students in this field. In this paper, the guidelines for a successful mechatronics project class are presented,…

  12. Teaching Power Electronics with a Design-Oriented and Project-Based Learning Method at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Power electronics is a fast developing technology within the electrical engineering field. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from DesignOriented Project Based Learning of switch-mode power supply design within a power electronics course at the Technical University of Denmark...... (DTU). Project-based learning (PBL) is known to be a motivating and problem-centered teaching method that not only places students at the core of the teaching and learning activities but also gives students the ability to transfer their acquired scientific knowledge into industrial practices. Students...... are asked to choose a specification from different power converter applications such as a fuel cell power conditioning converter, a light-emitting diode (LED) driver or a battery charger. Based upon their choice, the students select topology, design magnetic components, calculate input/output filters...

  13. Projecting the Water and Electric Consumption of Polytechnic University of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Jackie D.; Mercado, Joseph; Bautista, Lincoln A.; Baccay, Edcon B.

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates water and electric consumption in Polytechnic University of the Philippines - Sta. Mesa using a time series analysis. The researchers analyzed the water and electric usage separately. Electric consumption was examined in terms of pesos and kilowatt-hour, while water consumption was analyzed in pesos and cubic meter. The data are gathered from the university limited only from January 2009 to July 2015 in a monthly based record. The aim is to forecast the water and electric usage of the university for the years 2016 and 2017. There are two main statistical treatments that the researchers conducted to be able to formulate mathematical models that can estimate the water and electric consumption of the said school. Using Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA), electric usage was forecasted in peso and kilowatt-hour, and water usage in peso and cubic meter. Moreover, the predicted values of the consumptions are compared to the actual values using Paired T-test to examine whether there is a significant difference. Forecasting accurately the water and electric consumption would be helpful to manage the budget allotted for the water and electric consumption of PUP - Sta. Mesa for the next two years.

  14. FOX: A Fault-Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment Boston University Final Report Project Number: DE-SC0005365

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appavoo, Jonathan [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-17

    Exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today's machines. Systems software for exascale machines must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. The FOX project explored systems software and runtime support for a new approach to the data and work distribution for fault oblivious application execution. Our major OS work at Boston University focused on developing a new light-weight operating systems model that provides an appropriate context for both multi-core and multi-node application development. This work is discussed in section 1. Early on in the FOX project BU developed infrastructure for prototyping dynamic HPC environments in which the sets of nodes that an application is run on can be dynamically grown or shrunk. This work was an extension of the Kittyhawk project and is discussed in section 2. Section 3 documents the publications and software repositories that we have produced. To put our work in context of the complete FOX project contribution we include in section 4 an extended version of a paper that documents the complete work of the FOX team.

  15. Hands-on earth science with students at schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Earth science teachers at schools for the Deaf face a variety of challenges. This community of students has a wide range of language skills, teaching resources can be limited and often teachers are not trained in geosciences. An NSF CAREER grant provided an opportunity to make a difference to this community and foster earth science learning at 8 schools for the Deaf around the country. We designed hands-on deformational sandboxes for the teachers and provided accompanying curriculum materials. The sandbox is a physical model of crustal deformation that students can manipulate to test hypotheses. The visual nature of the sandbox was well-suited for the spatial grammar of American Sign Language used by these students. Furthermore, language skills were enhanced by scaffolded observation, sketch, annotation, discussion, interpretation assignments. Geoscience training of teachers was strengthened with workshops and three 5-day field trips for teachers and selected students to Utah, western New England and southern California. The field trips provided opportunity for students to work as geoscientists observing, interpreting, discussing and presenting their investigations. Between field trips, we set up videoconferences from the UMass experimental lab with the high school earth science classrooms. These sessions facilitated dialog between students and researchers at UMass. While the project set out to provide geoscience learning opportunities for students at Schools for the Deaf, the long lasting impact was the improved geoscience training of teachers, most of whom had limited post-secondary earth science training. The success of the project also rested on the dedication of the teachers to their students and their willingness to try new approaches and experiences. By tapping into a community of 6 teachers, who already shared curriculum and had fantastic leadership, the project was able to have significant impact and exceed the initial goals. The project has led to a

  16. Community projects based on Art & Health: A collaboration between the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid and Madrid city council's Madrid Salud Service

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila, Noemí; Orellana, Ana M.; Claver, María Dolores; Borrego Hernando, Olga; Antúnez, Noelia; García Cano, Marta; Segura del Pozo, Javier; Belver, Manuel H.; Martínez Cortés, Mercedes; Martínez, Catalina; Jambers, Brigitte; Cortés, Fátima; Yeves, Laura; Soto, María del Carmen; Saavedra Macías, Francisco Javier (Coordinador)

    2017-01-01

    In 2011 the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid, and Madrid City Council's Health Promotion and Prevention Service (Madrid Salud Service) signed a collaboration agreement for developing joint projects and activities. This mutual collaboration agreement has generated an extremely active working network, in which university students supported by health service professionals plus Faculty academics and researchers have designed, and developed, community projects based on ...

  17. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 16. Development and execution of pilot research projects at the CASINDO partner universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Each of the five Indonesian universities managed to develop pilot research projects and wrote research proposals to outline and strengthen their ideas. All of the universities also purchased equipment for the purpose of executing this research. UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) and UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) managed to finalize their research within the project period and wrote reports on their results. The other universities could not yet present results due to delay in one or several of the steps within the procedure.

  18. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  19. Community Development and Divergent Forces in Philippine State Universities and Colleges: Developing a Protocol in Evaluating Extension Projects Towards Community Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter S. Ontoy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Divergent paradigms operate in State Universities and Colleges SUCs, which influence the performance of extension projects towards attainment of full empowerment as the ultimate goal implied by the universally-accepted definition of community development. In particular, a livelihood and environment project of Cebu Normal University (CNU implemented in Caputatan Norte, Medillin, Cebu, Philippines was assessed based on five (5 primary parameters and two (2 secondary parameters. A novel protocol using Delphi Method shows was developed and used for this particular study, which could be adapted in evaluating the performance of community extension projects. In this particular case, the performance of CNU livelihood and environment project falls between ―demonstration‖ and ―community organizing‖. The evaluation shows that there is still a need to reinforce activities to the ultimate goal. However, it is also implied that the secondary parameters are more robust indicators in assessing the outcomes of the project implementation towards full community empowerment.

  20. Partnering with Universities, a NASA Visitor Center, Schools, and the INSPIRE Project to Perform Research and Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.; Smith, J. A.; Kloostra, E.; Knupp, K. R.; Taylor, K.; Anderson, S.; Baskauf, C. J.; Buckner, S.; DiMatties, J.; Fry, C. D.; Gaither, B.; Galben, C. W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Heaston, M. P.; Kraft, J.; Meisch, K.; Mills, R.; Nations, C.; Nielson, D.; Oelgoetz, J.; Rawlins, L. P.; Sudbrink, D. L.; Wright, A.

    2017-12-01

    For the August 2017 eclipse, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center partnered with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center (USSRC), Austin Peay State University (APSU) in Clarksville, Tennessee, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE) Project, and the local school systems of Montgomery County, Tennessee, and Christian County, Kentucky. Multiple site visits and workshops were carried out during the first eight months of 2017 to prepare local teachers and students for the eclipse. A special curriculum was developed to prepare USSRC Space Camp and INSPIRE students to observe and participate in science measurements during the eclipse. Representatives from Christian County school system and APSU carried out observations for the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment in two separate locations. UAH and APSU as part of the Montana State Ballooning Project, launched balloons containing video cameras and other instruments. USSRC Space Camp students and counselors and INSPIRE students conducted science experiments that included the following: atmospheric science investigations of the atmospheric boundary layer, very-low frequency and Ham radio observations to investigate ionospheric responses to the eclipse, animal and insect observations, solar-coronal observations, eclipse shadow bands. We report on the results of all these investigations.

  1. Integration of Structural Knowledge in Design Studio Project: Assessment Study of Curriculum In Architecture Course in University Of Malaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural education should advance in parallel with the industrial growth of building technology. Universities as producers of future architects have yet to develop curriculums for building technology to suit the growth of the building industry. This gap between education and industrial growth has been a topic of debate for many researchers who are concerned about architectural pedagogy. Architectural instruction further aggravated the problem whereby in most architectural schools worldwide, teaching is divided between the design studio, where the design projects are taught and lecture classes where the technical parts are taught. The latter should be integrated with design studio to enhance design levels. Students face difficulty integrating and applying the structural knowledge gained from structure classes into their design. One explanation for this deficiency is because the current architectural structure subject's content is borrowed from an engineering syllabus. This study will examine the course content, instruction styles and method of teaching structure subjects and will investigate the learning outcomes of design studio through students' performance and perception in integrating structural knowledge in their design projects. Respondents were students from Year 1 to Year 5 doing their Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Architecture degrees in University of Malaya. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the design studio coordinators and structure lecturers. This study aims to find the ideal course content/method of teaching to facilitate more integration between structure and design studio.

  2. Summary report of the University of Manchester involvement in the Chemval project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratillake, M.R.; Newton, G.W.A.; Robinson, V.J.

    1991-01-01

    Chemval is an international geochemical exercise, which aims at applying and validating predictive computer programmes describing the chemistry of radionuclides in the geosphere. As a component of the CEC Mirage project - second phase (on migration of radionuclides in the geosphere), Chemval is carried out in the framework of the third Community R and D programme on radioactive waste management and storage (1985-89). It is jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities and Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (UK Department of the Environment)

  3. Cornell University remote sensing program. [selected research projects in land and water resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T.; Belcher, D. J.; Mcnair, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    The major activities of the program staff from December 1, 1973 to May 31, 1974 are reported and include: (1) communication and instruction; (2) data and facilities; (3) research completed; (4) research in progress; (5) selected correspondence; (6) grant sponsored travel; and (7) seminars and newsletters. Detailed information and maps are given for the following selected projects: (1) ERTS mapping of waterways in the Tug Hill region of New York State; (2) photo-archeological investigation of Great Gully, New York; and (3) evaluation of selected highway impacts using aerial photography.

  4. Evaluation of an LED Retrofit Project at Princeton University's Carl Icahn Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murphy, Arthur [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Perrin, Tess [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    At Princeton University’s Carl Icahn Laboratory, DOE’s Commercial Buildings Integration Program documented the implementation of LED retrofit products for recessed troffers, linear cove lighting, and downlights – as part of Princeton’s first building-wide interior LED project. The conversion to LED enables more extensive use of lighting controls to tailor the lighting to the task and limit the operating hours based on occupancy, and the estimated energy savings including controls is 62% compared to the incumbent system.

  5. [Patient satisfaction survey and the place of users in the Oran university hospital quality project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougrani, Saada; Ouhadj, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Quality of care is a strategic priority of any management approach in order to meet users' expectations of health care systems. This study tried to define the role of patient satisfaction surveys and the place of user in the quality of care project. The results of patient satisfaction surveys conducted between 2010 and 2012 and the draft quality of care project were analysed. Patient satisfaction surveys from 2010 to 2012 focused on logistic shortcomings. No comment was formulated about health care. Comments and suggestions did not provide any contribution in terms of patient involvement in the health care process. The multiple perspectives of quality of care include clinical care and other social objectives of respect for the individual and attention to the patient. User satisfaction as assessed by patient satisfaction surveys or patients' experiences only reflect the health professionals' representation. However, the objective is to measure what the user perceives and feels and his/her representation of the attention provided. These approaches, conducted outside of the quality of care strategic plan, only provide a basis for actions with limited or no effectiveness.

  6. Management of technical documents: a projection at the University of Zulia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Judith Paredes Chacin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper analyze comprehensively and systematically the principles of organization and technical procedure, which support document management based on the use of information technologies. Method. We developed a study based on the documentary descriptive method in the context of the Dirección de Infraestructura (Dinfra from the Universidad del Zulia. Results. We find evidence of efficiency in the processes that support the management of technical documents: Plans, metrics and memories generated by the Dinfra. Conclusion. The conceptual basis of organizational and technical archives contribute to the systematization, shelter save and documental preservation, and ensure the timely retrieval of technical information for the management of the University of Zulia.

  7. First experience with the traumatological PACS project at the University of Innsbruck department of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peer, S.; Peer, R.; Jaschke, W.; Vogl, R.; Baldauf, E.

    1998-01-01

    Radiography in an emergency setting is a demanding task, in technical as well as in logistical terms. Rapid acquisition of high quality radiographs under difficult conditions, for example severely injured patients with multi-organ trauma is important. All image data and radiological reports must be transmitted to the trauma surgeon as soon as possible. To meet these needs with the promising means of modern X-ray technology, we decided to implement a completely digital X-ray division inside the new outpatient trauma department. In the setting of an outpatient emergency department digital radiography and PACS cannot be realised without problems. We present our first experience with the installation and 10 months filmless routine in the X-ray division for traumatology outpatients at the university of Innsbruck department of radiology. (orig.) [de

  8. Formative Competence-Based-Assessment through blogs. A project carried out in six Catalan universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cano Garcia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic programs in Design have always faced the challenge of providing the best education in a sphere so changing as Design discipline itself. This is especially true within the current renewal of curricula derived from the implementation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA and, to a much more general level, the adaptation of the discipline of Design to the new challenges posed by the Knowledge Society. In this context, we present the educational experience of a serious games design workshop, which has been conducted at the University of Barcelona's Design BA. This pedagogical activity emphazises on three aspects which we believe are fundamental to the current pedagogy of design: to give a more transverse view of this discipline; to value the role of Design as a means of innovation in today's Knowledge Society; and to rethink the social function of Design.

  9. Elementary and middle school science improvement project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcguire, Saundra Y.

    1989-01-01

    The Alabama A and M University Elementary and Middle School Science Improvement Project (Project SIP) was instituted to improve the science knowledge of elementary and middle school teachers using the experimental or hands-on approach. Summer workshops were conducted during the summers of 1986, 1987, and 1988 in the areas of biology, chemistry, physics, and electricity, and magnetism. Additionally, a manual containing 43 lessons which included background information, experiments and activities for classroom and home use was provided to each teacher. During the course of the project activities, the teachers interacted with various university faculty members, scientists, and NASA staff. The administrative aspects of the program, the delivery of the services to participating teachers, and the project outcome are addressed.

  10. Expert system application education project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzelez, Avelino J.; Ragusa, James M.

    1988-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) technology, and in particular expert systems, has shown potential applicability in many areas of operation at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In an era of limited resources, the early identification of good expert system applications, and their segregation from inappropriate ones can result in a more efficient use of available NASA resources. On the other hand, the education of students in a highly technical area such as AI requires an extensive hands-on effort. The nature of expert systems is such that proper sample applications for the educational process are difficult to find. A pilot project between NASA-KSC and the University of Central Florida which was designed to simultaneously address the needs of both institutions at a minimum cost. This project, referred to as Expert Systems Prototype Training Project (ESPTP), provided NASA with relatively inexpensive development of initial prototype versions of certain applications. University students likewise benefit by having expertise on a non-trivial problem accessible to them at no cost. Such expertise is indispensible in a hands-on training approach to developing expert systems.

  11. CT colonography: Project of High National Interest No. 2005062137 of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, E; Laghi, A; Regge, D; Sacco, P; Gallo, T; Turini, F; Talini, E; Ferrari, R; Mellaro, M; Rengo, M; Marchi, S; Caramella, D; Bartolozzi, C

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the Web site of the Italian Project on CT Colonography (Research Project of High National Interest, PRIN No. 2005062137) and present the prototype of the online database. The Web site was created with Microsoft Office Publisher 2003 software, which allows the realisation of multiple Web pages linked through a main menu located on the home page. The Web site contains a database of computed tomography (CT) colonography studies in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, all acquired with multidetector-row CT according to the parameters defined by the European Society of Abdominal and Gastrointestinal Radiology (ESGAR). The cases present different bowel-cleansing and tagging methods, and each case has been anonymised and classified according to the Colonography Reporting and Data System (C-RADS). The Web site is available at http address www.ctcolonography.org and is composed of eight pages. Download times for a 294-Mbyte file were 33 min from a residential ADSL (6 Mbit/s) network, 200 s from a local university network (100 Mbit/s) and 2 h and 50 min from a remote academic site in the USA. The Web site received 256 accesses in the 22 days since it went online. The Web site is an immediate and up-to-date tool for publicising the activity of the research project and a valuable learning resource for CT colonography.

  12. Robotic Mission to Mars: Hands-on, minds-on, web-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Naomi; Goktogen, Ali; Rankin, John; Anderson, Marion

    2012-11-01

    Problem-based learning has been demonstrated as an effective methodology for developing analytical skills and critical thinking. The use of scenario-based learning incorporates problem-based learning whilst encouraging students to collaborate with their colleagues and dynamically adapt to their environment. This increased interaction stimulates a deeper understanding and the generation of new knowledge. The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) uses scenario-based learning in its Mission to Mars, Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory and Primary Expedition to the M.A.R.S. Base programs. These programs utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive-learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring to engage students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The immersive nature of the programs demands specialist environments such as a simulated Mars environment, Mission Control and Space Laboratory, thus restricting these programs to a physical location and limiting student access to the programs. To move beyond these limitations, VSSEC worked with its university partners to develop a web-based mission that delivered the benefits of scenario-based learning within a school environment. The Robotic Mission to Mars allows students to remotely control a real rover, developed by the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (ACFR), on the VSSEC Mars surface. After completing a pre-mission training program and site selection activity, students take on the roles of scientists and engineers in Mission Control to complete a mission and collect data for further analysis. Mission Control is established using software developed by the ACRI Games Technology Lab at La Trobe University using the principles of serious gaming. The software allows students to control the rover, monitor its systems and collect scientific data for analysis. This program encourages

  13. Project-based learning in the teaching-learning process university. A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoval Hamón Leyla Angélica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area promotes the change in teaching-learning, where students have a more active role in their educational process. The main objective of this work is to analyse the use of an alternative proposal, focus in student-based teamwork activities, who seek to favour the acquisition and deepening of knowledge and skills. The implementation of this research was carried out by means of a longitudinal study in the subject of the degree of Economics, with the development of the methodology of Project Based Learning integrating the ICTs and improving the evaluation process (e.g. establishing headings and psychometric analysis of knowledge tests. The results of the research showed an improvement in the learning process from the observation, collection of works, analysis of knowledge tests and the official survey by students to assess the activity and the development of their competitors.

  14. Neptuno-nuclear European platform of training and university organizations project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Banutoiu, Marina; Paraschiva, M. V.; Meglea, S.

    2003-01-01

    The project focuses on a harmonised approach to education and training in nuclear engineering in Europe and its implementation, including better integration of national resources and capabilities. The expected result is an operational network for training and life-long learning schemes as well as for academic education at the master, doctoral and post doctoral degree, underpinning: - sustainability of European's excellence in nuclear technology; - harmonised approaches to safety and best practices, both operational and regulatory at European level in Member States and Accession Countries; - preservation of competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of irradiations in industry and medicine; - harmonised approach for training and education in nuclear engineering. In the network: - we implement the roadmap for nuclear education in Europe as developed and demonstrated in the ongoing Euratom FP5 project ENEM; - we warrant the end-user relevance of the education at all levels by recruiting (part-time) professors out of industry and by providing (re-)training of nuclear industry personnel; - we teach advanced courses preferably at selected centres of excellence; - bridging leading edge research and new knowledge generation with teaching and education; -creating nuclei of excellence for doctoral schools in nuclear engineering and sciences; - we facilitate transnational access to research infrastructure. The final aim of the NEPTUNO initiative is to guarantee sufficient people, means and knowledge (resources) to make possible the safe and efficient applications of the nuclear technology to the civil and industry in the medium and long term. This will be accomplished by the design, development and testing of a system able to achieve the sustainable integration of education and training in nuclear engineering and safety in Europe. Thus, by responding to the EC objective for call for proposals, a joint approach to be widely applied in

  15. Ethics in Community-University-Artist Partnered Research: Tensions, Contradictions and Gaps Identified in an 'Arts for Social Change' Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassi, Annalee; Spiegel, Jennifer Beth; Lockhart, Karen; Fels, Lynn; Boydell, Katherine; Marcuse, Judith

    Academics from diverse disciplines are recognizing not only the procedural ethical issues involved in research, but also the complexity of everyday "micro" ethical issues that arise. While ethical guidelines are being developed for research in aboriginal populations and low-and-middle-income countries, multi-partnered research initiatives examining arts-based interventions to promote social change pose a unique set of ethical dilemmas not yet fully explored. Our research team, comprising health, education, and social scientists, critical theorists, artists and community-activists launched a five-year research partnership on arts-for-social change. Funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council in Canada and based in six universities, including over 40 community-based collaborators, and informed by five main field projects (circus with street youth, theatre by people with disabilities, dance for people with Parkinson's disease, participatory theatre with refugees and artsinfused dialogue), we set out to synthesize existing knowledge and lessons we learned. We summarized these learnings into 12 key points for reflection, grouped into three categories: community-university partnership concerns ( n  = 3), dilemmas related to the arts ( n  = 5), and team issues ( n  = 4). In addition to addressing previous concerns outlined in the literature (e.g., related to consent, anonymity, dangerous emotional terrain, etc.), we identified power dynamics (visible and hidden) hindering meaningful participation of community partners and university-based teams that need to be addressed within a reflective critical framework of ethical practice. We present how our team has been addressing these issues, as examples of how such concerns could be approached in community-university partnerships in arts for social change.

  16. Summary of current research projects at the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Buchberger, T.; Buchtela, K.; Grass, F.; Hammer, J.; Kasa, T.; Schindler, P.; Weber, H.W.; Westphal, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna, with pulsing capability up to 250 MW is used as a university reactor for basic and applied research, education and training. The reactor is presently operated with a mixed core using 72 standard TRIGA fuel elements, 54 of them are still from first criticality (Al-clad), 9 of them were added later (SST-clad) and 9 are FLIP elements in the C ring. As experimental facilities, four beam tubes, one thermal column, one neutron radiography collimator installed in the previous thermalizing column, one slow and one fast pneumatic transfer system and five irradiation tubes are available. The experimental facilities are mainly used for students' education and training. Industrial research and routine service irradiations are only performed if a certain amount of scientific output can be expected. In many cases special experiments are designed and tested at the Atominstitute and later on transferred to more powerful neutron sources such as the ILL high flux reactor in Grenoble/France

  17. Research Projects at Chulalongkorn University for the Master Degree Programme in Nuclear Security and Safeguard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsuwankosit, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, began its master degree programme in nuclear security and safeguard in November 2013 with the support from the CBRN-Center of Excellence, European Union. This programme was planned as a way to raise the awareness of various local agencies in ASEAN countries regarding the threat of CBRN events. In the long run, the programme will also serve as the platform to develop the human resource and to provide the professional assistance required to counter such threat in the region. The programme closely follows the guideline as given by the IAEA and employs its materials as the main source of references. The first batch of 20 students came from countries in the ASEAN community. Due to the nature of the program, each student is required to conduct the research and a thesis based on such research is to be submitted as part of the requirement for the graduation. Currently, the research subjects that are readily available to the students can be classified into 5 categories: 1. subjects with neutron generator, 2. subjects with nuclear electronics and instruments, 3. subjects with industrial applications, 4. subjects with computer simulations, and 5. subjects with policy research. (author)

  18. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    During the academic year 1980 - 1981, the 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator in UTTAC has experienced several troubles. The accelerator tank had to be opened six times including the scheduled overhaul. Due to these troubles, both the beam time and the chain operation time were reduced by 20% as compared with the preceding year. However, the beam pulsing system was completed, and pulsed beam has been in use. The polarized ion source and the sputter ion source have worked well. A heavy ion booster with interdigital H-structure was designed, and has been under construction. Special efforts have been exerted on the detectors and detector systems. The examples of the achievements mainly associated with the Nuclear and Solid State Research Project are enumerated as follows. The complete experiment on d-p system provided the data on nuclear three body problem. The information about the mechanism of two-nucleon transfer reaction (p,t) was obtained. The mechanisms of (p,p) and (p,d) reactions were clarified. The experiment on the measurement of the magnetic moment of β-emitting products with polarized beam began. The properties of very highly excited states were clarified by the study of heavy ion-induced reactions. A new model for heavy ion fusion reaction was proposed. The mechanism of inner shell ionization was clarified by passing heavy ions through solids. (Kako, I.)

  19. The Midwest Proton Radiation Institute project at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anferov, V; Broderick, B; Collins, J C; Friesel, D L; Jenner, D; Jones, W P; Katuin, J; Klein, S B; Starks, W; Self, J; Schreuder, N [IUCF, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2001-12-12

    The IUCF cyclotrons ceased delivering particle beams for physics research and became dedicated medical proton beam accelerators in 1999. Removal of the beam lines and nuclear research facilities associated with the cyclotrons to make room for the new medical beam delivery systems was completed in October, 2000. A new achromatic beam line was completed, extending from the main stage cyclotron and ending at a temporary research platform. This beam line is being commissioned during ongoing applied research. The achromatic line will deliver 0.5 {mu}A of 205 MeV protons from which the treatment room technician may draw current at any time via fast switching, laminated magnets located at the entrances to the energy selection systems upstream of each of the treatment rooms. Three treatment rooms are planned, one containing two fixed horizontal lines and two gantry rooms. The cyclotrons will also support full time research in radiation effects, single event upset, radiation biology and pre-clinical research. This contribution describes the status of the medical construction project.

  20. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF): SciDAC-2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-06-30

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1, 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; and third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  1. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF). SciDAC-2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vary, James P. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian

    2012-09-29

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out. The UNEDF SciDAC project has developed several key computational codes and algorithms for reaching the goal of solving the nuclear quantum many-body problem throughout the chart of nuclei. Without such developments, scientific progress would not be possible. In addition the UNEDF SciDAC successfully applied these developments to solve many forefront research problems.

  2. Using stakeholder analysis to support moves towards universal coverage: lessons from the SHIELD project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Lucy; Erasmus, Ermin; Borghi, Jo; Macha, Janet; Kamuzora, Peter; Mtei, Gemini

    2012-03-01

    Stakeholder analysis is widely recommended as a tool for gathering insights on policy actor interests in, positions on, and power to influence, health policy issues. Such information is recognized to be critical in developing viable health policy proposals, and is particularly important for new health care financing proposals that aim to secure universal coverage (UC). However, there remain surprisingly few published accounts of the use of stakeholder analysis in health policy development generally, and health financing specifically, and even fewer that draw lessons from experience about how to do and how to use such analysis. This paper, therefore, aims to support those developing or researching UC reforms to think both about how to conduct stakeholder analysis, and how to use it to support evidence-informed pro-poor health policy development. It presents practical lessons and ideas drawn from experience of doing stakeholder analysis around UC reforms in South Africa and Tanzania, combined with insights from other relevant material. The paper has two parts. The first presents lessons of experience for conducting a stakeholder analysis, and the second, ideas about how to use the analysis to support policy design and the development of actor and broader political management strategies. Comparison of experience across South Africa and Tanzania shows that there are some commonalities concerning which stakeholders have general interests in UC reform. However, differences in context and in reform proposals generate differences in the particular interests of stakeholders and their likely positioning on reform proposals, as well as in their relative balance of power. It is, therefore, difficult to draw cross-national policy comparisons around these specific issues. Nonetheless, the paper shows that cross-national policy learning is possible around the approach to analysis, the factors influencing judgements and the implications for, and possible approaches to, management

  3. Physics and Physics Education at Clarion University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Vasudeva

    Clarion University is located in the rolling hills of western Pennsylvania. We are a primarily undergraduate public institution serving about 6000 students. We graduate students who take different career paths, one of them being teaching physics at high schools. Since educating teachers of tomorrow requires us to introduce currently trending, research proven pedagogical methods, we incorporate several aspects of physics pedagogies such as peer instruction, flipped classroom and hands on experimentation in a studio physics lab format. In this talk, I discuss some of our projects on physics education, and seek to find potential collaborators interested in working along similar lines.

  4. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 17. Development of Education Programs at Indonesian Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. All five Indonesian partner universities managed to develop and implement an education program within the timeline of the CASINDO project. UMY (Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Indonesia), UNRAM (University of Mataram, Mataram, Indonesia) and UNCEN (Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia) have chosen to develop a certificate program. UNDIP (Diponegoro University in Semarang, Java, Indonesia) and USU (University of Sumatra Utara, Medan, Indonesia) have both developed a master program in sustainable energy. UNDIP has already discussed the proposal of their master program with the Ministry of Education and will have to make some improvements. USU will first start the program as a specialisation within the Mechanical Engineering department and in some time continues to make it an independent master program. At all universities both contact persons and lecturers have put a lot of effort in developing the programs and succeeded. Additionally, through CASINDO a network of lecturers between the universities has developed, which will ease future cooperation, after the CASINDO project will have finished.

  5. Using Workflow Modeling to Identify Areas to Improve Genetic Test Processes in the University of Maryland Translational Pharmacogenomics Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Elizabeth M; Overby, Casey L; Banchero, Meghan; Pollin, Toni; Kelemen, Mark; Shuldiner, Alan R; Beitelshees, Amber L

    Delivering genetic test results to clinicians is a complex process. It involves many actors and multiple steps, requiring all of these to work together in order to create an optimal course of treatment for the patient. We used information gained from focus groups in order to illustrate the current process of delivering genetic test results to clinicians. We propose a business process model and notation (BPMN) representation of this process for a Translational Pharmacogenomics Project being implemented at the University of Maryland Medical Center, so that personalized medicine program implementers can identify areas to improve genetic testing processes. We found that the current process could be improved to reduce input errors, better inform and notify clinicians about the implications of certain genetic tests, and make results more easily understood. We demonstrate our use of BPMN to improve this important clinical process for CYP2C19 genetic testing in patients undergoing invasive treatment of coronary heart disease.

  6. Teaching Climate Change Through Data Analytics: Updates on the TRELLIS Project at the City University of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, B.; Cak, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Community colleges have been identified as a particularly important gateway for the United States' scientific workforce. However, students that begin their higher education at community colleges often face barriers in developing the skills needed for higher-level STEM careers, including basic training in mathematics, programming and communications, deep analytical and problem-solving skills, and experience with working across disciplines. As part of the Undergraduate STEM Interventions in Industry (USI2) Consortium, we have developed a summer bridge program for students in diverse STEM fields transferring from City University of New York (CUNY) community colleges to the City College of New York. Students participating in the program receive training and work on team data analysis projects on various themes related to climate change resilience and New York City. We will discuss our experiences during the first 2 years of implementation of the summer bridge program along with plans for a capstone program for students in their senior year.

  7. Work-based learning experiences help students with disabilities transition to careers: a case study of University of Washington projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellman, Scott; Burgstahler, Sheryl; Ladner, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes evidence-based practices employed by a collection of University of Washington projects that engage high school and postsecondary students with disabilities in work-based learning experiences such as industry and research internships, career development activities, job shadows, field trips, and mock interviews. The purpose of the article is two-fold. First, authors share best practices with others who wish to increase the participation of students with disabilities in work-based learning and thereby contribute to their academic and career success. The article discusses methods used to recruit students, employers and mentors, match students with specific opportunities, and prepare students for success. Second, authors share outcomes from studies regarding participation in these work-based learning opportunities, which include increased employment success, motivation to work toward a career, knowledge about careers and the workplace, job-related skills, ability to work with supervisors and coworkers, skills in self-advocating for accommodations, and perceived career options.

  8. An IS Project Management Course Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Information Systems curricula should provide project management (PM) theory, current practice, and hands-on experience. The schedule usually does not allow time in Analysis and Design courses for development oriented project management instruction other than a short introduction. Similarly, networking courses usually don't put project management…

  9. PROJECTING PRINCIPLES OF «MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL BASICS IN INFORMATICS» MODULE AS PART OF A UNIVERSAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Samerkhanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a presentation of “Mathematical and Physical Basics in Informatics” Module projected as part of universal baccalaureate model realized in Minin State Pedagogical University, Nizhny Novgorod, within the educational program for an extended group of qualifications “Informatics and Calculating Machines”. Module authors defined a strategy for baccalaureates preparation in the field of informational technology, which is realized due to a bunch of principles: education fundamentalization, learning systematization, activity, integration and student-centration. The principle of education fundamentalization requires consolidation of scientific and methodological preparation of students. The principle of learning systematization guarantees formation of students’ holistic ideology. The principle of integration is directed onto qualitative interdisciplinary conversion based on mutual enrichment of knowledge and skills. The principle of activity considers student personality, its formation and growth with respect to practical activity as a special form of psychical activity. The principle of student-centration is displayed as social-humanistic purpose of the educational process.

  10. Peer-mentoring Program during the Preclinical Years of Medical School at Bonn University: a Project Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Hendrik; Makowka, Philipp; Recker, Florian

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: To better prepare young medical students in a thorough and competent manner for the ever increasing clinical, scientific, as well as psychosocial requirements, universities should enable a close, personal transfer of experience and knowledge. Structured mentoring programs are a promising approach to incorporate clinical subjects earlier into the preclinical training. Such a mentoring program facilitates the prioritization of concepts from a broad, theory-heavy syllabus. Here we report the experiences and results of the preclinical mentoring program of Bonn University, which was introduced in the winter semester of 2012/2013. Project desciption: The program is characterized by the concept of peer-to-peer teaching during the preclinical semesters of medical school. Regular, voluntary course meetings with different clinical case examples provide students the opportunity to apply knowledge acquired from the basic science curricula; furthermore, a personal contact for advice and support is ensured. Thus, an informal exchange of experiences is made possible, which provides to the students motivational and learning aids, in particular for the oral examination at the end of the premedical semesters as well as for other examinations during medical school. Results: Over the course of the preceding three years the number of participants and the interest in the program grew steadily. The analysis of collected evaluations confirms very good communication between mentors and students (>80%), as well as consistently good to very good quality and usefulness in terms of the mentors' subject-specific and other advice. The overall final evaluation of the mentoring program was always good to very good (winter semester: very good 64.8±5.0%, good 35.2±5.0%, summer semester: very good 83.9±7.5%, good 16.1±7.5%) Summary: In summary, it has been shown that the mentoring program had a positive impact on the development, education and satisfaction of students beginning

  11. Pre-Service Physics Teachers’ Perception toward Hands-on Lab Activity and 21st Century Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, D. H.; Risdianto, E.; Sutarno, S.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the hands-on lab activities and 21st century skills of pre-service physics teachers at a university in Bengkulu. The respondents of this study were 113 students who have been finished and were following the laboratory course. The research instrument was questionnaire. The explored aspects of laboratory activities were motivation, the importance of laboratory activities, equipment, laboratory activities process, suitability of curriculum, assessment, laboratory design, and the 21st century skills training. The 21st century skills explored consist of learning and innovation skills, life and careers skills, and media, information and technology skills. The data obtained will be analyzed descriptively. Based on the results of data analysis was obtained that they have a good perception toward the aspect of motivation, the importance of hands-on lab activities, and laboratory activities process; and the perception was fair for other aspects. The lowest perception score was obtained in the aspects of the 21st century skills training. This result was in accordance with the 21st century skills of pre-service physics teachers which were still in moderate category. So it is necessary to develop a model of laboratory activities design that can training and enhancing the 21st century skills for pre-service physics teachers.

  12. [Gender-inclusive care of victims of violence : The model project "Gender Gewaltkonzept" at the University Hospital Aachen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evler, A; Scheller, M; Wagels, L; Bergs, R; Clemens, B; Kohn, N; Pütz, A; Voss, B; Schneider, F; Habel, U

    2016-07-01

    Violence is a topic of great social relevance, frequently causing tremendous health consequences for those affected and high consequential costs for health care and the national economy. The established consulting and assistance services are usually restricted to offers for ambulant supply, mainly from private agencies or societies. As a result, there is no identification and care for patients who have experienced violence and who are treated in hospital. Another deficiency is the identification and care of male victims of violence. Despite wide-ranging offers of assistance, only very few gender-specific consulting and support services have been available to date.Therefore, the model project "Gender Gewaltkonzept" was initiated at Aachen University Hospital to assess the prevalence of violence and the potential consequences of the violence experienced on the patients' health. In addition, we investigated whether males and females are in need of different supply requirements.Based on the results of the project "Gender Gewaltkonzept" so far, and on prevalence estimates proving that there is a high rate of violent experiences in both males and females, this overview is aimed at presenting the aid and protection concepts available for victims of violence, in addition to the existing deficiencies of the care system. We present approaches to resolving these deficiencies to be able to establish all-encompassing gender-appropriate support for victims of violence.

  13. Aircraft Emission Inventories Projected in Year 2015 for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Universal Airline Network. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baughcum, S.L.; Henderson, S.C.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the development of a three-dimensional database of aircraft fuel burn and emissions (fuel burned, NOx, CO, and hydrocarbons) from projected fleets of high speed civil transports (HSCT`s) on a universal airline network. Inventories for 500 and 1000 HSCT fleets, as well as the concurrent subsonic fleets, were calculated. The objective of this work was to evaluate the changes in geographical distribution of the HSCT emissions as the fleet size grew from 500 to 1000 HSCT`s. For this work, a new expanded HSCT network was used and flights projected using a market penetration analysis rather than assuming equal penetration as was done in the earlier studies. Emission inventories on this network were calculated for both Mach 2.0 and Mach 2.4 HSCT fleets with NOx cruise emission indices of approximately 5 and 15 grams NOx/kg fuel. These emissions inventories are available for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) modeling studies. Fuel burned and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons have been calculated on a 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude x 1 kilometer attitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files.

  14. A Low Cost Implementation of an Existing Hands-on Laboratory Experiment in Electronic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Onime

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In engineering the pedagogical content of most formative programmes includes a significant amount of practical laboratory hands-on activity designed to deliver knowledge acquisition from actual experience alongside traditional face-to-face classroom based lectures and tutorials; this hands-on aspect is not always adequately addressed by current e-learning platforms. An innovative approach to e-learning in engineering, named computer aided engineering education (CAEE is about the use of computer aids for the enhanced, interactive delivery of educational materials in different fields of engineering through two separate but related components; one for classroom and another for practical hands-on laboratory work. The component for hands-on laboratory practical work focuses on the use of mixed reality (video-based augmented reality tools on mobile devices/platforms. This paper presents the computer aided engineering education (CAEE implementation of a laboratory experiment in micro-electronics that highlights some features such as the ability to closely implement an existing laboratory based hands-on experiment with lower associated costs and the ability to conduct the experiment off-line while maintaining existing pedagogical contents and standards.

  15. Hands-on guide for 3D image creation for geological purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frehner, Marcel; Tisato, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    -cyan anaglyphs is their simplicity and the possibility to print them on normal paper or project them using a conventional projector. Producing 3D stereoscopic images is much easier than commonly thought. Our hands-on poster provides an easy-to-use guide for producing 3D stereoscopic images. Few simple rules-of-thumb are presented that define how photographs of any scene or object have to be shot to produce good-looking 3D images. We use the free software Stereophotomaker (http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr) to produce anaglyphs and provide red-cyan 3D glasses for viewing them. Our hands-on poster is easy to adapt and helps any geologist to present his/her field or hand specimen photographs in a much more fashionable 3D way for future publications or conference posters.

  16. Positive Affect Relevant to Epistemic Curiosity to Reflect Continuance Intention to Join a Hands-On Making Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Szeto, Elson; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on making (e.g., "Maker") has become prevalent in current educational settings. To understand the role that students' epistemic curiosity plays in hands-on making contests, this study explored its correlation to students' positive affect and continuance intention to participate in a hands-on making contest called…

  17. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  18. At-risk children's use of reflection and revision in hands-on experimental activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosino, Anthony J., Jr.

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating opportunities for reflection and revision in hands-on science instruction which emphasized experimentation using model rockets. The participants were low achieving sixth grade summer school students (n = 23) designated as at-risk for school failure by their district. The group was asked a series of interview questions based on work by Schauble et al. (1995) relating to experimentation. The interviews took place over three distinct time points corresponding to a "hands-on only" condition, a "hands-on with reflection and revision" condition and a "hands-on with repeated reflection and revision" condition. A Friedman's Two-Way Analysis of Variance by Ranks indicate students score low at first with traditional hands-on instruction but improve significantly with opportunities to reflect and revise their experiments. In addition, a sociocultural analysis was conducted during the summer school session to assess the model rocket activity as an apprenticeship, as guided participation and as participatory appropriation using a framework established by Rogoff (1994). Finally, a survey (the Classroom Environment Survey) was administered to the students measuring five constructs consistent with a constructivist classroom: participation, autonomy, relevance, commitment to learning and disruptions to learning. Analysis indicate students in the summer school model rocket intervention experienced a greater sense of constructivist principles during the activity than a similar comparison group utilizing reform minded instruction but not including opportunities for reflection and revision cycles. This research provides important evidence that, like scientists, students in school can learn effectively from extended practice in a varied context. Importantly, the data indicate that hands-on instruction is best utilized when opportunities for reflection and revision are made explicit. Implications are discussed related

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness of hands-on versus online education in child passenger safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Anita; Beckworth, Kristen L; Ansiaux, John A; Chen, Carol C; Hoffman, Benjamin; Shenoi, Rohit P

    2017-08-28

    Community paediatricians' knowledge of appropriate child safety seat (CSS) use in vehicles may be inadequate. We compared the effectiveness of hands-on and online education in improving and retaining child passenger safety (CPS) knowledge and skills among paediatric trainees. Paediatric trainees were randomised to receive hands-on skills training versus a 1-hour online module in CPS. CSS knowledge and installation skills were assessed using a validated 10-item/point questionnaire and an assessment tool respectively at baseline and after 6 months. Preintervention and postintervention knowledge improvement and CSS installation skills between groups were assessed using paired t-tests and effect size ( d ). Forty-eight students agreed to participate and were randomised. Thirty-nine completed training (hands-on: 23 and online: 15). At entry, no significant differences in learners' demographics and prior CPS education existed. Baseline CPS knowledge scores did not differ significantly between groups (p=0.26). Postintervention, both groups demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge scores (hands-on=3.1 (95% CI 2.4 to 3.7), ponline=2.6 (95% CI 1.9 to 3.3), ponline=1.1 (95% CI 0.7 to 1.6), ponline group (ponline group (forward-facing seat: 0.9 (95% CI -0.08 to 1.9), p=0.07); rear-facing seat: -0.2 (95% CI -1.1 to 0.7), p=0.6). Among paediatric trainees, hands-on and online CPS education are both effective in improving long-term CPS knowledge. Long-term installation skills for forward-facing and rear-facing CSS persist for hands-on education but are inconclusive for online education. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Project for Establishing a Selected Dissemination of Information Service for the Faculty Members at Education and Psychology Faculty, University of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Fadaei

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The project aim was to establish an SDI (Selected Dissemination of Information service for the faculty members at University of Tehran, faculty of psychology and education. The project was carried out during the 2006-2007 period. First, a three stage survey was conducted to identify the information needs which were then served using a current awareness service over the period. Findings confirmed that the SDI project significantly impacted on the faculty information seeking behavior. Furthermore, there had been evidence supporting the fact that it has also influenced the quality of instruction by facilitating the overall efficacy of information sources collected. It was the intent of researchers to expand this project at later stages to include all humanities faculties in the university and if possible at a national level.

  1. Quantity Surveying Undergraduates’ Awareness on Cost Significant of High-Rise Condominium Projects in Malaysia: The Case of a Private University in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Lee Wah; Seng Ng See; Choon Toh Tien; Sim Lim Cheng; Khian Yong Ching; Chen Goh Kai

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in quantity surveying (QS) emphasised the importance of identifying cost significant elements (CSE). The knowledge on CSE of high-rise condominium projects (HRCP) is essential as high-rise residential multi-unit projects are the next option in building construction due to limited land areas in urban areas. This study aims to determine the levels of awareness among QS undergraduates of a private university in Malaysia on CSE of HRCP in Malaysia. The respondents’ knowledge o...

  2. Lobachevsky Year at Kazan University: Center of Science, Education, Intellectual-Cognitive Tourism "Kazan - GeoNa - 2020+" and "Kazan-Moon-2020+" projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A.; Trudkova, N.

    2017-09-01

    Center "GeoNa" will enable scientists and teachers of the Russian universities to join to advanced achievements of a science, information technologies; to establish scientific communications with foreign colleagues in sphere of the high technology, educational projects and Intellectual-Cognitive Tourism. The Project "Kazan - Moon - 2020+" is directed on the decision of fundamental problems of celestial mechanics, selenodesy and geophysics of the Moon(s) connected to carrying out of complex theoretical researches and computer modelling.

  3. University of Colorado CubeSat Student Projects as Successful Model for Teaching Students about Engineering Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, S. E.; Li, X.; Woods, T. N.; Kohnert, R.

    2014-12-01

    There is a long history of cooperation between students at the University of Colorado, Boulder and professional engineers and scientists at LASP, which has led to many successful space missions with direct student involvement. The recent student-led missions include the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE, 1998 - 2002), the Student Dust Counter (SDC) on New Horizons (2006 - present), the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE), being a very successful NSF CubeSat that launched in September 2012, and the NASA Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat (launch will be in early 2015). Students are involved in all aspects of the design, and they experience the full scope of the mission process from concept, to fabrication and test, and mission operations. A significant part of the student involvement in the CubeSat projects is gained by using the CubeSat development as a focal point for an existing two-semester course sequence in CU's Aerospace Engineering Sciences (AES) Department: the Space Hardware Design section of Graduate Projects I & II (ASEN 5018 & ASEN 6028). The goal of these courses is to teach graduate students how to design and build systems using a requirement-based approach and fundamental systems engineering practices. The two-semester sequence takes teams of about 15 students from requirements definition and preliminary design through manufacturing, integration, and testing. In addition to the design process, students learn key professional skills such as working effectively in groups, finding solutions to open-ended problems, and actually building a system to their own set of specifications. The partnership between AES and LASP allows us to include engineering professionals in the mix, thus more effectively training science and engineering students for future roles in the civilian or commercial space industry. The mentoring process with LASP engineers helps to mitigate risk of the inexperience of the students and ensures consistent

  4. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with

  5. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with

  6. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire future international leaders in the field of radioisotope for the first time. The project would enable promote abilities of radioactive isotopes professions, and to build the human network with future leaders in the world-wide nuclear and radiation field. Especially by offering opportunity to construct human networks between worldwide radiation field leaders of next generation, intangible assets and pro-Korean human networks are secured among international radiation industry personnel. This might enhance the power and the status of Korean radiation industries, and establish the fundamental base for exporting of radiation technology and its products. We developed the performance measurement method for the school. This shows that 2010 WNU RI School was the first training program focusing on the radioisotope and very useful program for the participants in view of knowledge management and strengthening personal abilities. Especially, the experiences and a human network with world-wide future-leaders in radiation field are most valuable asset. It is expected that the participants could this experience and network developed in the program as a stepping stone toward the development of Korea's nuclear and radiation industry.

  7. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y.

    2010-08-01

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire future international leaders in the field of radioisotope for the first time. The project would enable promote abilities of radioactive isotopes professions, and to build the human network with future leaders in the world-wide nuclear and radiation field. Especially by offering opportunity to construct human networks between worldwide radiation field leaders of next generation, intangible assets and pro-Korean human networks are secured among international radiation industry personnel. This might enhance the power and the status of Korean radiation industries, and establish the fundamental base for exporting of radiation technology and its products. We developed the performance measurement method for the school. This shows that 2010 WNU RI School was the first training program focusing on the radioisotope and very useful program for the participants in view of knowledge management and strengthening personal abilities. Especially, the experiences and a human network with world-wide future-leaders in radiation field are most valuable asset. It is expected that the participants could this experience and network developed in the program as a stepping stone toward the development of Korea's nuclear and radiation industry

  8. Implementation of an innovative teaching project in a Chemical Process Design course at the University of Cantabria, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Berta; Muñoz, Iciar; Viguri, Javier R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper shows the planning, the teaching activities and the evaluation of the learning and teaching process implemented in the Chemical Process Design course at the University of Cantabria, Spain. Educational methods to address the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students who complete the course are expected to acquire are proposed and discussed. Undergraduate and graduate engineers' perceptions of the methodology used are evaluated by means of a questionnaire. Results of the teaching activities and the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed case study are discussed in relation to the course characteristics. The findings of the empirical evaluation shows that the excessive time students had to dedicate to the case study project and dealing with limited information are the most negative aspects obtained, whereas an increase in the students' self-confidence and the practical application of the methodology are the most positive aspects. Finally, improvements are discussed in order to extend the application of the methodology to other courses offered as part of the chemical engineering degree.

  9. Supporting the upper body with the hand on the thigh reduces back loading during lifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; Faber, G.S.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    When picking objects from the floor, low back pain patients often tend to support the upper body by leaning with one hand on a thigh. While this strategy may reduce back load, this has not yet been assessed, probably due to the difficulty of measuring the forces between hand and thigh.Ten healthy

  10. The Impact of Hands-On-Approach on Student Academic Performance in Basic Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Cecilia O.; Ekon, Esther E.; Ezenwa-Nebife, Dorothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Children can learn mathematics and sciences effectively even before being exposed to formal school curriculum if basic Mathematics and Sciences concepts are communicated to them early using activity oriented (Hands-on) method of teaching. Mathematics and Science are practical and activity oriented and can best be learnt through inquiry (Okebukola…

  11. Calculator-Controlled Robots: Hands-On Mathematics and Science Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherer, Tyson

    2010-01-01

    The Calculator Controlled Robots activities are designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry-based missions. These activities address National science and technology standards, as well as specifically focusing on mathematics content and process standards. There are ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to…

  12. Document Questionnaires and Datasets with DDI: A Hands-On Introduction with Colectica

    OpenAIRE

    Iverson, Jeremy; Smith, Dan

    2018-01-01

    This workshop offers a hands-on, practical approach to creating and documenting both surveys and datasets with DDI and Colectica. Participants will build and field a DDI-driven survey using their own questions or samples provided in the workshop. They will then ingest, annotate, and publish DDI dataset descriptions using the collected survey data.

  13. Choices of Pre-Service Science Teachers Laboratory Environments: Hands-on or Hands-off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapici, Hasan Ozgur; Akcay, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Learning in laboratories for students is not only crucial for conceptual understanding, but also contributes to gaining scientific reasoning skills. Following fast developments in technology, online laboratory environments have been improved considerably and nowadays form an attractive alternative for hands-on laboratories. The study was done in…

  14. A Low-Tech, Hands-On Approach To Teaching Sorting Algorithms to Working Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, R.; Geller, J.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on identifying the educational effects of "activity oriented" instructional techniques. Examines which instructional methods produce enhanced learning and comprehension. Discusses the problem of learning "sorting algorithms," a major topic in every Computer Science curriculum. Presents a low-tech, hands-on teaching method for sorting…

  15. Past Examination Questions in Senior Secondary Chemistry: From Written Practice to Hands-On Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; So, Wing-Mui Winnie; Cheung, Tsz-Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study applied an unconventional use of past examination papers by converting questions into hands-on experiments for students. Students in an experimental group were engaged in use of those experiments while the remainder attended conventional lectures with written practice. The results reflect that the experimental group positively improved…

  16. Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

  17. Introduction to Density Functional Theory: Calculations by Hand on the Helium Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseden, Kyle A.; Tye, Jesse W.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a type of electronic structure calculation that has rapidly gained popularity. In this article, we provide a step-by-step demonstration of a DFT calculation by hand on the helium atom using Slater's X-Alpha exchange functional on a single Gaussian-type orbital to represent the atomic wave function. This DFT…

  18. Hands On Activity Pada Pembelajaran Geometri Sekolah Sebagai Asesmen Kinerja Siswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartono Kartono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Geometri merupakan cabang matematika yang diajarkan mulai dari pendidikan dasar sampai pendidikan tinggi, namun berdasarkan suatu penelitian hasil belajar geometri kurang memuaskan khususnya hasil belajar geometri sekolah. Hasil belajar geometri sekolah terkait langsung dengan kegiatan pembelajarannya. Pembelajaran geometri akan efektif apabila kegiatan yang dilakukan sesuai dengan struktur kemampuan berpikir siswa. Menurut Teori Van Hiele tentang pembelajaran geometri, bahwa tingkat kemampuan berpikir siswa dalam belajar geometri meliputi lima tingkat , yaitu visualisasi, analisis, deduksi informal, deduksi, dan rigor.Tingkatan berpikir tersebut akan dilalui siswa secara berurutan, kecepatan berpindah dari tingkat ke tingkat berikutnya banyak bergantung pada isi dan metode pembelajarannya.Perlu disediakan aktivitas-aktivitas dalam pembelajaran yang sesuai dengan tingkat berpikir siswa dalam bentuk hands on activity. Melalui hands on activity akan terbentuk suatu penghayatan dan pengalaman untuk  menetapkan suatu pengertian, karena mampu membelajarkan secara bersama-sama kemampuan kognitif, afektif, dan psikomotorik serta dapat memberikan penghayatan secara mendalam terhadap apa yang dipelajari, sehingga apa yang diperoleh oleh siswa tidak mudah dilupakan. Hands on activity selain sebagai komponen kegiatan pembelajaran, dapat dimanfaatkan sebagai intrumen asesmen, khususnya asesmen kinerja siswa. Gunakanlah hands on activity pada pembelajaran geometri sekolah dan manfaatkan kegiatan tersebut sebagai bentuk asesmen kinerja siswa. 

  19. A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBonte, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

  20. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  1. Communicating Climate Science to Kids and Adults Through Citizen Science, Hands-On Demonstrations, and a Personal Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, L.; Braasch, G.

    2008-12-01

    There is a demonstrated need to increase the amount of formal and non-formal science education and to raise the level of climate literacy for children and adults. Scientists and technical leaders are more and more being called on to speak in non-academic settings ranging from grade schools to assemblies and seminars for the general public. This abstract describes some effective ways to teach and talk about climate change science in a way that engenders hope and empowerment while explaining scientific facts and research methods to non-scientists. Citizen participation in Science People's interest and learning increases when offered chances to do what scientists do. Relating science to their daily lives and showing the adventure of science can greatly increase communication. Citizen participation in science works because data collection stimulates experiential and cognitive ways of learning. Learn what programs for citizen science are available in your area. For instance, GLOBE and Budburst tie into the research of Smithsonian scientists who determined that the cherry blossoms and 40 other species of plants were blooming earlier due to climate warming. Hands-on Outdoor Activities Information enters the human brain through many different neural pathways and the more avenues that information comes in on, the more likely people are to retain that knowledge for their lifetimes. For instance, kids knowledge of how ice cores tell us about the earth's ancient history will be reinforced through making ice cores in the classroom. Gary Braasch's photographs from the children's book How We Know What We Know About Our Changing Climate: Scientists and Kids Explore Global Warming and from his adult book Earth Under Fire: How Global Warming is Changing the World will illustrate the presentation. . Making the Message Personal to the Audience. Reaching people through things they care about, their family lives, work or school and telling personal stories helps reach people. The videos

  2. Student tutors for hands-on training in focused emergency echocardiography – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focused emergency echocardiography performed by non-cardiologists has been shown to be feasible and effective in emergency situations. During resuscitation a short focused emergency echocardiography has been shown to narrow down potential differential diagnoses and to improve patient survival. Quite a large proportion of physicians are eligible to learn focused emergency echocardiography. Training in focused emergency echocardiography usually comprises a lecture, hands-on trainings in very small groups, and a practice phase. There is a shortage of experienced echocardiographers who can supervise the second step, the hands-on training. We thus investigated whether student tutors can perform the hands-on training for focused emergency echocardiography. Methods A total of 30 volunteer 4th and 5th year students were randomly assigned to a twelve-hour basic echocardiography course comprising a lecture followed by a hands-on training in small groups taught either by an expert cardiographer (EC or by a student tutor (ST. Using a pre-post-design, the students were evaluated by an OSCE. The students had to generate two still frames with the apical five-chamber view and the parasternal long axis in five minutes and to correctly mark twelve anatomical cardiac structures. Two blinded expert cardiographers rated the students’ performance using a standardized checklist. Students could achieve a maximum of 25 points. Results Both groups showed significant improvement after the training (p Conclusions Hands-on training by student tutors led to a significant gain in echocardiography skills, although inferior to teaching by an expert cardiographer.

  3. Getting started with Spring Framework a hands-on guide to begin developing applications using Spring Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, J

    2016-01-01

    Getting started with Spring Framework is a hands-on guide to begin developing applications using Spring Framework. The examples (consisting of 74 sample projects) that accompany this book are based on Spring 4.3 and Java 8. You can download the examples described in this book from the following GitHub project:github.com/getting-started-with-spring/3rdEdition This book is meant for Java developers with little or no knowledge of Spring Framework. Getting started with Spring Framework, Third Edition has been updated to reflect changes in Spring 4.3 and also includes new chapters on Java-based configuration and Spring Data (covers Spring Data JPA and Spring Data MongoDB projects). The existing chapters have been revised to include information on Java-based configuration. The book also includes some new information on bean definition profiles, importing application context XML files, lazy autowiring, creating custom qualifier annotations, JSR 349 annotations, spring-messaging module, Java 8's Optional type, and s...

  4. My Experience as a Student Participant in the Institute for Geophysics/Huston-Tillotson University Geodiversity Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, N.; Ellins, K.; Holt, J.; Olson, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    As a senior pre-service teacher at Huston-Tillotson University, a minority-serving institution in Texas, I found myself in need of a science course and reluctantly enrolled in "Special Topics in the Geosciences," a survey course taught by visiting scientists from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). I had no idea what the geosciences were about. On the first day of class we took a test and I began to feel a sense of foreboding, but after speaking with the instructors, I left filled with excitement. With my limited background in science, I knew that the class was going to be challenging and require a lot of studying. I took every opportunity offered in the class to learn more about the geosciences. If there was a field trip, I went. If there was an opportunity for me to speak to children about what I learned, I did. For example, I participated in the Explore UT open house event where, rather than being an observer as I had expected, I found myself explaining earthquake seismology to students, parents and visitors. The experience was pivotal. As I explained to a small group of 3rd graders how they could use computer applications to observe and understand seismic waves, I realized I wanted to be a science teacher and not an elementary level-teacher as I had planned. Since completing "Special Topics in the Geosciences," I've been an undergraduate research assistant at UTIG. Over the summer, I adapted approximately ten existing UTIG Earth Science learning activities into the 5-E instructional model for the fall 2006 professional development Earth Science Revolution Workshops for in- service teachers, and I developed a new lesson on tides for these workshops. I also participated in presenting both a workshop for minority-serving elementary teachers and a class for alternative certification teachers at HTU. In early September, I joined a group of scientists, engineers, and space-suited "astronauts" in the Arizona desert near Meteor Crater

  5. Seafloor Science and Remotely Operated Vehicle (SSROV) Day Camp: A Week-Long, Hands-On STEM Summer Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. G.; Fournier, T.; Monahan, K.; Paul, C.

    2015-12-01

    RETINA (Robotic Exploration Technologies IN Astrobiology) has developed a program geared towards stimulating our youth with innovative and relevant hands-on learning modules under a STEM umbrella. Given the breadth of potential science and engineering topics that excite children, the RETINA Program focuses on interactive participation in the design and development of simple robotic and sensor systems, providing a range of challenges to engage students through project-based learning (PBL). Thus, young students experience scientific discovery through the use and understanding of technology. This groundwork serves as the foundation for SSROV Camp, a week-long, summer day camp for 6th-8th grade students. The camp is centered on the sensors and platforms that guide seafloor exploration and discovery and builds upon the notion that transformative discoveries in the deep sea result from either sampling new environments or making new measurements with sensors adapted to this extreme environment. These technical and scientific needs are folded into the curriculum. Each of the first four days of the camp includes four team-based, hands-on technical challenges, communication among peer groups, and competition. The fifth day includes additional activities, culminating in camper-led presentations to describe a planned mission based on a given geologic setting. Presentations include hypotheses, operational requirements and expected data products. SSROV Camp was initiated last summer for three sessions, two in Monterey, CA and one in Oxford, MS. Campers from both regions grasped key elements of the program, based on written responses to questions before and after the camp. On average, 32% of the pre-test questions were answered correctly compared with 80% of the post-test questions. Additional confirmation of gains in campers' knowledge, skills, and critical thinking on environmental issues and engineering problems were apparent during the "jeopardy" competition, nightly homework

  6. A hands-on course in sensors using the Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    CERN Document Server

    Ziemann, Volker

    2018-01-01

    A Hands-On Course in Sensors using the Arduino and Raspberry Pi is the first book to give a practical and wide-ranging account of how to interface sensors and actuators with micro-controllers, Raspberry Pi and other control systems. The author describes the progression of raw signals through conditioning stages, digitization, data storage and presentation. The collection, processing, and understanding of sensor data plays a central role in industrial and scientific activities. This book builds simplified models of large industrial or scientific installations that contain hardware and other building blocks, including services for databases, web servers, control systems, and messaging brokers. A range of case studies are included within the book, including a weather station, geophones, a water-colour monitor, capacitance measurement, the profile of laser beam, and a remote-controlled and fire-seeking robot This book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students taking hands-on laboratory course...

  7. Teaching genetics using hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Stephanie Ann

    Teaching genetics can be challenging because of the difficulty of the content and misconceptions students might hold. This thesis focused on using hands-on model activities, problem solving, and inquiry-based teaching/learning methods in order to increase student understanding in an introductory biology class in the area of genetics. Various activities using these three methods were implemented into the classes to address any misconceptions and increase student learning of the difficult concepts. The activities that were implemented were shown to be successful based on pre-post assessment score comparison. The students were assessed on the subjects of inheritance patterns, meiosis, and protein synthesis and demonstrated growth in all of the areas. It was found that hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based activities were more successful in learning concepts in genetics and the students were more engaged than tradition styles of lecture.

  8. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-01-01

    , pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way...... to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs....

  9. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammet, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  10. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  11. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammet, S. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  12. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  13. Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The

  14. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  15. Establishing CAD/CAM in Preclinical Dental Education: Evaluation of a Hands-On Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Deisenhofer, Ulrich Karl; Porsche, Monika; Rammelsberg, Peter; Kappel, Stefanie; Stober, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a hands-on computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) module in a preclinical dental course in restorative dentistry. A controlled trial was conducted by dividing a class of 56 third-year dental students in Germany into study and control groups; allocation to the two groups depended on student schedules. Prior information about CAD/CAM-based restorations was provided for all students by means of lectures, preparation exercises, and production of gypsum casts of prepared resin teeth. The study group (32 students) then participated in a hands-on CAD/CAM module in small groups, digitizing their casts and designing zirconia frameworks for single crowns. The digitization process was introduced to the control group (24 students) solely by means of a video-supported lecture. To assess the knowledge gained, a 20-question written examination was administered; 48 students took the exam. The results were analyzed with Student's t-tests at a significance level of 0.05. The results on the examination showed a significant difference between the two groups: the mean scores were 16.8 (SD 1.7, range 13-19) for the study group and 12.5 (SD 3, range 4-18) for the control group. After the control group had also experienced the hands-on module, a total of 48 students from both groups completed a questionnaire with 13 rating-scale and three open-ended questions evaluating the module. Those results showed that the module was highly regarded by the students. This study supports the idea that small-group hands-on courses are helpful for instruction in digital restoration design. These students' knowledge gained and satisfaction seemed to justify the time, effort, and equipment needed.

  16. Oracle SOA BPEL PM 11g R1 a hands-on tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Saraswathi, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    This hands-on, example-driven guide is a practical getting started tutorial with plenty of step-by-step instructions for beginner to intermediate level readers working with BPEL PM in Oracle SOA SuiteWritten for SOA developers, administrators, architects, and engineers who want to get started with Oracle BPEL PM 11g. No previous experience with BPEL PM is required, but an understanding of SOA and web services is assumed

  17. INEDITHOS: a Hospital Pedagogy project devoted to improving the quality of life of children and young people with rare diseases from the intervention, and research with university volunteering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca NEGRE BENNASAR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experience in Hospital Pedagogy organized by the University of the Balearic Islands. This project is called INEDITHOS and its main objective is to work into improve the quality of life of children and youth with Rare Diseases. The project works in three lines of intervention: psycho-pedagogical support to patients and their families, research to respond to the needs that are detected in this area and the training of university students who collaborates in the project, using the Service Learning methodology. The long trajectory of the project that began in 2003 has made it possible to consolidate the three interventions resulting in a non-profit association with the same name. This result is complemented by the growing involvement of other Associations such as ABAIMAR and FEDER with which close collaboration is maintained. It is also worth noting the increase in the number of volunteers, which allows to offer attention to a higher number of affected while improving the quality of the interventions made thanks to the collaboration and involvement of students and teachers who, through the methodology of Learning and Service, carry out activities and elaborate end-of-degree and master’s work based on the needs identified in the volunteer interventions. INEDITHOS has introduced Rare Diseases in the university context sensitizing a large part of the Educational Community.

  18. Applying the Kanban method in problem-based project work: a case study in a manufacturing engineering bachelor's programme at Aalborg University Copenhagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balve, Patrick; Krüger, Volker; Tolstrup Sørensen, Lene

    2017-11-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has proven to be highly effective for educating students in an active and self-motivated manner in various disciplines. Student projects carried out following PBL principles are very dynamic and carry a high level of uncertainty, both conditions under which agile project management approaches are assumed to be highly supportive. The paper describes an empirical case study carried out at Aalborg University Copenhagen involving students from two different semesters of a Bachelor of Science programme. While executing the study, compelling examples of how PBL and the agile project management method Kanban blend could be identified. A final survey reveals that applying Kanban produces noticeable improvements with respect to creating, assigning and coordinating project tasks. Other improvements were found in group communication, knowledge about the work progress with regards to both the individual and the collective and the students' way of continuously improving their own teamwork.

  19. The GalileoMobile Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pilar Becerra, A.&ída; Bhatt, Megha; Kobel, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    GalileoMobile is a traveling science education project by an international team of PhD students and recent graduates (partnering with the Universe Awareness program) that brings astronomy to young people in remote regions of developing countries. Our primary project goals are: (1) to stimulate students' curiosity and interest in learning, (2) to exchange different visions of the cosmos and cultures, and (3) to inspire a feeling of unity "under the same sky" between people from different parts of the world. In 2009, GalileoMobile traveled to 30 schools in Chile, Bolivia and Peru, bringing hands-on activities and Galileoscopes; the team also produced a documentary movie to share the experiences and culture with the world. In 2012, GalileoMobile plans an expedition to India from the 2nd to the 13th of July in villages between Bangalore and Mysore. We will again bring hands-on astronomy activities and telescopes to the schools, and share our experiences with the world via internet resources. GalileoMobile is also collaborating with the Galileo Teacher Training Program to provide workshops for local teachers, to encourage continuation of astronomy education beyond our visit. In this way, we expect to spark sustainable interest in astronomy in remote areas that have little access to science outreach, and to share the culture of these areas with the world -- "under the same sky."

  20. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. L. Smith

    2006-01-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. However, INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users, who constitute a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system's response to initiating events and quantify associated consequential outcome frequencies. Specifically, for nuclear power plant applications, SAPHIRE can identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA) and containment failure during a severe accident which lead to releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA where the reactor is at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming an internal events model to a model for external events, such as flooding and fire analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to the public and environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE also includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM is a special user interface linked to SAPHIRE that automates the SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events (for example, to calculate a conditional core damage probability) very efficiently and expeditiously. This report provides an overview of the functions

  1. The European Urology Residents Education Programme Hands-on Training Format: 4 Years of Hands-on Training Improvements from the European School of Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Bhaskar K; Van Cleynenbreugel, Ben; Gozen, Ali; Palou, Jaun; Barmoshe, Sas; Biyani, Shekhar; Gaya, Josep M; Hellawell, Giles; Pini, Gio; Oscar, Faba R; Sanchez Salas, Rafael; Macek, Petr; Skolarikos, Andreas; Wagner, Christian; Eret, Viktor; Haensel, Stephen; Siena, Giampaolo; Schmidt, Marek; Klitsch, Max; Vesely, Stepan; Ploumidis, Achilles; Proietti, Silvia; Kamphuis, Guido; Tokas, Theodore; Geraghty, Rob; Veneziano, Dominico

    2018-03-14

    The European School of Urology (ESU) started the European Urology Residents Education Programme (EUREP) in 2003 for final year urology residents, with hands-on training (HOT) added later in 2007. To assess the geographical reach of EUREP, trainee demographics, and individual quality feedback in relation to annual methodology improvements in HOT. From September 2014 to October 2017 (four EUREP courses) several new features have been applied to the HOT format of the EUREP course: 1:1 training sessions (2015), fixed 60-min time slots (2016), and standardised teaching methodology (2017). The resulting EUREP HOT format was verified by collecting and prospectively analysing the following data: total number of participants attending different HOT courses; participants' age; country of origin; and feedback obtained annually. A total of 796 participants from 54 countries participated in 1450 HOT sessions over the last 4 yr. This included 294 (20%) ureteroscopy (URS) sessions, 237 (16.5%) transurethral resection (TUR) sessions, 840 (58%) basic laparoscopic sessions, and 79 (5.5%) intermediate laparoscopic sessions. While 712 residents (89%) were from Europe, 84 (11%) were from non-European nations. Of the European residents, most came from Italy (16%), Germany (15%), Spain (15%), and Romania (8%). Feedback for the basic laparoscopic session showed a constant improvement in scores over the last 4 yr, with the highest scores achieved last year. This included feedback on improvements in tutor rating (p=0.017), organisation (ptraining curriculum with wet laboratory or cadaveric courses in this format, although these could be performed in other training centres in conjunction with EUREP. The EUREP trainee demographics show that the purpose of the course is being achieved, with excellent feedback reported. While European trainees dominate the demographics, participation from a number of non-European countries suggests continued ESU collaboration with other national societies and

  2. Short and Long-Term Disability and Workers' Compensation Health Care Programs: Management Project at Georgetown University Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whippen, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    .... Recent acquisition discussions between Georgetown University medical Center and MedStar provide an opportunity to reengineer the Workers' Compensation and Short and Long-Term Disability Programs...

  3. Quantity Surveying Undergraduates’ Awareness on Cost Significant of High-Rise Condominium Projects in Malaysia: The Case of a Private University in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lee Wah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in quantity surveying (QS emphasised the importance of identifying cost significant elements (CSE. The knowledge on CSE of high-rise condominium projects (HRCP is essential as high-rise residential multi-unit projects are the next option in building construction due to limited land areas in urban areas. This study aims to determine the levels of awareness among QS undergraduates of a private university in Malaysia on CSE of HRCP in Malaysia. The respondents’ knowledge on CSE has not achieved a satisfactory level. Both male and female respondents have the same levels of awareness on CSE. Remedial strategies to improve this situation are recommended.

  4. Mechatronic control engineering and electro-mechanical system design - two mechatronic curricula at Aalborg University based on problem oriented and project based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2009-01-01

    , it is addressed how a mechatronic education is structured so courses and projects are aligned, to utilize the full benefits of the Problem Oriented Project Based Learning (POPBL) system practiced at AalborgUniversity (AAU). This is followed by a presentation of the two complementary educations in Mechatronicsat...... using a subsystem based approach. The challenges related to teaching and learning mechatronics are addressed, discussing how mechatronics is typically taught around the world also illustrating the trends and applications of mechatronic engineering and research. This is followed by an outline...... Based Learning environment....

  5. East Tennessee State University's "Make a Difference" Project: Using a Team-Based Consultative Model To Conduct Functional Behavioral Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Kelley; Hales, Cindy; Bush, Marta; Fox, James

    1998-01-01

    Describes implementation of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) through collaboration between a university (East Tennessee State University) and the local school system. Discusses related issues such as factors in team training, team size, FBA adaptations, and replicability of the FBA team model. (Author/DB)

  6. Development of a Pilot Data Management Infrastructure for Biomedical Researchers at University of Manchester – Approach, Findings, Challenges and Outlook of the MaDAM Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meik Poschen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Management and curation of digital data has been becoming ever more important in a higher education and research environment characterised by large and complex data, demand for more interdisciplinary and collaborative work, extended funder requirements and use of e-infrastructures to facilitate new research methods and paradigms. This paper presents the approach, technical infrastructure, findings, challenges and outlook (including future development within the successor project, MiSS of the ‘MaDAM: Pilot data management infrastructure for biomedical researchers at University of Manchester’ project funded under the infrastructure strand of the JISC Managing Research Data (JISCMRD programme. MaDAM developed a pilot research data management solution at the University of Manchester based on biomedical researchers’ requirements, which includes technical and governance components with the flexibility to meet future needs across multiple research groups and disciplines.

  7. Conceptualizing the role of multidisciplinarity and student perceptions of university-industry collaboration in project-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Project-based learning has a long history, especially in the disciplines of computer science and engineering. This approach is used to offer students a realistic view of their discipline, and this experience can be enhanced with industrial involvement as companies bring their real world problems to projects. One recent trend in project-based learning is utilizing multidisciplinary teams, enabling students to contrast their skills and experience with students from other discipli...

  8. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  9. Learning ion-solid interactions hands-on: An activity based, inquiry oriented, graduate course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Experimental work, using state of the art instrumentation, is integrated with lectures in a 'real life', learning by discovery approach, in the Ion-Solid Interactions graduate/undergraduate course offered by the Department of Physics of University of Central Florida. The lecture component of the course covers the underlying physical principles, and related scientific and technological applications, associated with the interaction of energetic ions with matter. In the experimental section the students form small groups and perform a variety of projects, experimental and computational, as part of a participative, inquiry oriented, learning process. In the most recent offering of the class, the students deposited a compound semiconductor thin film by dual-gun sputtering deposition, where each group aimed at a different stoichiometry of the same compound (Zn 1-x S x O y ). Then they analyzed the composition using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, measured electrical transport properties using Hall effect and conductivity measurements, and determined the band gap using spectrophotometry. Finally the groups shared their results and each wrote a 'journal-like' technical article describing the entire work. In a different assignment, each group also developed a Monte Carlo computer program ('TRIM-like') to simulate the penetration of ions into a solid, in ion implantation, calculating the stopping cross-sections with approximate models, taught in class, which can be analytically solved. The combination of classroom/laboratory activities is very well received by the students. They gain real life experience operating state of the art equipment, and working in teams, while performing research-like projects, and simultaneously they learn the theoretical foundations of the discipline

  10. Introducing Hands-on, Experiential Learning Experiences in an Urban Environmental Science Program at a Minority Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzgoren-Aydin, N. S.; Freile, D.

    2013-12-01

    STEM education at New Jersey City University increasingly focuses on experiential, student-centered learning. The Department of Geoscience/Geography plays a significant role in developing and implementing a new Urban Environmental Science Program. The program aims at graduating highly skilled, demographically diverse students (14 % African-American and 18% Hispanic) to be employed in high-growth Earth and Environmental Science career paths, both at a technical (e.g. B.S.) as well as an educational (K-12 grade) (e.g. B.A) level. The core program, including the Earth and Environmental Science curricula is guided by partners (e.g. USDA-NRCS). The program is highly interdisciplinary and 'hands-on', focusing upon the high-tech practical skills and knowledge demanded of science professionals in the 21st century. The focus of the curriculum is on improving environmental quality in northern NJ, centering upon our urban community in Jersey City and Hudson County. Our Department is moving towards a more earth system science approach to learning. Most of our courses (e.g., Earth Surface Processes, Sedimentology/Stratigraphy, Earth Materials, Essential Methods, Historical Geology) have hands-on laboratory and/or field components. Although some of our other courses do not have formal laboratory components, research modules of many such courses (Geochemistry, Urban Environmental Issues and Policy and Environmental Geology) involve strong field or laboratory studies. The department has a wide range of analytical and laboratory capacities including a portable XRF, bench-top XRD and ICP-MS. In spring 2013, Dr. Duzgoren-Aydin was awarded $277K in Higher Education Equipment Leasing Fund monies from the University in order to establish an Environmental Teaching and Research Laboratory. The addition of these funds will make it possible for the department to increase its instrumentation capacity by adding a mercury analyzer, Ion Chromatography and C-N-S analyzer, as well as updating

  11. Tuition fees and funding – barriers for non-traditional students? First results from the international research project Opening Universities for Lifelong Learning (OPULL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moissidis, Sonja; Schwarz, Jochen; Yndigegn, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Project OPULL – Opening Universities for Lifelong Learning – is undertaking research into ways of opening up higher education to vocationally qualified and experienced target groups in four European countries. Open university models in Germany, Denmark, Finland and the United Kingdom are being...... investigated in three research phases between 2009 and 2012 with the aim of identifying critical success factors for building open universities for Europe. This paper presents the first phase, in which educational systems in the participant countries have been mapped and interviews with lifelong learning...... experts undertaken. The current situation and perspectives in each country together with critical issues on how fees and funding influence higher education access for non-traditional students in these countries are discussed and explored through the interview evidence. The initial findings of the first...

  12. Comparison of the students’ satisfaction about the performance of academic advisors before and after the advisor project in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASOUMEH DELARAM

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inappropriate advice interferes with the students’ achievement of educational and professional goals and they may fail to use proper resources for their educational needs. The present study was carried out to compare the students’ satisfaction about the performance of academic advisors before and after the advisor project in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This longitudinal study was carried out using census report on 244 students in different courses at Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences in two stages at the first semester of 2010-2011 and first semester of 2011-2012. To collect the data, we used a self-designed questionnaire including individual and educational information and 10 multiple-choice questions with Likert scale to assess the students’ satisfaction about the advisors’ performance. Data were analyzed in SPSS 14 using paired t-test, qui-square test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the ten items of satisfaction, there was only a significant difference in “accessibility to an advisor before and after the advisor project in students of nursing and midwifery school” (p=0.010, and the difference was not significant in other items in these students. No significant difference was found in ten items of satisfaction in students at other schools before and after the advisor project (p=0.010. Conclusion: It seems that the implementation of advisor project could not provide a satisfactory position for students. Adequate supervision of university officials on proper implementation of the advisor project, supporting faculty advisors and strengthening their position can help to improve the process.

  13. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  14. Embedding Hands-On Mini Laboratory Experiences in a Core Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Course: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duanduan; Ugaz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Three self-contained mini-labs were integrated into a core undergraduate fluid mechanics course, with the goal of delivering hands-on content in a manner scalable to large class sizes. These mini-labs supported learning objectives involving friction loss in pipes, flow measurement, and centrifugal pump analysis. The hands-on experiments were…

  15. The effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Felita

    Student achievement in the Twenty First Century demands a new rigor in student science knowledge, since advances in science and technology require students to think and act like scientists. As a result, students must acquire proficient levels of knowledge and skills to support a knowledge base that is expanding exponentially with new scientific advances. This study examined the effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students. More specifically, this study was concerned with the influence of hands-on science instruction versus traditional science instruction on the science test scores of middle school students. The subjects in this study were one hundred and twenty sixth-grade students in six classes. Instruction involved lecture/discussion and hands-on activities carried out for a three week period. Specifically, the study ascertained the influence of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the science test scores of middle school students. Additionally, this study assessed the effect of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the attitudes of sixth grade students toward science. The two instruments used to collect data for this study were the Prentice Hall unit ecosystem test and the Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers Study (SWEPT) student's attitude survey. Moreover, the data for the study was treated using the One-Way Analysis of Covariance and the One-Way Analysis of Variance. The following findings were made based on the results: (1) A statistically significant difference existed in the science performance of middle school students exposed to hands-on science instruction. These students had significantly higher scores than the science performance of middle school students exposed to traditional instruction. (2) A statistically significant difference did not exist between the science scores of male and female middle school students. (3) A statistically

  16. Project based education as motivation factor in undergraduate program in Electronics at Copenhagen University College of Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesel, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the contents of our experience with project based courses and team work in the undergraduate program in Electronics. The main points of our program are described in this paper, where the leading idea is to combine theory with practical engineering projects. Our students work...

  17. Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

    2008-12-01

    Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such

  18. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  19. HSCI2014: booklet of the 11th International Conference on Hands-on Science

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Manuel F. M., ed. lit.; Pombo, José Miguel Marques, ed. lit.; Vázquez Dorrío, José Benito, ed. lit.; International Conference on Hands-on Science, 11, Aveiro, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The core topic of the 11th Hands-on Science Conference is "Science Education with and for Society" As we all know it is the Society that sets the requirements rules and procedures of Education. It is Society that defines what citizens must learn in what concern either concepts and or competencies, and how this learning can, must in fact…, take place. Society is the ensemble of all of us citizens and of all the structures tangible and intangible we create and created along the y...

  20. Count like an egyptian a hands-on introduction to ancient mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, David

    2014-01-01

    The mathematics of ancient Egypt was fundamentally different from our math today. Contrary to what people might think, it wasn't a primitive forerunner of modern mathematics. In fact, it can't be understood using our current computational methods. Count Like an Egyptian provides a fun, hands-on introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. David Reimer guides you step-by-step through addition, subtraction, multiplication, and more. He even shows you how fractions and decimals may have been calculated-they technically didn't exist in the land of the pharaohs.

  1. Getting started with Oracle SOA B2B Integration a hands-on tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Krishnaprem; Perlovsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This hands on tutorial gives you the best possible start you could hope for with Oracle B2B. Learn using real life scenarios and examples to give you a solid footing of B2B.This book is for B2B architects, consultants and developers who would like to design and develop B2B integrations using Oracle B2B. This book assumes no prior knowledge of Oracle B2B and explains all concepts from scratch using illustrations, real world examples and step-by-step instructions. The book covers enough depth and details to be useful for both beginner and advanced B2B users.

  2. Introduction to engineering a starter's guide with hands-on analog multimedia explorations

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, Lina

    2008-01-01

    This lecture provides a hands-on glimpse of the field of electrical engineering. The introduced applications utilize the NI ELVIS hardware and software platform to explore concepts such as circuits, power, analog sensing, and introductory analog signal processing such as signal generation, analog filtering, and audio and music processing. These principals and technologies are introduced in a very practical way and are fundamental to many of the electronic devices we use today. Some examples include photodetection, analog signal (audio, light, temperature) level meter, and analog music equalize

  3. The Liability of Colleges and Universities for Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Federally Funded Grants and Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews legal and practical aspects of a university's potential liability for fraud, waste, and abuse. Discusses the array of criminal, civil, and administrative sanctions that may be imposed on grantees who engage in fraudulent practices. (84 references) (MLF)

  4. UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAM IN ROBOTICS, Final Technical Annual Report, Project Period: 9/1/04 - 8/31/05

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James S. Tulenko; Carl D. Crane III

    2006-02-15

    The University Research Program in Robotics (URPR) Implementation Plan is an integrated group of universities performing fundamental research that addresses broad-based robotics and automation needs of the NNSA Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and Campaigns. The URPR mission is to provide improved capabilities of robotics science and engineering to meet the future needs of all weapon systems and other associated NNSA/DOE activities.

  5. Description of the supporting factors of final project in Mathematics and Natural Sciences Faculty of Syiah Kuala University with multiple correspondence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyana, Asep; Nurhasanah; Maulizasari

    2018-05-01

    Syiah Kuala University (Unsyiah) is hoped to have graduates who are qualified for working or creating a field of work. A final project course implementation process must be effective. This research uses data from the evaluation conducted by Mathematics and Natural Sciences Faculty (FMIPA) of Unsyiah. Some of the factors that support the completion of the final project are duration, guidance, the final project seminars, facility, public impact, and quality. This research aims to know the factors that have a relationship with the completion of the final project and identify similarities among variables. The factors that support the completion of the final project at every study program in FMIPA are (1) duration, (2) guidance and (3) facilities. These factors are examined for the correlations by chi-square test. After that, the variables are analyzed with multiple correspondence analysis. Based on the plot of correspondence, the activities of the guidance and facilities in Informatics Study Program are included in the fair category, while the guidance and facilities in the Chemistry are included in the best category. Besides that, students in Physics can finish the final project with the fastest completion duration, while students in Pharmacy finish for the longest time.

  6. Building blocks of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malamud, E.; O'Connor, C.; Cooper, A.

    1990-01-01

    COSI [Ohio's Center for Science and Industry], a well established science center, and SciTech, an emerging one, have formed a collaboration to develop a group of original interactive exhibits conveying to a wide audience the nature of the most fundamental features of the Universe, as revealed in the fascinating world of nuclear and particle science. These new exhibits will add to, and be supported by, the basic science exhibits which have already attracted large numbers of visitors to both centers. The new project, called Building Blocks of the Universe, aims to foster an appreciation of the way all features of the Universe arise from simple, basic rules and to lead the visitor from the perceived complexities of our surroundings, to the unperceived, but simpler features of the sub-nuclear world. It has already become apparent from individual prototypes that these simple but immensely far-reaching ideas can indeed be conveyed by hands-on exhibits. These exhibits will be linked and enhanced by an effective museum environment, using pictorial diagrams, accurate non-technical text, and artistic displays to create an atmosphere in which visitors can learn about phenomena beyond the range of direct perception. This paper describes the goals, content and organization of the exhibition. The authors also outline their experience with prototype exhibits, and thereby invite additional input into the development process

  7. Introducing Basic Molecular Biology to Turkish Rural and Urban Primary School Children via Hands-on PCR and Gel Electrophoresis Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selli, Cigdem; Yildirim, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

    2014-01-01

    This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation,…

  8. Kids Making Sense of Air Quality Around Them Through a Hands-On, STEM-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, T.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in many parts of the world is harming millions of people, shortening lives, and taking a toll on our ecosystem. Cities in India, China, and even the United States frequently exceed air quality standards. The use of localized data is a powerful enhancement to regulatory monitoring site data. Learning about air quality at a local level is a powerful driver for change. The Kids Making Sense program unites Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education with a complete measurement and environmental education system that teaches youth about air pollution and empowers them to drive positive change in their communities. With this program, youth learn about particle pollution, its sources, and health effects. A half-day lecture is followed by hands-on activity using handheld air sensors paired with an app on smartphones. Students make measurements around schools to discover pollution sources and cleaner areas. Next, the data they collect are crowdsourced on a website for guided discussion and data interpretation. This program meets Next Generation Science Standards, encourages project-based learning and deep understanding of applied science, and allows students to practice science like real scientists. The program has been successfully implemented in several schools in the United States and Asia, including New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Sacramento in the United States, and Taipei and Taichung in Taiwan. During this talk, we'll provide an overview of the program, discuss some of the challenges, and lay out the next steps for Kids Making Sense.

  9. Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

    2014-07-01

    Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K-5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

  10. ADAM, a hands-on patient simulator for teaching principles of drug disposition and compartmental pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuna, Ines; Holt, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    To design, construct and validate a pharmacokinetics simulator that offers students hands-on opportunities to participate in the design, administration and analysis of oral and intravenous dosing regimens. The Alberta Drug Administration Modeller (ADAM) is a mechanical patient in which peristaltic circulation of water through a network of silicone tubing and glass bottles creates a representation of the outcomes of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Changing peristaltic pump rates and volumes in bottles allows values for pharmacokinetic constants to be varied, thereby simulating differences in drug properties and in patient physiologies and pathologies. Following administration of methylene blue dye by oral or intravenous routes, plasma and/or urine samples are collected and drug concentrations are determined spectrophotometrically. The effectiveness of the simulator in enhancing student competence and confidence was assessed in two undergraduate laboratory classes. The simulator effectively models one- and two-compartment drug behaviour in a mathematically-robust and realistic manner. Data allow calculation of numerous pharmacokinetic constants, by traditional graphing methods or with curve-fitting software. Students' competence in solving pharmacokinetic problems involving calculations and graphing improved significantly, while an increase in confidence and understanding was reported. The ADAM is relatively inexpensive and straightforward to construct, and offers a realistic, hands-on pharmacokinetics learning opportunity for students that effectively complements didactic lectures. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  11. KEEFEKTIFAN MODEL PBL DENGAN MIND MAP MELALUI HANDS ON ACTIVITY TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KREATIF SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istika Ramadhani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keefektifan pembelajaran model PBL dengan mind map melalui hands on activity terhadap kemampuan berpikir kreatif siswa. Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah siswa kelas VII SMP Negeri 7 Semarang Tahun Ajaran 2014/2015. Pemilihan sampel dengan menggunakan cluster random sampling, diperoleh siswa kelas VII G sebagai kelas eksperimen1, kelas VII E sebagai kelas eksperimen 2, dan kelas VII C sebagai kelas kontrol. Kelas eksperimen 1 diberikan pembelajaran model PBL dengan mind map melalui hands on activity, kelas eksperimen 2 diberikan pembelajaran model PBL dengan mind map, dan kelas kontrol diberikan pembelajaran model ekspositori. Instrumen penelitian yang digunakan adalah tes kemampuan berpikir kreatif dan lembar pengamatan aktivitas siswa. Data dianalisis dengan uji proporsi, uji beda rata dengan anava, uji lanjut LSD, dan uji regresi. Hasil penelitian adalah (1 kemampuan berpikir kreatif siswa pada kelas eksperimen 1 dapat mencapai kriteria ketuntasan belajar; (2 kemampuan berpikir kreatif siswa pada kelas eksperimen 2 dapat mencapai kriteria ketuntasan belajar; (3 terdapat perbedaan kemampuan berpikir kreatif antara siswa pada kelas eksperimen 1, eksperimen 2, dan kelas kontrol. (4 terdapat pengaruh positif dari aktivitas belajar siswa pada kelas eksperimen 1 terhadap kemampuan berpikir kreatif siswa

  12. Back to the future with hands-on science: students' perceptions of learning anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Amy Nicole Burne; McAllister, Margaret

    2008-09-01

    This article examines student perceptions of learning related to anatomy and physiology in a bachelor of nursing program. One strategy to teach the sciences is simulated learning, a technology that offers exciting potential. Virtual environments for laboratory learning may offer numerous benefits: teachers can convey information to a larger group of students, reducing the need for small laboratory classes; less equipment is required, thus containing ongoing costs; and students can learn in their own time and place. However, simulated learning may also diminish access to the teacher-student relationship and the opportunity for guided practice and guided linking of theory with practice. Without this hands-on experience, there is a risk that students will not engage as effectively, and thus conceptual learning and the development of critical thinking skills are diminished. However, student perceptions of these learning experiences are largely unknown. Thus, this study examined students' perceptions of anatomy and physiology laboratory experiences and the importance they placed on hands-on experience in laboratory settings.

  13. Students' Hands-on Experimental Work vs Lecture Demonstration in Teaching Elementary School Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Ana; Ferk-Savec, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    Science educators have suggested many benefits that accrue from engaging students in experimental activities, therefore, experimental work has a long and distinctive role in chemistry curriculum since. The presented empirical study focuses on the valuation of effectiveness of different forms of experimental work - students' hands-on experimental work vs teacher's lecture demonstration - from the viewpoint of the quality of content knowledge acquisition and knowledge retention in teaching primary school chemistry. 106 primary school students (age 14-15 years) participated in the study. The data was collected via pre- and post- test protocol and two delayed post tests. Additionally 16 students selected from the sample were interviewed. The results indicate that students' content knowledge gained through teacher's demonstration of experiment is better and better knowledge retention takes place in comparison to students' knowledge gained through students' hands-on experimental work. However, most of the inteviewed students stated that they prefered conducting of experiments by themselves in comparison to observation of teacher's demonstration.

  14. 3D printed simulation models based on real patient situations for hands-on practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, E; Dekiff, M; Dirksen, D

    2017-11-01

    During the last few years, the curriculum of many dentistry schools in Germany has been reorganised. Two key aspects of the applied changes are the integration of up-to-date teaching methods and the promotion of interdisciplinarity. To support these efforts, an approach to fabricating individualised simulation models for hands-on courses employing 3D printing is presented. The models are based on real patients, thus providing students a more realistic preparation for real clinical situations. As a wide variety of dental procedures can be implemented, the simulation models can also contribute to a more interdisciplinary dental education. The data used for the construction of the models were acquired by 3D surface scanning. The data were further processed with 3D modelling software. Afterwards, the models were fabricated by 3D printing with the PolyJet technique. Three models serve as examples: a prosthodontic model for training veneer preparation, a conservative model for practicing dental bonding and an interdisciplinary model featuring carious teeth and an insufficient crown. The third model was evaluated in a hands-on course with 22 fourth-year dental students. The students answered a questionnaire and gave their personal opinion. Whilst the concept of the model received very positive feedback, some aspects of the implementation were criticised. We discuss these observations and suggest ways for further improvement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Clinically Prepared Veterinary Students: Enhancing Veterinary Student Hands-on Experiences and Supporting Hospital Caseload Using Shelter Medicine Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M. Shivley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Referral-level medicine is important in the veterinary curriculum, however veterinary students also need a solid base knowledge of clinically relevant, routine surgical and diagnostic skills to be clinically prepared after graduation. Exposure to a referral-only, or primarily referral caseload, does not always provide veterinary students with the routine hands-on experiences and competencies expected by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Australian Veterinary Boards Council, or prospective employers. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess how a shelter medicine program can fill the companion animal caseload gap and create the necessary hands-on experiences considered essential in the veterinary curriculum. Pedagogical frameworks, course curriculum and design, student experiences, and student assessments were described for three core curricular areas (surgery, medical days, population medicine of the Shelter Medicine Program at Mississippi State University. The shelter surgery experience provided a high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter environment where fourth-year students averaged 65 sterilization surgeries in two weeks and demonstrated a quantifiable decrease in surgical time. The shelter surgery experience added on average 9,000 small animal cases per year to the overall hospital caseload. Shelter medical days, where students provide veterinary care during on-site shelter visits, created opportunities for third-year students to directly interact with shelter animals by performing physical examinations and diagnostic testing, and to gain experience in developing treatment protocols and recommendations for commonly encountered problems. The shelter medical days experience averaged over 700 small animal cases per year and over 1,500 diagnostic procedures. Finally, students participated in 15 onsite shelter consultations where they obtained a working knowledge

  16. Clinically Prepared Veterinary Students: Enhancing Veterinary Student Hands-on Experiences and Supporting Hospital Caseload Using Shelter Medicine Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivley, Jacob M; Brookshire, Wilson C; Bushby, Philip A; Woodruff, Kimberly A

    2018-01-01

    Referral-level medicine is important in the veterinary curriculum, however veterinary students also need a solid base knowledge of clinically relevant, routine surgical and diagnostic skills to be clinically prepared after graduation. Exposure to a referral-only, or primarily referral caseload, does not always provide veterinary students with the routine hands-on experiences and competencies expected by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the Australian Veterinary Boards Council, or prospective employers. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess how a shelter medicine program can fill the companion animal caseload gap and create the necessary hands-on experiences considered essential in the veterinary curriculum. Pedagogical frameworks, course curriculum and design, student experiences, and student assessments were described for three core curricular areas (surgery, medical days, population medicine) of the Shelter Medicine Program at Mississippi State University. The shelter surgery experience provided a high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter environment where fourth-year students averaged 65 sterilization surgeries in two weeks and demonstrated a quantifiable decrease in surgical time. The shelter surgery experience added on average 9,000 small animal cases per year to the overall hospital caseload. Shelter medical days, where students provide veterinary care during on-site shelter visits, created opportunities for third-year students to directly interact with shelter animals by performing physical examinations and diagnostic testing, and to gain experience in developing treatment protocols and recommendations for commonly encountered problems. The shelter medical days experience averaged over 700 small animal cases per year and over 1,500 diagnostic procedures. Finally, students participated in 15 onsite shelter consultations where they obtained a working knowledge of biosecurity at a

  17. Final report for the Department of Energy funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project'' [University electronic research administration demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, John

    1998-07-31

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project (DE-FC02-92ER35180)'' for the period August 1994-July 1998. The goal of the project, referred to as NewERA, was to demonstrate the use of open standards for electronic commerce to support research administration, otherwise referred to as Electronic Research Administration (ERA). The NewERA demonstration project provided a means to test interagency standards developed within the Federal Grant Electronic Commerce Committee, a group comprised of federal granting agencies. The NewERA program was initiated by DOE. NewERA was comprised of three separate, but related, ERA activities in preaward administration, postaward administration, and secure Internet commerce. The goal of New ERA was to demonstrate an open standard implementation of ERA using electronic data interchange, e-mail and Internet transaction security between grant applicants and DOE, along with t h e other participating agencies.

  18. Withholding answers during hands-on scientific investigations? Comparing effects on developing students' scientific knowledge, reasoning, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin

    2018-03-01

    As more concerns have been raised about withholding answers during science teaching, this article argues for a need to detach 'withholding answers' from 'hands-on' investigation tasks. The present study examined students' learning of light-related content through three conditions: 'hands-on' + no 'withholding' (hands-on only: HO), 'hands-on' + 'withholding' (hands-on investigation with answers withheld: HOW), and no 'hands-on' + no 'withholding' (direction instruction: DI). Students were assessed in terms of how well they (1) knew the content taught in class; (2) reasoned with the learned content; and (3) applied the learned content to real-life situations. Nine classes of students at 4th and 5th grades, N = 136 in total, were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. ANCOVA results showed that students in the hands-on only condition reasoned significantly better than those in the other two conditions. Students in this condition also seemed to know the content fairly better although the advance was not significant. Students in all three conditions did not show a statistically significant difference in their ability to apply the learned content to real-life situations. The findings from this study provide important contributions regarding issues relating to withholding answers during guided scientific inquiry.

  19. Hands-on Approach to Prepare Specialists in Climate Changes Modeling and Analysis Using an Information-Computational Web-GIS Portal "Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordova, Y. E.; Martynova, Y. V.

    2014-12-01

    A problem of making education relevant to the workplace tasks is a key problem of higher education in the professional field of environmental sciences. To answer this challenge several new courses for students of "Climatology" and "Meteorology" specialties were developed and implemented at the Tomsk State University, which comprises theoretical knowledge from up-to-date environmental sciences with computational tasks. To organize the educational process we use an open-source course management system Moodle (www.moodle.org). It gave us an opportunity to combine text and multimedia in a theoretical part of educational courses. The hands-on approach is realized through development of innovative trainings which are performed within the information-computational web GIS platform "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/). The platform has a set of tools and data bases allowing a researcher to perform climate changes analysis on the selected territory. The tools are also used for students' trainings, which contain practical tasks on climate modeling and climate changes assessment and analysis. Laboratory exercises are covering three topics: "Analysis of regional climate changes"; "Analysis of climate extreme indices on the regional scale"; and "Analysis of future climate". They designed to consolidate students' knowledge of discipline, to instill in them the skills to work independently with large amounts of geophysical data using modern processing and analysis tools of web-GIS platform "Climate" and to train them to present results obtained on laboratory work as reports with the statement of the problem, the results of calculations and logically justified conclusion. Thus, students are engaged in n the use of modern tools of the geophysical data analysis and it cultivates dynamic of their professional learning. The approach can help us to fill in this gap because it is the only approach that offers experience, increases students involvement, advance the use of modern

  20. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 20. Installation of Demonstration Units at the Indonesian Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnker, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. Each of the five Indonesian partner universities has managed to choose, purchase and install demonstration equipment within the timeline of the Casindo project. This equipment will be presented to students, visitors, lecturers, government personnel and staff of other organizations. Next to this, researchers made research proposals in which use of the demonstration equipment is presented according to the research agenda of the university. The procedure of purchasing and installing equipment has been delayed in several ways, but all universities have managed to finalise the procedure and install the equipment. First research results have been presented and more results will follow in the next months.

  1. Searching for a New Way to Reach Patrons: A Search Engine Optimization Pilot Project at Binghamton University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Erin E.; Kelehan, Martha Daisy; Strong, Marcy A.

    2008-01-01

    Search engine use is one of the most popular online activities. According to a recent OCLC report, nearly all students start their electronic research using a search engine instead of the library Web site. Instead of viewing search engines as competition, however, librarians at Binghamton University Libraries decided to employ search engine…

  2. The influence of out-of-institution environments on the university schooling project of non-traditional students in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumuheki, Peace Buhwamatsiko; Zeelen, Jacobus; Openjuru, George L.

    2018-01-01

    Participation and integration of non-traditional students (NTS) in university education is influenced by factors within the institution and those external to the institution, including participants’ self-perceptions and dispositions. The objective of this qualitative study is to draw from the

  3. Educational-Methodical Projects for Students' Intellectual Competences Formation: The Imperative Goal of the Educational Process of the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuev, Ruslan A.; Kudyasheva, Albina N.; Buldakova, Natalya V.; Aleksandrova, Natalia S.; Vasilenko, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the tendencies of the modern information society which produces and consumes intelligence, knowledge and competences as the main educational product of labor market. These trends fundamentally alter the methodological basis of the educational process of the University, subjecting it to imperative goals: the…

  4. Language in the Workplace Project and Workplace Communication for Skilled Migrants Course at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bres, Julia; Holmes, Janet; Joe, Angela; Marra, Meredith; Newton, Jonathan; Riddiford Nicky; Vine, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    The School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies (LALS) at Victoria University of Wellington conducts research and teaching in Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Writing and Deaf Studies. It incorporates a Deaf Studies Research Unit, which undertakes research on topics relating to deaf people and their language in New Zealand, and the New…

  5. Aboriginal Business Capacity Building Programs in the Central Interior of British Columbia: A Collaborative Project between the University and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Titi; Schorcht, Blanca; Brazzoni, Randall

    2011-01-01

    Aboriginal communities in Canada are typically marginalized, have very low employment participation rates, and have limited economic infrastructure. The downturn in global economies further marginalized these communities. The University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC) Continuing Studies department piloted an Aboriginal and Small Business…

  6. The role of project-based learning in the "Political and social sciences of the environment" curriculum at Nijmegen University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leroy, P.; Bosch, van den H.; Ligthart, S.S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Since the end of 1996, teachers at the Faculty of Policy Sciences at Nijmegen University, The Netherlands, have been working on a new educational programme called "Political and Social Sciences of the Environment" (PSSE). In fact, the PSSE curriculum builds on the Environmental Policy Sciences

  7. Using Climate Change for Teaching Experimental Sciences in Teacher Education through Research Projects on Recycling at the University of Lleida (Western Catalonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastia, M. T.; Verdú, N.

    2016-12-01

    Although climate change is one of the most pressing challenges faced by humankind, climate change illiteracy is frequent among primary school teacher college students reaching the second school year at the University of Lleida (UdL). Climate change was chosen to structure the course on Experimental Sciences of the bilingual group because this topic involves all sciences, and because of the importance of the subject for future educators. In the bilingual group of the Education Faculty, Experimental Sciences is taught in English, and there are usually 1-2 international students in addition to around 20 local students. To increase the awareness about climate change and make this topic closer to the students' daily experience, a research project on recycling at the University of Lleida was assigned per groups of 4 students. The assignment was semi-structured, the students received a reduced set of instructions and large freedom to focus their particular projects. Additional instructions were provided along the way. We present results from the comparisons among faculties at UdL, and among the different users: students, professors and researchers, and administration staff. We also discuss the impact that this project had in the learning ability of the students and their awareness about climate change.

  8. Project-based learning applied to spacecraft power systems: a long-term engineering and educational program at UPM University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado, Santiago; Cubas, Javier; Roibás-Millán, Elena; Sorribes-Palmer, Félix

    2018-03-01

    The IDR/UPM Institute is the research center responsible for the Master in Space Systems (MUSE) of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM). This is a 2-year (120 ECTS) master's degree focused on space technology. The UPMSat-2 satellite program has become an excellent educational framework in which the academic contents of the master are trained through project-based learning and following a multidisciplinary approach. In the present work, the educational projects developed and carried out in relation to spacecraft power systems at the IDR/UPM Institute are described. These projects are currently being developed in the framework represented by the aforementioned MUSE master's program and UPMSat-2.

  9. The Space Weather Monitor Project: Bringing Hands-on Science to Students of the Developing World for the IHY2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Morrow, C.

    2006-08-01

    Stanford's Solar Center, Electrical Engineering Department, and local educators have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitors that students around the world can use to track solar-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, our Monitors are being deployed to 191 countries for the International Heliophysical Year, 2007. In partnership with Chabot Space and Science Center, we are designing and developing classroom and educator support materials to accompany the distribution. Materials will be culturally sensitive and will be translated into the six official languages of the United Nations (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish). Monitors will be provided free of charge to developing nations and can be set up anywhere there is access to power.

  10. Hands-On Open Access Broadband Wireless Technology Lab Mapping Course Outcomes to Lab Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan Alqudah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented growth in wireless communication is offering opportunities and challenges for educators. Thanks to technology advances and job opportunities, more and more students are interested in wireless communications courses. However, bridging the gap between classroom and real-world experience remains a challenge. Advanced undergraduate communications courses typically focus more on theory. Some courses are given online, and lack hands-on experiments. Driven by feedback from industry and students, we propose practical laboratory experiments that attempt to bridge the gap between classroom and real world. The laboratory exercises take advantage of the infrastructure of deployed wireless networks and allow students to measure, and analyze data, as well as to interact. The proposed labs can be used even in online courses. This paper describes the experiments proposed, the procedures and typical results. The experiments are tied to course objective.

  11. Fundamentals of endoscopic surgery: creation and validation of the hands-on test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Melina C; Dunkin, Brian J; Fried, Gerald M; Mellinger, John D; Trus, Thadeus; Kaneva, Pepa; Lyons, Calvin; Korndorffer, James R; Ujiki, Michael; Velanovich, Vic; Kochman, Michael L; Tsuda, Shawn; Martinez, Jose; Scott, Daniel J; Korus, Gary; Park, Adrian; Marks, Jeffrey M

    2014-03-01

    The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery™ (FES) program consists of online materials and didactic and skills-based tests. All components were designed to measure the skills and knowledge required to perform safe flexible endoscopy. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the hands-on component of the FES examination, and to establish the pass score. Expert endoscopists identified the critical skill set required for flexible endoscopy. They were then modeled in a virtual reality simulator (GI Mentor™ II, Simbionix™ Ltd., Airport City, Israel) to create five tasks and metrics. Scores were designed to measure both speed and precision. Validity evidence was assessed by correlating performance with self-reported endoscopic experience (surgeons and gastroenterologists [GIs]). Internal consistency of each test task was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was determined by having the same participant perform the test a second time and comparing their scores. Passing scores were determined by a contrasting groups methodology and use of receiver operating characteristic curves. A total of 160 participants (17 % GIs) performed the simulator test. Scores on the five tasks showed good internal consistency reliability and all had significant correlations with endoscopic experience. Total FES scores correlated 0.73, with participants' level of endoscopic experience providing evidence of their validity, and their internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.82. Test-retest reliability was assessed in 11 participants, and the intraclass correlation was 0.85. The passing score was determined and is estimated to have a sensitivity (true positive rate) of 0.81 and a 1-specificity (false positive rate) of 0.21. The FES hands-on skills test examines the basic procedural components required to perform safe flexible endoscopy. It meets rigorous standards of reliability and validity required for high

  12. Pilot Project on Women and Science. A report on women scientists at the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvaggio, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    In the fall of 1991, through the coordinating efforts of the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Pilot Project on Women and Science was initiated as a year-long study of women scientists at both the university and the laboratory. Its purpose was to gather information directly from women scientists in an attempt to analyze and make recommendations concerning the professional and cultural environment for women in the sciences. This report is an initial attempt to understand the ways in which women scientists view themselves, their profession, and the scientific culture they inhabit. By recording what these women say about their backgrounds and educational experiences, their current positions, the difficult negotiations many have made between their personal and professional lives, and their relative positions inside and outside the scientific community, the report calls attention both to the individual perspectives offered by these women and to the common concerns they share.

  13. Implementation of Service Learning and Civic Engagement for Computer Information Systems Students through a Course Project at the Hashemite University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khasawneh, Ahmad; Hammad, Bashar K.

    2013-01-01

    Service learning methodologies provide information systems students with the opportunity to create and implement systems in real-world, public service-oriented social contexts. This paper presents a case study of integrating a service learning project into an undergraduate Computer Information Systems course titled "Information Systems"…

  14. Using Films in Teaching Intercultural Concepts: An Action Research Project at Two Universities in India and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Satish; Ardichvili, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Films are used as a tool for teaching cross-cultural and intercultural concepts in higher education and in corporate settings. However, the processes and outcomes of using films in intercultural training and education have not been systematically researched. This paper discusses the results of a collaborative project involving faculty and students…

  15. Enhancing International Research and Development-Project Activity on University Campuses: Insights from U.S. Senior International Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Peter H.; Deardorff, Darla K.; Bolognese, Kerry D.

    2011-01-01

    In the interconnected world of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, the ability of higher-education institutions to contribute to and benefit from international research undertakings, sustainable-development-project activity, and capacity-building endeavors requires transnational involvement. While the potential benefits are…

  16. A Facebook Project for Japanese University Students (2): Does It Really Enhance Student Interaction, Learner Autonomy, and English Abilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Mayumi

    2013-01-01

    Facebook is, in most countries, a very popular Social Network Service (SNS). Since the launch of its service in Japan in 2008, it has been growing rapidly. As a platform for a link to the world, Facebook can also be used effectively for language learning in English as a foreign language (EFL) environments. The purpose of this project was to…

  17. Management Strategies for Curbing the Prevalence of Plagiarism in Project Writing amongst Students of Imo State University Oweeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emenalo, Florence Chizoba

    2016-01-01

    Many undergraduate students copy a lot from other people's research project reports and many graduate students lack the capacity to carry out and report the research work required of them for graduation. This research ascertained the views of Science and Arts Education students on the causes of the problem, types, and the strategies the university…

  18. Students' Evaluations of the Use of E-Learning in a Collaborative Project between Two South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, Poul; Bozalek, Vivienne; Carolissen, Ronelle; Leibowitz, Brenda; Swartz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Online learning is increasingly being used in Higher Education, with a number of advantages to online learning being identified. One of these advantages is the suggestion that online learning provides for equality of opportunity. This article reports on students' evaluations of the use of e-learning in a collaborative project between two South…

  19. Assessment of capacity for Health Policy and Systems Research and Analysis in seven African universities: results from the CHEPSAA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, Tolib; Lê, Gillian; Green, Andrew; Orgill, Marsha; Komba, Adalgot; Esena, Reuben K; Nyapada, Linet; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Amde, Woldekidan K; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The importance of health policy and systems research and analysis (HPSR+A) is widely recognized. Universities are central to strengthening and sustaining the HPSR+A capacity as they teach the next generation of decision-makers and health professionals. However, little is known about the capacity of universities, specifically, to develop the field. In this article, we report results of capacity self- assessments by seven universities within five African countries, conducted through the Consortium for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa (CHEPSAA). The capacity assessments focused on both capacity ‘assets’ and ‘needs’, and covered the wider context, as well as organizational and individual capacity levels. Six thematic areas of capacity were examined: leadership and governance, organizations’ resources, scope of HPSR+A teaching and research, communication, networking and getting research into policy and practice (GRIPP), demand for HPRS+A and resource environment. The self-assessments by each university used combinations of document reviews, semi-structured interviews and staff surveys, followed by comparative analysis. A framework approach, guided by the six thematic areas, was used to analyse data. We found that HPSR+A is an international priority, and an existing activity in Africa, though still neglected field with challenges including its reliance on unpredictable international funding. All universities have capacity assets, such as ongoing HPSR+A teaching and research. There are, however, varying levels of assets (such as differences in staff numbers, group sizes and amount of HPSR+A teaching and research), which, combined with different capacity needs at all three levels (such as individual training, improvement in systems for quality assurance and fostering demand for HPSR+A work), can shape a future agenda for HPSR+A capacity strengthening. Capacity assets and needs at different levels appear related. Possible integrated strategies for

  20. Experiment Study on Elastic Indicator of Thermal Shock Ceramic Materials——Implementation of Students’ Innovative Research Project of Shandong University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of undergraduate education and combine theory and practice, Shandong University of science and technology organized innovative research activities project for undergraduates. Combined with the characteristics of engineering mechanics course, teachers of engineering mechanics teaching and research section guided students to take an active part in scientific research and innovation practice teaching, which has obtained a good teaching effect. This paper introduces the concrete implement process of the college students’ innovative scientific research project “Experiment Study on Elastic Indicator of Thermal Shock Ceramic Materials”, which measures elastic indicator of ceramics using the ultrasonic method. This paper studies elastic indicator change rule of the mullite ceramic samples under different factors such as temperature difference, thermal shock times and so on. Studies have shown that in the condition of air-cooling, with the increase of thermal shock temperature difference and thermal shock times, the elastic modulus value, shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio are in a falling trend. The project implementation have proved that implement undergraduate innovation research projects could effectively arouse students’ learning enthusiasm, cultivate students’ scientific research innovation and analytical abilities to solve practical scientific research problems.

  1. How to analyse a Big Bang of data: the mammoth project at the Cern physics laboratory in Geneva to recreate the conditions immediately after the universe began requires computing power on an unprecedented scale

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas, Kim

    2005-01-01

    How to analyse a Big Bang of data: the mammoth project at the Cern physics laboratory in Geneva to recreate the conditions immediately after the universe began requires computing power on an unprecedented scale

  2. How to Find Optimal National Model of Pension System: the Projection on Russia (Book Review: Barr, N. Pension reform: A short guide [Text] / N. Barr, P. Diamond. – Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. – 261 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Avakovich Tumanyants

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Find Optimal National Model of Pension System: the Projection on Russia (Book Review: Barr, N. Pension reform: A short guide [Text] / N. Barr, P. Diamond. – Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. – 261 p.

  3. Students, teachers and technicians are installing a cosmic ray detector in the CMS visitor gallery. The detector was designed and built in the framework of the US Quarknet project under the supervision of physicists from the Notre Dame University (USA)

    CERN Document Server

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Students, teachers and technicians are installing a cosmic ray detector in the CMS visitor gallery. The detector was designed and built in the framework of the US Quarknet project under the supervision of physicists from the Notre Dame University (USA)

  4. UNIVERSITAS: A PROJECT WITH A HUMANIST AND INTEGRAL CULTURE APPROACH IN LAS TUNAS UNIVERSITY CENTER / UNIVERSITAS: PROYECTO POR UN PERFIL HUMANISTA Y DE CULTURA INTEGRAL EN EL CENTRO UNIVERSITARIO DE LAS TUNAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Macías Reyes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available UNIVERSITAS is a project of sociocultural transformation in Las Tunas university center, with the aim to impel the development of the integral culture in the university community. The knowledge and deepening in the needs, interests, hoping, ways of thinking and acting; in an analysis of the reality, ease the elaboration of the project; which enriches the cultural spectrum of the university community. It is supported by a body of theoretical and methodological budget. Its system of actions is based on newness ideas bind to mechanism of supervisory as: the coordinator group of the project, the orientation bureau, and at the same time the functioning of fixed spaces as: the university theater, the room for exhibitions, Univideo, student’ house, ropes, voices, university and creators, a date with craftsman, dance and music.

  5. Connecting university science experiences to middle school science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon; Laughran, Laura; Tamppari, Ray; Thomas, Perry

    1991-06-01

    Science teachers naturally rely on their university science experiences as a foundation for teaching middle school science. This foundation consists of knowledge far too complex for the middle level students to comprehend. In order for middle school science teachers to utilize their university science training they must search for ways to adapt their college experiences into appropriate middle school learning experience. The criteria set forth above provide broad-based guidelines for translating university science laboratory experiences into middle school activities. These guidelines are used by preservice teachers in our project as they identify, test, and organize a resource file of hands-on inquiry activities for use in their first year classrooms. It is anticipated that this file will provide a basis for future curriculum development as the teacher becomes more comfortable and more experienced in teaching hands-on science. The presentation of these guidelines is not meant to preclude any other criteria or considerations which a teacher or science department deems important. This is merely one example of how teachers may proceed to utilize their advanced science training as a basis for teaching middle school science.

  6. How to encourage entrepreneurship and innovation through the development of technology-based projects in the context of university teaching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Segarra Ciprés

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship and innovation are two of the values demanded by firms today, and therefore the associated skills are enhanced in grades with a clear focus on entrepreneurship. The goal is that students who leave their classrooms were able to undertake and not only in the sense of creating a firm, but also to have the ability to innovate in any tasks that require professional performance. However, despite the clear need to promote entrepreneurship, there are few practical examples of how to teach this competence. In this paper, we present an educational experience based on the theoretical framework provided by the Triple Helix Model, according to which synergies in entrepreneurship are multiplied when are joined the three axes in the task of undertaking: institutional, university and business. Its goal has been to support students from the business idea to the creation of a technology-based company, as a way to enhance their entrepreneurial and innovative capacity. To carry it out has created a multidisciplinary working group in which at university axis level courses of different knowledge domain have been coordinated: engineering, social sciences and humanities.

  7. Using Appreciative Inquiry for an e-Learning Change Management Programme: The ENTICE Project at Brunel University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Linda A.; Alberts, Philip P.; Stephenson, Julia E.

    Brunel University's e-Learning strategy provides direction for the teaching staff, but remains flexible. Although all Schools had engaged with e-Learning in the past, detailed consideration of effective e-Learning and the e-experience of students had not been generally in evidence. We sought to address this gap in the strategic work of schools by implementing a change management program, the major elements of which were the development of a local evidence-base of effectiveness of e-Learning practices and conversations for change. Our program was based on the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) method, which we adapted for this educational context. The aim was to identify the pedagogic value of the diverse range of e-Learning activities already being undertaken and to encourage more widespread use. There was also a longer-term objective of assisting schools to establish or review their own e-Learning strategies and action plans. In terms of the effectiveness of the process, it is evident that the AI methodology was very beneficial. There is greater awareness among academic staff of the range of e-Learning activities that are currently being used in teaching designs of teaching staff at the University and about student use and attitudes to those activities. The evidence provides inputs to the development/review of e-Learning action plans and strategies for each school, usually within the context of the overall school plan.

  8. Supervisors' perspective on medical thesis projects and dropout rates: survey among thesis supervisors at a large German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Elif; Richter, Felicitas; Valchanova, Ralitsa; Dewey, Marc

    2016-10-14

    To identify underlying causes for failure of medical thesis projects and the constantly high drop-out rate in Germany from the supervisors' perspective and to compare the results with the students' perspective. Cross-sectional survey. Online questionnaire for survey of medical thesis supervisors among the staff of Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Published, earlier longitudinal survey among students for comparison. 1069 thesis supervisors participated. Data are presented using descriptive statistics, and the χ 2 test served to compare the results among supervisors with the earlier data from the longitudinal survey of doctoral students. Not applicable. This survey is an observational study. Of 3653 potential participants, 1069 (29.3%) supervising 3744 doctoral candidates participated in the study. Supervisors considered themselves to be highly motivated and to offer adequate supervision. On the other hand, 87% stated that they did not feel well prepared for thesis supervision. Supervisors gave lack of timeliness of doctoral students and personal differences (p=0.024 and p=0.001) as the main reasons for terminating thesis projects. Doctoral students predominantly mentioned methodological problems and difficult subjects as critical issues (p=0.001 and pthesis supervisors and medical students feel ill prepared for their roles in the process of a medical dissertation. Contradictory reasons for terminating medical thesis projects based on supervisors' and students' self-assessment suggest a lack of communication and true scientific collaboration between supervisors and doctoral students as the major underlying issue that requires resolution. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. The desktop muon detector: A simple, physics-motivated machine- and electronics-shop project for university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axani, S. N.; Conrad, J. M.; Kirby, C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the construction of a desktop muon detector, an undergraduate-level physics project that develops machine-shop and electronics-shop technical skills. The desktop muon detector is a self-contained apparatus that employs a plastic scintillator as the detection medium and a silicon photomultiplier for light collection. This detector can be battery powered and is used in conjunction with the provided software. The total cost per detector is approximately 100. We describe physics experiments we have performed, and then suggest several other interesting measurements that are possible, with one or more desktop muon detectors.

  10. Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-on and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an additional hands-on consolidation phase (concept mapping) optimise cognitive learning at work stations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

    2010-05-01

    Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher-centred versus hands-on instruction; on the other hand, hands-on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all participants, the hands-on approach as well as the concept mapping adaptation were totally new. Our hands-on approach followed instruction based on "learning at work stations". A total of 397 high-achieving fifth graders participated in our study. We used a pre-test, post-test, retention test design both to detect students' short-term learning success and long-term learning success, and to document their decrease rates of newly acquired knowledge. Additionally, we monitored intrinsic motivation. Although the teacher-centred approach provided higher short-term learning success, hands-on instruction resulted in relatively lower decrease rates. However, after six weeks, all students reached similar levels of newly acquired knowledge. Nevertheless, concept mapping as a knowledge consolidation phase positively affected short-term increase in knowledge. Regularly placed in instruction, it might increase long-term retention rates. Scores of interest, perceived competence and perceived choice were very high in all the instructional schemes.

  11. Final report on a pilot academic e-books project at Keio University Libraries : Potential for the scholarly use of digitized academic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Takashi

    This article reports on the results and significance of a pilot academic e-books project carried out at the Keio University Libraries for fiscal 2010 to 2012 to assess the viability of a new model of the libraries providing all the campuses with accesses to Japanese academic books digitized jointly with academic publishers and cooperative firms. It focuses on the experimental use of digitized books, highlighting the students’ attitudes and expectations towards e-books as found from surveys. Some major findings include the following. Users have a strong demand for digitized readings that are rather lookup-oriented than learning-oriented, with greater value placed on the functionalities of federated full-text searching, reading on a screen, and accessing the desired chapter direct from table of contents. They also want an online space in which to manage different forms of digitized learning resources. We investigated the potential of e-books and new type of textbooks as educational infrastructures based on the results of experiment. Japan’s university libraries should need to engage actively in the mass digitization of academic books to be adaptive to the change in the ways research, study and teaching are conducted. We plan to start a joint experiment with other university libraries to develop a practical model for the use of e-books.

  12. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  13. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  14. Hands-On Math and Art Exhibition Promoting Science Attitudes and Educational Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Thuneberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current science, technology, engineering, art, math education (STEAM approach emphasizes integration of abstract science and mathematical ideas for concrete solutions by art. The main aim was to find out how experience of learning mathematics differed between the contexts of school and an informal Math and Art Exhibition. The study participants (N=256 were 12-13 years old from Finland. Several valid questionnaires and tests were applied (e.g., SRQ-A, RAVEN in pre- and postdesign showing a good reliability. The results based on General Linear Modeling and Structural Equation Path Modeling underline the motivational effects. The experience of the effectiveness of hands-on learning at school and at the exhibition was not consistent across the subgroups. The lowest achieving group appreciated the exhibition alternative for math learning compared to learning math at school. The boys considered the exhibition to be more useful than the girls as it fostered their science and technology attitudes. However, for the girls, the attractiveness of the exhibition, the experienced situation motivation, was much more strongly connected to the attitudes on science and technology and the worthiness of mathematics. Interestingly, the pupils experienced that even this short informal learning intervention affected their science and technology attitudes and educational plans.

  15. Interactive and Hands-on Methods for Professional Development of Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, S. N.; LeBeau, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Professional development workshops for undergraduate research programs can range from communicating science (i.e. oral, technical writing, poster presentations), applying for fellowships and scholarships, applying to graduate school, and learning about careers, among others. Novel methods of presenting the information on the above topics can result in positive outcomes beyond the obvious of transferring knowledge. Examples of innovative methods to present professional development information include 1) An interactive session on how to write an abstract where students are given an opportunity to draft an abstract from a short technical article, followed by discussion amongst a group of peers, and comparison with the "published" abstract. 2) Using the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) method to evaluate and critique a research poster. 3) Inviting "experts" such as a Fulbright scholar graduate student to present on applying for fellowships and scholarships. These innovative methods of delivery provide more hands-on activities that engage the students, and in some cases (abstract writing) provide practice for the student. The methods also require that students develop team work skills, communicate amongst their peers, and develop networks with their cohort. All of these are essential non-technical skills needed for success in any career. Feedback from students on these sessions are positive and most importantly, the students walk out of the session with a smile on their face saying how much fun it was. Evaluating the impact of these sessions is more challenging and under investigation currently.

  16. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [University of Kentucky (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  17. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-06-18

    Older adults' preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house's main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces.

  18. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Dasios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house’s main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator. Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces.

  19. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saseem Poudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. Materials and Methods: The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. Results: All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. Conclusion: The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures.

  20. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kitashiro, Shuji; Kanehira, Eiji; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures.

  1. Systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE), Version 5.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, K.D.; Kvarfordt, K.J.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of several microcomputer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), primarily for nuclear power plants. The Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM) is a special application tool designed for evaluation of operational occurrences using the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program methods. GEM provides the capability for an analyst to quickly and easily perform conditional core damage probability (CCDP) calculations. The analyst can then use the CCDP calculations to determine if the occurrence of an initiating event or a condition adversely impacts safety. It uses models and data developed in the SAPHIRE specially for the ASP program. GEM requires more data than that normally provided in SAPHIRE and will not perform properly with other models or data bases. This is the first release of GEM and the developers of GEM welcome user comments and feedback that will generate ideas for improvements to future versions. GEM is designated as version 5.0 to track GEM codes along with the other SAPHIRE codes as the GEM relies on the same, shared database structure

  2. Will medical examination gloves protect rescuers from defibrillation voltages during hands-on defibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joseph L; Chapman, Fred W

    2012-12-01

    Continuing compressions during a defibrillation shock has been proposed as a method of reducing pauses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) but the safety of this procedure is unproven. The medical examination gloves worn by rescuers play an important role in protecting the rescuer yet the electrical characteristics of these gloves are unknown. This study examined the response of medical examination gloves to defibrillation voltages. Part 1 of this study measured voltage-current curves for a small sample (8) of gloves. Part 2 tested more gloves (460) to determine the voltage required to produce a specific amount of current flow. Gloves were tested at two current levels: 0.1 mA and 10 mA. Testing included four glove materials (chloroprene, latex, nitrile, and vinyl) in a single layer and double-gloved. All gloves tested in part 1 allowed little current to flow (gloves and 93 of 120 (77%) double gloves allowed at least 0.1 mA of current flow at voltages within the external defibrillation voltage range. Also, 6 of 80 (7.5%) single gloves and 5 of 80 (6.2%) double gloves allowed over 10 mA. Few of the gloves tested limited the current to levels proven to be safe. A lack of sensation during hands-on defibrillation does not guarantee that a safety margin exists. As such, we encourage rescuers to minimize rather than eliminate the pause in compressions for defibrillation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A hands-on activity for teaching product-process matrix: roadmap and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Costa Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The product-process matrix is a well-known framework proposed by Hayes and Wheelwright (1979 that is commonly used to identify processes types and to analyze the alignment of these processes with the products of a company. For didactic purposes, the matrix helps undergraduates beginners from Production Engineering to understand the logic of production systems, providing knowledge that will be essential for various course subjects. Considering the high level of abstraction of the concepts underlying the product-process matrix, this paper presents a way to facilitate the learning of them through the application of a hands-on activity which relies on the active learning philosophy. The proposed dynamic uses colored plastic sheets and PVC pipes as main materials, differing from the original proposal of Penlesky and Treleven (2005 . In addition to presenting an extremely simple exercise, which encourages its application in the classroom, another contribution of this paper is to define a complete roadmap for conducting the activity. This roadmap describes the assembly of fictitious products in customization and standardization scenarios for the comparison of two processes types of product-process matrix, job shop and assembly line. The activity revealed very successful after its application to two groups of Production Engineering undergraduates, confirmed with positive feedback from the students surveyed.

  4. Proceedings of the seminar on the joint research project between JAERI and Universities. 'Actinide researches for 21st century - fusion between chemistry and engineering'. August 20-21, 1999, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    The Seminar on the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities was held in Tokai, August 20-21, 1999, to discuss future perspectives of the actinide researches for the nuclear fuel cycle. The papers related to the Joint Research Project on the Backend Chemistry were presented and discussed. The present report complies the papers contributed to the Seminar. (author)

  5. Proceedings of the seminar on the joint research project between JAERI and Universities. 'Actinide researches for 21st century - fusion between chemistry and engineering'. August 20-21, 1999, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    The Seminar on the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities was held in Tokai, August 20-21, 1999, to discuss future perspectives of the actinide researches for the nuclear fuel cycle. The papers related to the Joint Research Project on the Backend Chemistry were presented and discussed. The present report complies the papers contributed to the Seminar. (author)

  6. The NASA-Macquarie University Pilbara Education Project: Connecting the public to `science in the making' via virtual reality and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C. A.; Fergusson, J.; Bruce, G.; Gaskins, T.

    2006-12-01

    A 2005 international field trip to a key Mars analogue site in Western Australia was used to create a hi-tech education resource for use internationally. The NASA-Macquarie University Pilbara Education Project aims to engage high school students and the broader general community with `science in the making'. A team of educators and communicators, including a US documentary TV crew, joined 25 geologists, microbiologists, geochemists and other experts on the field trip to the Pilbara. The education team captured scientists debating different interpretations of what appears to be the best earliest evidence of life on Earth 3.5 billion years ago in situ. Initially the project was designed as a curriculum product, but difficulties in a range of areas persuaded researchers to chart a different course. While still maintaining high schools as a primary audience, designers refocused on the possibilities outside of the school gates and beyond. The paper describes the prompt for the project, its design and the impact of testing it with end users -- the students and their teachers -- in Australia and the UK.

  7. Experiencing community psychology through community-based learning class projects: reflections from an American University in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Mona M; Mohamed, Salma N; Ganzon, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Many introductory community psychology courses do not incorporate community-based learning (CBL), and when they do, it is most often in the form of individualized volunteer hours. We present an alternative model for CBL in which the entire class collaborates on an experiential project that promotes community action. We believe that such an approach better embodies the values and methods of the discipline and has a more powerful impact on the students and stakeholders. It may be especially effective in developing countries that do not have an established network of service infrastructures; in such nations the onus is on the teachers and learners of community psychology to contribute to transformative change. In this article practical guidelines are provided by the instructor regarding how to structure and implement this CBL model. Additionally, two students describe how the CBL experience solidified their learning of course concepts and significantly impacted them personally.

  8. [Drug use and involvement in risky driving styles in a sample of university students. The uniHcos project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Medina-García, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Virginia; Pulido-Manzanero, José; Fernández-Villa, Tania

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol use are known to increase the risk of traffic accidents, especially among youth. However, the association between habitual drug use and the adoption of risky driving behavior is not well known. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the association between habitual drug use and involvement in risky driving practices overall and by gender among university students. A cross sectional study was conducted. The study population was composed of 559 car drivers younger than 31 years who completed an online questionnaire during the 2011-2012 academic year. Among other factors, the questionnaire assessed the following items: habitual drug consumption (20 or more days) during the last year and involvement in other risky driving practices during the last month. A total of 27.7% of students reported they had used drugs regularly during the last year. Drug use was associated with a higher frequency of involvement in risky driving practices. In men, the factors most strongly associated with drug consumption were speeding, driving under influence of alcohol, and feeling drowsy while driving. In women, drug consumption was mainly associated with smoking while driving, drunk driving, and driving without rest. The results of our study support the hypothesis that habitual drug use is associated with an increased frequency of risky driving behavior. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and its Relationship to a Concentration in STEM Discipline at Alabama A&M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwoye, J.

    2017-12-01

    The American Meteorological Society (AMS) reported that our nation faces a serious challenge in attracting young people to science and science-related careers (including teaching). This is particularly true for members of groups underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and is especially acute in the small number of minority college students majoring in the geosciences. The purpose of this paper is to report on how the author engages Alabama A&M University (AAMU) students in STEM transportation science. Specifically, the objective is to develop a conceptual framework of engaging minority students in transportation concentration in the department of community and regional planning. The students were involved in writing a research paper on direct and indirect climate change impacts on transportation and also involved in classroom discussions during a wk14 module on overview of transportation suitability: climate change and environment. The paper concludes with minority needs to gain access to STEM and participation of minority students in field and site analysis.

  10. The NASA Earth Observing System Higher-Education Alliance Curriculum Development Project at Middle Tennessee State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolins, M. J.; Wylie, M.

    2008-12-01

    During the last three years, geodata-rich undergraduate curricula were developed at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) with major support from the NASA Earth Observing System Higher-Education Alliance ("GeoBrain") and additional support from Tennessee Space Grant and the NSF StepMT program. These curricula fall into three broad categories: (1) GIS-based curricula, (2) the free on-line textbook "Physical Regions and Features of the United States," and (3) presentation graphics (primarily satellite images) for faculty involved in teaching and research outside the United States. All three incorporate Earth Observing System data as well as data from other public sources. Most data was obtained through the GeoBrain data download website, the USGS Seamless Data Distribution System, or the National Atlas of the United States website. The three categories of curricula exemplify the diverse educational applications of satellite images and other map data. The GIS-based curricula (1) are built around ESRI GIS software and include an asteroid impact activity and a volcano activity. The free on-line textbook (2) provides a broad overview of the physical features of the United States and is intended as a supplement for undergraduate geoscience courses. Presentation graphics (3) have been created for faculty investigating Scottish archeology and historical/cultural issues in Portugal and Morocco. The three categories represent three distinctly different ways to use remotely-sensed data to improve undergraduate instruction.

  11. Revitalized citizen projects for Fukushima's radiation and nuclear disaster issues and introduction of the integrated programs relative to radiation education, exercise guidance, and development support at Tokushima University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakama, Minoru; Nakayama, Shintaro; Saze, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    As for the purpose of this project, 'Revitalized Residential Projects for Fukushima's Radiological and Nuclear Disaster Issues at Tokushima University', the organization of the special mission which is constructed in staffs with volunteer sprits at universities and research facilities have collaborated together with elementary and junior high school teachers and the local government at the revitalized areas in Fukushima. They have built and practiced the new learning education model to bring up the children in there who are not defeated by uneasiness and the rumor of the radiation pollutions relative to the nuclear disaster of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. For children carrying the future only at Fukushima but also in Japan, we bring up hope and the smile of them by coordinating their education to feed the resistance from an early stage to every rumor. By carrying on it we have set up with an integrated goal of getting that we can breed vitality and relief of the whole local community. Our radiation hazard support team at Tokushima University worked on urgent radiation exposure screening at Fukushima from the beginning of earthquake disaster. We had worked on support activities such as the radiation protection education, and also made efforts for the uneasiness reduction of citizens and reducing burdens on the local government. Until now we have kept up with working on the medium-and-long term trials of uneasiness reductions due to radiation properties and radiation hazards for local inhabitants and staffs such as any companies and the local government through practicing these programs, civilian learning society, staff learning society, learning society and counselling for mother and the child, radiation measurement, decontamination advice, and radioactivity measurement support, in particular, at Shirakawa City located as the doorway city of Tohoku area. This report introduces an outline of collaborated programs that we have developed in this project

  12. Integration of basic science and clinical medicine: the innovative approach of the cadaver biopsy project at the Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Anna; Vaisman, Lev; Johnston-Cox, Hillary; Gallan, Alexander; Shaffer, Kitt; Vaughan, Deborah; O'Hara, Carl; Joseph, Lija

    2014-01-01

    Curricular integration has emerged as a consistent theme in medical education reform. Vertical integration of topics such as pathology offers the potential to bring basic science content into the clinical arena, but faculty/student acceptance and curricular design pose challenges for such integration. The authors describe the Cadaver Biopsy Project (CBP) at Boston University School of Medicine as a sustainable model of vertical integration. Faculty and select senior medical students obtained biopsies of cadavers during the first-year gross anatomy course (fall 2009) and used these to develop clinical cases for courses in histology (spring 2010), pathology (fall 2010-spring 2011), and radiology (fall 2011 or spring 2012), thereby linking students' first experiences in basic sciences with other basic science courses and later clinical courses. Project goals included engaging medical stu dents in applying basic science princi ples in all aspects of patient care as they acquire skills. The educational intervention used a patient (cadaver)-centered approach and small-group, collaborative, case-based learning. Through this project, the authors involved clinical and basic science faculty-plus senior medical students-in a collaborative project to design and implement an integrated curriculum through which students revisited, at several different points, the microscopic structure and pathophysiology of common diseases. Developing appropriate, measurable out comes for medical education initiatives, including the CBP, is challenging. Accumu lation of qualitative feedback from surveys will guide continuous improvement of the CBP. Documenting longer-term impact of the curricular innovation on test scores and other competency-based outcomes is an ultimate goal.

  13. Open source EMR software: profiling, insights and hands-on analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiah, M L M; Haiqi, Ahmed; Zaidan, B B; Zaidan, A A

    2014-11-01

    The use of open source software in health informatics is increasingly advocated by authors in the literature. Although there is no clear evidence of the superiority of the current open source applications in the healthcare field, the number of available open source applications online is growing and they are gaining greater prominence. This repertoire of open source options is of a great value for any future-planner interested in adopting an electronic medical/health record system, whether selecting an existent application or building a new one. The following questions arise. How do the available open source options compare to each other with respect to functionality, usability and security? Can an implementer of an open source application find sufficient support both as a user and as a developer, and to what extent? Does the available literature provide adequate answers to such questions? This review attempts to shed some light on these aspects. The objective of this study is to provide more comprehensive guidance from an implementer perspective toward the available alternatives of open source healthcare software, particularly in the field of electronic medical/health records. The design of this study is twofold. In the first part, we profile the published literature on a sample of existent and active open source software in the healthcare area. The purpose of this part is to provide a summary of the available guides and studies relative to the sampled systems, and to identify any gaps in the published literature with respect to our research questions. In the second part, we investigate those alternative systems relative to a set of metrics, by actually installing the software and reporting a hands-on experience of the installation process, usability, as well as other factors. The literature covers many aspects of open source software implementation and utilization in healthcare practice. Roughly, those aspects could be distilled into a basic taxonomy, making the

  14. Design, implementation, and outcome of a hands-on arthrocentesis workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla-Labarca, Maria-Louise; Tsang, James C; Goldsmith, Melissa; Furie, Richard

    2009-09-01

    During a 4-week rheumatology elective at our institution, opportunities for internal medicine residents to perform arthrocentesis were limited, particularly for sites other than the knee. Consequently, residents were inadequately prepared and had less self-confidence to perform such procedures. To overcome these educational deficiencies, an arthrocentesis workshop was developed. We report our quality improvement data that was collected during the first year of workshop implementation. We devised a structured half-day arthrocentesis workshop for rheumatology fellows as well as rotating internal medicine residents. This program consisted of a one hour lecture immediately followed by a hands-on workshop that used mannequin models for 5 anatomic sites. A self-assessment questionnaire and medical knowledge test were administered before and after each session. The accuracy of the self-assessment questionnaire was analyzed by comparing responses to an external objective measure of knowledge in the same content area. Finally, an optional postworkshop survey addressed resident satisfaction. Thirty-eight trainees participated in the workshop between July 2006 and June 2007. There were statistically significant improvements in self-confidence in 9 content areas (P knowledge test during the preworkshop analysis. In contrast, the postworkshop analysis displayed modestly higher concordance. All residents completing a postworkshop survey believed that it was a useful exercise, and 96% stated that they would change their practice habits. The arthrocentesis workshop provided a solid foundation from which trainees can learn key concepts of joint injection, increase their self-confidence and refine their motor skills. The accuracy of resident self-reported confidence is poor and should therefore be used only to complement other means of competency assessment and medical knowledge acquisition.

  15. Systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE) version 5.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, K.D.; Kvarfordt, K.J.; Skinner, N.L.; Wood, S.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of several microcomputer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), primarily for nuclear power plants. This volume is the reference manual for the Systems Analysis and Risk Assessment (SARA) System Version 5.0, a microcomputer-based system used to analyze the safety issues of a open-quotes familyclose quotes [i.e., a power plant, a manufacturing facility, any facility on which a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) might be performed]. The SARA database contains PRA data primarily for the dominant accident sequences of a family and descriptive information about the family including event trees, fault trees, and system model diagrams. The number of facility databases that can be accessed is limited only by the amount of disk storage available. To simulate changes to family systems, SARA users change the failure rates of initiating and basic events and/or modify the structure of the cut sets that make up the event trees, fault trees, and systems. The user then evaluates the effects of these changes through the recalculation of the resultant accident sequence probabilities and importance measures. The results are displayed in tables and graphs that may be printed for reports. A preliminary version of the SARA program was completed in August 1985 and has undergone several updates in response to user suggestions and to maintain compatibility with the other SAPHIRE programs. Version 5.0 of SARA provides the same capability as earlier versions and adds the ability to process unlimited cut sets; display fire, flood, and seismic data; and perform more powerful cut set editing

  16. Project LITE - Light Inquiry Through Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, K.

    2004-12-01

    Hands-on, inquiry-based, constructivist activity offers students a powerful way to explore, uncover and ultimately gain a feel for the nature of science. In order to make practicable a more genuine approach to learning astronomy, we have undertaken the development of hands-on (and eyes-on) materials that can be used in introductory undergraduate astronomy courses. These materials focus on light and optics. Over the past several years as part of Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments), we have developed a kit of optical materials that is integrated with a set of Java applets. The combined kit and software allows students to do actual experiments concerning geometrical optics, fluorescence, phosphorescence, polarization and other topics by making use of the photons that are emitted by their computer screens. We have also developed a suite of over 100 Flash applets that allow students to directly explore many aspects of visual perception. A major effort of the project concerns spectroscopy, since it is arguably the most important tool used by astronomers to disentangle the nature of the universe. It is also one of the most challenging subjects to teach in undergraduate astronomy courses. The spectroscopy component of Project LITE includes take-home laboratory materials and experiments that are integrated with web-based software. We have also developed a novel quantitative handheld binocular spectrometer (patent pending). Our major spectroscopic software is called the Spectrum Explorer (SPEX). It allows students to create, manipulate and explore all types of spectra including blackbody, power law, emission and absorption. We are now extending the SPEX capabilities to help students gain easy access to the astronomical spectra included in the NVO databases. All of the Project LITE software can be found http://lite.bu.edu. Project LITE is supported by Grant #DUE-0125992 from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education.

  17. Project (inverted exclamation mark)EXITO!: success through diversity and universality for outcomes improvement among Hispanic home care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Louise; Espinosa, Javier; Bourne, Susan; O'Toole, Marie; Ingersoll, Gail L

    2009-01-01

    The National Health Disparities Report notes that Hispanics have poorer quality of care in 23 of 38 core measures. The result of this disparity is great personal and health system costs, which could be reduced. Prior studies have focused on access and language. We studied outcomes improvement. The purpose of this project was to develop a replicable theory-based outcomes improvement model for delivery of nursing care to Hispanic patients. The Leininger Sunrise Enabler approach was used to design a program specific to the cultural needs of a home care population. Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) data from 125 unduplicated home care patients were tracked. Nursing care delivery was analyzed using ethnographic research techniques. Delivery of nursing care using a culturally congruent approach reduced acute hospitalization and emergent care visits. Medication management and customer and nursing satisfaction also improved. National standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services in health care help reduce healthcare disparities, but improving Hispanic outcomes requires moving beyond symptoms and symptom management to transcultural care. The estimated savings to the health care system are significant.

  18. The impact of a hands-on approach to learning visible spectrometry upon students' performance, motivation, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtacnik, Margareta; Gros, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of introducing visible spectrometry concepts through hands-on laboratory work upon student learning within four vocational programs are discussed. All together, 118 students, average 18.6 years old, participated in the study. The results showed no correlation between students' motivational components (intrinsic, regulated, and controlled), chemistry self-concept and their achievement on an experiential knowledge test and knowledge gained from this hands-on approach. Statistically significant differences were found for academic achievement among students in a biotechnology technical program (School 1), food processing program (School 2), laboratory biomedicine program (School 3), and a biotechnology general program (School 4). Differences in academic achievement are further reflected in students' perception of particular knowledge gained through their hands-on experiences and in their expressed attitude toward different didactical characteristics. All students, regardless of their study program, highly evaluated the relaxed atmosphere that contributed to their self-confidence in completing their laboratory activities.

  19. Georgetown University generic integrated community energy system GU-ICES demonstration project. Modified work management plan. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-04-01

    This Phase II Modified Work Management Plan reflects the change from a Coal Using ICES to a Generic ICES Program. As such, it retains the essential elements relating to coal while broadening the number and types of alternative energy subsystems to be evaluated for eventual implementation on the Georgetown University Campus. In addition to the plan in Book I, Book II deals with an energy audit conducted at the campus in the fall of 1978 to establish a gross baseline from which to measure and evaluate the contributions of selected alternative energy subsystems both from an energy and cost standpoint. Book I proceeds from a discussion of an ICES through an explanation of the scope of effort in each phase expanded into detailed task descriptions by phase together with schedules, PERT and GANTT charts, milestones and levels of effort by task for the Feasibility Analysis, and schedules for the overall program. A description of examples of alternative subsystems to be considered is also included. A detailed Management Plan for the conduct of the effort by General Electric completes the plan. Appendices related to cogeneration, life-cycle costing, GE energy subsystems, the GU Master Energy Plan, and typical regulatory processes to be encountered are included. Book II treats the Energy Audit under the three committed task areas of System Description, Analysis and Survey, and Criteria for Energy Usage. The five major energy systems utilized at Georgetown are considered: electrical, chilled water, steam, gas and fuel oil, and city water. A top level analysis yields significant results and recommendations for further action with respect to a detailed measurements program, particularly of steam and electric power usage, over a one year period.

  20. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M.

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (greater than 100 C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62 percent of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 x 10(exp 4) cu m of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108 C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were less than 30 C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site.

  1. Project Management in Real Time: A Service-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erik; Drexler, John A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a service-learning assignment for a project management course. It is designed to facilitate hands-on student learning of both the technical and the interpersonal aspects of project management, and it involves student engagement with real customers and real stakeholders in the creation of real events with real outcomes. As…

  2. Bibliography. Computer-Oriented Projects, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L., Comp.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of references on computer-oriented projects. Includes information on computers; hands-on versus simulations; games; instruction; students' attitudes and learning styles; artificial intelligence; tutoring; and application of spreadsheets. (RT)

  3. Experimental research of the NN scattering with polarized particles at the VdG accelerator of Charles University. Project 'NN interactions'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, N.S.; Broz, J.; Cerny, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to study three-nucleon interactions using 14-16 MeV polarized neutron beam in conjunction with polarized deuteron target. Spin-dependent total cross-section differences Δρ L and Δρ T will be measured in the energy range, where there are no experimental data, with sufficient accuracy to check the contribution of the three-nucleon forces. In the test run, the obtained deuteron vector polarizations were P - = (- 39.5 ± 2)% and P + = (32.9 ± 2)%. The proposed experiment is the continuation of the preceding measurements of the same quantities in the np scattering at the Van de Graaff accelerator of Charles University

  4. Providing Hands on Experiences to Museum Visitors to Explore and Learn about Earthquakes and their Impacts in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Schiffman, C. R.; Butler, R. F.; Farley, M.; Frankel, S.; Hunter, N.; Lillie, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past ten years, UNAVCO has developed a suite of learning materials for formal undergraduate and grades 6-12 classroom environments, integrating GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to explore Earth science processes. To make complex Earth processes accessible to general audiences, UNAVCO has designed a multi-component visiting museum exhibit that explores the tectonic setting of the United States Pacific Northwest, hazards of living on a plate boundary, and the technologies being used to study the plate motion and in the future, help communities become more resilient to the impacts of earthquakes. This exhibit was installed in Fall 2013 at the Oregon State University (OSU) Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, Oregon. Through multiple hands-on elements, visitors to the HMSC exhibit explore and experience the build up and release of strain in the region, along with some of the technologies used to measure these changes. In one component, visitors compress a model of the Pacific Northwest to feel the build up of strain in the landscape and observe the movement of land over time. Supporting panels connect this movement to the measurements currently being observed by the network of PBO and other GPS stations in the Pacific Northwest. In another component, visitors learn about the recurrence interval for earthquakes at the Juan De Fuca - North America plate boundary by turning a handle to slowly move and compress plates until a simulated earthquake occurs. A related component explores how an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) of the future might combine seismic data collected by both seismometers and real time GPS to allow people and communities time to prepare for oncoming ground shaking and tsunami after an earthquake. Several technologies are also highlighted throughout the exhibit, including information panels that compare the accuracy of high precision GPS with smartphone technologies. Additionally, models of a full

  5. Balloon and Button Spectroscopy: A Hands-On Approach to Light and Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Without question, one of the most useful tools an astronomer or physicist can employ to study the universe is spectroscopy. However, for students in introductory physics or astronomy classes, spectroscopy is a relatively abstract concept that combines new physics topics such as thermal radiation, atomic physics, and the wave and particle nature of…

  6. How to Read Scientific Research Articles: A Hands-On Classroom Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogucka, Roxanne; Wood, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate students are generally unfamiliar with scientific literature. Further, students experience frustration when they read research articles the way they read textbooks, from beginning to end. Using a team-based active learning exercise, an instruction librarian and colleagues at University of Texas at Austin introduce nutritional…

  7. A Course Programme in Mobile Robotics with Integrated Hands-on Exercises and Competitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the design of and the considerations for a course programme in mobile robotics at the Technical University of Denmark. An integrated approach was taken designing mobile robot hardware, software and course curricula in an interconnected way. The courses in the programme all...

  8. Hands-On Experiments in the Interactive Physics Laboratory: Students' Intrinsic Motivation and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snetinová, Marie; Kácovský, Petr; Machalická, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Experiments in different forms can certainly be suitable tools for increasing student interest in physics. However, educators continuously discuss which forms of experimenting (if any) are the most beneficial for these purposes. At the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague, two different forms of physics experiments are…

  9. Blender master class a hands-on guide to modeling, sculpting, materials, and rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Simonds, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Blender is a powerful and free 3D graphics tool used by artists and designers worldwide. But even experienced designers can find it challenging to turn an idea into a polished piece.For those who have struggled to create professional-quality projects in Blender, author Ben Simonds offers this peek inside his studio. You'll learn how to create 3D models as you explore the creative process that he uses to model three example projects: a muscular bat creature, a futuristic robotic spider, and ancient temple ruins. Along the way, you'll master the Blender interface and learn how to create and refi

  10. Realizing universal health coverage for maternal health services in the Republic of Guinea: the use of workforce projections to design health labor market interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christel Jansen,1 Laurence Codjia,2 Giorgio Cometto,3 Mohamed Lamine Yansané,4 Marjolein Dieleman1 1Health Unit, Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Health Workforce, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; 3Global Health Workforce Alliance, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; 4Health Focus GmbH, Conakry, Guinea Background: Universal health coverage requires a health workforce that is available, accessible, and well-performing. This article presents a critical analysis of the health workforce needs for the delivery of maternal and neonatal health services in Guinea, and of feasible and relevant interventions to improve the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce in the country. Methods: A needs-based approach was used to project human resources for health (HRH requirements. This was combined with modeling of future health sector demand and supply. A baseline scenario with disaggregated need and supply data for the targeted health professionals per region and setting (urban or rural informed the identification of challenges related to the availability and distribution of the workforce between 2014 and 2024. Subsequently, the health labor market framework was used to identify interventions to improve the availability and distribution of the health workforce. These interventions were included in the supply side modeling, in order to create a “policy rich” scenario B which allowed for analysis of their potential impact. Results: In the Republic of Guinea, only 44% of the nurses and 18% of the midwives required for maternal and neonatal health services are currently available. If Guinea continues on its current path without scaling up recruitment efforts, the total stock of HRH employed by the public sector will decline by 15% between 2014 and 2024, while HRH needs will grow by 22% due to demographic trends. The high density of HRH in urban areas and the high number of auxiliary

  11. Basic CNC Operation. Training Workbook [and] Assessment and Training Guide [and] Hands-on Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoka-Hennepin Technical Coll., Minneapolis, MN.

    This workbook is intended for students taking a course in basic computer numerical control (CNC) operation that was developed during a project to retrain defense industry workers at risk of job loss or dislocation because of conversion of the defense industry. The workbook contains daily training guides for each of the course's 13 sessions. Among…

  12. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  13. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand…

  14. Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology: Real-Time, Hands-On, and Safe Experiments for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, Hitesh G.; Dean, Michelle R.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Wong, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    What students and teachers often ask is, how are nano-sized materials made when they are so small? One answer is through the process of self-assembly in which molecules, polymers, and nanoparticles connect to form larger objects of a defined structure and shape. Two hands-on experiments are presented in which students prepare capsules in real time…

  15. Blended Inquiry with Hands-On and Virtual Laboratories: The Role of Perceptual Features during Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Eva Erdosne; Ludvico, Lisa R.; Morrow, Becky L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of virtual and hands-on inquiry environments for the development of blended learning in a popular domain of bio-nanotechnology: the separation of different-sized DNA fragments using gel-electrophoresis, also known as DNA-fingerprinting. Since the latest scientific developments in nano- and micro-scale tools…

  16. Student Responses to a Hands-On Kinesthetic Lecture Activity for Learning about the Oxygen Carrying Capacity of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckler, Jennifer; Yu, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or "kinesthetic," activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic…

  17. How Science Texts and Hands-on Explorations Facilitate Meaning Making: Learning from Latina/o Third Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelas, Maria; Pieper, Lynne; Arsenault, Amy; Pappas, Christine C.; Keblawe-Shamah, Neveen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined opportunities for reasoning and meaning making that read-alouds of children's literature science information books and related hands-on explorations offered to young Latina/o students in an urban public school. Using a qualitative, interpretative framework, we analyzed classroom discourse and children's writing…

  18. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  19. Introducing Chemical Reactions Concepts in K-6 through a Hands-On Food Spherification and Spaghetti-Fication Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anju; Hill, Nicole; Valenzuela, Patricia; Johnson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Recruiting students in STEM majors to fill the gap in STEM workforce is a continued challenge, which can be addressed by introducing scientific principles through hand-on activities to the students at an early stage. This paper presents the design, implementation and assessment of a chemistry-related workshop for sixth grade students that were…

  20. Effects of In-Class Hands-On Laboratories in a Large Enrollment, Multiple Section Blended Linear Circuits Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Bonni H.; Ferri, Aldo A.; Majerich, David M.; Madden, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of hands-on learning in an undergraduate circuits class that is taught to non-majors; i.e., students outside of electrical and computing engineering. The course, ECE3710, is taught in a blended format facilitated by the video lectures prepared for two Massive Open Online Courses developed for the Coursera Platform.…

  1. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  2. Chemistry Science Investigation: Dognapping Workshop, an Outreach Program Designed to Introduce Students to Science through a Hands-On Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Sears, Jeremiah M.; Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Casillas, Maddison R.; Nguyen, Thao H.

    2017-01-01

    The Chemistry Science Investigation: Dognapping Workshop was designed to (i) target and inspire fourth grade students to view themselves as "Junior Scientists" before their career decisions are solidified; (ii) enable hands-on experience in fundamental scientific concepts; (iii) increase public interaction with science, technology,…

  3. Comparison of online, hands-on, and a combined approach for teaching cautery disbudding technique to dairy producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Charlotte B; LeBlanc, Stephen J; Haley, Derek B; Lissemore, Kerry D; Godkin, M Ann; Duffield, Todd F

    2018-01-01

    The use of pain control for disbudding and dehorning is important from both an animal and industry perspective. Best practices include the use of local anesthetic, commonly given as a cornual nerve block (CNB), and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The proportion is decreasing, but many dairy producers do not use local anesthesia, perhaps in part due to lack of knowledge of the CNB technique. Although this skill is typically learned in person from a veterinarian, alternative methods may be useful. The objective of this trial was to determine if there were differences in the efficacy of online training (n = 23), hands-on training (n = 20), and a combined approach (n = 23) for teaching producers to successfully administer a CNB and disbud a calf. The primary outcome was block efficacy, defined as a lack of established pain behaviors during iron application. Secondary outcomes were background knowledge (assessed by a written quiz), CNB and disbudding technique (evaluated by rubric scoring), time taken, and self-confidence before and after evaluation. Associations between training group and outcome were assessed with logistic regression, ordered logistic regression, and Cox-proportional hazard models, with a random effect for workshop. Block efficacy was not different between training groups, with 91% successful in both combined and online groups, and 75% in the hands-on trained group. Online learners had poorer technical scores than hands-on trainees. The combined group was not different from hands-on. Time to block completion tended to be longer for the online group (62 ± 11 s), whereas time to disbudding completion was not different between hands-on (41 ± 5 s) or combined trainees (41 ± 5 s). The combined group had the highest pre-evaluation confidence score, and remained higher after evaluation than online but was not different than hands-on. Although we saw some statistical differences between groups, absolute differences were small and block efficacy was

  4. Lessons Learned from Client Projects in an Undergraduate Project Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Carol E.

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes that a subtle combination of three learning methods offering "just in time" project management knowledge, coupled with hands-on project management experience can be particularly effective in producing project management students with employable skills. Students were required to apply formal project management knowledge to gain…

  5. Hands-on repair of component with a lowered pool water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfect, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of a broken positioner mechanism on a TRIGA Reactor neutron collimator, with a lowered pool water level, presented a unique challenge. Radiation dose measurements were made which indicated the repair could be done safely with only 3 feet of water providing shielding over the reactor core. The entire repair project went quite well, due in large part to extensive preplanning. Repair was done safely and radiation exposures were kept well below allowable levels. Savings were significant using this method of repair compared to the alternative of dismantling the facility. (author)

  6. Hands-on repair of component with a lowered pool water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfect, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of a broken positioner mechanism on a TRIGA Reactor neutron collimator, with a lowered pool water level, presented a unique challenge. Radiation dose measurements were made which indicated the repair could be done safetly with only 3 feet of water providing shielding over the reactor core. The entire repair project went quite well, due in large part to extensive preplanning. Repair was done safely and radiation exposures were kept well below allowable levels. Savings were significant using this method of repair compared to the alternative of dismantling the facility

  7. Project LASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  8. Opfer des NS-Bücherraubes – 10 Fälle aus medizinischen Bibliotheken in Wien: Provenienzforschungsprojekt an der Universitätsbibliothek der Medizinischen Universität Wien / Victims of book expropriation during nazi regime – 10 examples from medical libraries in Vienna: provenance research project at the university library at the Medical University Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007 the university library at the Medical University Vienna runs a provenance research project. Books, stolen between 1938 and 1945, were acquired by at that time discrete libraries at institutions and clinics of the former medical faculty at Vienna University. A systematic survey of the now centralised book collection should bring to light these misgotten book acquisitions. Aim of the project is to document such cases and to restitute books to their lawful owners or their legal successors. Until Novemver 2008 about 80,000 volumes were scrutinised directly at the shelves by so-called autopsy. So far about 200 definitely stolen books and approximately 1800 suspicious books were dedected. This paper describes the initial position, method and hitherto existing results of the provenance research project. Ten cases of such book theft, recorded in the now centralised collection of the university library of the Medical University Vienna (former medical faculty, should depict victims of book expropiation during nazi regime. These cases include second-hand bookshops (Alois Fantl, Hans Peter Kraus, an university professor from the former medical faculty at Vienna University (Markus Hajek, general practitioners not associated with the former medical faculty (Adolf Kronfeld, Richard Löwi, private persons (Lily Fuchs, Raoul Fernand Jellinek-Mercedes and books from public and private libraries (Akademischer Verein jüdischer Mediziner, Bibliothek Sassenbach, Ortskrankenkasse Dresden.

  9. Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011, the Mālama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), mālama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

  10. Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School (PASS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clarence D.; Hathaway, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School Project (PASS) Project was granted a one-year no cost extension for 2001-2002. In year three of the project, objectives and strategies were modified based on the previous year-end evaluation. The recommendations were incorporated and the program was replicated within most of the remaining elementary schools in Portsmouth, Virginia and continued in the four middle schools. The Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School Project is a partnership, which includes Norfolk State University, Cooperating Hampton Roads Organizations for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME), NASA Langley Research Center, and the City of Portsmouth, Virginia Public Schools. The project seeks to strengthen the knowledge of Portsmouth Public Schools students in the field of atmospheric sciences and enhance teacher awareness of hands on activities in the atmospheric sciences. The project specifically seeks to: 1) increase the interest and participation of elementary and middle school students in science and mathematics; 2) strengthen existing science programs; and 3) facilitate greater achievement in core subjects, which are necessary for math, science, and technical careers. Emphasis was placed on providing training activities, materials and resources for elementary students (grades 3 - 5) and middle school students (grades 6 - 8), and teachers through a CHROME club structure. The first year of the project focused on introducing elementary students to concepts and activities in atmospheric science. Year two of the project built on the first year's activities and utilizes advanced topics and activities appropriate for middle school students. During the third year of the project, in addition to the approaches used in years one and two, emphasis was placed on activities that enhanced the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL).

  11. Hands-On Defibrillation Skills of Pediatric Acute Care Providers During a Simulated Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalala, Utpal S; Balakumar, Niveditha; Zamora, Maria; Appachi, Elumalai

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Timely defibrillation in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) is associated with good outcome. While defibrillation skills of pediatric providers have been reported to be poor, the factors related to poor hands-on defibrillation skills of pediatric providers are largely unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate delay in individual steps of the defibrillation and human and non-human factors associated with poor hands-on defibrillation skills among pediatric acute care providers during a simulated VFCA scenario. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of video evaluation of hands-on defibrillation skills of pediatric providers in a simulated VFCA in our children's hospital. Each provider was asked to use pads followed by paddles to provide 2 J/kg shock to an infant mannequin in VFCA. The hands-on skills were evaluated for struggle with any step of defibrillation, defined a priori as >10 s delay with particular step. The data was analyzed using chi-square test with significant p -value 10 s delay) with each of connecting the pads/paddles to the device, using pads/paddles on the mannequin and using buttons on the machine was 34 (50%), 26 (38%), and 31 (46%), respectively. Conclusions: The defibrillation skills of providers in a tertiary care children's hospital are poor. Both human and machine-related factors are associated with delay in defibrillation. Prior use of the study defibrillator is associated with a significantly shorter time-to-first shock as compared to prior use of any other defibrillator or no prior use of any defibrillator.

  12. Do clinical examination gloves provide adequate electrical insulation for safe hands-on defibrillation? I: Resistive properties of nitrile gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Charles D; Lee-Shrewsbury, Victoria; Hogg, Kitwani; Petley, Graham W

    2013-07-01

    Uninterrupted chest compressions are a key factor in determining resuscitation success. Interruptions to chest compression are often associated with defibrillation, particularly the need to stand clear from the patient during defibrillation. It has been suggested that clinical examination gloves may provide adequate electrical resistance to enable safe hands-on defibrillation in order to minimise interruptions. We therefore examined whether commonly used nitrile clinical examination gloves provide adequate resistance to current flow to enable safe hands-on defibrillation. Clinical examination gloves (Kimberly Clark KC300 Sterling nitrile) worn by members of hospital cardiac arrest teams were collected immediately following termination of resuscitation. To determine the level of protection afforded by visually intact gloves, electrical resistance across the glove was measured by applying a DC voltage across the glove and measuring subsequent resistance. Forty new unused gloves (control) were compared with 28 clinical (non-CPR) gloves and 128 clinical (CPR) gloves. One glove in each group had a visible tear and was excluded from analysis. Control gloves had a minimum resistance of 120 kΩ (median 190 kΩ) compared with 60 kΩ in clinical gloves (both CPR (median 140 kΩ) and non-CPR groups (median 160 kΩ)). Nitrile clinical examination gloves do not provide adequate electrical insulation for the rescuer to safely undertake 'hands-on' defibrillation and when exposed to the physical forces of external chest compression, even greater resistive degradation occurs. Further work is required to identify gloves suitable for safe use for 'hands-on' defibrillation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  14. Drug use, family support and related factors in university students. A cross-sectional study based on the uniHcos Project data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-De la Torre, Jorge; Fernández-Villa, Tania; Molina, Antonio José; Amezcua-Prieto, Carmen; Mateos, Ramona; Cancela, José María; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Ortíz-Moncada, Rocío; Alguacil, Juan; Almaraz, Ana; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Suárez-Varela, María Morales; Blázquez-Abellán, Gemma; Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Valero, Luis Félix; Ayán, Carlos; Vilorio-Marqués, Laura; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Martín, Vicente

    2018-01-09

    To assess the prevalence of illegal drug use in college students on any previous occasion, during the previous year and the previous month, and to analyze the relationship between illegal drug use and family support and other factors. A cross-sectional study using data from students participating in the uniHcos project (n = 3767) was conducted. The prevalence and age of onset of consumption of cannabis, non-prescription sedatives, stimulants and depressants was evaluated. Polyconsumption was also assessed. The independent variables were: family support, age, residence, and employment status. To determine the factors related to drug use multivariate logistic regression models stratified by gender were fitted. Differences between men and women in prevalence of illegal drug use except non-prescription sedatives were observed. In both genders, less family support was associated with higher consumption of all drugs, except depressants, and with polyconsumption. To be studying and looking for work was related to cannabis and stimulant use and to polyconsumption among women, but only to cannabis use among men. These results support the notion that the start of university studies is a particularly relevant stage in the onset of illegal drug use and its prevention, and that consumption may be especially associated with family support. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Thomas, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Flaring is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multiyear study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency. 1 tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  16. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Spanish normative studies in young adults (NEURONORMA young adults project): norms for Stroop Color-Word Interference and Tower of London-Drexel University tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognoni, T; Casals-Coll, M; Sánchez-Benavides, G; Quintana, M; Manero, R M; Calvo, L; Palomo, R; Aranciva, F; Tamayo, F; Peña-Casanova, J

    2013-03-01

    The Stroop Color-Word Interference Test (Stroop) measures cognitive flexibility, selective attention, cognitive inhibition and information processing speed. The Tower of London-Drexel University version test (TOL) assesses higher-order problem solving and executive planning abilities. In this study, as part of the Spanish normative studies project in young adults (NEURONORMA young adults), we present normative data for the Stroop and young adults TOL tests. The sample consisted of 179 participants who are cognitively normal and range in age from 18 to 49 years. Tables are provided to convert raw scores to scaled scores. Scores adjusted for sociodemographic factors were obtained by applying linear regression techniques. No effects were found for age and sex in either test. Educational level impacted most of the Stroop test variables and some of the TOL scores (Total Moves score and Total Initiation Time score). The norms obtained will be extremely useful in the clinical evaluation of young Spanish adults. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Hands-off and hands-on casting consistency of amputee below knee sockets using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; McFadyen, Angus; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Residual limb shape capturing (Casting) consistency has a great influence on the quality of socket fit. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to establish a reliable reference grid for intercast and intracast shape and volume consistency of two common casting methods, Hands-off and Hands-on. Residual limbs were cast for twelve people with a unilateral below knee amputation and scanned twice for each casting concept. Subsequently, all four volume images of each amputee were semiautomatically segmented and registered to a common coordinate system using the tibia and then the shape and volume differences were calculated. The results show that both casting methods have intra cast volume consistency and there is no significant volume difference between the two methods. Inter- and intracast mean volume differences were not clinically significant based on the volume of one sock criteria. Neither the Hands-off nor the Hands-on method resulted in a consistent residual limb shape as the coefficient of variation of shape differences was high. The resultant shape of the residual limb in the Hands-off casting was variable but the differences were not clinically significant. For the Hands-on casting, shape differences were equal to the maximum acceptable limit for a poor socket fit.

  19. Access to hands-on mathematics measurement activities using robots controlled via speech generating devices: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kim; Cook, Al

    2014-07-01

    To examine how using a robot controlled via a speech generating device (SGD) influences the ways students with physical and communication limitations can demonstrate their knowledge in math measurement activities. Three children with severe physical disabilities and complex communication needs used the robot and SGD system to perform four math measurement lessons in comparing, sorting and ordering objects. The performance of the participants was measured and the process of using the system was described in terms of manipulation and communication events. Stakeholder opinions were solicited regarding robot use. Robot use revealed some gaps in the procedural knowledge of the participants. Access to both the robot and SGD was shown to provide several benefits. Stakeholders thought the intervention was important and feasible for a classroom environment. The participants were able to participate actively in the hands-on and communicative measurement activities and thus meet the demands of current math instruction methods. Current mathematics pedagogy encourages doing hands-on activities while communicating about concepts. Adapted Lego robots enabled children with severe physical disabilities to perform hands-on length measurement activities. Controlling the robots from speech generating devices (SGD) enabled the children, who also had complex communication needs, to reflect and report on results during the activities. By using the robots combined with SGDs, children both exhibited their knowledge of and experienced the concepts of mathematical measurements.

  20. A Summer at the University: A twenty five years experience with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    After running a summer school for enthusiastic high school students for 25 years, we reached the point where three of my colleagues at the physics department, are exstudents from two physics courses offered (more than ten years ago) within our program. There are also graduates in some others Faculties in different universities. Here we would like to describe the evolution of this project since its beginning, with 60 students in an introductory physics class to the 3000 now attending (January 2014) the around 60 courses offered in almost all areas of knowledge, from theater to Biotechnology. Lately, as we became aware of the relevance of teaching sciences to young kids in elementary school, we started a winter section addressing this group of students. The courses are mainly a hands on experience. In this talk we will comment about our learning experience working on this kind of projects and our projections for the future. Partial travel support from Escuela de Verano.