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Sample records for handlebars

  1. Ureteric transection secondary to penetrating handlebar injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Debbink

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ureteric trauma is rare, occurring in <1% of all traumas. We present a unique case of a 13 year old female who sustained a penetrating abdominal injury from a bicycle handlebar. Upon initial examination there was herniation of bowel through the abdominal wound, so exploratory laparotomy was performed. A serosal injury of the colon and bleeding mesenteric veins were encountered; the retroperitoneum was not explored at that time. Postoperative course was remarkable for a doubling of the serum creatinine, increasing abdominal distention and pain. Computed tomography on postoperative day five demonstrated a large amount of intra-abdominal fluid. The patient was taken for re-exploration. The left ureter was found to be completely transected. It was repaired over a double-J stent. This case demonstrates the need for a high index of suspicion in the diagnosis of ureteric injury. Keywords: Ureter, Bicycle, Handlebar, Penetrating

  2. Discrimination of handlebar grip samples by fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis and statistics

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    Zeyu Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors presented a study on the discrimination of handlebar grip samples, to provide effective forensic science service for hit and run traffic cases. 50 bicycle handlebar grip samples, 49 electric bike handlebar grip samples, and 96 motorcycle handlebar grip samples have been randomly collected by the local police in Beijing (China. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR was utilized as analytical technology. Then, target absorption selection, data pretreatment, and discrimination of linked samples and unlinked samples were chosen as three steps to improve the discrimination of FTIR spectrums collected from different handlebar grip samples. Principal component analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve were utilized to evaluate different data selection methods and different data pretreatment methods, respectively. It is possible to explore the evidential value of handlebar grip residue evidence through instrumental analysis and statistical treatments. It will provide a universal discrimination method for other forensic science samples as well.

  3. Handlebar Hernia With Jejunal and Duodenal Injuries: A Case Report

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    Ching-Wen Huang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is an uncommon complication of abdominal blunt trauma. Handlebar hernia is even more infrequent. To the best of our knowledge, there are fewer than 30 cases of handlebar hernia reported in the English literature. Associated intra-abdominal injuries are infrequent. We present a case of handlebar hernia with jejunal and duodenal injuries. Emergency surgical intervention included primary repair of the disrupted musculofascial defect and injuries of the duodenum and jejunum. Bile- stained discharge from the drain tube was noted, so a second operation was performed about 7 days after the first. Leakage from the sutured jejunal perforation and another irregular perforation in the posterior wall of the fourth portion of the duodenum were noted. The two perforations were debrided and repaired. The muscular and fascial defects were debrided and closed with interrupted sutures. The patient recovered smoothly and was discharged 30 days after the blunt injury. No other major complication was noted 11 months after surgery.

  4. The full spectrum of handlebar injuries in children: a decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraja, R M; Palmer, C S; Arul, G S; Bevan, C; Crameri, J

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic paediatric handlebar injury (HBI) is known to occur with different vehicles, affect different body regions, and have substantial associated morbidity. However, previous handlebar injury research has focused on the specific combination of abdominal injury and bicycle riding. Our aim was to fully describe the epidemiology and resultant spectrum of injuries caused by a HBI. Retrospective data analysis of all paediatric patients (trauma registry over a 10-year period. Primary outcome was the HBI, its location and management. The effects of patient age, vehicle type, the impact region, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were also evaluated. HBI patients were compared against a cohort injured while riding similar vehicles, but not having sustained a HBI. 1990 patients were admitted with a handlebar-equipped vehicle trauma; 236 (11.9%) having sustained a HBI. HBI patients were twice as likely to be aged between 6 and 14 years old compared with non-HBI patients (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.5-3.2). 88.6% of the HBI patients sustained an isolated injury, and 45.3% had non-abdominal handlebar impact. There were no significant differences in median ISS (p=0.4) or need for operative intervention (OR 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-1.5) between HBI and non-HBI patients. HBI patients had a significantly longer LOS (1.8 days vs. 1.2 days; p=0.001), and more frequently required a major operation (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.2-5.4). The majority of splenic, renal and hepatic injuries were managed conservatively. Although the majority of paediatric HBI is associated with both intra-abdominal injury and bicycle riding, it produces a spectrum of potentially serious injuries and patients are more likely to undergo major surgery. Therefore these patients should always be treated with a high degree of suspicion. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Handlebar palsy--a compression syndrome of the deep terminal (motor) branch of the ulnar nerve in biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Daniel; Beer, Serafin

    2002-10-01

    We describe 3 patients who developed a severe palsy of the intrinsic ulnar supplied hand muscles after bicycle riding. Clinically and electrophysiologically all showed an isolated lesion of the deep terminal motor branch of the ulnar nerve leaving the hypothenar muscle and the distal sensory branch intact. This type of lesion at the canal of Guyon is quite unusual, caused in the majority of cases by chronic external pressure over the ulnar palm. In earlier reports describing this lesion in bicycle riders, most patients experienced this lesion after a long distance ride. Due to the change of riding position and shape of handlebars (horn handle) in recent years, however, even a single bicycle ride may be sufficient to cause a lesion of this ulnar branch. Especially in downhill riding, a large part of the body weight is supported by the hand on the corner of the handlebar leading to a high load at Guyon's canal. As no sensory fibres are affected, the patients are not aware of the ongoing nerve compression until a severe lesion develops. Individual adaptation of the handlebar and riding position seems to be crucial for prevention of this type of nerve lesion.

  6. A method for handlebars ballast calculation in order to reduce vibrations transmissibility in walk behind tractors

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    Angelo Fabbri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Walk behind tractors have some advantages over other agricultural machines, such as the cheapness and the easy to use, however the driver is exposed to high level of vibrations transmitted from handles to hand-arm system and to shoulders. The vibrations induce discomfort and early fatigue to the operator. In order to control the vibration transmissibility, a ballast mass may be added to the handles. Even if the determination of the appropriate ballast mass is a critical point in the handle design. The aim of this research was to study the influence of the handle mass modification, on the dynamic structure behaviour. Modal frequencies and subsequent transmissibility calculated by using an analytical approach and a finite elements model, were compared. A good agreement between the results obtained by the two methods was found (average percentage difference calculated on natural frequencies equal to 5.8±3.8%. Power tillers are made generally by small or medium-small size manufacturers that have difficulties in dealing with finite element codes or modal analysis techniques. As a consequence, the proposed analytical method could be used to find the optimal ballast mass in a simple and economic way, without experimental tests or complex finite element codes. A specific and very simple software or spreadsheet, developed on the base of the analytical method here discussed, could effectively to help the manufacturers in the handlebar design phase. The choice of the correct elastic mount, the dimensioning of the guide members and the ballast mass could be considerably simplified.

  7. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

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    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  8. An innovative multi dof TMD system for motorcycle handlebars designed to reduce structural vibrations and human exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, S.; Cheli, F.; Leo, E.; Pezzola, M.

    2012-08-01

    Motor vehicle ride comfort is mainly affected by reciprocating engine inertia unbalances. These forces are transmitted to the driver through the main frame, the engine mounts, and the auxiliary sub systems—all components with which he physically comes into contact. On-road traction vehicle engines are mainly characterized by transient exercise. Thus, an excitation frequency range from 800 RPM (≈15 Hz for stationary vehicles) up to 15,000 RPM (≈250 Hz as a cut off condition) occurs. Several structural resonances are induced by the unbalancing forces spectrum, thus exposing the driver to amplified vibrations. The aim of this research is to reduce driver vibration exposure, by acting on the modal response of structures with which the driver comes into contact. An experimental methodology, capable of identifying local vibration modes was developed. The application of this methodology on a reference vehicle allows us to detect if/when/how the above mentioned resonances are excited. Numerical models were used to study structural modifications. In this article, a handlebar equipped with an innovative multi reciprocating tuned mass damper was optimized. All structural modifications were designed, developed and installed on a vehicle. Modal investigations were then performed in order to predict modification efficiency. Furthermore, functional solution efficiency was verified during sweep tests performed on a target vehicle, by means of a roller bench capable of replicating on-road loads. Three main investigation zones of the vehicle were detected and monitored using accelerometers: (1) engine mounts, to characterize vibration emissions; (2) bindings connecting the engine to the frame, in order to detect vibration transfer paths, with particular attention being paid to local dynamic amplifications due to compliances and (3) the terminal components with which the driver comes into contact.

  9. ISSN 2073 ISSN 2073 9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s 9990 East Cent. Afr.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    Estimates of the incidence and costs associated with handlebar related injuries in children. .... There was no evidence of peripheral blood eosinophilia. Chest radiograph was .... the United States, with a review of worldwide cases. Clinical ...

  10. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  11. 16 CFR 1512.5 - Requirements for braking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for braking system. 1512.5 Section 1512.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT... dimension between the brake hand lever and the handlebars in the plane containing the centerlines of the...

  12. 49 CFR 571.123 - Standard No. 123; Motorcycle controls and displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... handgrip. If a motorcycle with an automatic clutch other than a scooter is equipped with a supplemental rear brake control, the control shall be located on the left handlebar. If a scooter with an automatic... equipped with self-proportioning or antilock braking devices utilizing a single control for front and rear...

  13. 75 FR 49020 - CFMOTO Powersports, Inc., Receipt of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... range without removal of the operator's left hand from the handgrip. If a motorcycle with an automatic... located on the left handlebar. If a scooter with an automatic clutch is equipped with a supplemental rear... braking devices utilizing a single control for front and rear brakes, the control shall be located and...

  14. Ergonomic Analysis of UI’s BicyclesUsing Posture Evaluation Index (PEI Method in Virtual Environment

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    Erlinda Muslim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to study ergonomic aspect from University of Indonesia bicycle in virtual environment. Software Jack 6.0 was used to analyze it. PEI was used as approach that integrated the results of three methods: Lower Back Analysis, Ovako Working Posture Analysis, and Rapid Upper Limb Assessment. The research objective is to evaluate existing design of University of Indonesia bicycle and to determine the most ergonomic redesign which concern with handlebar height and saddle height modification. The result showed that the most ergonomic design of University of Indonesia bicycle is the one with the highest handlebar height (22 cm and the lowest saddle height (11 cm.

  15. Imaging of blunt arterial trauma of the upper extremity in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodina, M.; Gudinchet, F.; Schnyder, P.; Reinberg, O.

    2001-01-01

    We report four patients with blunt arterial trauma of the upper limb following unusual mechanisms of injury in two patients (one fell on the handlebars of his bicycle, the second was crushed by a moving lawn mower) and due to bicycle accidents in two further patients. The use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in all patients, together with colour Doppler imaging (CDI) in one patient, provided optimum preoperative identification and localisation of the arterial lesions. (orig.)

  16. Traumatisk ventralhernie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Charnoubi, Waseem A Ghulam; Berg, Jais Oliver; Rosenstock, Steffen Jais

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernias are rare. We describe a case of a handlebar hernia which was initially misinterpreted as a rectus haematoma, and consequently the patient was discharged without any treatment. The patient was admitted two days after with severe pain and computed tomography showed ...... a defect in the abdominal wall. The patient underwent laparoscopic hernial repair with a Goretex mesh after some weeks when the primary tissue damage had subsided....

  17. On Gait Analysis Estimation Errors Using Force Sensors on a Smart Rollator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Joaquin; Urdiales, Cristina; Martinez, Antonio B; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-11-10

    Gait analysis can provide valuable information on a person's condition and rehabilitation progress. Gait is typically captured using external equipment and/or wearable sensors. These tests are largely constrained to specific controlled environments. In addition, gait analysis often requires experts for calibration, operation and/or to place sensors on volunteers. Alternatively, mobility support devices like rollators can be equipped with onboard sensors to monitor gait parameters, while users perform their Activities of Daily Living. Gait analysis in rollators may use odometry and force sensors in the handlebars. However, force based estimation of gait parameters is less accurate than traditional methods, especially when rollators are not properly used. This paper presents an evaluation of force based gait analysis using a smart rollator on different groups of users to determine when this methodology is applicable. In a second stage, the rollator is used in combination with two lab-based gait analysis systems to assess the rollator estimation error. Our results show that: (i) there is an inverse relation between the variance in the force difference between handlebars and support on the handlebars-related to the user condition-and the estimation error; and (ii) this error is lower than 10% when the variation in the force difference is above 7 N. This lower limit was exceeded by the 95.83% of our challenged volunteers. In conclusion, rollators are useful for gait characterization as long as users really need the device for ambulation.

  18. The effectiveness of front fork systems at damping accelerations during isolated aspects specific to cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Miller, Matthew C; Fink, Philip W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2017-11-01

    Cross-country mountain bike suspension reportedly enhances comfort and performance through reduced vibration and impact exposure. This study analysed the effectiveness of three different front fork systems at damping accelerations during the crossing of three isolated obstacles (stairs, drop, and root). One participant completed three trials on six separate occasions in a randomised order using rigid, air-sprung, and carbon leaf-sprung forks. Performance was determined by time to cross obstacles, while triaxial accelerometers quantified impact exposure and damping response. Results identified significant main effect of fork type for performance time (p < 0.05). The air-sprung and leaf-sprung forks were significantly slower than the rigid forks for the stairs (p < 0.05), while air-sprung suspension was slower than the rigid for the root protocol (p < 0.05). There were no differences for the drop protocol (p < 0.05). Rigid forks reduced overall exposure (p < 0.05), specifically at the handlebars for the stairs and drop trials. More detailed analysis presented smaller vertical accelerations at the handlebar for air-sprung and leaf-sprung forks on the stairs (p < 0.05), and drop (p < 0.05) but not the root. As such, it appears that the suspension systems tested were ineffective at reducing overall impact exposure at the handlebar during isolated aspects of cross-country terrain features which may be influenced to a larger extent by rider technique.

  19. Influence of hamstring muscles extensibility on spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in highly trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, José M; Alacid, Fernando; López-Miñarro, Pedro A

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hamstring muscles extensibility in standing, maximal trunk flexion with knees extended and on the bicycle in lower handlebar-hands position of highly trained cyclists. Ninety-six cyclists were recruited for the study (mean ± SD, age: 30.36 ± 5.98 years). Sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt were measured in the standing position, maximal trunk flexion with knees extended (sit-and-reach test) and while sitting on a bicycle in lower handlebar-hand position using a Spinal Mouse system. Hamstring muscles extensibility was determined in both legs by passive straight leg raise test (PSLR). The sample was divided into three groups according to PSLR angle: (1) reduced extensibility (PSLR hamstring extensibility group (PSLR = 80º - 90º; n = 35), and (3) high hamstring extensibility (PSLR = > 90º; n = 31). ANOVA analysis showed significant differences among groups for thoracic (p hamstring muscles extensibility influence the thoracic and pelvic postures when maximal trunk flexion with knees extended is performed, but not when cyclists are seated on their bicycles.

  20. On Gait Analysis Estimation Errors Using Force Sensors on a Smart Rollator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Ballesteros

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis can provide valuable information on a person’s condition and rehabilitation progress. Gait is typically captured using external equipment and/or wearable sensors. These tests are largely constrained to specific controlled environments. In addition, gait analysis often requires experts for calibration, operation and/or to place sensors on volunteers. Alternatively, mobility support devices like rollators can be equipped with onboard sensors to monitor gait parameters, while users perform their Activities of Daily Living. Gait analysis in rollators may use odometry and force sensors in the handlebars. However, force based estimation of gait parameters is less accurate than traditional methods, especially when rollators are not properly used. This paper presents an evaluation of force based gait analysis using a smart rollator on different groups of users to determine when this methodology is applicable. In a second stage, the rollator is used in combination with two lab-based gait analysis systems to assess the rollator estimation error. Our results show that: (i there is an inverse relation between the variance in the force difference between handlebars and support on the handlebars—related to the user condition—and the estimation error; and (ii this error is lower than 10% when the variation in the force difference is above 7 N. This lower limit was exceeded by the 95.83% of our challenged volunteers. In conclusion, rollators are useful for gait characterization as long as users really need the device for ambulation.

  1. The Four-Ball Gyro and Motorcycle Countersteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J. Ronald; Carroll, Bradley W.

    2017-04-01

    Most two-wheel motorcycle riders know that, at highway speeds, if you want to turn left you push on the left handlebar and pull on the right handlebar. This is called countersteering. Countersteering is counterintuitive since pushing left and pulling right when the front wheel is not spinning would turn the wheel to the right. All good motorcycle instructors teach countersteering but few understand the physics of why it works, even though there is considerable discussion about it among motorcycle riders. This paper gives a simplified explanation of gyroscopic precession and then applies this to the front wheel of a motorcycle using two steps: 1) explaining how the wheel's lean is initiated, and 2) explaining how the lean will cause the wheel to turn. To assist with this discussion and to demonstrate the conclusions, a "wheel" was constructed using copper pipe, a bicycle wheel hub, and one pound of lead in each of four "balls" at the end of the spokes (see Fig. 1).

  2. In-depth analysis of bicycle hydraulic disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Oliver; Györfi, Benedikt; Wrede, Jürgen; Arnold, Timo; Moia, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic Disc Brakes (HDBs) represent the most recent and innovative bicycle braking system. Especially Electric Bicycles (EBs), which are becoming more and more popular, are equipped with this powerful, unaffected by environmental influences, and low-wear type of brakes. As a consequence of the high braking performance, typical bicycle braking errors lead to more serious accidents. This is the starting point for the development of a Braking Dynamics Assistance system (BDA) to prevent front wheel lockup and nose-over (falling over the handlebars). One of the essential prerequisites for the system design is a better understanding of bicycle HDBs' characteristics. A physical simulation model and a test bench have been built for this purpose. The results of the virtual and real experiments conducted show a high correlation and allow valuable insights into HDBs on bicycles, which have not been studied scientifically in any depth so far.

  3. Mountain biking injuries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    Mountain biking is a fast, exciting adventure sport with increasing numbers of participants and competitions. A search of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, DH data, and Embase databases was performed using the following keywords: mountain, biking and injuries. This revealed 2 review articles, 17 case controlled studies, 4 case series and 5 case reports. This review summarises the published literature on mountain biking injuries, discusses injury frequency and common injury mechanisms. Riders are quick to adopt safety measures. Helmet usage is now increasingly common and handlebar adaptations have been discontinued. Although the sport has a reputation for speed and risk with research and awareness, injury prevention measures are being adopted making the sport as safe as possible.

  4. [Successful repair of complete pancreatic rupture and subtotal duodenal avulsion after blunt abdominal trauma in childhood--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, M; Vorwerk, T

    2003-03-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented after a bicycle accident with handlebar injury of the epigastrium with clinical signs of hollow visceral injury and elevated pancreatic enzymes. Upon emergency laparotomy, a complete rupture of the pancreatic isthmus and a nearly total transsection of the postpyloric duodenum were encountered (Grade IV according to Lucas). Reconstruction consisted of reanastomosis of the proximal duodenum, closure of the distal end of the pancreatic head and internal drainage of the left pancreas into a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop. The postoperative course was uneventful. For rare traumatic pancreaticoduodenal lesions only individual surgical concepts are promising depending on the extent of damage. However, effort should be made to preserve as much pancreatic tissue as possible.

  5. Ergonomic material-handling device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsnick, Lance E.; Zalk, David M.; Perry, Catherine M.; Biggs, Terry; Tageson, Robert E.

    2004-08-24

    A hand-held ergonomic material-handling device capable of moving heavy objects, such as large waste containers and other large objects requiring mechanical assistance. The ergonomic material-handling device can be used with neutral postures of the back, shoulders, wrists and knees, thereby reducing potential injury to the user. The device involves two key features: 1) gives the user the ability to adjust the height of the handles of the device to ergonomically fit the needs of the user's back, wrists and shoulders; and 2) has a rounded handlebar shape, as well as the size and configuration of the handles which keep the user's wrists in a neutral posture during manipulation of the device.

  6. PENGEMBANGAN KONSEP SEPEDA PERKOTAAN DENGAN MEMPERTIMBANGKAN KRITERIA ERGONOMI

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    Bambang Suhardi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Indonesian urban bicycle concept requires the most suitable bicycle type as the initial reference which is decided by considering various criteria. Ergonomics is one of the important criteria, considering that the high frequency riding bike which bring health risks, such as CTS, kyphosis and urogenital disorders. Short wheel base recumbent bike is the most potential for development. The development of this bike includes increased balance by reducing the length of the bike frame and tubing, improve handling by replacing the handlebar is comfortable and uses smaller tires, and use kickstand for easy parking. Besides, the development of this bike adapted to the Indonesian anthropometry and features that support the ability of this bike to explore the city streets.

  7. Noninvasive measurement of physiological signals on a modified home bathroom scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, O T; Dookun Park; Giovangrandi, L; Kovacs, G T A

    2012-08-01

    A commercial bathroom scale with both handlebar and footpad electrodes was modified to enable measurement of four physiological signals: the ballistocardiogram (BCG), electrocardiogram (ECG), lower body impedance plethysmogram (IPG), and lower body electromyogram (EMG). The BCG, which describes the reaction of the body to cardiac ejection of blood, was measured using the strain gauges in the scale. The ECG was detected using handlebar electrodes with a two-electrode amplifier. For the lower body IPG, the two electrodes under the subject's toes were driven with an ac current stimulus, and the resulting differential voltage across the heels was measured and demodulated synchronously with the source. The voltage signal from the same two footpad electrodes under the heels was passed through a passive low-pass filter network into another amplifier, and the output was the lower body EMG signal. The signals were measured from nine healthy subjects, and the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while the subjects were standing still was estimated for the four signals as follows: BCG, 7.6 dB; ECG, 15.8 dB; IPG, 10.7 dB. During periods of motion, the decrease in SNR for the BCG signal was found to be correlated to the increase in rms power for the lower body EMG (r = 0.89, p <; 0.01). The EMG could, thus, be used to flag noise-corrupted segments of the BCG, increasing the measurement robustness. This setup could be used for monitoring the cardiovascular health of patients at home.

  8. Cycling, and Male Sexual and Urinary Function: Results from a Large, Multinational, Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mohannad A; Gaither, Thomas W; Murphy, Gregory P; Chumnarnsongkhroh, Thanabhudee; Metzler, Ian; Sanford, Thomas; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Eisenberg, Michael L; Carroll, Peter R; Osterberg, E Charles; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2017-10-13

    We explored the relation of cycling to urinary and sexual function in a large multinational sample of men. Cyclists were recruited to complete a survey through Facebook® advertisements and outreach to sporting clubs. Swimmers and runners were recruited as a comparison group. Cyclists were categorized into low and high intensity cyclists. Participants were queried using validated questionnaires, including SHIM (Sexual Health Inventory for Men), I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and NIH-CPSI (National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index), in addition to questions about urinary tract infections, urethral stricture, genital numbness and saddle sores. Of 5,488 complete survey responses 3,932 (72%) were included in our analysis. On multivariate analysis swimmers/runners had a lower mean SHIM score than low and high intensity cyclists (19.5 vs 19.9 and 20.7, p = 0.02 and history. Cyclists had statistically higher odds of urethral stricture compared to swimmers/runners (OR 2.5, p = 0.042). Standing more than 20% of the time while cycling significantly reduced the odds of genital numbness (OR 0.4, p = 0.006). Adjusting the handlebar higher or even with the saddle had lower odds of genital numbness and saddle sores (OR 0.8, p = 0.005 and 0.6, p <0.001, respectively). Cyclists had no worse sexual or urinary functions than swimmers or runners but cyclists were more prone to urethral stricture. Increased time standing while cycling and a higher handlebar height were associated with lower odds of genital sores and numbness. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analisa Kekuatan Sambungan Pipa Baja Karbon dan Besi Cor Berbasis Teknologi Las Gesek (Friction Welding

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    Nur Husodo

    2016-12-01

    process of switching to an alternative method for frictionwelding manufacturing process motorcycle handlebar. The study was conducted with three variations of pressurewrought by 375, 437.5 and 500 kgf / cm 2, while the frictional pressure of 62.5 kgf / cm 2 and the length of time string 120seconds. The resulting test samples tested microstructure with metallografi done while the mechanical propertieshardness testing and tensile strength. The analysis were performed to determine the chances of friction welding is usedas an alternative production process motorcycle handlebar. It can be deduced that the friction welding method can beused to connect two pieces of metal of different steel compositions, namely low carbon steel pipe with cast iron. Weldstrength will increase when the pressure forging also increased. The highest weld strength was 546.66 N / mm2.Keywords: Friction weldingl, low carbon steel pipe, cast iron, forging pressure, friction pressure

  10. Driving Interface Based on Tactile Sensors for Electric Wheelchairs or Trolleys

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    Andrés Trujillo-León

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel device based on a tactile interface to replace the attendant joystick in electric wheelchairs. It can also be used in other vehicles such as shopping trolleys. Its use allows intuitive driving that requires little or no training, so its usability is high. This is achieved by a tactile sensor located on the handlebar of the chair or trolley and the processing of the information provided by it. When the user interacts with the handle of the chair or trolley, he or she exerts a pressure pattern that depends on the intention to accelerate, brake or turn to the left or right. The electronics within the device then perform the signal conditioning and processing of the information received, identifying the intention of the user on the basis of this pattern using an algorithm, and translating it into control signals for the control module of the wheelchair. These signals are equivalent to those provided by a joystick. This proposal aims to help disabled people and their attendees and prolong the personal autonomy in a context of aging populations.

  11. Uji Performansi Getaran Mekanis dan Kebisingan Mist Blower Yanmar MK 150-B

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    Ahmad Noval Irvani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mist blower is one of the mechanization tool of agriculture considered as a tool that can assist humans in fertilizer and pesticides spreading activities. Levels of motor speed in the used mist blower were 1915, 4009, and 7227 rpm. Vibration measurements were conducted on the engine and handlebar control mist blower with the three-dimensional axes namely X, Y, and Z. Mist blower noise measurements were performed on the engine, operator's right ear and left ear. Based on the analysis of vibration and noise from the mist blower of type MK 150-B was obtained the safe limit values from the use of these tools. The safe limit of the use of mist blower in motor rotation speed of 1915, 4009, and 7227 rpm after being compared with the vibration and noise were 1 hour, 1 hour and 24 minutes respectively. The farther the distance from noise source, the lower the noise level too. Moreover objectivity study of operator was conducted. The first farmer was tired faster than the second farmer. In terms of age of farmer, the second farmer (60 years older than the first farmers (40 years, but this should not affect significantly. Activity on the previous day greatly affects the level of fatigue when operating the mist blower. This was because the first farmers did more activities and had rest periods that less than second farmer.

  12. Rare Case of Large Bowel Injury due to Direct Blunt Trauma to a Preexisting Femoral Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tinner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an 85-year-old man with a known asymptomatic left femoral hernia who was admitted to the emergency ward a few hours after falling from a bicycle and suffering from blunt trauma of the handlebar to the left inguinal region. The clinical findings and a computed tomography (CT scan detecting free air in the femoral hernia sac suggested bowel perforation. Emergency laparotomy 6 hours after the incident confirmed a tear of the sigmoid colon accompanied by free blood and faeces in the left inguinal region of the abdomen. A segmental sigmoid resection and a primary end-to-end colorectal anastomosis were performed. The postoperative course was complicated by delayed oral feeding, a local infection, and a partial left testicle necrosis that led to secondary resection. The patient was discharged after 32 days of in-hospital care. Three months post trauma, we recorded a restitutio ad integrum. The case exemplifies that blunt trauma to preexisting femoral hernias may cause potentially lethal bowel perforation and that the time interval between time of injury and surgical treatment may be a prognostic factor. CT scans seem most suitable for ruling out bowel perforation. The scarce literature for blunt trauma to hernias is reviewed.

  13. Pediatric anthropometrics are inconsistent with current guidelines for assessing rider fit on all-terrain vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Andrew C; Mullineaux, David R; Auxier, James T; Forman, Jennifer L; Shapiro, Robert; Pienkowski, David

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to establish objective anthropometric measures of fit or misfit for young riders on adult and youth-sized all-terrain vehicles and use these metrics to test the unproved historical reasoning that age alone is a sufficient measure of rider-ATV fit. Male children (6-11 years, n=8; and 12-15 years, n=11) were selected by convenience sampling. Rider-ATV fit was quantified by five measures adapted from published recommendations: (1) standing-seat clearance, (2) hand size, (3) foot vs. foot-brake position, (4) elbow angle, and (5) handlebar-to-knee distance. Youths aged 12-15 years fit the adult-sized ATV better than the ATV Safety Institute recommended age-appropriate youth model (63% of subjects fit all 5 measures on adult-sized ATV vs. 20% on youth-sized ATV). Youths aged 6-11 years fit poorly on ATVs of both sizes (0% fit all 5 parameters on the adult-sized ATV vs 12% on the youth-sized ATV). The ATV Safety Institute recommends rider-ATV fit according to age and engine displacement, but no objective data linking age or anthropometrics with ATV engine or frame size has been previously published. Age alone is a poor predictor of rider-ATV fit; the five metrics used offer an improvement compared to current recommendations. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acquired Duodenal Obstruction in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hung Chien

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic intramural hematoma of the duodenum is a rare cause of acquired duodenal obstruction in children, and a high degree of suspicion is therefore required to make an early and accurate diagnosis. We report a 6-year-old boy whose epigastrium was impacted by the handlebar of his bicycle during a traffic accident. The boy then experienced epigastralgia. Six days later, progressive bilious vomiting suggestive of gastrointestinal obstruction was noted. Imaging studies revealed a large hematoma extending from the fourth portion of the duodenum to the jejunum. Conservative methods of treatment failed to manage his condition. He underwent laparoscopic surgery to evacuate the hematoma. We also report a case of duodenal obstruction in a previously healthy 2-year-old girl who presented for the first time with acute symptoms of proximal intestinal obstruction. Contrast examinations showed apparent barium retention over the stomach and proximal duodenum. She underwent surgery due to persistent obstruction, and a mushroom-like foreign body was detected embedded in the orifice of the windsock duodenal web. After duodenoduodenostomy and removal of the bezoar, she had a smooth recovery and tolerated feeding well. We conclude that blunt abdominal trauma and incomplete duodenal obstruction, such as that caused by duodenal web, should be considered as possible causes of acquired proximal gastrointestinal obstruction in previously healthy children, despite their rarity.

  15. Harvesting Energy from the Counterbalancing (Weaving Movement in Bicycle Riding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Priya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bicycles are known to be rich source of kinetic energy, some of which is available for harvesting during speedy and balanced maneuvers by the user. A conventional dynamo attached to the rim can generate a large amount of output power at an expense of extra energy input from the user. However, when applying energy conversion technology to human powered equipments, it is important to minimize the increase in extra muscular activity and to maximize the efficiency of human movements. This study proposes a novel energy harvesting methodology that utilizes lateral oscillation of bicycle frame (weaving caused by user weight shifting movements in order to increase the pedaling force in uphill riding or during quick speed-up. Based on the 3D motion analysis, we designed and implemented the prototype of an electro-dynamic energy harvester that can be mounted on the bicycle’s handlebar to collect energy from the side-to-side movement. The harvester was found to generate substantial electric output power of 6.6 mW from normal road riding. It was able to generate power even during uphill riding which has never been shown with other approaches. Moreover, harvesting of energy from weaving motion seems to increase the economy of cycling by helping efficient usage of human power.

  16. Bike to work safely (follow-up)

    CERN Document Server

    Simon Baird, HSE Unit Head

    2016-01-01

    Following a recent article about safe cycling (see here), the Bulletin received a request for more details on the type of accidents that are reported.   An analysis of the 38 accidents involving bicycles reported this year up to the end of August reveals that the most common single cause of accidents is slippery surfaces: ice, snow, water and gravel, so the message here is to take extra care, particularly when cycling in bad weather. The second item on the list is obstacles of various kinds: collisions with kerbs, potholes and even the transition from roads to cycle paths. The lesson here is to pay close attention to the surface you’re cycling over, and if you do spot a pothole, even if it does not lead to an accident, report it so that it can be repaired. It’s also worth remembering that you’re more likely to avoid coming off your bike if you keep your hands on the handlebars. The third highest cause is collisions with other vehicles, and here there are lessons for ...

  17. Effect of bicycle saddle designs on the pressure to the perineum of the bicyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Brian D; Schrader, Steven M; Breitenstein, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    Increasing awareness of an association between bicycling and male sexual dysfunction has led to the appearance of a variety of bicycle saddles that share the design objective of reducing pressure in the groin of the cyclist by removal of the narrow protruding nose of the saddle. This study compared three of these saddle designs to a traditional sport/road racing saddle with a narrow protruding nose in terms of pressure in the region of the perineum (groin) of the cyclist. Saddle, pedal, and handlebar contact pressure were measured from 33 bicycle police patrol officers pedaling a stationary bicycle at a controlled cadence and workload. Pressure was characterized over the saddle as a whole and over a region of the saddle assumed to represent pressure on the cyclist's perineum located anteriorly to the ischial tuberosities. The traditional sport/racing saddle was associated with more than two times the pressure in the perineal region than the saddles without a protruding nose (P perineum of the bicyclist.

  18. Harvesting energy from the counterbalancing (weaving) movement in bicycle riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yoonseok; Yeo, Jeongjin; Priya, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Bicycles are known to be rich source of kinetic energy, some of which is available for harvesting during speedy and balanced maneuvers by the user. A conventional dynamo attached to the rim can generate a large amount of output power at an expense of extra energy input from the user. However, when applying energy conversion technology to human powered equipments, it is important to minimize the increase in extra muscular activity and to maximize the efficiency of human movements. This study proposes a novel energy harvesting methodology that utilizes lateral oscillation of bicycle frame (weaving) caused by user weight shifting movements in order to increase the pedaling force in uphill riding or during quick speed-up. Based on the 3D motion analysis, we designed and implemented the prototype of an electro-dynamic energy harvester that can be mounted on the bicycle's handlebar to collect energy from the side-to-side movement. The harvester was found to generate substantial electric output power of 6.6 mW from normal road riding. It was able to generate power even during uphill riding which has never been shown with other approaches. Moreover, harvesting of energy from weaving motion seems to increase the economy of cycling by helping efficient usage of human power.

  19. Novel surgical technique for complete traumatic rupture of the pancreas: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauch Karl-Walter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Complete pancreatic rupture is a rare injury. The typical mechanism by which this occurs is overstretching of the pancreas across the vertebral column during blunt abdominal trauma. The management of this injury depends on the location and extent of the injury. Case presentation A 45-year-old Caucasian woman presented with blunt abdominal trauma after she fell onto the end of a handlebar during a bicycle accident. She arrived in the emergency room with stable vital signs and an isolated bruise just above the umbilicus. A computed tomography scan revealed a complete rupture of the pancreas, just ventral to her superior mesenteric vein, and an accompanying hematoma but no additional injuries. An emergency laparotomy was performed; the head of the pancreas was oversewn with interrupted sutures and this was followed by a two-layer pancreaticojejunostomy with the tail of the pancreas. The recovery after surgery was completely uneventful. Conclusions Isolated complete pancreatic rupture is a rare injury that can be managed with complete organ preservation. The combination of suturing the pancreatic head and two-layer pancreaticojejunostomy with the pancreatic tail is a feasible technique to manage this condition.

  20. Injuries in mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulrapp, H; Weber, A; Rosemeyer, B

    2001-01-01

    Despite still growing attraction mountain biking as a matter of sports traumatology still lacks relevant data based on large cross-sectional surveys. To obtain an overview of risk factors, types, and main body sites of injuries occurring in mountain biking we assessed the results of a questionnaire answered by 3873 athletes. A total of 8133 single lesions were reported by 3474 athletes, 36% of whom regularly participated in competitions. The incidence of injuries in mountain biking is comparable to that in other outdoor sports, the majority of injuries being minor. Mountain biking athletes were found to have an overall injury risk rate of 0.6% per year and 1 injury per 1000 h of biking. The main risk factors included slippery road surface, cyclist's poor judgement of the situation, and excessive speed, representing personal factors that could be altered by preventive measures. Of all injuries 14% were due to collision with some part of the bike, especially the pedals and the handlebar. While 75% of the injuries were minor, such as skin wounds and simple contusions, 10% were so severe that hospitalization was required. A breakdown of the injuries according to body site and frequency of occurrence is presented.

  1. Sensor design for outdoor racing bicycle field testing for human vibration comfort evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanwalleghem, Joachim; De Baere, Ives; Van Paepegem, Wim; Loccufier, Mia

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the vibrational comfort evaluation of the cyclist when cycling a rough surface. Outdoor comfort tests have so far only been done through instrumenting the bicycle with accelerometers. This work instruments a racing bicycle with custom-made contact force sensors and velocity sensors to acquire human comfort through the absorbed power method. Comfort evaluation is assessed at the hand–arm and seat interface of the cyclist with the bicycle. By means of careful finite-element analysis for designing the force gauges at the handlebar and the seat combined with precise calibration of both force and velocity sensors, all sensors have proven to work properly. Initial field tests are focused on the proper functioning of the designed sensors and their suitability for vibration comfort measurements. Tests on a cobblestone road reveal that the outcome of the absorbed power values is within the same range as those from laboratory tests found in the literature. This sensor design approach for outdoor testing with racing bicycles may give a new interpretation on evaluating the cyclist's comfort since the vibrational load is not only quantified in terms of acceleration but also in terms of force and velocity at the bicycle–cyclist contact points. (paper)

  2. A Study for Adjustable Riding Position of the Innovation Bicycle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Che; Huang, Tai-Shen

    2018-04-01

    This research is about the analysis and design of the user in a wheelchair use posture can be changed. So user can through different sitting posture changes to provide different needs, so the folding design patents for the existing data collection and classification, through the analysis of advantages and disadvantages, further to find the innovative design approach. Finally through the multi linkage mechanism system, change the seat, handlebars and rear position, provide different posture context. In order to reduce the cost, this study is designed to integrate the innovation input mechanism, multi linkage system, through the construction of 10 joints and degrees of freedom of the bicycle frame. Then use 3D software to design of bicycle the size of the frame of innovation, through the three-dimensional CAD model to simulate the mechanism between movement and interference, and to evaluate the 3D The virtual prototype can meet the requirement. It will also enable CAE to analyze and determine the strength and the safety of the bicycle frame structure of ANSYS11.0 stress. Finally, we have integrated design through CAID to make a product appearance, the focus of research is mainly a study of CAD, CAE, CAID integration the production and the completion of a prototype.

  3. Pengembangan Sistem Informasi Geografis Berbasis Node.JS untuk Pemetaan Mesin dan Tracking Engineer dengan Pemanfaatan Geolocation pada PT IBM Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RACHMAT FAJRIN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PT IBM memiliki banyak klien di Indonesia, ini membuat persebaran produk (dalam hal ini mesin atm yang semakin meluas di wilayah Indonesia. Hal ini memicu PT IBM untuk menempatkan engineer dibanyak wilayah untuk memenuhi kebutuhan services dan maintenance. Untuk itu dalam penelitian ini dikembangkan sebuah sistem informasi geografis untuk pemetaan mesin dan tracking engineer dengan pemanfaatan geolocation yang bertujuan untuk menampilkan peta digital beserta lokasi mesin dan engineer di seluruh Indonesia, yang akan memudahkan PT IBM dalam pemberian tugas kepada engineer untuk services dan maintenance ke lokasi mesin terdekat. Sistem ini dibangun menggunakan beberapa software open source yaitu, Node.JS dan Express.JS yang merupakan server-side javascript web platform, Handlebars untuk template engine, MySQL sebagai database storage, Postman yang berfungsi sebagai API (Application Program Interface testing, Google Maps API untuk implementasi peta digital dan juga Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM untuk platform mengirim notifikasi dari web ke device engineer.Pengembangan Sistem Informasi Geografis Berbasis Node.JS untuk Pemetaan Mesin dan Tracking Engineer dengan Pemanfaatan Geolocation pada PT IBM Indonesia

  4. Right hepatic vein injury after blunt abdominal trauma in a 12-year-old boy- case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roik, D.; Konecka, A.; Brzewski, M.; Marcinski, A.; Kaminski, A.; Piotrowska, A.; Jasinska, A.

    2008-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma in children is one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization. We present a rare case of traumatic liver injury. A 12-year-old boy was admitted to the Surgery Department after a bicycle fall and handlebar impact injury to the right infracostal area. At admission he was stable, with no abnormalities except for a subcutaneous hepatoma found in the injured area. Abdominal ultrasound examination revealed free intraperitoneal fluid. Computed tomography (CT) revealed irregular branching laceration of the right superior hepatic segments with extension into the hepatic veins. No active extravasation of contrast material was seen. On the next day, cause of the deterioration of the patient's condition, CT examination was repeated and revealed focal extravasation of contrast material in the portal hilum posterior to the gallbladder. An injury of the right hepatic vein was found on laparotomy. Hepatic vein injury is a rare but very serious complication after blunt liver trauma and it is an indication for surgical treatment. Diagnostic imaging is essential for therapeutic decisions, but its value is sometimes limited.The precise analysis of injury mechanism and localization may be very helpful.CT is currently the modality of choice for the evaluation of blunt liver trauma. If an active bleeding is suspected the delayed scans seem to be recommended. (author)

  5. Evaluation and Management of Blunt Solid Organ Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jonathan G; Shah, Jay; Robinson, Craig; Dariushnia, Sean

    2017-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in patients under the age of 45 and generally associated with a high kinetic energy event such as a motor vehicle accident or fall from extreme elevations. Blunt trauma can affect every organ system and major vascular structure with potentially devastating effect. When we consider abdominal solid organ injury from blunt trauma, we usually think of the liver, spleen, and kidneys. However, all of the abdominal organs, including the pancreas and adrenal glands, may be involved. Blunt hepatic trauma is more commonly associated with venous bleeding rather than arterial injury. Stable venous injury is often managed conservatively; when the patient is hemodynamically unstable from venous hepatic injury, operative management should be first-line therapy. When the injury is arterial, endovascular therapy should be initiated. Blunt trauma to the spleen is the most common cause of traumatic injury to the spleen. Management is controversial. In our institution unstable patients are taken to the operating room, and stable patients with Grades IV-V injuries and patients with active arterial injury are taken for endovascular treatment. Renal injuries are less common, and evidence of arterial injury such as active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm is warranted before endovascular therapy. Pancreatic trauma is uncommon and usually secondary to steering wheel/handlebar mechanism injuries. Adrenal injuries are rare in the absence of megatrauma or underlying adrenal abnormality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A case report of vibration-induced hand comorbidities in a postwoman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violante Francesco S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged exposure to hand-transmitted vibration is associated with an increased occurrence of symptoms and signs of disorders in the vascular, neurological and osteoarticular systems of the upper limbs. However, the available epidemiological evidence is derived from studies on high vibration levels caused by vibratory tools, whereas little is known about possible upper limb disorders caused by chronic exposure to low vibration levels emitted by fixed sources. Case presentation We present the case of a postwoman who delivered mail for 15 years using a low-powered motorcycle. The woman was in good health until 2002, when she was diagnosed with bilateral Raynaud's phenomenon. In March 2003 a bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome was electromyographically diagnosed; surgical treatment was ineffective. Further examinations in 2005 highlighted the presence of chronic tendonitis (right middle finger flexor. Risk assessment From 1987, for 15 years, our patient rode her motorcycle for 4 h/day, carrying a load of 20-30 kg. For about a quarter of the time she drove over country roads. Using the information collected about the tasks carried out every day by the postwoman and some measurements performed on both handles of the motorcycle, as well as on both iron parts of the handlebars, we reconstructed the woman's previous exposure to hand-arm vibration. 8-hour energy-equivalent frequency weighted acceleration was about 2.4 m/s2. The lifetime dose was 1.5 × 109(m2/s4hd. Conclusions The particular set of comorbidities presented by our patient suggests a common pathophysiological basis for all the diseases. Considering the level of exposure to vibrations and the lack of specific knowledge on the effects of vibration in women, we hypothesize an association between the work exposure and the onset of the diseases.

  7. On the use of naturalistic methods to examine safety-relevant behaviours amongst children and evaluate a cycling education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J; Dozza, M; Patton, D A; Maharaj, P; Boufous, S; Eveston, T

    2017-11-01

    School-based cycling education programs aim to improve cycling safety and participation amongst children. Available research suggests that typical programs, which focus on bicycle manoeuvring skills, have limited effects on behaviour observed on a track or planned route. The current study uses theoretically more valid, naturalistic cycling data, to evaluate Safe Cycle, a program that incorporates hazard and self-awareness training. Soon after Safe Cycle was delivered at treatment schools, research bicycles instrumented with a rearward- and a forward-facing camera were loaned to six children from treatment schools and six children from (waitlist) control schools. In each group half the children were in Year 6, and half were in Year 7/8. Each child was instructed to ride the research bicycle instead of their own bicycle for the 1-2 weeks that they had a research bicycle. Video data were reduced using a purpose-designed coding scheme that identified whether participants performed specific safety-relevant behaviours in appropriate circumstances. While the participants controlled their bicycles well, gave way appropriately to traffic at intersections, and stopped at red lights, participants frequently removed one or both hands from the handlebars, and seldom signalled turns, conducted over-shoulder-checks when changing lanes, or looked in multiple directions at intersections (except when crossing a road). While aspects of design and small sample sizes limited evaluation findings, this research demonstrated the feasibility and potential of naturalistic data to support cycling education program evaluation. Further, the study substantially extended available naturalistic study of children's cycling behaviour to highlight behaviours which might be targeted by cycling safety initiatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. External Hand Forces Exerted by Long-Term Care Staff to Push Floor-Based Lifts: Effects of Flooring System and Resident Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Chantelle C; Korall, Alexandra M B; Russell, Colin M; Feldman, Fabio; Robinovitch, Stephen N; Mackey, Dawn C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of flooring type and resident weight on external hand forces required to push floor-based lifts in long-term care (LTC). Novel compliant flooring is designed to reduce fall-related injuries among LTC residents but may increase forces required for staff to perform pushing tasks. A motorized lift may offset the effect of flooring on push forces. Fourteen female LTC staff performed straight-line pushes with two floor-based lifts (conventional, motor driven) loaded with passengers of average and 90th-percentile resident weights over four flooring systems (concrete+vinyl, compliant+vinyl, concrete+carpet, compliant+carpet). Initial and sustained push forces were measured by a handlebar-mounted triaxial load cell and compared to participant-specific tolerance limits. Participants rated pushing difficulty. Novel compliant flooring increased initial and sustained push forces and subjective ratings compared to concrete flooring. Compared to the conventional lift, the motor-driven lift substantially reduced initial and sustained push forces and perceived difficulty of pushing for all four floors and both resident weights. Participants exerted forces above published tolerance limits only when using the conventional lift on the carpet conditions (concrete+carpet, compliant+carpet). With the motor-driven lift only, resident weight did not affect push forces. Novel compliant flooring increased linear push forces generated by LTC staff using floor-based lifts, but forces did not exceed tolerance limits when pushing over compliant+vinyl. The motor-driven lift substantially reduced push forces compared to the conventional lift. Results may help to address risk of work-related musculoskeletal injury, especially in locations with novel compliant flooring. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  9. Oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Mountain biking injuries in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Kylee B; Meyers, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, the sport of mountain biking has experienced extensive growth in youth participation. Due to the unpredictable nature of outdoor sport, a lack of rider awareness and increased participation, the number of injuries has unnecessarily increased. Many believe that the actual incidence of trauma in this sport is underestimated and is just the 'tip of the iceberg'. The most common mechanism of injury is usually attributed to downhill riding and forward falling. Although rare, this type of fall can result in serious cranial and thoraco-abdominal trauma. Head and neck trauma continue to be documented, often resulting in concussions and the possibility of permanent neurological sequelae. Upper limb injuries range from minor dermal abrasions, contusions and muscular strains to complex particular fracture dislocations. These are caused by attempting to arrest the face with an outstretched hand, leading to additional direct injury. Common overuse injuries include repeated compression from the handlebars and vibration leading to neurovascular complications in the hands. Along with reports of blunt abdominal trauma and lumbar muscle strains, lower extremity injuries may include various hip/pelvic/groin contusions, patellofemoral inflammation, and various muscle strains. The primary causes of mountain biking injuries in children and adolescents include overuse, excessive fatigue, age, level of experience, and inappropriate or improperly adjusted equipment. Additional factors contributing to trauma among this age group involve musculoskeletal immaturity, collisions and falls, excessive speed, environmental conditions, conditioning and fitness status of the rider, nonconservative behavioural patterns, and inadequate medical care. The limited available data restrict the identification and understanding of specific paediatric mountain biking injuries and injury mechanisms. Education about unnecessary risk of injury, use of protective equipment, suitable bikes

  11. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 22-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of right shoulder pain after a motocross accident. He was traveling at approximately 10 mph around a turn when he lost control and was thrown over the handlebars, landing directly on his right shoulder. On arrival, he was holding his arm in adduction and internal rotation. An area of swelling was noted over his anterior shoulder. He was unable to abduct his shoulder. No humeral gapping was noted. He had normal neuro-vascular status distal to the injury. Significant findings: Radiographs demonstrated posterior displacement of the humeral head on the “Y” view (see white arrow and widening of the glenohumeral joint space on anterior-posterior view (see red arrow. The findings were consistent with posterior dislocation and a Hill-Sachs type deformity. Sedation was performed and reduction was attempted using external rotation, traction counter-traction. An immediate “pop” was felt during the procedure. Post-procedure radiographs revealed a persistent posterior subluxation with interlocking at posterior glenoid. CT revealed posterior dislocation with acute depressed impaction deformity medial to the biceps groove with the humeral head perched on the posterior glenoid, interlocked at reverse Hill-Sachs deformity (see blue arrow. Discussion: Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare and represent only 2% of all shoulder dislocations. Posterior shoulder dislocations are missed on initial diagnosis in more than 60% of cases.1 Posterior shoulder dislocations result from axial loading of the adducted and internally rotated shoulder, violent muscle contractions (resulting from seizures or electrocution, a direct posterior force applied to the anterior shoulder.1 Physical findings include decreased anterior prominence of the humeral head, increased palpable posterior prominence of the humeral head below the acromion, increased palpable prominence of the

  12. Miserere. Aesthetics of Terror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Incampo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available I say: “Oh, what a beautiful surrealist picture!” With quite precise awareness: this páthos, these emotions of mine do not stem from our common sense. An aesthetic judgment is founded on an immediate subjective intuition: an emotion or a free feeling of a single subject towards an object. A universal sense, possibly. Some judgments of ours in ethics and in law are no different from our perceptions in front of art. It would be the same for a hypothetical sentence of the judge that concluded with these words: “I acquit Arsenio Lupin because of his magnificent handlebar moustache like that of Guy de Maupassant”. Everyone would think intuitively that it is an unfair sentence. Is there aesthetics of terror? The case that the article intends to examine is that of the famous kidnapping and murder of the Italian statesman Aldo Moro by the “Brigate Rosse” [Red Brigades] (1978. The method used here consists in studying the image of the kidnapping as iconic documentation of reality, and, above all, as an ethical-legal judgment about the terrorist crime. Moro was photographed during his kidnapping. There are at least two pictures. Both constitute an extraordinary source for a judgment on the basis of an image. In both of them, Aldo Moro is pictured in front of a Red Brigades banner during the captivity. In what sense do these pictures document an aesthetic judgment concerning the “case Moro”? The answer can be found in a remarkable iconic coincidence of these pictures with a masterpiece by Georges Rouault (Paris 1871-1958 devoted to the theme of the “Ecce Homo”. The Gospel in the “Ecce Homo” scene (John: 19, 4-5 narrates how Pontius Pilate wanted to arouse the compassion of the people with a scourging and the exposure of Jesus to the crowd. The plate under consideration is entitled “Qui ne se grime pas?” [Who does not have a painted face?] and is a key work in Rouault’s suite of prints Miserere, dated for 1923.

  13. Positive Pacing Strategies Are Utilized by Elite Male and Female Para-cyclists in Short Time Trials in the Velodrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rachel L

    2015-01-01

    In para-cycling, competitors are classed based on functional impairment resulting in cyclists with neurological and locomotor impairments competing against each other. In Paralympic competition, classes are combined by using a factoring adjustment to race times to produce the overall medallists. Pacing in short-duration track cycling events is proposed to utilize an "all-out" strategy in able-bodied competition. However, pacing in para-cycling may vary depending on the level of impairment. Analysis of the pacing strategies employed by different classification groups may offer scope for optimal performance; therefore, this study investigated the pacing strategy adopted during the 1-km time trial (TT) and 500-m TT in elite C1 to C3 para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists. Total times and intermediate split times (125-m intervals; measured to 0.001 s) were obtained from the C1-C3 men's 1-km TT (n = 28) and women's 500-m TT (n = 9) from the 2012 Paralympic Games and the men's 1-km TT (n = 19) and women's 500-m TT (n = 12) from the 2013 UCI World Track Championships from publically available video. Split times were expressed as actual time, factored time (for the para-cyclists) and as a percentage of total time. A two-way analysis of variance was used to investigate differences in split times between the different classifications and the able-bodied cyclists in the men's 1-km TT and between the para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists in the women's 500-m TT. The importance of position at the first split was investigated with Kendall's Tau-b correlation. The first 125-m split time was the slowest for all cyclists, representing the acceleration phase from a standing start. C2 cyclists were slowest at this 125-m split, probably due to a combination of remaining seated in this acceleration phase and a high proportion of cyclists in this group being trans-femoral amputees. Not all cyclists used aero-bars, preferring to use drop, flat or bullhorn handlebars. Split times

  14. Positive pacing strategies are utilised by elite male and female para-cyclists in short time trials in the velodrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Lindsey Wright

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In para-cycling, competitors are classed based on functional impairment resulting in cyclists with neurological and locomotor impairments competing against each other. In Paralympic competition, classes are combined by using a factoring adjustment to race times to produce the overall medallists. Pacing in short-duration track cycling events is proposed to utilise an all-out strategy in able-bodied competition. However, pacing in para-cycling may vary depending on the level of impairment. Analysis of the pacing strategies employed by different classification groups may offer scope for optimal performance; therefore, this study investigated the pacing strategy adopted during the 1-km time trial (TT and 500-m TT in elite C1 to C3 para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists. Total times and intermediate split times (125-m intervals; measured to 0.001s were obtained from the C1-C3 men’s 1-km TT (n=28 and women’s 500-m TT (n=9 from the 2012 Paralympic Games and the men’s 1-km TT (n=19 and women’s 500-m TT (n=12 from the 2013 UCI World Track Championships from publically available video. Split times were expressed as actual time, factored time (for the para-cyclists and as a percentage of total time. A two-way analysis of variance was used to investigate differences in split times between the different classifications and the able-bodied cyclists in the men’s 1-km TT and between the para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists in the women’s 500-m TT. The importance of position at the first split was investigated with Kendall’s Tau-b correlation. The first 125-m split time was the slowest for all cyclists, representing the acceleration phase from a standing start. C2 cyclists were slowest at this 125-m split, probably due to a combination of remaining seated in this acceleration phase and a high proportion of cyclists in this group being trans-femoral amputees. Not all cyclists used aero-bars, preferring to use drop, flat or bullhorn handlebars