WorldWideScience

Sample records for hands-on computer training

  1. Using mockups for hands-on training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    The presentation of Using Mockups for Hands-on Training will be a slide presentation showing slides of mockups that are used by the Westinghouse Hanford Company in Maintenance Training activities. This presentation will compare mockups to actual plant equipment. It will explain the advantages and disadvantages of using mockups. The presentation will show students using the mockups in the classroom environment and slides of the actual plant equipment. The presentation will discuss performance-based training. This part of the presentation will show slides of students doing hands-on training on aerial lifts, fork trucks, and crane and rigging applications. Also shown are mockups that are used for basic hydraulics; hydraulic torquing; refrigeration and air conditioning; valve seat repair; safety relief valve training; and others. The presentation will discuss functional duplicate equipment and simulated nonfunctional equipment. The presentation will discuss the acquisition of mockups from spare parts inventory or from excess parts inventory. The presentation will show attendees how the mockups are used to enhance the training of the Hanford Site employees and how similar mockups could be used throughout the nuclear industry

  2. Multidisciplinary Graduate Training in Social Research Methodology and Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis: A Hands-On/Hands-Off Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Claude Julie; Bourdon, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of training graduate students and researchers in qualitative and mixed-methods analysis since the mid-1990s, the authors reflect on the evolution of a multidisciplinary graduate course developed in a Canadian university since 2007. The hands-on/hands-off course design based on the use of NVivo was developed in parallel…

  3. A community sharing hands-on centers in engineer's training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jean-pierre jpt Taboy

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available As teachers in Technical Universities, we must think about the engineer's training. We need good applicants, up to date hardware and software for hand-on. Each university don't have enough money and technical people to cover the new needs. A community sharing remote hand-on centers could be a solution.

  4. Designing a hands-on brain computer interface laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Long, Laura Kathleen; Mesgarani, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Devices and systems that interact with the brain have become a growing field of research and development in recent years. Engineering students are well positioned to contribute to both hardware development and signal analysis techniques in this field. However, this area has been left out of most engineering curricula. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) based brain computer interface (BCI) laboratory course to educate students through hands-on experiments. The course is offered jointly by the Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science Departments of Columbia University in the City of New York and is open to senior undergraduate and graduate students. The course provides an effective introduction to the experimental design, neuroscience concepts, data analysis techniques, and technical skills required in the field of BCI.

  5. Hands-on Training Courses Using Research Reactors and Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The enhancement of nuclear science education and training in all Member States is of interest to the IAEA since many of these countries, particularly in the developing world, are building up and expanding their scientific and technological infrastructures. Unfortunately, most of these countries still lack sufficient numbers of well-educated and qualified nuclear specialists and technologists. This may arise from, amongst other things: a lack of candidates with sufficient educational background in nuclear science who would qualify to receive specialized training; a lack of institutions available for training nuclear science specialists; a lack of lecturers in nuclear related fields; and a lack of suitable educational and teaching materials. A related concern is the potential loss of valuable knowledge accumulated over many decades due to the ageing workforce. An imperative for Member States is to develop and offer suitable graduate and postgraduate academic programmes which combine study and project work so that students can attain a prerequisite level of knowledge, abilities and skills in their chosen subject area. In nearly all academic programmes, experimental work forms an essential and integral component of study to help students develop general and subject specific skills. Experimental laboratory courses and exercises can mean practical work in a conventional laboratory or an advanced facility with an operational particle accelerator or research reactor often accompanied by computer simulations and theoretical exercises. In this context, available or newly planned research reactors and particle accelerators should be seen as extremely important and indispensable components of nuclear science and technology curricula. Research reactors can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on nuclear fission and the interaction of neutrons and photons with matter, while particle accelerators can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on charged particle

  6. Teaching Hands-On Linux Host Computer Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Rose

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2003, a project to augment and improve the teaching of information assurance courses was started at IUP. Thus far, ten hands-on exercises have been developed. The exercises described in this article, and presented in the appendix, are based on actions required to secure a Linux host. Publicly available resources were used to…

  7. ISO training program mixes lectures, hands-on exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakofsky, S.; Vitale, D.

    1994-01-01

    Early in 1990, the Dresser-Rand Co., made the decision to upgrade its purchased material quality program and pursue ISO 9000 registration for all product divisions. A joint quality-purchasing council from all US based divisions met and developed a new strategy that included: developing and maintaining a common external audit schedule eliminating duplicate audits; development of a formal training program for auditors; implementing a rule for all divisions that called for internal and external audits to be conducted by certified auditors; implementing an aggressive internal audit program for each division preparing for ISO 9001 or 9002 registration. Development of a formal training program began with educating and training future instructors. Two people were selected who had previous audit and quality system experience. Both were sent to various seminars on ISO 9000, attended a lead assessor course, passed the examination, and became registered with the Institute of Quality Assurance (IQA) in the United Kingdom. The original course was developed by a consultant along with one future instructor. Course content used traditional auditing methodology, but included many team exercises including an actual factory audit. The paper describes the methods and contents of this training course

  8. Teaching Computer Security with a Hands-On Component

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy , Narayan

    2011-01-01

    Part 2: WISE 7; International audience; To address national needs for computer security education, many universities have incorporated computer and security courses into their undergraduate and graduate curricula. Our department has introduced computer security courses at both the undergraduate and the graduate level. This paper describes our approach, our experiences, and lessons learned in teaching a Computer Security Overview course.There are two key elements in the course: Studying comput...

  9. Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

  10. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-01-01

    , pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way...... to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs....

  11. Student tutors for hands-on training in focused emergency echocardiography – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focused emergency echocardiography performed by non-cardiologists has been shown to be feasible and effective in emergency situations. During resuscitation a short focused emergency echocardiography has been shown to narrow down potential differential diagnoses and to improve patient survival. Quite a large proportion of physicians are eligible to learn focused emergency echocardiography. Training in focused emergency echocardiography usually comprises a lecture, hands-on trainings in very small groups, and a practice phase. There is a shortage of experienced echocardiographers who can supervise the second step, the hands-on training. We thus investigated whether student tutors can perform the hands-on training for focused emergency echocardiography. Methods A total of 30 volunteer 4th and 5th year students were randomly assigned to a twelve-hour basic echocardiography course comprising a lecture followed by a hands-on training in small groups taught either by an expert cardiographer (EC or by a student tutor (ST. Using a pre-post-design, the students were evaluated by an OSCE. The students had to generate two still frames with the apical five-chamber view and the parasternal long axis in five minutes and to correctly mark twelve anatomical cardiac structures. Two blinded expert cardiographers rated the students’ performance using a standardized checklist. Students could achieve a maximum of 25 points. Results Both groups showed significant improvement after the training (p Conclusions Hands-on training by student tutors led to a significant gain in echocardiography skills, although inferior to teaching by an expert cardiographer.

  12. Basic CNC Operation. Training Workbook [and] Assessment and Training Guide [and] Hands-on Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoka-Hennepin Technical Coll., Minneapolis, MN.

    This workbook is intended for students taking a course in basic computer numerical control (CNC) operation that was developed during a project to retrain defense industry workers at risk of job loss or dislocation because of conversion of the defense industry. The workbook contains daily training guides for each of the course's 13 sessions. Among…

  13. The European Urology Residents Education Programme Hands-on Training Format: 4 Years of Hands-on Training Improvements from the European School of Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Bhaskar K; Van Cleynenbreugel, Ben; Gozen, Ali; Palou, Jaun; Barmoshe, Sas; Biyani, Shekhar; Gaya, Josep M; Hellawell, Giles; Pini, Gio; Oscar, Faba R; Sanchez Salas, Rafael; Macek, Petr; Skolarikos, Andreas; Wagner, Christian; Eret, Viktor; Haensel, Stephen; Siena, Giampaolo; Schmidt, Marek; Klitsch, Max; Vesely, Stepan; Ploumidis, Achilles; Proietti, Silvia; Kamphuis, Guido; Tokas, Theodore; Geraghty, Rob; Veneziano, Dominico

    2018-03-14

    The European School of Urology (ESU) started the European Urology Residents Education Programme (EUREP) in 2003 for final year urology residents, with hands-on training (HOT) added later in 2007. To assess the geographical reach of EUREP, trainee demographics, and individual quality feedback in relation to annual methodology improvements in HOT. From September 2014 to October 2017 (four EUREP courses) several new features have been applied to the HOT format of the EUREP course: 1:1 training sessions (2015), fixed 60-min time slots (2016), and standardised teaching methodology (2017). The resulting EUREP HOT format was verified by collecting and prospectively analysing the following data: total number of participants attending different HOT courses; participants' age; country of origin; and feedback obtained annually. A total of 796 participants from 54 countries participated in 1450 HOT sessions over the last 4 yr. This included 294 (20%) ureteroscopy (URS) sessions, 237 (16.5%) transurethral resection (TUR) sessions, 840 (58%) basic laparoscopic sessions, and 79 (5.5%) intermediate laparoscopic sessions. While 712 residents (89%) were from Europe, 84 (11%) were from non-European nations. Of the European residents, most came from Italy (16%), Germany (15%), Spain (15%), and Romania (8%). Feedback for the basic laparoscopic session showed a constant improvement in scores over the last 4 yr, with the highest scores achieved last year. This included feedback on improvements in tutor rating (p=0.017), organisation (ptraining curriculum with wet laboratory or cadaveric courses in this format, although these could be performed in other training centres in conjunction with EUREP. The EUREP trainee demographics show that the purpose of the course is being achieved, with excellent feedback reported. While European trainees dominate the demographics, participation from a number of non-European countries suggests continued ESU collaboration with other national societies and

  14. Prospective randomized study of contrast reaction management curricula: Computer-based interactive simulation versus high-fidelity hands-on simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Carolyn L., E-mail: wangcl@uw.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 357115, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-7115 (United States); Schopp, Jennifer G.; Kani, Kimia [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 357115, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-7115 (United States); Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M. [Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Zaidi, Sadaf; Hippe, Dan S.; Paladin, Angelisa M.; Bush, William H. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 357115, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-7115 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We developed a computer-based interactive simulation program for teaching contrast reaction management to radiology trainees and compared its effectiveness to high-fidelity hands-on simulation training. Materials and methods: IRB approved HIPAA compliant prospective study of 44 radiology residents, fellows and faculty who were randomized into either the high-fidelity hands-on simulation group or computer-based simulation group. All participants took separate written tests prior to and immediately after their intervention. Four months later participants took a delayed written test and a hands-on high-fidelity severe contrast reaction scenario performance test graded on predefined critical actions. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the computer and hands-on groups’ written pretest, immediate post-test, or delayed post-test scores (p > 0.6 for all). Both groups’ scores improved immediately following the intervention (p < 0.001). The delayed test scores 4 months later were still significantly higher than the pre-test scores (p ≤ 0.02). The computer group's performance was similar to the hands-on group on the severe contrast reaction simulation scenario test (p = 0.7). There were also no significant differences between the computer and hands-on groups in performance on the individual core competencies of contrast reaction management during the contrast reaction scenario. Conclusion: It is feasible to develop a computer-based interactive simulation program to teach contrast reaction management. Trainees that underwent computer-based simulation training scored similarly on written tests and on a hands-on high-fidelity severe contrast reaction scenario performance test as those trained with hands-on high-fidelity simulation.

  15. Prospective randomized study of contrast reaction management curricula: Computer-based interactive simulation versus high-fidelity hands-on simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Carolyn L.; Schopp, Jennifer G.; Kani, Kimia; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M.; Zaidi, Sadaf; Hippe, Dan S.; Paladin, Angelisa M.; Bush, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We developed a computer-based interactive simulation program for teaching contrast reaction management to radiology trainees and compared its effectiveness to high-fidelity hands-on simulation training. Materials and methods: IRB approved HIPAA compliant prospective study of 44 radiology residents, fellows and faculty who were randomized into either the high-fidelity hands-on simulation group or computer-based simulation group. All participants took separate written tests prior to and immediately after their intervention. Four months later participants took a delayed written test and a hands-on high-fidelity severe contrast reaction scenario performance test graded on predefined critical actions. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the computer and hands-on groups’ written pretest, immediate post-test, or delayed post-test scores (p > 0.6 for all). Both groups’ scores improved immediately following the intervention (p < 0.001). The delayed test scores 4 months later were still significantly higher than the pre-test scores (p ≤ 0.02). The computer group's performance was similar to the hands-on group on the severe contrast reaction simulation scenario test (p = 0.7). There were also no significant differences between the computer and hands-on groups in performance on the individual core competencies of contrast reaction management during the contrast reaction scenario. Conclusion: It is feasible to develop a computer-based interactive simulation program to teach contrast reaction management. Trainees that underwent computer-based simulation training scored similarly on written tests and on a hands-on high-fidelity severe contrast reaction scenario performance test as those trained with hands-on high-fidelity simulation

  16. Hands-on approach to teaching Earth system sciences using a information-computational web-GIS portal "Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordova, Yulia; Gorbatenko, Valentina; Martynova, Yulia; Shulgina, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    A problem of making education relevant to the workplace tasks is a key problem of higher education because old-school training programs are not keeping pace with the rapidly changing situation in the professional field of environmental sciences. A joint group of specialists from Tomsk State University and Siberian center for Environmental research and Training/IMCES SB RAS developed several new courses for students of "Climatology" and "Meteorology" specialties, which comprises theoretical knowledge from up-to-date environmental sciences with practical tasks. To organize the educational process we use an open-source course management system Moodle (www.moodle.org). It gave us an opportunity to combine text and multimedia in a theoretical part of educational courses. The hands-on approach is realized through development of innovative trainings which are performed within the information-computational platform "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/) using web GIS tools. These trainings contain practical tasks on climate modeling and climate changes assessment and analysis and should be performed using typical tools which are usually used by scientists performing such kind of research. Thus, students are engaged in n the use of modern tools of the geophysical data analysis and it cultivates dynamic of their professional learning. The hands-on approach can help us to fill in this gap because it is the only approach that offers experience, increases students involvement, advance the use of modern information and communication tools. The courses are implemented at Tomsk State University and help forming modern curriculum in Earth system science area. This work is partially supported by SB RAS project VIII.80.2.1, RFBR grants numbers 13-05-12034 and 14-05-00502.

  17. Perceived Barriers to the Use of High-Fidelity Hands-On Simulation Training for Contrast Reaction Management: Why Programs are Not Using It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnugounder, Sankar; Hippe, Daniel S; Maximin, Suresh; O'Malley, Ryan B; Wang, Carolyn L

    2015-01-01

    Although subjective and objective benefits of high-fidelity simulation have been reported in medicine, there has been slow adoption in radiology. The purpose of our study was to identify the perceived barriers in the use of high-fidelity hands-on simulation for contrast reaction management training. An IRB exempt 32 questions online web survey was sent to 179 non-military radiology residency program directors listed in the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database Access system (FREIDA). Survey questions included the type of contrast reaction management training, cost, time commitment of residents and faculty, and the reasons for not using simulation training. Responses from the survey were summarized as count (percentage), mean ± standard deviation (SD), or median (range). 84 (47%) of 179 programs responded, of which 88% offered CRM training. Most (72%) conducted the CRM training annually while only 4% conducted it more frequently. Didactic lecture was the most frequently used training modality (97%), followed by HFS (30%) and computer-based simulation (CBS) (19%); 5.5% used both HFS and CBS. Of the 51 programs that offer CRM training but do not use HFS, the most common reason reported was insufficient availability (41%). Other reported reasons included cost (33%), no access to simulation centers (33%), lack of trained faculty (27%) and time constraints (27%). Although high-fidelity hands-on simulation training is the best way to reproduce real-life contrast reaction scenarios, many institutions do not provide this training due to constraints such as cost, lack of access or insufficient availability of simulation labs, and lack of trained faculty. As a specialty, radiology needs to better address these barriers at both an institutional and national level. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Product training for the technical expert the art of developing and delivering hands-on learning

    CERN Document Server

    Bixby, Daniel W

    2018-01-01

    I was pleased to review Dan's new book - pleased because he addresses an old topic in a new way. He is making no assumptions for trainers who are not fully experienced and seasoned. He takes them step-by-step through practical and realistic methods to set up training graduates to actually be on-the-job performers. Enjoy, learn and be inspired. Jim Kirkpatrick, PhD Senior Consultant, Kirkpatrick Partners, USA Daniel Bixby's approach to Product Training for technical experts is practical, relevant and exactly what anyone who is required to train others on technical content really needs. He writes with candor and with a sense of ease, making the reader feel as though he is right there with you helping to develop your training competency. A must read for anyone on your team required to provide technical training to others! Jennifer Alfaro Chief Human Resources Officer, USA An expert guide to developing and delivering technical product training programs While there are many books on talent developmen...

  19. Introducing computational thinking through hands-on projects using R with applications to calculus, probability and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benakli, Nadia; Kostadinov, Boyan; Satyanarayana, Ashwin; Singh, Satyanand

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to promote computational thinking among mathematics, engineering, science and technology students, through hands-on computer experiments. These activities have the potential to empower students to learn, create and invent with technology, and they engage computational thinking through simulations, visualizations and data analysis. We present nine computer experiments and suggest a few more, with applications to calculus, probability and data analysis, which engage computational thinking through simulations, visualizations and data analysis. We are using the free (open-source) statistical programming language R. Our goal is to give a taste of what R offers rather than to present a comprehensive tutorial on the R language. In our experience, these kinds of interactive computer activities can be easily integrated into a smart classroom. Furthermore, these activities do tend to keep students motivated and actively engaged in the process of learning, problem solving and developing a better intuition for understanding complex mathematical concepts.

  20. Hands-On Surgical Training Workshop: an Active Role-Playing Patient Education for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkietkachorn, Apinut; Boonyawong, Pangpoom; Rhunsiri, Peera; Tantiphlachiva, Kasaya

    2017-09-01

    Most patient education involves passive learning. To improve patient education regarding surgery, an active learning workshop-based teaching method is proposed. The objective of this study was to assess level of patient surgical knowledge, achievement of workshop learning objectives, patient apprehension about future surgery, and participant workshop satisfaction after completing a surgical training workshop. A four-station workshop (surgical scrub, surgical suture, laparoscopic surgery, and robotic surgery) was developed to teach four important components of the surgical process. Healthy, surgery-naive adolescents were enrolled to attend this 1-h workshop-based training program. Training received by participants was technically and procedurally identical to training received by actual surgeons. Pre- and post-workshop questionnaires were used to assess learning outcomes. There were 1312 participants, with a mean age 15.9 ± 1.1 years and a gender breakdown of 303 males and 1009 females. For surgical knowledge, mean pre-workshop and post-workshop scores were 6.1 ± 1.5 and 7.5 ± 1.5 (out of 10 points), respectively (p education is an effective way to improve understanding of surgery-related processes. This teaching method may also decrease apprehension that patients or potential patients harbor regarding a future surgical procedure.

  1. MO-DE-BRA-04: Hands-On Fluoroscopy Safety Training with Real-Time Patient and Staff Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderhoek, M; Bevins, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are routinely performed across many different hospital departments. However, many involved staff members have minimal training regarding safe and optimal use of fluoroscopy systems. We developed and taught a hands-on fluoroscopy safety class incorporating real-time patient and staff dosimetry in order to promote safer and more optimal use of fluoroscopy during FGI. Methods: The hands-on fluoroscopy safety class is taught in an FGI suite, unique to each department. A patient equivalent phantom is set on the patient table with an ion chamber positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom. This provides a surrogate measure of patient entrance dose. Multiple solid state dosimeters (RaySafe i2 dosimetry systemTM) are deployed at different distances from the phantom (0.1, 1, 3 meters), which provide surrogate measures of staff dose. Instructors direct participating clinical staff to operate the fluoroscopy system as they view live fluoroscopic images, patient entrance dose, and staff doses in real-time. During class, instructors work with clinical staff to investigate how patient entrance dose, staff doses, and image quality are affected by different parameters, including pulse rate, magnification, collimation, beam angulation, imaging mode, system geometry, distance, and shielding. Results: Real-time dose visualization enables clinical staff to directly see and learn how to optimize their use of their own fluoroscopy system to minimize patient and staff dose, yet maintain sufficient image quality for FGI. As a direct result of the class, multiple hospital departments have implemented changes to their imaging protocols, including reduction of the default fluoroscopy pulse rate and increased use of collimation and lower dose fluoroscopy modes. Conclusion: Hands-on fluoroscopy safety training substantially benefits from real-time patient and staff dosimetry incorporated into the class. Real-time dose display helps

  2. MO-DE-BRA-04: Hands-On Fluoroscopy Safety Training with Real-Time Patient and Staff Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhoek, M; Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are routinely performed across many different hospital departments. However, many involved staff members have minimal training regarding safe and optimal use of fluoroscopy systems. We developed and taught a hands-on fluoroscopy safety class incorporating real-time patient and staff dosimetry in order to promote safer and more optimal use of fluoroscopy during FGI. Methods: The hands-on fluoroscopy safety class is taught in an FGI suite, unique to each department. A patient equivalent phantom is set on the patient table with an ion chamber positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom. This provides a surrogate measure of patient entrance dose. Multiple solid state dosimeters (RaySafe i2 dosimetry systemTM) are deployed at different distances from the phantom (0.1, 1, 3 meters), which provide surrogate measures of staff dose. Instructors direct participating clinical staff to operate the fluoroscopy system as they view live fluoroscopic images, patient entrance dose, and staff doses in real-time. During class, instructors work with clinical staff to investigate how patient entrance dose, staff doses, and image quality are affected by different parameters, including pulse rate, magnification, collimation, beam angulation, imaging mode, system geometry, distance, and shielding. Results: Real-time dose visualization enables clinical staff to directly see and learn how to optimize their use of their own fluoroscopy system to minimize patient and staff dose, yet maintain sufficient image quality for FGI. As a direct result of the class, multiple hospital departments have implemented changes to their imaging protocols, including reduction of the default fluoroscopy pulse rate and increased use of collimation and lower dose fluoroscopy modes. Conclusion: Hands-on fluoroscopy safety training substantially benefits from real-time patient and staff dosimetry incorporated into the class. Real-time dose display helps

  3. The Effectiveness of Hands-on Health Informatics Skills Exercises in the Multidisciplinary Smart Home Healthcare and Health Informatics Training Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapci, A H; Sapci, H A

    2017-10-01

    This article aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of newly established innovative smart home healthcare and health informatics laboratories, and a novel laboratory course that focuses on experiential health informatics training, and determine students' self-confidence to operate wireless home health monitoring devices before and after the hands-on laboratory course. Two web-based pretraining and posttraining questionnaires were sent to 64 students who received hands-on training with wireless remote patient monitoring devices in smart home healthcare and health informatics laboratories. All 64 students completed the pretraining survey (100% response rate), and 49 students completed the posttraining survey (76% response rate). The quantitative data analysis showed that 95% of students had an interest in taking more hands-on laboratory courses. Sixty-seven percent of students had no prior experience with medical image, physiological data acquisition, storage, and transmission protocols. After the hands-on training session, 75.51% of students expressed improved confidence about training patients to measure blood pressure monitor using wireless devices. Ninety percent of students preferred to use a similar experiential approach in their future learning experience. Additionally, the qualitative data analysis demonstrated that students were expecting to have more courses with hands-on exercises and integration of technology-enabled delivery and patient monitoring concepts into the curriculum. This study demonstrated that the multidisciplinary smart home healthcare and health informatics training laboratories and the hands-on exercises improved students' technology adoption rates and their self-confidence in using wireless patient monitoring devices. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  4. Objective structured assessment of technical skills evaluation of theoretical compared with hands-on training of shoulder dystocia management: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerkle, Bernd; Pueth, Julia; Hefler, Lukas A; Tempfer-Bentz, Eva-Katrin; Tempfer, Clemens B

    2012-10-01

    To compare the skills of performing a shoulder dystocia management algorithm after hands-on training compared with demonstration. We randomized medical students to a 30-minute hands-on (group 1) and a 30-minute demonstration (group 2) training session teaching a standardized shoulder dystocia management scheme on a pelvic training model. Participants were tested with a 22-item Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills scoring system after training and 72 hours thereafter. Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills scores were the primary outcome. Performance time, self-assessment, confidence, and global rating scale were the secondary outcomes. Statistics were performed using Mann-Whitney U test, χ test, and multiple linear regression analysis. Two hundred three participants were randomized. Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills scores were significantly higher in group 1 (n=103) compared with group 2 (n=100) (17.95±3.14 compared with 15.67±3.18, respectively; PTechnical Skills scores were still significantly higher in group 1 (n=67) compared with group 2 (n=60) (18.17±2.76 compared with 14.98±3.03, respectively; PTechnical Skills scores. Hands-on training helps to achieve a significant improvement of shoulder dystocia management on a pelvic training model. www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01618565. I.

  5. Advanced computer-based training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H D; Martin, H D

    1987-05-01

    The paper presents new techniques of computer-based training for personnel of nuclear power plants. Training on full-scope simulators is further increased by use of dedicated computer-based equipment. An interactive communication system runs on a personal computer linked to a video disc; a part-task simulator runs on 32 bit process computers and shows two versions: as functional trainer or as on-line predictor with an interactive learning system (OPAL), which may be well-tailored to a specific nuclear power plant. The common goal of both develoments is the optimization of the cost-benefit ratio for training and equipment.

  6. Advanced computer-based training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.D.; Martin, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents new techniques of computer-based training for personnel of nuclear power plants. Training on full-scope simulators is further increased by use of dedicated computer-based equipment. An interactive communication system runs on a personal computer linked to a video disc; a part-task simulator runs on 32 bit process computers and shows two versions: as functional trainer or as on-line predictor with an interactive learning system (OPAL), which may be well-tailored to a specific nuclear power plant. The common goal of both develoments is the optimization of the cost-benefit ratio for training and equipment. (orig.) [de

  7. Computer training, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The products of educational firms today lead toward a multimedia approach to the education and training of commercial programmers and systems analysts. Computer-assisted instruction or CAI is a relatively new medium to augment the other media. The government use of computers is discussed together with the importance of computer pretests. Pretests can aid in determining a person's ability to absorb a particular instructional level. The material presented in a number of computer courses is listed.

  8. Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) evaluation of theoretical versus hands-on training of vaginal breech delivery management: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerkle, Bernd; Rueter, Katharina; Hefler, Lukas A; Tempfer-Bentz, Eva-Katrin; Tempfer, Clemens B

    2013-12-01

    To compare the skills of performing a vaginal breech (VB) delivery after hands-on training versus demonstration. We randomized medical students to a 30-min demonstration (group 1) or a 30-min hands-on (group 2) training session using a standardized VB management algorithm on a pelvic training model. Subjects were tested with a 25 item Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scoring system immediately after training and 72 h thereafter. OSATS scores were the primary outcome. Performance time (PT), self assessment (SA), confidence (CON), and global rating scale (GRS) were the secondary outcomes. Statistics were performed using the Mann-Whitney U-test, chi-square test, and multiple linear regression analysis. 172 subjects were randomized. OSATS scores (primary outcome) were significantly higher in group 2 (n=88) compared to group 1 (n=84) (21.18±2.29 vs. 20.19±2.37, respectively; p=0.006). The secondary outcomes GRS (10.31±2.28 vs. 9.17±2.21; p=0.001), PT (214.60±57.97 s vs. 246.98±59.34 s; ptraining leads to a significant improvement of VB management in a pelvic training model, but this effect was only seen in the short term. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A randomized comparison of video demonstration versus hands-on training of medical students for vacuum delivery using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Ziad; Kumpernatz, Anne K; Rezniczek, Günther A; Cetin, Cem; Tempfer-Bentz, Eva-Katrin; Tempfer, Clemens B

    2017-03-01

    To compare medical students' skills for vaginal operative delivery by vacuum extraction (VE) after hands-on training versus video demonstration. We randomized medical students to an expert demonstration (group 1) or a hands-on (group 2) training using a standardized VE algorithm on a pelvic training model. Students were tested with a 40-item Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scoring system after training and 4 days later. OSATS scores were the primary outcome. Performance time, self-assessment, confidence, and global rating scale were secondary outcomes. We assessed the constructive validity of OSATS in this VE model comparing metric scores of experts and students. In all, 137 students were randomized. OSATS scores were higher in group 2 (n = 63) compared with group 1 (n = 74) (32.89 ± 6.39 vs 27.51 ± 10.27, respectively; P training is superior to video demonstration for teaching VE on a pelvic model.

  10. Hands-on Approach to Prepare Specialists in Climate Changes Modeling and Analysis Using an Information-Computational Web-GIS Portal "Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordova, Y. E.; Martynova, Y. V.

    2014-12-01

    A problem of making education relevant to the workplace tasks is a key problem of higher education in the professional field of environmental sciences. To answer this challenge several new courses for students of "Climatology" and "Meteorology" specialties were developed and implemented at the Tomsk State University, which comprises theoretical knowledge from up-to-date environmental sciences with computational tasks. To organize the educational process we use an open-source course management system Moodle (www.moodle.org). It gave us an opportunity to combine text and multimedia in a theoretical part of educational courses. The hands-on approach is realized through development of innovative trainings which are performed within the information-computational web GIS platform "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/). The platform has a set of tools and data bases allowing a researcher to perform climate changes analysis on the selected territory. The tools are also used for students' trainings, which contain practical tasks on climate modeling and climate changes assessment and analysis. Laboratory exercises are covering three topics: "Analysis of regional climate changes"; "Analysis of climate extreme indices on the regional scale"; and "Analysis of future climate". They designed to consolidate students' knowledge of discipline, to instill in them the skills to work independently with large amounts of geophysical data using modern processing and analysis tools of web-GIS platform "Climate" and to train them to present results obtained on laboratory work as reports with the statement of the problem, the results of calculations and logically justified conclusion. Thus, students are engaged in n the use of modern tools of the geophysical data analysis and it cultivates dynamic of their professional learning. The approach can help us to fill in this gap because it is the only approach that offers experience, increases students involvement, advance the use of modern

  11. Computer Based Training Authors' and Designers' training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric GODET

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This communication, through couple of studies driven since 10 years, tries to show how important is the training of authors in Computer Based Training (CBT. We submit here an approach to prepare designers mastering Interactive Multimedia modules in this domain. Which institutions are really dedicating their efforts in training authors and designers in this area of CBTs? Television devices and broadcast organisations offered since year 60s' a first support for Distance Learning. New media, New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT allowed several public and private organisations to start Distance Learning projects. As usual some of them met their training objectives, other of them failed. Did their really failed? Currently, nobody has the right answer. Today, we do not have enough efficient tools allowing us to evaluate trainees' acquisition in a short term view. Training evaluation needs more than 10 to 20 years of elapsed time to bring reliable measures. Nevertheless, given the high investments already done in this area, we cannot wait until the final results of the pedagogical evaluation. A lot of analyses showed relevant issues which can be used as directions for CBTs authors and designers training. Warning - Our studies and the derived conclusions are mainly based on projects driven in the field. We additionally bring our several years experience in the training of movie film authors in the design of interactive multimedia products. Some of our examples are extracting from vocational training projects where we were involved in all development phases from the analysis of needs to the evaluation of the acquisition within the trainee's / employee job's. Obviously, we cannot bring and exhaustive approach in this domain where a lot of parameters are involved as frame for the CBT interactive multimedia modules authors' and designers' training.

  12. Integration of Hands-On Team Training into Existing Curriculum Improves Both Technical and Nontechnical Skills in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Robert C; Owei, Lily; Rao, Raghavendra; Riddle, Elijah W; Brooks, Ari D; Dempsey, Daniel T; Morris, Jon B; Neylan, Christopher J; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    Nontechnical skills are an essential component of surgical education and a major competency assessed by the ACGME milestones project. However, the optimal way to integrate nontechnical skills training into existing curricula and then objectively evaluate the outcome is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect laparoscopic team-based task training would have on the nontechnical skills needed for laparoscopic surgery. 9 PGY-1 residents underwent an established training curriculum for teaching the knowledge and technical skills involved in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Initial training involved a didactic session, expert-led practice on a porcine model in a simulated operating room and laparoscopic skills practice on a virtual reality trainer. Residents then performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the same porcine model as a preintervention test. Three to four months following this, residents were subjected to specific nontechnical skills training involving 2 simple team-based laparoscopic tasks. They then practiced a further 4 to 6 hours on the virtual reality trainer. A repeat postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomy was then performed 3 to 4 months after nontechnical skills training. Both the preintervention and postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomies were audiovisually recorded and then evaluated by 2 independent surgeons in a blinded fashion. Technical skills were assessed using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) and a technique specific rating scale (TRS) that we developed for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Nontechnical skills were assessed using nontechnical skills for surgeons (NOTSS). Residents also completed a survey at the beginning and end of the training. Tertiary care, university based teaching institution. A total of 9 general surgery residents at the intern level. The mean OSATS score improved from 13.7 ± 1.24 to 26.7 ± 0.31 (p training. There was a strong correlation between OSATS and

  13. Computer training aids for nuclear operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.G.P.; Binns, J.B.H.

    1983-01-01

    The Royal Navy's Nuclear Propulsion School at HMS SULTAN which is responsible for training all ratings and officers who operate Submarine Pressurised Water Reactor plants, has available a varied selection of classroom simulator training aids as well as purpose built Submarine Manoeuvring Room simulators. The use of these classroom training aids in the twelve months prior to Autumn 1981 is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of using relatively expensive computer based aids to support classroom instruction for students who do not investigate mathematically the dynamics of the Reactor Plant are identified. The conclusions drawn indicate that for students of limited academic ability the classroom simulators are disproportionately expensive in cost, maintenance load, and instructional time. Secondly, the experience gained in the use of the Manoeuvring Room Simulators to train future operators who have just finished the academic phase of their training is outlined. The possible pitfalls for the instructor are discussed and the lessons learnt, concluding that these simulators provide a valuable substitute for the live plant enabling trainees to be brought up to a common standard and reducing their on job training time to an acceptable level. (author)

  14. Computer aided training system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midkiff, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    The first three phases of Training System Development (TSD) -- job and task analysis, curriculum design, and training material development -- are time consuming and labor intensive. The use of personal computers with a combination of commercial and custom-designed software resulted in a significant reduction in the man-hours required to complete these phases for a Health Physics Technician Training Program at a nuclear power station. This paper reports that each step in the training program project involved the use of personal computers: job survey data were compiled with a statistical package, task analysis was performed with custom software designed to interface with a commercial database management program. Job Performance Measures (tests) were generated by a custom program from data in the task analysis database, and training materials were drafted, edited, and produced using commercial word processing software

  15. Alzheimer's Association Quality Care Campaign and professional training initiatives: improving hands-on care for people with dementia in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth; Reed, Peter

    2009-04-01

    In the U.S.A., direct care workers and licensed practical nurses are the professionals who provide the most hands-on care to people with dementia in nursing homes and residential care facilities--yet they do not receive adequate training in dementia care. Dementia care training needs to be universal with all disciplines at all levels of care. Even though there is variability on recommended hours and content, most studies emphasize the importance of dementia care training as a distinct component of required training for any professional or paraprofessional working in long-term care. In 2005, the Alzheimer's Association launched its Quality Care Campaign to improve dementia care through state and federal advocacy; consumer education and empowerment; and staff training. This paper describes the effectiveness of Alzheimer's Association training as measured by knowledge gained and providers' intention to change their behavior immediately after attending the training.Overall, findings indicated that the participants responded positively to evidence-based training in dementia care that emphasized the importance of (i) leadership, (ii) team communication and collaboration, (iii) support and empowerment of direct care staff, (iv) awareness and practice of specific dementia care issues, (v) resident and family involvement in care, and (vi) professional self-care.

  16. Skills training through hands-on practical activities in civil technology – a case study of three technical schools in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogale Maeko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Skills training for Civil Technology learners in South African schools, is an aspect entrenched in the Civil Technology policy document in order to produce skilled personnel for a sustainable economy. Practical activities through the Practical Assessment Task (PAT are national requirements for all practical-based subjects from grades 10–12 in South African schools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of Civil Technology practical activities in three South African schools in the Eastern Cape Province. Purposive sampling was used to identify 41 learners and 3 teachers to participate in the study. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and observation as data collection methods were instruments used to collect data. The study has found that learners exit grade 12 without basic practical hands-on skills. Civil Technology practical activities were found to be inadequately offered in the three schools investigated. Educators should be well-trained by higher education institutions (HEIs to conduct practical activities with learners so that these learners are equipped with marketable skills in order to contribute to a sustainable economy after grade 12. Technology teacher education and training should include regular exposure and visits to relevant industries in order for teachers to keep abreast with the latest technological developments. The supply of equipment to schools should be coupled with routine maintenance of the equipment.

  17. Visually impaired researchers get their hands on quantum chemistry: application to a computational study on the isomerization of a sterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounnas, Valère; Wedler, Henry B.; Newman, Timothy; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Harrison, Jason G.; Nepomuceno, Gabriella; Pemberton, Ryan; Tantillo, Dean J.; Vriend, Gert

    2014-11-01

    In molecular sciences, articles tend to revolve around 2D representations of 3D molecules, and sighted scientists often resort to 3D virtual reality software to study these molecules in detail. Blind and visually impaired (BVI) molecular scientists have access to a series of audio devices that can help them read the text in articles and work with computers. Reading articles published in this journal, though, is nearly impossible for them because they need to generate mental 3D images of molecules, but the article-reading software cannot do that for them. We have previously designed AsteriX, a web server that fully automatically decomposes articles, detects 2D plots of low molecular weight molecules, removes meta data and annotations from these plots, and converts them into 3D atomic coordinates. AsteriX-BVI goes one step further and converts the 3D representation into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations. These Braille-annotated physical 3D models allow BVI scientists to generate a complete mental model of the molecule. AsteriX-BVI uses Molden to convert the meta data of quantum chemistry experiments into BVI friendly formats so that the entire line of scientific information that sighted people take for granted—from published articles, via printed results of computational chemistry experiments, to 3D models—is now available to BVI scientists too. The possibilities offered by AsteriX-BVI are illustrated by a project on the isomerization of a sterol, executed by the blind co-author of this article (HBW).

  18. Hands-On Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss manipulatives and hands-on investigations for Calculus involving volume, arc length, and surface area to motivate and develop formulae which can then be verified using techniques of integration. Pre-service teachers in calculus courses using these activities experience a classroom in which active learning is encouraged and…

  19. Hands-on Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  20. Hands On Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  1. Hands-On Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  2. Training School Administrators in Computer Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuck, Dennis W.; Bozeman, William C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of faculty members in doctoral-level educational administration programs that examined the use of computers in administrative training programs. The present status and future directions of technological training of school administrators are discussed, and a sample curriculum for a course in technology and computing is…

  3. Educational Experiences in Oceanography through Hands-On Involvement with Surface Drifters: an Introduction to Ocean Currents, Engineering, Data Collection, and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's (NEFSC) Student Drifters Program is providing education opportunities for students of all ages. Using GPS-tracked ocean drifters, various educational institutions can provide students with hands-on experience in physical oceanography, engineering, and computer science. In building drifters many high school and undergraduate students may focus on drifter construction, sometimes designing their own drifter or attempting to improve current NEFSC models. While learning basic oceanography younger students can build drifters with the help of an educator and directions available on the studentdrifters.org website. Once drifters are deployed, often by a local mariner or oceanographic partner, drifter tracks can be visualised on maps provided at http://nefsc.noaa.gov/drifter. With the lesson plans available for those interested in computer science, students may download, process, and plot the drifter position data with basic Python code provided. Drifter tracks help students to visualize ocean currents, and also allow them to understand real particle tracking applications such as in search and rescue, oil spill dispersion, larval transport, and the movement of injured sea animals. Additionally, ocean circulation modelers can use student drifter paths to validate their models. The Student Drifters Program has worked with over 100 schools, several of them having deployed drifters on the West Coast. Funding for the program often comes from individual schools and small grants but in the future will preferably come from larger government grants. NSF, Sea-Grant, NOAA, and EPA are all possible sources of funding, especially with the support of multiple schools and large marine education associations. The Student Drifters Program is a unique resource for educators, students, and scientists alike.

  4. Computer based training: Technology and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Computer Based Training (CBT) offers great potential for revolutionizing the training environment. Tremendous advances in computer cost performance, instructional design science, and authoring systems have combined to put CBT within the reach of all. The ability of today's CBT systems to implement powerful training strategies, simulate complex processes and systems, and individualize and control the training process make it certain that CBT will now, at long last, live up to its potential. This paper reviews the major technologies and trends involved and offers some suggestions for getting started in CBT

  5. Training Software in Artificial-Intelligence Computing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ayanna; Rogstad, Eric; Chalfant, Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The Artificial Intelligence (AI) Toolkit is a computer program for training scientists, engineers, and university students in three soft-computing techniques (fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms) used in artificial-intelligence applications. The program promotes an easily understandable tutorial interface, including an interactive graphical component through which the user can gain hands-on experience in soft-computing techniques applied to realistic example problems. The tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on the workings of soft-computing technology, whereas the hands-on examples allow interaction and reinforcement of the techniques explained throughout the tutorial. In the fuzzy-logic example, a user can interact with a robot and an obstacle course to verify how fuzzy logic is used to command a rover traverse from an arbitrary start to the goal location. For the genetic algorithm example, the problem is to determine the minimum-length path for visiting a user-chosen set of planets in the solar system. For the neural-network example, the problem is to decide, on the basis of input data on physical characteristics, whether a person is a man, woman, or child. The AI Toolkit is compatible with the Windows 95,98, ME, NT 4.0, 2000, and XP operating systems. A computer having a processor speed of at least 300 MHz, and random-access memory of at least 56MB is recommended for optimal performance. The program can be run on a slower computer having less memory, but some functions may not be executed properly.

  6. Computer Training for Entrepreneurial Meteorologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Joseph P.; Young, George S.

    2001-05-01

    Computer applications of increasing diversity form a growing part of the undergraduate education of meteorologists in the early twenty-first century. The advent of the Internet economy, as well as a waning demand for traditional forecasters brought about by better numerical models and statistical forecasting techniques has greatly increased the need for operational and commercial meteorologists to acquire computer skills beyond the traditional techniques of numerical analysis and applied statistics. Specifically, students with the skills to develop data distribution products are in high demand in the private sector job market. Meeting these demands requires greater breadth, depth, and efficiency in computer instruction. The authors suggest that computer instruction for undergraduate meteorologists should include three key elements: a data distribution focus, emphasis on the techniques required to learn computer programming on an as-needed basis, and a project orientation to promote management skills and support student morale. In an exploration of this approach, the authors have reinvented the Applications of Computers to Meteorology course in the Department of Meteorology at The Pennsylvania State University to teach computer programming within the framework of an Internet product development cycle. Because the computer skills required for data distribution programming change rapidly, specific languages are valuable for only a limited time. A key goal of this course was therefore to help students learn how to retrain efficiently as technologies evolve. The crux of the course was a semester-long project during which students developed an Internet data distribution product. As project management skills are also important in the job market, the course teamed students in groups of four for this product development project. The success, failures, and lessons learned from this experiment are discussed and conclusions drawn concerning undergraduate instructional methods

  7. A Case Study for Comparing the Effectiveness of a Computer Simulation and a Hands-on Activity on Learning Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Adem; Gulacar, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Science education reform emphasizes innovative and constructivist views of science teaching and learning that promotes active learning environments, dynamic instructions, and authentic science experiments. Technology-based and hands-on instructional designs are among innovative science teaching and learning methods. Research shows that these two…

  8. Computer based training for oil spill management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Large oil spills are infrequent occurrences, which poses a particular problem for training oil spill response staff and for maintaining a high level of response readiness. Conventional training methods involve table-top simulations to develop tactical and strategic response skills and boom-deployment exercises to maintain operational readiness. Both forms of training are quite effective, but they are very time-consuming to organize, are expensive to conduct, and tend to become repetitious. To provide a variety of response experiences, a computer-based system of oil spill response training has been developed which can supplement a table-top training program. Using a graphic interface, a realistic and challenging computerized oil spill response simulation has been produced. Integral to the system is a program editing tool which allows the teacher to develop a custom training exercise for the area of interest to the student. 1 ref

  9. Hands on exotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy. Bivens

    1998-01-01

    To lead, teach, rear, bring up, instruct, train, show, inform, guide, direct, inspire, and foster expansion of knowledge-that is education. Environmental education has been defined as the interdisciplinary process of developing a citizenry that is knowledgeable about the total environment, including both its natural and built aspects, that has the capacity and the...

  10. Intelligent computer-aided training and tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, R. Bowen; Savely, Robert T.

    1991-01-01

    Specific autonomous training systems based on artificial intelligence technology for use by NASA astronauts, flight controllers, and ground-based support personnel that demonstrate an alternative to current training systems are described. In addition to these specific systems, the evolution of a general architecture for autonomous intelligent training systems that integrates many of the features of traditional training programs with artificial intelligence techniques is presented. These Intelligent Computer-Aided Training (ICAT) systems would provide, for the trainee, much of the same experience that could be gained from the best on-the-job training. By integrating domain expertise with a knowledge of appropriate training methods, an ICAT session should duplicate, as closely as possible, the trainee undergoing on-the-job training in the task environment, benefitting from the full attention of a task expert who is also an expert trainer. Thus, the philosophy of the ICAT system is to emulate the behavior of an experienced individual devoting his full time and attention to the training of a novice - proposing challenging training scenarios, monitoring and evaluating the actions of the trainee, providing meaningful comments in response to trainee errors, responding to trainee requests for information, giving hints (if appropriate), and remembering the strengths and weaknesses displayed by the trainee so that appropriate future exercises can be designed.

  11. CERN Technical Training: new courses on computer security

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Two new trainings are available at CERN concerning computer security. • How to create secure software? The "Developing secure software" course (3.5 hours) is designed for software programmers, both for regular software and Web applications. It covers main aspects of security in different phases of the software development lifecycle. The last, optional hour discusses security issues of Web application developers. This course, although not hands-on, is interactive and full of real-life examples. The first session of this course will take place, in English, on 21 April in the CERN Technical Training Center. More sessions will be scheduled in 2009. • How to safely navigate and send mails? The "Secure e-mail and Web browsing" course is an entry-level 1.5-hour training aimed to show how to detect and avoid typical security pitfalls encountered when e-mailing and browsing the Web. It is designed for non-technical users of Internet Explorer and Outlook. The first sessions o...

  12. Hands-on 2.0: improving transfer of training via the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Acquisition of Data for Outcomes and Procedure Transfer (ADOPT) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dort, Jonathan; Trickey, Amber; Paige, John; Schwarz, Erin; Dunkin, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Practicing surgeons commonly learn new procedures and techniques by attending a "hands-on" course, though trainings are often ineffective at promoting subsequent procedure adoption in practice. We describe implementation of a new program with the SAGES All Things Hernia Hands-On Course, Acquisition of Data for Outcomes and Procedure Transfer (ADOPT), which employs standardized, proven teaching techniques, and 1-year mentorship. Attendee confidence and procedure adoption are compared between standard and ADOPT programs. For the pilot ADOPT course implementation, a hands-on course focusing on abdominal wall hernia repair was chosen. ADOPT participants were recruited among enrollees for the standard Hands-On Hernia Course. Enrollment in ADOPT was capped at 10 participants and limited to a 2:1 student-to-faculty ratio, compared to the standard course 22 participants with a 4:1 student-to-faculty ratio. ADOPT mentors interacted with participants through webinars, phone conferences, and continuous email availability throughout the year. All participants were asked to provide pre- and post-course surveys inquiring about the number of targeted hernia procedures performed and related confidence level. Four of 10 ADOPT participants (40%) and six of 22 standard training participants (27%) returned questionnaires. Over the 3 months following the course, ADOPT participants performed more ventral hernia mesh insertion procedures than standard training participants (median 13 vs. 0.5, p = 0.010) and considerably more total combined procedures (median 26 vs. 7, p = 0.054). Compared to standard training, learners who participated in ADOPT reported greater confidence improvements in employing a components separation via an open approach (p = 0.051), and performing an open transversus abdominis release, though the difference did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.14). These results suggest that the ADOPT program, with standardized and structured teaching

  13. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-01

    contamination-control program developed by LLNL. A comprehensive study guide and a post-training practical exam supplement the CBT effort. The ''hands-on'' practical is particularly important in that it gives participants not only the opportunity to demonstrate what they've learned, but to ask questions about their individual work situations. The challenge is how to make the CBT program more facility- and task-specific while, at the same time, making the program more in tune with the education and/or experience levels of individual trainees. To that end, they have designed a CBT program, which they refer to as an ''onion''. That is, the course is layered, going from the general to the more and more specific

  14. The Effects of Upper-Limb Training Assisted with an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robotic Hand on Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingyi Nam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundImpaired hand dexterity is a major disability of the upper limb after stroke. An electromyography (EMG-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES robotic hand was designed previously, whereas its rehabilitation effects were not investigated.ObjectivesThis study aims to investigate the rehabilitation effectiveness of the EMG-driven NMES-robotic hand-assisted upper-limb training on persons with chronic stroke.MethodA clinical trial with single-group design was conducted on chronic stroke participants (n = 15 who received 20 sessions of EMG-driven NMES-robotic hand-assisted upper-limb training. The training effects were evaluated by pretraining, posttraining, and 3-month follow-up assessments with the clinical scores of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT, the Wolf Motor Function Test, the Motor Functional Independence Measure, and the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS. Improvements in the muscle coordination across the sessions were investigated by EMG parameters, including EMG activation level and Co-contraction Indexes (CIs of the target muscles in the upper limb.ResultsSignificant improvements in the FMA shoulder/elbow and wrist/hand scores (P < 0.05, the ARAT (P < 0.05, and in the MAS (P < 0.05 were observed after the training and sustained 3 months later. The EMG parameters indicated a significant decrease of the muscle activation level in flexor digitorum (FD and biceps brachii (P < 0.05, as well as a significant reduction of CIs in the muscle pairs of FD and triceps brachii and biceps brachii and triceps brachii (P < 0.05.ConclusionThe upper-limb training integrated with the assistance from the EMG-driven NMES-robotic hand is effective for the improvements of the voluntary motor functions and the muscle coordination in the proximal and distal joints. Furthermore, the motor improvement after the training could be maintained till 3 months later.Trial registration

  15. The Effects of Upper-Limb Training Assisted with an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robotic Hand on Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Chingyi; Rong, Wei; Li, Waiming; Xie, Yunong; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Impaired hand dexterity is a major disability of the upper limb after stroke. An electromyography (EMG)-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) robotic hand was designed previously, whereas its rehabilitation effects were not investigated. This study aims to investigate the rehabilitation effectiveness of the EMG-driven NMES-robotic hand-assisted upper-limb training on persons with chronic stroke. A clinical trial with single-group design was conducted on chronic stroke participants ( n  = 15) who received 20 sessions of EMG-driven NMES-robotic hand-assisted upper-limb training. The training effects were evaluated by pretraining, posttraining, and 3-month follow-up assessments with the clinical scores of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), the Wolf Motor Function Test, the Motor Functional Independence Measure, and the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Improvements in the muscle coordination across the sessions were investigated by EMG parameters, including EMG activation level and Co-contraction Indexes (CIs) of the target muscles in the upper limb. Significant improvements in the FMA shoulder/elbow and wrist/hand scores ( P  < 0.05), the ARAT ( P  < 0.05), and in the MAS ( P  < 0.05) were observed after the training and sustained 3 months later. The EMG parameters indicated a significant decrease of the muscle activation level in flexor digitorum (FD) and biceps brachii ( P  < 0.05), as well as a significant reduction of CIs in the muscle pairs of FD and triceps brachii and biceps brachii and triceps brachii ( P  < 0.05). The upper-limb training integrated with the assistance from the EMG-driven NMES-robotic hand is effective for the improvements of the voluntary motor functions and the muscle coordination in the proximal and distal joints. Furthermore, the motor improvement after the training could be maintained till 3 months later. ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT02117089; date of registration: April

  16. Computer Skills Training and Readiness to Work with Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Hershkovitz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In today’s job market, computer skills are part of the prerequisites for many jobs. In this paper, we report on a study of readiness to work with computers (the dependent variable among unemployed women (N=54 after participating in a unique, web-supported training focused on computer skills and empowerment. Overall, the level of participants’ readiness to work with computers was much higher at the end of the course than it was at its begin-ning. During the analysis, we explored associations between this variable and variables from four categories: log-based (describing the online activity; computer literacy and experience; job-seeking motivation and practice; and training satisfaction. Only two variables were associated with the dependent variable: knowledge post-test duration and satisfaction with content. After building a prediction model for the dependent variable, another log-based variable was highlighted: total number of actions in the course website along the course. Overall, our analyses shed light on the predominance of log-based variables over variables from other categories. These findings might hint at the need of developing new assessment tools for learners and trainees that take into consideration human-computer interaction when measuring self-efficacy variables.

  17. CERN Technical Training: new courses on computer security

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Two new trainings are available at CERN concerning computer security. • How to create secure software? The "Developing secure software" course (3.5 hours) is designed for software programmers, both for regular software and Web applications. It covers main aspects of security in different phases of the software development lifecycle. The last, optional hour discusses security issues of Web application developers. This course, although not hands-on, is interactive and full of real-life examples. The first session of this course will take place, in English, on 21 April in the CERN Technical Training Centre. More sessions will be scheduled in 2009. • How to safely navigate and send mails? The "Secure e-mail and Web browsing" course is an entry-level 1.5-hour course designed to show how to detect and avoid typical security pitfalls encountered when e-mailing and browsing the Web. It is designed for non-technical users of Internet Explorer and Outlook. The first sessions ...

  18. CERN Technical Training: new courses on computer security

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Two new trainings are available at CERN concerning computer security. • How to create secure software? The "Developing secure software" course (3.5 hours) is designed for software programmers, both for regular software and Web applications. It covers main aspects of security in different phases of the software development lifecycle. The last, optional hour discusses security issues of Web application developers. This course, although not hands-on, is interactive and full of real-life examples. The first session of this course will take place, in English, on 21 April in the CERN Technical Training Centre. More sessions will be scheduled in 2009. • How to safely navigate and send mails? The "Secure e-mail and Web browsing" course is an entry-level 1.5-hour course designed to show how to detect and avoid typical security pitfalls encountered when e-mailing and browsing the Web. It is designed for non-technical users of Internet Explorer and Outlook. The first sessions o...

  19. VECTR: Virtual Environment Computational Training Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, William L.

    2018-01-01

    The Westridge Middle School Curriculum and Community Night is an annual event designed to introduce students and parents to potential employers in the Central Florida area. NASA participated in the event in 2017, and has been asked to come back for the 2018 event on January 25. We will be demonstrating our Microsoft Hololens Virtual Rovers project, and the Virtual Environment Computational Training Resource (VECTR) virtual reality tool.

  20. Computer-Based Cognitive Training in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka

    2016-01-01

    At present there is a rapid growth of aging population groups worldwide, which brings about serious economic and social problems. Thus, there is considerable effort to prolong the active life of these older people and keep them independent. The purpose of this mini review is to explore available clinical studies implementing computer-based cognitive training programs as intervention tools in the prevention and delay of cognitive decline in aging, with a special focus on their effectiveness. This was done by conducting a literature search in the databases Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE and Springer, and consequently by evaluating the findings of the relevant studies. The findings show that computerized cognitive training can lead to the improvement of cognitive functions such as working memory and reasoning skills in particular. However, this training should be performed over a longer time span since a short-term cognitive training mainly has an impact on short-term memory with temporary effects. In addition, the training must be intense to become effective. Furthermore, the results indicate that it is important to pay close attention to the methodological standards in future clinical studies.

  1. Building Capacity Through Hands-on Computational Internships to Assure Reproducible Results and Implementation of Digital Documentation in the ICERT REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, R.; Gentle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Modern data pipelines and computational processes require that meticulous methodologies be applied in order to insure that the source data, algorithms, and results are properly curated, managed and retained while remaining discoverable, accessible, and reproducible. Given the complexity of understanding the scientific problem domain being researched, combined with the overhead of learning to use advanced computing technologies, it becomes paramount that the next generation of scientists and researchers learn to embrace best-practices. The Integrative Computational Education and Research Traineeship (ICERT) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Site at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). During Summer 2015, two ICERT interns joined the 3DDY project. 3DDY converts geospatial datasets into file types that can take advantage of new formats, such as natural user interfaces, interactive visualization, and 3D printing. Mentored by TACC researchers for ten weeks, students with no previous background in computational science learned to use scripts to build the first prototype of the 3DDY application, and leveraged Wrangler, the newest high performance computing (HPC) resource at TACC. Test datasets for quadrangles in central Texas were used to assemble the 3DDY workflow and code. Test files were successfully converted into a stereo lithographic (STL) format, which is amenable for use with a 3D printers. Test files and the scripts were documented and shared using the Figshare site while metadata was documented for the 3DDY application using OntoSoft. These efforts validated a straightforward set of workflows to transform geospatial data and established the first prototype version of 3DDY. Adding the data and software management procedures helped students realize a broader set of tangible results (e.g. Figshare entries), better document their progress and the final state of their work for the research group and community

  2. Computer-based training at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartmell, A.; Evans, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuel Limited (BNFL) operate the United Kingdom's spent-fuel receipt, storage, and reprocessing complex at Sellafield. Spent fuel from graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled Magnox reactors has been reprocessed at Sellafield for 22 yr. Spent fuel from light water and advanced gas reactors is stored pending reprocessing in the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant currently being constructed. The range of knowledge and skills needed for plant operation, construction, and commissioning represents a formidable training requirement. In addition, employees need to be acquainted with company practices and procedures. Computer-based training (CBT) is expected to play a significant role in this process. In this paper, current applications of CBT to the filed of nuclear criticality safety are described and plans for the immediate future are outlined

  3. Simulation and computation in health physics training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, S.R.A.; Gibbs, D.C.C.; Marchant, C.P.

    1980-01-01

    The Royal Naval College has devised a number of computer aided learning programmes applicable to health physics which include radiation shield design and optimisation, environmental impact of a reactor accident, exposure levels produced by an inert radioactive gas cloud, and the prediction of radiation detector response in various radiation field conditions. Analogue computers are used on reduced or fast time scales because time dependent phenomenon are not always easily assimilated in real time. The build-up and decay of fission products, the dynamics of intake of radioactive material and reactor accident dynamics can be effectively simulated. It is essential to relate these simulations to real time and the College applies a research reactor and analytical phantom to this end. A special feature of the reactor is a chamber which can be supplied with Argon-41 from reactor exhaust gases to create a realistic gaseous contamination environment. Reactor accident situations are also taught by using role playing sequences carried out in real time in the emergency facilities associated with the research reactor. These facilities are outlined and the training technique illustrated with examples of the calculations and simulations. The training needs of the future are discussed, with emphasis on optimisation and cost-benefit analysis. (H.K.)

  4. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  5. Computational surgery and dual training computing, robotics and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, Barbara; Berceli, Scott; Collet, Christophe; Cerveri, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume focuses on the use of medical imaging, medical robotics, simulation, and information technology in surgery. It offers a road map for computational surgery success,  discusses the computer-assisted management of disease and surgery, and provides a rational for image processing and diagnostic. This book also presents some advances on image-driven intervention and robotics, as well as evaluates models and simulations for a broad spectrum of cancers as well as cardiovascular, neurological, and bone diseases. Training and performance analysis in surgery assisted by robotic systems is also covered. This book also: ·         Provides a comprehensive overview of the use of computational surgery and disease management ·         Discusses the design and use of medical robotic tools for orthopedic surgery, endoscopic surgery, and prostate surgery ·         Provides practical examples and case studies in the areas of image processing, virtual surgery, and simulation traini...

  6. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    The education and training system for Accident Management was developed by the Japanese BWR group and Hitachi Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the education and training system with computer simulations. Both systems are designed to be executed on personal computers. The outlines of the CAI education system and the education and training system with simulator are reported below. These systems provides plant operators and technical support center staff with the effective education and training for accident management. (author)

  7. Computer-based training for particle accelerator personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, R.R.

    1999-01-01

    A continuing problem at many laboratories is the training of new operators in the arcane technology of particle accelerators. Presently most of this training occurs on the job, under a mentor. Such training is expensive, and while it provides operational experience, it is frequently lax in providing the physics background needed to truly understand accelerator systems. Using computers in a self-paced, interactive environment can be more effective in meeting this training need. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  8. Introduction of the computer-based operation training tools in classrooms to support simulator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kobayashi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Operation training with full-scope simulators is effective to improve trainees operation competency. To obtain more effective results of simulator training, roles of the ''classroom operation training'' closely cooperated to simulator training are important. The ''classroom operation training'' is aimed at pre- and post-studies for operation knowledge related to operation training using full-scope simulators. We have been developing computer-based operation training tools which are used in classroom training sessions. As the first step, we developed the Simulator Training Replay System. This is an aiding tool in the classroom used to enhance trainees operation performance. This system can synchronously replay plant behavior on CRT display with operators action on a video monitor in the simulator training sessions. This system is used to review plant behavior - trainees response after simulator training sessions and to understand plant behavior - operation procedure before operation training. (author)

  9. Cognitive training in Parkinson disease: cognition-specific vs nonspecific computer training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Ronan; Gschwandtner, Ute; Benz, Nina; Hatz, Florian; Schindler, Christian; Taub, Ethan; Fuhr, Peter

    2014-04-08

    In this study, we compared a cognition-specific computer-based cognitive training program with a motion-controlled computer sports game that is not cognition-specific for their ability to enhance cognitive performance in various cognitive domains in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Patients with PD were trained with either a computer program designed to enhance cognition (CogniPlus, 19 patients) or a computer sports game with motion-capturing controllers (Nintendo Wii, 20 patients). The effect of training in 5 cognitive domains was measured by neuropsychological testing at baseline and after training. Group differences over all variables were assessed with multivariate analysis of variance, and group differences in single variables were assessed with 95% confidence intervals of mean difference. The groups were similar regarding age, sex, and educational level. Patients with PD who were trained with Wii for 4 weeks performed better in attention (95% confidence interval: -1.49 to -0.11) than patients trained with CogniPlus. In our study, patients with PD derived at least the same degree of cognitive benefit from non-cognition-specific training involving movement as from cognition-specific computerized training. For patients with PD, game consoles may be a less expensive and more entertaining alternative to computer programs specifically designed for cognitive training. This study provides Class III evidence that, in patients with PD, cognition-specific computer-based training is not superior to a motion-controlled computer game in improving cognitive performance.

  10. Senior Surfing: Computer Use, Aging, and Formal Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Peace, Paula; Parrish, Elaine; Peace, C. Brian; Xu, Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe data from two case studies of seniors (one younger senior and one older senior) in learning to use computers. The study combined interviews, observations, and documents to take a close look at their experiences with computers, as well as the influences of aging and computer training on their experiences. The study…

  11. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Cloud Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing (1/2), by Belmiro Rodrigues Moreira (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part).   Wednesday, May 30, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  12. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  13. VPIsystems industry training program on computer-aided design of fiber optic communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andre; Chan, David K. C.

    2002-05-01

    In industry today, professional Photonic Design Automation (PDA) tools are a necessity to enable fast development cycles for the design of optical components, systems and networks. The training of industrial personnel is of great importance in facilitating the full usability of PDA tools tailored to meet these demands. As the market leader of design and planning tools for system integrators and manufacturers of optical transmission systems and components, VPIsystems offers a set of two-day training courses. Attendees are taught on the design of metro WDM networks, high speed DWDM and ultra long-haul WDM systems, analogue and digital cable access systems, EDFA and Raman amplifiers, as well as active devices and circuits. The course work compromises of: (1) lectures on physical and modeling background topics; (2) creation of typical simulation scenarios and; (3) the analysis of results. This course work is facilitated by guided, hands-on lab exercises using VPIsystems software for a variety of practical design situations. In classes of up to 15, each attendee is allocated a computer, thereby allowing for a thorough and speedy training for the individual in all of the covered topics as well as for any extra-curriculum topics to be covered. Since 1999, more than 750 people have graduated from over 60 training courses. In this paper, details of VPIsystems Industry training program will be presented.

  14. Large-scale computer-mediated training for management teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Salmon

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995/6 the Open University Business School (OUBS trained 187 tutors in the UK and Continental Western Europe in Computer Mediated Conferencing (CMC for management education. The medium chosen for the training was FirstClassTM. In 1996/7 the OUBS trained a further 106 tutors in FirstClassTM using an improved version of the previous years training. The on line training was based on a previously developed model of learning on line. The model was tested both by means of the structure of the training programme and the improvements made. The training programme was evaluated and revised for the second cohort. Comparison was made between the two training programmes.

  15. Personal Computer-less (PC-less) Microcontroller Training Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somantri, Y.; Wahyudin, D.; Fushilat, I.

    2018-02-01

    The need of microcontroller training kit is necessary for practical work of students of electrical engineering education. However, to use available training kit not only costly but also does not meet the need of laboratory requirements. An affordable and portable microcontroller kit could answer such problem. This paper explains the design and development of Personal Computer Less (PC-Less) Microcontroller Training Kit. It was developed based on Lattepanda processor and Arduino microcontroller as target. The training kit equipped with advanced input-output interfaces that adopted the concept of low cost and low power system. The preliminary usability testing proved this device can be used as a tool for microcontroller programming and industrial automation training. By adopting the concept of portability, the device could be operated in the rural area which electricity and computer infrastructure are limited. Furthermore, the training kit is suitable for student of electrical engineering student from university and vocational high school.

  16. Computer-aided voice training in higher education: participants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The training of performance singing in a multi lingual, multi cultural educational context presents unique problems and requires inventive teaching strategies. Computer-aided training offers objective visual feedback of the voice production that can be implemented as a teaching aid in higher education. This article reports on ...

  17. AI in Computer-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camstra, Bert

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, intelligent approaches to CBT are put into several perspectives in an attempt to elucidate the concepts and give them a more realistic (and not only glamorous) footing. The role of expert systems in training is explored and possible routes towards intelligent CBT are outlined. [This paper was first published in "Interactive Learning…

  18. A review of computer-based simulators for ultrasound training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Tobias; Rieger, Andreas; Navab, Nassir; Friess, Helmut; Martignoni, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Computer-based simulators for ultrasound training are a topic of recent interest. During the last 15 years, many different systems and methods have been proposed. This article provides an overview and classification of systems in this domain and a discussion of their advantages. Systems are classified and discussed according to the image simulation method, user interactions and medical applications. Computer simulation of ultrasound has one key advantage over traditional training. It enables novel training concepts, for example, through advanced visualization, case databases, and automatically generated feedback. Qualitative evaluations have mainly shown positive learning effects. However, few quantitative evaluations have been performed and long-term effects have to be examined.

  19. Guidelines for development of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) computer security training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The report presents guidance for the NASA Computer Security Program Manager and the NASA Center Computer Security Officials as they develop training requirements and implement computer security training programs. NASA audiences are categorized based on the computer security knowledge required to accomplish identified job functions. Training requirements, in terms of training subject areas, are presented for both computer security program management personnel and computer resource providers and users. Sources of computer security training are identified.

  20. Using computer-based training to facilitate radiation protection review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    In a national laboratory setting, it is necessary to provide radiation protection overview and training to diverse parts of the laboratory population. This includes employees at research reactors, accelerators, waste facilities, radiochemical isotope processing, and analytical laboratories, among others. In addition, our own radiation protection and monitoring staffs must be trained. To assist in the implementation of this full range of training, ORNL has purchased prepackaged computer-based training in health physics and technical mathematics with training modules that can be selected from many topics. By selection of specific modules, appropriate radiation protection review packages can be determined to meet many individual program needs. Because our radiation protection personnel must have some previous radiation protection experience or the equivalent of an associate's degree in radiation protection for entry level, the computer-based training will serve primarily as review of major principles. Others may need very specific prior training to make the computer-based training effective in their work situations. 4 refs

  1. Intravenous catheter training system: computer-based education versus traditional learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engum, Scott A; Jeffries, Pamela; Fisher, Lisa

    2003-07-01

    Virtual reality simulators allow trainees to practice techniques without consequences, reduce potential risk associated with training, minimize animal use, and help to develop standards and optimize procedures. Current intravenous (IV) catheter placement training methods utilize plastic arms, however, the lack of variability can diminish the educational stimulus for the student. This study compares the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia, virtual reality computer IV catheter simulator with a traditional laboratory experience of teaching IV venipuncture skills to both nursing and medical students. A randomized, pretest-posttest experimental design was employed. A total of 163 participants, 70 baccalaureate nursing students and 93 third-year medical students beginning their fundamental skills training were recruited. The students ranged in age from 20 to 55 years (mean 25). Fifty-eight percent were female and 68% percent perceived themselves as having average computer skills (25% declaring excellence). The methods of IV catheter education compared included a traditional method of instruction involving a scripted self-study module which involved a 10-minute videotape, instructor demonstration, and hands-on-experience using plastic mannequin arms. The second method involved an interactive multimedia, commercially made computer catheter simulator program utilizing virtual reality (CathSim). The pretest scores were similar between the computer and the traditional laboratory group. There was a significant improvement in cognitive gains, student satisfaction, and documentation of the procedure with the traditional laboratory group compared with the computer catheter simulator group. Both groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly. CONCLUSIONS; This evaluation and assessment was an initial effort to assess new teaching methodologies related to intravenous catheter placement and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors

  2. Effective computer training for people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Farbeh-Tabrizi

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of computer courses at Methodist City Action computer school for students with psychological and physical disabilities and discusses the motivation behind developing these courses and the original research and development which led to their establishment. It also outlines methods of delivery and the impact of these courses on the students\\' quality of life, independence, social inclusion, literacy, numeracy and employment status. This research was carried out by using available literature found from local libraries and Internet, interviews and classroom observations, and concludes that there is an apparent lack of participation in tertiary education from people with disabilities in New Zealand.

  3. Hands-on Universe - Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, R.

    2006-08-01

    The EU-HOU project aims at re-awakening the interest for science through astronomy and new technologies, by challenging middle and high schools pupils. It relies on real observations acquired through an internet-based network of robotic optical and radio telescopes or with didactical tools such as Webcam. Pupils manipulate and measure images in the classroom environment, using the specifically designed software SalsaJ, within pedagogical trans-disciplinary resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. Gathering eight European countries coordinated in France, EU-HOU is partly funded by the European Union. All its outputs are freely available on the Web, in English and the other languages involved. A European network of teachers is being developed through training sessions.

  4. Factors Affecting Preservice Teachers' Computer Use for General Purposes: Implications for Computer Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogheib, Salah

    2014-01-01

    As the majority of educational research has focused on preservice teachers' computer use for "educational purposes," the question remains: Do preservice teachers use computer technology for daily life activities and encounters? And do preservice teachers' personality traits and motivational beliefs related to computer training provided…

  5. Computer gaming comes to service rig training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowers, J.

    2007-05-15

    This article addressed the challenge of providing service rig workers with a good understanding of the tasks and risks involved in the job before they even step out into the field. The product, SimuLynx was presented. SimuLynx is based on video and gaming technology to immerse the user in the service rig work environment with other crew members. The user tries to perform the different steps of a junior floorhand's job while a coach gives directions. The article discussed how the system works. For example, when faced with a task, the user chooses from several options. The coach informs the virtual junior floorhand if the decision was right or wrong. He will also give warnings and let the user realize the consequences of a wrong action. The benefits of the system were also presented. For example, instead of 30 days of on-the-job training, an employee may only need several days after going through the program. Other benefits that were reviewed included reduced accident risk-levels for new workers; higher rig efficiency; and, lower training costs. In addition, a potential recruit can decide if the job is right for him before signing up for an expensive course or starting off with a service rig company. As well, the rig company can decide if someone is suitable before hiring that person. 3 figs.

  6. Security personnel training using a computer-based game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph, J.; Bickner, L.

    1987-01-01

    Security personnel training is an integral part of a total physical security program, and is essential in enabling security personnel to perform their function effectively. Several training tools are currently available for use by security supervisors, including: textbook study, classroom instruction, and live simulations. However, due to shortcomings inherent in each of these tools, a need exists for the development of low-cost alternative training methods. This paper discusses one such alternative: a computer-based, game-type security training system. This system would be based on a personal computer with high-resolution graphics. Key features of this system include: a high degree of realism; flexibility in use and maintenance; high trainee motivation; and low cost

  7. Computer simulation as an operational and training aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Tottman-Trayner, E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes how the rapid development of desktop computing power, the associated fall in prices, and the advancement of computer graphics technology driven by the entertainment industry has enabled the nuclear industry to achieve improvements in operation and training through the use of computer simulation. Applications are focused on the fuel handling operations at Torness Power Station where visualization through computer modelling is being used to enhance operator awareness and to assist in a number of operational scenarios. It is concluded that there are significant benefits to be gained from the introduction of the facility at Torness as well as other locations. (author)

  8. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Masuda, Takahiro; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    2000-01-01

    Under severe accident conditions of a nuclear power plant, plant operators and technical support center (TSC) staffs will be under a amount of stress. Therefore, those individuals responsible for managing the plant should promote their understanding about the accident management and operations. Moreover, it is also important to train in ordinary times, so that they can carry out accident management operations effectively on severe accidents. Therefore, the education and training system which works on personal computers was developed by Japanese BWR group (Tokyo Electric Power Co.,Inc., Tohoku Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Chubu Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Hokuriku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Chugoku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Japan Atomic Power Co.,Inc.), and Hitachi, Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the other is education and training system with a computer simulation. Both systems are designed to execute on MS-Windows(R) platform of personal computers. These systems provide plant operators and technical support center staffs with an effective education and training tool for accident management. TEPCO used the simulation system for the emergency exercise assuming the occurrence of hypothetical severe accident, and have performed an effective exercise in March, 2000. (author)

  9. Computer based training simulator for Hunterston Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, R.S.M.; Hacking, D.

    1978-01-01

    For reasons which are stated, the Hunterston-B nuclear power station automatic control system includes a manual over-ride facility. It is therefore essential for the station engineers to be trained to recognise and control all feasible modes of plant and logic malfunction. A training simulator has been built which consists of a replica of the shutdown monitoring panel in the Central Control Room and is controlled by a mini-computer. This paper highlights the computer aspects of the simulator and relevant derived experience, under the following headings: engineering background; shutdown sequence equipment; simulator equipment; features; software; testing; maintenance. (U.K.)

  10. Hanford general employee training: Computer-based training instructor's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The Computer-Based Training portion of the Hanford General Employee Training course is designed to be used in a classroom setting with a live instructor. Future references to this course'' refer only to the computer-based portion of the whole. This course covers the basic Safety, Security, and Quality issues that pertain to all employees of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The topics that are covered were taken from the recommendations and requirements for General Employee Training as set forth by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in INPO 87-004, Guidelines for General Employee Training, applicable US Department of Energy orders, and Westinghouse Hanford Company procedures and policy. Besides presenting fundamental concepts, this course also contains information on resources that are available to assist students. It does this using Interactive Videodisk technology, which combines computer-generated text and graphics with audio and video provided by a videodisk player.

  11. Network attacks and defenses a hands-on approach

    CERN Document Server

    Trabelsi, Zouheir; Al Braiki, Arwa; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The attacks on computers and business networks are growing daily, and the need for security professionals who understand how malfeasants perform attacks and compromise networks is a growing requirement to counter the threat. Network security education generally lacks appropriate textbooks with detailed, hands-on exercises that include both offensive and defensive techniques. Using step-by-step processes to build and generate attacks using offensive techniques, Network Attacks and Defenses: A Hands-on Approach enables students to implement appropriate network security solutions within a laborat

  12. Training Effects on Computer-Mediated Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Hsien-Chin; Peng, Zhong-Yan

    2009-01-01

    The interactive functions of weblogs facilitate computer-mediated peer reviews for collaborative writing. As limited research has been conducted on examining the training effects of peer reviews on students' peer comments, their revision quality, and their perceptions when composing in weblogs, the present case study aims to fill the gap. Thirteen…

  13. Industrial application of a graphics computer-based training system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemm, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Graphics Computer Based Training (GCBT) roles include drilling, tutoring, simulation and problem solving. Of these, Commonwealth Edison uses mainly tutoring, simulation and problem solving. These roles are not separate in any particular program. They are integrated to provide tutoring and part-task simulation, part-task simulation and problem solving, or problem solving tutoring. Commonwealth's Graphics Computer Based Training program was a result of over a year's worth of research and planning. The keys to the program are it's flexibility and control. Flexibility is maintained through stand alone units capable of program authoring and modification for plant/site specific users. Yet, the system has the capability to support up to 31 terminals with a 40 mb hard disk drive. Control of the GCBT program is accomplished through establishment of development priorities and a central development facility (Commonwealth Edison's Production Training Center)

  14. Computer aided instruction in the nuclear training classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives formulated for introducing computer aided instruction into the nuclear training programme are discussed and the process of comparative evaluation which was followed to arrive at a preferred system is described. Three points must be remembered. First it is unlikely that specialized training will benefit from any cost reduction since the total manpower invested can seldom be applied over enough students to represent an overall cost saving when compared with conventional classroom methods. Second it is unnecessary to present on a video screen material which would be better left in its original printed textbook or manual. Thirdly care must be taken not to assume too much or too little prior knowledge in the student. In nuclear training, concentrated information transfer is required in a short period of time. Carefully planned and executed computer assisted instruction can improve teaching effectiveness and provide a welcome alternative to conventional classroom instruction. (U.K.)

  15. Towards Computing Ratcheting and Training in Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferracin, Paolo; Caspi, Shlomo; Lietzke, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing 3D finite element models to predict the behavior of high field Nb 3 Sn superconducting magnets. The models track the coil response during assembly, cool-down, and excitation, with particular interest on displacements when frictional forces arise. As Lorentz forces were cycled, irreversible displacements were computed and compared with strain gauge measurements. Additional analysis was done on the local frictional energy released during magnet excitation, and the resulting temperature rise. Magnet quenching and training was correlated to the level of energy release during such mechanical displacements under frictional forces. We report in this paper the computational results of the ratcheting process, the impact of friction, and the path-dependent energy release leading to a computed magnet training curve

  16. Computer technologies of future teachers of fine art training as an object of scientific educational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan Cherniavskyi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with computer technology training, highlights the current state ofcomputerization of educational process in teacher training colleges, reveals the specifictechniques of professional training of teachers of fine arts to use computer technology inteaching careers.Key words: Methods of professional training, professional activities, computertechnology training future teachers of Fine Arts, the subject of research.

  17. Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A + A You are here Home Hands-On Skills for Caregivers Printer-friendly version When you’re ... therapist who can help you develop your transferring skills. Allow for their reality Remember to accept your ...

  18. Computer-enhanced laparoscopic training system (CELTS): bridging the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylopoulos, N; Cotin, S; Maithel, S K; Ottensmeye, M; Jackson, P G; Bardsley, R S; Neumann, P F; Rattner, D W; Dawson, S L

    2004-05-01

    There is a large and growing gap between the need for better surgical training methodologies and the systems currently available for such training. In an effort to bridge this gap and overcome the disadvantages of the training simulators now in use, we developed the Computer-Enhanced Laparoscopic Training System (CELTS). CELTS is a computer-based system capable of tracking the motion of laparoscopic instruments and providing feedback about performance in real time. CELTS consists of a mechanical interface, a customizable set of tasks, and an Internet-based software interface. The special cognitive and psychomotor skills a laparoscopic surgeon should master were explicitly defined and transformed into quantitative metrics based on kinematics analysis theory. A single global standardized and task-independent scoring system utilizing a z-score statistic was developed. Validation exercises were performed. The scoring system clearly revealed a gap between experts and trainees, irrespective of the task performed; none of the trainees obtained a score above the threshold that distinguishes the two groups. Moreover, CELTS provided educational feedback by identifying the key factors that contributed to the overall score. Among the defined metrics, depth perception, smoothness of motion, instrument orientation, and the outcome of the task are major indicators of performance and key parameters that distinguish experts from trainees. Time and path length alone, which are the most commonly used metrics in currently available systems, are not considered good indicators of performance. CELTS is a novel and standardized skills trainer that combines the advantages of computer simulation with the features of the traditional and popular training boxes. CELTS can easily be used with a wide array of tasks and ensures comparability across different training conditions. This report further shows that a set of appropriate and clinically relevant performance metrics can be defined and a

  19. Computer-aided training exam creation and personnel records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, R.K.; Louche, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    A problem has existed in nuclear power plant training departments about how to choose questions for examinations without instructor bias, how to permanently store this exam so that it can be reconstructed, how to statistically analyze class, instructor, and student performance, and how to keep accurate, easily accessible records of all training. The design of the software package discussed in the paper is such that a complete record of classes, quizzes, exams, instructors, and analysis is available for each trainee. The need for classes is automatically available from the computer with randomly created exams available on request

  20. Internship training in computer science: Exploring student satisfaction levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Ghaith M

    2017-08-01

    The requirement of employability in the job market prompted universities to conduct internship training as part of their study plans. There is a need to train students on important academic and professional skills related to the workplace with an IT component. This article describes a statistical study that measures satisfaction levels among students in the faculty of Information Technology and Computer Science in Jordan. The objective of this study is to explore factors that influence student satisfaction with regards to enrolling in an internship training program. The study was conducted to gather student perceptions, opinions, preferences and satisfaction levels related to the program. Data were collected via a mixed method survey (surveys and interviews) from student-respondents. The survey collects demographic and background information from students, including their perception of faculty performance in the training poised to prepare them for the job market. Findings from this study show that students expect internship training to improve their professional and personal skills as well as to increase their workplace-related satisfaction. It is concluded that improving the internship training is crucial among the students as it is expected to enrich their experiences, knowledge and skills in the personal and professional life. It is also expected to increase their level of confidence when it comes to exploring their future job opportunities in the Jordanian market. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optical computing with soliton trains in Bose–Einstein condensates

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 World Scientific Publishing Company. Optical computing devices can be implemented based on controlled generation of soliton trains in single and multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). Our concepts utilize the phenomenon that the frequency of soliton trains in BEC can be governed by changing interactions within the atom cloud [F. Pinsker, N. G. Berloff and V. M. Pérez-García, Phys. Rev. A87, 053624 (2013), arXiv:1305.4097]. We use this property to store numbers in terms of those frequencies for a short time until observation. The properties of soliton trains can be changed in an intended way by other components of BEC occupying comparable states or via phase engineering. We elucidate, in which sense, such an additional degree of freedom can be regarded as a tool for controlled manipulation of data. Finally, the outcome of any manipulation made is read out by observing the signature within the density profile.

  2. seismo-live: Training in Computational Seismology using Jupyter Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, H.; Krischer, L.; van Driel, M.; Tape, C.

    2016-12-01

    Practical training in computational methodologies is still underrepresented in Earth science curriculae despite the increasing use of sometimes highly sophisticated simulation technologies in research projects. At the same time well-engineered community codes make it easy to return simulation-based results yet with the danger that the inherent traps of numerical solutions are not well understood. It is our belief that training with highly simplified numerical solutions (here to the equations describing elastic wave propagation) with carefully chosen elementary ingredients of simulation technologies (e.g., finite-differencing, function interpolation, spectral derivatives, numerical integration) could substantially improve this situation. For this purpose we have initiated a community platform (www.seismo-live.org) where Python-based Jupyter notebooks can be accessed and run without and necessary downloads or local software installations. The increasingly popular Jupyter notebooks allow combining markup language, graphics, equations with interactive, executable python codes. We demonstrate the potential with training notebooks for the finite-difference method, pseudospectral methods, finite/spectral element methods, the finite-volume and the discontinuous Galerkin method. The platform already includes general Python training, introduction to the ObsPy library for seismology as well as seismic data processing and noise analysis. Submission of Jupyter notebooks for general seismology are encouraged. The platform can be used for complementary teaching in Earth Science courses on compute-intensive research areas.

  3. Novel ex vivo model for hands-on teaching of and training in EUS-guided biliary drainage: creation of "Mumbai EUS" stereolithography/3D printing bile duct prototype (with videos)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhir, Vinay; Itoi, Takao; Fockens, Paul; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Khashab, Mouen A.; Seo, Dong Wan; Yang, Ai Ming; Lawrence, Khek Yu; Maydeo, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative rescue method in patients with failed ERCP. Opportunities for teaching and training are limited because of a low case volume at most centers. Objective: To evaluate a stereolithography/3-dimensional (3D) printing bile

  4. Computer-assisted training in the thermal production department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felgines, R.

    1985-01-01

    For many years now, in the United States and Canada, computer-assisted training (CAT) experiments have been carried out in various fields: general or professional education, student testing in universities. This method seems very promising and particularly for continuing education and for keeping industrial process operating and maintenance personnel abreast of their specialities. Thanks to the progress in data processing and remote processing with central computers, this technique is being developed in France for professional training applications. Faced with many training problems, the Thermal Production Department of EDF (Electricite de France) first conducted in 1979 a test involving a limited subset of the nuclear power station operating personnel; this course amounted to some ten hours with very limited content. It seemed promising enough, so that in 1981, a real test was launched at 4 PWR plants: DAMPIERRE, FESSENHEIM, GRAVELINES, TRICASTIN. This test which involves about 700 employees has been fruitful and we decided to generalise this system to all the French nuclear power plants (40 units of 900 and 1300 MW). (author)

  5. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Computer Security - Introduction to information and computer security (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Computer Security: Introduction to information and computer security (1/4), by Sebastian Lopienski (CERN).   Monday, 21 May, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 31-3-004 - IT Auditorium ) Sebastian Lopienski is CERN's Deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and maintains security tools for vulnerability assessment and intrusion detection; provides training and awareness raising; and does incident investigation and response. During his work at CERN since 2001, Sebastian has had various assignments, including designing and developing software to manage and support services hosted in the CERN Computer Centre; providing Central CVS Service for software projects at CERN; and development of applications for accelerator controls in Java. He graduated from the University of Warsaw (MSc in Computer Science) in 2002, and earned an MBA degree at the Enterprise Administration Institute in Ai...

  6. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a

  7. Parts of the Whole: Hands On Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Wallace

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this column we describe a hands-on data collection lab for an introductory statistics course. The exercise elicits issues of normality, sampling, and sample mean comparisons. Based on volcanology models of tephra dispersion, this lab leads students to question the accuracy of some assumptions made in the model, particularly regarding the normality of the dispersal of tephra of identical size in a given atmospheric layer.

  8. Using Computer Graphics in the 90's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Violet A.

    Computer-Aided Design, a hands-on program for public school teachers, was first offered in the summer of 1987 as an outgrowth of a 1986 robotics training program. Area technology teachers needed computer-aided design (CAD) training because of a New York State Education system transition from the industrial arts curriculum to a new curriculum in…

  9. Hands-on physics displays for undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, Carl W.

    2014-07-01

    Initiated by Frank Oppenheimer in 1969, the Exploratorium in San Francisco has been the model for hands-on science museums throughout the world. The key idea has been to bring people with all levels of scientific background in contact with interesting and attractive exhibits that require the active participation of the visitor. Unfortunately, many science museums are now forced to cater primarily to very young audiences, often 8 years old or less, with predictable constraints on the intellectual depth of their exhibits. To counter this trend, the author has constructed several hands-on displays for the University of Michigan Physics Department that demonstrate: (1) magnetic levitation of pyrolytic graphite, (2) the varied magnetic induction effects in aluminum, copper and air, (3) chaotic motion of a double pendulum, (4) conservation of energy and momentum in a steel ball magnetic accelerator, (5) the diffraction pattern of red and green laser pointer beams created by CDs and DVDs, (6) a magnetic analog of the refraction of light at a dielectric boundary and (7) optical rotation of light in an aqueous fructose solution. Each of these exhibits can be constructed for something like $1000 or less and are robust enough to withstand unsupervised public use. The dynamic behavior of these exhibits will be shown in accompanying video sequences. The following story has a history that goes back quite a few years. In the late 70's, I was spending time at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center accompanied by my family that included our two grade school children. Needless to say, we much enjoyed weekend excursions to all sorts of interesting sites in the Bay Area, especially the Exploratorium, an unusual science museum created by Frank Oppenheimer that opened in 1969. The notion that exhibits would be designed specifically for "hands-on" interactions was at that time quite revolutionary. This idea captivated a number of people everywhere including a friend in Ann Arbor, Cynthia

  10. Computer based training for nuclear operations personnel: From concept to reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.; Klemm, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Computer Based Training (CBT) can be subdivided into two categories: Computer Aided Instruction (CAI), or the actual presentation of learning material; and Computer Managed Instruction (CMI), the tracking, recording, and documenting of instruction and student progress. Both CAI and CMI can be attractive to the student and to the training department. A brief overview of CAI and CMI benefits is given in this paper

  11. The effect of ergonomic training and intervention on reducing occupational stress among computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yektaee

    2014-05-01

    Result: According to covariance analysis, ergonomic training and interventions lead to reduction of occupational stress of computer users. .Conclusion: Training computer users and informing them of the ergonomic principals and also providing interventions such as correction of posture, reducing duration of work time, using armrest and footrest would have significant implication in reducing occupational stress among computer users.

  12. Developing a Systematic Education and Training Approach Using Personal Computer Based Simulators for Nuclear Power Programmes. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This publication compiles the output and findings of a technical meeting organized by the IAEA. The use of personal computer (PC) based basic principle simulators in education and training is aimed at enhancing understanding of nuclear technologies through “learning by doing”. This hands-on experiential training is highly suitable for operators, maintenance technicians, suppliers, regulators, students and engineers. Experts from 21 Member States, together with IAEA staff, presented the current status of the PC based basic principle simulators, their applications in education and training and identified relevant gaps and needs for improvements and/or new development. The resultant publication includes summaries of the presentations, follow-up discussions as well as conclusions and recommendations for possible future activities.

  13. Mechatronics Interface for Computer Assisted Prostate Surgery Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano del Monte, Felipe; Padilla Castañeda, Miguel A.; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2006-09-01

    In this work is presented the development of a mechatronics device to simulate the interaction of the surgeon with the surgical instrument (resectoscope) used during a Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). Our mechatronics interface is part of a computer assisted system for training in TURP, which is based on a 3D graphics model of the prostate which can be deformed and resected interactively by the user. The mechatronics interface, is the device that the urology residents will manipulate to simulate the movements performed during surgery. Our current prototype has five degrees of freedom, which are enough to have a realistic simulation of the surgery movements. Two of these degrees of freedom are linear, to determinate the linear displacement of the resecting loop and the other three are rotational to determinate three directions and amounts of rotation.

  14. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Daniel C; Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (plearning to their respective training programs.

  15. The influence of biofeedback training on trapezius activity and rest during occupational computer work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Søgaard, K; Christensen, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of biofeedback training on trapezius activity and rest (gaps) during occupational computer work. A randomized controlled trial with 164 computer workers was performed. Two groups working with computer mouse more than 50% (n = 64) and less than 25% (n....... By improving trapezius inactivity during computer work, biofeedback training may have the potential to prevent trapezius myalgia in computer workers....... muscles during normal computer work was recorded. Changes in discomfort/pain were not recorded. The biofeedback training reduced activity (P

  16. Livestock Judges Training Provides Hands-On Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Scott; Harrison, Steve; Packham, Joel; Sanchez, Dawn; Jensen, Jim; Kaysen, Brett; King, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The judging of a market animal at a fair is the highlight of a youth-owned livestock project. Livestock judges are hired to evaluate youth projects at fairs. They are critical ambassadors for agriculture and influence countless youths and adults. Judges must be knowledgeable about current animal evaluation methods that support youth development.…

  17. Data Processing: Fifteen Suggestions for Computer Training in Your Business Education Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Lowell L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents 15 suggestions for training business education students in the use of computers. Suggestions involve computer language, method of presentation, laboratory time, programing assignments, instructions and handouts, problem solving, deadlines, reviews, programming concepts, programming logic, documentation, and defensive programming. (CT)

  18. Interactive computer-based training program for radiological workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is redesigning its existing Computer-Based Training (CBT) programs for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort that is aimed at producing a single highly interactive and flexible CBT program. The new CBT program is designed to address a variety of radiological workers, including researchers, x-ray operators, and individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The program addresses the diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. The CBT program includes photographs, line drawings and illustrations, sound, video, and simulations, and it allows for easy insertion and replacement of text, graphics, sound, and video. The new design supports timely updates and customization for use at other University of California sites. The CBT program is divided into ten basic modules. Introduction and Lessons Learned, History and Uses, Fundamentals, Background Radiation, Biological Effects of Radiation, Characteristics of Radionuclides, Radiological Controls, Monitoring, Emergency Response, Responsibilities. Some of the main modules features as many as seven or eight submodules. For example, the module on Characteristics of Radionuclides features submodules on common radionuclides, tritium uranium, plutonium, x-ray machines, E-beam devices, radiographic devices, and accelerators. Required submodules are tailored to an individual's type of work and facility, and they are determined by the answers to an onscreen questionnaire given at the outset of training. Individuals can challenge most individual modules, but certain submodules will be mandatory based on the initial survey. For example, individuals working in the uranium facility will be required to complete the submodule on 'History and Uses of Uranium'. However, all other submodules under the main module, 'History and Uses', will be available if selected for preview. For each module, an opportunity is provided for further

  19. Computer Training for Seniors: An Academic-Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Martha J.; O'Sullivan, Beth; DeBurra, Katherine; Fedner, Alesha

    2013-01-01

    Computer technology is integral to information retrieval, social communication, and social interaction. However, only 47% of seniors aged 65 and older use computers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a client-centered computer program on computer skills, attitudes toward computer use, and generativity in novice senior…

  20. Application of Cognitive Principles in Distributed Computer-Based Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deatz, Richard

    2001-01-01

    As the U.S. Army continues to develop more powerful and complex digital information systems, it is essential that both training needs and training opportunities are addressed to meet mission objectives...

  1. Effects of Learning Style and Training Method on Computer Attitude and Performance in World Wide Web Page Design Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Huey-Wen; Wang, Yu-Fang

    1999-01-01

    Compares the effects of two training methods on computer attitude and performance in a World Wide Web page design program in a field experiment with high school students in Taiwan. Discusses individual differences, Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory and Learning Style Inventory, Computer Attitude Scale, and results of statistical analyses.…

  2. Computer-Based Simulations for Maintenance Training: Current ARI Research. Technical Report 544.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerr, Bruce W.; And Others

    Three research efforts that used computer-based simulations for maintenance training were in progress when this report was written: Game-Based Learning, which investigated the use of computer-based games to train electronics diagnostic skills; Human Performance in Fault Diagnosis Tasks, which evaluated the use of context-free tasks to train…

  3. Training auscultatory skills: computer simulated heart sounds or additional bedside training? A randomized trial on third-year medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study compares the value of additional use of computer simulated heart sounds, to conventional bedside auscultation training, on the cardiac auscultation skills of 3rd year medical students at Oslo University Medical School. Methods In addition to their usual curriculum courses, groups of seven students each were randomized to receive four hours of additional auscultation training either employing a computer simulator system or adding on more conventional bedside training. Cardiac auscultation skills were afterwards tested using live patients. Each student gave a written description of the auscultation findings in four selected patients, and was rewarded from 0-10 points for each patient. Differences between the two study groups were evaluated using student's t-test. Results At the auscultation test no significant difference in mean score was found between the students who had used additional computer based sound simulation compared to additional bedside training. Conclusions Students at an early stage of their cardiology training demonstrated equal performance of cardiac auscultation whether they had received an additional short auscultation course based on computer simulated training, or had had additional bedside training. PMID:20082701

  4. The pedagogical effectiveness of ASR-based computer assisted pronunciation training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neri, A.

    2007-01-01

    Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training (CAPT) systems with Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology have become increasingly popular to train pronunciation in the second language (L2). The advantage of these systems is the provision of a self-paced, stress-free type of training with automatic

  5. A multi-media computer program for training in basic professional counseling skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, J.; Van der Zee, K.I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of a self-instructional program for training in basic counseling skills. The product was a multimedia computer program, named GEVAT. The training under consideration was based on a traditional training in which students enhance these skills under supervision.

  6. Is Training Essential for Interpreting Cardiac Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripsweden, J.; Brolin, E. Bacsovics; Brismar, T.; Nilsson, T.; Svensson, A.; Werner, C.; Cederlund, K.; Mir-Akbari, H.; Rueck, A.; Rasmussen, E.; Winter, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has gained increasing acceptance for diagnosing obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Several guidelines have been published on required education for proficiency in the interpretation of these examinations. Purpose: To describe the learning-curve effect of the interpretation of 100 consecutive cardiac CT examinations aimed at diagnosing CAD. The diagnostic accuracy of radiologists and radiographers was also compared. Material and Methods: Two radiologists and two radiographers, all with no prior experience in evaluation of cardiac CT, independently underwent a dedicated training program of 100 examinations randomized into 10 blocks (sessions), with 10 cases in each. They independently evaluated the coronary arteries regarding significant obstructive CAD. After every session, individual feedback on diagnostic accuracy and comparison with the corresponding invasive coronary angiography (currently regarded as the gold standard to detect coronary lesions) was given. The time required for interpretation was recorded. Results: The mean review time decreased (P<0.0001) successively during the 10 sessions for all the observers together. The first session had a mean review time of 32 min, and the last session 16 min. No significant improvement in sensitivity, specificity, or negative predictive value (NPV) was observed. For positive predictive value (PPV), there was an improvement for the radiologists (P<0.05), but not for the radiographers. The radiographers had a higher total specificity compared to the radiologists (P<0.01). Conclusion: The review time for novices in cardiac CT was approximately halved during the first 100 cases, with maintained accuracy. There was a learning-curve effect in PPV for the radiologists. The diagnostic accuracy of dedicated radiographers indicates that they might be considered to be included as part of the evaluation team

  7. Computer Directed Training System (CDTS), User’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    lessons, together with an estimate of the time required for completion. a. BSCOl0. This lesson in BASIC ( Beginners All Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code...A2-8 FIGURESj Figure A2-1. Training Systems Manager and Training Monitors Responsibility Flowchart ...training at the site. Therefore, the TSM must be knowledgeable in the various tasks required. Figure A2-1 illustrates the position in the flowchart . These

  8. Hands-on creativity in Vocational Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    and therefore not well suited for VET comprising production, handcraft and industry. In Europe, vocational education schemes are considered the solid base on which almost all kinds of industry and craft depend. If Europe is to retain its innovative capacity, then vocational education, especially the capacity......This presentation poses the question: what conception of the phenomenon of creativity is best suited to the field of vocational education? VET (Vocational Education and Training) aims to prepare people for employment in craft and industry. In this field, there is an ever-growing requirement...... for creativity and innovation. In response, it is my concern that an understanding of creativity be developed with vocational education and training in mind. It is not enough to import models from other areas, where the distinction between ideas and production or creativity and execution is often relatively hazy...

  9. Distributed computing methodology for training neural networks in an image-guided diagnostic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagianakos, V P; Magoulas, G D; Vrahatis, M N

    2006-03-01

    Distributed computing is a process through which a set of computers connected by a network is used collectively to solve a single problem. In this paper, we propose a distributed computing methodology for training neural networks for the detection of lesions in colonoscopy. Our approach is based on partitioning the training set across multiple processors using a parallel virtual machine. In this way, interconnected computers of varied architectures can be used for the distributed evaluation of the error function and gradient values, and, thus, training neural networks utilizing various learning methods. The proposed methodology has large granularity and low synchronization, and has been implemented and tested. Our results indicate that the parallel virtual machine implementation of the training algorithms developed leads to considerable speedup, especially when large network architectures and training sets are used.

  10. Battle Staff Training System II: Computer-Based Instruction Supporting the Force XXI Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the methodology and lessons learned in the development of the Innovative Tools and Techniques for Brigade and Below Staff Training II - Battle Staff Training System II (ITTBBST-BSTS II...

  11. Computer-Based Training of Cannon Fire Direction Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    and military knowlge needed to perfor wartime missio (Department of the Army, 1987). These occur "in residence" at Army schools, during on-the-job...not permit detailed analysis of the activities associated with producing and executing a training course. This is a serious problem because many of...and to sustain existing training products. Tracing the changes in support activities is difficult because support activities exist at many different

  12. A Low Cost Implementation of an Existing Hands-on Laboratory Experiment in Electronic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Onime

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In engineering the pedagogical content of most formative programmes includes a significant amount of practical laboratory hands-on activity designed to deliver knowledge acquisition from actual experience alongside traditional face-to-face classroom based lectures and tutorials; this hands-on aspect is not always adequately addressed by current e-learning platforms. An innovative approach to e-learning in engineering, named computer aided engineering education (CAEE is about the use of computer aids for the enhanced, interactive delivery of educational materials in different fields of engineering through two separate but related components; one for classroom and another for practical hands-on laboratory work. The component for hands-on laboratory practical work focuses on the use of mixed reality (video-based augmented reality tools on mobile devices/platforms. This paper presents the computer aided engineering education (CAEE implementation of a laboratory experiment in micro-electronics that highlights some features such as the ability to closely implement an existing laboratory based hands-on experiment with lower associated costs and the ability to conduct the experiment off-line while maintaining existing pedagogical contents and standards.

  13. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  14. Formative Evaluation of the Tactical Patrol Craft Trainer: A Computer-Based Training Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Dean

    1997-01-01

    ...) during the implementation stage. The TPCT is an interactive multi-media computer based trainer designed to deliver a full fidelity and analog video training scenario to Prospective Commanding Officers (PCOs...

  15. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  16. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  17. Deception Detection in a Computer-Mediated Environment: Gender, Trust, and Training Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dziubinski, Monica

    2003-01-01

    .... This research draws on communication and deception literature to develop a conceptual model proposing relationships between deception detection abilities in a computer-mediated environment, gender, trust, and training...

  18. The student`s training to creating computer games for preschool-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мардарова И.К.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the special aspects of future kindergartner training to creating computer games for children of preschool age. The scratch-projects technology and recommendation for use at kindergarten pedagogical process are described in it.

  19. Lightweight and Compace Multifunction Computer-Controlled Strength and Aerobic Training Device, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research proposes to develop a computer-controlled lightweight and compact device for aerobic and resistive training (DART) to counteract muscular atrophy and...

  20. Computer-based, personalized cognitive training versus classical computer games: a randomized double-blind prospective trial of cognitive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Chava; Korczyn, Amos D; Shatil, Evelyn; Aharonson, Vered; Birnboim, Smadar; Giladi, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that cognitive training can result in cognitive gains in healthy older adults. We investigated whether personalized computerized cognitive training provides greater benefits than those obtained by playing conventional computer games. This was a randomized double-blind interventional study. Self-referred healthy older adults (n = 155, 68 ± 7 years old) were assigned to either a personalized, computerized cognitive training or to a computer games group. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline and after 3 months by a neuropsychological assessment battery. Differences in cognitive performance scores between and within groups were evaluated using mixed effects models in 2 approaches: adherence only (AO; n = 121) and intention to treat (ITT; n = 155). Both groups improved in cognitive performance. The improvement in the personalized cognitive training group was significant (p computer games group it was significant (p games in improving visuospatial working memory (p = 0.0001), visuospatial learning (p = 0.0012) and focused attention (p = 0.0019). Personalized, computerized cognitive training appears to be more effective than computer games in improving cognitive performance in healthy older adults. Further studies are needed to evaluate the ecological validity of these findings. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Computer-assisted training experiment used in the field of thermal energy production (EDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felgines, R.

    1982-01-01

    In 1981, the EDF carried out an experiment with computer-assisted training (EAO). This new approach, which continued until June 1982, involved about 700 employees all of whom operated nuclear power stations. The different stages of this experiment and the lessons which can be drawn from it are given the lessons were of a positive nature and make it possible to envisage complete coverage of all nuclear power stations by computer-assisted training within a very short space of time [fr

  2. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  3. Virginia Power's computer-based interactive videodisc training: a prototype for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigler, G.G.; Adams, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Virginia Power has developed a system and internally produced a prototype for computer-based interactive videodisc (CBIV) training. Two programs have been developed using the CBIV instructional methodology: Fire Team Retraining and General Employee Training (practical factors). In addition, the company developed a related program for conducting a videodisc tour of their nuclear power stations using a videodisc information management system (VIMS)

  4. Classroom versus Computer-Based CPR Training: A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Robb S.; Gazzillo Diaz, Linda; Middlemas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether computer-based CPR training is comparable to traditional classroom training. Design and Setting: This study was quantitative in design. Data was gathered from a standardized examination and skill performance evaluation which yielded numerical scores. Subjects: The subjects were 64…

  5. Computer Graphics Orientation and Training in a Corporate/Production Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Marsha Jean

    This master's thesis provides an overview of a computer graphics production environment and proposes a realistic approach to orientation and on-going training for employees working within a fast-paced production schedule. Problems involved in meeting the training needs of employees are briefly discussed in the first chapter, while the second…

  6. Autogenic Feedback Training (Body Fortran) with Biofeedback and the Computer for Self-Improvement and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.; Sumintardja, Elmira Nasrudin

    1983-01-01

    Describes autogenic feedback training, which provides the basis whereby an individual is able to improve on well being through use of a technique described as "body fortran," implying that you program self as one programs a computer. Necessary requisites are described including relaxation training and the management of stress. (JAC)

  7. Effects of Computer-Based Training on Procedural Modifications to Standard Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Lauren K.; Sidener, Tina M.; DeBar, Ruth M.; Vladescu, Jason C.; Kahng, SungWoo

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated methods for training decision-making when functional analysis data are undifferentiated. The current study evaluated computer-based training to teach 20 graduate students to arrange functional analysis conditions, analyze functional analysis data, and implement procedural modifications. Participants were exposed to…

  8. Computer Education in the Vocational Teacher Training Centre at Eindhoven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, J. W. M. A.; Verbunt, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Teachers from The Netherland's 26 higher technical colleges in need of a teaching qualification (called an "informatica") were able to obtain it by in-service training, organized and offered by universities. Types of courses offered and policy describing information technology activities to be developed in the country by 1989 are…

  9. Optical computing with soliton trains in Bose–Einstein condensates

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2015-01-01

    that the frequency of soliton trains in BEC can be governed by changing interactions within the atom cloud [F. Pinsker, N. G. Berloff and V. M. Pérez-García, Phys. Rev. A87, 053624 (2013), arXiv:1305.4097]. We use this property to store numbers in terms of those

  10. Severe Neglect and Computer-based Home Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cognitive rehabilitation from a functional perspective often requires intensive training over a longer period of time. In the case of rehabilitation of unilateral neglect, the frequency and intensity needed is expensive and difficult to implement both for the therapists and the patients...

  11. Constraints in Teacher Training for Computer Assisted Language Testing Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Laborda, Jesus; Litzler, Mary Frances

    2011-01-01

    Many ELT examinations have gone online in the last few years and a large number of educational institutions have also started considering the possibility of implementing their own tests. This paper deals with the training of a group of 24 ELT teachers in the Region of Valencia (Spain). In 2007, the Ministry of Education provided funds to determine…

  12. Model of training of computer science teachers by means of distant education technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т А Соловьева

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Training of future computer science teachers in conditions of informatization of education is analyzed. Distant educational technologies (DET and traditional process of training, their advantages and disadvantages are considered, active functions of DET as the basis of the model of training by means of DET is stressed. It is shown that mixed education combining both distant ant traditional technologies takes place on the basis of the created model. Practical use of the model is shown on the example of the course «Recursion» for future computer science teachers.

  13. Hands-on optics: an informal science education initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony M.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Arthurs, Eugene G.; Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2007-09-01

    The project is collaboration between two scientific societies, the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program is designed to bring science education enrichment to thousands of underrepresented middle school students in more than ten states, including female and minority students, who typically have not been the beneficiaries of science and engineering resources and investments. HOO provides each teacher with up to six activity modules, each containing enough materials for up to 30 students to participate in 6-8 hours of hands-on optics-related activities. Sample activities, developed by education specialists at NOAO, include building kaleidoscopes and telescopes, communicating with a beam of light, and a hit-the-target laser beam challenge. Teachers engage in two days of training and, where possible, are partnered with a local optics professional (drawn from the local rosters of SPIE and OSA members) who volunteers to spend time with the teacher and students as they explore the module activities. Through these activities, students gain experience and understanding of optics principles, as well as learning the basics of inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving skills involving optics, and how optics interfaces with other disciplines. While the modules were designed for use in informal after- school or weekend sessions, the number of venues has expanded to large and small science centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl Scouts, summer camps, family workshops, and use in the classroom.

  14. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach. Admittedly, time constraints and clinical demands can make incorporation of physics teaching into clinical practice problematic. We created and implemented a week-long, intensive physics rotation for fledgling radiology residents and evaluated its effectiveness. The dedicated physics rotation is held for 1 week during the first month of radiology residency. It comprises three components: introductory lectures, hands-on practical clinical physics operations, and observation of clinical image production. A brief introduction of the physics pertinent to each modality is given at the beginning of each session. Hands-on experimental demonstrations are emphasized, receiving the greatest allotment of time. The residents perform experiments such as measuring radiation dose, studying the relationship between patient dose and clinical practice (eg, fluoroscopy technique), investigating the influence of acquisition parameters (kV, mAs) on radiographs, and evaluating image quality using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and gamma camera/single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography phantoms. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the rotation is based on an examination that tests the residents' grasp of basic medical physics concepts along with written course evaluations provided by each resident. The pre- and post-rotation tests show that after the physics rotation, the average correct score of 25

  15. Semi-supervised adaptation in ssvep-based brain-computer interface using tri-training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Thomas; Kjaer, Troels W.; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and computationally simple tri-training based semi-supervised steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). It is implemented with autocorrelation-based features and a Naïve-Bayes classifier (NBC). The system uses nine characters...

  16. A Low-Tech, Hands-On Approach To Teaching Sorting Algorithms to Working Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, R.; Geller, J.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on identifying the educational effects of "activity oriented" instructional techniques. Examines which instructional methods produce enhanced learning and comprehension. Discusses the problem of learning "sorting algorithms," a major topic in every Computer Science curriculum. Presents a low-tech, hands-on teaching method for sorting…

  17. Math in Action. Hands-On, Minds-On Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite-Stupiansky, Sandra; Stupiansky, Nicholas G.

    1998-01-01

    Hands-on math must also involve students' minds in creative thinking. Math manipulatives must be used for uncovering, not just discovering. This paper presents guidelines for planning hands-on, minds-on math for elementary students. Suggestions include dialoging, questioning, integrating manipulatives and other tools, writing, and evaluating. (SM)

  18. HANDS-ON MATERIALS AS INVITATION TO A FANTASY WORLD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    In this article I wish to introduce an innovative use of hands-on-materials, developed by Peter Müller, a Danish elementary school teacher. The hands-on material itself consists of a collection of small plastic bears in different colors and sizes, which can be used for many different purposes among...

  19. Design and evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for enhancing numerical cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja eKäser

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design and a first pilot evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for children with developmental dyscalculia (DD or difficulties in learning mathematics. The program has been designed according to insights on the typical and atypical development of mathematical abilities. The learning process is supported through multimodal cues, which encode different properties of numbers. To offer optimal learning conditions, a user model completes the program and allows flexible adaptation to a child’s individual learning and knowledge profile. 32 children with difficulties in learning mathematics completed the 6 to 12-weeks computer training. The children played the game for 20 minutes per day for 5 days a week. The training effects were evaluated using neuropsychological tests. Generally, children benefited significantly from the training regarding number representation and arithmetic operations. Furthermore, children liked to play with the program and reported that the training improved their mathematical abilities.

  20. VOCATIONAL TRAINING OF COMPETITIVE ENGINEERS THROUGH THE USE OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. Loboda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the increasing importance of computer technologies and the need to educatean engineer at the level of modern advances in science and technology. New methods and technologies of learning based on the training of competitive engineers are considered. The teaching and methodological support of the didactic process of the professional training for the engineering students is presented and characterized: the motivation tasks for laboratory training and for calculating-and-graphic assignments, the individual card for the organization of the student's work, the methodical guidances. Examples of motivational tasks used for laboratory training are provided: the solution of the search tasks of linear programming, the simulation modeling of the optimal tax rates. The most effective ways to organize learning process using computer technologies for the vocational training of engineering students are indicated.

  1. Comparison of the effectiveness of hands-on versus online education in child passenger safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Anita; Beckworth, Kristen L; Ansiaux, John A; Chen, Carol C; Hoffman, Benjamin; Shenoi, Rohit P

    2017-08-28

    Community paediatricians' knowledge of appropriate child safety seat (CSS) use in vehicles may be inadequate. We compared the effectiveness of hands-on and online education in improving and retaining child passenger safety (CPS) knowledge and skills among paediatric trainees. Paediatric trainees were randomised to receive hands-on skills training versus a 1-hour online module in CPS. CSS knowledge and installation skills were assessed using a validated 10-item/point questionnaire and an assessment tool respectively at baseline and after 6 months. Preintervention and postintervention knowledge improvement and CSS installation skills between groups were assessed using paired t-tests and effect size ( d ). Forty-eight students agreed to participate and were randomised. Thirty-nine completed training (hands-on: 23 and online: 15). At entry, no significant differences in learners' demographics and prior CPS education existed. Baseline CPS knowledge scores did not differ significantly between groups (p=0.26). Postintervention, both groups demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge scores (hands-on=3.1 (95% CI 2.4 to 3.7), ponline=2.6 (95% CI 1.9 to 3.3), ponline=1.1 (95% CI 0.7 to 1.6), ponline group (ponline group (forward-facing seat: 0.9 (95% CI -0.08 to 1.9), p=0.07); rear-facing seat: -0.2 (95% CI -1.1 to 0.7), p=0.6). Among paediatric trainees, hands-on and online CPS education are both effective in improving long-term CPS knowledge. Long-term installation skills for forward-facing and rear-facing CSS persist for hands-on education but are inconclusive for online education. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Feedback in Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training: When technology meets pedagogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neri, A.; Cucchiarini, C.; Strik, H.

    2002-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) has now established itself as a prolific and fast growing area whose advantages are already well-known to educators. Yet, many authors lament the lack of a reliable integrated conceptual framework linking technology advances and second language acquisition

  3. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  4. Training to use a commercial brain-computer interface as access technology: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Sarvnaz; Selitskiy, Dmitry; Pau, James; Davies, T Claire; Owens, R Glynn

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes how an individual with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy was trained over a period of four weeks to use a commercial electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI). The participant spent three sessions exploring the system, and seven sessions playing a game focused on EEG feedback training of left and right arm motor imagery and a customised, training game paradigm was employed. The participant showed improvement in the production of two distinct EEG patterns. The participant's performance was influenced by motivation, fatigue and concentration. Six weeks post-training the participant could still control the BCI and used this to type a sentence using an augmentative and alternative communication application on a wirelessly linked device. The results from this case study highlight the importance of creating a dynamic, relevant and engaging training environment for BCIs. Implications for Rehabilitation Customising a training paradigm to suit the users' interests can influence adherence to assistive technology training. Mood, fatigue, physical illness and motivation influence the usability of a brain-computer interface. Commercial brain-computer interfaces, which require little set up time, may be used as access technology for individuals with severe disabilities.

  5. A general-purpose development environment for intelligent computer-aided training systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savely, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    Space station training will be a major task, requiring the creation of large numbers of simulation-based training systems for crew, flight controllers, and ground-based support personnel. Given the long duration of space station missions and the large number of activities supported by the space station, the extension of space shuttle training methods to space station training may prove to be impractical. The application of artificial intelligence technology to simulation training can provide the ability to deliver individualized training to large numbers of personnel in a distributed workstation environment. The principal objective of this project is the creation of a software development environment which can be used to build intelligent training systems for procedural tasks associated with the operation of the space station. Current NASA Johnson Space Center projects and joint projects with other NASA operational centers will result in specific training systems for existing space shuttle crew, ground support personnel, and flight controller tasks. Concurrently with the creation of these systems, a general-purpose development environment for intelligent computer-aided training systems will be built. Such an environment would permit the rapid production, delivery, and evolution of training systems for space station crew, flight controllers, and other support personnel. The widespread use of such systems will serve to preserve task and training expertise, support the training of many personnel in a distributed manner, and ensure the uniformity and verifiability of training experiences. As a result, significant reductions in training costs can be realized while safety and the probability of mission success can be enhanced.

  6. 1st Hands-on Science Science Fair

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Esteves. Z.

    2017-01-01

    In school learning of science through investigative hands-on experiments is in the core of the Hands-on Science Network vision. However informal and non-formal contexts may also provide valuable paths for implementing this strategy aiming a better e!ective science education. In May 2011, a "rst country wide “Hands-on Science’ Science Fair” was organized in Portugal with the participation of 131 students that presented 38 projects in all "elds of Science. In this communication we will pr...

  7. Computer-Based Training at a Military Medical Center: Understanding Decreased Participation in Training among Staff and Ways to Improve Completion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Military health care facilities make extensive use of computer-based training (CBT) for both clinical and non-clinical staff. Despite evidence identifying various factors that may impact CBT, the problem is unclear as to what factors specifically influence employee participation in computer-based training. The purpose of this mixed method case…

  8. Mental workload during brain-computer interface training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Elizabeth A; Williams, Justin C; Vanderheiden, Gregg C; Radwin, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    It is not well understood how people perceive the difficulty of performing brain-computer interface (BCI) tasks, which specific aspects of mental workload contribute the most, and whether there is a difference in perceived workload between participants who are able-bodied and disabled. This study evaluated mental workload using the NASA Task Load Index (TLX), a multi-dimensional rating procedure with six subscales: Mental Demands, Physical Demands, Temporal Demands, Performance, Effort, and Frustration. Able-bodied and motor disabled participants completed the survey after performing EEG-based BCI Fitts' law target acquisition and phrase spelling tasks. The NASA-TLX scores were similar for able-bodied and disabled participants. For example, overall workload scores (range 0-100) for 1D horizontal tasks were 48.5 (SD = 17.7) and 46.6 (SD 10.3), respectively. The TLX can be used to inform the design of BCIs that will have greater usability by evaluating subjective workload between BCI tasks, participant groups, and control modalities. Mental workload of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) can be evaluated with the NASA Task Load Index (TLX). The TLX is an effective tool for comparing subjective workload between BCI tasks, participant groups (able-bodied and disabled), and control modalities. The data can inform the design of BCIs that will have greater usability.

  9. Developing a self-learning training program for RIS computer skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stike, R; Olivi, P

    2000-01-01

    The demonstration of competency by healthcare professionals remains a priority for hospital administrators, as well as for the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Unfortunately, staff members who have to complete competency exercises often describe the process as a burden. Ineffective training processes may be the culprit. Our teaching hospital developed a training program for the radiology information system (RIS) computer system used by an imaging department of more than 200 staff members. The emphasis of our training program was on the design phase and the contribution of subject-matter experts (SMEs) to the content and testing of training materials, which included a computer-assisted, self-learning manual (SLM) and a pocket guide. The first step in the design process was to identify subject matter experts (SMEs) within the imaging department. Seven SMEs were shadowed by the IT educator. The role of the SME was to demonstrate current practices with RIS, to state principles involved and to serve as a reference for questions during training development. The steps that followed planning and design were: training delivery, evaluation and ongoing training. These steps were implemented in a series of workshops, which included soliciting feedback about the training program. Feedback was used to revise the SLM. The RIS SLM training project was a huge success for everyone involved. The average score for the core-skills test was higher than 90 percent. Seventy-five percent of the current staff was trained in the first phase, including radiology students. Our yearly cost savings using SLM workshops instead of on-the-job training will be about $35,000. We attribute the success of this project to a detailed timeline, SME contributions, the pilot testing phase, and the positive attitude of the imaging staff.

  10. Computer software design description for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF), Project L-045H, Operator Training Station (OTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Operator Training Station (OTS) is a computer-based training tool designed to aid plant operations and engineering staff in familiarizing themselves with the TEDF Central Control System (CCS)

  11. Evaluation of Computer-Based Training for Health Workers in Echocardiography for RHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Daniel; Okello, Emmy; Beaton, Andrea; Selnow, Gary; Remenyi, Bo; Watson, Caroline; Longenecker, Chris T; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew C

    2017-03-01

    The implementation of screening for rheumatic heart disease at a population-scale would require a considerable increase in human resources. Training nonexpert staff in echocardiography requires appropriate methods and materials. This pre/post study aims to measure the change in the knowledge and confidence of a group of health workers after a computer-assisted training intervention in basic echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease. A syllabus of self-guided, computer-based modules to train nonexpert health workers in basic echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease was developed. Thirty-eight health workers from Uganda participated in the training. Using a pre/post design, identical test instruments were administered before and after the training intervention, assessing the knowledge (using multiple-choice questions) and confidence (using Likert scale questions) in clinical science and echocardiography. The mean total score on knowledge tests rose from 44.8% to 85.4% (mean difference: 40.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 35.4% to 45.8%), with strong evidence for an increase in scores across all knowledge theme areas (p science (difference: 7.1, 95% CI: 6.2 to 8.0; p computer-assisted learning may reduce the human resource requirements for training staff in echocardiography. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hands-on-Universe, Europe Bringing frontline interactive astronomy to the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, R.

    Hands-on-Universe, Europe (EU-HOU) aims at re-awakening the interest for science in the young generations through astronomy and new technologies. It relies on real observations acquired through a worldwide internet-based network of automatic telescopes or with didactical tools (webcam, radiotelescope). Pupils manipulate images in the classroom environment, using specific software within pedagogical resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. EU-HOU is freely available on the web, and trains european teachers.

  13. The use of computer-assisted interactive videodisc training in reactor operations at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiplett, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    This presentation discussed the use of computer aided training at Savannah River Site using a computer-assisted interactive videodisc system. This system was used in situations where there was a high frequency of training required, where there were a large number of people to be trained and where there was a rigid work schedule. The system was used to support classroom training to emphasize major points, display graphics of flowpaths, for simulations, and video of actual equipment

  14. Increased motor cortex excitability during motor imagery in brain-computer interface trained subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokienko, Olesya A.; Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Kulikova, Sofia N.; Bobrov, Pavel D.; Chernikova, Liudmila A.; Frolov, Alexander A.; Piradov, Mikhail A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Motor imagery (MI) is the mental performance of movement without muscle activity. It is generally accepted that MI and motor performance have similar physiological mechanisms. Purpose: To investigate the activity and excitability of cortical motor areas during MI in subjects who were previously trained with an MI-based brain-computer interface (BCI). Subjects and Methods: Eleven healthy volunteers without neurological impairments (mean age, 36 years; range: 24–68 years) were either trained with an MI-based BCI (BCI-trained, n = 5) or received no BCI training (n = 6, controls). Subjects imagined grasping in a blocked paradigm task with alternating rest and task periods. For evaluating the activity and excitability of cortical motor areas we used functional MRI and navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS). Results: fMRI revealed activation in Brodmann areas 3 and 6, the cerebellum, and the thalamus during MI in all subjects. The primary motor cortex was activated only in BCI-trained subjects. The associative zones of activation were larger in non-trained subjects. During MI, motor evoked potentials recorded from two of the three targeted muscles were significantly higher only in BCI-trained subjects. The motor threshold decreased (median = 17%) during MI, which was also observed only in BCI-trained subjects. Conclusion: Previous BCI training increased motor cortex excitability during MI. These data may help to improve BCI applications, including rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:24319425

  15. Increased motor cortex excitability during motor imagery in brain-computer interface trained subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya eMokienko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor imagery (MI is the mental performance of movement without muscle activity. It is generally accepted that MI and motor performance have similar physiological mechanisms.Purpose: To investigate the activity and excitability of cortical motor areas during MI in subjects who were previously trained with an MI-based brain-computer interface (BCI.Subjects and methods: Eleven healthy volunteers without neurological impairments (mean age, 36 years; range: 24–68 years were either trained with an MI-based BCI (BCI-trained, n = 5 or received no BCI training (n = 6, controls. Subjects imagined grasping in a blocked paradigm task with alternating rest and task periods. For evaluating the activity and excitability of cortical motor areas we used functional MRI and navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS.Results: fMRI revealed activation in Brodmann areas 3 and 6, the cerebellum, and the thalamus during MI in all subjects. The primary motor cortex was activated only in BCI-trained subjects. The associative zones of activation were larger in non-trained subjects. During MI, motor evoked potentials recorded from two of the three targeted muscles were significantly higher only in BCI-trained subjects. The motor threshold decreased (median = 17% during MI, which was also observed only in BCI-trained subjects.Conclusion: Previous BCI training increased motor cortex excitability during MI. These data may help to improve BCI applications, including rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis system for bone scintigrams from Japanese patients: importance of training database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horikoshi, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Onoguchi, Masahisa

    2012-01-01

    higher performance than the corresponding CAD software trained with a European database for the analysis of bone scans from Japanese patients. These results could at least partly be caused by the physical differences between Japanese and European patients resulting in less influence of attenuation......Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) software for bone scintigrams have recently been introduced as a clinical quality assurance tool. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of two CAD systems, one based on a European and one on a Japanese training database, in a group of bone...... scans from Japanese patients.The two CAD software are trained to interpret bone scans using training databases consisting of bone scans with the desired interpretation, metastatic disease or not. One software was trained using 795 bone scans from European patients and the other with 904 bone scans from...

  17. Preservice Teachers' Computer Use in Single Computer Training Courses; Relationships and Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogheib, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Single computer courses offered at colleges of education are expected to provide preservice teachers with the skills and expertise needed to adopt computer technology in their future classrooms. However, preservice teachers still find difficulty adopting such technology. This research paper investigated relationships among preservice teachers'…

  18. Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Executive Functions after Stroke: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Renate M.; Murre, Jaap M. J.; Veltman, Dick J.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke commonly results in cognitive impairments in working memory, attention, and executive function, which may be restored with appropriate training programs. Our aim was to systematically review the evidence for computer-based cognitive training of executive dysfunctions. Methods: Studies were included if they concerned adults who had suffered stroke or other types of acquired brain injury, if the intervention was computer training of executive functions, and if the outcome was related to executive functioning. We searched in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library. Study quality was evaluated based on the CONSORT Statement. Treatment effect was evaluated based on differences compared to pre-treatment and/or to a control group. Results: Twenty studies were included. Two were randomized controlled trials that used an active control group. The other studies included multiple baselines, a passive control group, or were uncontrolled. Improvements were observed in tasks similar to the training (near transfer) and in tasks dissimilar to the training (far transfer). However, these effects were not larger in trained than in active control groups. Two studies evaluated neural effects and found changes in both functional and structural connectivity. Most studies suffered from methodological limitations (e.g., lack of an active control group and no adjustment for multiple testing) hampering differentiation of training effects from spontaneous recovery, retest effects, and placebo effects. Conclusions: The positive findings of most studies, including neural changes, warrant continuation of research in this field, but only if its methodological limitations are addressed. PMID:27148007

  19. Computer based training for NPP personnel (interactive communication systems and functional trainers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    KWU as a manufacturer of thermal and nuclear power plants has extensive customer training obligations within its power plant contracts. In this respect KWU has gained large experience in training of personnel, in the production of training material including video tapes an in the design of simulators. KWU developed interactive communication systems (ICS) for training and retraining purposes with a personal computer operating a video disc player on which video instruction is stored. The training program is edited with the help of a self developed editing system which enables the author to easily enter his instructions into the computer. ICS enables the plant management to better monitor the performance of its personnel through computerized training results and helps to save training manpower. German NPPs differ very much from other designs with respect to a more complex and integrated reactor control system and an additional reactor limitation system. Simulators for such plants therefore have also to simulate these systems. KWU developed a Functional Trainer (FT) which is a replica of the primary system, the auxiliary systems linked to it and the associated control, limitation and protection systems including the influences of the turbine operation and control

  20. Exercise manual for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, P.R.; Widney, T.W.; Goolsby, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center and Regional Security; Nelson, J.D.; Evanko, D.A. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspected Party and the Inspection Team. Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. The Exercise Manual supplements the ACE-IT software by providing general information on on-site inspections and detailed information for the CWC challenge inspection exercise. The detailed information includes the pre-inspection briefing, maps, list of sensitive items, medical records, and shipping records.

  1. Measuring the Effectiveness of Information Security Training: A Comparative Analysis of Computer-Based Training and Instructor-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Financial institutions are increasingly finding difficulty defending against information security risks and threats, as they are often the number one target for information thieves. An effective information security training and awareness program can be a critical component of protecting an organization's information assets. Many financial…

  2. State-of-the-art computer technologies used to train nuclear specialists and to conduct research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, Yu.A.; Tikhonenko, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses innovative methods used in the process of training nuclear specialists and conducting research which are based on state-of-the-art computer technologies. The approach proposed makes wide use of mathematical modeling and state-of-the-art programming techniques. It is based on the development, improvement and application of problem-oriented computer codes to support the teaching process and to solve fundamental and applied problems of nuclear physics and nuclear engineering.

  3. Computer-Based Cognitive Training for Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results from a Pilot Randomized, Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Deborah E.; Yaffe, Kristine; Belfor, Nataliya; Jagust, William J.; DeCarli, Charles; Reed, Bruce R.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a pilot randomized, controlled trial of intensive, computer-based cognitive training in 47 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The intervention group performed exercises specifically designed to improve auditory processing speed and accuracy for 100 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks; the control group performed more passive computer activities (reading, listening, visuospatial game) for similar amounts of time. Subjects had a mean age of 74 years and 60% were men; 7...

  4. Hands-on-Entropy, Energy Balance with Biological Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy). This has enabled students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce complex biological processes and structures in order model them mathematically to account for both deterministic and probabilistic processes. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront random forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk will present a number of these exercises, with particular focus on the hands-on experiments done by the students, and will give examples of the tangible material that our students work with throughout the two-semester sequence of their course on introductory

  5. At-risk children's use of reflection and revision in hands-on experimental activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosino, Anthony J., Jr.

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating opportunities for reflection and revision in hands-on science instruction which emphasized experimentation using model rockets. The participants were low achieving sixth grade summer school students (n = 23) designated as at-risk for school failure by their district. The group was asked a series of interview questions based on work by Schauble et al. (1995) relating to experimentation. The interviews took place over three distinct time points corresponding to a "hands-on only" condition, a "hands-on with reflection and revision" condition and a "hands-on with repeated reflection and revision" condition. A Friedman's Two-Way Analysis of Variance by Ranks indicate students score low at first with traditional hands-on instruction but improve significantly with opportunities to reflect and revise their experiments. In addition, a sociocultural analysis was conducted during the summer school session to assess the model rocket activity as an apprenticeship, as guided participation and as participatory appropriation using a framework established by Rogoff (1994). Finally, a survey (the Classroom Environment Survey) was administered to the students measuring five constructs consistent with a constructivist classroom: participation, autonomy, relevance, commitment to learning and disruptions to learning. Analysis indicate students in the summer school model rocket intervention experienced a greater sense of constructivist principles during the activity than a similar comparison group utilizing reform minded instruction but not including opportunities for reflection and revision cycles. This research provides important evidence that, like scientists, students in school can learn effectively from extended practice in a varied context. Importantly, the data indicate that hands-on instruction is best utilized when opportunities for reflection and revision are made explicit. Implications are discussed related

  6. A Randomized Field Trial of the Fast ForWord Language Computer-Based Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Benson, James G.; Overman, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an independent assessment of the Fast ForWord Language computer-based training program developed by Scientific Learning Corporation. Previous laboratory research involving children with language-based learning impairments showed strong effects on their abilities to recognize brief and fast sequences of nonspeech and speech…

  7. The Effects of Computer-Simulation Game Training on Participants' Opinions on Leadership Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewiorek, Anna; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Lainema, Timo; Saarinen, Eeli; Lehtinen, Erno

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to elucidate new information on the possibility of leadership training through business computer-simulation gaming in a virtual working context. In the study, a business-simulation gaming session was organised for graduate students ("n"?=?26). The participants played the simulation game in virtual teams…

  8. THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE PHYSICAL EXERCISE TRAINING ON MATHEMATICAL COMPUTATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Bala

    2014-12-01

    The results showed that the children’s computation performance was enhanced significantly in the groups with 30, or 45, or 60 min of physical exercise, but not in the groups without physical exercise. This means that even acute intensive physical training can yield positive effects on children's mathematical abilities.

  9. Students' Viewpoint of Computer Game for Training in Indonesian Universities and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudin, Didin; Hasegawa, Shinobu; Kamaludin, Apep

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the survey--conducted in Indonesian universities (UNIV) and high schools (HS)--whose concern is to examine preferences and influences of computer game for training. Comparing the students' viewpoint between both educational levels could determine which educational level would satisfy the need of MAGNITUDE--mobile serious game…

  10. A Framework for the Design of Computer-Assisted Simulation Training for Complex Police Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Tor; Åström, Jan; Anderson, Greg; Bowles, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report progress concerning the design of a computer-assisted simulation training (CAST) platform for developing decision-making skills in police students. The overarching aim is to outline a theoretical framework for the design of CAST to facilitate police students' development of search techniques in…

  11. What Communication Theories Can Teach the Designer of Computer-Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ronald E.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews characteristics of computer-based training (CBT) that make application of communication theories appropriate and presents principles from communication theory (e.g., general systems theory, symbolic interactionism, rule theories, and interpersonal communication theories) to illustrate how CBT developers can profitably apply them to…

  12. Evaluating the Relationship of Computer Literacy Training Competence and Nursing Experience to CPIS Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Dorothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive/correlational project was to examine the relationship between the level of computer literacy, informatics training, nursing experience, and perceived competence in using computerized patient information systems (CPIS) and nursing resistance to using CPIS. The Nurse Computerized Patient Information…

  13. Providing training enhances the biomechanical improvements of an alternative computer mouse design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Odell, D.; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    To determine if an alternative mouse promotes more neutral postures and decreases forearm muscle activity and if training enhances these biomechanical benefits is the purpose of the study. Computer mouse use is a risk factor for developing musculoskeletal disorders; alternative mouse designs can

  14. Providing Training Enhances the Biomechanical Improvements of an Alternative Computer Mouse Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Odell, D.; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine if an alternative mouse promotes more neutral postures and decreases forearm muscle activity and if training enhances these biomechanical benefits. Background: Computer mouse use is a risk factor for developing musculoskeletal disorders;

  15. Computer-Based Training Programs for Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment and/or Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Klimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, due to the demographic trends, the number of aging population groups is dramatically rising, especially in developed countries. This trend causes serious economic and social issues, but also an increase of aging disorders such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI or dementia in older population groups. MCI and dementia are connected with deterioration of cognitive functions. The aim of this mini review article is therefore to explore whether computer-based training programs might be an effective intervention tool for older people with MCI and/or dementia or not. The methods include a literature search in the world’s acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, MEDLINE and Springer, and consequently, evaluation of the findings of the relevant studies. The findings from the selected studies are quite neutral with respect to the efficacy of the computer assisted intervention programs on the improvement of basic cognitive functions. On the one hand, they suggest that the computer-based training interventions might generate some positive effects on patients with MCI and/or dementia, such as the improvement of learning and short-term memory, as well as behavioral symptoms. On the other hand, these training interventions seem to be short-term, with small sample sizes and their efficacy was proved only in the half of the detected studies. Therefore more longitudinal randomized controlled trials (RCTs are needed to prove the efficacy of the computer-based training programs among older individuals with MCI and/or dementia.

  16. Computer-based training (CBT) intervention reduces workplace violence and harassment for homecare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger C; Anger, W Kent; Laharnar, Naima; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Weinstein, Marc; Perrin, Nancy

    2017-07-01

    The study examines the effectiveness of a workplace violence and harassment prevention and response program with female homecare workers in a consumer driven model of care. Homecare workers were randomized to either; computer based training (CBT only) or computer-based training with homecare worker peer facilitation (CBT + peer). Participants completed measures on confidence, incidents of violence, and harassment, health and work outcomes at baseline, 3, 6 months post-baseline. Homecare workers reported improved confidence to prevent and respond to workplace violence and harassment and a reduction in incidents of workplace violence and harassment in both groups at 6-month follow-up. A decrease in negative health and work outcomes associated with violence and harassment were not reported in the groups. CBT alone or with trained peer facilitation with homecare workers can increase confidence and reduce incidents of workplace violence and harassment in a consumer-driven model of care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. GRAPHIC COMPETENCE AS A COMPONENT OF TRAINING FUTURE ENGINEERING TEACHERS OF COMPUTER PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Kozak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analysis the system of professional training of future engineering teachers of computer type at the pedagogical universities, including graphical content preparation. It is established that the modernization of this system of training engineering teachers of computer profile is extremely important because of increasing demands for total graphics education, which in terms of mass communication, the need to compress a significant amount of information and opportunities provided by new information technologies, becomes so important as second literacy. The article reveals the essential characteristics of the concept of graphic competence as important component of the modernization of the education system, and an attempt to find promising ways of further work to effective solving of the issue of formation of graphic competence of engineering teachers of computer profile.

  18. Exploring quantum physics through hands-on projects

    CERN Document Server

    Prutchi, David

    2012-01-01

    Build an intuitive understanding of the principles behind quantum mechanics through practical construction and replication of original experiments With easy-to-acquire, low-cost materials and basic knowledge of algebra and trigonometry, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects takes readers step by step through the process of re-creating scientific experiments that played an essential role in the creation and development of quantum mechanics. From simple measurements of Planck's constant to testing violations of Bell's inequalities using entangled photons, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects not only immerses readers in the process of quantum mechanics, it provides insight into the history of the field--how the theories and discoveries apply to our world not only today, but also tomorrow. By immersing readers in groundbreaking experiments that can be performed at home, school, or in the lab, this first-ever, hands-on book successfully demystifies the world of quantum physics for...

  19. Developing a strategy for computational lab skills training through Software and Data Carpentry: Experiences from the ELIXIR Pilot action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, A.; Gelder, C.W.G. van; Nenadic, A.; Palagi, P.M.; Korpelainen, E.; Lijnzaad, P.; Marek, D.; Sansone, S.A.; Hancock, J.; Goble, C.

    2017-01-01

    Quality training in computational skills for life scientists is essential to allow them to deliver robust, reproducible and cutting-edge research. A pan-European bioinformatics programme, ELIXIR, has adopted a well-established and progressive programme of computational lab and data skills training

  20. Designing and using computer simulations in medical education and training: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Karl E; O'Neil, Harold F

    2013-10-01

    Computer-based technologies informed by the science of learning are becoming increasingly prevalent in education and training. For the Department of Defense (DoD), this presents a great potential advantage to the effective preparation of a new generation of technologically enabled service members. Military medicine has broad education and training challenges ranging from first aid and personal protective skills for every service member to specialized combat medic training; many of these challenges can be met with gaming and simulation technologies that this new generation has embraced. However, comprehensive use of medical games and simulation to augment expert mentorship is still limited to elite medical provider training programs, but can be expected to become broadly used in the training of first responders and allied health care providers. The purpose of this supplement is to review the use of computer games and simulation to teach and assess medical knowledge and skills. This review and other DoD research policy sources will form the basis for development of a research and development road map and guidelines for use of this technology in military medicine. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Hands-On Mathematics: Two Cases from Ancient Chinese Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjun

    2009-01-01

    In modern mathematical teaching, it has become increasingly emphasized that mathematical knowledge should be taught by problem-solving, hands-on activities, and interactive learning experiences. Comparing the ideas of modern mathematical education with the development of ancient Chinese mathematics, we find that the history of mathematics in…

  2. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  3. Teaching DNA Fingerprinting using a Hands-on Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thatcher

    1998-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive hands-on lesson in DNA fingerprinting that can be completed in a single class period. Involves students in solving a murder in which a drop of blood is fingerprinted and matched with the blood of the murderer. (DDR)

  4. A Hands-On Approach to Maglev for Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Raymond T.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) can be taught to gifted students in grades 4-9 using hands-on activities that align to the National Science Standards. Principles of magnetic levitation, advantages of magnetic levitation, construction of a Maglev project, testing and evaluation of vehicles, and presentation of the unit are…

  5. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  6. Google Earth for Landowners: Insights from Hands-on Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Google Earth is an accessible, user-friendly GIS that can help landowners in their management planning. I offered hands-on Google Earth workshops to landowners to teach skills, including mapmaking, length and area measurement, and database management. Workshop participants were surveyed at least 6 months following workshop completion, and learning…

  7. Brain training improves recovery after stroke but waiting list improves equally: A multicenter randomized controlled trial of a computer-based cognitive flexibility training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate M van de Ven

    Full Text Available Brain training is currently widely used in an attempt to improve cognitive functioning. Computer-based training can be performed at home and could therefore be an effective add-on to available rehabilitation programs aimed at improving cognitive functioning. Several studies have reported cognitive improvements after computer training, but most lacked proper active and passive control conditions.Our aim was to investigate whether computer-based cognitive flexibility training improves executive functioning after stroke. We also conducted within-group analyses similar to those used in previous studies, to assess inferences about transfer effects when comparisons to proper control groups are missing.We conducted a randomized controlled, double blind trial. Adults (30-80 years old who had suffered a stroke within the last 5 years were assigned to either an intervention group (n = 38, active control group (i.e., mock training; n = 35, or waiting list control group (n = 24. The intervention and mock training consisted of 58 half-hour sessions within a 12-week period. Cognitive functioning was assessed using several paper-and-pencil and computerized neuropsychological tasks before the training, immediately after training, and 4 weeks after training completion.Both training groups improved on training tasks, and all groups improved on several transfer tasks (three executive functioning tasks, attention, reasoning, and psychomotor speed. Improvements remained 4 weeks after training completion. However, the amount of improvement in executive and general cognitive functioning in the intervention group was similar to that of both control groups (active control and waiting list. Therefore, this improvement was likely due to training-unspecific effects. Our results stress the importance to include both active and passive control conditions in the study design and analyses. Results from studies without proper control conditions should be interpreted with care.

  8. A computer-based training system combining virtual reality and multimedia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansfield, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Training new users of complex machines is often an expensive and time-consuming process. This is particularly true for special purpose systems, such as those frequently encountered in DOE applications. This paper presents a computer-based training system intended as a partial solution to this problem. The system extends the basic virtual reality (VR) training paradigm by adding a multimedia component which may be accessed during interaction with the virtual environment: The 3D model used to create the virtual reality is also used as the primary navigation tool through the associated multimedia. This method exploits the natural mapping between a virtual world and the real world that it represents to provide a more intuitive way for the student to interact with all forms of information about the system

  9. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  10. FEATURES OF TEACHING COMPUTER SCIENCE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS OF HUMANITARIAN SPHERE OF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н А Савченко

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current socio-economic conditions of modern society it is impossible without the introducing information technologies into all spheres of life. The importance of teaching natural Sciences for Humanities is of no doubt. This article addresses the main problems of teaching computer science for foreign students studying in the field of training 41.03.01 “Foreign area studies”.

  11. Comparison of online, hands-on, and a combined approach for teaching cautery disbudding technique to dairy producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Charlotte B; LeBlanc, Stephen J; Haley, Derek B; Lissemore, Kerry D; Godkin, M Ann; Duffield, Todd F

    2018-01-01

    The use of pain control for disbudding and dehorning is important from both an animal and industry perspective. Best practices include the use of local anesthetic, commonly given as a cornual nerve block (CNB), and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The proportion is decreasing, but many dairy producers do not use local anesthesia, perhaps in part due to lack of knowledge of the CNB technique. Although this skill is typically learned in person from a veterinarian, alternative methods may be useful. The objective of this trial was to determine if there were differences in the efficacy of online training (n = 23), hands-on training (n = 20), and a combined approach (n = 23) for teaching producers to successfully administer a CNB and disbud a calf. The primary outcome was block efficacy, defined as a lack of established pain behaviors during iron application. Secondary outcomes were background knowledge (assessed by a written quiz), CNB and disbudding technique (evaluated by rubric scoring), time taken, and self-confidence before and after evaluation. Associations between training group and outcome were assessed with logistic regression, ordered logistic regression, and Cox-proportional hazard models, with a random effect for workshop. Block efficacy was not different between training groups, with 91% successful in both combined and online groups, and 75% in the hands-on trained group. Online learners had poorer technical scores than hands-on trainees. The combined group was not different from hands-on. Time to block completion tended to be longer for the online group (62 ± 11 s), whereas time to disbudding completion was not different between hands-on (41 ± 5 s) or combined trainees (41 ± 5 s). The combined group had the highest pre-evaluation confidence score, and remained higher after evaluation than online but was not different than hands-on. Although we saw some statistical differences between groups, absolute differences were small and block efficacy was

  12. Training Older Adults to Use Tablet Computers: Does It Enhance Cognitive Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Micaela Y; Haber, Sara; Drew, Linda M; Park, Denise C

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence shows that engaging in learning new skills improves episodic memory in older adults. In this study, older adults who were computer novices were trained to use a tablet computer and associated software applications. We hypothesize that sustained engagement in this mentally challenging training would yield a dual benefit of improved cognition and enhancement of everyday function by introducing useful skills. A total of 54 older adults (age 60-90) committed 15 hr/week for 3 months. Eighteen participants received extensive iPad training, learning a broad range of practical applications. The iPad group was compared with 2 separate controls: a Placebo group that engaged in passive tasks requiring little new learning; and a Social group that had regular social interaction, but no active skill acquisition. All participants completed the same cognitive battery pre- and post-engagement. Compared with both controls, the iPad group showed greater improvements in episodic memory and processing speed but did not differ in mental control or visuospatial processing. iPad training improved cognition relative to engaging in social or nonchallenging activities. Mastering relevant technological devices have the added advantage of providing older adults with technological skills useful in facilitating everyday activities (e.g., banking). This work informs the selection of targeted activities for future interventions and community programs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  13. Establishing CAD/CAM in Preclinical Dental Education: Evaluation of a Hands-On Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Deisenhofer, Ulrich Karl; Porsche, Monika; Rammelsberg, Peter; Kappel, Stefanie; Stober, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a hands-on computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) module in a preclinical dental course in restorative dentistry. A controlled trial was conducted by dividing a class of 56 third-year dental students in Germany into study and control groups; allocation to the two groups depended on student schedules. Prior information about CAD/CAM-based restorations was provided for all students by means of lectures, preparation exercises, and production of gypsum casts of prepared resin teeth. The study group (32 students) then participated in a hands-on CAD/CAM module in small groups, digitizing their casts and designing zirconia frameworks for single crowns. The digitization process was introduced to the control group (24 students) solely by means of a video-supported lecture. To assess the knowledge gained, a 20-question written examination was administered; 48 students took the exam. The results were analyzed with Student's t-tests at a significance level of 0.05. The results on the examination showed a significant difference between the two groups: the mean scores were 16.8 (SD 1.7, range 13-19) for the study group and 12.5 (SD 3, range 4-18) for the control group. After the control group had also experienced the hands-on module, a total of 48 students from both groups completed a questionnaire with 13 rating-scale and three open-ended questions evaluating the module. Those results showed that the module was highly regarded by the students. This study supports the idea that small-group hands-on courses are helpful for instruction in digital restoration design. These students' knowledge gained and satisfaction seemed to justify the time, effort, and equipment needed.

  14. A brain-computer interface based attention training program for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Guan Lim

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD symptoms can be difficult to treat. We previously reported that a 20-session brain-computer interface (BCI attention training programme improved ADHD symptoms. Here, we investigated a new more intensive BCI-based attention training game system on 20 unmedicated ADHD children (16 males, 4 females with significant inattentive symptoms (combined and inattentive ADHD subtypes. This new system monitored attention through a head band with dry EEG sensors, which was used to drive a feed forward game. The system was calibrated for each user by measuring the EEG parameters during a Stroop task. Treatment consisted of an 8-week training comprising 24 sessions followed by 3 once-monthly booster training sessions. Following intervention, both parent-rated inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms on the ADHD Rating Scale showed significant improvement. At week 8, the mean improvement was -4.6 (5.9 and -4.7 (5.6 respectively for inattentive symptoms and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms (both p<0.01. Cohen's d effect size for inattentive symptoms was large at 0.78 at week 8 and 0.84 at week 24 (post-boosters. Further analysis showed that the change in the EEG based BCI ADHD severity measure correlated with the change ADHD Rating Scale scores. The BCI-based attention training game system is a potential new treatment for ADHD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01344044.

  15. A Hands-On Approach To Teaching Microcontroller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Fai Yeong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Practice and application-oriented approach in education is important, and some research on active learning and cooperative problem-solving have shown that a student will learn faster and develop communication skill, leadership and team work through these methods. This paper presents a study of student preference and performance while learning the microcontroller subject with a 2-day curriculum that emphasized on hands-on approach. The curriculum uses the PIC16F877A microcontroller and participants learned to develop basic circuits and several other applications. Programming was completed on the MPLAB platform. Results show that participants had better understanding in this subject after attending the hands-on course.

  16. Developing a strategy for computational lab skills training through Software and Data Carpentry: Experiences from the ELIXIR Pilot action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Aleksandra; van Gelder, Celia W G; Nenadic, Aleksandra; Palagi, Patricia M; Korpelainen, Eija; Lijnzaad, Philip; Marek, Diana; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Hancock, John; Goble, Carole

    2017-01-01

    Quality training in computational skills for life scientists is essential to allow them to deliver robust, reproducible and cutting-edge research. A pan-European bioinformatics programme, ELIXIR, has adopted a well-established and progressive programme of computational lab and data skills training from Software and Data Carpentry, aimed at increasing the number of skilled life scientists and building a sustainable training community in this field. This article describes the Pilot action, which introduced the Carpentry training model to the ELIXIR community.

  17. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF COMPUTER TRAINING OF FUTURE LAWYERS ON INDICATORS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Sherman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article devoted to a research of influence of progress in Informatics and relative to it disciplines to the showings of educational progress. It has been analyzed the scientific attitude to the definition of term «educational progress». It has been substantiated that computer and information competency of future lawyers is not only a partial of professional activities but also a powerful tool of information tasks with educational character solving by a student in the process of his professional training in the university, that is displayed by the readings of educational progress. During the research we have received the value of coefficient of correlation between the values of final marks in the disciplines Informatics, Legal information retrieval systems, Legal statistics and the results of end-of-semester exams from the first to the forth course, the average score and quality coefficient of students' education progress in the control and experimental groups. During the research of influence of level of formedness of computer and information competency of future lawyers on the readings of the final progress in the educational subjects it has been established that: the level of formedness of base component of computer and information competence, that is provided by the learning of Informatics discipline on the information stage of working of system of professional computer and information training have positive influence on the showings of students' final progress in education subjects. This process is more effective in the experimental groups and to a greater extent it influences the coefficient of final progress quality than its average score; this influence especially visible is on the social and economic and humanitarian disciplines, it is confirmed by value of calculated coefficients of correlation; at the axiological stage of system function of professional computer and informational training the maximum values of the coefficients of

  18. Improvements in musculoskeletal health and computing behaviors: Effects of a macroergonomics office workplace and training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michelle M; Huang, Yueng Hsiang; Lee, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Computer use and its association with musculoskeletal and visual symptoms is an escalating concern. Organizations are shifting to a more proactive injury prevention perspective. Accordingly, a macroergonomics intervention consisting of flexible workplace design and office ergonomics training was designed to examine the effects on worker's computing behaviors, postures, and musculoskeletal discomfort, and their relationship to psychosocial factors. Participants were assigned to either group: 1) no-intervention control 2) flexible Workplace-only (WP-only), and 3) flexible Workplace + Training (WP+T). Observational findings indicate both intervention groups experienced positive, significant changes in improved workstation arrangements and computing postures, with the WP+T intervention group exhibiting a higher, significant change of behavioral translation. Also, significant, positive relationships between observed postures and musculoskeletal discomfort/pain were found. The intervention effect was stronger when management was responsive to workers' ergonomics needs. This study suggests that a macroergonomics intervention can produce beneficial effects for office and computer workers and organizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. IT release management a hands-on guide

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Dave

    2011-01-01

    When implemented correctly, release management can help ensure that quality is integrated throughout the development, implementation, and delivery of services, applications, and infrastructure. This holistic, total cost of ownership approach allows for higher levels of system availability, is more cost effective to maintain, and increases overall stability, maintainability, and reliability. Filled with practical insights, IT Release Management: A Hands-on Guide clearly illustrates the effective implementation of a release process in the real world. It examines the similarities and differences

  20. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Bernard H. IV; Ebert, David

    1988-01-01

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  1. Computer-based auditory phoneme discrimination training improves speech recognition in noise in experienced adult cochlear implant listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Annette; Serman, Maja; Gefeller, Olaf; Hoppe, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    Specific computer-based auditory training may be a useful completion in the rehabilitation process for cochlear implant (CI) listeners to achieve sufficient speech intelligibility. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a computerized, phoneme-discrimination training programme. The study employed a pretest-post-test design; participants were randomly assigned to the training or control group. Over a period of three weeks, the training group was instructed to train in phoneme discrimination via computer, twice a week. Sentence recognition in different noise conditions (moderate to difficult) was tested pre- and post-training, and six months after the training was completed. The control group was tested and retested within one month. Twenty-seven adult CI listeners who had been using cochlear implants for more than two years participated in the programme; 15 adults in the training group, 12 adults in the control group. Besides significant improvements for the trained phoneme-identification task, a generalized training effect was noted via significantly improved sentence recognition in moderate noise. No significant changes were noted in the difficult noise conditions. Improved performance was maintained over an extended period. Phoneme-discrimination training improves experienced CI listeners' speech perception in noise. Additional research is needed to optimize auditory training for individual benefit.

  2. Implementation of internet training on posture reform of computer users in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keykhaie, Zohreh; Zareban, Iraj; Shahrakipoor, Mahnaz; Hormozi, Maryam; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Masoudi, Gholamreza; Rahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-12-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are of common problems among computer (PC) users. Training of posture reform plays a significant role in the prevention of the emergence, progression and complications of these diseases. The present research was performed to study the effect of the Internet training on the posture reform of the Internet users working in two Iranian universities including Sistan and Baluchestan University and Islamic Azad University of Zahedan in 2014. This study was a quasi-experimental intervention with control group and conducted in two Iranian universities including Sistan and Baluchestan University and Islamic Azad University of Zahedan. The study was done on 160 PC users in the two groups of intervention (80 people) and control (80 people). Training PowerPoint was sent to the intervention group through the Internet and a post test was given to them after 45 days. Statistical software of SPSS 19 and statistical tests of Kolmogrov, t-test, Fisher Exact test, and correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. After the training, the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, performance and self-efficacy in the intervention group were 24.21 ± 1.34, 38.36 ± 2.89, 7.59 ± 1.16, and 45.06 ± 4.11, respectively (P Internet had a significant impact on the posture reform of the PC users. According to the findings observed, there was a significant relationship between the scores of self-efficacy-performance after training. Therefore, based on the findings of the study, it is suggested that Internet training to increase self-efficacy approach in the successive periods can be effective to reform the postures of PC users.

  3. Real-time development of data acquisition and analysis software for hands-on physiology education in neuroscience: G-PRIME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gus K; Johnson, Bruce R; Bonow, Robert H; Land, Bruce R; Hoy, Ronald R

    2009-01-01

    We report on the real-time creation of an application for hands-on neurophysiology in an advanced undergraduate teaching laboratory. Enabled by the rapid software development tools included in the Matlab technical computing environment (The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a team, consisting of a neurophysiology educator and a biophysicist trained as an electrical engineer, interfaced to a course of approximately 15 students from engineering and biology backgrounds. The result is the powerful freeware data acquisition and analysis environment, "g-PRIME." The software was developed from week to week in response to curriculum demands, and student feedback. The program evolved from a simple software oscilloscope, enabling RC circuit analysis, to a suite of tools supporting analysis of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission analysis in invertebrate model systems. The program has subsequently expanded in application to university courses, research, and high school projects in the US and abroad as free courseware.

  4. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    Fifty-two leaders in the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course (BNCOC) at Fort Benning, Georgia, participated in an assessment of two desk-top computer simulations used to train tactical decision making...

  5. Computer-Assisted Training as a Complement in Rehabilitation of Patients With Chronic Vestibular Dizziness-A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Michael Smærup; Gro¨nvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare a computer exercise program with conservative home-training following printed instructions in the rehabilitation of elderly patients with vestibular dysfunction. Design Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Setting Geriatric Department, Aarhus University Hospital...

  6. Projective methodical system of students training to the course «History of computer science»

    OpenAIRE

    С А Виденин

    2008-01-01

    Components of teachers readiness to professional activity are described in the item. The projective methods of training to a course « History of computer science « in favour to improve professional grounding of students' are considered.

  7. Computer-assisted generation of individual training concepts for advanced education in manufacturing metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Teresa; Weckenmann, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Due to increasing requirements on the accuracy and reproducibility of measurement results together with a rapid development of novel technologies for the execution of measurements, there is a high demand for adequately qualified metrologists. Accordingly, a variety of training offers are provided by machine manufacturers, universities and other institutions. Yet, for an interested learner it is very difficult to define an optimal training schedule for his/her individual demands. Therefore, a computer-based assistance tool is developed to support a demand-responsive scheduling of training. Based on the difference between the actual and intended competence profile and under consideration of amending requirements, an optimally customized qualification concept is derived. For this, available training offers are categorized according to different dimensions: regarding contents of the course, but also intended target groups, focus of the imparted competences, implemented methods of learning and teaching, expected constraints for learning and necessary preknowledge. After completing a course, the achieved competences and the transferability of gathered knowledge are evaluated. Based on the results, recommendations for amending measures of learning are provided. Thus, a customized qualification for manufacturing metrology is facilitated, adapted to the specific needs and constraints of each individual learner

  8. Do pre-trained deep learning models improve computer-aided classification of digital mammograms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutalib, Sarah S.; Mohamed, Aly A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Berg, Wendie A.; Luo, Yahong; Wu, Shandong

    2018-02-01

    Digital mammography screening is an important exam for the early detection of breast cancer and reduction in mortality. False positives leading to high recall rates, however, results in unnecessary negative consequences to patients and health care systems. In order to better aid radiologists, computer-aided tools can be utilized to improve distinction between image classifications and thus potentially reduce false recalls. The emergence of deep learning has shown promising results in the area of biomedical imaging data analysis. This study aimed to investigate deep learning and transfer learning methods that can improve digital mammography classification performance. In particular, we evaluated the effect of pre-training deep learning models with other imaging datasets in order to boost classification performance on a digital mammography dataset. Two types of datasets were used for pre-training: (1) a digitized film mammography dataset, and (2) a very large non-medical imaging dataset. By using either of these datasets to pre-train the network initially, and then fine-tuning with the digital mammography dataset, we found an increase in overall classification performance in comparison to a model without pre-training, with the very large non-medical dataset performing the best in improving the classification accuracy.

  9. Effects of In-Class Hands-On Laboratories in a Large Enrollment, Multiple Section Blended Linear Circuits Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Bonni H.; Ferri, Aldo A.; Majerich, David M.; Madden, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of hands-on learning in an undergraduate circuits class that is taught to non-majors; i.e., students outside of electrical and computing engineering. The course, ECE3710, is taught in a blended format facilitated by the video lectures prepared for two Massive Open Online Courses developed for the Coursera Platform.…

  10. Development process of in-service training intended for teachers to perform teaching of mathematics with computer algebra systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardıç, Mehmet Alper; Işleyen, Tevfik

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we deal with the development process of in-service training activities designed in order for mathematics teachers of secondary education to realize teaching of mathematics, utilizing computer algebra systems. In addition, the results obtained from the researches carried out during and after the in-service training were summarized. Last section focuses on suggestions any teacher can use to carry out activities aimed at using computer algebra systems in teaching environments.

  11. Training people from disadvantaged groups in computer use: Is the backlog not too big to overcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Blignaut

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The digital divide is both a matter of having access to technology and being able to use it. There are several initiatives to roll out Information and Communication Technology (ICT in public places in South Africa, but the question arises as to whether people will be able to use it effectively. Is the backlog with regard to general education and training not so insurmountable that people from disadvantaged communities are not educable for computer usage? This paper reports on the experiences and observations of instructors during a word processing training course for people from such communities. An interaction model that incorporates user and interface limitations with the difficulties experienced, serves as framework for the discussion. It became clear that most of the difficulties that attendees experienced were related to lack of technological experience, a limitation that can be eliminated through practice and perseverance. Enough practice might also result in an attenuation of the effects of some psychological limitations.

  12. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  13. Computer game as a tool for training the identification of phonemic length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennala, Riitta; Richardson, Ulla; Ylinen, Sari; Lyytinen, Heikki; Martin, Maisa

    2014-12-01

    Computer-assisted training of Finnish phonemic length was conducted with 7-year-old Russian-speaking second-language learners of Finnish. Phonemic length plays a different role in these two languages. The training included game activities with two- and three-syllable word and pseudo-word minimal pairs with prototypical vowel durations. The lowest accuracy scores were recorded for two-syllable words. Accuracy scores were higher for the minimal pairs with larger rather than smaller differences in duration. Accuracy scores were lower for long duration than for short duration. The ability to identify quantity degree was generalized to stimuli used in the identification test in two of the children. Ideas for improving the game are introduced.

  14. The effect of metacognitive monitoring feedback on performance in a computer-based training simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hyup

    2018-02-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed to study the effect of metacognitive monitoring feedback on performance in a computer-based training simulation. According to prior research on metacognition, the accurate checking of learning is a critical part of improving the quality of human performance. However, only rarely have researchers studied the learning effects of the accurate checking of retrospective confidence judgments (RCJs) during a computer-based military training simulation. In this study, we provided participants feedback screens after they had completed a warning task and identification task in a radar monitoring simulation. There were two groups in this experiment. One group (group A) viewed the feedback screens with the flight path of all target aircraft and the triangular graphs of both RCJ scores and human performance together. The other group (group B) only watched the feedback screens with the flight path of all target aircraft. There was no significant difference in performance improvement between groups A and B for the warning task (Day 1: group A - 0.347, group B - 0.305; Day 2: group A - 0.488, group B - 0.413). However, the identification task yielded a significant difference in performance improvement between these groups (Day 1: group A - 0.174, group B - 0.1555; Day 2: group A - 0.324, group B - 0.199). The results show that debiasing self-judgment of the identification task produces a positive training effect on learners. The findings of this study will be beneficial for designing an advanced instructional strategy in a simulation-based training environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The status of training and education in information and computer technology of Australian nurses: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Robert; Fallon, Tony; Soar, Jeffrey; Buikstra, Elizabeth; Hegney, Desley

    2008-10-01

    A study was undertaken of the current knowledge and future training requirements of nurses in information and computer technology to inform policy to meet national goals for health. The role of the modern clinical nurse is intertwined with information and computer technology and adoption of such technology forms an important component of national strategies in health. The majority of nurses are expected to use information and computer technology during their work; however, the full extent of their knowledge and experience is unclear. Self-administered postal survey. A 78-item questionnaire was distributed to 10,000 Australian Nursing Federation members to identify the nurses' use of information and computer technology. Eighteen items related to nurses' training and education in information and computer technology. Response rate was 44%. Computers were used by 86.3% of respondents as part of their work-related activities. Between 4-17% of nurses had received training in each of 11 generic computer skills and software applications during their preregistration/pre-enrolment and between 12-30% as continuing professional education. Nurses who had received training believed that it was adequate to meet the needs of their job and was given at an appropriate time. Almost half of the respondents indicated that they required more training to better meet the information and computer technology requirements of their jobs and a quarter believed that their level of computer literacy was restricting their career development. Nurses considered that the vast majority of employers did not encourage information and computer technology training and, for those for whom training was available, workload was the major barrier to uptake. Nurses favoured introduction of a national competency standard in information and computer technology. For the considerable benefits of information and computer technology to be incorporated fully into the health system, employers must pay more attention

  16. Hands on with ASP.NET MVC covering MVC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    MVC (Model-View-Controller) is the popular Microsoft technology which enables you to build dynamic, data-driven, mobile websites, TDD site. Hands-On with ASP.NET MVC is not only written for those who are going to have affair with MVC for the 1st time, rather it is written in such a way that even experienced professional will love reading this book. This book covers all the tiny steps on using MVC at its best. With complete practical tutorials to illustrate the concepts, you will step by step build one End to End application which covers below mentioned techniques - Controllers, Views, Models,

  17. Circuits and electronics hands-on learning with analog discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Okyere Attia, John

    2018-01-01

    The book provides instructions on building circuits on breadboards, connecting the Analog Discovery wires to the circuit under test, and making electrical measurements. Various measurement techniques are described and used in this book, including: impedance measurements, complex power measurements, frequency response measurements, power spectrum measurements, current versus voltage characteristic measurements of diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and Mosfets. The book includes end-of-chapter problems for additional exercises geared towards hands-on learning, experimentation, comparisons between measured results and those obtained from theoretical calculations.

  18. Teaching radio astrophysics the hand-on way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    Astronomy and space sciences have always been instrumental in attracting young students to physical sciences. While the lectures/demonstrations and exhibitions pertaining to space sci-ences capture the imagination of young students, these alone are not sufficient to induce them to join scientific research. In countries like India, where a large number of students take to physical sciences for under-graduate education, complex sociological factors are key issues in translating this large body of students to potential researchers. While lectures and exhibition lead to an increase in scientific awareness for these students, these do not give a feel for scien-tific research and bridge the gap between high school/college science education and high end research. In this context, a hands-on approach to astronomy education, in science research environments or closely connected to scientific institutions, offers a promising alternative. This approach has been used in optical astronomy, where inexpensive small telescopes are available, often coupling a vast network of amateur astronomy clubs to leading astronomy institutes. The non-visual and relatively more technical nature of radio astronomy has limited a similar approach in past for connecting students to space sciences using radio waveband. The tech-nological explosion in communication industry and radio connectivity in the last decade along with an expansion in engineering education makes this possible now using a hands-on approach in teaching radio astrophysics. In this presentation, the sociological factors affecting the student choice are discussed followed by a review of the efforts to bridge the above mentioned gap by various groups in the world in the last decade with a view to enumerate the best practices in a hands-on approach. A program using this approach at National Center for Radio Astrophysics is described, where the students are exposed to simple hands-on radio astronomy experiments such as spectral line

  19. Discovering SQL A Hands-On Guide for Beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Kriegel, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the SQL skills that businesses demand when hiring programmers If you're a SQL beginner, you don't just want to learn SQL basics, you also want to get some practical SQL skills you can use in the job market. This book gives you both. Covering the basics through intermediate topics with clear explanations, hands-on exercises, and helpful solutions, this book is the perfect introduction to SQL. Topics include both the current SQL:2008 standards, the upcoming SQL:2011 standards, and also how to use SQL against current releases of the most popular commercial SQL databases, such as Oracle,

  20. Why standard brain-computer interface (BCI) training protocols should be changed: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunet, Camille; Jahanpour, Emilie; Lotte, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Objective. While promising, electroencephaloraphy based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are barely used due to their lack of reliability: 15% to 30% of users are unable to control a BCI. Standard training protocols may be partly responsible as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology. Our main objective was to determine in practice to what extent standard training protocols impact users’ motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) control performance. Approach. We performed two experiments. The first consisted in evaluating the efficiency of a standard BCI training protocol for the acquisition of non-BCI related skills in a BCI-free context, which enabled us to rule out the possible impact of BCIs on the training outcome. Thus, participants (N = 54) were asked to perform simple motor tasks. The second experiment was aimed at measuring the correlations between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. The ten best and ten worst performers of the first study were recruited for an MI-BCI experiment during which they had to learn to perform two MI tasks. We also assessed users’ spatial ability and pre-training μ rhythm amplitude, as both have been related to MI-BCI performance in the literature. Main results. Around 17% of the participants were unable to learn to perform the motor tasks, which is close to the BCI illiteracy rate. This suggests that standard training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching. No correlation was found between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. However, spatial ability played an important role in MI-BCI performance. In addition, once the spatial ability covariable had been controlled for, using an ANCOVA, it appeared that participants who faced difficulty during the first experiment improved during the second while the others did not. Significance. These studies suggest that (1) standard MI-BCI training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching, (2) spatial ability is confirmed as impacting on MI-BCI performance, and (3) when faced

  1. Count like an egyptian a hands-on introduction to ancient mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, David

    2014-01-01

    The mathematics of ancient Egypt was fundamentally different from our math today. Contrary to what people might think, it wasn't a primitive forerunner of modern mathematics. In fact, it can't be understood using our current computational methods. Count Like an Egyptian provides a fun, hands-on introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. David Reimer guides you step-by-step through addition, subtraction, multiplication, and more. He even shows you how fractions and decimals may have been calculated-they technically didn't exist in the land of the pharaohs.

  2. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  3. Development of computer games for assessment and training in post-stroke arm telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-de-Pablo, Cristina; Perry, Joel C; Cavallaro, Francesca I; Zabaleta, Haritz; Keller, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of long term disability among adults in industrialized nations. The majority of these disabilities include deficiencies in arm function, which can make independent living very difficult. Research shows that better results in rehabilitation are obtained when patients receive more intensive therapy. However this intensive therapy is currently too expensive to be provided by the public health system, and at home few patients perform the repetitive exercises recommended by their therapists. Computer games can provide an affordable, enjoyable, and effective way to intensify treatment, while keeping the patient as well as their therapists informed about their progress. This paper presents the study, design, implementation and user-testing of a set of computer games for at-home assessment and training of upper-limb motor impairment after stroke.

  4. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment

  5. Number sense or working memory? The effect of two computer-based trainings on mathematical skills in elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Holling, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Research on the improvement of elementary school mathematics has shown that computer-based training of number sense (e.g., processing magnitudes or locating numbers on the number line) can lead to substantial achievement gains in arithmetic skills. Recent studies, however, have highlighted that training domain-general cognitive abilities (e.g., working memory [WM]) may also improve mathematical achievement. This study addressed the question of whether a training of domain-specific number sense skills or domain-general WM abilities is more appropriate for improving mathematical abilities in elementary school. Fifty-nine children (M age = 9 years, 32 girls and 27 boys) received either a computer-based, adaptive training of number sense (n = 20), WM skills (n = 19), or served as a control group (n = 20). The training duration was 20 min per day for 15 days. Before and after training, we measured mathematical ability using a curriculum-based math test, as well as spatial WM. For both training groups, we observed substantial increases in the math posttest compared to the control group (d = .54 for number sense skills training, d = .57 for WM training, respectively). Whereas the number sense group showed significant gains in arithmetical skills, the WM training group exhibited marginally significant gains in word problem solving. However, no training group showed significant posttest gains on the spatial WM task. Results indicate that a short training of either domain-specific or domain-general skills may result in reliable short-term training gains in math performance, although no stable training effects were found in the spatial WM task.

  6. A Novel Goal-Oriented Approach for Training Older Adult Computer Novices: Beyond the Effects of Individual-Difference Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis-Sawyer, Lisa A.; Sterns, Harvey L.

    1999-01-01

    Spreadsheet training using either goal-oriented or verbal persuasion approach was given to 106 computer novices aged 50-89. Goal orientation achieved more changes in computer attitudes, efficacy, and proficiency. Intellectual ability and personality dimensions did not affect results. (SK)

  7. Training by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, E.

    1984-12-01

    Effective training by simulation is a matter of 1. accurate definition of the training need, 2. selecting the right hardware/software package to do the job cost effectively, 3. careful, methodical building of the training program and 4. an appropriate setting, such as a well-equipped training center. Several points seem clear: 1. ''Computer shock'' or computer phobia -- that is, fear of the simulator, can be a factor with some of the older operators. But it quickly disappears once they're into the program, and learn the versatility and the exciting dynamics of simulators. 2. Operator training is becoming more sophisticated throughout the HPI. Among other things, operators should get out into the plant to learn more about how their actions in the control room impact the plant. Operators are becoming more ''big picture'' oriented. 3. When inexperienced training instructors are used, they should attend a good ''train the trainer'' course emphasizing platform skills and instructional technology. 4. Operators need as much ''hands on'' experience with the plant's actual operating equipment as possible. The cognitive ''linkage'' between that equipment and what they see on the CRT is vitally important.

  8. Computer versus Compensatory Calendar Training in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Functional Impact in a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Melanie J; Locke, Dona E C; Duncan, Noah L; Hanna, Sherrie M; Cuc, Andrea V; Fields, Julie A; Hoffman Snyder, Charlene R; Lunde, Angela M; Smith, Glenn E

    2017-09-06

    This pilot study examined the functional impact of computerized versus compensatory calendar training in cognitive rehabilitation participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fifty-seven participants with amnestic MCI completed randomly assigned calendar or computer training. A standard care control group was used for comparison. Measures of adherence, memory-based activities of daily living (mADLs), and self-efficacy were completed. The calendar training group demonstrated significant improvement in mADLs compared to controls, while the computer training group did not. Calendar training may be more effective in improving mADLs than computerized intervention. However, this study highlights how behavioral trials with fewer than 30-50 participants per arm are likely underpowered, resulting in seemingly null findings.

  9. Emerging and Future Computing Paradigms and Their Impact on the Research, Training, and Design Environments of the Aerospace Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the training workshop on Emerging and Future Computing Paradigms and their impact on the Research, Training and Design Environments of the Aerospace Workforce. The workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 18 and 19, 2003. The workshop was jointly sponsored by Old Dominion University and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to a) provide broad overviews of the diverse activities related to new computing paradigms, including grid computing, pervasive computing, high-productivity computing, and the IBM-led autonomic computing; and b) identify future directions for research that have high potential for future aerospace workforce environments. The format of the workshop included twenty-one, half-hour overview-type presentations and three exhibits by vendors.

  10. Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness Curricula Using Active Learning and Hands-on Strategies as Continuing Education for Medical Technologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Fiester

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequent reports of laboratory- (and hospital- acquired infection suggest a deficiency in safety training or lack of compliance. To assess the need for continuing education (CE addressing this problem, an original education needs assessment survey was designed and administered to medical technologists (med-techs in Northeast Ohio. Survey results were used to design a learner-centered training curriculum (for example, Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness trainings that engaged med-techs in active learning, integrative peer-to-peer teaching, and hands-on exercises in order to improve microbiology safety knowledge and associated laboratory techniques. The Lab Safety training was delivered six times and the Bioterrorism Readiness training was delivered five times. Pre/posttesting revealed significant gains in knowledge and techniques specific to laboratory safety, security, risk assessment, and bioterrorism readiness amongst the majority of med-techs completing the CE trainings. The majority of participants felt that the hands-on exercises met their needs and that their personal laboratory practices would change as a result of the training course, as measured by attitudinal surveys. We conclude that active learning techniques and peer education significantly enhance microbiology learning amongst participating med-techs.

  11. Proceedings of the 1993 Conference on Intelligent Computer-Aided Training and Virtual Environment Technology, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Patricia R.; Loftin, R. Bowen

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings are organized in the same manner as the conference's contributed sessions, with the papers grouped by topic area. These areas are as follows: VE (virtual environment) training for Space Flight, Virtual Environment Hardware, Knowledge Aquisition for ICAT (Intelligent Computer-Aided Training) & VE, Multimedia in ICAT Systems, VE in Training & Education (1 & 2), Virtual Environment Software (1 & 2), Models in ICAT systems, ICAT Commercial Applications, ICAT Architectures & Authoring Systems, ICAT Education & Medical Applications, Assessing VE for Training, VE & Human Systems (1 & 2), ICAT Theory & Natural Language, ICAT Applications in the Military, VE Applications in Engineering, Knowledge Acquisition for ICAT, and ICAT Applications in Aerospace.

  12. Computer-Based Auditory Training Programs for Children with Hearing Impairment – A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjundaswamy, Manohar; Prabhu, Prashanth; Rajanna, Revathi Kittur; Ningegowda, Raghavendra Gulaganji; Sharma, Madhuri

    2018-01-01

    Introduction  Communication breakdown, a consequence of hearing impairment (HI), is being fought by fitting amplification devices and providing auditory training since the inception of audiology. The advances in both audiology and rehabilitation programs have led to the advent of computer-based auditory training programs (CBATPs). Objective  To review the existing literature documenting the evidence-based CBATPs for children with HIs. Since there was only one such article, we also chose to review the commercially available CBATPs for children with HI. The strengths and weaknesses of the existing literature were reviewed in order to improve further researches. Data Synthesis  Google Scholar and PubMed databases were searched using various combinations of keywords. The participant, intervention, control, outcome and study design (PICOS) criteria were used for the inclusion of articles. Out of 124 article abstracts reviewed, 5 studies were shortlisted for detailed reading. One among them satisfied all the criteria, and was taken for review. The commercially available programs were chosen based on an extensive search in Google. The reviewed article was well-structured, with appropriate outcomes. The commercially available programs cover many aspects of the auditory training through a wide range of stimuli and activities. Conclusions  There is a dire need for extensive research to be performed in the field of CBATPs to establish their efficacy, also to establish them as evidence-based practices. PMID:29371904

  13. Computer-Based Auditory Training Programs for Children with Hearing Impairment - A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjundaswamy, Manohar; Prabhu, Prashanth; Rajanna, Revathi Kittur; Ningegowda, Raghavendra Gulaganji; Sharma, Madhuri

    2018-01-01

    Introduction  Communication breakdown, a consequence of hearing impairment (HI), is being fought by fitting amplification devices and providing auditory training since the inception of audiology. The advances in both audiology and rehabilitation programs have led to the advent of computer-based auditory training programs (CBATPs). Objective  To review the existing literature documenting the evidence-based CBATPs for children with HIs. Since there was only one such article, we also chose to review the commercially available CBATPs for children with HI. The strengths and weaknesses of the existing literature were reviewed in order to improve further researches. Data Synthesis  Google Scholar and PubMed databases were searched using various combinations of keywords. The participant, intervention, control, outcome and study design (PICOS) criteria were used for the inclusion of articles. Out of 124 article abstracts reviewed, 5 studies were shortlisted for detailed reading. One among them satisfied all the criteria, and was taken for review. The commercially available programs were chosen based on an extensive search in Google. The reviewed article was well-structured, with appropriate outcomes. The commercially available programs cover many aspects of the auditory training through a wide range of stimuli and activities. Conclusions  There is a dire need for extensive research to be performed in the field of CBATPs to establish their efficacy, also to establish them as evidence-based practices.

  14. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface training: the impact on motor cortical responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiorri, F.; De Vico Fallani, F.; Cincotti, F.; Babiloni, F.; Molinari, M.; Kleih, S. C.; Neuper, C.; Kübler, A.; Mattia, D.

    2011-04-01

    The main purpose of electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is to provide an alternative channel to support communication and control when motor pathways are interrupted. Despite the considerable amount of research focused on the improvement of EEG signal detection and translation into output commands, little is known about how learning to operate a BCI device may affect brain plasticity. This study investigated if and how sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training would induce persistent functional changes in motor cortex, as assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and high-density EEG. Motor imagery (MI)-based BCI training in naïve participants led to a significant increase in motor cortical excitability, as revealed by post-training TMS mapping of the hand muscle's cortical representation; peak amplitude and volume of the motor evoked potentials recorded from the opponens pollicis muscle were significantly higher only in those subjects who develop a MI strategy based on imagination of hand grasping to successfully control a computer cursor. Furthermore, analysis of the functional brain networks constructed using a connectivity matrix between scalp electrodes revealed a significant decrease in the global efficiency index for the higher-beta frequency range (22-29 Hz), indicating that the brain network changes its topology with practice of hand grasping MI. Our findings build the neurophysiological basis for the use of non-invasive BCI technology for monitoring and guidance of motor imagery-dependent brain plasticity and thus may render BCI a viable tool for post-stroke rehabilitation.

  15. The Educator´s Approach to Media Training and Computer Games within Leisure Time of School-children

    OpenAIRE

    MORAVCOVÁ, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes possible ways of approaching computer games playing as part of leisure time of school-children and deals with the significance of media training in leisure time. At first it specifies the concept of leisure time and its functions, then shows some positive and negative effects of the media. It further describes classical computer games, the problem of excess computer game playing and means of prevention. The paper deals with the educator's personality and the importance of ...

  16. Hands on versus remote techniques in waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asquith, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear industry has many requirements for planned and uplanned physical interactions with radioactive materials or their environment. In each case a choice must be made as to whether the interaction should be made directly by the operator using a 'hands on' technique, wearing any necessary protective clothing, or by entirely remote techniques. In facilities where remote handling equipment has already been provided and planned for, remote techniques are usually the obvious choice. However in radioactive waste management and decommissioning there are many cases where unexpected requirements emerge, often for relatively short term activities, where the choice is more complex. This paper takes a look at the various factors which should be considered in order to make these decisions, an overview of the types of remote equipment available in the UK and some examples of the benefits which have resulted when remote techniques have been adopted in Britain

  17. Geneva University: Experiments in Physics: Hands-on Creative Processes

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 3 octobre 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg «Experiments in Physics : Hands-on Creative Processes» Prof. Manfred Euler Leibniz-Institute for Mathematics and Science Education (IPN) University of Kiel, Deutschland Experiments play a variety of different roles in knowledge generation. The lecture will focus on the function of experiments as engines of intuition that foster insights into complex processes. The experimental presentations consider self-organization phenomena in various domains that range from the nanomechanics of biomolecules to perception and cognition. The inherent universality contributes to elucidating the enigmatic phenomenon of creativity. Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.       &...

  18. Hands-on courses in petroleum engineering improve performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Kassem, J.H.; Islam, M.R. [Regina Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    A hands-on methodology was employed to teach eight lecture-based courses in the United Arab Emirates University in which initially two petroleum engineering courses were used to test the methodology. The courses are considered to be basic to petroleum engineering. Although the courses did not have any impact on the overall student grades, the courses stimulated independent thought among students who were not previously used to this mode of thinking. Students were exposed to laboratory experiments and project works that were considered previously to be too-difficult-to-handle by undergraduate students. The course methodology was more acceptable to the female than the male population. The course methodology centered on creative thinking, questioning the establishment methods and critiquing conventional modes of thinking. Despite the differences between male and female students, overall the student population recognized that their ability to think independently and critically improved after taking the course. An appendix contains examples of learning modules. 18 refs.

  19. Computer Simulation Model to Train Medical Personnel on Glucose Clamp Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghoul, Pooya; Boulet, Benoit; Tardif, Annie; Haidar, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    A glucose clamp procedure is the most reliable way to quantify insulin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but skilled and trained research personnel are required to frequently adjust the glucose infusion rate. A computer environment that simulates glucose clamp experiments can be used for efficient personnel training and development and testing of algorithms for automated glucose clamps. We built 17 virtual healthy subjects (mean age, 25±6 years; mean body mass index, 22.2±3 kg/m 2 ), each comprising a mathematical model of glucose regulation and a unique set of parameters. Each virtual subject simulates plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in response to intravenous insulin and glucose infusions. Each virtual subject provides a unique response, and its parameters were estimated from combined intravenous glucose tolerance test-hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data using the Bayesian approach. The virtual subjects were validated by comparing their simulated predictions against data from 12 healthy individuals who underwent a hyperglycemic glucose clamp procedure. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were predicted by the virtual subjects in response to glucose infusions determined by a trained research staff performing a simulated hyperglycemic clamp experiment. The total amount of glucose infusion was indifferent between the simulated and the real subjects (85±18 g vs. 83±23 g; p=NS) as well as plasma insulin levels (63±20 mU/L vs. 58±16 mU/L; p=NS). The virtual subjects can reliably predict glucose needs and plasma insulin profiles during hyperglycemic glucose clamp conditions. These virtual subjects can be used to train personnel to make glucose infusion adjustments during clamp experiments. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computer-assisted resilience training to prepare healthcare workers for pandemic influenza: a randomized trial of the optimal dose of training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Leslie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Working in a hospital during an extraordinary infectious disease outbreak can cause significant stress and contribute to healthcare workers choosing to reduce patient contact. Psychological training of healthcare workers prior to an influenza pandemic may reduce stress-related absenteeism, however, established training methods that change behavior and attitudes are too resource-intensive for widespread use. This study tests the feasibility and effectiveness of a less expensive alternative - an interactive, computer-assisted training course designed to build resilience to the stresses of working during a pandemic. Methods A "dose-finding" study compared pre-post changes in three different durations of training. We measured variables that are likely to mediate stress-responses in a pandemic before and after training: confidence in support and training, pandemic-related self-efficacy, coping style and interpersonal problems. Results 158 hospital workers took the course and were randomly assigned to the short (7 sessions, median cumulative duration 111 minutes, medium (12 sessions, 158 minutes or long (17 sessions, 223 minutes version. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, the course was associated with significant improvements in confidence in support and training, pandemic self-efficacy and interpersonal problems. Participants who under-utilized coping via problem-solving or seeking support or over-utilized escape-avoidance experienced improved coping. Comparison of doses showed improved interpersonal problems in the medium and long course but not in the short course. There was a trend towards higher drop-out rates with longer duration of training. Conclusions Computer-assisted resilience training in healthcare workers appears to be of significant benefit and merits further study under pandemic conditions. Comparing three "doses" of the course suggested that the medium course was optimal.

  1. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saseem Poudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. Materials and Methods: The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. Results: All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. Conclusion: The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures.

  2. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kitashiro, Shuji; Kanehira, Eiji; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures.

  3. Comparison of Computer Based Instruction to Behavior Skills Training for Teaching Staff Implementation of Discrete-Trial Instruction with an Adult with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, Melissa R.; Williams, W. Larry; Garrido, Natalia; Lee, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, behavior skills training (BST) is compared to a computer based training package for teaching discrete trial instruction to staff, teaching an adult with autism. The computer based training package consisted of instructions, video modeling and feedback. BST consisted of instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback. Following…

  4. Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes Using Computer-Based and Face-to-Face Personal Hygiene Training Methods in Food Processing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Ginger D.; LaBorde, Luke F.; Radhakrishna, Rama B.; Brown, J. Lynne; Cutter, Catherine N.

    2006-01-01

    Computer-based training is increasingly favored by food companies for training workers due to convenience, self-pacing ability, and ease of use. The objectives of this study were to determine if personal hygiene training, offered through a computer-based method, is as effective as a face-to-face method in knowledge acquisition and improved…

  5. Development of multimedia computer-based training for VXI integrated fuel monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeffe, R.; Ellacott, T.; Truong, Q.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Canadian Safeguards Support Program has developed the VXI Integrated Fuel Monitor (VFIM) which is based on the international VXI instrument bus standard. This equipment is a generic radiation monitor which can be used in an integrated mode where several detection systems can be connected to a common system where information is collected, displayed, and analyzed via a virtual control panel with the aid of computers, trackball and computer monitor. The equipment can also be used in an autonomous mode as a portable radiation monitor with a very low power consumption. The equipment has been described at previous international symposia. Integration of several monitoring systems (bundle counter, core discharge monitor, and yes/no monitor) has been carried out at Wolsong 2. Performance results from one of the monitoring systems which was installed at CANDU nuclear stations are discussed in a companion paper at this symposium. This paper describes the development of an effective multimedia computer-based training package for the primary users of the equipment; namely IAEA inspectors and technicians. (author)

  6. Efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training for people with hearing loss: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Henshaw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Auditory training involves active listening to auditory stimuli and aims to improve performance in auditory tasks. As such, auditory training is a potential intervention for the management of people with hearing loss. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review (PROSPERO 2011: CRD42011001406 evaluated the published evidence-base for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training to improve speech intelligibility, cognition and communication abilities in adults with hearing loss, with or without hearing aids or cochlear implants. METHODS: A systematic search of eight databases and key journals identified 229 articles published since 1996, 13 of which met the inclusion criteria. Data were independently extracted and reviewed by the two authors. Study quality was assessed using ten pre-defined scientific and intervention-specific measures. RESULTS: Auditory training resulted in improved performance for trained tasks in 9/10 articles that reported on-task outcomes. Although significant generalisation of learning was shown to untrained measures of speech intelligibility (11/13 articles, cognition (1/1 articles and self-reported hearing abilities (1/2 articles, improvements were small and not robust. Where reported, compliance with computer-based auditory training was high, and retention of learning was shown at post-training follow-ups. Published evidence was of very-low to moderate study quality. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that published evidence for the efficacy of individual computer-based auditory training for adults with hearing loss is not robust and therefore cannot be reliably used to guide intervention at this time. We identify a need for high-quality evidence to further examine the efficacy of computer-based auditory training for people with hearing loss.

  7. 3D printed simulation models based on real patient situations for hands-on practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, E; Dekiff, M; Dirksen, D

    2017-11-01

    During the last few years, the curriculum of many dentistry schools in Germany has been reorganised. Two key aspects of the applied changes are the integration of up-to-date teaching methods and the promotion of interdisciplinarity. To support these efforts, an approach to fabricating individualised simulation models for hands-on courses employing 3D printing is presented. The models are based on real patients, thus providing students a more realistic preparation for real clinical situations. As a wide variety of dental procedures can be implemented, the simulation models can also contribute to a more interdisciplinary dental education. The data used for the construction of the models were acquired by 3D surface scanning. The data were further processed with 3D modelling software. Afterwards, the models were fabricated by 3D printing with the PolyJet technique. Three models serve as examples: a prosthodontic model for training veneer preparation, a conservative model for practicing dental bonding and an interdisciplinary model featuring carious teeth and an insufficient crown. The third model was evaluated in a hands-on course with 22 fourth-year dental students. The students answered a questionnaire and gave their personal opinion. Whilst the concept of the model received very positive feedback, some aspects of the implementation were criticised. We discuss these observations and suggest ways for further improvement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program that aims to evaluate the effectiveness in students learning the Rock Cycle theme. Prior research on both PBL and Rock Cycle was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and Rock Cycle as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies. PBL is a student-centered method based on the principle of using problems as the starting point for the acquisition of new knowledge. Problems are based on complex real-world situations. All information needed to solve the problem is initially not given. Students will identify, find, and use appropriate resources to complete the exercise. They work permanently in small groups, developing self-directed activities and increasing participation in discussions. Teacher based guidance allows students to be fully engaged in knowledge building. That way, the learning process is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected. Theme "Rock Cycle" was introduced using a problematic situation, which outlined the geological processes highlighted in "Foz do Douro" the next coastline of the school where the study was developed. The questions proposed by the students were solved, using strategies that involved the use of hands-on activities and virtual labs in Geology. The systematization of the selected theme was performed in a field excursion, implemented according to the organizational model of Nir Orion, to The "Foz do Douro" metamorphic complex. In the evaluation of the learning process, data were obtained on students' development of knowledge and competencies through the application of

  9. Development of Computer-Based Training to Supplement Lessons in Fundamentals of Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian P. Benitez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Fundamentals of Electronics allow students to familiarize with basic electronics concepts, acquire skills in the use of multi-meter test instrument, and develop mastery in testing basic electronic components. Actual teaching and doing observations during practical activities on components pin identification and testing showed that the lack of skills of new students in testing components can lead to incorrect fault diagnosis and wrong pin connection during in-circuit replacement of the defective parts. With the aim of reinforcing students with concrete understanding of the concepts of components applied in the actual test and measurement, a Computer-Based Training was developed. The proponent developed the learning modules (courseware utilizing concept mapping and storyboarding instructional design. Developing a courseware as simulated, activity-based and interactive as possible was the primary goal to resemble the real-world process. A Local area network (LAN-based learning management system was also developed to use in administering the learning modules. The Paired Sample T-Test based on the pretest and post-test result was used to determine whether the students achieved learning after taking the courseware. The result revealed that there is a significant achievement of the students after studying the learning module. The E-learning content was validated by the instructors in terms of contents, activities, assessment and format with a grand weighted mean of 4.35 interpreted as Sufficient. Based from the evaluation result, supplementing with the proposed computer-based training can enhance the teachinglearning process in electronic fundamentals.

  10. Computer Simulation as a Tool for Assessing Decision-Making in Pandemic Influenza Response Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Leaming

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to develop and test a computer-based, interactive simulation of a hypothetical pandemic influenza outbreak. Fidelity was enhanced with integrated video and branching decision trees, built upon the 2007 federal planning assumptions. We conducted a before-and-after study of the simulation effectiveness to assess the simulations’ ability to assess participants’ beliefs regarding their own hospitals’ mass casualty incident preparedness.Methods: Development: Using a Delphi process, we finalized a simulation that serves up a minimum of over 50 key decisions to 6 role-players on networked laptops in a conference area. The simulation played out an 8-week scenario, beginning with pre-incident decisions. Testing: Role-players and trainees (N=155 were facilitated to make decisions during the pandemic. Because decision responses vary, the simulation plays out differently, and a casualty counter quantifies hypothetical losses. The facilitator reviews and critiques key factors for casualty control, including effective communications, working with external organizations, development of internal policies and procedures, maintaining supplies and services, technical infrastructure support, public relations and training. Pre- and post-survey data were compared on trainees.Results: Post-simulation trainees indicated a greater likelihood of needing to improve their organization in terms of communications, mass casualty incident planning, public information and training. Participants also recognized which key factors required immediate attention at their own home facilities.Conclusion: The use of a computer-simulation was effective in providing a facilitated environment for determining the perception of preparedness, evaluating general preparedness concepts and introduced participants to critical decisions involved in handling a regional pandemic influenza surge. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:236–242.

  11. A virtual surgical training system that simulates cutting of soft tissue using a modified pre-computed elastic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toe, Kyaw Kyar; Huang, Weimin; Yang, Tao; Duan, Yuping; Zhou, Jiayin; Su, Yi; Teo, Soo-Kng; Kumar, Selvaraj Senthil; Lim, Calvin Chi-Wan; Chui, Chee Kong; Chang, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a surgical training system that incorporates cutting operation of soft tissue simulated based on a modified pre-computed linear elastic model in the Simulation Open Framework Architecture (SOFA) environment. A precomputed linear elastic model used for the simulation of soft tissue deformation involves computing the compliance matrix a priori based on the topological information of the mesh. While this process may require a few minutes to several hours, based on the number of vertices in the mesh, it needs only to be computed once and allows real-time computation of the subsequent soft tissue deformation. However, as the compliance matrix is based on the initial topology of the mesh, it does not allow any topological changes during simulation, such as cutting or tearing of the mesh. This work proposes a way to modify the pre-computed data by correcting the topological connectivity in the compliance matrix, without re-computing the compliance matrix which is computationally expensive.

  12. Effects of training and motivation on auditory P300 brain-computer interface performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykara, E; Ruf, C A; Fioravanti, C; Käthner, I; Simon, N; Kleih, S C; Kübler, A; Halder, S

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology aims at helping end-users with severe motor paralysis to communicate with their environment without using the natural output pathways of the brain. For end-users in complete paralysis, loss of gaze control may necessitate non-visual BCI systems. The present study investigated the effect of training on performance with an auditory P300 multi-class speller paradigm. For half of the participants, spatial cues were added to the auditory stimuli to see whether performance can be further optimized. The influence of motivation, mood and workload on performance and P300 component was also examined. In five sessions, 16 healthy participants were instructed to spell several words by attending to animal sounds representing the rows and columns of a 5 × 5 letter matrix. 81% of the participants achieved an average online accuracy of ⩾ 70%. From the first to the fifth session information transfer rates increased from 3.72 bits/min to 5.63 bits/min. Motivation significantly influenced P300 amplitude and online ITR. No significant facilitative effect of spatial cues on performance was observed. Training improves performance in an auditory BCI paradigm. Motivation influences performance and P300 amplitude. The described auditory BCI system may help end-users to communicate independently of gaze control with their environment. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A unified approach to linking experimental, statistical and computational analysis of spike train data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Meng

    Full Text Available A fundamental issue in neuroscience is how to identify the multiple biophysical mechanisms through which neurons generate observed patterns of spiking activity. In previous work, we proposed a method for linking observed patterns of spiking activity to specific biophysical mechanisms based on a state space modeling framework and a sequential Monte Carlo, or particle filter, estimation algorithm. We have shown, in simulation, that this approach is able to identify a space of simple biophysical models that were consistent with observed spiking data (and included the model that generated the data, but have yet to demonstrate the application of the method to identify realistic currents from real spike train data. Here, we apply the particle filter to spiking data recorded from rat layer V cortical neurons, and correctly identify the dynamics of an slow, intrinsic current. The underlying intrinsic current is successfully identified in four distinct neurons, even though the cells exhibit two distinct classes of spiking activity: regular spiking and bursting. This approach--linking statistical, computational, and experimental neuroscience--provides an effective technique to constrain detailed biophysical models to specific mechanisms consistent with observed spike train data.

  14. Computer-aided training sensorimotor cortex functions in humans before the upper limb transplantation using virtual reality and sensory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynski, Marek; Jaskolska, Anna; Marusiak, Jaroslaw; Wolczowski, Andrzej; Bierut, Przemyslaw; Szumowski, Lukasz; Witkowski, Jerzy; Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-08-01

    One of the biggest problems of upper limb transplantation is lack of certainty as to whether a patient will be able to control voluntary movements of transplanted hands. Based on findings of the recent research on brain cortex plasticity, a premise can be drawn that mental training supported with visual and sensory feedback can cause structural and functional reorganization of the sensorimotor cortex, which leads to recovery of function associated with the control of movements performed by the upper limbs. In this study, authors - based on the above observations - propose the computer-aided training (CAT) system, which generating visual and sensory stimuli, should enhance the effectiveness of mental training applied to humans before upper limb transplantation. The basis for the concept of computer-aided training system is a virtual hand whose reaching and grasping movements the trained patient can observe on the VR headset screen (visual feedback) and whose contact with virtual objects the patient can feel as a touch (sensory feedback). The computer training system is composed of three main components: (1) the system generating 3D virtual world in which the patient sees the virtual limb from the perspective as if it were his/her own hand; (2) sensory feedback transforming information about the interaction of the virtual hand with the grasped object into mechanical vibration; (3) the therapist's panel for controlling the training course. Results of the case study demonstrate that mental training supported with visual and sensory stimuli generated by the computer system leads to a beneficial change of the brain activity related to motor control of the reaching in the patient with bilateral upper limb congenital transverse deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Telescope Construction: A Hands-On Approach to Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazine, Angela R.; Albin, E.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a popular semester-long telescope making course offered at Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA. The program is tailored for junior / senior level high school students and incorporates the current educational performance standards for the state of Georgia. This course steps out of the traditional classroom environment and allows students to explore optics and astronomical concepts by constructing their own telescopes. Student telescopes follow the classic six-inch f/8 Newtonian reflector design, which has proven to be a good compromise between portability and aperture. Participants meet for a few hours, twice weekly, to build their telescopes. Over the course of the semester, raw one-inch thick Pyrex mirror blanks are ground, polished, and figured by hand into precision telescope objectives. Along the way, students are introduced to the Ronchi and Foucault methods for testing optics and once figured, completed mirrors are then chemically silvered. A plywood Dobsonian-style base is built and eventually mated with an optical tube made from a standard eight-inch concrete form tube or sonotube. An evening of star testing the optics and observation is planned at the end of the semester to insure the proper operation of each telescope. In summary, we believe that a hands-on approach to the understanding and use of optical telescopes is a great way not only to instill enthusiasm among students for the night sky, but may perhaps inspire the next generation of professional telescope makers.

  16. An Educational Model for Hands-On Hydrology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Nakhjiri, N.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of a hands-on modeling tool developed for students in civil engineering and earth science disciplines to help them learn the fundamentals of hydrologic processes, model calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and practice conceptual thinking in solving engineering problems. The toolbox includes two simplified hydrologic models, namely HBV-EDU and HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures. The models provide an interdisciplinary application-oriented learning environment that introduces the hydrologic phenomena through the use of a simplified conceptual hydrologic model. The toolbox can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation) are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching more advanced topics including uncertainty analysis, and ensemble simulation. Both models have been administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of hydrology.

  17. A Cognitive and Pedagogical Evaluation Framework for Computer-Based Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocci, Randy

    2003-01-01

    .... All training programs must have comprehensive evaluation guidelines in place to ensure the quality of instruction from the classroom-training environment to the virtual training environment is not diminished...

  18. Cognitive and Neural Plasticity in Older Adults’ Prospective Memory Following Training with the Virtual Week Computer Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Rose

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prospective memory (PM – the ability to remember and successfully execute our intentions and planned activities – is critical for functional independence and declines with age, yet few studies have attempted to train PM in older adults. We developed a PM training program using the Virtual Week computer game. Trained participants played the game in twelve, 1-hour sessions over one month. Measures of neuropsychological functions, lab-based PM, event-related potentials (ERPs during performance on a lab-based PM task, instrumental activities of daily living, and real-world PM were assessed before and after training. Performance was compared to both no-contact and active (music training control groups. PM on the Virtual Week game dramatically improved following training relative to controls, suggesting PM plasticity is preserved in older adults. Relative to control participants, training did not produce reliable transfer to laboratory-based tasks, but was associated with a reduction of an ERP component (sustained negativity over occipito-parietal cortex associated with processing PM cues, indicative of more automatic PM retrieval. Most importantly, training produced far transfer to real-world outcomes including improvements in performance on real-world PM and activities of daily living. Real-world gains were not observed in either control group. Our findings demonstrate that short-term training with the Virtual Week game produces cognitive and neural plasticity that may result in real-world benefits to supporting functional independence in older adulthood.

  19. Computer-aided detection of masses in full-field digital mammography using screen-film mammograms for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallenberg, Michiel; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2008-01-01

    It would be of great value when available databases of screen-film mammography (SFM) images can be used to train full-field digital mammography (FFDM) computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, as compilation of new databases is costly. In this paper, we investigate this possibility. Firstly, we develop a method that converts an FFDM image into an SFM-like representation. In this conversion method, we establish a relation between exposure and optical density by simulation of an automatic exposure control unit. Secondly, we investigate the effects of using the SFM images as training samples compared to training with FFDM images. Our FFDM database consisted of 266 cases, of which 102 were biopsy-proven malignant masses and 164 normals. The images were acquired with systems of two different manufacturers. We found that, when we trained our FFDM CAD system with a small number of images, training with FFDM images, using a five-fold crossvalidation procedure, outperformed training with SFM images. However, when the full SFM database, consisting of 348 abnormal cases (including 204 priors) and 810 normal cases, was used for training, SFM training outperformed FFDMA training. These results show that an existing CAD system for detection of masses in SFM can be used for FFDM images without retraining.

  20. Cognitive and neural plasticity in older adults' prospective memory following training with the Virtual Week computer game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nathan S; Rendell, Peter G; Hering, Alexandra; Kliegel, Matthias; Bidelman, Gavin M; Craik, Fergus I M

    2015-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) - the ability to remember and successfully execute our intentions and planned activities - is critical for functional independence and declines with age, yet few studies have attempted to train PM in older adults. We developed a PM training program using the Virtual Week computer game. Trained participants played the game in 12, 1-h sessions over 1 month. Measures of neuropsychological functions, lab-based PM, event-related potentials (ERPs) during performance on a lab-based PM task, instrumental activities of daily living, and real-world PM were assessed before and after training. Performance was compared to both no-contact and active (music training) control groups. PM on the Virtual Week game dramatically improved following training relative to controls, suggesting PM plasticity is preserved in older adults. Relative to control participants, training did not produce reliable transfer to laboratory-based tasks, but was associated with a reduction of an ERP component (sustained negativity over occipito-parietal cortex) associated with processing PM cues, indicative of more automatic PM retrieval. Most importantly, training produced far transfer to real-world outcomes including improvements in performance on real-world PM and activities of daily living. Real-world gains were not observed in either control group. Our findings demonstrate that short-term training with the Virtual Week game produces cognitive and neural plasticity that may result in real-world benefits to supporting functional independence in older adulthood.

  1. Development of the operator training system using computer graphics. Pt. 2. Operator behavior CG system and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kunihide; Ebisu, Mitsuhiro; Takano, Kenichi; Watabe, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    In training, it has been important to show good performance of operators dealing with abnormal operating; condition simulated by a training simulator. Video-taping of the scenario-based performance by instructors of a training center is the most common way. However, it is difficult for the experienced instructors to show good performance due to the stress of being video-taped. Therefore, the authors developed a system named Operator Behavior Computer Graphic System (OBCGS) to computer-graphically show the behavior of operators. The input data of this system are data on operation, watching, walking and utterances with time, objects of operation and watching, contents of their behavior, etc. The system temporally uses the output data of Man Machine Simulator developed by CRIEPI. OBCGS has 3 kinds of user interfaces. The first one computer-graphically shows 3 operators and one shift supervisor behaving in the control room from a bird's eye viewpoint. The second one has multi windows to show details of computer graphics of operators and control panels. The last one shows the history of operations, warnings and utterance. The system shows reasonable computer graphics in quality from the viewpoint of showing good performance of operations. This report also describes how to use the OBCGS and ways of application to the operator training. (author)

  2. User`s guide for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), Version 2.0 software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, P.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horak, K.E.; Evanko, D.A. [Excel Tactical Staffing, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1998-04-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams (inspectors) and Inspected Parties (hosts). Traditional training techniques include lectures, table-top inspections, and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT is used for training both inspectors and hosts to conduct a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). The training covers the entire sequence of events in the challenge inspection regime, from initial notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities. The primary emphasis of the training tool is on conducting the inspection itself, and in particular, implementing the concept of managed access. (Managed access is a technique used to assure the inspectors that the facility is in compliance with the CWC, while at the same time protecting sensitive information unrelated to the CWC.) Information for all of the activities is located in the electronic {open_quotes}Exercise Manual.{close_quotes} In addition, interactive menus are used to negotiate access to each room and to alternate information during the simulated inspection. ACE-IT also demonstrates how various inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information.

  3. Assessing motor imagery in brain-computer interface training: Psychological and neurophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Anatoly; Liburkina, Sofya; Yakovlev, Lev; Perepelkina, Olga; Kaplan, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is considered to be a promising cognitive tool for improving motor skills as well as for rehabilitation therapy of movement disorders. It is believed that MI training efficiency could be improved by using the brain-computer interface (BCI) technology providing real-time feedback on person's mental attempts. While BCI is indeed a convenient and motivating tool for practicing MI, it is not clear whether it could be used for predicting or measuring potential positive impact of the training. In this study, we are trying to establish whether the proficiency in BCI control is associated with any of the neurophysiological or psychological correlates of motor imagery, as well as to determine possible interrelations among them. For that purpose, we studied motor imagery in a group of 19 healthy BCI-trained volunteers and performed a correlation analysis across various quantitative assessment metrics. We examined subjects' sensorimotor event-related EEG events, corticospinal excitability changes estimated with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), BCI accuracy and self-assessment reports obtained with specially designed questionnaires and interview routine. Our results showed, expectedly, that BCI performance is dependent on the subject's capability to suppress EEG sensorimotor rhythms, which in turn is correlated with the idle state amplitude of those oscillations. Neither BCI accuracy nor the EEG features associated with MI were found to correlate with the level of corticospinal excitability increase during motor imagery, and with assessed imagery vividness. Finally, a significant correlation was found between the level of corticospinal excitability increase and kinesthetic vividness of imagery (KVIQ-20 questionnaire). Our results suggest that two distinct neurophysiological mechanisms might mediate possible effects of motor imagery: the non-specific cortical sensorimotor disinhibition and the focal corticospinal excitability increase

  4. Computer-Based Training Development and Guidance for the Army’s Unmanned Aviation Systems Maintenance Training Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    When they view the graphics or animation they cannot look at and read the text. When they read the text they cannot view the graphics or animation ...and animation in learner-paced segments Pre-training Provide essential pre-training Modality Consider narrations versus printed text Reduce...text to narrated animation Spatial contiguity Place on-screen text next to corresponding graphics Temporal contiguity Present corresponding

  5. Westinghouse Nuclear Core Design Training Center - a design simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altomare, S.; Pritchett, J.; Altman, D.

    1992-01-01

    The emergence of more powerful computing technology enables nuclear design calculations to be done on workstations. This shift to workstation usage has already had a profound effect in the training area. In 1991, the Westinghouse Electric Corporation's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division (CNFD) developed and implemented a Nuclear Core Design Training Center (CDTC), a new concept in on-the-job training. The CDTC provides controlled on-the-job training in a structured classroom environment. It alllows one trainer, with the use of a specially prepared training facility, to provide full-scope, hands-on training to many trainees at one time. Also, the CDTC system reduces the overall cycle time required to complete the total training experience while also providing the flexibility of individual training in selected modules of interest. This paper provides descriptions of the CDTC and the respective experience gained in the application of this new concept

  6. Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.

    2000-01-01

    This final report discusses the development and implementation of several educational products for K-16 teachers and students. Specifically, I received support for: (A) three K-12 Teacher workshops, Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach, and minimal Support to finish two computer-based tutorials. (B) Contact Light: An Interactive CD-ROM, and (C) Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive GIS Database. Each of these projects directly supports NASA's Strategic Plan to: "Involve the education community in our endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, enlighten inquisitive minds", and, to "communicate widely the content, relevancy, and excitement of NASA's missions and discoveries to inspire and to increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology." Attachment: Appendix A. And also article: "Aristarchus plateau: as potential lunar base site."

  7. Game-Based Practice versus Traditional Practice in Computer-Based Writing Strategy Training: Effects on Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proske, Antje; Roscoe, Rod D.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving sustained student engagement with practice in computer-based writing strategy training can be a challenge. One potential solution is to foster engagement by embedding practice in educational games; yet there is currently little research comparing the effectiveness of game-based practice versus more traditional forms of practice. In this…

  8. Computer-Based Phonological Skills Training for Primary Students with Mild to Moderate Dyslexia--A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, John M.

    2006-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the efficacy of "Phonics Alive 2: The Sound Blender", a computer-based phonological skills training program, delivered with both at-home and at-school components over a 10-week period, as a potential treatment of phonological dyslexia. Participants were 20 dyslexic primary students with an average delay of…

  9. A Longitudinal Examination of the Effects of Computer Self-Efficacy Growth on Performance during Technology Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James P.; Kher, Hemant V.

    2015-01-01

    Technology training in the classroom is critical in preparing students for upper level classes as well as professional careers, especially in fields such as technology. One of the key enablers to this process is computer self-efficacy (CSE), which has an extensive stream of empirical research. Despite this, one of the missing pieces is how CSE…

  10. Interactive computer codes for education and training on nuclear safety and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Two interactive computer codes for education and training on nuclear safety and radioprotection developed at RA6 Reactor Division-Bariloche Atomic Center-CNEA are presented on this paper. The first code named SIMREACT has been developed in order to simulate the control of a research nuclear reactor in real time with a simple but accurate approach. The code solves the equations of neutron punctual kinetics with time variable reactivity. Utilizing the timer of the computer and the controls of a PC keyboard, with an adequate graphic interface, a simulation in real time of the temporal behavior of a research reactor is obtained. The reactivity can be changed by means of the extraction or insertion of control rods. It was implemented also the simulation of automatic pilot and scram. The use of this code is focalized on practices of nuclear reactor control like start-up from the subcritical state with external source up to power to a desired level, change of power level, calibration of a control rod with different methods, and approach to critical condition by interpolation of the answer in function of reactivity. The second code named LICEN has been developed in order to help the studies of all the topics included in examination programs for obtaining licenses for research reactor operators and radioprotection officials. Using the PC mouse, with an adequate graphic interface, the student can gradually learn the topics related with general and special licenses. The general option includes nuclear reactor engineering, radioprotection, nuclear safety, documentation and normative. The specific option includes mandatory documentation, description of the installation and task on normal and emergency situations. For each of these topics there are sub-items with all the relevant information. The objective of this code is to joint in one electronic place a large amount of information which usually it is disseminated on difficult to find separated papers. (author)

  11. Intelligent computer aided training systems in the real world: Making the technology accessible to the educational mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Madeline

    1993-01-01

    Intelligent computer aided training systems hold great promise for the application of this technology to mainstream education and training. Yet, this technology, which holds such a vast potential impact for the future of education and training, has had little impact beyond the enclaves of government research labs. This is largely due to the inaccessibility of the technology to those individuals in whose hands it can have the greatest impact, teachers and educators. Simply throwing technology at an educator and expecting them to use it as an effective tool is not the answer. This paper provides a background into the use of technology as a training tool. MindLink, developed by HyperTech Systems, provides trainers with a powerful rule-based tool that can be integrated directly into a Windows application. By embedding expert systems technology it becomes more accessible and easier to master.

  12. Computer-based attention training in the schools for children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a preliminary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Naomi J; Sheldrick, Radley Christopher; Gotthelf, David; Perrin, Ellen C

    2011-07-01

    Objective. This study examined the efficacy of 2 computer-based training systems to teach children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to attend more effectively. Design/methods. A total of 41 children with ADHD from 2 middle schools were randomly assigned to receive 2 sessions a week at school of either neurofeedback (NF) or attention training through a standard computer format (SCF), either immediately or after a 6-month wait (waitlist control group). Parents, children, and teachers completed questionnaires pre- and postintervention. Results. Primary parents in the NF condition reported significant (P ADHD index, the BASC Attention Problems Scale, and on the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning (BRIEF). Conclusion. This randomized control trial provides preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of computer-based interventions for ADHD and supports the feasibility of offering them in a school setting.

  13. Computation of the Response Surface in the Tensor Train data format

    KAUST Repository

    Dolgov, Sergey; Khoromskij, Boris N.; Litvinenko, Alexander; Matthies, Hermann G.

    2014-01-01

    We apply the Tensor Train (TT) approximation to construct the Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) of a random field, and solve the stochastic elliptic diffusion PDE with the stochastic Galerkin discretization. We compare two strategies of the polynomial chaos expansion: sparse and full polynomial (multi-index) sets. In the full set, the polynomial orders are chosen independently in each variable, which provides higher flexibility and accuracy. However, the total amount of degrees of freedom grows exponentially with the number of stochastic coordinates. To cope with this curse of dimensionality, the data is kept compressed in the TT decomposition, a recurrent low-rank factorization. PCE computations on sparse grids sets are extensively studied, but the TT representation for PCE is a novel approach that is investigated in this paper. We outline how to deduce the PCE from the covariance matrix, assemble the Galerkin operator, and evaluate some post-processing (mean, variance, Sobol indices), staying within the low-rank framework. The most demanding are two stages. First, we interpolate PCE coefficients in the TT format using a few number of samples, which is performed via the block cross approximation method. Second, we solve the discretized equation (large linear system) via the alternating minimal energy algorithm. In the numerical experiments we demonstrate that the full expansion set encapsulated in the TT format is indeed preferable in cases when high accuracy and high polynomial orders are required.

  14. Computation of the Response Surface in the Tensor Train data format

    KAUST Repository

    Dolgov, Sergey

    2014-06-11

    We apply the Tensor Train (TT) approximation to construct the Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) of a random field, and solve the stochastic elliptic diffusion PDE with the stochastic Galerkin discretization. We compare two strategies of the polynomial chaos expansion: sparse and full polynomial (multi-index) sets. In the full set, the polynomial orders are chosen independently in each variable, which provides higher flexibility and accuracy. However, the total amount of degrees of freedom grows exponentially with the number of stochastic coordinates. To cope with this curse of dimensionality, the data is kept compressed in the TT decomposition, a recurrent low-rank factorization. PCE computations on sparse grids sets are extensively studied, but the TT representation for PCE is a novel approach that is investigated in this paper. We outline how to deduce the PCE from the covariance matrix, assemble the Galerkin operator, and evaluate some post-processing (mean, variance, Sobol indices), staying within the low-rank framework. The most demanding are two stages. First, we interpolate PCE coefficients in the TT format using a few number of samples, which is performed via the block cross approximation method. Second, we solve the discretized equation (large linear system) via the alternating minimal energy algorithm. In the numerical experiments we demonstrate that the full expansion set encapsulated in the TT format is indeed preferable in cases when high accuracy and high polynomial orders are required.

  15. Development of a computer-based training (CBT) course for the FSUTMS comprehensive modeling workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    FSUTMS training is a major activity of the Systems Planning Office of the Florida Department of : Transportation (FDOT). The training aims to establish and maintain quality assurance for consistent : statewide modeling standards and provide up-to-dat...

  16. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  17. Science &Language Teaching in Hands-on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    As announced in the paper presented in Toulouse, a trinational teacher training program addressing school teachers from France, Germany and Italy on teaching foreign languages together with science and history through Space related projects has been implemented and launched successfully. Supported by the French Ministry of Education (Académie de Nice), the bigovernmental French-German Youth Office (Office franco- allemand pour la Jeunesse) and the European Space Agency the first session was held in Cannes in October 2001 and brought together 36 language, science and history teachers, 12 from each country. Through different workshops, presentations and visits this five-day training encounter initiated the participants with Space activities and exploration as well as offering them back-up information on astronomy. It gave them furthermore the opportunity of improving their linguistic skills and of exchanging their teaching experience. The program was highly welcomed by all the participants who will meet this year in Germany for the second session devoted to establishing together bi- or trinational projects for future class encounters based on the same subjects. My paper will deal with the results of the program which have been beyond expectation and will encourage us to continue this pluridisciplinary approach of language &science teaching and extend it to other language combinations.

  18. Support for hands-on optics immersions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Gabriel C.; McCann, Lowell I.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Laboratory Physics Association (ALPhA) is an official affiliate organization of the AAPT, supporting upper-level undergraduate instructional lab education in physics. The ALPhA Immersions program is intended to be an efficient use of an instructor's time: with expert colleague-mentors on hand they spend 2.5 days learning a key new instructional experiment (of their choice) well enough to confidently teach it to the students at their home institutions. At an ALPhA Immersion, participants work in groups of no more than three per experimental setup. Our follow-up surveys support the notion that this individualized, concentrated focus directly results in significant updating and improvement of undergraduate laboratory instruction in physics across the country. Such programs have the effect of encouraging investment, on the part of individual institutions. For example, we have disseminated ideas, training, and equipment for contemporary single-photon-based instructional labs dealing with core, contemporary issues in Quantum Mechanics. By the time this paper is presented, ALPhA will have delivered at least 420 single-photon detectors to a wide variety of educational institutions. We have also partnered with the non-profit Jonathan F. Reichert Foundation to support equipment acquisition by institutions participating in our wide variety of training programs.

  19. Programming massively parallel processors a hands-on approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David B

    2010-01-01

    Programming Massively Parallel Processors discusses basic concepts about parallel programming and GPU architecture. ""Massively parallel"" refers to the use of a large number of processors to perform a set of computations in a coordinated parallel way. The book details various techniques for constructing parallel programs. It also discusses the development process, performance level, floating-point format, parallel patterns, and dynamic parallelism. The book serves as a teaching guide where parallel programming is the main topic of the course. It builds on the basics of C programming for CUDA, a parallel programming environment that is supported on NVI- DIA GPUs. Composed of 12 chapters, the book begins with basic information about the GPU as a parallel computer source. It also explains the main concepts of CUDA, data parallelism, and the importance of memory access efficiency using CUDA. The target audience of the book is graduate and undergraduate students from all science and engineering disciplines who ...

  20. Interaction devices for hands-on desktop design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Wendy; Madsen, Sally; Fiene, Jonathan; Bolas, Mark T.; McDowall, Ian E.; Faste, Rolf

    2003-05-01

    Starting with a list of typical hand actions - such as touching or twisting - a collection of physical input device prototypes was created to study better ways of engaging the body and mind in the computer aided design process. These devices were interchangeably coupled with a graphics system to allow for rapid exploration of the interplay between the designer's intent, body motions, and the resulting on-screen design. User testing showed that a number of key considerations should influence the future development of such devices: coupling between the physical and virtual worlds, tactile feedback, and scale. It is hoped that these explorations contribute to the greater goal of creating user interface devices that increase the fluency, productivity and joy of computer-augmented design.

  1. Blended Learning Model on Hands-On Approach for In-Service Secondary School Teachers: Combination of E-Learning and Face-to-Face Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vinh-Thang; Nakamori, Yoshiteru; Ho, Tu-Bao; Lim, Cher Ping

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a blended learning model on hands-on approach for in-service secondary school teachers using a quasi-experimental design. A 24-h teacher-training course using the blended learning model was administered to 117 teachers, while face-to-face instruction was given to 60 teachers. The…

  2. An Online Approach for Training International Climate Scientists to Use Computer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, M. B.; Mesquita, M. D.; Veldore, V.

    2013-12-01

    With the mounting evidence by the work of IPCC (2007), climate change has been acknowledged as a significant challenge to Sustainable Development by the international community. It is important that scientists in developing countries have access to knowledge and tools so that well-informed decisions can be made about the mitigation and adaptation of climate change. However, training researchers to use climate modeling techniques and data analysis has become a challenge, because current capacity building approaches train researchers to use climate models through short-term workshops, which requires a large amount of funding. It has also been observed that many participants who recently completed capacity building courses still view climate and weather models as a metaphorical 'black box', where data goes in and results comes out; and there is evidence that these participants lack a basic understanding of the climate system. Both of these issues limit the ability of some scientists to go beyond running a model based on rote memorization of the process. As a result, they are unable to solve problems regarding run-time errors, thus cannot determine whether or not their model simulation is reasonable. Current research in the field of science education indicates that there are effective strategies to teach learners about science models. They involve having the learner work with, experiment with, modify, and apply models in a way that is significant and informative to the learner. It has also been noted that in the case of computational models, the installation and set up process alone can be time consuming and confusing for new users, which can hinder their ability to concentrate on using, experimenting with, and applying the model to real-world scenarios. Therefore, developing an online version of capacity building is an alternative approach to the workshop training programs, which makes use of new technologies and it allows for a long-term educational process in a way

  3. Performance/Design Requirements and Detailed Technical Description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem for Integration into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A. K.; And Others

    The performance/design requirements and a detailed technical description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem to be integrated into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System are described. The subsystem may be used for computer-assisted lesson construction and has presentation capability for on-the-job training for data automation, staff, and…

  4. [User friendliness of computer-based cognitive training for psychogeriatric patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Eva S; Hoorweg, Angela; van der Lee, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment associated with dementia is characterized by a continuous decline. Cognitive training is a method to train specific brain functions such as memory and attention to prevent or slow down cognitive decline. A small number of studies has shown that cognitive training on a computer has a positive effect on both cognition and mood in people with cognitive impairment. This pilot study tested if serious games could be integrated in a psychogeriatric rehabilitation center. Fourteen psychogeriatric patients participated twice weekly in cognitive training sessions on a computer. Both the participants and the facilitator reported positive interactions and outcomes. However, after five weeks only half of the sample still participated in the training. This was partly because of patient turn-over as well as incorporating this new task in the facilitators' daily work. Fear of failure, physical limitations and rapidly decreasing cognitive function led to drop out according to the facilitator. The engagement of patients in the games and the role of the facilitator seemed essential for success, especially monitoring (and adjusting) the difficulty level of the program for every individual participant.

  5. Computer-Based Training in Eating and Nutrition Facilitates Person-Centered Hospital Care: A Group Concept Mapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergren, Albert; Edfors, Ellinor; Norberg, Erika; Stubbendorff, Anna; Hedin, Gita; Wetterstrand, Martin; Rosas, Scott R; Hagell, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Studies have shown that computer-based training in eating and nutrition for hospital nursing staff increased the likelihood that patients at risk of undernutrition would receive nutritional interventions. This article seeks to provide understanding from the perspective of nursing staff of conceptually important areas for computer-based nutritional training, and their relative importance to nutritional care, following completion of the training. Group concept mapping, an integrated qualitative and quantitative methodology, was used to conceptualize important factors relating to the training experiences through four focus groups (n = 43), statement sorting (n = 38), and importance rating (n = 32), followed by multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. Sorting of 38 statements yielded four clusters. These clusters (number of statements) were as follows: personal competence and development (10), practice close care development (10), patient safety (9), and awareness about the nutrition care process (9). First and second clusters represented "the learning organization," and third and fourth represented "quality improvement." These findings provide a conceptual basis for understanding the importance of training in eating and nutrition, which contributes to a learning organization and quality improvement, and can be linked to and facilitates person-centered nutritional care and patient safety.

  6. Improving the management of diabetes in hospitalized patients: the results of a computer-based house staff training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Hurwitz, Shelley; Yialamas, Maria; Min, Le; Garg, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes in hospitalized patients is associated with poor clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that computer-based diabetes training could improve house staff knowledge and comfort for the management of diabetes in a large tertiary-care hospital. We implemented a computer-based training program on inpatient diabetes for internal medicine house staff at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA) in September 2009. House staff were required to complete the program and answer a set of questions, before and after the program, to evaluate their level of comfort and knowledge of inpatient diabetes. Chart reviews of all non-critically ill patients with diabetes managed by house staff in August 2009 (before the program) and December 2009 (after the program) were performed. Chart reviews were also performed for August 2008 and December 2008 to compare house staff management practices when the computer-based educational program was not available. A significant increase in comfort levels and knowledge in the management of inpatient diabetes was seen among house staff at all levels of training (Pstaff compared with junior house staff. Nonsignificant trends suggesting increased use of basal-bolus insulin (P=0.06) and decreased use of sliding-scale insulin (P=0.10) were seen following the educational intervention in 2009, whereas no such change was seen in 2008 (P>0.90). Overall, house staff evaluated the training program as "very relevant" and the technology interface as "good." A computer-based diabetes training program can improve the comfort and knowledge of house staff and potentially improve their insulin administration practices at large academic centers.

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis of lung cancer: the effect of training data sets on classification accuracy of lung nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jing; Liu, Ji-Yu; Sun, Xi-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Nie, Sheng-Dong

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) scheme for classification between malignant and benign lung nodules, and also assess whether CADx performance changes in detecting nodules associated with early and advanced stage lung cancer. The study involves 243 biopsy-confirmed pulmonary nodules. Among them, 76 are benign, 81 are stage I and 86 are stage III malignant nodules. The cases are separated into three data sets involving: (1) all nodules, (2) benign and stage I malignant nodules, and (3) benign and stage III malignant nodules. A CADx scheme is applied to segment lung nodules depicted on computed tomography images and we initially computed 66 3D image features. Then, three machine learning models namely, a support vector machine, naïve Bayes classifier and linear discriminant analysis, are separately trained and tested by using three data sets and a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method embedded with a Relief-F feature selection algorithm. When separately using three data sets to train and test three classifiers, the average areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) are 0.94, 0.90 and 0.99, respectively. When using the classifiers trained using data sets with all nodules, average AUC values are 0.88 and 0.99 for detecting early and advanced stage nodules, respectively. AUC values computed from three classifiers trained using the same data set are consistent without statistically significant difference (p  >  0.05). This study demonstrates (1) the feasibility of applying a CADx scheme to accurately distinguish between benign and malignant lung nodules, and (2) a positive trend between CADx performance and cancer progression stage. Thus, in order to increase CADx performance in detecting subtle and early cancer, training data sets should include more diverse early stage cancer cases.

  8. Teaching with Dogs: Learning about Learning through Hands-on Experience in Dog Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Bridget L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes a pilot study of an experiential learning technique that was designed to give undergraduate students a greater understanding of the principles and theories of learning and behavior, which is traditionally taught only in a lecture-based format. Students were assigned the role of a dog trainer, and they were responsible for…

  9. Vicarious learning during simulations: is it more effective than hands-on training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Karsten; Pilz, Florian; Siebeck, Matthias; Fischer, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Doctor-patient communication skills are often fostered by using simulations with standardised patients (SPs). The efficiency of such experiences is greater if student observers learn at least as much from the simulation as do students who actually interact with the patient. This study aimed to investigate whether the type of simulation-based learning (learning by doing versus vicarious learning) and the order in which these activities are carried out (learning by doing → vicarious learning versus vicarious learning → learning by doing) have any effect on the acquisition of knowledge on effective doctor-patient communication strategies. In addition, we wished to examine the extent to which an observation script and a feedback formulation script affect knowledge acquisition in this domain. The sample consisted of 200 undergraduate medical students (126 female, 74 male). They participated in two separate simulation sessions, each of which was 30 minutes long and was followed by a collaborative peer feedback phase. Half of the students first performed (learning by doing) and then observed (vicarious learning) the simulation, and the other half participated in the reverse order. Knowledge of doctor-patient communication was measured before, between and after the simulations. Vicarious learning led to greater knowledge of doctor-patient communication scores than learning by doing. The order in which vicarious learning was experienced had no influence. The inclusion of an observation script also enabled significantly greater learning in students to whom this script was given compared with students who were not supported in this way, but the presence of a feedback script had no effect. Students appear to learn at least as much, if not more, about doctor-patient communication by observing their peers interact with SPs as they do from interacting with SPs themselves. Instructional support for observing simulations in the form of observation scripts facilitates both vicarious learning and learning by doing. An observation script may focus learners' attention on the important aspects of doctor-patient communication and increase the content-related accuracy of peer feedback. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  10. Student Hands-On Training (SHOT) Workshop Summer 2003 and 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koehler, Chris

    2004-01-01

    .... The objective of SHOT I AND II workshops are to provide these new students exposure to some of the basics of spacecraft construction, the teamwork and coordination involved, as well as the challenges...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  12. Pre-Service Physics Teachers’ Perception toward Hands-on Lab Activity and 21st Century Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, D. H.; Risdianto, E.; Sutarno, S.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the hands-on lab activities and 21st century skills of pre-service physics teachers at a university in Bengkulu. The respondents of this study were 113 students who have been finished and were following the laboratory course. The research instrument was questionnaire. The explored aspects of laboratory activities were motivation, the importance of laboratory activities, equipment, laboratory activities process, suitability of curriculum, assessment, laboratory design, and the 21st century skills training. The 21st century skills explored consist of learning and innovation skills, life and careers skills, and media, information and technology skills. The data obtained will be analyzed descriptively. Based on the results of data analysis was obtained that they have a good perception toward the aspect of motivation, the importance of hands-on lab activities, and laboratory activities process; and the perception was fair for other aspects. The lowest perception score was obtained in the aspects of the 21st century skills training. This result was in accordance with the 21st century skills of pre-service physics teachers which were still in moderate category. So it is necessary to develop a model of laboratory activities design that can training and enhancing the 21st century skills for pre-service physics teachers.

  13. A Longitudinal Examination of the Effects of Computer Self-efficacy Growth on Performance during Technology Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Downey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Technology training in the classroom is critical in preparing students for upper level classes as well as professional careers, especially in fields such as technology. One of the key enablers to this process is computer self-efficacy (CSE, which has an extensive stream of empirical research. Despite this, one of the missing pieces is how CSE actually changes during training, and how such change is related to antecedents and performance outcomes. Measuring change requires repeated data gathering and the use of latent growth modeling, a relatively new statistical technique. This study examines CSE (specifically general CSE or GCSE growth over time during training, and how this growth is influenced by anxiety and gender and influences performance, using a semester-long lab course covering three applications. The use of GCSE growth more accurately models how students actually learn in a technology classroom. It provides novel clarity in the interaction of gender, anxiety, GCSE, specific CSEs, and performance during training. The study finds that the relationship between anxiety and self-efficacy decreases over time during training, becoming non-significant; it clarifies the significant role gender plays in influencing GCSE at the start of and during training. It finds GCSE influences application performance only through specific CSEs.

  14. The Development of an Interactive Computer-Based Training Program for Timely and Humane On-Farm Pig Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Caitlyn R; Pairis-Garcia, Monique D; Campler, Magnus R; Anthony, Raymond; Johnson, Anna K; Coleman, Grahame J; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2018-02-05

    With extensive knowledge and training in the prevention, management, and treatment of disease conditions in animals, veterinarians play a critical role in ensuring good welfare on swine farms by training caretakers on the importance of timely euthanasia. To assist veterinarians and other industry professionals in training new and seasoned caretakers, an interactive computer-based training program was created. It consists of three modules, each containing five case studies, which cover three distinct production stages (breeding stock, piglets, and wean to grower-finisher pigs). Case study development was derived from five specific euthanasia criteria defined in the 2015 Common Swine Industry Audit, a nationally recognized auditing program used in the US. Case studies provide information regarding treatment history, clinical signs, and condition severity of the pig and prompt learners to make management decisions regarding pig treatment and care. Once a decision is made, feedback is provided so learners understand the appropriateness of their decision compared to current industry guidelines. In addition to training farm personnel, this program may also be a valuable resource if incorporated into veterinary, graduate, and continuing education curricula. This innovative tool represents the first interactive euthanasia-specific training program in the US swine industry and offers the potential to improve timely and humane on-farm pig euthanasia.

  15. Whatever works: a systematic user-centered training protocol to optimize brain-computer interfacing individually.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth V C Friedrich

    Full Text Available This study implemented a systematic user-centered training protocol for a 4-class brain-computer interface (BCI. The goal was to optimize the BCI individually in order to achieve high performance within few sessions for all users. Eight able-bodied volunteers, who were initially naïve to the use of a BCI, participated in 10 sessions over a period of about 5 weeks. In an initial screening session, users were asked to perform the following seven mental tasks while multi-channel EEG was recorded: mental rotation, word association, auditory imagery, mental subtraction, spatial navigation, motor imagery of the left hand and motor imagery of both feet. Out of these seven mental tasks, the best 4-class combination as well as most reactive frequency band (between 8-30 Hz was selected individually for online control. Classification was based on common spatial patterns and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. The number and time of classifier updates varied individually. Selection speed was increased by reducing trial length. To minimize differences in brain activity between sessions with and without feedback, sham feedback was provided in the screening and calibration runs in which usually no real-time feedback is shown. Selected task combinations and frequency ranges differed between users. The tasks that were included in the 4-class combination most often were (1 motor imagery of the left hand (2, one brain-teaser task (word association or mental subtraction (3, mental rotation task and (4 one more dynamic imagery task (auditory imagery, spatial navigation, imagery of the feet. Participants achieved mean performances over sessions of 44-84% and peak performances in single-sessions of 58-93% in this user-centered 4-class BCI protocol. This protocol is highly adjustable to individual users and thus could increase the percentage of users who can gain and maintain BCI control. A high priority for future work is to examine this protocol with severely

  16. A Hands-on Guide to Video Podcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, L. L.; Hurt, R.

    2008-02-01

    Video podcasting, or vodcasting, is the latest evolution of the podcast revolution. The market for on demand multimedia content spans the gamut, ranging from portable media players to computers, and increasingly to televisions through home media centres. This new mode of accessing content is rapidly growing in popularity, particularly among younger audiences. Vodcasting allows a direct link between consumer and content producer, bypassing traditional media networks, making it ideal for EPO efforts. Even modest budgets can yield compelling astronomy vodcasts that will appeal to a large audience. Gateways like the iTunes Store and video community websites such as Veoh and YouTube have created new content markets where none existed before. This paper highlights the key steps for producing a vodcast and shows some statistics from two leading astronomy vodcasts. The reader will see how to make (or improve) a science video podcast and learn about some of the latest developments in this rapidly-evolving field.

  17. Development of the operator training system using computer graphics. Pt. 1. Defining the system configuration and developing basic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takana, Kenchi; Sasou, Kunihide; Sano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Koichi; Noji, Kunio

    2001-01-01

    Efficient and concurrent operator training seems to be crucial in near future because of an increase in operators to be trained due to generation alternations. Ever developed Man -Machine-Simulator (MMS) has several merits: (1) Operators' cognitive and behavioral activities among team in emergency could be simulated based on the concurrent mental model; (2) Simulated scenarios could be expanded to multiple malfunctions events, to all of which procedures could not be stipulated previously, (3) Standard behavior in coping with anomalies including communication and operations could be presented. This paper describes the development of an operator training system by applying this MMS. Three dimensional computer graphics (3D-CG) was adopted for improving the training effects and attracting operators' interest by visually presenting realistic operating team behavior in the main control room. Towards the completion of the operator training system, following designs of system configuration and developments of several basic techniques were availed: (1) Imaging the utilization of the operator training system, functions to be equipped and system configurations for realizing functions were determined. And three of scenarios were chosen in order to appeal the merits of the MMS and to raise training effects. (2) Knowledge base was completed to execute simulations. And connection between operator team model and plant simulator, that is the 2nd generation type simulator of the BTC -4, was executed to obtain simulation results (time sequential log data of plant dynamics and operating team behavior). (3) Operator's actions seen in VCR tapes in real training were classified for eighteen kinds of fundamental categories and those fundamental actions were modeled on 3D-CG using the People Shop software. The 3D-CG of main control panel was prepared using Multi Gen software. (author)

  18. Simulators in catheter-based interventional radiology: training or computer games?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, D.A.; Kessel, D.O.; Healey, A.E.; Johnson, S.J.; Lewandowski, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Training in interventional radiology (IR) relies on a traditional apprenticeship; to protect patients, expert supervision is mandatory until knowledge, attitudes and practical skills have been certified as satisfactory. However, the current quality of IR training is threatened by reduced time for trainees to learn, as well as a loss of basic diagnostic, training cases to non-invasive imaging. At the same time, IR techniques are becoming a focus of interest to a range of other clinical specialities. To address this training shortfall there is a need to develop novel training alternatives such as simulator models. Few simulator models in any medical field have been successfully validated to show improved clinical skills in treating patients. To date no endovascular simulator has met this standard. A good simulator must be based around key performance measures (metrics) derived from careful analysis of the procedure to be replicated. Metrics can be determined by trained psychologists from a direct analysis of the content of the job or task to be tested. The identification of these critical measures of performance is a complex process which must be tailored to a training curriculum to be effective. Simulators based on flawed metrics will invariably lead to unsatisfactory assessment. It follows that simulator development must involve the statutory licensing authorities. Equally it is essential that we do not assume that training on a particular simulator will correlate with the ability to perform the task in the real world. This 'transfer of training' must be rigorously proven by validation studies

  19. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2012-06-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or was done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data makes it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of IT forensics. Motivated by these facts, a training concept, which allows the creation of practical exercises, is presented in this paper. The focus is on the practical implementation of forensic important relationships.

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 - 30.4.2004 (5 days) Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Pla...

  1. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 10 - 12.5.2004 (3...

  2. Task-Oriented Training with Computer Games for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Hand Osteoarthritis: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia Swarnalatha; Shay, Barbara; Szturm, Tony

    2016-09-13

    To examine the feasibility of a clinical trial on a novel, home-based task-oriented training with conventional hand exercises in people with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis. To explore the experiences of participants who completed their respective home exercise programmes. Thirty volunteer participants aged between 30 and 60 years and diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis were proposed for a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial ( ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT01635582). Participants received task-oriented training with interactive computer games and objects of daily life or finger mobility and strengthening exercises. Both programmes were home based and were done four sessions per week with 20 minutes each session for 6 weeks. Major feasibility outcomes were number of volunteers screened, randomized, and retained; completion of blinded assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data management; and clinical outcomes of hand function. Reaching the recruitment target in 18 months and achieving exercise compliance >80% were set as success criteria. Concurrent with the trial, focus group interviews explored experiences of those participants who completed their respective programmes. After trial initiation, revisions in inclusion criteria were required to promote recruitment. A total of 17 participants were randomized and 15 were retained. Completion of assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data collection and management demonstrated excellent feasibility. Both groups improved in hand function outcomes and exercise compliance was above 85%. Participants perceived both programmes as appropriate and acceptable. Participants who completed task-oriented training also agreed that playing different computer games was enjoyable, engaging, and motivating. Findings demonstrate initial evidence on recruitment, feasibility of trial procedures, and acceptability of

  3. Comparison of the effectiveness of resistance training in women with chronic computer-related neck pain: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Lin, Caina; Liu, Cuicui; Ke, Songjian; Wan, Qing; Luo, Haijie; Huang, Zhuxi; Xin, Wenjun; Ma, Chao; Wu, Shaoling

    2017-10-01

    Chronic computer-related neck pain is common among office workers. Studies have proposed neck strengthening exercise as a therapy to pain relieving and function improvement. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of different loading resistance trainings and we hypothesized that women with work-related neck pain could benefit more from progressive resistance training for pain and function recovery. A randomized controlled trial was conducted and subjects characterized by monotonous jobs were recruited. One hundred and nine employed women with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated into three groups, namely, progressive resistance training (PRT), fixed resistance training (FRT), and control group (CG). In PRT and FRT, four exercises for neck muscles with an elastic rubber band were performed on regular basis for 6 weeks. The therapeutic effectiveness was then evaluated at pretreatment, 2, 4, and 6 weeks during training period, and 3-month posttreatment. Assessment tools included visual analog scale (VAS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and maximal isometric neck strength. The outcomes were significantly better in PRT and FRT than those in CG at 6-week timepoint and 3-month follow-up (p = 0.000), in terms of VAS, NDI, PPT, and neck muscle strength. Besides, there were statistically significant decreases observed in VAS scores of PRT group compared with those in FRT at 4-, 6-week timepoints, and 3-month follow-up (p training was an effective method for pain relieving, mobility improving, pain threshold, and neck muscle strength enhancing in women with chronic computer-related neck pain. Thus, our study provided evidence that women with work-related neck pain might benefit more from PRT, which may have important implications for future clinical practice. The study was qualified and registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry as ChiCTR-TRC-12002723.

  4. The impact of patient and physician computer mediated communication skill training on reported communication and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roter, Debra L; Wexler, Randy; Naragon, Phyllis; Forrest, Brian; Dees, Jason; Almodovar, Astrid; Wood, Julie

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate parallel patient and physician computer-mediated communication skill training on participants' report of skill use and patient satisfaction. Separate patient and clinician web-tools comprised of over 500, 10-s video clips demonstrating patient-centered skills in various ways. Four clinician members of the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network participated by enrolling 194 patients into a randomized patient trial and 29 physicians into a non-randomized clinician trial of respective interventions. All participants completed baseline and follow-up self-report measures of visit communication and satisfaction. Intervention patients reported using more skills than controls in five of six skill areas, including identification of problems/concerns, information exchange, treatment adherence, shared decision-making and interpersonal rapport (all ppost intervention, physicians reported using more skills in the same 5 areas (all pCommunication skill training delivered in a computer mediated format had a positive and parallel impact on both patient and clinician reported use of patient-centered communication and in patient satisfaction. Computer-mediated interventions are cost and time effective thereby increasing patient and clinician willingness to undertake training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE METHODICAL ASPECTS OF MAXIMA USING AS A TOOL FOR FUNDAMENTAL TRAINING OF BACHELORS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shyshkina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the formation of the information society, where the pace of scientific progress is rapidly growing, it is difficult to provide the training for immediate inclusion of the person into the production chain at a workplace or in an educational system. There is the way out and it is fundamentalization of informatics education. It is necessary to train the specialist so that he (she could be able to be adapted quickly to the changes occurring in the industry technological development; to give him knowledge, universal in nature, so as the expert may navigate quickly to resolve the professional tasks on this basis. The article describes the trends of systems of computer mathematics (SCM pedagogical use for teaching computer science disciplines. The general characteristics and conditions for effective use of the Maxima as a tool for fundamentalization of the bachelors learning process are outlined. The ways of informatics disciplines teaching methodology are revealed. The peculiarities of cloud based learning solutions are considered. The purpose of the article is the analysis of contemporary approaches to the use of systems of computer mathematics as a tool for fundamentalization of informatics disciplines training courses and identify methodological aspects of these systems application for the teaching of operations research as by the example of SCM Maxima. The object of investigation is the learning process of informatics bachelors with the use of SCM. The subject of investigation is the peculiarities of using the SCM Maxima as a learning tool for informatics courses support

  6. INIS Training Seminar 2013, 7-11 October 2013, Vienna, Austria. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organised an INIS Training Seminar from 7 to 11 October 2013 at its Headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The programme of the seminar concentrated on all aspects of INIS input preparation, indexing and classification, submission of non-conventional literature (NCL), searching the INIS Collection, and promotion of INIS. The training course consisted of lectures in the form of presentations, followed by discussions to allow an exchange of information and by practical sessions specifically on the topic. The course also consisted of hands-on training using computer training facilities

  7. Contract Training and Computer-Assisted Instruction at Santa Fe Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortego, Sheila; Richards, Beverly

    In summer 1993, Santa Fe Community College, New Mexico, created the External Programs Division (EPD) under its credit instruction program to serve the needs of non-traditional students. The EPD encompasses contract training, the Flex Lab, distance education, the AutoDesk Training Center, an Alternative Fuels program, and the corrections training…

  8. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  9. The Impact of Recruit Socioeconomic Background and Computer Literacy on U.S. Navy Initial Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stiles, Christine

    1999-01-01

    .... This study examines household income data, computer, telephone, and on-line penetration rate data by socioeconomic level, student computer use data, and data from the DoD's Survey of Recruit Socioeconomic Background...

  10. Computer Education for Teachers in Secondary Schools; Aims and Objectives in Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation for Information Processing, Geneva (Switzerland). Working Group on Secondary School Education.

    Society and education are changing rapidly, and since computers are playing a significant role in these changes it is imperative that secondary school teachers become more fully informed about computers. Computers are of interest to learners because they have led to new theoretical developments, such as automata theory, have many practical…

  11. Developing a strategy for computational lab skills training through Software and Data Carpentry: Experiences from the ELIXIR Pilot action [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Pawlik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality training in computational skills for life scientists is essential to allow them to deliver robust, reproducible and cutting-edge research. A pan-European bioinformatics programme, ELIXIR, has adopted a well-established and progressive programme of computational lab and data skills training from Software and Data Carpentry, aimed at increasing the number of skilled life scientists and building a sustainable training community in this field. This article describes the Pilot action, which introduced the Carpentry training model to the ELIXIR community.

  12. Hands-on earth science with students at schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Earth science teachers at schools for the Deaf face a variety of challenges. This community of students has a wide range of language skills, teaching resources can be limited and often teachers are not trained in geosciences. An NSF CAREER grant provided an opportunity to make a difference to this community and foster earth science learning at 8 schools for the Deaf around the country. We designed hands-on deformational sandboxes for the teachers and provided accompanying curriculum materials. The sandbox is a physical model of crustal deformation that students can manipulate to test hypotheses. The visual nature of the sandbox was well-suited for the spatial grammar of American Sign Language used by these students. Furthermore, language skills were enhanced by scaffolded observation, sketch, annotation, discussion, interpretation assignments. Geoscience training of teachers was strengthened with workshops and three 5-day field trips for teachers and selected students to Utah, western New England and southern California. The field trips provided opportunity for students to work as geoscientists observing, interpreting, discussing and presenting their investigations. Between field trips, we set up videoconferences from the UMass experimental lab with the high school earth science classrooms. These sessions facilitated dialog between students and researchers at UMass. While the project set out to provide geoscience learning opportunities for students at Schools for the Deaf, the long lasting impact was the improved geoscience training of teachers, most of whom had limited post-secondary earth science training. The success of the project also rested on the dedication of the teachers to their students and their willingness to try new approaches and experiences. By tapping into a community of 6 teachers, who already shared curriculum and had fantastic leadership, the project was able to have significant impact and exceed the initial goals. The project has led to a

  13. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  14. Faculty Workshops for Teaching Information Assurance through Hands-On Exercises and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Williams, Kenneth; Yu, Huiming; Rorrer, Audrey; Chu, Bei-Tseng; Yang, Li; Winters, Kathy; Kizza, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Though many Information Assurance (IA) educators agree that hands-on exercises and case studies improve student learning, hands-on exercises and case studies are not widely adopted due to the time needed to develop them and integrate them into curricula. Under the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarship for Service program, we…

  15. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  16. Shape Memory Polymers: A Joint Chemical and Materials Engineering Hands-On Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Mujan; Beck, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Hands-on experiences are excellent tools for increasing retention of first year engineering students. They also encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, a critical skill for modern engineers. In this paper, we describe and evaluate a joint Chemical and Materials Engineering hands-on lab that explores cross-linking and glass transition in…

  17. All in: expansion of the acquisition of data for outcomes and procedure transfer (ADOPT) program to an entire SAGES annual meeting hands-on hernia course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dort, Jonathan; Trickey, Amber; Paige, John; Schwarz, Erin; Cecil, Tom; Coleman, Mark; Dunkin, Brian

    2018-05-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) for the surgeon has been challenging because of a lack of standardized approaches of hands-on courses, resulting in poor post-course outcomes. To remedy this situation, SAGES has introduced the ADOPT program, implementing a standardized, long-term mentoring program as part of its hernia hands-on course. Previous work evaluating the pilot program showed increased adoption of learned procedures as well as increased confidence of the mentored surgeons. This manuscript describes the impact of such a program when it is instituted across an entire hands-on course. Following collection of pre-course benchmark data, all participants in the 2016 SAGES hands-on hernia course underwent structured, learner-focused instruction during the cadaveric lab. All faculty had completed a standardized teaching course in the Lapco TT format. Subsequently, course participants were enrolled in a year-long program involving longitudinal mentorship, webinars, conference calls, and coaching. Information about participant demographics, training, experience, self-reported case volumes, and confidence levels related to procedures were collected via survey 3 months prior to 9 months after the course. Twenty surgeons participated in the SAGES ADOPT 2016 hands-on hernia program. Of these, seventeen completed pre-course questionnaires (85%), ten completed the 3-month questionnaire (50%), and four completed the 9-month questionnaire (20%). Nine of ten respondents of the 3-month survey (90%) reported changes in their practice. In the 9-month survey, significant increases in the annualized procedural volumes were reported for open primary ventral hernia repair, open components separation, and mesh insertion for ventral hernia repair (p ADOPT program to an entire hands-on hernia course is both feasible and beneficial, with evidence of Kirkpatrick Levels 1-4a training effectiveness. This expanded success suggests that it is a useful blueprint for the CPD of

  18. Five Years of a Computer Based New Training Program in Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shachar, B.; Tshuva, M.; Fitussi, I.; Ankri, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the main goals of the Department of Human Resources Development is to give employees fundamental knowledge, refreshing know-how and increasing safety awareness. In this regard safety deals with risks in operating nuclear facilities, including radiation, industrial risks and fire. Israeli Work Supervision (informing and training employees, 1992) (1) and work safety regulations (industrial safety and health for ionization radiation employees) state the need for training by the employer at least once a year. The employer also must take means to verify that the employees actually understand what they were trained for

  19. A low-cost, hands-on module to characterize antimicrobial compounds using an interdisciplinary, biophysical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma S Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a hands-on experimental module that combines biology experiments with a physics-based analytical model in order to characterize antimicrobial compounds. To understand antibiotic resistance, participants perform a disc diffusion assay to test the antimicrobial activity of different compounds and then apply a diffusion-based analytical model to gain insights into the behavior of the active antimicrobial component. In our experience, this module was robust, reproducible, and cost-effective, suggesting that it could be implemented in diverse settings such as undergraduate research, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math camps, school programs, and laboratory training workshops. By providing valuable interdisciplinary research experience in science outreach and education initiatives, this module addresses the paucity of structured training or education programs that integrate diverse scientific fields. Its low-cost requirements make it especially suitable for use in resource-limited settings.

  20. Flaws in current human training protocols for spontaneous Brain-Computer Interfaces: lessons learned from instructional design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien eLotte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While recent research on Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI has highlighted their potential for many applications, they remain barely used outside laboratories. The main reason is their lack of robustness. Indeed, with current BCI, mental state recognition is usually slow and often incorrect. Spontaneous BCI (i.e., mental imagery-based BCI often rely on mutual learning efforts by the user and the machine, with BCI users learning to produce stable EEG patterns (spontaneous BCI control being widely acknowledged as a skill while the computer learns to automatically recognize these EEG patterns, using signal processing. Most research so far was focused on signal processing, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. However, how well the user masters the BCI skill is also a key element explaining BCI robustness. Indeed, if the user is not able to produce stable and distinct EEG patterns, then no signal processing algorithm would be able to recognize them. Unfortunately, despite the importance of BCI training protocols, they have been scarcely studied so far, and used mostly unchanged for years.In this paper, we advocate that current human training approaches for spontaneous BCI are most likely inappropriate. We notably study instructional design literature in order to identify the key requirements and guidelines for a successful training procedure that promotes a good and efficient skill learning. This literature study highlights that current spontaneous BCI user training procedures satisfy very few of these requirements and hence are likely to be suboptimal. We therefore identify the flaws in BCI training protocols according to instructional design principles, at several levels: in the instructions provided to the user, in the tasks he/she has to perform, and in the feedback provided. For each level, we propose new research directions that are theoretically expected to address some of these flaws and to help users learn the BCI skill more efficiently.

  1. Effectiveness Evaluation of Force Protection Training Using Computer-Based Instruction and X3d Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cruzbaez, Wilfredo

    2007-01-01

    Due to growing operational constraints accelerated by the Global War on Terror, the United States Navy is looking for alternative methods of training to maintain its force in a high status of readiness...

  2. Computation of a Suburban Night Train Timetable Based on Key Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schittenhelm, Bernd; Landex, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Timetable evaluation can be based on a set of key performance indicators. This article presents six essential key performance indicators: Fixed interval service frequency, direct connections, transfer waiting time, use of dedicated rolling stock, dedicated train personnel, dedicated tracks...

  3. A Computer-based Training Intervention for Work Supervisors to Respond to Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Glass

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Effective training on the impacts of IPV can improve knowledge, achieving a large effect size, and produce changes in perspective about domestic violence and motivation to address domestic violence in the workplace, based on questionnaire responses.

  4. Development of a cloud-based Bioinformatics Training Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revote, Jerico; Watson-Haigh, Nathan S; Quenette, Steve; Bethwaite, Blair; McGrath, Annette; Shang, Catherine A

    2017-05-01

    The Bioinformatics Training Platform (BTP) has been developed to provide access to the computational infrastructure required to deliver sophisticated hands-on bioinformatics training courses. The BTP is a cloud-based solution that is in active use for delivering next-generation sequencing training to Australian researchers at geographically dispersed locations. The BTP was built to provide an easy, accessible, consistent and cost-effective approach to delivering workshops at host universities and organizations with a high demand for bioinformatics training but lacking the dedicated bioinformatics training suites required. To support broad uptake of the BTP, the platform has been made compatible with multiple cloud infrastructures. The BTP is an open-source and open-access resource. To date, 20 training workshops have been delivered to over 700 trainees at over 10 venues across Australia using the BTP. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Toward the optimization of PC-based training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kohei; Murai, Shunji

    Since 1992, the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) have been co-organising the Regional Remote Sensing Seminar on Tropical Ecosystem Management (Program Chairman: Prof. Shunji Murai) every year in some country in Asia. In these seminars, the members of the ISPRS Working Group VI/2 'Computer Assisted Teaching' have been performing a PC-based hands-on-training on remote sensing and GIS for beginners. The main objective of the training was to transfer not only knowledge but also the technology of remote sensing and GIS to the beginners. The software and CD-ROM data set provided at the training were well designed not only for training but also for practical data analysis. This paper presents an outline of the training and discusses the optimisation of PC-based training for remote sensing and GIS.

  6. Cognitive computer training in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus no intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida; Leckman, J. F.; Lindschou, Jane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention and impulsivity and/or hyperactivity and a range of cognitive dysfunctions. Pharmacological treatment may be beneficial; however, many affected individuals...... of cognition, mostly on the working memory or attention but with poor generalization of training on other cognitive functions and functional outcome. Children with ADHD have a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is important that cognitive training target multiple cognitive functions. METHODS...

  7. Memristor-Based Synapse Design and Training Scheme for Neuromorphic Computing Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    system level built upon the conventional Von Neumann computer architecture [2][3]. Developing the neuromorphic architecture at chip level by...SCHEME FOR NEUROMORPHIC COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-11-2-0046 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6...creation of memristor-based neuromorphic computing architecture. Rather than the existing crossbar-based neuron network designs, we focus on memristor

  8. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  9. Computer training of attention and inhibition for youngsters with obesity: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Sandra; Braet, Caroline; Naets, Tiffany; Houben, Katrijn; Boendermaker, Wouter

    2018-04-01

    Obesity is a widespread problem that starts from an early age. Previous studies suggest that obese youngsters have an attentional bias and an automatic approach tendency towards high-calorie food and display difficulties inhibiting impulses, which may result in a higher intake of (high-calorie) food. An interesting idea for improvement of the current obesity treatment is adding a program that enables to train their difficulties. Subjects were 36 youngsters aged 9-15 years old from an inpatient treatment program for obesity, randomized over a training group and an active control group. The training consisted of six training sessions with cognitive tasks aimed at enhancing inhibition towards unhealthy food items (with a go/no-go task), as well as decreasing a food approach bias (using an approach/avoidance task) and a food attentional bias (using a dot-probe task). The current study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability and initial effectiveness of the training and explores if these characteristics helps obese youngsters to maintain weight-loss once they return home at the end of their inpatient treatment program. Results on the cognitive performances were investigated during two measurement sessions, spread over 5 weeks while weight evolution was followed over 13 weeks. Results showed that the training program was feasible and acceptable to the majority of participants and clinicians. Furthermore, the preliminary findings suggest that the training tasks used were ineffective in this group of obese children. Lessons learned and suggestions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Realization of the developing potential of training to computer science in conditions of adoption of the second generation state educational standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Георгиевич Григорьев

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In article requirements to training to computer science and an information technology, formulated with a position of planned results presented in the standard of the second generation are described.

  11. Effect of instructive visual stimuli on neurofeedback training for motor imagery-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshiyuki; Saeki, Midori; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Nakayashiki, Kosei; Takata, Yohei

    2015-10-01

    Event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) from the motor cortex is associated with execution, observation, and mental imagery of motor tasks. Generation of ERD by motor imagery (MI) has been widely used for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) linked to neuroprosthetics and other motor assistance devices. Control of MI-based BCIs can be acquired by neurofeedback training to reliably induce MI-associated ERD. To develop more effective training conditions, we investigated the effect of static and dynamic visual representations of target movements (a picture of forearms or a video clip of hand grasping movements) during the BCI neurofeedback training. After 4 consecutive training days, the group that performed MI while viewing the video showed significant improvement in generating MI-associated ERD compared with the group that viewed the static image. This result suggests that passively observing the target movement during MI would improve the associated mental imagery and enhance MI-based BCIs skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Combination of brain-computer interface training and goal-directed physical therapy in chronic stroke: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetz, Doris; Braun, Christoph; Weber, Cornelia; Soekadar, Surjo R; Caria, Andrea; Birbaumer, Niels

    2010-09-01

    There is no accepted and efficient rehabilitation strategy to reduce focal impairments for patients with chronic stroke who lack residual movements. A 67-year-old hemiplegic patient with no active finger extension was trained with a brain-computer interface (BCI) combined with a specific daily life-oriented physiotherapy. The BCI used electrical brain activity (EEG) and magnetic brain activity (MEG) to drive an orthosis and a robot affixed to the patient's affected upper extremity, which enabled him to move the paralyzed arm and hand driven by voluntary modulation of micro-rhythm activity. In addition, the patient practiced goal-directed physiotherapy training. Over 1 year, he completed 3 training blocks. Arm motor function, gait capacities (using Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, Modified Ashworth Scale, 10-m walk speed, and goal attainment score), and brain reorganization (functional MRI, MEG) were repeatedly assessed. The ability of hand and arm movements as well as speed and safety of gait improved significantly (mean 46.6%). Improvement of motor function was associated with increased micro-oscillations in the ipsilesional motor cortex. This proof-of-principle study suggests that the combination of BCI training with goal-directed, active physical therapy may improve the motor abilities of chronic stroke patients despite apparent initial paralysis.

  13. The Development of Educational and/or Training Computer Games for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jungmin

    2012-01-01

    Computer and video games have much in common with the strategies used in special education. Free resources for game development are becoming more widely available, so lay computer users, such as teachers and other practitioners, now have the capacity to develop games using a low budget and a little self-teaching. This article provides a guideline…

  14. 16th Department of Energy Computer Security Group Training Conference: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    Various topic on computer security are presented. Integrity standards, smartcard systems, network firewalls, encryption systems, cryptography, computer security programs, multilevel security guards, electronic mail privacy, the central intelligence agency, internet security, and high-speed ATM networking are typical examples of discussed topics. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  15. Conditions of development of professional competence by preparation of the teacher in the field of a technique of training to computer science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Юрьевна Заславская

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In article results of research of formation of professional competence of teachers of computer science in modern conditions of modernization of an education system are described. In the conditions of formation information, it is necessary to carry out preparation of the teacher possessing administrative competence, necessary quality first of all in the course of training of the theory and a technique of training to computer science.

  16. Virtual Training of the Myosignal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Terlaak

    Full Text Available To investigate which of three virtual training methods produces the largest learning effects on discrete and continuous myocontrol. The secondary objective was to examine the relation between myocontrol and manual motor control tests.A cohort analytic study.University laboratory.3 groups of 12 able-bodied participants (N = 36.Participants trained the control over their myosignals on 3 consecutive days. Training was done with either myosignal feedback on a computer screen, a virtual myoelectric prosthetic hand or a computer game. Participants performed 2 myocontrol tests and 2 manual motor control tests before the first and after the last training session. They were asked to open and close a virtual prosthetic hand on 3 different velocities as a discrete myocontrol test and followed a line with their myosignals for 30 seconds as a continuous myocontrol test. The motor control tests were a pegboard and grip-force test.Discrete myocontrol test: mean velocities. Continuous myocontrol test: error and error SD. Pegboard test: time to complete. Grip-force test: produced forces.No differences in learning effects on myocontrol were found for the different virtual training methods. Discrete myocontrol ability did not significantly improve as a result of training. Continuous myocontrol ability improved significantly as a result of training, both on average control and variability. All correlations between the motor control and myocontrol test outcome measures were below .50.Three different virtual training methods showed comparable results when learning myocontrol. Continuous myocontrol was improved by training while discrete myocontrol was not. Myocontrol ability could not be predicted by the manual motor control tests.

  17. virtX - a computer based system for training the intrasurgical use of mobile image intensifier systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretschner, Dietrich Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Currently the correct intrasurgical positioning and adjustment of mobile X-ray image intensifiers (C-arm can be learned theoretically through the use of textbooks, the practical training with the device itself suffers from the lack of visual feedback, i.e. radiographs corresponding to the adjustment of the C-arm. This leads to the question, whether the training of correct operation and adjustment of a C-arm in different operation scenarios can be supported by a C-arm simulation system being part of a CBT system (Computer Based Training. Methods: In co-operation with physicians from accident surgery and radiology the computer-based training system virtX was developed. virtX confronts the user with different exercises of C-arm adjustment and evaluates their execution and the results. These tasks can be created with the help of an authoring tool and can be accomplished by the trainee in different modes: a pure virtual mode and a combined virtual-real mode. In the pure virtual mode the user controls the virtual C-arm in a virtual operating theatre via the graphic-interactive virtX user interface. In the virtual-real mode however the position and orientation of a real C-arm are detected and mapped onto the virtual C-arm. At any time during the completion of an exercise the user can produce a close-to-reality, virtual radiograph and can control all parameters, like the positions of the apertures, X-ray intensity, etc. virtX was used on a three-day course for OR personnel with 120 participants and evaluated using questionnaires.Results: 79 of the participants returned a questionnaire. The average age of the 62 female and 15 male participants (two n.s. was 34 ± 9 years, their professional experience was 8.3 ± 7.6 years. 18 persons (23% indicated to work occasionally with a C-arm, 61 (77% worked regularly with it. Over 83% of the interviewed participants considered virtX a useful addition to the conventional C-arm training

  18. Effects of progressive strength training on muscle mass in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients determined by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauza, E.; Strehblow, C.; Hanusch-Enserer, U.; Fasching, P.; Metz-Schimmerl, S.; Strasser, B.; Kostner, K.; Dunstan, D.; Haber, P.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the effect of a 4-month progressive strength training program on muscle and fat mass assessed by computed tomography (CT) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, and to assess the relationships of changes in muscle cross-section area (CSA) with glycaemic control. Twenty adults (mean age ± SE: 56.4 ± 0.9 a) with T2DM participated in a supervised strength training program for 4 months 3 days/week. Muscle and fat areas of the quadriceps muscle were estimated by CT volumetry before and immediately after the training. Glycaemic (HbA1c) and anthropometric (BMI, skinfolds) measurements were assessed at 0 and 4 months, respectively. After strength training, muscle strength increased significantly in all measured muscle groups. Quadriceps size (CSA of the muscle) was increased by 2.4 % (from 7.99 ± 0.3 cm 3 to 8.18 ± 0.3 cm 3 , p = 0.003) for the right extremity, 3.9 % (from 8.1 ± 0.4 cm 3 to 8.41 ± 0.5 cm 3 , p = 0.04) for the left side. Fat tissue CSA reduced from 0.66 ± 0.1 cm 3 to 0.56 ± 0.12 cm 3 for the right leg (15.3 % reduction) and from 0.58 ± 0.12 cm 3 to 0.37 ± 0.13 cm 3 for the left leg (35.8 % reduction), resulting in a mean fat CSA reduction of 24.8 %. Fat mass assessed by skin folds was significantly reduced and lean body mass was significantly increased. The change in muscle CSA was not correlated with the changes in HbA1c or muscle strength. Strength training significantly improves both muscle mass and the muscle to fat ratio in T2DM. However, changes in muscle observed with computed tomography were not related to changes observed in HbA1c with training. (author) [de

  19. Evaluating Behavioral Self-Monitoring with Accuracy Training for Changing Computer Work Postures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravina, Nicole E.; Loewy, Shannon; Rice, Anna; Austin, John

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to replicate and extend a study by Gravina, Austin, Schroedter, and Loewy (2008). A similar self-monitoring procedure, with the addition of self-monitoring accuracy training, was implemented to increase the percentage of observations in which participants worked in neutral postures. The accuracy training…

  20. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Computer Applications to Training and Wargaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    forms of experimental learning - are often dismissed as infeasible, distracting , dysfunctional, or more appropriate to training than to education...McWilliams will be the DSB Secretariat representative. It is not anticipated that your Inquiry will need to go into any T articular matters within the

  1. Computational Model of a Positive BDNF Feedback Loop in Hippocampal Neurons Following Inhibitory Avoidance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yili; Smolen, Paul; Alberini, Cristina M.; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory avoidance (IA) training in rodents initiates a molecular cascade within hippocampal neurons. This cascade contributes to the transition of short- to long-term memory (i.e., consolidation). Here, a differential equation-based model was developed to describe a positive feedback loop within this molecular cascade. The feedback loop begins…

  2. Twenty weeks of computer-training improves sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark Schram; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2012-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) show alteration of perceptual and cognitive abilities in addition to motor and sensory deficits, which may include altered sense of agency. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 20 weeks of internet-based motor, perceptual and cognitive training enhances...

  3. Computer-Based Working Memory Training in Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavarian, Mona; Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    We designed a working memory (WM) training programme in game framework for mild intellectually disabled students. Twenty-four students participated as test and control groups. The auditory and visual-spatial WM were assessed by primary test, which included computerised Wechsler numerical forward and backward sub-tests and secondary tests, which…

  4. Positive Effects of Computer-Based Cognitive Training in Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, C.; Chambon, C.; Michel, B. F.; Paban, V.; Alescio-Lautier, B.

    2012-01-01

    Considering the high risk for individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (A-MCI) to progress towards Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated the efficacy of a non-pharmacological intervention, that is, cognitive training that could reduce cognitive difficulties and delay the cognitive decline. For this, we evaluated the efficacy of a…

  5. Training of Speechreading for Severely Hearing-Impaired Persons by Human and Computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes evaluation results for a software programme that is intended to be used as a training-aid for lipreading in German. Tests were carried out in schools for hearing-impaired children in Germany which indicate that the ability to lipread increases significantly already after use...... of the software during a short period of time....

  6. Generational Learning Style Preferences Based on Computer-Based Healthcare Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michaelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to determine the degree of perceived differences for auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning styles of Traditionalist, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Millennial generational healthcare workers participating in technology-assisted healthcare training. Methodology. This mixed-method research…

  7. ATLAS OpenData and OpenKey: using low tech computational tools for students training in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez Pineda, Arturos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    One of the big challenges in High Energy Physics development is the fact that many potential -and very valuable- students and young researchers live in countries where internet access and computational infrastructure are poor compared to institutions already participating. In order to accelerate the process, the ATLAS Open Data project releases useful and meaningful data and tools using standard and easy-to-deploy computational means, such as custom and light Linux Virtual Machines, open source technologies, web and desktop applications. The ATLAS Open Key, a simple USB pen, allows transporting all those resources around the globe. As simple as it sounds, this approach is helping to train students that are now PhD candidates and to integrate HEP educational programs at Master level in universities where did not exist before. The software tools and resources used will be presented, as well as results and stories, ideas and next steps of the ATLAS Open Data project.

  8. Introducing computer-assisted training sessions in the clinical skills lab at the Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Somaya; Mishriky, Adel M; Youssef, Mirella

    2008-01-01

    The Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University clinical skills lab was established in 1981 as the first skills lab in Egypt to cope with innovation in medical education adopted since school inauguration in 1978. Students are trained using their peers or models. Training is done weekly, guided by checklists tested for validity and reliability and updated regularly. Students receive immediate feedback on their performance. Recently, the number of students has increased, leading to challenges in providing adequate supervision and training experiences. A project to design and implement a computer-assisted training (CAT) system seemed to be a plausible solution. To assess the quality of a newly developed CAT product, faculty and students' satisfaction with it, and its impact on the learning process. The project involved preparation of multimedia video-films with a web interface for links of different scientific materials. The project was implemented on second year students. A quality check was done to assess the product's scientific content, and technical quality using questionnaires filled by 84 faculty members (139 filled forms) and 175 students (924 filled forms). For assessment of impact, results of examinations after project implementation were compared with results of 2nd year students of previous 3 years. More faculty (96.3%) were satisfied with the product and considered its quality good to excellent, compared to 93.9% of students, p < 0.001. Most faculty (76.2%) have agreed on its suitability for self-learning, while most students considered the product would be suitable after modification. The percentage of students' failures was lower after project implementation, compared to previous 3 years, p < 0.05. CAT materials developed for training of second year students in skills lab proved to be of good scientific content and quality, and suitable for self-learning. Their use was associated with lower failure rates among students. A randomized trial is recommended

  9. Benefits of Exercise Training For Computer-Based Staff: A Meta Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothna Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Office workers sit down to work for approximately 8 hours a day and, as a result, many of them do not have enough time for any form of physical exercise. This can lead to musculoskeletal discomforts, especially low back pain and recently, many researchers focused on home/office-based exercise training for prevention/treatment of low back pain among this population. Objective: This Meta analyses paper tried to discuss about the latest suggested exercises for the office workers based on the mechanisms and theories behind low back pain among office workers. Method: In this Meta analyses the author tried to collect relevant papers which were published previously on the subject. Google Scholar, Scopus, and PubMed were used as sources to find the articles. Only articles that were published using the same methodology, including office workers, musculoskeletal discomforts, low back pain, and exercise training keywords, were selected. Studies that failed to report sufficient sample statistics, or lacked a substantial review of past academic scholarship and/or clear methodologies, were excluded. Results: Limited evidence regarding the prevention of, and treatment methods for, musculoskeletal discomfort, especially those in the low back, among office workers, is available. The findings showed that training exercises had a significant effect (p<0.05 on low back pain discomfort scores and decreased pain levels in response to office-based exercise training. Conclusion: Office-based exercise training can affect pain/discomfort scores among office workers through positive effects on flexibility and strength of muscles. As such, it should be suggested to occupational therapists as a practical way for the treatment/prevention of low back pain among office workers.

  10. Training leads to increased auditory brain-computer interface performance of end-users with motor impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S; Käthner, I; Kübler, A

    2016-02-01

    Auditory brain-computer interfaces are an assistive technology that can restore communication for motor impaired end-users. Such non-visual brain-computer interface paradigms are of particular importance for end-users that may lose or have lost gaze control. We attempted to show that motor impaired end-users can learn to control an auditory speller on the basis of event-related potentials. Five end-users with motor impairments, two of whom with additional visual impairments, participated in five sessions. We applied a newly developed auditory brain-computer interface paradigm with natural sounds and directional cues. Three of five end-users learned to select symbols using this method. Averaged over all five end-users the information transfer rate increased by more than 1800% from the first session (0.17 bits/min) to the last session (3.08 bits/min). The two best end-users achieved information transfer rates of 5.78 bits/min and accuracies of 92%. Our results show that an auditory BCI with a combination of natural sounds and directional cues, can be controlled by end-users with motor impairment. Training improves the performance of end-users to the level of healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first time end-users with motor impairments controlled an auditory brain-computer interface speller with such high accuracy and information transfer rates. Further, our results demonstrate that operating a BCI with event-related potentials benefits from training and specifically end-users may require more than one session to develop their full potential. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) versus traditional textbook methods for training in abdominal examination (Japanese experience).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayumi, A K; Kurihara, Y; Imai, M; Pachev, G; Seo, H; Hoshino, Y; Cheifetz, R; Matsuura, K; Momoi, M; Saleem, M; Lara-Guerra, H; Miki, Y; Kariya, Y

    2004-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of computer-assisted, text-based and computer-and-text learning conditions on the performances of 3 groups of medical students in the pre-clinical years of their programme, taking into account their academic achievement to date. A fourth group of students served as a control (no-study) group. Participants were recruited from the pre-clinical years of the training programmes in 2 medical schools in Japan, Jichi Medical School near Tokyo and Kochi Medical School near Osaka. Participants were randomly assigned to 4 learning conditions and tested before and after the study on their knowledge of and skill in performing an abdominal examination, in a multiple-choice test and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), respectively. Information about performance in the programme was collected from school records and students were classified as average, good or excellent. Student and faculty evaluations of their experience in the study were explored by means of a short evaluation survey. Compared to the control group, all 3 study groups exhibited significant gains in performance on knowledge and performance measures. For the knowledge measure, the gains of the computer-assisted and computer-assisted plus text-based learning groups were significantly greater than the gains of the text-based learning group. The performances of the 3 groups did not differ on the OSCE measure. Analyses of gains by performance level revealed that high achieving students' learning was independent of study method. Lower achieving students performed better after using computer-based learning methods. The results suggest that computer-assisted learning methods will be of greater help to students who do not find the traditional methods effective. Explorations of the factors behind this are a matter for future research.

  12. Cognitive computer training in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus no intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikic, Aida; Leckman, James F; Lindschou, Jane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention and impulsivity and/or hyperactivity and a range of cognitive dysfunctions. Pharmacological treatment may be beneficial; however, many affected individuals...... of cognition, mostly on the working memory or attention but with poor generalization of training on other cognitive functions and functional outcome. Children with ADHD have a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is important that cognitive training target multiple cognitive functions. METHODS...... continue to have difficulties with cognitive functions despite medical treatment, and up to 30 % do not respond to pharmacological treatment. Inadequate medical compliance and the long-term effects of treatment make it necessary to explore nonpharmacological and supplementary treatments for ADHD. Treatment...

  13. An Evaluation of the Feasibility of Using Hand-Held Computers for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-30

    approved. I FRANK E. GIUNTI F. A. NERONE Chief, Instructuinal Colonel, Infantry Development Division Director, Training Developments Institute...on electronic networks (PLATO) were initiated, and HHCs were borrowed and programmed. A number of Battelle experts were also consulted. Devices Noted...of a network . as an book. aide-memoire, a calculator, a word For outdoor use there is no processor, a financial planner and comparable product. From on

  14. Educational training in ead: the experience of teaching, research and extension in the course of graduation computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noeli Antonia Pimentel Vaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The University has as one of its pillars the teaching, research and extension triad. Only through the articulation between these three activities can higher education institutions fulfill their role: to fully form citizens capable of acting critically and reflexively in society. This work aims to present the experience of the Degree in Computer Science of the Center for Teaching and Learning in Network of the State University of Goiás in the curricular component Supervised Stage. Through this component the students went to elementary schools in their municipalities to analyze and intervene to propose improvements in the teaching-learning process, using computational resources with pedagogical functionalities. After the course of research and intervention, the academics presented their research papers to a committee made up of professors from the area at the First Scientific Meeting of the CEAR / UEG, and from these works, the best ones were selected and presented their work, also in the III Congress of Teaching, Research and Extension of UEG. In these two moments the academics had access to updated information in their area of professional training and / or study; Discussed with the academic community, through the presentation of relevant thematic banners. In this way, they had the opportunity to reflect the professional training panorama of the degrees, exchanging experiences and interacting with teachers / researchers in the area.

  15. An assessment of the effectiveness of computer-based training for newly commissioned Surface Warfare Division officers. / by William R. Bowman, Crawford, Alice M., Stephen Mehay.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, William R.; Crawford, Alice M.; Mehay, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. The goal of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of the new SWOS-at-Sea training for newly commissioned surface warfare officers that was introduced in 2003. The new regime combined self-paced computer-based training (CBT) with on-the-job training (OJT) on-board an officer's ship. The study relied on a variety of analytical techniques, including a literature review of CBT and OJT training, interviews and focus groups with junior a...

  16. Recovery Act. Development of a Model Energy Conservation Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-07-05

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an updated model Energy Conservation training program for stationary engineers. This revision to the IUOE National Training Fund’s existing Energy Conservation training curriculum is designed to enable stationary engineers to incorporate essential energy management into routine building operation and maintenance tasks. The curriculum uses a blended learning approach that includes classroom, hands-on, computer simulation and web-based training in addition to a portfolio requirement for a workplace-based learning application. The Energy Conservation training program goal is development of a workforce that can maintain new and existing commercial buildings at optimum energy performance levels. The grant start date was July 6, 2010 and the project continued through September 30, 2012, including a three month non-funded extension.

  17. Programming languages ​​as a way of training in polytechnics computer. Your Social conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo González Fernández

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a panorama of the necessity the current Cuban society has to form high quality technicians in Computer science, and the social and historical conditions that compromise the existence of the subject “Language of Programming ”inside its study plan, as well as the necessity to upgrade teachers who teach this subject, in Computer Science's Polytechnical School "Carlos Hidalgo Díaz” in Pinar del Río province. Regarding the inadequacies there are in these programs, in the theoretical and methodological order, it is expected that with an intervention strategy consisting on an upgrading course this problem can be solved.

  18. USING SECOND LIFE VIRTUAL COMPUTER WORLD AS A TRAINING TOOL FOR THE SUBJECTIVE GLOBAL ASSESSMENT (sga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Clark Connery

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The SGA is a clinical tool used to assess protein energy wasting. Although well validated, it is still not widely incorporated into clinical practice. A barrier to use may be the physical assessment section. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to develop a free and effective tool to train clinicians on performing the SGA. Second Life (SL is a free virtual reality program accessed through the internet using human-like “avatars.” A museum environment was created with panels presenting SGA background information through text, images, and videos of SGA being performed. Users are able to navigate the information by logging onto a provided avatar. After the initial panels, this avatar is able to interact with avatar bots and perform animations which mimic each body assessment within the SGA. Two trial periods were conducted to assess the efficacy of this training tool. The alpha trial consisted of 3 hospital dietitians and 3 nutrition students. These subjects came to the investigators’ facility to test the program. Subjective responses were collected and used to improve the training tool. Feedback was positive regarding the information, delivery, and direction of the project; however, they did complain of difficulty with controlling the avatar. The beta trial consists of users accessing the module remotely. These users include academic and clinical dietitians. Responses are being collected via 5 surveys covering each portion of the module. While 16 dietitians responded to the beta trial, only 4 have completed the training. Current survey responses state: the use of SL is easy and enjoyable; all SGA information was clear and in a desirable format; tactile comparison objects were beneficial for understanding; the in depth description of each assessment is beneficial; the animations that the avatars perform on the bots needs improvement; a patient avatar on which users could perform the full SGA is desirable; the use of SL in the learning

  19. The Role of Hands-On Science Labs in Engaging the Next Generation of Space Explorers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa A. J.

    2002-01-01

    Each country participating on the International Space Station (ISS) recognizes the importance of educating the coming generation about space and its opportunities. In 2001 the St. James School in downtown Houston, Texas was approached with a proposal to renovate an unused classroom and become involved with the "GLOBE" Program and other Internet based international learning resources. This inner-city school willingly agreed to the program based on "hands-on" learning. One month after room conversion and ten computer terminals donated by area businesses connectivity established to the internet the students immediately began using the "Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)" program and the International Space Station (ISS) Program educational resources. The "GLOBE" program involves numerous scientific and technical agencies studying the Earth, who make it their goal to provide educational resources to an international community of K-12 scientist. This project was conceived as a successor to the "Interactive Elementary Space Museum for the New Millennium" a space museum in a school corridor without the same type of budget. The laboratory is a collaboration, which involved area businesses, volunteers from the NASA/Johnson Space Center ISS Outreach Program, and students. This paper will outline planning and operation of the school science laboratory project from the point of view of the schools interest and involvement and assess its success to date. It will consider the lessons learned by the participating school administrations in the management of the process and discuss some of the issues that can both promote and discourage school participation in such projects.

  20. The effectiveness of a training method using self-modeling webcam photos for reducing musculoskeletal risk among office workers using computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Cwikel, Julie; Shapira, Bracha; Orenstein, Ido

    2012-03-01

    An intervention study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of an innovative self-modeling photo-training method for reducing musculoskeletal risk among office workers using computers. Sixty workers were randomly assigned to either: 1) a control group; 2) an office training group that received personal, ergonomic training and workstation adjustments or 3) a photo-training group that received both office training and an automatic frequent-feedback system that displayed on the computer screen a photo of the worker's current sitting posture together with the correct posture photo taken earlier during office training. Musculoskeletal risk was evaluated using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) method before, during and after the six weeks intervention. Both training methods provided effective short-term posture improvement; however, sustained improvement was only attained with the photo-training method. Both interventions had a greater effect on older workers and on workers suffering more musculoskeletal pain. The photo-training method had a greater positive effect on women than on men. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Observer training for computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boo, Diederick W.; van Hoorn, François; van Schuppen, Joost; Schijf, Laura; Scheerder, Maeke J.; Freling, Nicole J.; Mets, Onno; Weber, Michael; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether short-term feedback helps readers to increase their performance using computer-aided detection (CAD) for nodule detection in chest radiography. The 140 CXRs (56 with a solitary CT-proven nodules and 84 negative controls) were divided into four subsets of 35; each were read in a

  2. Using a Cloud-Based Computing Environment to Support Teacher Training on Common Core Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cory

    2013-01-01

    A cloud-based computing environment, Google Apps for Education (GAFE), has provided the Anaheim City School District (ACSD) a comprehensive and collaborative avenue for creating, sharing, and editing documents, calendars, and social networking communities. With this environment, teachers and district staff at ACSD are able to utilize the deep…

  3. Combined rTMS and virtual reality brain-computer interface training for motor recovery after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N. N.; Carey, J.; Edelman, B. J.; Doud, A.; Grande, A.; Lakshminarayan, K.; He, B.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with brain-computer interface (BCI) training can address motor impairment after stroke by down-regulating exaggerated inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere and encouraging ipsilesional activation. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI, compared to sham rTMS  +  BCI, on motor recovery after stroke in subjects with lasting motor paresis. Approach. Three stroke subjects approximately one year post-stroke participated in three weeks of combined rTMS (real or sham) and BCI, followed by three weeks of BCI alone. Behavioral and electrophysiological differences were evaluated at baseline, after three weeks, and after six weeks of treatment. Main results. Motor improvements were observed in both real rTMS  +  BCI and sham groups, but only the former showed significant alterations in inter-hemispheric inhibition in the desired direction and increased relative ipsilesional cortical activation from fMRI. In addition, significant improvements in BCI performance over time and adequate control of the virtual reality BCI paradigm were observed only in the former group. Significance. When combined, the results highlight the feasibility and efficacy of combined rTMS  +  BCI for motor recovery, demonstrated by increased ipsilesional motor activity and improvements in behavioral function for the real rTMS  +  BCI condition in particular. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of BCI training alone, as shown by behavioral improvements for the sham rTMS  +  BCI condition. This study is the first to evaluate combined rTMS and BCI training for motor rehabilitation and provides a foundation for continued work to evaluate the potential of both rTMS and virtual reality BCI training for motor recovery after stroke.

  4. Hazardous materials responder training in the new millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turpin, R.D.; Betsinger, G.B. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States). Environmental Response Team; Merchant, S. [Environmental Tectonics Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Environmental Response Team (ERT) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was created to provide on-site professional expertise as well as health and safety guidance to Federal on-scene coordinators during accidental oil and chemical releases. ERT provides practical technical solutions to response activities based on theory as well as actual experience. Its creation in 1978 fulfilled the requirements of the U.S. National Contingency Plan. Members of the team have developed a 40-hour Hazardous Waste Responders training course and have themselves, attended a hands-on chemical and biological warfare personnel protective clothing course provided by the U.S. Army. The course demonstrated decontamination showers, moon suits, and entry procedures to a contaminated battlefield situation. ERT continues to emphasize the importance of hands-on training and exercises. Various training programs are underway where students can learn real-time monitoring techniques and respond to simulated hazardous waste incidents. They also learn how to assess environmental, public and occupational health and safety information on the Internet. The students also run air plume models and perform wet bench chemistry experiments. With the advent of more powerful computers, the current objective is to continue with these training activities using Instructor Controlled Interactive Computer Training (ICICT).

  5. Diffusion and Large-Scale Adoption of Computer-Supported Training Simulations in the Military Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    SVET Submerged Vehicle Egress Trainer SWET Shallow Water Egress Trainer TAM Technology Acceptance Model TCP Transmission Control Protocol TEEP...metaphor for food and water , firearms and training, and medical supplies and first aid knowledge), logistical costs (transportation, fuel, and...too long to build new scenarios # 6 3 4 0 % 2.00 4.35 8.70 0.00 Lack of availabilit y when needed # 0 4 0 0 % 0.00 5.80 0.00 0.00 No

  6. Brain-computer interface training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic severe hemiparesis: Proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima-Shindo, Yuko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ushiba, Junichi; Matsushika, Yayoi; Kamatani, Daiki; Oto, Misa; Ono, Takashi; Nishimoto, Atsuko; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Liu, Meigen

    2015-04-01

    Brain-computer interface technology has been applied to stroke patients to improve their motor function. Event-related desynchronization during motor imagery, which is used as a brain-computer interface trigger, is sometimes difficult to detect in stroke patients. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is known to increase event-related desynchronization. This study investigated the adjunctive effect of anodal tDCS for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparesis. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke. A non-randomized controlled study. Subjects were divided between a brain-computer interface group and a tDCS- brain-computer interface group and participated in a 10-day brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was detected in the affected hemisphere during motor imagery of the affected fingers. The tDCS-brain-computer interface group received anodal tDCS before brain-computer interface training. Event-related desynchronization was evaluated before and after the intervention. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor score (FM-U) was assessed before, immediately after, and 3 months after, the intervention. Event-related desynchronization was significantly increased in the tDCS- brain-computer interface group. The FM-U was significantly increased in both groups. The FM-U improvement was maintained at 3 months in the tDCS-brain-computer interface group. Anodal tDCS can be a conditioning tool for brain-computer interface training in patients with severe hemiparetic stroke.

  7. Computer-assisted upper extremity training using interactive biking exercise (iBikE) platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Cheol; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Upper extremity exercise training has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in different chronic health conditions. Arm-operated bicycles are frequently used to facilitate upper extremity training however effective use of these devices at patient homes is hampered by lack of remote connectivity with clinical rehabilitation team, inability to monitor exercise progress in real time using simple graphical representation, and absence of an alert system which would prevent exertion levels exceeding those approved by the clinical rehabilitation team. We developed an interactive biking exercise (iBikE) platform aimed at addressing these limitations. The platform uses a miniature wireless 3-axis accelerometer mounted on a patient wrist that transmits the cycling acceleration data to a laptop. The laptop screen presents an exercise dashboard to the patient in real time allowing easy graphical visualization of exercise progress and presentation of exercise parameters in relation to prescribed targets. The iBikE platform is programmed to alert the patient when exercise intensity exceeds the levels recommended by the patient care provider. The iBikE platform has been tested in 7 healthy volunteers (age range: 26-50 years) and shown to reliably reflect exercise progress and to generate alerts at pre-setup levels. Implementation of remote connectivity with patient rehabilitation team is warranted for future extension and evaluation efforts.

  8. Accelerators and Beams, multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, R.R.; Browman, A.A.; Mead, W.C.; Williams, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user close-quote s rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive On-Screen Laboratories, hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  9. ''Accelerators and Beams,'' multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, R. R.; Browman, A. A.; Mead, W. C.; Williams, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive ''On-Screen Laboratories,'' hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer

  10. The Importance of Computer Science for Public Health Training: An Opportunity and Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Sarah; Christie, Gillian; Yach, Derek; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, the Welch-Rose Report established a public health education system in the United States. Since then, the system has evolved to address emerging health needs and integrate new technologies. Today, personalized health technologies generate large amounts of data. Emerging computer science techniques, such as machine learning, present an opportunity to extract insights from these data that could help identify high-risk individuals and tailor health interventions and recommendations. As these technologies play a larger role in health promotion, collaboration between the public health and technology communities will become the norm. Offering public health trainees coursework in computer science alongside traditional public health disciplines will facilitate this evolution, improving public health's capacity to harness these technologies to improve population health.

  11. Patient-reported changes in communication after computer-based script training for aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Larry M; Halper, Anita S; Cherney, Leora

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate changes in patient-reported communication difficulty after a home-based, computer-delivered intervention designed to improve conversational skills in adults with aphasia. Delayed treatment design with baseline, preintervention, postintervention, and follow-up observations. Outpatient rehabilitation. Twenty subjects with chronic aphasia. Sessions with the speech-language pathologist to develop personally relevant conversational scripts, followed by 9 weeks of intensive home practice using a computer program loaded on a laptop, and weekly monitoring visits with the speech-language pathologist. Communication Difficulty (CD) subscale of the Burden of Stroke Scale (BOSS). The intervention resulted in a statistically and clinically significant decrease of 6.79 points (P=.038) in the CD subscale of the BOSS during the intervention, maintained during the follow-up period. The findings of this study provide positive albeit preliminary and limited support for the use of a home-based, computer-delivered language intervention program for improving patient-reported communication outcomes in adults with chronic aphasia. Additional research will be required to examine the efficacy and effectiveness of this intervention.

  12. Computer simulation of a clinical magnet resonance tomography scanner for training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacklaender, T.; Mertens, H.; Cramer, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The idea for this project was born by the necessity to offer medical students an easy approach to the theoretical basics of magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to simulate the features and functions of such a scanner on a commercially available computer by means of a computer program. Materials and Methods: The simulation was programmed in pure Java under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for a commercially available computer with Windows, Macintosh or Linux operating system. The graphic user interface is oriented to a real scanner. In an external program parameter, images for the proton density and the relaxation times T1 and T2 are calculated on the basis of clinical examinations. From this, the image calculation is carried out in the simulation program pixel by pixel on the basis of a pulse sequence chosen and modified by the user. The images can be stored and printed. In addition, it is possible to display and modify k-space images. Results: Seven classes of pulse sequences are implemented and up to 14 relevant sequence parameters, such as repetition time and echo time, can be altered. Aliasing and motion artifacts can be simulated. As the image calculation only takes a few seconds, interactive working is possible. (orig.)

  13. [Computer simulation of a clinical magnet resonance tomography scanner for training purposes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackländer, T; Mertens, H; Cramer, B M

    2004-08-01

    The idea for this project was born by the necessity to offer medical students an easy approach to the theoretical basics of magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to simulate the features and functions of such a scanner on a commercially available computer by means of a computer program. The simulation was programmed in pure Java under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for a commercially available computer with Windows, Macintosh or Linux operating system. The graphic user interface is oriented to a real scanner. In an external program parameter, images for the proton density and the relaxation times T1 and T2 are calculated on the basis of clinical examinations. From this, the image calculation is carried out in the simulation program pixel by pixel on the basis of a pulse sequence chosen and modified by the user. The images can be stored and printed. In addition, it is possible to display and modify k-space images. Seven classes of pulse sequences are implemented and up to 14 relevant sequence parameters, such as repetition time and echo time, can be altered. Aliasing and motion artifacts can be simulated. As the image calculation only takes a few seconds, interactive working is possible. The simulation has been used in the university education for more than 1 year, successfully illustrating the dependence of the MR images on the measuring parameters. This should facititate the approach of students to the understanding MR imaging in the future.

  14. Hands-on guide for 3D image creation for geological purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frehner, Marcel; Tisato, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    -cyan anaglyphs is their simplicity and the possibility to print them on normal paper or project them using a conventional projector. Producing 3D stereoscopic images is much easier than commonly thought. Our hands-on poster provides an easy-to-use guide for producing 3D stereoscopic images. Few simple rules-of-thumb are presented that define how photographs of any scene or object have to be shot to produce good-looking 3D images. We use the free software Stereophotomaker (http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr) to produce anaglyphs and provide red-cyan 3D glasses for viewing them. Our hands-on poster is easy to adapt and helps any geologist to present his/her field or hand specimen photographs in a much more fashionable 3D way for future publications or conference posters.

  15. Computer Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncarz, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Looks at computer engineers and describes their job, employment outlook, earnings, and training and qualifications. Provides a list of resources related to computer engineering careers and the computer industry. (JOW)

  16. Blended Training for Combat Medics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, Jennifer; Dickinson, Sandra; Lazarus, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Bleeding from extremity wounds is the number one cause of preventable death on the battlefield and current research stresses the importance of training in preparing every Soldier to use tourniquets. HapMed is designed to provide tourniquet application training to combat medics and Soldiers using a blended training solution encompassing information, demonstration, practice, and feedback. The system combines an instrumented manikin arm, PDA, and computer. The manikin arm provides several training options including stand-alone, hands-on skills training in which soldiers can experience the actual torque required to staunch bleeding from an extremity wound and be timed on tourniquet application. This is more realistic than using a block of wood to act as a limb, which is often how training is conducted today. Combining the manikin arm with the PDA allows instructors to provide scenario based training. In a classroom or field setting, an instructor can specify wound variables such as location, casualty size, and whether the wound is a tough bleed. The PDA also allows more detailed feedback to be provided. Finally, combining the manikin arm with game-based technologies, the third component, provides opportunities to build knowledge and to practice battlefield decision making. Not only do soldiers learn how to apply a tourniquet, but when to apply a tourniquet in combat. The purpose of the paper is to describe the learning science underlying the design of HapMed, illustrate the training system and ways it is being expanded to encompass other critical life-saving tasks, and report on feedback received from instructors and trainees at military training and simulation centers.

  17. Robotic Mission to Mars: Hands-on, minds-on, web-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Naomi; Goktogen, Ali; Rankin, John; Anderson, Marion

    2012-11-01

    Problem-based learning has been demonstrated as an effective methodology for developing analytical skills and critical thinking. The use of scenario-based learning incorporates problem-based learning whilst encouraging students to collaborate with their colleagues and dynamically adapt to their environment. This increased interaction stimulates a deeper understanding and the generation of new knowledge. The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) uses scenario-based learning in its Mission to Mars, Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory and Primary Expedition to the M.A.R.S. Base programs. These programs utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive-learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring to engage students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The immersive nature of the programs demands specialist environments such as a simulated Mars environment, Mission Control and Space Laboratory, thus restricting these programs to a physical location and limiting student access to the programs. To move beyond these limitations, VSSEC worked with its university partners to develop a web-based mission that delivered the benefits of scenario-based learning within a school environment. The Robotic Mission to Mars allows students to remotely control a real rover, developed by the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (ACFR), on the VSSEC Mars surface. After completing a pre-mission training program and site selection activity, students take on the roles of scientists and engineers in Mission Control to complete a mission and collect data for further analysis. Mission Control is established using software developed by the ACRI Games Technology Lab at La Trobe University using the principles of serious gaming. The software allows students to control the rover, monitor its systems and collect scientific data for analysis. This program encourages

  18. Identifying Computer-Generated Portraits: The Importance of Training and Incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Brandon; Banks, Martin S; Farid, Hany

    2017-09-01

    The past two decades have seen remarkable advances in photo-realistic rendering of everything from inanimate objects to landscapes, animals, and humans. We previously showed that despite these tremendous advances, human observers remain fairly good at distinguishing computer-generated from photographic images. Building on these results, we describe a series of follow-up experiments that reveal how to improve observer performance. Of general interest to anyone performing psychophysical studies on Mechanical Turk or similar platforms, we find that observer performance can be significantly improved with the proper incentives.

  19. Air, Ocean and Climate Monitoring Enhancing Undergraduate Training in the Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, W. W.; Johnson, L. P.; Obl, W.; Stewart, A.; Harris, W. C.; Craig, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Faculty in the Department of Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences strongly believe in the concept that undergraduate research and research-related activities must be integrated into the fabric of our undergraduate Science and Technology curricula. High level skills, such as problem solving, reasoning, collaboration and the ability to engage in research, are learned for advanced study in graduate school or for competing for well paying positions in the scientific community. One goal of our academic programs is to have a pipeline of research activities from high school to four year college, to graduate school, based on the GISS Institute on Climate and Planets model.

  20. Positive Affect Relevant to Epistemic Curiosity to Reflect Continuance Intention to Join a Hands-On Making Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Szeto, Elson; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on making (e.g., "Maker") has become prevalent in current educational settings. To understand the role that students' epistemic curiosity plays in hands-on making contests, this study explored its correlation to students' positive affect and continuance intention to participate in a hands-on making contest called…

  1. Improvement of skills and knowledge by a hands-on cardiac CT course. Before and after evaluation with a validated questionnaire and self-assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, E.; Germershausen, C.; Greupner, J.; Schnapauff, D.; Rief, M.; Grigoryev, M.; Wollenberg, U.; Dewey, Marc [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Charite-Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: cardiac computed tomography (CT) is becoming increasingly important in noninvasive imaging. To meet this demand, there are a growing number of short training courses for cardiac CT. Whether such courses improve the knowledge and skills of participants is not known. Materials and methods: the concept of a two-day cardiac CT course consisting of introductory lectures, live patient examinations, and hands-on exercises for interpreting cardiac CT scans on workstations was analyzed using participant evaluations (scales from 1 = excellent to 6 = very poor). Participants rated their increase in knowledge and completed a validated questionnaire with 20 questions. Results: a total of 102 participants attended the courses. There were significant differences in the number of correctly answered test questions between cardiac CT experts and participants at the beginning of the course (91.5 {+-} 6.3% vs. 62.4 {+-} 16.1% p < 0.001). The number of questions answered correctly by the participants increased significantly after completion of the course (mean increase of 4 correctly answered questions, 81.8 {+-} 11.4%. vs. 62.4 {+-} 16.1% p < 0.001). This objective increase in knowledge was in good agreement with participant self-assessments (76.4 {+-} 12.6% vs. 81.8 {+-} 11.4%). The quality of the course received good to very good scores, ranging from 1.8 {+-} 0.7 for speed of presentation to 1.4 {+-} 0.5 for lecturer competence. The score for overall course quality was 1.4 {+-} 0.6. Conclusion: A relatively short cardiac CT course can significantly improve the quantifiable knowledge of participants. The overall quality of the course was rated as very good. (orig.)

  2. Improvement of skills and knowledge by a hands-on cardiac CT course. Before and after evaluation with a validated questionnaire and self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, E.; Germershausen, C.; Greupner, J.; Schnapauff, D.; Rief, M.; Grigoryev, M.; Wollenberg, U.; Dewey, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: cardiac computed tomography (CT) is becoming increasingly important in noninvasive imaging. To meet this demand, there are a growing number of short training courses for cardiac CT. Whether such courses improve the knowledge and skills of participants is not known. Materials and methods: the concept of a two-day cardiac CT course consisting of introductory lectures, live patient examinations, and hands-on exercises for interpreting cardiac CT scans on workstations was analyzed using participant evaluations (scales from 1 = excellent to 6 = very poor). Participants rated their increase in knowledge and completed a validated questionnaire with 20 questions. Results: a total of 102 participants attended the courses. There were significant differences in the number of correctly answered test questions between cardiac CT experts and participants at the beginning of the course (91.5 ± 6.3% vs. 62.4 ± 16.1% p < 0.001). The number of questions answered correctly by the participants increased significantly after completion of the course (mean increase of 4 correctly answered questions, 81.8 ± 11.4%. vs. 62.4 ± 16.1% p < 0.001). This objective increase in knowledge was in good agreement with participant self-assessments (76.4 ± 12.6% vs. 81.8 ± 11.4%). The quality of the course received good to very good scores, ranging from 1.8 ± 0.7 for speed of presentation to 1.4 ± 0.5 for lecturer competence. The score for overall course quality was 1.4 ± 0.6. Conclusion: A relatively short cardiac CT course can significantly improve the quantifiable knowledge of participants. The overall quality of the course was rated as very good. (orig.)

  3. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  4. Testing a computer-based ostomy care training resource for staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    Fragmented teaching and ostomy care provided by nonspecialized clinicians unfamiliar with state-of-the-art care and products have been identified as problems in teaching ostomy care to the new ostomate. After conducting a literature review of theories and concepts related to the impact of nurse behaviors and confidence on ostomy care, the author developed a computer-based learning resource and assessed its effect on staff nurse confidence. Of 189 staff nurses with a minimum of 1 year acute-care experience employed in the acute care, emergency, and rehabilitation departments of an acute care facility in the Midwestern US, 103 agreed to participate and returned completed pre- and post-tests, each comprising the same eight statements about providing ostomy care. F and P values were computed for differences between pre- and post test scores. Based on a scale where 1 = totally disagree and 5 = totally agree with the statement, baseline confidence and perceived mean knowledge scores averaged 3.8 and after viewing the resource program post-test mean scores averaged 4.51, a statistically significant improvement (P = 0.000). The largest difference between pre- and post test scores involved feeling confident in having the resources to learn ostomy skills independently. The availability of an electronic ostomy care resource was rated highly in both pre- and post testing. Studies to assess the effects of increased confidence and knowledge on the quality and provision of care are warranted.

  5. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II) user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David P. Colton

    2007-01-01

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  7. An evaluation of training with an auditory P300 brain-computer interface for the Japanese Hiragana syllabary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Halder

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaze-independent brain-computer interfaces (BCIs are a possible communication channel for persons with paralysis. We investigated if it is possible to use auditory stimuli to create a BCI for the Japanese Hiragana syllabary, which has 46 Hiragana characters. Additionally, we investigated if training has an effect on accuracy despite the high amount of different stimuli involved. Able-bodied participants (N=6 were asked to select 25 syllables (out of fifty possible choices using a two step procedure: first the consonant (ten choices and then the vowel (five choices. This was repeated on three separate days. Additionally, a person with spinal cord injury (SCI participated in the experiment. Four out of six healthy participants reached Hiragana syllable accuracies above 70% and the information transfer rate increased from 1.7 bits/min in the first session to 3.2 bits/min in the third session. The accuracy of the participant with SCI increased from 12% (0.2 bits/min to 56% (2 bits/min in session three. Reliable selections from a 10×5 matrix using auditory stimuli were possible and performance is increased by training. We were able to show that auditory P300 BCIs can be used for communication with up to fifty symbols. This enables the use of the technology of auditory P300 BCIs with a variety of applications.

  8. An Evaluation of Training with an Auditory P300 Brain-Computer Interface for the Japanese Hiragana Syllabary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sebastian; Takano, Kouji; Ora, Hiroki; Onishi, Akinari; Utsumi, Kota; Kansaku, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Gaze-independent brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a possible communication channel for persons with paralysis. We investigated if it is possible to use auditory stimuli to create a BCI for the Japanese Hiragana syllabary, which has 46 Hiragana characters. Additionally, we investigated if training has an effect on accuracy despite the high amount of different stimuli involved. Able-bodied participants ( N = 6) were asked to select 25 syllables (out of fifty possible choices) using a two step procedure: First the consonant (ten choices) and then the vowel (five choices). This was repeated on 3 separate days. Additionally, a person with spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the experiment. Four out of six healthy participants reached Hiragana syllable accuracies above 70% and the information transfer rate increased from 1.7 bits/min in the first session to 3.2 bits/min in the third session. The accuracy of the participant with SCI increased from 12% (0.2 bits/min) to 56% (2 bits/min) in session three. Reliable selections from a 10 × 5 matrix using auditory stimuli were possible and performance is increased by training. We were able to show that auditory P300 BCIs can be used for communication with up to fifty symbols. This enables the use of the technology of auditory P300 BCIs with a variety of applications.

  9. Computer-Based Training in Math and Working Memory Improves Cognitive Skills and Academic Achievement in Primary School Children: Behavioral Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Sánchez-Pérez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Student academic achievement has been positively related to further development outcomes, such as the attainment of higher educational, employment, and socioeconomic aspirations. Among all the academic competences, mathematics has been identified as an essential skill in the field of international leadership as well as for those seeking positions in disciplines related to science, technology, and engineering. Given its positive consequences, studies have designed trainings to enhance children's mathematical skills. Additionally, the ability to regulate and control actions and cognitions, i.e., executive functions (EF, has been associated with school success, which has resulted in a strong effort to develop EF training programs to improve students' EF and academic achievement. The present study examined the efficacy of a school computer-based training composed of two components, namely, working memory and mathematics tasks. Among the advantages of using a computer-based training program is the ease with which it can be implemented in school settings and the ease by which the difficulty of the tasks can be adapted to fit the child's ability level. To test the effects of the training, children's cognitive skills (EF and IQ and their school achievement (math and language grades and abilities were evaluated. The results revealed a significant improvement in cognitive skills, such as non-verbal IQ and inhibition, and better school performance in math and reading among the children who participated in the training compared to those children who did not. Most of the improvements were related to training on WM tasks. These findings confirmed the efficacy of a computer-based training that combined WM and mathematics activities as part of the school routines based on the training's impact on children's academic competences and cognitive skills.

  10. Computer-Based Training in Math and Working Memory Improves Cognitive Skills and Academic Achievement in Primary School Children: Behavioral Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, Noelia; Castillo, Alejandro; López-López, José A; Pina, Violeta; Puga, Jorge L; Campoy, Guillermo; González-Salinas, Carmen; Fuentes, Luis J

    2017-01-01

    Student academic achievement has been positively related to further development outcomes, such as the attainment of higher educational, employment, and socioeconomic aspirations. Among all the academic competences, mathematics has been identified as an essential skill in the field of international leadership as well as for those seeking positions in disciplines related to science, technology, and engineering. Given its positive consequences, studies have designed trainings to enhance children's mathematical skills. Additionally, the ability to regulate and control actions and cognitions, i.e., executive functions (EF), has been associated with school success, which has resulted in a strong effort to develop EF training programs to improve students' EF and academic achievement. The present study examined the efficacy of a school computer-based training composed of two components, namely, working memory and mathematics tasks. Among the advantages of using a computer-based training program is the ease with which it can be implemented in school settings and the ease by which the difficulty of the tasks can be adapted to fit the child's ability level. To test the effects of the training, children's cognitive skills (EF and IQ) and their school achievement (math and language grades and abilities) were evaluated. The results revealed a significant improvement in cognitive skills, such as non-verbal IQ and inhibition, and better school performance in math and reading among the children who participated in the training compared to those children who did not. Most of the improvements were related to training on WM tasks. These findings confirmed the efficacy of a computer-based training that combined WM and mathematics activities as part of the school routines based on the training's impact on children's academic competences and cognitive skills.

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  14. Observer training for computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boo, Diederick W; van Hoorn, François; van Schuppen, Joost; Schijf, Laura; Scheerder, Maeke J; Freling, Nicole J; Mets, Onno; Weber, Michael; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M

    2012-08-01

    To assess whether short-term feedback helps readers to increase their performance using computer-aided detection (CAD) for nodule detection in chest radiography. The 140 CXRs (56 with a solitary CT-proven nodules and 84 negative controls) were divided into four subsets of 35; each were read in a different order by six readers. Lesion presence, location and diagnostic confidence were scored without and with CAD (IQQA-Chest, EDDA Technology) as second reader. Readers received individual feedback after each subset. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC) were calculated for readings with and without CAD with respect to change over time and impact of CAD. CAD stand-alone sensitivity was 59 % with 1.9 false-positives per image. Mean AUC slightly increased over time with and without CAD (0.78 vs. 0.84 with and 0.76 vs. 0.82 without CAD) but differences did not reach significance. The sensitivity increased (65 % vs. 70 % and 66 % vs. 70 %) and specificity decreased over time (79 % vs. 74 % and 80 % vs. 77 %) but no significant impact of CAD was found. Short-term feedback does not increase the ability of readers to differentiate true- from false-positive candidate lesions and to use CAD more effectively. • Computer-aided detection (CAD) is increasingly used as an adjunct for many radiological techniques. • Short-term feedback does not improve reader performance with CAD in chest radiography. • Differentiation between true- and false-positive CAD for low conspicious possible lesions proves difficult. • CAD can potentially increase reader performance for nodule detection in chest radiography.

  15. [Computer-assisted analysis of the results of training in internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbová, H; Spunda, M

    1991-06-01

    Analysis of the results of teaching of clinical disciplines has in the long run an impact on the standard and value of medical care. It requires processing of quantitative and qualitative data. The selection of indicators which will be followed up and procedures used for their processing are of fundamental importance. The submitted investigation is an example how to use possibilities to process results of effectiveness analysis in teaching internal medicine by means of computer technique. As an indicator of effectiveness the authors selected the percentage of students who had an opportunity during the given period of their studies to observe a certain pathological condition, and as method of data collection a survey by means of questionnaires was used. The task permits to differentiate the students' experience (whether the student examined the patient himself or whether the patient was only demonstrated) and it makes it possible to differentiate the place of observation (at the university teaching hospital or regional non-teaching hospital attachment). The task permits also to form sub-groups of respondents to combine them as desired and to compare their results. The described computer programme support comprises primary processing of the output of the questionnaire survey. The questionnaires are transformed and stored by groups of respondents in data files of suitable format (programme SDFORM); the processing of results is described as well as their presentation as output listing or on the display in the interactive way (SDRESULT programme). Using the above programmes, the authors processed the results of a survey made among students during and after completion of the studies in a series of 70 recommended pathological conditions. As an example the authors compare results of observations in 20 selected pathological conditions important for the diagnosis and therapy in primary care in the final stage of the medical course in 1981 and 1985.

  16. Improving zero-training brain-computer interfaces by mixing model estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, T.; Hübner, D.; Tangermann, M.; Müller, K. R.; Dambre, J.; Kindermans, P. J.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) based on event-related potentials (ERP) incorporate a decoder to classify recorded brain signals and subsequently select a control signal that drives a computer application. Standard supervised BCI decoders require a tedious calibration procedure prior to every session. Several unsupervised classification methods have been proposed that tune the decoder during actual use and as such omit this calibration. Each of these methods has its own strengths and weaknesses. Our aim is to improve overall accuracy of ERP-based BCIs without calibration. Approach. We consider two approaches for unsupervised classification of ERP signals. Learning from label proportions (LLP) was recently shown to be guaranteed to converge to a supervised decoder when enough data is available. In contrast, the formerly proposed expectation maximization (EM) based decoding for ERP-BCI does not have this guarantee. However, while this decoder has high variance due to random initialization of its parameters, it obtains a higher accuracy faster than LLP when the initialization is good. We introduce a method to optimally combine these two unsupervised decoding methods, letting one method’s strengths compensate for the weaknesses of the other and vice versa. The new method is compared to the aforementioned methods in a resimulation of an experiment with a visual speller. Main results. Analysis of the experimental results shows that the new method exceeds the performance of the previous unsupervised classification approaches in terms of ERP classification accuracy and symbol selection accuracy during the spelling experiment. Furthermore, the method shows less dependency on random initialization of model parameters and is consequently more reliable. Significance. Improving the accuracy and subsequent reliability of calibrationless BCIs makes these systems more appealing for frequent use.

  17. The profesional preparation of the tutors to atten d the midle level technical in electrotec hnical and Computer in job training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melba Rivas Cáceres

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is about a study of the preparation of the tutors o f the technicians of Electrotechnics and Computer science in labor training. In this one reflects about histor ic antecedent and tendencies in the preparation of the tutors of the labor entities, about the stage of labor training and the rols of the tutor i n the labor entities in the attention of the one trained , as well as the theoretical sustenance of the process of the tutors' preparation.

  18. An Intelligent Computer-aided Training System (CAT) for Diagnosing Adult Illiterates: Integrating NASA Technology into Workplace Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaden, David B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An important part of NASA's mission involves the secondary application of its technologies in the public and private sectors. One current application being developed is The Adult Literacy Evaluator, a simulation-based diagnostic tool designed to assess the operant literacy abilities of adults having difficulties in learning to read and write. Using Intelligent Computer-Aided Training (ICAT) system technology in addition to speech recognition, closed-captioned television (CCTV), live video and other state-of-the-art graphics and storage capabilities, this project attempts to overcome the negative effects of adult literacy assessment by allowing the client to interact with an intelligent computer system which simulates real-life literacy activities and materials and which measures literacy performance in the actual context of its use. The specific objectives of the project are as follows: (1) to develop a simulation-based diagnostic tool to assess adults' prior knowledge about reading and writing processes in actual contexts of application; (2) to provide a profile of readers' strengths and weaknesses; and (3) to suggest instructional strategies and materials which can be used as a beginning point for remediation. In the first and development phase of the project, descriptions of literacy events and environments are being written and functional literacy documents analyzed for their components. From these descriptions, scripts are being generated which define the interaction between the student, an on-screen guide and the simulated literacy environment.

  19. Model to Implement Virtual Computing Labs via Cloud Computing Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Luna Encalada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, we have seen a significant number of new technological ideas appearing in literature discussing the future of education. For example, E-learning, cloud computing, social networking, virtual laboratories, virtual realities, virtual worlds, massive open online courses (MOOCs, and bring your own device (BYOD are all new concepts of immersive and global education that have emerged in educational literature. One of the greatest challenges presented to e-learning solutions is the reproduction of the benefits of an educational institution’s physical laboratory. For a university without a computing lab, to obtain hands-on IT training with software, operating systems, networks, servers, storage, and cloud computing similar to that which could be received on a university campus computing lab, it is necessary to use a combination of technological tools. Such teaching tools must promote the transmission of knowledge, encourage interaction and collaboration, and ensure students obtain valuable hands-on experience. That, in turn, allows the universities to focus more on teaching and research activities than on the implementation and configuration of complex physical systems. In this article, we present a model for implementing ecosystems which allow universities to teach practical Information Technology (IT skills. The model utilizes what is called a “social cloud”, which utilizes all cloud computing services, such as Software as a Service (SaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS, and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS. Additionally, it integrates the cloud learning aspects of a MOOC and several aspects of social networking and support. Social clouds have striking benefits such as centrality, ease of use, scalability, and ubiquity, providing a superior learning environment when compared to that of a simple physical lab. The proposed model allows students to foster all the educational pillars such as learning to know, learning to be, learning

  20. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with

  1. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with

  2. Didactic training vs. computer-based self-learning in the prediction of diminutive colon polyp histology by trainees: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Taimur; Cinnor, Birtukan; Gupta, Neil; Hosford, Lindsay; Bansal, Ajay; Olyaee, Mojtaba S; Wani, Sachin; Rastogi, Amit

    2017-12-01

    Background and study aim  Experts can accurately predict diminutive polyp histology, but the ideal method to train nonexperts is not known. The aim of the study was to compare accuracy in diminutive polyp histology characterization using narrow-band imaging (NBI) between participants undergoing classroom didactic training vs. computer-based self-learning. Participants and methods  Trainees at two institutions were randomized to classroom didactic training or computer-based self-learning. In didactic training, experienced endoscopists reviewed a presentation on NBI patterns for adenomatous and hyperplastic polyps and 40 NBI videos, along with interactive discussion. The self-learning group reviewed the same presentation of 40 teaching videos independently, without interactive discussion. A total of 40 testing videos of diminutive polyps under NBI were then evaluated by both groups. Performance characteristics were calculated by comparing predicted and actual histology. Fisher's exact test was used and P  didactic training and 9 self-learning). A larger proportion of polyps were diagnosed with high confidence in the classroom group (66.5 % vs. 50.8 %; P  didactic training for predicting diminutive polyp histology. This approach can help in widespread training and clinical implementation of real-time polyp histology characterization. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Supporting the upper body with the hand on the thigh reduces back loading during lifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; Faber, G.S.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    When picking objects from the floor, low back pain patients often tend to support the upper body by leaning with one hand on a thigh. While this strategy may reduce back load, this has not yet been assessed, probably due to the difficulty of measuring the forces between hand and thigh.Ten healthy

  4. The Impact of Hands-On-Approach on Student Academic Performance in Basic Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Cecilia O.; Ekon, Esther E.; Ezenwa-Nebife, Dorothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Children can learn mathematics and sciences effectively even before being exposed to formal school curriculum if basic Mathematics and Sciences concepts are communicated to them early using activity oriented (Hands-on) method of teaching. Mathematics and Science are practical and activity oriented and can best be learnt through inquiry (Okebukola…

  5. Calculator-Controlled Robots: Hands-On Mathematics and Science Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherer, Tyson

    2010-01-01

    The Calculator Controlled Robots activities are designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry-based missions. These activities address National science and technology standards, as well as specifically focusing on mathematics content and process standards. There are ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to…

  6. Document Questionnaires and Datasets with DDI: A Hands-On Introduction with Colectica

    OpenAIRE

    Iverson, Jeremy; Smith, Dan

    2018-01-01

    This workshop offers a hands-on, practical approach to creating and documenting both surveys and datasets with DDI and Colectica. Participants will build and field a DDI-driven survey using their own questions or samples provided in the workshop. They will then ingest, annotate, and publish DDI dataset descriptions using the collected survey data.

  7. Integrating Hands-On Undergraduate Research in an Applied Spatial Science Senior Level Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhavy, David L.; Unger, Daniel R.; Hung, I-Kuai; Douglass, David

    2015-01-01

    A senior within a spatial science Ecological Planning capstone course designed an undergraduate research project to increase his spatial science expertise and to assess the hands-on instruction methodology employed within the Bachelor of Science in Spatial Science program at Stephen F Austin State University. The height of 30 building features…

  8. Choices of Pre-Service Science Teachers Laboratory Environments: Hands-on or Hands-off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapici, Hasan Ozgur; Akcay, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Learning in laboratories for students is not only crucial for conceptual understanding, but also contributes to gaining scientific reasoning skills. Following fast developments in technology, online laboratory environments have been improved considerably and nowadays form an attractive alternative for hands-on laboratories. The study was done in…

  9. Hands-on Summer Camp to Attract K-12 Students to Engineering Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Muhittin; Ren, Jianhong; Custer, Sheryl; Coleman, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This paper explains the organization and execution of a summer engineering outreach camp designed to attract and motivate high school students as well as increase their awareness of various engineering fields. The camp curriculum included hands-on, competitive design-oriented engineering projects from several disciplines: the electrical,…

  10. Past Examination Questions in Senior Secondary Chemistry: From Written Practice to Hands-On Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; So, Wing-Mui Winnie; Cheung, Tsz-Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study applied an unconventional use of past examination papers by converting questions into hands-on experiments for students. Students in an experimental group were engaged in use of those experiments while the remainder attended conventional lectures with written practice. The results reflect that the experimental group positively improved…

  11. Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

  12. Introduction to Density Functional Theory: Calculations by Hand on the Helium Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseden, Kyle A.; Tye, Jesse W.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a type of electronic structure calculation that has rapidly gained popularity. In this article, we provide a step-by-step demonstration of a DFT calculation by hand on the helium atom using Slater's X-Alpha exchange functional on a single Gaussian-type orbital to represent the atomic wave function. This DFT…

  13. Hands On Activity Pada Pembelajaran Geometri Sekolah Sebagai Asesmen Kinerja Siswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartono Kartono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Geometri merupakan cabang matematika yang diajarkan mulai dari pendidikan dasar sampai pendidikan tinggi, namun berdasarkan suatu penelitian hasil belajar geometri kurang memuaskan khususnya hasil belajar geometri sekolah. Hasil belajar geometri sekolah terkait langsung dengan kegiatan pembelajarannya. Pembelajaran geometri akan efektif apabila kegiatan yang dilakukan sesuai dengan struktur kemampuan berpikir siswa. Menurut Teori Van Hiele tentang pembelajaran geometri, bahwa tingkat kemampuan berpikir siswa dalam belajar geometri meliputi lima tingkat , yaitu visualisasi, analisis, deduksi informal, deduksi, dan rigor.Tingkatan berpikir tersebut akan dilalui siswa secara berurutan, kecepatan berpindah dari tingkat ke tingkat berikutnya banyak bergantung pada isi dan metode pembelajarannya.Perlu disediakan aktivitas-aktivitas dalam pembelajaran yang sesuai dengan tingkat berpikir siswa dalam bentuk hands on activity. Melalui hands on activity akan terbentuk suatu penghayatan dan pengalaman untuk  menetapkan suatu pengertian, karena mampu membelajarkan secara bersama-sama kemampuan kognitif, afektif, dan psikomotorik serta dapat memberikan penghayatan secara mendalam terhadap apa yang dipelajari, sehingga apa yang diperoleh oleh siswa tidak mudah dilupakan. Hands on activity selain sebagai komponen kegiatan pembelajaran, dapat dimanfaatkan sebagai intrumen asesmen, khususnya asesmen kinerja siswa. Gunakanlah hands on activity pada pembelajaran geometri sekolah dan manfaatkan kegiatan tersebut sebagai bentuk asesmen kinerja siswa. 

  14. A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBonte, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

  15. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  16. Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

  17. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  18. Developing computer-based training programs for basic mammalian histology: Didactic versus discovery-based design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Henry Joel

    Educators have long tried to understand what stimulates students to learn. The Swiss psychologist and zoologist, Jean Claude Piaget, suggested that students are stimulated to learn when they attempt to resolve confusion. He reasoned that students try to explain the world with the knowledge they have acquired in life. When they find their own explanations to be inadequate to explain phenomena, students find themselves in a temporary state of confusion. This prompts students to seek more plausible explanations. At this point, students are primed for learning (Piaget 1964). The Piagetian approach described above is called learning by discovery. To promote discovery learning, a teacher must first allow the student to recognize his misconception and then provide a plausible explanation to replace that misconception (Chinn and Brewer 1993). One application of this method is found in the various learning cycles, which have been demonstrated to be effective means for teaching science (Renner and Lawson 1973, Lawson 1986, Marek and Methven 1991, and Glasson & Lalik 1993). In contrast to the learning cycle, tutorial computer programs are generally not designed to correct student misconceptions, but rather follow a passive, didactic method of teaching. In the didactic or expositional method, the student is told about a phenomenon, but is neither encouraged to explore it, nor explain it in his own terms (Schneider and Renner 1980).

  19. [The P300 based brain-computer interface: effect of stimulus position in a stimulus train].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, I P; Shishkin, S L; Kochetova, A G; Kaplan, A Ia

    2012-01-01

    The P300 brain-computer interface (BCI) is currently the most efficient BCI. This interface is based on detection of the P300 wave of the brain potentials evoked when a symbol related to the intended input is highlighted. To increase operation speed of the P300 BCI, reduction of the number of stimuli repetitions is needed. This reduction leads to increase of the relative contribution to the input symbol detection from the reaction to the first target stimulus. It is known that the event-related potentials (ERP) to the first stimulus presentations can be different from the ERP to stimuli presented latter. In particular, the amplitude of responses to the first stimulus presentations is often increased, which is beneficial for their recognition by the BCI. However, this effect was not studied within the BCI framework. The current study examined the ERP obtained from healthy participants (n = 14) in the standard P300 BCI paradigm using 10 trials, as well as in the modified P300 BCI with stimuli presented on moving objects in triple-trial (n = 6) and single-trial (n = 6) stimulation modes. Increased ERP amplitude was observed in response to the first target stimuli in both conditions, as well as in the single-trial mode comparing to triple-trial. We discuss the prospects of using the specific features of the ERP to first stimuli and the single-trial ERP for optimizing the high-speed modes in the P300 BCIs.

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  1. Evaluating tooth restorations: micro-computed tomography in practical training for students in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhle, Hans; Schmidli, Fredy; Krastl, Gabriel; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Direct composite fillings belong to widespread tooth restoration techniques in dental medicine. The procedure consists of successive steps, which include etching of the prepared tooth surface, bonding and placement of composite in incrementally built up layers. Durability and lifespan of the composite inlays strongly depend on the accurate completion of the individual steps to be also realized by students in dental medicine. Improper handling or nonconformity in the bonding procedure often lead to air enclosures (bubbles) as well as to significant gaps between the composite layers or at the margins of the restoration. Traditionally one analyzes the quality of the restoration cutting the tooth in an arbitrarily selected plane and inspecting this plane by conventional optical microscopy. Although the precision of this established method is satisfactory, it is restricted to the selected two-dimensional plane. Rather simple micro computed tomography (μCT) systems, such as SkyScan 1174™, allows for the non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of restored teeth ex vivo and virtually cutting the tomographic data in any desired direction, offering a powerful tool for inspection of the restored tooth with micrometer resolution before cutting and thus also to select a two-dimensional plane with potential defects. In order to study the influence of the individual steps on the resulted tooth restoration, direct composite fillings were placed in mod cavities of extracted teeth. After etching, an adhesive was applied in half of the specimens. From the tomographic datasets, it becomes clear that gaps occur more frequently when bonding is omitted. The visualization of air enclosures offers to determine the probability to find a micrometer-sized defect using an arbitrarily selected cutting plane for inspection.

  2. Computational Approaches for Analyzing Tradeoffs between Training and Aiding. Final Technical Paper for Period February-December 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, William B.; Johnson, William B.

    A methodological framework is presented for representing tradeoffs among alternative combinations of training and aiding for personnel in complex situations. In general, more highly trained people need less aid, and those with less training need more aid. Balancing training and aiding to accomplish the objectives of the system in a cost effective…

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  5. Predicting Classifier Performance with Limited Training Data: Applications to Computer-Aided Diagnosis in Breast and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavanhally, Ajay; Viswanath, Satish; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly employ medical imaging data in conjunction with supervised classifiers, where the latter require large amounts of training data to accurately model the system. Yet, a classifier selected at the start of the trial based on smaller and more accessible datasets may yield inaccurate and unstable classification performance. In this paper, we aim to address two common concerns in classifier selection for clinical trials: (1) predicting expected classifier performance for large datasets based on error rates calculated from smaller datasets and (2) the selection of appropriate classifiers based on expected performance for larger datasets. We present a framework for comparative evaluation of classifiers using only limited amounts of training data by using random repeated sampling (RRS) in conjunction with a cross-validation sampling strategy. Extrapolated error rates are subsequently validated via comparison with leave-one-out cross-validation performed on a larger dataset. The ability to predict error rates as dataset size increases is demonstrated on both synthetic data as well as three different computational imaging tasks: detecting cancerous image regions in prostate histopathology, differentiating high and low grade cancer in breast histopathology, and detecting cancerous metavoxels in prostate magnetic resonance spectroscopy. For each task, the relationships between 3 distinct classifiers (k-nearest neighbor, naive Bayes, Support Vector Machine) are explored. Further quantitative evaluation in terms of interquartile range (IQR) suggests that our approach consistently yields error rates with lower variability (mean IQRs of 0.0070, 0.0127, and 0.0140) than a traditional RRS approach (mean IQRs of 0.0297, 0.0779, and 0.305) that does not employ cross-validation sampling for all three datasets. PMID:25993029

  6. Student Science Training Program in Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science. Final Report to the National Science Foundation. Artificial Intelligence Memo No. 393.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Harold; diSessa, Andy

    During the summer of 1976, the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory sponsored a Student Science Training Program in Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Science for high ability secondary school students. This report describes, in some detail, the style of the program, the curriculum and the projects the students under-took. It is hoped that this…

  7. Experience of computer technology usage within university training for future specialists of nuclear power plants under «the university-enterprise» program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.K.; Vol'man, M.A.; Zhuravleva, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the aspects of training program for future specialists of nuclear power plants. This program is realized at NPP Department of Ivanovo State University and Kalinin NPP. The usage of computer and simulation modeling at the university are the main components of this concept [ru

  8. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.G.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individuals who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and accountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and high interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field exercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training program has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  9. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.E.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individual who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and acoountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and highly interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field excercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training programs has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  10. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  11. Improving executive functioning in children with ADHD: training multiple executive functions within the context of a computer game. a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Dovis

    Full Text Available Executive functions (EFs training interventions aimed at ADHD-symptom reduction have yielded mixed results. Generally, these interventions focus on training a single cognitive domain (e.g., working memory [WM], inhibition, or cognitive-flexibility. However, evidence suggests that most children with ADHD show deficits on multiple EFs, and that these EFs are largely related to different brain regions. Therefore, training multiple EFs might be a potentially more effective strategy to reduce EF-related ADHD symptoms.Eighty-nine children with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD (aged 8-12 were randomized to either a full-active-condition where visuospatial WM, inhibition and cognitive-flexibility were trained, a partially-active-condition where inhibition and cognitive-flexibility were trained and the WM-training task was presented in placebo-mode, or to a full placebo-condition. Short-term and long-term (3-months effects of this gamified, 25-session, home-based computer-training were evaluated on multiple outcome domains.During training compliance was high (only 3% failed to meet compliance criteria. After training, only children in the full-active condition showed improvement on measures of visuospatial short-term-memory (STM and WM. Inhibitory performance and interference control only improved in the full-active- and the partially-active condition. No Treatment-condition x Time interactions were found for cognitive-flexibility, verbal WM, complex-reasoning, nor for any parent-, teacher-, or child-rated ADHD behaviors, EF-behaviors, motivational behaviors, or general problem behaviors. Nonetheless, almost all measures showed main Time-effects, including the teacher-ratings.Improvements on inhibition and visuospatial STM and WM were specifically related to the type of treatment received. However, transfer to untrained EFs and behaviors was mostly nonspecific (i.e., only interference control improved exclusively in the two EF training conditions. As such

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  19. Hazard perception skills of young drivers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can be improved with computer based driver training: An exploratory randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, C R; Unsworth, C A; Dillon, M P; Tay, R; Falkmer, T; Bird, P; Carey, L M

    2017-12-01

    Young drivers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are at higher risk of road traffic injuries than their peers. Increased risk correlates with poor hazard perception skill. Few studies have investigated hazard perception training using computer technology with this group of drivers. *Determine the presence and magnitude of the between-group and within- subject change in hazard perception skills in young drivers with ADHD who receive Drive Smart training. *Determine whether training-facilitated change in hazard perception is maintained over time. This was a feasibility study, randomised control trial conducted in Australia. The design included a delayed treatment for the control group. Twenty-five drivers with a diagnosis of ADHD were randomised to the Immediate Intervention or Delayed Intervention group.The Immediate Intervention group received a training session using a computer application entitled Drive Smart. The Delayed Intervention group watched a documentary video initially (control condition), followed by the Drive Smart computer training session. The participant's hazard perception skill was measured using the Hazard Perception Test (HPT). After adjusting for baseline scores, there was a significant betweengroup difference in post-intervention HPT change scores in favour of the Immediate Intervention group. The magnitude of the effect was large. There was no significant within-group delayed intervention effect. A significant maintenance effect was found at 6-week follow-up for the Immediate Intervention group. The hazard perception skills of participants improved following training with large effect size and some maintenance of gain. A multimodal approach to training is indicated to facilitate maintenance. A full-scale trial is feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics: Part II: Android Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    The growth of Android in the mobile sector and the interest to investigate these devices from a forensic point of view has rapidly increased. Many companies have security problems with mobile devices in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents, it is important to have professional trained staff. Furthermore, it is necessary to further train their existing employees in the practical applications of mobile forensics owing to the fact that a lot of companies are trusted with very sensitive data. Inspired by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1] which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses training approaches and practical exercises to investigate Android mobile devices.

  1. A hands-on course in sensors using the Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    CERN Document Server

    Ziemann, Volker

    2018-01-01

    A Hands-On Course in Sensors using the Arduino and Raspberry Pi is the first book to give a practical and wide-ranging account of how to interface sensors and actuators with micro-controllers, Raspberry Pi and other control systems. The author describes the progression of raw signals through conditioning stages, digitization, data storage and presentation. The collection, processing, and understanding of sensor data plays a central role in industrial and scientific activities. This book builds simplified models of large industrial or scientific installations that contain hardware and other building blocks, including services for databases, web servers, control systems, and messaging brokers. A range of case studies are included within the book, including a weather station, geophones, a water-colour monitor, capacitance measurement, the profile of laser beam, and a remote-controlled and fire-seeking robot This book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students taking hands-on laboratory course...

  2. Teaching genetics using hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Stephanie Ann

    Teaching genetics can be challenging because of the difficulty of the content and misconceptions students might hold. This thesis focused on using hands-on model activities, problem solving, and inquiry-based teaching/learning methods in order to increase student understanding in an introductory biology class in the area of genetics. Various activities using these three methods were implemented into the classes to address any misconceptions and increase student learning of the difficult concepts. The activities that were implemented were shown to be successful based on pre-post assessment score comparison. The students were assessed on the subjects of inheritance patterns, meiosis, and protein synthesis and demonstrated growth in all of the areas. It was found that hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based activities were more successful in learning concepts in genetics and the students were more engaged than tradition styles of lecture.

  3. A counterpoint between computer simulations and biological experiments to train new members of a laboratory of physiological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozu, Marcelo; Dorr, Ricardo A; Gutiérrez, Facundo; Politi, M Teresa; Toriano, Roxana

    2012-12-01

    When new members join a working group dedicated to scientific research, several changes occur in the group's dynamics. From a teaching point of view, a subsequent challenge is to develop innovative strategies to train new staff members in creative thinking, which is the most complex and abstract skill in the cognitive domain according to Bloom's revised taxonomy. In this sense, current technological and digital advances offer new possibilities in the field of education. Computer simulation and biological experiments can be used together as a combined tool for teaching and learning sometimes complex physiological and biophysical concepts. Moreover, creativity can be thought of as a social process that relies on interactions among staff members. In this regard, the acquisition of cognitive abilities coexists with the attainment of other skills from psychomotor and affective domains. Such dynamism in teaching and learning stimulates teamwork and encourages the integration of members of the working group. A practical example, based on the teaching of biophysical subjects such as osmosis, solute transport, and membrane permeability, which are crucial in understanding the physiological concept of homeostasis, is presented.

  4. THE STERN PROJECT–HANDS ON ROCKETS SCIENCE FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENT

    OpenAIRE

    Schüttauf, Katharina; Stamminger, Andreas; Lappöhn, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    In April 2012, the German Aerospace Center DLR initiated a sponsorship program for university students to develop, build and launch their own rockets over a period of three years. The program designation STERN was abbreviated from the German “STudentische Experimental-RaketeN”, which translates to Student- Experimental-Rockets. The primary goal of the STERN program is to inspire students in the subject of space transportation through hands-on activities within a pro...

  5. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammet, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  6. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  7. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammet, S. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  8. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  9. Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The

  10. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  11. Oracle SOA BPEL PM 11g R1 a hands-on tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Saraswathi, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    This hands-on, example-driven guide is a practical getting started tutorial with plenty of step-by-step instructions for beginner to intermediate level readers working with BPEL PM in Oracle SOA SuiteWritten for SOA developers, administrators, architects, and engineers who want to get started with Oracle BPEL PM 11g. No previous experience with BPEL PM is required, but an understanding of SOA and web services is assumed

  12. Developing an Innovative and Creative Hands-on Lean Six Sigma Manufacturing Experiments for Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Badawi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop an innovative and creative hands-on project based on Lean Six Sigma experiments for engineering education at the College of Engineering at the University of Hail. The exercises were designed using junction box assembly to meet the following learning outcomes: 1-to provide students with solid experience on waste elimination and variation reduction and 2-to engage students in exercises related to assembly line mass production and motion study. To achieve these objectives, students were introduced to the principles of Lean manufacturing and Six Sigma through various pedagogical activities such as classroom instruction, laboratory experiments, hands-on exercises, and interactive group work. In addition, Minitab 17 statistical package and Quality Companion 3 software were used to facilitate The Lean Six Sigma exercises. The software application and hands-on manufacturing assembly were found to be extremely valuable in giving students the chance to identify which variables to control in order to minimize variation and eliminate waste. This research was funded by a grant from the Deanship of Academic Research at University of Hail for project number E-26-IC, and under the umbrella of Ministry of Education within the framework of the National Initiative on Creativity and Innovation in Saudi Universities at University of Hail.

  13. Skills-O-Mat: Computer Supported Interactive Motion- and Game-Based Training in Mixing Alginate in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Andreas; Lemos, Martin; Spreckelsen, Cord; Ohnesorge-Radtke, Ulla; Rafai, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The training of motor skills is a crucial aspect of medical education today. Serious games and haptic virtual simulations have been used in the training of surgical procedures. Otherwise, however, a combination of serious games and motor skills training is rarely used in medical education. This article presents Skills-O-Mat, an interactive serious…

  14. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. L. Smith

    2006-01-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. However, INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users, who constitute a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system's response to initiating events and quantify associated consequential outcome frequencies. Specifically, for nuclear power plant applications, SAPHIRE can identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA) and containment failure during a severe accident which lead to releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA where the reactor is at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming an internal events model to a model for external events, such as flooding and fire analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to the public and environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE also includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM is a special user interface linked to SAPHIRE that automates the SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events (for example, to calculate a conditional core damage probability) very efficiently and expeditiously. This report provides an overview of the functions

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  2. Effects of acupuncture and computer-assisted cognitive training for post-stroke attention deficits: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; McCaskey, Michael A; Yang, Shanli; Ye, Haicheng; Tao, Jing; Jiang, Cai; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Balzer, Christian; Ettlin, Thierry; Schupp, Wilfried; Kulke, Hartwig; Chen, Lidian

    2015-12-02

    A majority of stroke survivors present with cognitive impairments. Attention disturbance, which leads to impaired concentration and overall reduced cognitive functions, is strongly associated with stroke. The clinical efficacy of acupuncture with Baihui (GV20) and Shenting (GV24) as well as computer-assisted cognitive training in stroke and post-stroke cognitive impairment have both been demonstrated in previous studies. To date, no systematic comparison of these exists and the potential beneficial effects of a combined application are yet to be examined. The main objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the effects of computer-assisted cognitive training compared to acupuncture on the outcomes of attention assessments. The second objective is to test the effects of a combined cognitive intervention that incorporates computer-assisted cognitive training and acupuncture (ACoTrain). An international multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled pilot trial will be conducted. In a 1:1:1 ratio, 60 inpatients with post-stroke cognitive dysfunction will be randomly allocated into either the acupuncture group, the computer-assisted cognitive training group, or the ACoTrain group in addition to their individual rehabilitation programme. The intervention period of this pilot trial will last 4 weeks (30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, Monday to Friday). The primary outcome is the test battery for attentional performance. The secondary outcomes include the Trail Making Test, Test des Deux Barrages, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and Modified Barthel Index for assessment of daily life competence, and the EuroQol Questionnaire for health-related quality of life. This trial mainly focuses on evaluating the effects of computer-assisted cognitive training compared to acupuncture on the outcomes of attention assessments. The results of this pilot trial are expected to provide new insights on how Eastern and Western medicine can complement one another and

  3. Efficiency increasing of training process on basic technique of wrestler's motor actions in free style at the initial stage with using of computer technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tupeev Y.V.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of use of computer technologies in a system of preparation of fighters on a pioneering stage are exhibited. 10 competent sportsmen, 20 trainers of the maximum grade participated in experiment, 10 fighters of a freestyle of the first grade level. Directions of raise of a learning efficiency base the mechanic of impellent operations of juvenile fighters designated. The frame of the designed informational - methodical program "Champion" is presented. Productivity of information technologies in training base the mechanic of impellent operations in training process of juvenile fighters is defined.

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  5. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  6. Embedding Hands-On Mini Laboratory Experiences in a Core Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Course: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duanduan; Ugaz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Three self-contained mini-labs were integrated into a core undergraduate fluid mechanics course, with the goal of delivering hands-on content in a manner scalable to large class sizes. These mini-labs supported learning objectives involving friction loss in pipes, flow measurement, and centrifugal pump analysis. The hands-on experiments were…

  7. The effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Felita

    Student achievement in the Twenty First Century demands a new rigor in student science knowledge, since advances in science and technology require students to think and act like scientists. As a result, students must acquire proficient levels of knowledge and skills to support a knowledge base that is expanding exponentially with new scientific advances. This study examined the effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students. More specifically, this study was concerned with the influence of hands-on science instruction versus traditional science instruction on the science test scores of middle school students. The subjects in this study were one hundred and twenty sixth-grade students in six classes. Instruction involved lecture/discussion and hands-on activities carried out for a three week period. Specifically, the study ascertained the influence of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the science test scores of middle school students. Additionally, this study assessed the effect of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the attitudes of sixth grade students toward science. The two instruments used to collect data for this study were the Prentice Hall unit ecosystem test and the Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers Study (SWEPT) student's attitude survey. Moreover, the data for the study was treated using the One-Way Analysis of Covariance and the One-Way Analysis of Variance. The following findings were made based on the results: (1) A statistically significant difference existed in the science performance of middle school students exposed to hands-on science instruction. These students had significantly higher scores than the science performance of middle school students exposed to traditional instruction. (2) A statistically significant difference did not exist between the science scores of male and female middle school students. (3) A statistically

  8. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  9. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  10. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  11. Bibliography. Computer-Oriented Projects, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L., Comp.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of references on computer-oriented projects. Includes information on computers; hands-on versus simulations; games; instruction; students' attitudes and learning styles; artificial intelligence; tutoring; and application of spreadsheets. (RT)

  12. The Hands-On Universe: Making Sense of the Universe with All Your Senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, R.

    2018-02-01

    For the past four years, the Hands-On Universe public engagement programme has explored unconventional, interactive and multi-sensorial ways of communicating complex ideas in cosmology and astrophysics to a wide variety of audiences. The programme lead, Roberto Trotta, has reached thousands of people through food-based workshops, art and science collaborations and a book written using only the 1000 most common words in the English language. In this article, Roberto reflects in first person on what has worked well in the programme, and what has not.

  13. HSCI2014: booklet of the 11th International Conference on Hands-on Science

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Manuel F. M., ed. lit.; Pombo, José Miguel Marques, ed. lit.; Vázquez Dorrío, José Benito, ed. lit.; International Conference on Hands-on Science, 11, Aveiro, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The core topic of the 11th Hands-on Science Conference is "Science Education with and for Society" As we all know it is the Society that sets the requirements rules and procedures of Education. It is Society that defines what citizens must learn in what concern either concepts and or competencies, and how this learning can, must in fact…, take place. Society is the ensemble of all of us citizens and of all the structures tangible and intangible we create and created along the y...

  14. The Opinions about Relationship between Students and Teachers in the Class of Hands-on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigultong, M.

    2018-02-01

    This research has the purpose to study on 1) Relationship between Students and Teachers in the Class of Hands - on and 2) Class Management at Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi. The research consists of collecting information from 400 students who have valid student status in 2016 at Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi. This research uses content analysis technique, Average (-X) and Standard Deviation to interpret the information. The results of the research focus on 2 topics 1) The Human relationship between Students and Teachers. The samples group had high expectations of human relationship (x=3.87). 2) Class Management. The samples group had high expectations of Class Management (x=3.88).

  15. Getting started with Oracle SOA B2B Integration a hands-on tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Krishnaprem; Perlovsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This hands on tutorial gives you the best possible start you could hope for with Oracle B2B. Learn using real life scenarios and examples to give you a solid footing of B2B.This book is for B2B architects, consultants and developers who would like to design and develop B2B integrations using Oracle B2B. This book assumes no prior knowledge of Oracle B2B and explains all concepts from scratch using illustrations, real world examples and step-by-step instructions. The book covers enough depth and details to be useful for both beginner and advanced B2B users.

  16. Introduction to engineering a starter's guide with hands-on analog multimedia explorations

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, Lina

    2008-01-01

    This lecture provides a hands-on glimpse of the field of electrical engineering. The introduced applications utilize the NI ELVIS hardware and software platform to explore concepts such as circuits, power, analog sensing, and introductory analog signal processing such as signal generation, analog filtering, and audio and music processing. These principals and technologies are introduced in a very practical way and are fundamental to many of the electronic devices we use today. Some examples include photodetection, analog signal (audio, light, temperature) level meter, and analog music equalize

  17. Forecasting of chalcogenide spinels of the general formula AB2X4 using the method of training of an electronic computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiseleva, N.N.; Savitskij, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental evidence on the existence of AB 2 X 4 compounds in A-B-X systems (A and B are any elements of the periodic system, in particular, rare earth elements, X is S or Se) and the data on the properties of elements and simple sulphides (selenides) were used for an attempt to find the probability of formation of AB 2 X 4 compounds as a function of the component properties. The experimental evidence was analyzed by a computer employing algorithms of concept formation training. The results were used to predict new AB 2 X 4 compounds. The computer training method proved an efficient means of revealing the connection between probability of spinel type compounds existence with the component properties. Certain compounds of general formula AB 2 X 4 were predicted and the probability that they possess spinel structure was evaluated

  18. FEATURES OF THE USE OF COMPUTER AND INTERNET TECHNOLOGY IN THE WORKSHOPS ON LABOR TRAINING FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL PUPILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro M. Bisirkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of the use of Internet technologies in the workshops on labor training in secondary school. Training programs include the study of various technologies using web resources. The Internet offers many different training and educational materials that expand the opportunities for students to model and explore the processes, create their own products and projects under the subject "Labor Training". The effective use of educational online resources depends on the availability of ICT, their technical level, the ability of users efficiently search and use them at various stages of the learning process.

  19. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    .... A questionnaire administered to leaders following simulation exercises documented their sense of personal involvement during mission execution and their perceptions of the training value of the simulations...

  20. Introducing Hands-on, Experiential Learning Experiences in an Urban Environmental Science Program at a Minority Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzgoren-Aydin, N. S.; Freile, D.

    2013-12-01

    several laboratory facilities. Furthermore, authors have applied to the NSF-TUES grant program to purchase a particle size analyzer. Currently, the grant is pending. We have defined 4 curricular goals to enhance student learning by providing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and research experiences. 1- Develop technical/analytical knowledge and skills by using advanced analytical instrumentation; 2- Improve quantitative reasoning skills to assess the quality of data; 3- Have comprehensive educational training to improve problem solving skills; and 4- use their quantitative reasoning (Goal # 2) and problem solving skills (Goal #3) to evaluate real-world geological and environmental problems. We also give special emphasis to expected measurable outcomes for individual courses. An external evaluator will assess the effectiveness of integrating advance instrumentation into the Earth and Environmental Science curricula. We will work closely with the evaluator to ensure successful implementation of the learning objectives. Examples from the impacted courses will be presented.