WorldWideScience

Sample records for handicap ten research

  1. Ten recommendations for software engineering in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Janna; Haug, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Research in the context of data-driven science requires a backbone of well-written software, but scientific researchers are typically not trained at length in software engineering, the principles for creating better software products. To address this gap, in particular for young researchers new to programming, we give ten recommendations to ensure the usability, sustainability and practicality of research software.

  2. Self-Handicapping Behavior: A Critical Review of Empirical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsrud, Robert Steven

    Since the identification of self-handicapping strategies in 1978, considerable attention has been paid to this phenomenon. Self-handicapping is a strategy for discounting ability attributions for probable failure while augmenting ability attributions for possible success. Behavioral self-handicaps are conceptually distinct from self-reported…

  3. Aurally Handicapped -- Research; A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 625.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Information Center on Exceptional Children.

    The selected bibliography of research on aurally handicapped children contains approximately 95 abstracts with indexing information explained to be drawn from the computer file of abstracts representing the Council for Exceptional Children Information Center's complete holdings as of August, 1972. Abstracts are said to be chosen using the criteria…

  4. Mid-term evaluation of ten National Research schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Göran; Dahl, Hanne Marlene; Gustafsson, Christina

    the scheme was launched, the Research Council has issued three calls for proposals and allocated grants to a total of 22 national research schools. Five were started up in 2009, ten in 2013 and seven in 2015. A Nordic scientific programme committee was appointed in 2013, with responsibility for assessing...... grant applications, monitoring the progress of the FORSKERSKOLER scheme and serving as the evaluation panel for the mid-term evaluation in 2013 and in 2016/2017. The task of the evaluation panel has been to: 1) evaluate the quality of and progress achieved by the ten research schools which were awarded...... funding in 2012 and launched in 2013; and 2) to provide recommendations as to whether funding should be continued to cover the full eight-year period or terminated after five years. Continued funding is recommended for all ten schools to cover the full eight-year period, according to the proposed budget...

  5. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  6. The next ten years in neonatology: new directions in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Fanos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a prelude to proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology to be held in Cagliari, Italy from October 21st to 25th, 2014. These proceedings will be a significant milestone, highlighting the new frontiers of perinatal and neonatal research. Over the five days of this meeting, we aim to (1 examine the roots of the new directions in perinatal and neonatal research; (2 predict the trajectories of advancement in medical technologies, research, clinical care and teaching that will be the future of perinatology and neonatology. The discussion will be in four sections:back to the future: the placenta and perinatal programming;paradigm shift: the revolution of metabolomics in perinatalogy and neonatology;brave new world: the microbiome and microbiomics from perinatal to adult life;new inhabitants on the planet earth: adults who were born with extremely low birth weight. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  7. Current and Past Research on Autistic Children and Their Families. Conducted by Division TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children). TEACCH Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopler, Eric

    This report summarizes research conducted by, or in collaboration with, the Division TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped CHildren) of the Department of Psychiatry in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill. The summaries contain bibliographic citations for published papers…

  8. Ten steps to conducting health professional education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen; Caldwell, Patrina; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-08-01

    The approaches used to educate future clinicians must be continually improved through evidence-based methods. Clinicians interested in conducting education research need to understand the terminology and conventions of health professional education, in the same way that health professional educators from education backgrounds need to be aware of clinical practices and scientific mores and jargon. This article provides clinicians with 10 steps to conducting health professional education research, and encourages collaboration between clinicians interested in education and health professional educators. The basic steps in conducting education research are introduced, beginning with literature searches, using appropriate terminology and writing conventions, and finding research collaborators. We encourage researchers to ask themselves, 'So what?' about their research idea to ensure it is interesting and relevant to a journal's readers. The nuts and bolts of educational research are then presented, including research questions and methodologies, outcome measures, theoretical frameworks and epistemologies. The final two steps aim to foster internationally relevant and well-designed research studies. Conducting and publishing education research is often difficult for clinicians, who struggle with what is required. Yet clinicians who teach are ideally placed to identify the knowledge gaps about how we can more effectively educate future clinicians. These 10 steps provide clinicians with guidance on how to conduct education research so relevant research findings can inform the education of future clinicians. Conducting and publishing education research is often difficult for clinicians. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Ten Year Citation Analysis of Major Australian Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Robin J.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Excellence in Research for Australia scheme has heightened debate amongst research institutions over the use of metrics such as citations, especially given the ready availability of citation data. An analysis is presented of the citation performance of nine Australian universities and the Commonwealth Scientific, Industrial…

  10. Research, records and responsibility ten years of PARADISEC

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Research, records and responsibility' explores developments in collaborative archiving practice between archives and the communities they serve and represent, incorporating case studies of historical recordings, visual data and material culture.

  11. Development of a ten-year pulse research strategy | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In particular, research funding for pulse crops is a fraction of investments made in ... As a result, global pulse crop production has remained relatively stagnant in yield per ... mechanisms, in particular for small-holder farmers in Africa and Asia.

  12. Adoption research, practice, and societal trends: Ten years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Mary O'Leary

    2017-12-01

    Adoption involves the legal transfer of parental rights and responsibilities from a child's birth parents to adults who will raise the child (Reitz & Watson, 1992). Research related to adoption has expanded over the past 10 years and has incorporated more focus on implications for practice and public policy. This expansion has reflected increased awareness of the lived experience of adopted individuals, in addition to that of adoptive families and birth or first parents and families, collectively known as the adoption kinship network (Grotevant & McRoy, 1998). Trends discussed included research and social trends or movements (2007-2017) since the publication of the final article in a series of articles in the psychological literature related to adoption in The Counseling Psychologist (Baden & Wiley, 2007; Lee, 2003; O'Brien & Zamostny, 2003; Wiley & Baden, 2005; Zamostny, O'Brien, Baden, & Wiley, 2003; Zamostny, Wiley, O'Brien, Lee, & Baden, 2003). This article summarizes the social trends and research related to adoption over the last 10 years, including longitudinal and meta-analytic studies, increased research and conceptualization of ethnic and racial identity development, research on microaggressions, and research on diverse adoptive families, including those with gay and lesbian parents. Social trends included increased knowledge related to Internet accessibility, genetic information, continued focus on openness, and viewing adoption through a more critical lens. Implications are discussed for the development of programs that enhance competence of mental health professionals and adoption professionals in adoption-competent practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Hospital usage of marketing research over a ten year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, P M

    1995-01-01

    The acceptance and use of marketing techniques and concepts in the health care area is a phenomenon well known to most marketers. Prior to 1979, marketing in the health care field was relatively unknown. Since that time, however, the growth of health care marketing has not been accompanied by commensurate growth in marketing research efforts.

  14. Arts for the Handicapped Child. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Committee, Arts for the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    Presented is a collection of case studies by therapists, educators, artists, parents, and recreation leaders, dealing with the arts as learning experiences for handicapped children. Each of the ten articles records the positive effects of arts experiences (dance, art, music, drama) on the growth and development of a particular handicapped child or…

  15. The Journal of Real Estate Research: A Ten-Year Review

    OpenAIRE

    G. Donald Jud

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a catalogue of the papers published in The Journal of Real Estate Research during its first ten years of operation, 1986-96. Articles are indexed by volume and number of The Journal, author, title, and subject.

  16. New Directions in Vocational Education for the Handicapped: Implications for Research and Development. Occasional Paper No. 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Edwin

    The history of educational programming for the handicapped has unfortunately been one of quiet discrimination. This pattern has come from the evolution of an isolation-based society. Society is moving increasingly toward the human and equity-based treatment of disabled people. Reflecting some court decisions, the Education of the Handicapped Act…

  17. Ten Reasons to Still Keep the Focus on Teen Childbearing. Research Brief, Publication #2009-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Emily; Peterson, Kristen; Manlove, Jennifer; Scarupa, Harriet J., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, Child Trends drew on statistics and research findings to produce a report called "Ten Reasons to Keep the Focus on Teen Childbearing." That report took note of the steady decline in the nation's teenage pregnancy and childbearing rates, beginning in 1991, while citing multiple reasons to continue to be concerned about teen childbearing.…

  18. Three Preschool Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta--Interviews with Parents. Handicap Research Group Report No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Jane; Millde, Kristina

    The report describes three preschool Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and the psychosocial support families require from society. Introductory sections explain the condition, review international research on brittle bones, consider the life situation of children with brittle bones, and examine societal support for…

  19. Educational virtual environments: A ten-year review of empirical research (1999-2009)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikropoulos, Tassos; Natsis, Antonios

    2011-01-01

    This study is a ten-year critical review of empirical research on the educational applications of Virtual Reality (VR). Results show that although the majority of the 53 reviewed articles refer to science and mathematics, researchers from social sciences also seem to appreciate the educational...... value of VR and incorporate their learning goals in Educational Virtual Environments (EVEs). Although VR supports multisensory interaction channels, visual representations predominate. Few are the studies that incorporate intuitive interactivity, indicating a research trend in this direction. Few...

  20. Review of the Studies on Self-Handicapping

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 忠弘

    1992-01-01

    Since Jones & Berglas (1978) presented the conception of self-handicapping, a lot of empirical research on self-handicapping was reported. Some reseachers drew a distinction between ""acquired"" (or ""behavioral"") self-handicapping such as drug ingestion, alcohol consumption, effort reduction, and choosing a difficult task, and ""claimed"" (or ""self-reported"") self-handicapping such as verbal claim to be ill, socially anxious, test anxious, or in a bad mood. This paper reviewed these studi...

  1. Low trait self-control predicts self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Knee, C Raymond

    2012-02-01

    Past research has shown that self-handicapping stems from uncertainty about one's ability and self-presentational concerns. The present studies suggest that low dispositional self-control is also associated with self-handicapping. In 3 studies (N = 289), the association between self-control and self-handicapping was tested. Self-control was operationalized as trait self-control, whereas self-handicapping was operationalized as trait self-handicapping in Study 1 (N = 160), self-reported self-handicapping in Study 2 (N = 74), and behavioral self-handicapping in Study 3 (N = 55). In all 3 studies, hierarchical regression analyses revealed that low self-control predicts self-handicapping, independent of self-esteem, self-doubt, social desirability, and gender. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ten year experience with student pharmacist research within a health system and education center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalets, Elizabeth Landrum; Williams, Charlene; Park, Irene

    2018-03-01

    Skills gained from research experience allow student pharmacists to evolve as practitioners, innovators and perpetual learners in an increasingly complex healthcare environment. Data published regarding pharmacy resident research are focused on external dissemination rates and research programs. Little is published regarding student research. This descriptive study was a five-year before and after comparison between the existing co-curricular model and a new longitudinal, 12-month research advanced pharmacy practice experience (L-APPE) model for student pharmacist research. The objective was to describe the development and transition to the L-APPE and compare the models in external dissemination rates and preceptor-classified impact on patient care. Preceptors were surveyed to characterize the impact on the health care institution. Over a ten-year period, 65 fourth year students engaged in research. From 2006-2011, 28 students (43.4% of student cohort) completed co-curricular research projects. From 2011-2016, 37 students (40.2% of student cohort) completed the L-APPE. The number of national poster presentations increased 6-fold with the L-APPE, from 6 (21.4%) to 36 (97.3%) (p posters and peer reviewed publications had a 350% higher occurrence (RR 4.5, 95% CI 1.9-10.9; p meaningful practice model or prescribing pattern benefits. Additional study of pharmacy student research is warranted. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Status of national health research systems in ten countries of the WHO African Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirigia Joses M

    2006-10-01

    . Four out of the ten countries reported that they had a budget line for health research in the Ministry of Health budget document. Conclusion Governments of countries of the African Region, with the support of development partners, private sector and civil society, urgently need to improve the research policy environment by developing health research policies, strategic plans, legislations, programmes and rolling plans with the involvement of all stakeholders, e.g., relevant sectors, research organizations, communities, industry and donors. In a nutshell, development of high-performing national health research systems in the countries of the WHO African Region, though optional, is an imperative. It may be the only way of breaking free from the current vicious cycle of ill-health and poverty.

  4. Citizens and Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stanley B., Jr.

    In a speech delivered at the National Easter Seal Society's Annual Convention (1974), the author discusses progress toward full citizenship for the handicapped focusing on the roles of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) and the Office for the Handicapped, Constitutional guarantees of equal rights for all citizens, and national…

  5. Teaching the Handicapped Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Sarah

    1983-01-01

    The article describes exercises in drama and creative writing to broaden the imaginations of visually handicapped children through stories and poems with a nonvisual imagery. Examples of stories and poems written specifically for the visually handicapped are included. (Author/CL)

  6. ISRIA statement: ten-point guidelines for an effective process of research impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Paula; Ovseiko, Pavel V; Grant, Jonathan; Graham, Kathryn E A; Boukhris, Omar F; Dowd, Anne-Maree; Balling, Gert V; Christensen, Rikke N; Pollitt, Alexandra; Taylor, Mark; Sued, Omar; Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Chorzempa, Heidi

    2018-02-08

    As governments, funding agencies and research organisations worldwide seek to maximise both the financial and non-financial returns on investment in research, the way the research process is organised and funded is becoming increasingly under scrutiny. There are growing demands and aspirations to measure research impact (beyond academic publications), to understand how science works, and to optimise its societal and economic impact. In response, a multidisciplinary practice called research impact assessment is rapidly developing. Given that the practice is still in its formative stage, systematised recommendations or accepted standards for practitioners (such as funders and those responsible for managing research projects) across countries or disciplines to guide research impact assessment are not yet available.In this statement, we propose initial guidelines for a rigorous and effective process of research impact assessment applicable to all research disciplines and oriented towards practice. This statement systematises expert knowledge and practitioner experience from designing and delivering the International School on Research Impact Assessment (ISRIA). It brings together insights from over 450 experts and practitioners from 34 countries, who participated in the school during its 5-year run (from 2013 to 2017) and shares a set of core values from the school's learning programme. These insights are distilled into ten-point guidelines, which relate to (1) context, (2) purpose, (3) stakeholders' needs, (4) stakeholder engagement, (5) conceptual frameworks, (6) methods and data sources, (7) indicators and metrics, (8) ethics and conflicts of interest, (9) communication, and (10) community of practice.The guidelines can help practitioners improve and standardise the process of research impact assessment, but they are by no means exhaustive and require evaluation and continuous improvement. The prima facie effectiveness of the guidelines is based on the systematised

  7. Anatomical correlates of self-handicapping tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos M; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-04-01

    Self-handicaps are obstacles created (or claimed) by individuals in anticipation of failure. Despite the vast amount of psychological research on self-handicapping tendency, the neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in self-handicapping tendency in young and healthy subjects are unknown. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and a questionnaire to measure individual self-handicapping tendency, and we investigated the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and self-handicapping tendency across the brain in healthy young adult (mean age, 21.3 years; standard deviation - SD = 1.9) men (n = 94) and women (n = 91). We discovered that higher individual self-handicapping tendency was associated with larger rGMV in the subgenual cingulate gyrus (sgCG). A wide range of previous studies showed (a) the opposite pattern is seen in the association between rGMV in the sgCG and depression and (b) this area is active when negative emotions are suppressed. The present results suggest that the sgCG is also involved in self-handicapping, which is a behavior thought to be engaged in the protection of self-esteem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. "I know you self-handicapped last exam": gender differences in reactions to self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Edward R; McCrea, Sean M; Boris, Hillary I

    2003-01-01

    Past research has shown that self-handicapping involves the trade-off of ability-related attributional benefits for interpersonal costs. Study 1 examined whether perceiver or target sex moderates impressions of self-handicapping targets. Although target sex was not an important factor, female perceivers were consistently more critical of behavioral self-handicappers. Two additional studies replicated this gender difference with variations of the handicap. Study 3 examined the motives inferred by perceivers and found that women not only view self-handicappers as more unmotivated but also report greater suspicion of self-handicapping motives; furthermore, these differences in perceived motives mediated sex differences in reactions to self-handicappers. Implications for the effectiveness of self-handicapping as an impression management strategy are discussed.

  9. Creative Climate: A global ten-year communications, research and learning project about environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M. A.; Smith, J.

    2010-12-01

    The next ten years have been described by influential science and policy figures as ‘the most important in human history’. Many believe that the actions taken will decide whether we catastrophically change the atmosphere and eradicate our fellow species or find an alternative, less-damaging development path. But communications and public engagement initiatives have tended to focus on near term impacts or debates - whether they emphasise hazards, or trumpet ‘solutions’. There are signs of diminishing returns on communications and public engagement efforts, and serious obstacles to engaging around 40% of publics in e.g. the US and the UK. The Creative Climate web project takes a new approach, inviting people to see humanity’s intellectual and practical journey with these issues as an inspiring, dynamic and unfolding story. We are inviting people to join us in building a huge living archive of experiences and ideas that respond to these issues. The website will collect thoughts and stories from doorstep to workplace, from lab to garden; from international conference to community meeting - from all over the world. The body of diaries lie at the core of the project, but these are supplemented by the offer of free online learning resources and broadcast-quality audio and video materials. The project is experimental in terms of its scope, its approach to environmental communications and debate and in its use of media. It works with formal partners, including the BBC, yet also makes the most of the opportunities for user generated content to create a rich multimedia resource that can support research, learning and engagement. The design of the project is informed by environmental social science and communications research, and by an awareness of the unfolding potential of Internet based communications to support social change. It is also intended that the Creative Climate platform will develop so as to serve researchers by offering an open resource of qualitative

  10. Research on pinch devices of tens of kA to MA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, L.; Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Silvester, G.; Zambra, M. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Pavez, C.; Saavedra, R. [Univ. de Concepcion (Chile); Bruzzone, H. [Pladema (Antiqua and Barbuda)]|[Univ. de Mar del Plata and CONICET (Argentina); Barbaglia, M. [Pladema (Antiqua and Barbuda); Mayer, R. [Pladema (Antiqua and Barbuda)]|[Inst. Balseiro, Bariloche, CNEA and CONICET (Argentina); Sidelnikov, Y.; Kies, W. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    At present the Plasma Physics and Plasma Technology Group of the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN) has the experimental facilities in order to study dense transient discharges in a wide range of energy and current, namely: (I) energy from tens of joules to hundred of kilojoules, (II) current from tens of kiloamperes to some mega-amperes. Also several diagnostics have been implemented. An overview of the work being carried out on dense pinch discharges at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear is presented. (orig.)

  11. Research on pinch devices of tens of kA to MA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, L.; Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Silvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Pavez, C.; Saavedra, R.; Bruzzone, H.; Barbaglia, M.; Mayer, R.; Sidelnikov, Y.; Kies, W.

    2004-01-01

    At present the Plasma Physics and Plasma Technology Group of the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN) has the experimental facilities in order to study dense transient discharges in a wide range of energy and current, namely: (I) energy from tens of joules to hundred of kilojoules, (II) current from tens of kiloamperes to some mega-amperes. Also several diagnostics have been implemented. An overview of the work being carried out on dense pinch discharges at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear is presented. (orig.)

  12. Facilitating creativity in handicapped and non-handicapped children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prime objective of this paper is to create awareness on the presence of the handicapped in Nigeria and the need to facilitate creative potentials in handicapped and non-handicapped children. Various factors that could facilitate creativity and other factors that could inhibit creativity were discussed. The implications for ...

  13. Handicap, Architecture & Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    Cd-rommen er et visuelt projekteringsværktøj for byggeriets parter. Den viser nogle af de problemer mennesker med handicap har ved at færdes i de fysiske omgivelser, men peger også mulige løsninger for at gøre omgivelserne tilgængelige for alle....

  14. The Multiply Handicapped Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, James M., Ed.; Anderson, Robert M., Ed.

    Articles presented in the area of the medical and educational challenge of the multiply handicapped child are an overview of the problem, the increasing challenge, congenital malformations, children whose mothers had rubella, prematurity and deafness, the epidemiology of reproductive casualty, and new education for old problems. Discussions of…

  15. Frequency of Divorce Among Parents of Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufeit, Lawrence J.; Wurster, Stanley R.

    Seventy-six parents of handicapped children were surveyed to compare the frequency of divorce in the sample population to that of the U.S. population. A research review revealed that the first-born child causes extensive to severe crises in the parents' marital relationship; that the presence of a child with a handicapping condition causes a…

  16. Self-Handicapping by Task Choice: An Attribute Ambiguity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Mitchell M.; And Others

    Self-handicapping strategies are behaviors or choices of performance settings which allow people to maintain self-esteem by avoiding negative self-relevant attributions. People will behave in such a way that accurate, nonambiguous attributions about their performance cannot be made. Research on self-handicapping has focused on clinically relevant…

  17. Personal Integration Resources of Mentally Handicapped Teenagers into Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the issues concerning the study of mentally handicapped teenagers' integrative potential within modernisation of contemporary Russian education. The research is concentrated on the study of personal and social determinants influencing the readiness of mentally handicapped students to be integrated into the environment.…

  18. Non-Discriminatory Psychological Assessment of the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William R.

    In 1979 the National Research Council established a panel to study testing of handicapped people for selection and placement purposes in educational and employment settings. The study involved the review of relevant literature, solicitation of pertinent information from organizations representing handicapped persons and from professionals involved…

  19. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Subcommittee (ASCAC) Report: Top Ten Exascale Research Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Robert [University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute; Ang, James [Sandia National Laboratories; Bergman, Keren [Columbia University; Borkar, Shekhar [Intel; Carlson, William [Institute for Defense Analyses; Carrington, Laura [University of California, San Diego; Chiu, George [IBM; Colwell, Robert [DARPA; Dally, William [NVIDIA; Dongarra, Jack [University of Tennessee; Geist, Al [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Haring, Rud [IBM; Hittinger, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Hoisie, Adolfy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Klein, Dean Micron; Kogge, Peter [University of Notre Dame; Lethin, Richard [Reservoir Labs; Sarkar, Vivek [Rice University; Schreiber, Robert [Hewlett Packard; Shalf, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Sterling, Thomas [Indiana University; Stevens, Rick [Argonne National Laboratory; Bashor, Jon [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Brightwell, Ron [Sandia National Laboratories; Coteus, Paul [IBM; Debenedictus, Erik [Sandia National Laboratories; Hiller, Jon [Science and Technology Associates; Kim, K. H. [IBM; Langston, Harper [Reservoir Labs; Murphy, Richard Micron; Webster, Clayton [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Wild, Stefan [Argonne National Laboratory; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Rob [Argonne National Laboratory; Leyffer, Sven [Argonne National Laboratory; Laros III, James [Sandia National Laboratories

    2014-02-10

    Exascale computing systems are essential for the scientific fields that will transform the 21st century global economy, including energy, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and materials science. Progress in these fields is predicated on the ability to perform advanced scientific and engineering simulations, and analyze the deluge of data. On July 29, 2013, ASCAC was charged by Patricia Dehmer, the Acting Director of the Office of Science, to assemble a subcommittee to provide advice on exascale computing. This subcommittee was directed to return a list of no more than ten technical approaches (hardware and software) that will enable the development of a system that achieves the Department's goals for exascale computing. Numerous reports over the past few years have documented the technical challenges and the non¬-viability of simply scaling existing computer designs to reach exascale. The technical challenges revolve around energy consumption, memory performance, resilience, extreme concurrency, and big data. Drawing from these reports and more recent experience, this ASCAC subcommittee has identified the top ten computing technology advancements that are critical to making a capable, economically viable, exascale system.

  20. Growth motivation as a moderator of behavioral self-handicapping in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christina M; Park, Sun W; Folger, Susan F

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral self-handicapping is a strategy used to protect attributions about ability. People behaviorally self-handicap by creating an obstacle to their success so failure is attributed to the obstacle instead of to their ability. Although past research has observed behavioral self-handicapping exclusively in men, the current research revealed a moderator of behavioral self-handicapping in women: growth motivation, which reflects the desire to develop one's abilities and learn from failure. Participants (N = 100) completed a test purportedly predictive of successful careers and relationships, and some were given failure feedback about their performance. Participants could behaviorally self-handicap by choosing to complete another test in a performance-impairing environment. Although men self-handicapped more overall, women self-handicapped more after failure when they were low in growth motivation. These results highlight a novel moderator of behavioral self-handicapping in women.

  1. Top ten research priorities for spinal cord injury: the methodology and results of a British priority setting partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Middendorp, J J; Allison, H C; Ahuja, S; Bracher, D; Dyson, C; Fairbank, J; Gall, A; Glover, A; Gray, L; Masri, W El; Uttridge, A; Cowan, K

    2016-05-01

    This is a mixed-method consensus development project. The objective of this study was to identify a top ten list of priorities for future research into spinal cord injury (SCI). The British Spinal Cord Injury Priority Setting Partnership was established in 2013 and completed in 2014. Stakeholders included consumer organisations, healthcare professional societies and caregivers. This partnership involved the following four key stages: (i) gathering of research questions, (ii) checking of existing research evidence, (iii) interim prioritisation and (iv) a final consensus meeting to reach agreement on the top ten research priorities. Adult individuals with spinal cord dysfunction because of trauma or non-traumatic causes, including transverse myelitis, and individuals with a cauda equina syndrome (henceforth grouped and referred to as SCI) were invited to participate in this priority setting partnership. We collected 784 questions from 403 survey respondents (290 individuals with SCI), which, after merging duplicate questions and checking systematic reviews for evidence, were reduced to 109 unique unanswered research questions. A total of 293 people (211 individuals with SCI) participated in the interim prioritisation process, leading to the identification of 25 priorities. At a final consensus meeting, a representative group of individuals with SCI, caregivers and health professionals agreed on their top ten research priorities. Following a comprehensive, rigorous and inclusive process, with participation from individuals with SCI, caregivers and health professionals, the SCI research agenda has been defined by people to whom it matters most and should inform the scope and future activities of funders and researchers for the years to come. The NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre provided core funding for this project.

  2. The New York City Subways: The First Ten Years. A Library Research Exercise Using a Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents a library research exercise developed at York College which uses the Apple IIe microcomputer and word processing software--the Applewriter--to teach library research skills. Unlike some other library research exercises on disk, this program allows the student to decide on alternative approaches to solving the given problem:…

  3. Benefits for handicapped children

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of long-term care benefits within the CERN Health Insurance Scheme requires the coordination of the benefits foreseen for handicapped children. Measures were adopted by the Management following the recommendation made by the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 March 2003. A document clarifying these measures is available on the Web at the following address: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/soc/Social_affairs/social_affairs.asp Social Affairs Service 74201

  4. Compassionate use of interventions: results of a European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) survey of ten European countries

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitfield, Kate

    2010-11-12

    Abstract Background \\'Compassionate use\\' programmes allow medicinal products that are not authorised, but are in the development process, to be made available to patients with a severe disease who have no other satisfactory treatment available to them. We sought to understand how such programmes are regulated in ten European Union countries. Methods The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) conducted a comprehensive survey on clinical research regulatory requirements, including questions on regulations of \\'compassionate use\\' programmes. Ten European countries, covering approximately 70% of the EU population, were included in the survey (Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the UK). Results European Regulation 726\\/2004\\/EC is clear on the intentions of \\'compassionate use\\' programmes and aimed to harmonise them in the European Union. The survey reveals that different countries have adopted different requirements and that \\'compassionate use\\' is not interpreted in the same way across Europe. Four of the ten countries surveyed have no formal regulatory system for the programmes. We discuss the need for \\'compassionate use\\' programmes and their regulation where protection of patients is paramount. Conclusions \\'Compassionate use\\' is a misleading term and should be replaced with \\'expanded access\\'. There is a need for expanded access programmes in order to serve the interests of seriously ill patients who have no other treatment options. To protect these patients, European legislation needs to be more explicit and informative with regard to the regulatory requirements, restrictions, and responsibilities in expanded access programmes.

  5. Compassionate use of interventions: results of a European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) survey of ten European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background 'Compassionate use' programmes allow medicinal products that are not authorised, but are in the development process, to be made available to patients with a severe disease who have no other satisfactory treatment available to them. We sought to understand how such programmes are regulated in ten European Union countries. Methods The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) conducted a comprehensive survey on clinical research regulatory requirements, including questions on regulations of 'compassionate use' programmes. Ten European countries, covering approximately 70% of the EU population, were included in the survey (Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the UK). Results European Regulation 726/2004/EC is clear on the intentions of 'compassionate use' programmes and aimed to harmonise them in the European Union. The survey reveals that different countries have adopted different requirements and that 'compassionate use' is not interpreted in the same way across Europe. Four of the ten countries surveyed have no formal regulatory system for the programmes. We discuss the need for 'compassionate use' programmes and their regulation where protection of patients is paramount. Conclusions 'Compassionate use' is a misleading term and should be replaced with 'expanded access'. There is a need for expanded access programmes in order to serve the interests of seriously ill patients who have no other treatment options. To protect these patients, European legislation needs to be more explicit and informative with regard to the regulatory requirements, restrictions, and responsibilities in expanded access programmes. PMID:21073691

  6. The relative age effect in European professional soccer: did ten years of research make any difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Werner F; Baker, Joseph; Michiels, Stijn; Schorer, Joerg; Van Winckel, Jan; Williams, A Mark

    2012-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) refers to an asymmetry in the birth-date distribution favouring players born early in the selection year and discriminating against participants born later in the year. While the RAE effect was initially reported in sport more than two decades ago, there have been few attempts to examine whether player selection strategies have changed over time in light of our improved understanding of the phenomenon. We compared the birth-date distributions of professional soccer players in ten European countries over a 10-year period involving the 2000-2001 and 2010-2011 competitive seasons, respectively. Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests were used to compare differences between the observed and expected birth-date distributions across selection years. Generally, results indicated no change in the RAE over the past 10 years in professional soccer, emphasizing the robust nature of this phenomenon. We propose a change in the structure of youth involvement in soccer to reduce the impact of the RAE on talent identification and selection.

  7. Nuclear research in Strasbourg. The first ten years 1941-1951

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casel, R.

    1993-01-01

    The story of the first decade of the nuclear research in Strasbourg includes three different periods. During the war there is the installation as part of the Reichsuniversitaet Strassburg (november 1941-november 1944) of one 'Medical Research Institute' the physics department of which is equipped with a very important equipment for the period, particularly a connection generator of 1.5 MeV. For the Liberation, the civil hospices and the Strasbourg Medicine Faculty decide to create from the old german installations an artificial radioisotope production laboratory: the 'Strasbourg Nuclear Research Institute' (N.R.I) which was born in 1947 as interfaculty Institute (Medicine, Science, Pharmacy). But the N.R.I doesn't make for the applied research but for the fundamental research. To the nuclear research institute will be added in 1950 the corpuscular physics and the nuclear chemistry laboratories. 163 refs., 20 figs

  8. Ten years research activities in Earth observation at the Cyprus University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Mamouri, Rodanthi; Nisantzi, Argyro; Papoutsa, Christiana; Tzouvaras, Marios; Neoclous, Kyriacos; Mettas, Christodoulos; Michaelides, Silas

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the achievements for the last 10 years of the Remote Sensing and Geo-Environment Laboratory of the Cyprus University of Technology in the Earth observation through the ERATOSTHENES Research Centre. Over the past 10 years, the Centre has secured competitive research funding from various sources, such as the European Commission, the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, as well as industrial partners, having participated either as a coordinator or as a partner in more than 60 research projects. The research activities of the Centre encompass remote sensing and GIS applications in the fields of Cultural Heritage, Agriculture, Water Resource Management, Environment, Infrastructure, Marine Spatial Planning, Atmospheric, Air Pollution and Coastal Applications, Natural Resource Management and Hazard Assessment. The aim of this paper is to map the existing activities and identify the future trends and goals of the Eratosthenes Research Centre for the next 15 years.

  9. Academic Self-Handicapping and Achievement Goals: A Further Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Carol; Urdan, Tim

    2001-01-01

    This study extends previous research on the relations among students' personal achievement goals, perceptions of the classroom goal structure, and reports of the use of self-handicapping strategies. Surveys, specific to the math domain, were given to 484 7th-grade students in nine middle schools. Personal performance-avoid goals positively predicted handicapping, whereas personal performance-approach goals did not. Personal task goals negatively predicted handicapping. Perceptions of a performance goal structure positively predicted handicapping, and perceptions of a task goal structure negatively predicted handicapping, independent of personal goals. Median splits used to examine multiple goal profiles revealed that students high in performance-avoid goals used handicapping more than did those low in performance-avoid goals regardless of the level of task goals. Students low in performance-avoid goals and high in task goals handicapped less than those low in both goals. Level of performance-approach goals had little effect on the relation between task goals and handicapping. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Ten essentials for action-oriented and second order energy transitions, transformations and climate change research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazey, Ioan; Schäpke, Niko; Caniglia, Guido; Patterson, James; Hultman, Johan; van Mierlo, Barbara; Säwe, Filippa; Wiek, Arnim; Wittmayer, Julia; Aldunce, Paulina; Al Waer, Husam; Battacharya, Nandini; Bradbury, Hilary; Carmen, Esther; Colvin, John; Cvitanovic, Christopher; D'Souza, Marcella; Gopel, Maja; Goldstein, Bruce; Hämäläinen, Timo; Harper, Gavin; Henfry, Tom; Hodgson, Anthony; Howden, Mark S.; Kerr, Andy; Klaes, Matthias; Lyon, Christopher; Midgley, Gerald; Moser, Susanne; Mukherjee, Nandan; Müller, Karl; O'Brien, Karen; O'Connell, Deborah A.; Olsson, Per; Page, Glenn; Reed, Mark S.; Searle, Beverley; Silvestri, Giorgia; Spaiser, Viktoria; Strasser, Tim; Tschakert, Petra; Uribe-Calvo, Natalia; Waddell, Steve; Rao-Williams, Jennifer; Wise, Russell; Wolstenholme, Ruth; Woods, Mel; Wyborn, Carina

    The most critical question for climate research is no longer about the problem, but about how to facilitate the transformative changes necessary to avoid catastrophic climate-induced change. Addressing this question, however, will require massive upscaling of research that can rapidly enhance

  11. From Network to ResearchTen Years of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Søren; Grund, Cynthia M.; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles the history of the Nordic Network of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics (NNIMIPA) and its roots in previous research networks and milieus. It explains how a cross-disciplinary network works and gives rise to research projects that bridge the gap between...

  12. Evaluation of the Vocational Preparation and Success of Handicapped Individuals Who Reside in Rural Areas of Florida. Florida Rural Research Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Diane M.

    Phase 2 of a three-phase project examined the secondary education background and employment adjustment of handicapped youth in rural counties in Florida. (Phase 1 was a pilot study.) Subjects were former special education students in five rural project counties who had been identified as needing services in the area of educable mental retardation,…

  13. An Overview of Ten Years of Student Research and JDSO Publications (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, R.; Fitzgerald, M.; Genet, R.; Davidson, B.

    2017-12-01

    (Abstract only) The astronomy research seminar, initially designed and taught by Russell Genet at Cuesta College over the past decade, has resulted in over 100 published student research papers in the Journal of Double Star Observations along with dozens of other papers and conference presentations. While the seminar began at a single community college, it has now spread to include students from dozens of institutions and instructors, reaching students from middle school through graduate school. The seminar has integrated the large community-of-practice of amateur and professional astronomers, educators, students, and hardware and software engineers while providing an important experience for student researchers. In this paper, we provide an overview analysis of 109 publications authored by 320 individual students involved in the astronomy research seminar over the last decade.

  14. An overview of ten years of student research and JDSO publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Rachel; Fitzgerald, Michael; Genet, Russell; Davidson, Brendan

    2017-06-01

    The astronomy research seminar, initially designed and taught by Russell Genet at Cuesta College over the past decade, has resulted in over 100 published student research papers in the Journal of Double Star Observations along with dozens of other papers and conference presentations. While the seminar began at a single community college it has now spread to include students from dozens of institutions and instructors, reaching students from middle school through graduate school. The seminar has integrated the large community-of-practice of amateur and professional astronomers, educators, students, and hardware and software engineers while providing an important experience for student researchers. In this paper, we provide an overview analysis of 109 publications authored by 320 individual students involved in the astronomy research seminar over the last decade.

  15. Development of a ten-year pulse research strategy | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This strategy will be designed to increase investment in strategic, game-changing pulse research with emphasis on transformative research that is not under way or ... des chercheurs et des praticiens se sont réunis à Montréal dans le cadre de la conférence d'une journée intitulée The Global Need for Formal Child Care.

  16. From Network to ResearchTen Years of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Søren R.; Grund, Cynthia M.; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles the history of the Nordic Network of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics (NNIMIPA) and its roots in previous research networks and milieus. It explains how a cross-disciplinary network works and gives rise to research projects that bridge the gap between...... the disciplines involved. As examples, three thematically linked projects within NNIMIPA are presented. These projects all have performance interaction (between musicians and between musician and audience) as their nexus....

  17. Self-handicapping and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    Self-handicapping is a process containing strategies of externalization in which an individual can excuse failure and internalize success. This study investigated the relationship of self-handicapping with measures of burnout. The Self-handicapping Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory were administered to 309 university students. Self-handicapping was positively correlated to emotional exhaustion, lowered personal accomplishment, and depersonalization. A structural equation model fit the data well and accounted for 20% of the variance in emotional exhaustion, 14% in lowered personal accomplishment, and 10% in depersonalization.

  18. Costs of self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Miron; Tsai, Fen-Fang

    2005-04-01

    Four studies examined the relation of trait self-handicapping with health-related measures. Study 1 showed that, over time, self-handicapping and maladjustment reinforce each other. Study 2 showed that self-handicappers reported a loss in competence satisfaction which, in turn, mediated the relation of self-handicapping with negative mood. Study 3 found that, over time, self-handicappers report an increase in substance use. Study 4 showed that self-handicappers reported a loss in intrinsic motivation for their jobs. It was suggested that people with unstable (or contingent) self-esteem use self-handicapping to bolster a fragile self-concept.

  19. Pediatric biobanking: a pilot qualitative survey of practices, rules and researcher opinions in ten European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvaterra, Elena; Giorda, Roberto; Bassi, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking such as ......Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking...... such as decision making, privacy protection, minor recontact, and research withdrawal by focusing on theoretical or empirical perspectives. Our research attempted to analyze such issues in a comprehensive manner by exploring practices, rules, and researcher opinions regarding proxy consent, minor assent, specimens...

  20. A Content Analysis of LGBTQ Qualitative Research in Counseling: A Ten-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Shelton, Kimber

    2011-01-01

    This content analysis examines the qualitative methodology used in counseling research with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) issues published over the last 10 years (1998-2008) in 4 counseling and counseling psychology journals ("Journal of Counseling & Development," "Journal of Counseling Psychology," "Journal of LGBT Issues…

  1. Ten Salient Practices of Undergraduate Research Mentors: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley-Holbrook, Elizabeth; Hall, Eric; Stewart, Kearsley; Walkington, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies salient practices of faculty mentors of undergraduate research (UR) as indicated in the extensive literature of the past two decades on UR. The well-established benefits for students involved in UR are dependent, first and foremost, on high-quality mentoring. Mentorship is a defining feature of UR. As more and different types…

  2. Ten-Year Research Update Review: Psychiatric Problems in Children with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plioplys, Sigita; Dunn, David W.; Caplan, Rochelle

    2007-01-01

    The research on epilepsy, a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by seizures, psychopathology, cognitive, and linguistic problems among children in the age group of 0 to 18 years is reported. Early identification of children with epilepsy (CWE) and the development of multidisciplinary management strategies would advance relevant clinical…

  3. Ten years of high temperature materials research at PSI - An overview paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouchon, Manuel A.; Chen Jiachao

    2014-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute high temperature materials research for advanced nuclear systems is performed since a decade, formerly by the HT-Mat group and today the advanced nuclear materials (ANM) group. In this paper the activities being conducted in this time are summarized. This includes the study of three major materials classes, intermetallics with a titanium alluminide, nanostructured steel with different ODS candidates, and ceramics with silicon carbide composites. The studies being performed include experimental work, studying the mechanical behavior as function of irradiation exposure and temperature, including also in situ studies such as the creep under ion beam irradiation plus miniaturized samples such as pillars. The microstructure changes as function of these exposures, using electron microscopy on one hand and advanced beamline techniques on the other hand. Part of the finding lead to the development of new damage mechanism models. Complementary to the experimental approach, modelling activities were conducted to understand the basics of the damage mechanisms. The research lead to a consolidation of the candidate materials to the most promising ones, namely the oxide dispersion strengthened steels (ODS) and the silicon carbide based composite materials. The research lead to new, relevant data such as the creep behavior of material under extreme reactor conditions, the embitterment mechanism in advanced materials, and much more. A sketch of the research philosophy and an outline of the main results will be given. (author)

  4. Consulting the oracle: ten lessons from using the Delphi technique in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Sinead; Hasson, Felicity; McKenna, Hugh

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide insight into the Delphi technique by outlining our personal experiences during its use over a 10-year period in a variety of applications. As a means of achieving consensus on an issue, the Delphi research method has become widely used in healthcare research generally and nursing research in particular. The literature on this technique is expanding, mainly addressing what it is and how it should be used. However, there is still much confusion and uncertainty surrounding it, particularly about issues such as modifications, consensus, anonymity, definition of experts, how 'experts' are selected and how non-respondents are pursued. This issues that arise when planning and carrying out a Delphi study include the definition of consensus; the issue of anonymity vs. quasi-anonymity for participants; how to estimate the time needed to collect the data, analyse each 'round', feed back results to participants, and gain their responses to this feedback; how to define and select the 'experts' who will be asked to participate; how to enhance response rates; and how many 'rounds' to conduct. Many challenges and questions are raised when using the Delphi technique, but there is no doubt that it is an important method for achieving consensus on issues where none previously existed. Researchers need to adapt the method to suit their particular study.

  5. Ten years of TRIGA reactor research at the University of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kelly, Sean

    2002-01-01

    The 1 MW TRIGA Research Reactor at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory is the second TRIGA at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). A small (10 kW-1963, 250 kW-1968) TRIGA Mark I was housed in the basement of the Engineering Building until is was shutdown and decommissioned in 1989. The new TRIGA Mark II with a licensed power of 1.1 MW reached initial criticality in 1992. Prior to 1990, reactor research at UT usually consisted of projects requiring neutron activation analysis (NAA) but the step up to a much larger reactor with neutron beam capability required additional personnel to build the neutron research program. The TCNS is currently used to perform Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis to determine hydrogen and boron concentrations of various composite materials. The early 1990s was a very active period for neutron beam projects at the NETL. In addition to the TCNS, a real-time neutron radiography facility (NIF) and a high-resolution neutron depth profiling facility (NDP) were installed in two separate beam ports. The NDP facility was most recently used to investigate alpha damage on stainless steel in support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stewardship programs. In 1999, a sapphire beam filter was installed in the NDP system to reduce the fast neutron flux at the sample location. A collaborative effort was started in 1997 between UT-Austin and the University of Texas at Arlington to build a reactor-based, low-energy positron beam (TIPS). The limited success in obtaining funding has placed the project on hold. The Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program has grown rapidly and effectively doubled in size over the past 5 years but years of low nuclear research funding, an overall stagnation in the U.S. nuclear power industry and a persuasive public distrust of nuclear energy has caused a precipitous decline in many programs. Recently, the U.S. DOE has encouraged University Research Reactors (URR) in the U.S. to collaborate closely together by forming URR

  6. Planning ten years ahead a multidisciplinary nuclear research technology institute: the case of IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Willy Hoppe de

    2011-01-01

    Planning is always a problem in government organizations whose mission involves the development of R and D activities. The current issue of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), one of the institutes comprising the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), is to plan the reconciling the long-term ramifications of a large project whose funding is primarily derived from the budget Union with the R and D agenda of IPEN which is largely driven and funded by science and technology funding agencies. This paper aims at reporting the results of one of the stages of the work developed by IPEN to deal with this problem. In mid-2010, top management of IPEN approved the implementation of a participatory planning effort with the following guidelines: (1) focus on two of the three finalist functions of IPEN - Research and Development (R and D) and Products and Services (P and S), (2) results orientation with a time horizon of 10 years, (3) incorporation of the unfolding of a large project in this planning effort (this project has its own planning) and (4) the source of information of the planning process would be the teams involved in the research lines and projects (LPP's) and the lines of production activities (LAP's) - the lowest grouping level in the current planning framework of IPEN. The planning process developed was based on an adaptation of a technique known as technology roadmapping. The data were collected through a web questionnaire. At the end of the data collection in mid- December 2010 89 LPP's and LAP 28's responses were recorded. For the purposes of this article the following groups of information related to R and D finalist function are presented: Where are we now?: (1) Profile of the current team; (2) Motivation of research and (3) Sources used for identification R and D goals. How can we get there?: (4) Profile of research partners, and (5) Profile of the necessary changes. Where do we want to go?: (6) Classification of results by areas and (7

  7. Planning ten years ahead a multidisciplinary nuclear research technology institute: the case of IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Willy Hoppe de, E-mail: whsousa@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Planos e Programas

    2011-07-01

    Planning is always a problem in government organizations whose mission involves the development of R and D activities. The current issue of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), one of the institutes comprising the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), is to plan the reconciling the long-term ramifications of a large project whose funding is primarily derived from the budget Union with the R and D agenda of IPEN which is largely driven and funded by science and technology funding agencies. This paper aims at reporting the results of one of the stages of the work developed by IPEN to deal with this problem. In mid-2010, top management of IPEN approved the implementation of a participatory planning effort with the following guidelines: (1) focus on two of the three finalist functions of IPEN - Research and Development (R and D) and Products and Services (P and S), (2) results orientation with a time horizon of 10 years, (3) incorporation of the unfolding of a large project in this planning effort (this project has its own planning) and (4) the source of information of the planning process would be the teams involved in the research lines and projects (LPP's) and the lines of production activities (LAP's) - the lowest grouping level in the current planning framework of IPEN. The planning process developed was based on an adaptation of a technique known as technology roadmapping. The data were collected through a web questionnaire. At the end of the data collection in mid- December 2010 89 LPP's and LAP 28's responses were recorded. For the purposes of this article the following groups of information related to R and D finalist function are presented: Where are we now?: (1) Profile of the current team; (2) Motivation of research and (3) Sources used for identification R and D goals. How can we get there?: (4) Profile of research partners, and (5) Profile of the necessary changes. Where do we want to go?: (6) Classification of

  8. Ten years of IAEA cooperation with the Russian research reactor fuel return programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, S.; Adelfang, P.; Bradley, E. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Programme was launched in 2001. Over the duration, the programme successfully completed 43 safe shipments of 1.6 tons of fresh and spent HEU fuel from different countries using Russian fuelled research reactors to the country of origin. The IAEA has been a very active supporter of the RRRFR Programme since its inception. Under the auspices of the RRRFR Programme, the Agency has been ensuring a broad range of technical advisory and organizational support to the HEU fuel repatriation, as well as training and advisory assistance for supporting RR conversion from HEU to LEU. The presentation gives an overview of the RRRFR programme achievements with special consideration of the IAEA contribution. These include an overview of the shipments' history in terms of fresh and spent fuel, as well as a summary of experiences gained during the shipments' preparation and termination. The presentation focuses on technical advisory support given by the IAEA during the programme implementation, captures the consolidated knowledge of the unique international programme and shares the most important lessons learned. (orig.)

  9. Telecommunication for the Physically Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Pat; Gose, Joan

    The paper examines the uses of telecommunication for physically handicapped students. Basic equipment, including a modem and keyboard interface, are described. The types and uses of computer bulletin boards are also described. Among benefits of telecommunications for physically handicapped students noted in the paper are social prestige,…

  10. Working with Handicapped Art Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Rawley A.

    Presented at the 1979 National Art Education Association Convention on the arts in special education, the paper focuses on studies of the aesthetic and therapeutic use of special art procedures with handicapped students. The art education needs of handicapped students are briefly discussed, along with the impact and implications of new…

  11. Sexual Adjustment in the Handicapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Dorothea D.; Padrone, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    Major topics discussed include introduction and background of the growing recognition of sexual feelings and concerns of the handicapped, attitudes and assumptions resulting from lack of information for both the handicapped and the various disciplines that serve them, medical and psychological aspects of sexual response, and services for the…

  12. The Self-Handicapping Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Janet M.; Dorman, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that self-handicapping students protect their self-images by deliberately not trying to achieve for fear of trying hard, failing anyway, and appearing "dumb." Surveys of high school students examined three areas of students' perceptions (self-handicapping, academic self-efficacy, and classroom environment). The correlation…

  13. HIPs at Ten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, George; O'Donnell, Ken; Schneider, Carol Geary

    2017-01-01

    2017 is the anniversary of the introduction of what are now commonly known as high-impact practices (HIPs). Many of the specific activities pursued under the HIPs acronym have been around in some form for decades, such as study abroad, internships, and student-faculty research. It was about ten years ago that, after conferring HIPs at Ten with…

  14. Waves and turbulences studies in plasmas: ten years of research on quiescent plasmas at the Brazilian Space Research National Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Quiescent plasmas generated by thermionic discharges and surface confined by multipole magnetic fields have been used in basic plasma research since 1973. The first machine was developed at UCLA (USA) to produce an uniform plasma for beam and waves studies in large cross section plasmas. A double quiescent plasma machine was constructed at the plasma laboratory of INPE in 1981, it began its operation producing linear ion-acoustic waves in an Argon plasma. Later on non linear ion acoustic waves and solitons were studied in plasma containing several species of negative and positive ions. The anomalous particle transport across multipole magnetic fields were also investigated. An anomalous resistivity associated with an ion acoustic turbulence is responsible for the formation of a small amplitude double-layer. The existence of a bootstrap mechanism is shown experimentally. Today, the main interest is toward the generation of Langmuir waves in non uniform plasmas. An experimental study on Langmuir wave generation using a grid system is been carried on. A magnetized quiescent plasma device for studies of whistle wave generation is been constructed. This machine will make possible future studies on several wave modes of magnetized plasmas. (author). 31 refs, 16 figs

  15. SYNCHRONIC DISTANCE EDUCATION FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A HANDICAPPED PERSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KARAL

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays knowledge and communication technologies are developing rapidly and changing people’s lives. With the help of the developing technologies, people can access knowledge independent of time and place and distance education technologies offer handicapped students a range of opportunities in order that they may access a better level of education. By defining perceptions related to the distance education of a physically handicapped student engaged in a program of synchrony distance education at Karadeniz Technical University to throw a fresh light on this topic. Due to the nature research problem, phenomenology, one of qualitative research patterns, was used in this study which has a qualitative character. In this study, because it was intended to present a handicapped person’s thoughts related to distance education, semi-structured interview, one of qualitative data collection techniques was thought to be the most appropriate data collection instrument. The sampling of the research included the handicapped student receiving courses by synchrony distance education in Karadeniz Technical University, two friends of the student following the same course and the assistant in the course environment. The interviews were recorded with a video camera, a transcript of each of the interviews was prepared and the data was analyzed scientifically. In the light of the research findings, it was decided that the synchrony distance education environment helped handicapped person feel more secure and relaxed and for his handicap not to be noticed by others. In addition, without the lecturers’ feeling of compassion, it presented handicapped student with an opportunity to prove himself. Also, because the courses classes? were recorded in this environment, students could review the content of the class in their own time and this process could be repeated, thus the students could learn at their own speed.

  16. Resilience research and policy/practice discourse in health, social, behavioral, and environmental sciences over the last ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Astier M

    2008-12-01

    Resilience research has gained increased scientific interest and political currency over the last ten years. To set this volume in the wider context of scholarly debate conducted in previous special theme issue and/or special section publications of refereed journals on resilience and related concepts (1998-2008). Peer reviewed journals of health, social, behavioral, and environmental sciences were searched systematically for articles on resilience and/or related themes published as a set. Non-English language publications were included, while those involving non-human subjects were excluded. A total of fifteen journal special issues and/or special sections (including a debate and a roundtable discussion) on resilience and/or related themes were retrieved and examined with the aim of teasing out salient points of direct relevance to African social policy and health care systems. Viewed chronologically, this series of public discussions and debates charts a progressive paradigm shift from the pathogenic perspectives on risk and vulnerability to a clear turn of attention to health-centered approaches to building resilience to disasters and preventing vulnerability to disease, social dysfunction, human and environmental resource depletion. Resilience is a dynamic and multi-dimensional process of adaptation to adverse and/or turbulent changes in human, institutional, and ecological systems across scales, and thus requires a composite, multi-faceted Resilience Index (RI), in order to be meaningfully gauged. Collaborative links between interdisciplinary research institutions, policy makers and practitioners involved in promoting sustainable social and health care systems are called for, particularly in Africa.

  17. The effect of spiritual intelligence instruction on the increasing spiritual intelligence and two components in Maybod adult physical handicaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Movahedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this research was the effect of spiritual intelligence instruction on increasing spiritual intelligence’s Maybod adult handicaps in 2014. 28 female and male (7 men and 21 women adult handicaps participated in this research which was as done pretest quasi – experimental – intervention studing with control group. These people were chosen as purposeful sampling and set in two experimental and control group in equal numbers. After fulfilling pretest, two group were compared by T test and after ensuring of absence of significant difference between two group, In ten session (90 minutes, the experimental group were been taught spiritual intelligence and the control group didn’t have any teaching. Befor and after session, these two groups were been complete Abdollahzade spiritual intelligence test. The analysis of data did on one way covariance statistical analysis. The results showed the experimental group got significantly high scores in regard to control group of general spiritual intelligence, the underestsnding of the relation to universe sourceand spiritual life in emphasis of internal core. Regarding to findings, it results the spiritual intelligence instruction can on increase spiritual intelligence of handicaps.

  18. Handicap questionnaires: what do they assess?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, M.; Brandsma, J. W.; de Groot, I. J.; van den Bos, G. A.; de Haan, R. J.; de Jong, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    There is an increasing need to get insight into the social and societal impact of chronic conditions on a person's life, i.e. person-perceived handicap. The purpose of this study is to report how current handicap questionnaires assess handicap. A literature search using both Medline and the database

  19. Emotionally Handicapped Pupils: Developing Appropriate Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. for Exceptional Children.

    The document is designed to assist local school systems as they plan, develop, and improve programs for emotionally handicapped students. Sections cover the following areas: definition of emotionally handicapped students; pre-planninq for emotionally handicapped programs; identification, referral, screening, assessment, and placement; service…

  20. Compassionate use of interventions: results of a European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) survey of ten European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Kate; Huemer, Karl-Heinz; Winter, Diana

    2010-01-01

    'Compassionate use' programmes allow medicinal products that are not authorised, but are in the development process, to be made available to patients with a severe disease who have no other satisfactory treatment available to them. We sought to understand how such programmes are regulated in ten ...

  1. Chapter Ten

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    differences in behavior. Research motivated from this perspective focuses on ways to ... work serves as a case study for the way cultural psychology can provide a framework for better understanding ...... emotion, and motivation. Psychological ...

  2. Psychology and the Handicapped Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrick, Carl E., Ed.; And Others

    Reviewed in seven author contributed chapters are findings of experimental psychology relevant to the education of handicapped children in the areas of sensory processes, visual perception, memory, cognition and language development, sustained attention and impulse control, and personality and social development. Noted in an introductory chapter…

  3. Equine Therapy for Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minner, Sam; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Four aspects in planning a therapeutic horsemanship program for handicapped individuals are considered: training instructors, obtaining the needed horses and equipment, identifying the participants, and implementing the program and developing a curriculum. An example of a horsemanship program begun in Kentucky is offered. (CL)

  4. Handicaps No Hindrance with Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Colleen

    1974-01-01

    A horseback riding program, sponsored by 4-H members for handicapped children in Michigan's Genesse County, has proven physically and emotionally veneficial for the children. All therapeutic exercises were performed with the approval of the child's physician and therapist. Plans for expanding the program are being considered. (AG)

  5. The Relationship between High School Mathematics Classroom Environment and Student Self-Handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Adams, Joan E.; Ferguson, Janet M.

    Classroom environment research investigating the relationship between classroom environment and self-handicapping was conducted in Australian, Canadian, and British high schools. A sample of 3,602 students from 29 schools responded to a questionnaire that assessed student perceptions of classroom environment, self-handicapping, and academic…

  6. Research and realization of ten-print data quality control techniques for imperial scale automated fingerprint identification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the first individualization-information processing equipment put into practical service worldwide, Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS has always been regarded as the first choice in individualization of criminal suspects or those who died in mass disasters. By integrating data within the existing regional large-scale AFIS database, many countries are constructing an ultra large state-of-the-art AFIS (or Imperial Scale AFIS system. Therefore, it is very important to develop a series of ten-print data quality controlling process for this system of this type, which would insure a substantial matching efficiency, as the pouring data come into this imperial scale being. As the image quality of ten-print data is closely relevant to AFIS matching proficiency, a lot of police departments have allocated huge amount of human and financial resources over this issue by carrying out manual verification works for years. Unfortunately, quality control method above is always proved to be inadequate because it is an astronomical task involved, in which it has always been problematic and less affiant for potential errors. Hence, we will implement quality control in the above procedure with supplementary-acquisition effect caused by the delay of feedback instructions sent from the human verification teams. In this article, a series of fingerprint image quality supervising techniques has been put forward, which makes it possible for computer programs to supervise the ten-print image quality in real-time and more accurate manner as substitute for traditional manual verifications. Besides its prominent advantages in the human and financial expenditures, it has also been proved to obviously improve the image quality of the AFIS ten-print database, which leads up to a dramatic improvement in the AFIS-matching accuracy as well.

  7. Social Interpersonal Skills of Handicapped and Nonhandicapped Adults at Work

    OpenAIRE

    Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin; Rule, S.; Salzberg, Charles L.; Stowitschek, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    The pattern and content of social interactions of successful handicapped and nonhandicapped employees were observed in two employment settings. Data suggest that both groups were active social interactants who frequently worked cooperatively, yet interacted relatively infrequently with their supervisors. Implications for future research are discussed.

  8. Early Intervention and the Integration of Handicapped and Nonhandicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, Michael J.

    This collection of 11 articles focuses on integrating handicapped and nonhandicapped children in preschool programs. Article 1 presents arguments for preschool integration. Article 2 discusses research on peer interaction and mixed-age socialization. Article 3 advocates a behavior analysis and operant conditioning approach to studying and…

  9. Implicit theory of athletic ability and self-handicapping in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung Hung; Chen, Mei-Yen; Lin, Meng-Shyan; Kee, Ying Hwa; Kuo, Chin Fang; Shui, Shang-Hsueh

    2008-10-01

    Self-handicapping is a maladaptive behavior which undermines students' achievements, but the antecedents of self-handicapping are not well studied in physical education. The aim was to examine the relations of implicit theory of abilities and self-handicapping in physical education. 264 college students, whose mean age was 20.3 yr. (SD = 1.7), completed the Conceptions of the Nature of Athletic Ability Questionnaire-2 and Self-handicapping Scale for Sport. Analysis indicated entity beliefs positively predicted reduced effort and making excuses. Also, incremental beliefs negatively predicted reduced effort. Results are discussed in terms of implicit theory of ability and self-handicapping. Directions for research and implications are stated.

  10. The effects of self-handicapping on attributions and perceived judo competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlees, Iain; Jones, Simon; Holder, Tim; Thelwell, Richard

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hypotheses derived from Jones and Berglas's (1978) self-handicapping model. It was hypothesized that individuals using many self-handicaps would use more internal attributions and report greater gains in perceived judo ability following success than individuals using few self-handicaps. In addition, it was hypothesized that individuals using many self-handicaps would use more external attributions and report less reduction in perceived judo ability following failure. Fifty-three judo players completed measures of trait self-handicapping, situational self-handicapping and a measure of perceived judo ability before competition. Following competition, the participants completed the Causal Dimension Scale II and the measure of perceived judo ability for a second time. Analyses of variance revealed that high self-handicappers attributed failure to more external factors than low self-handicappers. It was also found that high self-handicappers reported less of a reduction in perceived judo ability following failure than low self-handicappers. The findings therefore provide support for the potential short-term benefits of self-handicapping in sport, although further research is required to examine the long-term implications of using self-handicaps.

  11. Orthodontics for mentally handicapped patients [Orthodontie bij pati�nten met een verstandelijke handicap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelink, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The mentally handicapped exhibit a 3 times higher incidence of malocclusions and related functional problems than the general population. In contrast there is little available literature relating to the orthodontic treatment of handicapped patients. Based on published articles on orthodontic

  12. Self-Modification Technique for the Control of Eating Behavior for the Visually Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoy, Mary T.; van Benten, Letitia

    1978-01-01

    A ten-week study was done of four visually handicapped overweight adolescents (ages 15-19 years) in a residential school to evaluate the efficacy of an operant conditioning technique designed to promote weight loss by altering eating habits. (Author/DLS)

  13. Educational assistance to students with physical handicaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Vázquez Vázquez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was developed with the aim of determining the state of educational attention to students with handicaps. The Methods used are: General dialectical, Historic and logical and Systemic, Observation, Interview and Survey. As sample were taken 20 teachers and 100% of the students with handicaps from the faculty. Results: The educational assistance to students with ha ndi caps is being given empirically , regulations and guidelines from the Higher Ministry of Education related to handicaps are not known; There is scarce knowledge about the characteristics of handicaps and needs of guidance for effective learning. It recog nizes the importance of providing necessary resources for inclusion in the Higher Education.

  14. The role of the different aspects of academic motivation and competitiveness in explaining self-handicapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjan Šimek

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present research on self-handicapping, the goal was to examine the role of different types of academic motivation according to the level of self-determination. Since the existing research on self-handicapping has examined only the role of interpersonal competition, we also aimed to explore the role of different kinds of competition, i.e., the role of the reasons that motivate people to participate in competition, and the role of the reasons for the avoidance of competition. 748 high school students participated in the study. Regarding the role of academic motivation in self-handicapping the prevailing role of amotivation stood out. Intrinsic motivation predicted self-handicapping negatively, but extrinsic motivation proved to be a positive predictor. The factor structure of the Academic Motivation Scale only enabled differentiation of the reasons for education on the level of three basic types. With regard to the role of the different dimensions of competitiveness in self-handicapping, results show that those denoted by fear of failure and self-worth protection proved to be more characteristic of self-handicapping than those defined by a high valuation of the importance of quality of task accomplishment. Among others, our research suggests that by diverting students away from hypercompetitive values, functionality of self-handicapping can be decreased.

  15. EARLY TREATMENT OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN-ESPECIALLY OF MENTALLY HANDICAPPED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter SKUBER

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In my discussion about the early treatment, I am going to point out three important matters:1. Open public health serviceThe deliveries are made at hospitals and the health service is the first to detect and treat children who are disturbed in their development. It also supervisor pregnancies. Upon the delivery, the screening test is used to analyze the risk delivery. At the beginning, the treatment is individual.2. Group (5-8 children in regular kindergartenThe transition of the child from the clinical treatment to the kindergarten is the result of an agreement between the team of experts both from the health institutes and pedagogical field of activity working in this way also when the child is in the nursery.The group of 5-8 handicapped children is now under the supervision of a nursery teacher having been to obtain special pedagogical education.3. Seminars of parentsThe state unity of associations providing for handicapped, in cooperation with local associations, organizes seminars lasting several days for parents and children.The purpose of the seminars is first of all helping parents in solving their emotional problems and also informing them on numerous issues appearing in connection with their child and themselves.

  16. Ten years of biotechnology development at the Central Research Roentgenological Institute of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg, O.A.; Klimovich, V.B.; Volchkov, V.A.; Evtushenko, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    Sums up the progress in and prospects for research at the medical biotechnology department of the Institute. The department includes four laboratories: for genetic engineering, hydridoma technology, biotechnogoly of preparations for radiodiagnosis and therapy and for preclinical trials of biotechnologic products. Fundamental researh carried out at the department are described friefly, namely, studies and modification of molecular genetic mechanisms of cellular death, modification of pro- and eukaryote cell radiosensitivity, as well as the results and trends of applied research, such as derivation of an original murine myeloma strain, a partner for the creation of stable monoclonal antibody-producing hybridomata

  17. Euthanasia of Severely Handicapped Infants: Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Libby

    Ethical decisions are involved in life and death decisions for severely handicapped infants. Although it has become common practice for physicians not to treat severely handicapped infants, the ethical considerations involved in euthanasia are complex. A review of the literature reveals that concerns center around the quality of life of the…

  18. 28 CFR 41.31 - Handicapped person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Persons § 41.31 Handicapped person. (a) Handicapped person means any person who has a physical or mental...: (1) Physical or mental impairment means: (i) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic... disorder, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific...

  19. Handicapped Litigation: A Review of Significant Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, John W.

    Since 1979 many courts have handed down rulings in favor of handicapped children under the Education of the Handicapped Act. This twentieth chapter in a book on school law summarizes these cases. In "Kruelle v. Biggs," the court ruled that a school district must provide residential placement free of charge if such placement is necessary…

  20. Ten Ways to Improve the Use of Statistical Mediation Analysis in the Practice of Child and Adolescent Treatment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Marija; Wiers, Reinout W.; Prins, Pier J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite guidelines and repeated calls from the literature, statistical mediation analysis in youth treatment outcome research is rare. Even more concerning is that many studies that "have" reported mediation analyses do not fulfill basic requirements for mediation analysis, providing inconclusive data and clinical implications. As a result, after…

  1. Ten ways to improve the use of statistical mediation analysis in the practice of child and adolescent treatment research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maric, M.; Wiers, R.W.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite guidelines and repeated calls from the literature, statistical mediation analysis in youth treatment outcome research is rare. Even more concerning is that many studies that have reported mediation analyses do not fulfill basic requirements for mediation analysis, providing inconclusive data

  2. The European General Practice Research Network Presents the Translations of Its Comprehensive Definition of Multimorbidity in Family Medicine in Ten European Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reste, Jean Yves; Nabbe, Patrice; Rivet, Charles; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Doerr, Christa; Czachowski, Slawomir; Lingner, Heidrun; Argyriadou, Stella; Lazic, Djurdjica; Assenova, Radost; Hasaganic, Melida; Munoz, Miquel Angel; Thulesius, Hans; Le Floch, Bernard; Derriennic, Jeremy; Sowinska, Agnieska; Van Marwijk, Harm; Lietard, Claire; Van Royen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review. Objective To translate that English definition into European languages and to validate the semantic, conceptual and cultural homogeneity of the translations for further research. Method Forward translation of the EGPRN’s definition of multimorbidity followed by a Delphi consensus procedure assessment, a backward translation and a cultural check with all teams to ensure the homogeneity of the translations in their national context. Consensus was defined as 70% of the scores being higher than 6. Delphi rounds were repeated in each country until a consensus was reached Results 229 European medical expert FPs participated in the study. Ten consensual translations of the EGPRN comprehensive definition of multimorbidity were achieved. Conclusion A comprehensive definition of multimorbidity is now available in English and ten European languages for further collaborative research in FM and long-term care. PMID:25607642

  3. Ten years on: a follow-up review of ERP research in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Stuart J; Barry, Robert J; Clarke, Adam R

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews the event-related potential (ERP) literature in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) over the years 2002-2012. ERP studies exploring various aspects of brain functioning in children and adolescents with AD/HD are reviewed, with a focus on group effects and interpretations in the domains of attention, inhibitory control, performance monitoring, non-pharmacological treatments, and ERP/energetics interactions. There has been a distinct shift in research intensity over the past 10 years, with a large increase in ERP studies conducted in the areas of inhibitory control and performance monitoring. Overall, the research has identified a substantial number of ERP correlates of AD/HD. Robust differences from healthy controls have been reported in early orienting, inhibitory control, and error-processing components. These data offer potential to improve our understanding of the specific brain dysfunction(s) which contribute to the disorder. The literature would benefit from a more rigorous approach to clinical group composition and consideration of age effects, as well as increased emphasis on replication and extension studies using exacting participant, task, and analysis parameters. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations between Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Classroom Environment and Self-Handicapping in Australian and Canadian High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Ferguson, Janet M.

    2004-01-01

    Research investigating the relationship between classroom environment and self-handicapping was conducted in Australian and Canadian high schools. A sample of 2,006 students responded to a questionnaire that assessed student perceptions of classroom environment and self-handicapping. Simple and multiple correlational analyses showed that classroom…

  5. The Use of WISC-R Subtest Scatter in the Identification of Intellectually Gifted Handicapped Children: An Inappropriate Task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper discusses issues involved in the identification of gifted handicapped children, reviewing several research studies that attempted to define a specific configuration of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised subtest scores indicative of handicapped children possessing intellectual gifts. The author concludes that profiles and…

  6. The role of Chandra in ten years from now and for the next few decades of astrophysical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Becker, Glenn E.; McCollough, Michael L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Thong, Sinh A.; Van Stone, David; Winkelman, Sherry

    2018-06-01

    For almost twenty years, Chandra has advanced our understanding of the X-ray Universe by allowing astronomers to peer into a previously unexplored region of the high-energy observational parameters space. Thanks to its longevity,the mission has accumulated a large, unique body of observations whose legacy value, already tangible at this point, will only increase with time, and whose long-lasting influence extends well beyond the energy interval probed by Chandra. The Chandra archive, through the extensive characterization of the links between observations and literature, has measured the impact of Chandra on the astrophysical literature at a high level of granularity, providing striking evidence of how deeply and widely Chandra has impacted the advancement of both high-energy astrophysics and astronomical research from a multi-wavelength perspective. In this talk, based on the missions that have been submitted for recommendation at the next decadal survey and the possible outcomes of the evaluation process, I will discuss how Chandra archival data can be used to anticipate the projected scientific success and long-lasting effects of a X-ray mission like Lynx or, differently, how they will become instrumental to maximize the scientific output of a new generation of facilities that will observe in different energies. I will argue that, in either scenario, the centrality of Chandra will extend well after the final demise of the mission, and its data will continue serving the community in many different ways for the foreseeable future.

  7. The Knowledge of Nurses and Midwives Related to Mentally-Handicapped Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yildirim Sari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM/BACKGROUND: The purpose of this research is to determine the knowledge of nurses and midwives who are working at primary health care services. METHODS: The information regarding the research has been given to the nurses and midwives working at primary health centers of Manisa, and 70 nurses and midwives have accepted to attend the research. In collecting the data, two questionnaire forms prepared by the researchers have been used and these forms are composed of two parts. In the first part of the questionnaire, there are questions about the sociodemografhic characteristics of midwives and nurses; in the second one the questions are related to the symptoms and causes of mental-handicap and the attempts regarding the mentally-handicapped child and his family. RESULTS: The nurses and midwives have stated that the most important cause of mental handicap is marriages among relatives (92.9%. and that in a situation of not being able to fullfill mental motor skills in relation to age, they suspect mental handicap (90%. They have also stated that they mostly have or can have difficulty in communucating with the mentally-handicapped child (64%. CONCLUSION: As a result, the nurses and midwives have adequate knowledge about the causes and symptoms of mental handicap. On the other hand, their knowledge regarding the services to be planned in care of mentally-handicapped children is limited. At the primary health care services, educational studies can be planned in order to give better health service for mentally-handicapped individuals. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 127-132

  8. Music Communication, Projection and Analogy of Handicapped Children in Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lipský, Matěj

    2014-01-01

    /Abstract Music Communication, Projection and Analogy of Handicapped Children in Music Therapy Presented work takes an interest in music contents produced by handicapped children attending music therapy sessions. The contents of music were gained from the children by the method of improvisation, particularly by "concert technique". In the theoretical part we present philosophical background for the music therapy in a field of special education and research. This background thought we have fou...

  9. Consumer Education for the Mentally Handicapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperstein, Neil M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses community placement of mentally handicapped people and remedial procedures for encouraging independent decision making and behavior. Intertwines this behavior change with an alternative method of consumer education. (Author/RK)

  10. Is Being Gifted a Social Handicap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laurence J.; Cross, Tracy L.

    1988-01-01

    Interviews with 15 gifted/talented adolescents indicated that many of them experienced giftedness as a social handicap. Some students coped with this by managing information about themselves to minimize their visibility as gifted students to others. (Author/JDD)

  11. Enhancing the prediction of self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R N; Snyder, C R; Higgins, R L; Schrag, J L

    1986-12-01

    Levels of test anxiety, Type A and Type B coronary-prone behavior, fear of failure, and covert self-esteem were studied as predictors of self-handicapping performance attributions for college women who were placed in either a high- (N = 49) or low- (N = 49) evaluative test or task situation. We hypothesized that test anxiety. Type A or Type B level, and their interaction would account for reliable variance in the prediction of self-handicapping. However, we also theorized that underlying high fear of failure and low covert self-esteem would explain the self-handicapping claims of test-anxious and Type A subjects. The results indicated that only high levels of test anxiety and high levels of covert self-esteem were related to women's self-handicapping attributions.

  12. The ten stages pilot plant: its utilization in the research of the dynamic behavior and regullating process of a jet nozzle cascade for uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadoya, R.; Camara, A.S.; Consiglio, R.V.; Bley, P.; Hein, H.; Linder, G.

    1986-01-01

    A ten stage pilot plant to study experimentally dynamic behavior of a uranium enrichment plant based on separation nozzle process was developed and constructed at Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. This installation was transfered to the Development Center of Nuclear Technology (CDTN) of Nuclebras in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The separation elements installed have a new design with higher efficiency, Known as double-deflections system. The power plant has been used to improve the control method and to prove the stability of separation nozzle cascade under pertubations produced artificially. The stabilization process of UF 6 quantity in cascade by UF 6 inventory regulation at bottom stage will have practication in the First Cascade, in Rezende, RJ, Brazil and may be uded i emonstration plant. The experimental results have shown to be comparable with those obtained by computer simulation. (Author) [pt

  13. Handicap principle implies emergence of dimorphic ornaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Sara M; Braun, Rosemary I; Abrams, Daniel M

    2016-11-30

    Species spanning the animal kingdom have evolved extravagant and costly ornaments to attract mating partners. Zahavi's handicap principle offers an elegant explanation for this: ornaments signal individual quality, and must be costly to ensure honest signalling, making mate selection more efficient. Here, we incorporate the assumptions of the handicap principle into a mathematical model and show that they are sufficient to explain the heretofore puzzling observation of bimodally distributed ornament sizes in a variety of species. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping in predicting student procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K; Steele, Misty R

    2011-12-01

    The relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping student procrastination were explored. College undergraduate participants (N = 138; 40 men, 97 women, one not reporting sex) filled out the Procrastination Scale, the Self-Handicapping Scale-Short Form, and the Self-regulation and Self-handicapping scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression of the above measures indicated that self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping all predicted scores on the Procrastination Scale, but self-regulation fully accounted for the predictive power of self-efficacy. The results suggested self-regulation and self-handicapping predict procrastination independently. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature on the concept of "self-efficacy for self-regulation" and its use in the field of procrastination research.

  15. Learning Handicapped and Nonlearning Handicapped Female Juvenile Offenders: Educational and Criminal Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes-Mendoza, Kathy E.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Interviews with 30 female juvenile offenders were conducted to (1) describe their educational and criminal backgrounds and (2) describe a subgroup of learning handicapped juvenile female offenders. Nearly one third had received special education services prior to their incarceration with additional offenders diagnosed as handicapped upon entry…

  16. How Can Research Keep Up With eHealth? Ten Strategies for Increasing the Timeliness and Usefulness of eHealth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background eHealth interventions appear and change so quickly that they challenge the way we conduct research. By the time a randomized trial of a new intervention is published, technological improvements and clinical discoveries may make the intervention dated and unappealing. This and the spate of health-related apps and websites may lead consumers, patients, and caregivers to use interventions that lack evidence of efficacy. Objective This paper aims to offer strategies for increasing the speed and usefulness of eHealth research. Methods The paper describes two types of strategies based on the authors’ own research and the research literature: those that improve the efficiency of eHealth research, and those that improve its quality. Results Efficiency strategies include: (1) think small: conduct small studies that can target discrete but significant questions and thereby speed knowledge acquisition; (2) use efficient designs: use such methods as fractional-factorial and quasi-experimental designs and surrogate endpoints, and experimentally modify and evaluate interventions and delivery systems already in use; (3) study universals: focus on timeless behavioral, psychological, and cognitive principles and systems; (4) anticipate the next big thing: listen to voices outside normal practice and connect different perspectives for new insights; (5) improve information delivery systems: researchers should apply their communications expertise to enhance inter-researcher communication, which could synergistically accelerate progress and capitalize upon the availability of “big data”; and (6) develop models, including mediators and moderators: valid models are remarkably generative, and tests of moderation and mediation should elucidate boundary conditions of effects and treatment mechanisms. Quality strategies include: (1) continuous quality improvement: researchers need to borrow engineering practices such as the continuous enhancement of interventions to

  17. How can research keep up with eHealth? Ten strategies for increasing the timeliness and usefulness of eHealth research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B; Gustafson, David H; Shah, Dhavan

    2014-02-19

    eHealth interventions appear and change so quickly that they challenge the way we conduct research. By the time a randomized trial of a new intervention is published, technological improvements and clinical discoveries may make the intervention dated and unappealing. This and the spate of health-related apps and websites may lead consumers, patients, and caregivers to use interventions that lack evidence of efficacy. This paper aims to offer strategies for increasing the speed and usefulness of eHealth research. The paper describes two types of strategies based on the authors' own research and the research literature: those that improve the efficiency of eHealth research, and those that improve its quality. Efficiency strategies include: (1) think small: conduct small studies that can target discrete but significant questions and thereby speed knowledge acquisition; (2) use efficient designs: use such methods as fractional-factorial and quasi-experimental designs and surrogate endpoints, and experimentally modify and evaluate interventions and delivery systems already in use; (3) study universals: focus on timeless behavioral, psychological, and cognitive principles and systems; (4) anticipate the next big thing: listen to voices outside normal practice and connect different perspectives for new insights; (5) improve information delivery systems: researchers should apply their communications expertise to enhance inter-researcher communication, which could synergistically accelerate progress and capitalize upon the availability of "big data"; and (6) develop models, including mediators and moderators: valid models are remarkably generative, and tests of moderation and mediation should elucidate boundary conditions of effects and treatment mechanisms. Quality strategies include: (1) continuous quality improvement: researchers need to borrow engineering practices such as the continuous enhancement of interventions to incorporate clinical and technological progress; (2

  18. Bridging the gaps among research, policy and practice in ten low- and middle-income countries: Development and testing of questionnaire for health-care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boupha Boungnong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reliability and validity of instruments used to survey health-care providers' views about and experiences with research evidence have seldom been examined. Methods Country teams from ten low- and middle-income countries (China, Ghana, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Laos, Mexico, Pakistan, Senegal and Tanzania participated in the development, translation, pilot-testing and administration of a questionnaire designed to measure health-care providers' views and activities related to improving their clinical practice and their awareness of, access to and use of research evidence, as well as changes in their clinical practice that they attribute to particular sources of research evidence that they have used. We use internal consistency as a measure of the questionnaire's reliability and, whenever possible, we use explanatory factor analyses to assess the degree to which questions that pertain to a single domain actually address common themes. We assess the questionnaire's face validity and content validity and, to a lesser extent, we also explore its criterion validity. Results The questionnaire has high internal consistency, with Cronbach's alphas between 0.7 and 0.9 for 16 of 20 domains and sub-domains (identified by factor analyses. Cronbach's alphas are greater than 0.9 for two domains, suggesting some item redundancy. Pre- and post-field work assessments indicate the questionnaire has good face validity and content validity. Our limited assessment of criterion validity shows weak but statistically significant associations between the general influence of research evidence among providers and more specific measures of providers' change in approach to preventing or treating a clinical condition. Conclusion Our analysis points to a number of strengths of the questionnaire - high internal consistency (reliability and good face and content validity - but also to areas where it can be shortened without losing important conceptual

  19. Handicapped Infants and Euthanasia: A Challenge to Our Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David

    1985-01-01

    The issue of pediatric euthanasia for handicapped newborns is examined and contrasting viewpoints emphasizing the quality and the sanctity of life are considered. The author asserts that advocacy for handicapped children involves decisions regarding the euthanasia question. (CL)

  20. Handicapping: the effects of its source and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, James C; Crant, J Michael

    2008-07-01

    Using a sample of 246 working adults, the authors created a 2 x 2 x 2 experimental design to isolate the influence of performance outcome, source of handicapping, and frequency of handicapping on reactions to handicapping in organizations. Dependent measures were observers' allocations of credit/blame, interpersonal affect, and the perceived credibility of the explanation. Results showed direct effects on observer impressions for all 3 independent variables, along with a significant Source x Frequency interaction. Handicapping information presented by others yielded more favorable observer impressions than did self-handicapping, and frequent handicapping decreased observer impressions. The least credible handicapping strategy was multiple self-handicaps. A significant 3-way interaction showed that source and frequency affected perceived credibility differently, depending upon whether actual performance was a success or a failure.

  1. ATTITUDES OF HEALTHY CHILDREN PARENTS TOWARDS HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AT THE PRE-SCHOOL AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzica KERAMICIEVA

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970-ties, in the USA and Western and Eastern Europe, the model of segregated education has been abandoned, and nowadays the handicapped children attend regular schools all together with other healthy pupils. This , so called Integrative Pedagogy, proceeds from the mental hygiene aspects according to which the restrictive environment in special schools has not been a favorable one for the development of those children.The integrational process of these children in preschool institutions and schools has rather been difficult due to a number of reasons. As one of them, already mentioned and found in literature , has been the negative attitude of non-handicapped children parents towards those handicapped in their development.The problem of this research is to check and test the attitude of healthy children parents towards handicapped children at preschool age. This research shall also tend to analyze the origin of the such attitudes i. e. , whether they have been a result of an insufficient information and ignorance of the obstacles during development, or been produced by imitation of the environment, or due to an empathy, or even because of the fear that “ such a thing better never enter their home”, etc.We sincerely believe that, revealing the above parents’ attitudes and their origin, would certainly bring finding ways of their successful socialization and making the integrational process of handicapped children with their normal mates in preschool institutions easier.

  2. The Special Needs of Prison Inmates with Handicaps: An Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziano, Louis; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Surveyed 45 workers in correctional agencies to examine number of handicapped inmates and types of programs provided to them. Found that most prison systems had identified some handicapped inmates. Variety of programs were offered to inmates, many systems did not have specialized treatment for handicapped. Found need for evaluation and treatment…

  3. Handicap og beskæftigelse i 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgelund, Jan; Larsen, Brian; Kløft Schademan, Helle

    Denne rapport giver ny viden om beskæftigelsessituationen for personer med handicap. Den viser, at personer med handicap er lige så tilfredse med deres arbejde, som personer uden handicap, og at de oplever at de har de samme jobkrav og de samme muligheder for indflydelse og udvikling, og de har s...

  4. Excuses, Excuses: Self-Handicapping in an Australian Adolescent Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Suzanne; Moore, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine gender differences in the self-handicapping tendencies of a sample of 337 Australian school attending adolescents, who were aged between 15 and 19 years. Self-handicapping, as measured by the shortened Self-Handicapping Scale, was examined in relation to self-esteem, performance attributions, coping…

  5. Telecommunications: A New Horizon for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Pat; Gose, Joan

    The paper describes a computer bulletin board program operated by physically handicapped high school students. Through the bulletin board system, resource people have been contacted, students' written communication and interpersonal relationships have been strengthened, and professional contact has been strengthened. Administrative implications…

  6. Therapeutic Intervention for the Physically Handicapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillios, James; Janzen, Henry L.

    1978-01-01

    The need for training counselors specifically for intervention with the physically handicapped is the major focus of this article. Definitions of disabilities, rehabilitation and emotional factors are stressed as important variables in physical and psychotherapeutic treatment. The authors review some of the psychological aspects in counseling the…

  7. Rehabilitation and Care of the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, Eugenie; And Others

    An overview of services to help the handicapped is given in light of the characteristics of social conditions and social development in Denmark, and the history of rehabilitative care is examined. Information is given on the following areas: legislative, organization and financing; the national health service; the general education of handicapped…

  8. Disability and handicap among elderly Singaporeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S S

    2001-08-01

    Singapore's elderly population has been growing rapidly and is expected to constitute more than 25 percent of the total population by the year 2030. The ageing process brings with it a host of health problems. Here the question arises--Are the increasing years of life going to create a high proportion of sick and disabled elderly people, or a rich human resource of healthy senior citizens? Since more women are living longer than men, who would face a higher risk of disability and handicap? These questions are yet to be answered in Singapore. This paper seeks answers to these questions. The study is based on a sample survey of 1209 elderly Singaporeans living in Kampong Glam, Kreta Ayer and Bukit Merah parliamentary constituencies which have some of the highest proportions of the aged population. The results revealed that more than half of the aged had a disability and the rate of disability was significantly higher among the women as compared to the men. More than one-third of the elderly had a handicap and the rate of handicap among the women was twice as much as that among the men. Severity of handicap was directly correlated with age.

  9. Handicapped Students in the Danish Educational System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Education, Copenhagen (Denmark).

    The educational policy of Denmark and the educational system which has evolved from this policy are described. The policy states that everyone has a right to the same access to education and training, regardless of sex, social origins, geographic origins, and physical or mental handicap; and all public education is free of charge from the age of 5…

  10. Employment of Handicapped People in Leisure Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, David M.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    In response to the need for up-to-date information on employment opportunities for handicapped people in the leisure occupations, a national survey was conducted to determine both existing levels of employment and employer practices. The survey was sent to 500 agencies and businesses representing four leisure occupational subclusters: travel,…

  11. Reducing Truancy in Students with Mild Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Albert M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Contingency contracting and group counseling were provided to 26 mildly to moderately handicapped middle school students with high rates of truancy. Subjects exhibited attendance gains after treatment; gains were not maintained at followup but attendance rates were still higher than the rates of control students. Measures of academic performance…

  12. Development of Self-Handicapping Tendencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Charles; Kimble, Emily A.; Croy, Nan A.

    1998-01-01

    Determines when U.S. children begin to self-handicap, that is, to reduce preparation effort before evaluations. Finds that the high-self-esteem third graders acted adaptively by practicing more for the evaluation task, while the high-self-esteem sixth graders prepared more only if they had been reminded of their personal resources beforehand. (CMK)

  13. Predictors of Choral Directors' Voice Handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are considerable and these challenges are greater for choral directors who depend on the voice as a musical and instructive instrument. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine choral directors' vocal condition using a modified Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and (2) determine the extent to which the major variables…

  14. [Respiratory handicap. Recognition, evaluation and social benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, J; Pujet, J C

    1983-01-01

    The medico-social aspects of respiratory handicap pose some perplexing problems, notably in their recognition, rigorous evaluation and in the granting of social security benefits. The clinical and respiratory function data should be standardised and classified according to type and significance of respiratory disease and also according to the degree of co-operation and understanding of the patient. The respiratory handicap should be evaluated after considering the functional disability engendered by the disorder and their socio-professional repercussions. The abnormality in the lungs should be measured by resting tests; the degree of disability by exercise studies; the socio-professional handicap by ergonometric tests to assess the scale of the demands and requirements of family and social and professional life, indeed the cultural and economic style of the individual concerned. Such combined studies would enable recognition of severe chronic respiratory handicap leading to decisions for exemption certificates, such as cases of severe respiratory failure in patients requiring supplementary treatment for oxygen therapy or assisted ventilation. The benefits and grants offered to those with respiratory handicaps would involve a number of rights relating to: care, work, costs of replacement of workers in the event of prolonged sick leave or the benefits of an invalidity pension. There will be other allowances such as invalidity cards, lodging special studies and other rights particularly relating to lodging and special equipment. The present scale is difficult to use both because of its lack of specificity and its ill-chosen terminology. For better balance between the handicap and the benefits offered, a common and more flexible system, with a printed table should be at hand for the doctor to use for certain decisions: long term illness, period of invalidity or early retirement because of medical incapacity. Within each table a sub-section should exist to allow for

  15. The Effects of Incidental Teaching on the Generalized Use of Social Amenities at School by a Mildly Handicapped Adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Oswald, L. K.; Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin; West, R.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, researchers have begun exploring the effects of incidental teaching on the acquisition of socially appropriate behavior by handicapped children and adults. The results of these investigations suggest that incidental teaching may facilitate the generalization of newly trained social skills. This study used incidental teaching procedures to teach a 16-year-old mildly handicapped student to use social amenities in a resource classroom. In addition, generalization was assessed to anothe...

  16. Assimilation or transformation? An analysis of change in ten secondary science teachers following an inquiry-based research experience for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Margaret R.

    2006-12-01

    It is argued that teachers must experience inquiry in order to be able to translate it to their classrooms. The National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Research Experiences for Teachers (RETs) offer promising programs, yet scant empirical support documents the effectiveness of these programs. In this study, ten experienced, secondary science teachers were followed back to the classroom after a five-week, marine ecology RET, addressing the questions: How do teachers' conceptions and enactment of classroom inquiry change after the program?; What are the program's goals?; What accounts for these differences?; and What do these findings imply for future RETs? Data collected includes pre and post program questionnaires, audiotapes and videotapes of pre and post program teaching, post program STIR instrument responses, interviews, and field notes. The study found that an extensive, reflective program model, conducted by scientists who are teacher-centered, successfully conveyed the program model of inquiry. Post program, teachers' conceptions of inquiry were more student centered, focused less on assessment and classroom management and more on authentic content, questions, and presentations, and incorporated program language. Question patterns during enactment shifted to fewer teacher questions, more student questions, and increased higher order questions by students and teachers. More procedural questions indicated role shifts. The STIR instrument fostered understanding of enactment and, with critical incidents analyses, highlighted underlying teacher value structures. Teachers with more theoretical sophistication and who had Rationalistic and Egalitarian value structures applied inquiry throughout their teaching and moved beyond contextual constraints. Implications suggest that those who develop and implement RETs need to be masterful "bridge builders" to help transition teachers and their learning back to the classroom. Reflection holds promise for illuminating teachers

  17. [Golf handicap score is a suitable scale for monitoring rehabilitation after apoplexia cerebri].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Per; Meden, Per; Knudsen, Lars V; Knudsen, G M; Thomsen, Carsten; Feng, Ling; Pinborg, Lars H

    2015-12-21

    A 67-year-old male was examined nine, 35 and 135 days after stroke using conventional stroke scales, 18 holes of golf, functional MRI (fist closures) and translocator protein imaging of microglial function in the brain using single photon emission computed tomography. The data showed that the over 100-year-old golf handicap scale is better suited for quantifying recovery after stroke than conventional stroke assessment scales, which are prone to ceiling effect. We suggest that rating with golf handicap should be used more widely in stroke research, and we find it tremendously important that these new findings are published before Christmas.

  18. Grief elaboration in families with handicapped member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, C; Finocchiaro, G; Raciti, L; Alberti, A

    1992-01-01

    Families with handicapped member seem to follow the same five stages (rejection and isolation, anger, dealing with the problem, depression, acceptance) of Kubler-Ross grief elaboration theory while dealing with the narcissistic wound of a handicapped child. Some of these families show a block in one of the stages. The effort of psychotherapy is to remove the block and let them reach the last stage. In this paper families under systemic psychotherapeutic treatment are analyzed, who had in common the birth of a child with low or modest invalidating signs and psychotic or autistic features. The families structure did not show the characteristics of a psychotic family. Nevertheless either one or both parents ignored the evidence of their child disease and they built a "disease-incongrous" wait around the child, trying to push away the painful reality. The authors explain the importance of this approach for the improvement of the autistic traits.

  19. Fear of Failure, Self-Handicapping, and Negative Emotions in Response to Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Herman, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that students who fear failure are likely to utilize cognitive strategies such as self-handicapping that serve to perpetuate failure. Such devastating motivational dispositions clearly limit academic success. The present study examined negative emotional responses to scenarios involving academic failure among a sample of…

  20. Predictors of Self-Handicapping: An Examination of Personal and Contextual Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Teresa; And Others

    Evaluation is so paramount in students' lives that researchers have found that, for many students, one's self-worth is intricately tied to one's performance. Self-handicapping is a strategy that may be used to maintain one's self-worth. This anticipatory tactic typically involves the use of procrastination; by procrastinating, one clouds the…

  1. Ten per cent more grain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-08-15

    At a low estimate, ten per cent of stored grain is lost every year to insect pests. In this article, based on a lecture given earlier this year in Switzerland, Dr. Harry E. Goresline, Food Radiation Specialist of the Food and Agriculture Organisation, now assisting the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture, explains how use of radiation can help to prevent losses and the research which has taken place to ensure its safety

  2. Chernobyl ten years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The accident in the fourth reactor plant in Chernobyl in Ukraine occurred ten years years ago, caused the death of 31 people while the health consequences have turned out to be difficult to assess. This review describes the accident, its consequences and effects to health, studies carried out at the present state as well as the comparison with the other accidents and disaster. (author)

  3. Tens bij bevallingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin-Nuis, F.D.F.

    2000-01-01

    TENS (Transcutane Electrische Neuro Stimulatie) is een pijnverlichtingsmethode die berust op de Gate Control Theory van Melzack en Wall. Door middel van electrische pulsen via de huid zou de geleiding van nociceptieve signalen (pijnprikkels) worden beïnvloed en zou het lichaam endorfinen aanmaken:

  4. Affordances: Ten Years On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jill P.; Stillman, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Ten years ago the construct, affordance, was rising in prominence in scholarly literature. A proliferation of different uses and meanings was evident. Beginning with its origin in the work of Gibson, we traced its development and use in various scholarly fields. This paper revisits our original question with respect to its utility in mathematics…

  5. Examining the relationship between authenticity and self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ahmet; Akin, Umran

    2014-12-01

    Self-handicapping includes strategies of externalization in which people excuse failure and internalize success, but which also prevents them from behaving in an authentic way. The goal was to investigate the relation of authenticity with self-handicapping. The study was conducted with 366 university students (176 men, 190 women; M age = 20.2 yr.). Participants completed the Turkish version of the Authenticity Scale and the Self-handicapping Scale. Self-handicapping was correlated positively with two factors of authenticity, accepting external influence and self-alienation, and negatively with the authentic living factor. A multiple regression analysis indicated that self-handicapping was predicted positively by self-alienation and accepting external influence and negatively by authentic living, accounting for 21% of the variance collectively. These results demonstrated the negative association of authenticity with self-handicapping.

  6. The Relationship Between Academic Identity and Self-Handicapping

    OpenAIRE

    Carlisle, Brandon Lamare

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present dissertation was to examine whether, and how, behavioral academic self-handicapping and claimed academic self-handicapping differentially relate to the academic identity statuses (i.e., achieved, diffused, moratorium, and foreclosed). Self-handicapping has been defined as creating or claiming obstacles to performance in order to enhance the ability to externalize failure and internalize success. Academic identity status involves a student’s decision to attend colleg...

  7. Sex differences in claimed and behavioral self-handicapping and ADHD symptomatology in emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaconis, Maryanne; Boyd, Stephen J; Hartung, Cynthia M; McCrea, Sean M; Lefler, Elizabeth K; Canu, Will H

    2016-12-01

    Although the research is clear that boys with ADHD have higher symptomatology and impairment than girls with ADHD, for adults the research is mixed. Some studies suggest no sex differences, whereas others suggest that women might have higher symptomatology and impairment. The present study examined sex differences in ADHD symptomatology and impairment, and the possible role of claimed and behavioral self-handicapping as an explanation for any differences. Claimed self-handicapping (CSH) involves reports of performance-inhibiting conditions, whereas behavioral self-handicapping (BSH) involves reporting more objective, intentional acts that could undermine performance. College students (N = 699) completed an online study. Sex differences were found for hyperactivity such that women reported higher levels, but not for inattention or impairment. The test of the indirect effect of sex through CSH was significant, suggesting that higher levels of CSH in women were associated with elevated ADHD symptoms and impairment. The test of the indirect effect of sex through BSH was also significant, suggesting that higher levels of BSH in men are associated with elevated symptoms of ADHD and impairment. These data extend the literature by suggesting that self-handicapping might at least partially explain differential self-reporting of ADHD symptoms and impairment in emerging adults across the sexes.

  8. Honig v. Doe: the suspension and expulsion of handicapped students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, M L

    1989-09-01

    Public Law 94-142 provides for a free appropriate public education for all handicapped children, but does not address the issue of disciplining handicapped students. The result has been confusion and uncertainty, particularly concerning expulsion and suspension. The courts have been forced into this vacuum, acting as arbiters. The Supreme Court's ruling in Honig v. Doe will help to delineate the proper role of educators in the suspension and expulsion of handicapped students. This article examines that role and offers recommendations for school policies regarding the discipline of handicapped students.

  9. A motivational analysis of defensive pessimism and self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Andrew J; Church, Marcy A

    2003-06-01

    Two studies examined motivational influences on and correlates of defensive pessimism and self-handicapping and investigated the relationship between these two cognitive strategies and performance attainment. The findings indicated that defensive pessimism and self-handicapping have similar motivational profiles, with the primary difference being that self-handicapping represents the absence of approach motivation in the achievement domain, as well as the presence of avoidance motivation. Self-handicapping, but not defensive pessimism, was shown to undermine performance-attainment, and performance-avoidance goals were validated as mediators of this negative relationship. Issues regarding the functional nature of the two cognitive strategies are discussed.

  10. Academic self-handicapping and their correlates in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocoradă, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-handicapping has been examined as a self-protectivestrategy, used by adults and young, males and females, in different situations assessed as threatening for the positive self-esteem. The purpose of this study is to explore the relations between self-handicapping and some variables relevant in the academic field as learning motivation, academic results, selfesteem. Age and gender are the criteria of our analysis. The results suggestthe males and later adolescents (males and females self-handicap more that the females and the young adolescents. Self-esteem and some components of learning motivation are the variables that influence self-handicapping at significant levels.

  11. Powers of ten

    CERN Document Server

    1979-01-01

    Powers of Ten is a 1977 short documentary film written and directed by Charles Eames and his wife, Ray. The film depicts the relative scale of the Universe in factors of ten (see also logarithmic scale and order of magnitude). The idea for the film appears to have come from the 1957 book Cosmic View by Kees Boeke. The film begins with an aerial image of a man reclining on a blanket; the view is that of one meter across. The viewpoint, accompanied by expository voiceover, then slowly zooms out to a view ten meters across ( or 101 m in standard form), revealing that the man is picnicking in a park with a female companion. The zoom-out continues, to a view of 100 meters (102 m), then 1 kilometer (103 m), and so on, increasing the perspective—the picnic is revealed to be taking place near Soldier Field on Chicago's waterfront—and continuing to zoom out to a field of view of 1024 meters, or the size of the observable universe. The camera then zooms back in to the picnic, and then to views of negative pow...

  12. Discipline in the Public Schools: A Dual Standard for Handicapped and Nonhandicapped Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sue G.

    1984-01-01

    Federal regulation protects handicapped students' education against unwarranted interruption without specifying procedures for disciplining handicapped students. This article reviews court decisions in disciplinary cases and provides procedural guidelines to follow in disciplining handicapped students. (MD)

  13. Comparison of Irrational Believes between Mothers of Severe or Profound Mentally Handicapped Children with Healthy Children Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Hivadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of present research was the comparison of mothers irrational believes with severe or profound mentally handicapped child and mothers with normal child from 6 to14 years old in Tehran city. Materials & Methods: This study was an analytical, cross – sectional and comparative (case – control research. From mothers with severe or profound mentally handicapped child who had refered to Tehran welfare services centers, 80 mothers were selected by regular randomized sampling from two rehabilitation centers and 80 mothers with normal child were selected for peering with the group of testimonial from schools areas of east, west, south, north and center of Tehran, through multi - stage cluster sampling in for variables of: age of mothers, educational levels, the location of living and the number of children. They answered to questionnaire of irrational believes of jons (IBT. Analysis of data was done by descriptive and infringing statistics methods (Independent T test, U Mann Whitney, Chi-square and fisher. Results: The findings showed that: there are significantly differences in total irrational believes and irrational believes of blame proneness, frustration reactive, anxious over concern, problem avoiding and dependency, perfectionism between two groups of mothers (P<0/05. There was no significant difference in irrational believes between mothers who had mental handicap daughter and mothers who had mental handicap son (P=0/314. There was no significantly difference between two groups of mothers in four believes of demand for approval (P=0/737, high-self expectation (P=0/126, emotional irresponsibility (P=0/727, helplessness for change (p=0/283. Conclusion: Irrational believes and many its sub scales. In mothers of severe or profound mental handicap children were more than mothers with normal child. But believes of demand for approval, high self expectation, emotional irresponsibility, helplessness for change in mothers with

  14. The psychometric properties of the Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire in a Dutch-speaking population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, S; To, W T; De Ridder, D

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study is to translate and validate the tinnitus handicap questionnaire (THQ) for a Dutch-speaking population. The factor structure of the questionnaire, the reliability and the validity is determined. Furthermore, a statistical comparison with the original English version of the tinnitus handicap questionnaire is performed. We assessed 101 patients at the Tinnitus Research Initiative clinic of Antwerp University Hospital. Twenty-seven Dutch items from the tinnitus handicap questionnaire by Kuk et al. [(1990), Ear Hear11:434-45.] were obtained by the process of translation and back translation. The factor structure, internal consistency, was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and item correlations were used to confirm reliability. The construct validity was confirmed with a visual analogue scale for loudness and distress, awareness, annoyance, the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ), the mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Profile of Mood State (POMS), ensuring that this new instrument measures the tinnitus handicap. This study demonstrates that the Dutch version of the tinnitus handicap questionnaire is a reliable (Cronbach's alpha coefficient α = 0.93) and valid measure of self-perceived tinnitus-related distress [with visual analogue scale for loudness (r = 0.39) and distress (r =0.45), awareness (r = 0.39), annoyance (r = 0.57), the Tinnitus Questionnaire (r = 0.82), the mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (r = 0.79), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (r = 0.62) and the Beck Depression Inventory (r = 0.32)]. The psychometric properties are in line with previous findings on the English version with regard to reliability and validity. However, the items in the subscales differ from the English version. While the English version has three subscales, our version has only two subscales. Yet, the English version reports that for the three factors, there is a low

  15. Long tracks Energy: Views on ten years of research on green energy; Lange spor Energi: Blikk paa ti aar med forskning paa miljoevennlig energi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coldevin, Grete Haakonsen

    2011-07-01

    RENERGI is the The Research Council of Norway's strategic research program aimed the energy sector. The program has given and gives us central knowledge about technologies, solutions, policies and instruments that could help solve the energy and climate challenges and support the Norwegian business opportunities for value creation.The program period extending from 2004 to 2013. This booklet presents an analysis Research shows the development of the research program has funded from the beginning to the present. The analysis of RENERGI, we call it 'Long Track' follows selected projects and portfolios of projects through more year to track the effectiveness Research Council funding had. And what are the key findings? Experiences from RENERGI and from the precursors to the program, show that increased funding for research in this field triggers innovative research and innovation.The program means adapted to industry characteristics: Energy requires strong communities, and the program has helped to build up such over time. These strong communities nest ground for the establishment of Centres for environmentally friendly energy (FME), the newest addition by the Research Council of instruments in this area. Analysis of research over time are important because they show effect of investing public funds in research. When initiate research, there is great expectations to short-term results. We know it can take time before results come. What gives returns today often based on research many years. Research using these analyzes as part of our knowledge base for future priorities and in our dialogue with research funding ministries. Research teams can use the results to summarize own operations over time. Businesses can benefit greatly Long-term analysis showing that energy research has opened for business start-ups and established companies given new products they can create value from. 'Long Track' emphasizes the importance of thinking long-term: When a research starts up, it

  16. Long tracks Energy: Views on ten years of research on green energy; Lange spor Energi: Blikk paa ti aar med forskning paa miljoevennlig energi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coldevin, Grete Haakonsen

    2011-07-01

    RENERGI is the The Research Council of Norway's strategic research program aimed the energy sector. The program has given and gives us central knowledge about technologies, solutions, policies and instruments that could help solve the energy and climate challenges and support the Norwegian business opportunities for value creation.The program period extending from 2004 to 2013. This booklet presents an analysis Research shows the development of the research program has funded from the beginning to the present. The analysis of RENERGI, we call it 'Long Track' follows selected projects and portfolios of projects through more year to track the effectiveness Research Council funding had. And what are the key findings? Experiences from RENERGI and from the precursors to the program, show that increased funding for research in this field triggers innovative research and innovation.The program means adapted to industry characteristics: Energy requires strong communities, and the program has helped to build up such over time. These strong communities nest ground for the establishment of Centres for environmentally friendly energy (FME), the newest addition by the Research Council of instruments in this area. Analysis of research over time are important because they show effect of investing public funds in research. When initiate research, there is great expectations to short-term results. We know it can take time before results come. What gives returns today often based on research many years. Research using these analyzes as part of our knowledge base for future priorities and in our dialogue with research funding ministries. Research teams can use the results to summarize own operations over time. Businesses can benefit greatly Long-term analysis showing that energy research has opened for business start-ups and established companies given new products they can create value from. 'Long Track' emphasizes the importance of thinking long-term: When

  17. Vocational Reintegration of Handicapped Workers with Assistive Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. E.

    1977-01-01

    Two approaches to vocational reintegration of handicapped workers are described: (1) adapting the disabled to the working environment through treatment, therapy, counseling, selective placement, and prostheses, and (2) adapting the working environment to particular handicaps, with the assistive device fitted to the machine or tool rather than to…

  18. The Impact of Handicapping Conditions on Consumer Attitudes in Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Eleanor M.; And Others

    The report summarizes results of a study of attitudes of 222 undergraduate university students (University of Minnesota, Duluth) toward financial decisions involving a family member with a handicap. The Situational Attitude Scale--Handicapped Family Consumer (which assesses attitudes toward parental expenditure of money for siblings or…

  19. "Euthanasia" of Persons with Severe Handicaps: Refuting the Rationalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusthaus, Evelyn

    1985-01-01

    The article examines two common rationalizations for euthanasia of persons with severe handicaps and presents arguments to refute them. The article calls for parents, professionals, and friends of persons with severe handicaps to be vocal in refuting euthanasia and its rationales. (Author/CL)

  20. Mortality of mentally handicapped patients after mass inter-hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-18

    Aug 18, 1990 ... handicapped group the death rate was as high as 58,5/1 000 because it was an older population. In our patients we observed that in spite of the preparation before transfer, and the improved facilities and nursing care afterwards, there was an increase in the death rate of mentally handicapped patients after ...

  1. Academic Self-Handicapping and Achievement: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinger, Malte; Wirthwein, Linda; Lemmer, Gunnar; Steinmayr, Ricarda

    2014-01-01

    Self-handicapping represents a frequently used strategy for regulating the threat to self-esteem elicited by the fear of failing in academic achievement settings. Several studies have documented negative associations between self-handicapping and different educational outcomes, inter alia academic achievement. However, studies on the relation…

  2. Underachievers' Cognitive and Behavioral Strategies--Self-Handicapping at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Jari-Erik; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two studies with a total of 153 junior and senior high-school students and vocational students in Finland investigated whether underachievers applied a self-handicapping or learned-helplessness strategy in achievement contexts. Underachievers seemed to apply a self-handicapping strategy rather than a learned-helplessness approach. (SLD)

  3. Siblings of the Handicapped: A Literature Review for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Mary Elizabeth; Midlarsky, Elizabeth

    1985-01-01

    Siblings of handicapped children may have adjustment problems associated with increased family responsibilities, increased parental expectations, and perceived parental neglect in favor of the disabled sibling. Problems may be related to socioeconomic status; family size; age, sex, and birth order of the sibling; and severity of the handicap. (GDC)

  4. STATE ANXIETY, SUBJECTIVE IMBALANCE AND HANDICAP IN VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yougan Saman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEvidence is emerging of a significant clinical and neuro-anatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. Aims1.To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit.2.To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. MethodsTwo separate cohorts Vestibular Schwannoma (VS patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric responses and questionnaire assessment (Vertigo handicap Questionnaire, Vertigo Symptom Scale, State Trait Anxiety InventoryFifteen post resection Vestibular schwannoma patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1. Forty-five patients with VS in-situ and with preserved vestibular function formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2. Experiment 1: VS subjects (N=15 with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a State anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterwards with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1. Experiment 2: State anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1 N=26 and without balance symptoms (Group 2 N=11 (Aim 2. The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER.ResultsIn experiment 1, a significant difference (p<0.01 was found when comparing

  5. Management techniques for the control of Melinis minutiflora P. Beauv. (molasses grass: ten years of research on an invasive grass species in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Romero Martins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The invasion of exotic species is considered to be a major threat to the preservation of biodiversity. In the Parque Nacional de Brasília (National Park of Brasília, the invasive Melinis minutiflora (molasses grass occupies more than 10 % of the area of the park. The present, long-term, study compared two treatments of exposure to molasses grass: 1 fire and 2 integrated management (fire + herbicide sprays + manual removal. The aerial biomass of molasses grass in the experimental area initially represented ca. 55 % of the total aerial biomass, a percentage that apparently did not influence native plant species richness at this site. Fire alone was not sufficient to control molasses grass, which attained its pre-treatment biomass values after two years. Integrated management reduced, and maintained, biomass to less than 1 % of its original value after ten years, and maintained this level throughout the study, demonstrating that it is a promising strategy for the recovery of areas invaded by molasses grass in the Cerrado. However, because of the recolonization by molasses grass, long-term monitoring efforts are targeting outbreaks, which would require immediate intervention in order to maintain the native biological diversity of the region.

  6. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werlin Steven L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children.

  7. Factors related to tinnitus and hyperacusis handicap in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazh, Hashir; Lammaing, Karen; Moore, Brian C J

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to assess factors related to tinnitus and hyperacusis handicap in older people. Retrospective cross-sectional. Data were gathered for 184 patients with an average age of 69 years. Tinnitus handicap as measured via the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) was significantly predicted by tinnitus annoyance as measured via the visual analogue scale (VAS) (regression coefficient, b = 2.9, p tinnitus on the patient's life as measured via the VAS (b = 3.9, p tinnitus annoyance significantly predicts tinnitus handicap, it is important to explore factors associated with annoyance that may be useful in designing appropriate rehabilitative interventions aimed at reducing tinnitus handicap in older people. Future studies should explore whether hyperacusis and insomnia in older people with tinnitus need to be managed in conjunction with treatment for depression.

  8. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) for labour pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Richard

    2012-05-01

    Because TENS is applied inconsistently and not always in line with optimal TENS application theory, this may explain why TENS for labour pain appears to be effective in some individuals and not in others. This article reviews TENS theory, advises upon optimal TENS application for labour pain and discusses some of the limitations of TENS research on labour pain. TENS application for labour pain may include TENS applied to either side of the lower spine, set to 200 mus pulse duration and 100 pulses per second. As pain increases, TENS intensity should be increased and as pain decreases, TENS intensity should be reduced to maintain a strong but pain free intensity of stimulation. This application may particularly reduce back pain during labour.

  9. The Dance Within: A Pilot Project in Dance for the Handicapped and Teaching Dance for the Handicapped: A Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan Dance Association, Lansing.

    The Michigan Dance Association's Dance Project for the Handicapped is the subject of the two pamphlets that make up this document. The first pamphlet, "The Dance Within," describes the history, nature and goals of the Jackson Pilot Project, the first handicapped dance program in Michigan; it also offers suggestions on how to set up similar…

  10. A ten-year audit of traditional Chinese medicine and other natural product research published in the Chinese Medical Journal (2000-2009)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard A. Collins

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical research encompasses a wide variety of disciplines. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural product research have made great contributions to preventing and treating illness. The number and content of original research reports evaluating TCM and natural products have not previously been described. Information in this area will identify areas of relative strength and weakness in terms of knowledge gaps with respect to clinical conditions and natural product remedies.Methods Original research reports (i.e. original articles, brief reports, and research letters) published in the Chinese Medical Journal (CMJ) from January 2000 to December 2009 evaluating TCM and other natural products were reviewed.The United Kingdom Clinical Research Collaboration (UK-CRC) Health Research Classification System was used to analyze the type of health research conducted. Further analysis on the major illnesses addressed and the major herbal components utilized was conducted.Results One hundred and seventeen original research reports involving TCM or other natural products were identified,comprising 3.82% of the CMJ output in the period covered by this study. Of the different materia medica described in these reports, 74.4% were derived exclusively from plant material, 10.3% from animals, 3.4% from fungi, 1.7% from minerals, and 10.3% were of mixed (plant / animal / fungal / mineral) composition. Twelve herbs were investigated exclusively or were constituents of 66/87 (75.9%) of the plant-based materia medica investigated. Panax ginseng was the most commonly investigated herb or constituent (14/87, 16.1%), followed by Astragalus membranaceus (9/87, 10.3%),Coptis chinensis/Berberis spp. (7/87, 8.0%) and Rheum spp. (7/87, 8.0%). Four UK-CRC health categories accounted for the majority of TCM and other natural product research (cancer, 20.9%; cardiovascular, 19.2%; oral/gastrointestinal,9.8%; and inflammatory/immune, 9.0%). The most common research activity was

  11. Boom time for scientists: with tens of millions of dollars coming in every year, science researchers across Ottawa are enjoying a new sense of optimism

    CERN Multimedia

    Spears, T

    2002-01-01

    A combination of fresh government and industry money and a sense of optimism have stimulated hiring, new construction and an aura of aggressive expansion in Ottowa's science research facilities (1 page).

  12. Tendency to self-handicapping in the situation of expected failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smederevac-Stokić Snežana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic objective of this research is to determine what type of self-handicapping strategies subjects will use when they face potential failure, under the condition that they have the possibility of strategy choice. Another research objective is directed to the research of relation between the selected self-handicapping strategy and personality characteristics. 120 student of the second and third year of the Department of psychology, University of Novi Sad has been taken into sample. In the first research stage, all students administrated a series of personality self-report tests. In the second experiment stage, the participants were divided into four groups, on the basis of two criteria: the solvability of intelligence test tasks and the presence of hampering factors during task solving. The research results show that there are at least two types of self-handicapping strategies. One type is used by the majority of people when found in the situation where potential failure is expected. It refers to searching for alibis in external circumstances and it is probably the reflection of sound tendencies of facing possible consequences of information on one’s own incompetence. Another type of strategies presents consistent behaviour pattern, determined by the higher degree of adverse affectivity and negative image of oneself, and it is manifested in the use of poor psychophysical condition as the alibi for failure.

  13. Scientists and Classroom Teachers Working Together, a Win-win Scenario Demonstrated Over a Ten Year Period of Collaboration Through Arctic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvellas, B.; Grebmeier, J. M.; Cooper, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    From 2002-2012 NSF and NOAA have supported a Vermont high school biology teacher to work with Dr. Jackie Grebmeier on 8 research cruises to the Arctic. Not only was the teacher embedded in Dr. Grebmeier's research team efforts, but her students were able to follow the work on board through her daily journals and photos. Subsequently, Dr. Grebmeier traveled to Vermont for a personal visit to students in multiple classes, grades 4-12. The opportunity for teachers to be teamed with a researcher, especially over an extended period of time as we will discuss in our presentation, allows their students to share in the tremendous learning experience and gain a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of science. The result is that the students begin to understand how the content they learn in the classroom is utilized in a real world setting. We will also discuss the more subtle benefits that occurred throughout the school year through connecting academic content with personal examples of "real" science. Note that the recently released Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), when fully implemented, will change the way students learn science. Appendix A of the NGSS lists 7 Conceptual Shifts in these new standards. #1 states "K-12 Science Education Should Reflect the Interconnected Nature of Science as it is Practiced and Experienced in the Real World" and #4 calls for a "Focus on Deeper Understanding of Content as well as Application of Content." What better way to address the standards than bringing real world science research into the classroom? Many K-12 science teachers, particularly those in elementary classrooms, have never had the opportunity to pursue their own research and even fewer have experienced first hand the real world work of a research scientist. This presentation will provide insights about our successful collaboration and value-added aspects to enhance the educational experience.

  14. Sociocultural handicap of foreign pupils and professional qualification of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markéta Zachová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The presented text shows the results of research carried out within the dissertation thesis. The main topic is the phenomenon of sociocultural handicap of foreign pupils (pupils with a different mother tongue. The research is based on the expert belief that integration of foreign pupils (pupils with a different mother tongue into Czech schools and the training of teachers in this field is still somewhat marginal, even though there is a growing debate about increasing cultural diversity, increasing heterogeneity of schools and introduction of inclusive measures. The aim of the research was to analyze professional training of teachers in relation to the sociocultural handicap of foreign pupils (pupils with a different mother tongue. The goal was refined by the formulation of research questions: What possible problems (difficulties reflect teachers in the teaching process of foreign pupils? What procedures and strategies do teachers use to help these pupils to be integrated successfully? How do teachers assess their professional readiness for education of foreign pupils (whether they were sufficiently prepared to work with foreign pupils in the course of their undergraduate studies, where they find benefits, deficiencies in this training? How do students assess their undergraduate education for foreign-pupil teaching (whether they were ready to work with foreign pupils in their previous undergraduate education, where they find benefits, deficiencies in this training? The research used questionnaire survey techniques for teachers and students and semi-structured interviews for teachers. The partial technique was the analysis of study subjects focused on the education of foreign pupils at the Faculty of Education at West Bohemian University in Pilsen (hereinafter WBU. The research group was made up of teachers of the 1st grade of primary schools of the Pilsen and Karlovy Vary regions and students of the 4th grade of the field of Teaching for the

  15. Engaging Researchers with the World's First Scholarly Arts Repositories: Ten Years after the UK's Kultur Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meece, Stephanie; Robinson, Amy; Gramstadt, Marie-Therese

    2017-01-01

    Open access institutional repositories can be ill-equipped to manage the complexity of research outputs from departments of fine arts, media, drama, music, cultural heritage, and the creative arts in general. The U.K.-based Kultur project was funded to create a flexible multimedia repository model using EPrints software. The project launched the…

  16. Ten years of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-08-15

    Ten years have elapsed since the world's first nuclear power station began to supply electricity in Russia, and this in turn marked the end of a twelve year stage following the first controlled nuclear chain reaction at Chicago. These periods mark major stages in the development of atomic energy from the realm of abstract ideas to that of everyday industrial application. They followed a period of fundamental research and laboratory work, culminating in Enrico Fermi's demonstration of a system whereby the forces of the atom could be brought under control. Then it was necessary to find ways and means of using the chain reaction for practical purposes and on an industrial scale. And after this had been shown in 1954 to be technically possible, it had still to be developed into an economic process. The nuclear power station has proved itself from the technical and engineering standpoint. The third phase of development has been to bring it to the stage of being economically competitive with alternative sources of energy, and it would appear that we are now reaching that goal - though more slowly than had been envisaged ten years ago

  17. The ten thousand Kims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Ki; Minnhagen, Petter; Kim, Beom Jun

    2011-07-01

    In Korean culture, the names of family members are recorded in special family books. This makes it possible to follow the distribution of Korean family names far back in history. It is shown here that these name distributions are well described by a simple null model, the random group formation (RGF) model. This model makes it possible to predict how the name distributions change and these predictions are shown to be borne out. In particular, the RGF model predicts that for married women entering a collection of family books in a certain year, the occurrence of the most common family name 'Kim' should be directly proportional to the total number of married women with the same proportionality constant for all the years. This prediction is also borne out to a high degree. We speculate that it reflects some inherent social stability in the Korean culture. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the total population of the Korean culture down to the year 500 AD, based on the RGF model, and find about ten thousand Kims.

  18. The ten thousand Kims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Ki; Minnhagen, Petter; Kim, Beom Jun

    2011-01-01

    In Korean culture, the names of family members are recorded in special family books. This makes it possible to follow the distribution of Korean family names far back in history. It is shown here that these name distributions are well described by a simple null model, the random group formation (RGF) model. This model makes it possible to predict how the name distributions change and these predictions are shown to be borne out. In particular, the RGF model predicts that for married women entering a collection of family books in a certain year, the occurrence of the most common family name 'Kim' should be directly proportional to the total number of married women with the same proportionality constant for all the years. This prediction is also borne out to a high degree. We speculate that it reflects some inherent social stability in the Korean culture. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the total population of the Korean culture down to the year 500 AD, based on the RGF model, and find about ten thousand Kims.

  19. Medical Services from the Point of View of People with a Sight Handicap

    OpenAIRE

    Nováková Peršínová, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    My thesis deals with the provision of medical services to people with a severe sight handicap. My research focuses on fully blind people. The aim of my thesis is to find out the situation of these people within medical facilities. I try to reveal blind people's experience of how healthcare workers communicate with them, how well prepared healthcare professionals are and how blind people themselves are prepared. I also examine what technical obstacles are encountered by blind people in medical...

  20. The Role of Classroom Goal Structure in Students' Use of Self-Handicapping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdan, Tim; Midgley, Carol; Anderman, Eric M.

    1998-01-01

    Surveyed 656 fifth graders on their use of self-handicapping strategies and examined predictors of self-handicapping. Boys used handicapping more than girls did, and grade point average and perceived academic competence were negatively related to handicapping. Ability goal structure and teaching practices highlighting relative ability were…

  1. Improving Learning Tasks for Mentally Handicapped People Using AmI Environments Based on Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Martín

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype to improve learning tasks for mentally handicapped people is shown in this research paper using ambient intelligence techniques and based on cyber-physical systems. The whole system is composed of a worktable, a cyber-glove (both with several RFID and NFC detection zones, and an AmI software application for modeling and workflow guidance. A case study was carried out by the authors where sixteen mentally handicapped people and 3 trainers were involved in the experiment. The experiment consisted in the execution of several memorization tasks of movements of objects using the approach presented in this paper. The results obtained were very interesting, indicating that this kind of solutions are feasible and allow the learning of complex tasks to some types of mentally handicapped people. In addition, at the end of the paper are presented some lessons learned after performing the experimentation.

  2. Adler's psychology (of use) today: personal history of traumatic life events as a self-handicapping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGree, C E; Snyder, C R

    1985-06-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the reporting of a history of traumatic life events may serve as a strategy to control attributions about performance in an evaluative setting (i.e., self-handicapping). Following from Alfred Adler's early theorization in the psychology of use, as well as more recent theory and research on self-handicapping, we predicted that individuals would emphasize the adversity of events and experiences in their background when an uncertain evaluation was expected and when a traumatic background would serve as a suitable excuse for potential failure. Results generally supported the hypothesized self-protective reporting of traumatic life events.

  3. Self-handicapping status, claimed self-handicaps and reduced practice effort following success and failure feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T; Richardson, A

    2001-03-01

    Self-handicapping involves the strategic establishment of an impediment or obstacle to success prior to a performance situation which thereby provides a convenient excuse for poor performance. The study sought to establish that relative to low trait self-handicappers, high trait self-handicappers exposed to failure in an intellectually evaluative situation will (a) pre-emptively claim more handicaps, and (b) behaviourally self-handicap through reduced practice effort, and (c) report greater anxiety and negative affect relative to low trait self-handicappers. Participants were 72 undergraduate students, divided equally between high and low self-handicapping groups. This study utilised a 2 (self-handicapping status: high, low) x 3 (performance feedback: fail, low task importance; fail, high task importance; success) between-subjects factorial design to investigate claimed and behavioural self-handicapping through reduced practice effort. This was done by manipulating performance outcome and perceived task importance. Relative to low trait self-handicappers, high trait high self-handicappers claimed more handicaps and engaged in greater behavioural self-handicapping following failure when working on tasks that were described as potentially diagnostic of low ability. While low self-handicappers internalised their success more than their failure in the high task importance condition, high self-handicappers were undifferentiated in their attributions across performance conditions. Greater anxiety and greater negative affect were also characteristic of high self-handicappers. The study highlights the self-protective benefit of self-handicapping in sparing the individual from conclusions of low ability, and the failure of high self-handicappers to fully internalise their success. These elements and the role of uncertain estimates of ability are discussed in considering implications for intervention.

  4. Self-reported versus behavioral self-handicapping: empirical evidence for a theoretical distinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, E R; Deppe, R K; Gordon, L J

    1991-12-01

    The present study was an investigation of how Ss would respond when given 2 self-handicapping options, 1 behavioral (withdrawal of practice effort) and 1 self-reported (reporting high levels of stress). Ss anticipating a diagnostic test of intellectual ability were given different instructions regarding the effects of stress and practice on test performance. Ss were told that (a) stress only, (b) practice only, (c) both stress and practice, or (d) neither stress nor practice affected test scores. Ss were then given the opportunity to self-report a handicap on a stress inventory and to behaviorally self-handicap by failing to practice before the test. High self-handicapping men and women showed evidence of self-reported handicapping, but only high self-handicapping men behaviorally self-handicapped. However, when both self-handicaps were viable, both high self-handicapping men and women preferred the self-reported over the behavioral self-handicap.

  5. Horticulture for Secondary Level Handicapped Adolescents: The Cherokee County Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Greg H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Cherokee County (Alabama) horticulture training program provides 40 mildly mentally retarded adolescents with vocational training in a marketable skills. The broad spectrum of vocational skills makes horticulture ideal for the handicapped. (DB)

  6. Handicaps for the large scale commercial application of micropropagation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.L.M.

    1988-01-01

    In the last 10 years micropropagation has shown a spectacular development. However, at present the widespread use of micropropagation is handicapped by the following facts: Frequently mutations occur, particularly when applying the adventitious bud technique and callus systems. Basic knowledge

  7. Sexuality and the Developmentally Handicapped: Health Education Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary-Lou; Forchuk, Cheryl

    1987-01-01

    The article describes a sex education program for small groups of developmentally handicapped adolescents and young adults which includes information on and discussion of body parts, acceptable social behavior, assertiveness, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases. (Author/JW)

  8. Personal, interpersonal, and situational influences on behavioral self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christina M; Kimble, Charles E

    2009-12-01

    This study explored the combined effects of personal factors (participant sex), interpersonal factors (experimenter sex), and situational factors (performance feedback) on two forms of behavioral self-handicapping. Participants received non-contingent success or failure feedback concerning their performance on a novel ability and were given the opportunity to self-handicap before performing again. Behavioral self-handicapping took the form of (a) exerting less practice effort (practice) or (b) choosing a performance-debilitating tape (choice). Men practiced least after failure feedback and chose a debilitating tape if they were interacting with a female experimenter. Generally, across all participants in both choice and practice conditions, high performance concern and the presence of a male experimenter led to the most self-handicapping. Results are interpreted in terms of self-presentational concerns that emphasize a desire to impress or an awareness of the female or male experimenter's acceptance of self-handicappers.

  9. Effect of maternal education on the rate of childhood handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawky, S; Milaat, W M; Abalkhail, B A; Soliman, N K

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relation between maternal education and various maternal risk factors, identify the impact of maternal education on the risk of childhood handicap and estimate the proportion of childhood handicap that can be prevented by maternal education. Data was collected from all married women attending the two major maternity and child hospitals in Jeddah during April 1999. Women with at least one living child were interviewed for sociodemographic factors and having at least one handicapped child. The risk of having a handicapped child and the population attributable risk percent were calculated. Some potential risk factors are dominant in our society as approximately 30% of women did not attend school and 84% did not work. Consanguineous marriages accounted for about 43%. Pre-marriage counseling was limited as only 10% of women counseled before marriage. The proportion of unemployment and consanguineous marriages decreased significantly by increase in maternal education level. Conversely, the proportion of women reporting pre-marriage counseling increased significantly by increase in maternal education level. Approximately, 7% of women reported having at least one handicapped child. The risk of having a handicapped child showed a significant sharp decline with increase in maternal education level. At least 25% of childhood handicap can be prevented by achieving female primary education and up to half of cases can be prevented if mothers finish their intermediate education. Female education plays a major role in child health. The results of this study suggest investment in female education, which would have substantial positive effects in reducing incidence of childhood handicap in Jeddah.

  10. Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1990, P.L. 101-476: A Summary. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This summary of the Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-476, identifies how these Amendments extend and expand special education research, demonstration, and training programs of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA authorizes three state formula grant programs and several discretionary grant…

  11. Self-Handicapping and Its Impact on Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeter Sinem Uzar Ozcetin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Self handicapping is characterized by experiencing anxiety at succeeding a mission although the person has the capacity to fulfill the assignment or duty. It describes one's showing tendency to link own failures to problems in own performance instead of own abilities to protect oneself from the possibility of failure. When individuals care about performance much but doubt about success, they display self-handicapping strategies to protect their self. Self-handicappers try to protect their self by internalizing successes and externalizing failures. This strategies help them feel well in both successes and failures. Self-handicapping becomes a trait of personality in time and the individual begins to use it continuously as a negative coping mechanism to protect his/her self and to avoid failures. These actions eliminates the capability of rational thinking and prevents solution of the problems as a result of irrational interpretations. Self-handicapping causes the decrease of life satisfaction and motivation, and causes the increase of maladaptation, negative mood, somatic symptoms and alcohol-drug abuse. As a conclusion, self-handicapping hinders performance and this negative performance influences adaptation and psychological well-being. The most essential approach to prevent occurrence of self-handicapping behaviours is empowerment of the self. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 145-154

  12. [Physical handicapped, economic practices and matrimonial strategies in Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassin, D

    1991-01-01

    Social relations around the handicapped are generally presented in terms of economic dependence and social inadaptation. This point of view leads to give greater importance, especially in Africa, to studying the way in which group and society help the physically or mentally ill. Actually, this approach does not give a complete account about the real situation of the handicapped in social relations of production and reproduction. From a series of in-depth interviews conducted in handicapped families of the suburbs of Dakar, two aspects are analyzed: the economic role of the handicapped, through the circulation of the product of his begging in his household or through the exploitation of his work as apprentice in a workshop; and his value on the marriage market, where invalid persons are given without dowry if they are women, and must pay a much more important amount if they are men. The social situation of the handicapped thus is not only a matter of assistance or charity, but as well of strategies that the handicapped and above all his circle implement in order to take advantage of the stigma or on the contrary try to erase it.

  13. Academic Goals and Self-Handicapping Strategies in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradás, María del Mar; Freire, Carlos; Valle, Antonio; Núñez, José Carlos

    2016-05-23

    In highly competitive settings like university, the fear of failure leads some students to protect their self-worth using self-handicapping strategies. The present investigation examines to what extent academic goals are related to those tactics in university students. Specifically, MANCOVA was applied to estimate statistical differences linked to behavioral and claimed self-handicapping strategies according to the level (high/medium/low) of four types of academic goal (achievement approach, achievement avoidance, mastery approach, and work avoidance). Degree, year in school, and gender were entered as covariates. 940 students (86.5% women) from University of A Coruña (M = 20.44; SD = 1.73) participated. Results show that: (a) both behavioral and claimed self-handicapping are promoted by ego-oriented goals (achievement avoidance, F(2, 937) = 23.56, p self-handicapping (F(2, 937) = 9.09, p self-handicapping; and (c) mastery approach goals are significantly, negatively related to both types of self-handicapping (F(2, 937) = 20.09, p < .001, η p 2 = .041). Psychological and educational implications of the findings are discussed.

  14. Discussion of the dizziness handicap inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Basak; Serbetcioglu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    A review of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). NUMBER OF STUDIES: Seventy-four studies. Articles published between January 1990 and May 2012 were identified by searches in PubMed electronic database. Of the 227 articles meeting the inclusion criteria 74 were reviewed. These articles are discussed under nine topics; Reliability, validity and internal consistency of the original version of DHI, relationship between vestibular/balance tests and DHI, association between DHI and the other scales related to balance impairments, exploratory factor analysis of the DHI, screening version of DHI, translations of DHI into other languages, the role of DHI to assess the success of the treatment of balance disorder, DHI results in various vestibular disorders, general characteristics of DHI in patients with balance impairment. Self reported measures represent unique pieces of the information important for the management of dizzy patients. DHI is the most widely used self reported measurement of patients with dizziness. It has been translated into fourteen languages, so it is widely accepted.

  15. Creating Awareness of Sexual Abuse in Children with Special Education Needs: Depending on the Opinions of Teachers of the Mentally Handicapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükbayraktar, Çagla Girgin; Er, Rukiye Konuk; Kesici, Sahin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine what students and families should do in order to prevent sexual abuse in students who need special education, depending on the opinions of teachers of mentally handicapped students. The qualitative research technique was used in this research. The study population of the research consisted of the…

  16. Models and impact of patient and public involvement in studies carried out by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London: findings from ten case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Annabelle; Hanley, Bec; Gafos, Mitzy; Cromarty, Ben; Stephens, Richard; Sturgeon, Kate; Scott, Karen; Cragg, William J; Tweed, Conor D; Teera, Jacqueline; Vale, Claire L

    2016-07-29

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) in studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit (MRC CTU) at University College London varies by research type and setting. We developed a series of case studies of PPI to document and share good practice. We used purposive sampling to identify studies representing the scope of research at the MRC CTU and different approaches to PPI. We carried out semi-structured interviews with staff and patient representatives. Interview notes were analysed descriptively to categorise the main aims and motivations for involvement; activities undertaken; their impact on the studies and lessons learned. We conducted 19 interviews about ten case studies, comprising one systematic review, one observational study and 8 randomised controlled trials in HIV and cancer. Studies were either open or completed, with start dates between 2003 and 2011. Interviews took place between March and November 2014 and were updated in summer 2015 where there had been significant developments in the study (i.e. if the study had presented results subsequent to the interview taking place). A wide range of PPI models, including representation on trial committees or management groups, community engagement, one-off task-focused activities, patient research partners and participant involvement had been used. Overall, interviewees felt that PPI had a positive impact, leading to improvements, for example in the research question; study design; communication with potential participants; study recruitment; confidence to carry out or complete a study; interpretation and communication of results; and influence on future research. A range of models of PPI can benefit clinical studies. Researchers should consider different approaches to PPI, based on the desired impact and the people they want to involve. Use of multiple models may increase the potential impacts of PPI in clinical research.

  17. Self-handicapping, excuse making, and counterfactual thinking: consequences for self-esteem and future motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Sean M

    2008-08-01

    Researchers interested in counterfactual thinking have often found that upward counterfactual thoughts lead to increased motivation to improve in the future, although at the cost of increased negative affect. The present studies suggest that because upward counterfactual thoughts indicate reasons for a poor performance, they can also serve as excuses. In this case, upward counterfactual thoughts should result in more positive self-esteem and reduced future motivation. Five studies demonstrated these effects in the context of self-handicapping. First, upward counterfactual thinking was increased in the presence of a self-handicap. Second, upward counterfactual thoughts indicating the presence of a self-handicap protected self-esteem following failure. Finally, upward counterfactual thoughts that protect self-esteem reduced preparation for a subsequent performance as well as performance itself. These findings suggest that the consequences of upward counterfactuals for affect and motivation are moderated by the goals of the individual as well as the content of the thoughts. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  18. Czech, Slovak science ten years after split

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Ten years after the split of Czechoslovakia Czech and Slovak science are facing the same difficulties: shortage of money for research, poor salaries, obsolete equipment and brain drain, especially of the young, according to a feature in the Daily Lidove Noviny (1 page).

  19. Top Ten Concerns for Trustees in 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Joel W.

    1988-01-01

    Ten issues most likely to influence institutions this year include tuition policy and financing, capital renewal and replacement, charitable giving, scientific equipment and laboratories, endowment management and spending policy, research funding, corporate contributions, minority enrollment and hiring, debt financing and debt capacity, and cost…

  20. Giant multipole resonances: perspectives after ten years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly ten years ago evidence was published for the first of the so-called giant multipole resonances, the giant quadrupole resonance. During the ensuing years research in this field has spread to many nuclear physics laboratories throughout the world. The present status of electric giant multipole resonances is reviewed. 24 figures, 1 table

  1. Self-esteem at school and self-handicapping in childhood: comparison of groups with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesi, Marianna; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has focused on the role of self-esteem and self-handicapping strategies in the school domain. Self-handicapping refers to maladaptive strategies employed by adults and children for protection and maintenance of positive school self esteem. In this study the self-esteem and the self-handicapping strategies of children with dyslexia, reading comprehension disabilities, and mathematical disabilities were compared to a control group with normal learning. There were 56 children whose mean age was 8 (23 girls, 33 boys), attending Grade 3 of primary school. These pupils were selected by scores on a battery of learning tests commonly used in Italy for assessment of learning disabilities. Analyses suggested these children with dyslexia, reading comprehension disabilities, and mathematical disabilities had lower ratings of self-esteem at school and employed more self-handicapping strategies than did children whose learning was normal. More research is required to identify and examine in depth the factors that promote adaptive strategies to cope with children's reading difficulties.

  2. An investigation of whether factors associated with short-term attrition change or persist over ten years: data from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatfield Mark

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors associated with the loss of participants in long-term longitudinal studies of ageing, due to refusal or moves, have been discussed less than those with short term follow-up. Methods In a population-based study of cognition and ageing (the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS, factors associated with dropout due to refusal and moving in the first follow-up period (over two years are compared with factors associated with dropout over ten years. Participants at 10-year follow-up are compared with their age-standardised baseline contemporaries. Results Some consistent trends are found over the longer term. Refusers tended to have poorer cognition, less years of education, not have a family history of dementia and be women. Characteristics of people who moved differed between waves, but the oldest and people in worse health moved more. When surviving and responding individuals at ten years are compared with those of the same age at baseline many differences are found. Individuals of lower social class, education, cognitive ability, in residential care, with sight/hearing problems and poor/fair self-reported health are less likely to be seen after 10 years of follow-up. Individuals report more health problems when they participate in multiple interviews. Conclusion The characteristics of refusers in the longer term are similar to those refusing to participate over the shorter term. Long-term follow-up studies will under represent the disadvantaged and disabled but represent full health status of participating individuals better. There are advantages and disadvantages to both short-term and long-term follow-up.

  3. Are anthropometric, flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance variables related to clubhead velocity in low- and high-handicap golfers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Marnewick, Michel C; Maulder, Peter S; Nortje, Jacques P; Hume, Patria A; Bradshaw, Elizabeth J

    2009-09-01

    The present study assessed the anthropometric profile (International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry protocol), flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance of 20 male golfers. These data were collected in order to determine: a) the relationship between these kinanthropometric measures and clubhead velocity; and b) if these measures could distinguish low-handicap (LHG) and high-handicap (HHG) golfers. Ten LHG (handicap of 0.3 +/- 0.5) and 10 HHG (handicap of 20.3 +/- 2.4) performed 10 swings for maximum velocity and accuracy with their own 5-iron golf club at a wall-mounted target. LHG hit the target significantly more (115%) and had a 12% faster clubhead velocity than HHG (p bench press strength and longer (5%) upper am and total arm (4%) length and less (24%) right hip internal rotation than HHG (0.01 velocity (p bench press and hack squat strength as well as upper arm and total arm length also approaching significance (0.01 bench press strength and longer arms may therefore be at a competitive advantage, as these characteristics allow the production of greater clubhead velocity and resulting ball displacement. Such results have implications for golf talent identification programs and for the prescription and monitoring of golf conditioning programs. While golf conditioning programs may have many aims, specific trunk rotation exercises need to be included if increased clubhead velocity is the goal. Muscular hypertrophy development may not need to be emphasized as it could reduce golf performance by limiting range of motion and/or increasing moment of inertia.

  4. Personality traits, age and sex as predictors for self-handicapping tendency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Petar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-handicapping is one of the strategies people use when facing potential failure. Paper presents new scale for assessing self-handicapping tendency as relatively stable trait, as well as its relations with personality traits, sex and age. Self-handicapping questionnaire and shortened form of Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire were administered to 230 participants of both sexes, age 18 to 59. Confirmatory factor analysis shows that model with four latent dimensions, encompassed by a higher-order latent dimension, fits the data well. Those lower order dimensions correspond to originally created scales: External handicaps in interpersonal area, Internal handicaps in interpersonal area, Internal handicaps in achievement area and External handicaps in achievement area. Results of MANCOVA shows that Neuroticism is predictor of all dimensions of self- handicapping. Impulsive sensation seeking predicts choice of external handicaps in interpersonal area, as well as internal handicaps in achievement area. Latter is predicted also by low Activity. Younger subjects show significantly higher tendency to use internal handicaps, and men in general show more self-handicapping tendency than women, except in choosing internal handicaps in achievement area, where sex shows no significant effect.

  5. ABACC ten years applying safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, Elias

    2001-01-01

    The Argentinian-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of nuclear special materials has been in operations for ten years. The rational behind the creation and the work performed by the Agency during the last decade is described. (author)

  6. Treatment of Orally Handicapped Edentulous Older Adults Using Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The oral handicap of complete edentulism is the terminal outcome of a multifactorial process involving biological factors and patient-related factors. Fully edentulous orally handicapped older adults have been neglected because removable acrylic dentures have been the classic therapy for complete edentulism but are only rehabilitative, not therapeutic. Not replacing missing teeth with stable dentures could prevent adequate food intake. Osseointegrated endosseous implants used as a therapeutic adjunct can reduce the problem of long-term bone resorption to less than 0.1 mm per year. Implant-borne prostheses substantially increase the overall health and quality of life of orally handicapped fully edentulous older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DESIGN OF CITY BUS LIFT FOR THE HANDICAPPEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Turgut GÜRSEL

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the technological developments, the handicappeds do not take part sufficiently in the social and economic life, because buildings, road construction features and means of the transport are not suitable for them. In this study, a lift for handicappeds was designed, that is supposed to be installed to the middle door of city buses. The lift, whose installation should require a few changes at the bus, is driven by a hydraulic system from the street to the level of the bus floor and vice-versa. In the work, at first a construction was developed in accordance with the dimensions of the middle door of a city bus. After determining of dimensions of all elements, a hydraulic mechanism was constructed, that raises the handicapped, its wheelchair and the platform. Furthermore the construction of the elements of the system were determined, and its proofs of strength analysis were indicated

  8. Correlations between self-handicapping and self-defeating personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, T; Morales, J; Beyler, J; Tatter, T; Swigert, L

    1991-10-01

    In this study scores on Strube's self-handicapping scale were correlated with scores on Schill's self-defeating personality scale. Berglas believes there are subtypes of self-defeating personality and that his concept of self-handicapping should be correlated with the three criteria which represent a self-protective component of self-defeating personality. Some support for Berglas' proposition was found, particularly for men. However, correlations with other components of self-defeating personality suggest the criteria thought to be self-protective may need to be reconsidered.

  9. Minimizing Teacher Stress. Structuring Positive Interactions for Handicapped and Nonhandicapped Children in Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Nola R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Components of an integrated physical education program, which consists of handicapped and nonhandicapped students, include: (1) activities that promote interaction among all students; (2) strategies that place handicapped and nonhandicapped students together; and (3) reinforcement of cooperative behavior. (CJ)

  10. 13 CFR 113.3-3 - Structural accommodations for handicapped clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... handicapped clients. 113.3-3 Section 113.3-3 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... ADMINISTRATOR General Provisions § 113.3-3 Structural accommodations for handicapped clients. (a) Existing... by handicapped clients. Where structural changes are necessary to make the recipient's goods or...

  11. Re-Examining the Effects of Noncontingent Success on Self-Handicapping Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Self-handicapping refers to the practice on the part of certain individuals to handicap their performance when poor performance is likely to reveal low ability. Noncontingent success (feedback that is inflated relative to performance) is more likely to promote self-handicapping behaviour than noncontingent failure (failure feedback…

  12. An Assessment of the Self-Protective Function of Self-Handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, Annie; And Others

    Self-handicapping is the phenomenon of setting oneself up to fail a feared evaluation task to protect a sense of self-worth. A study examined whether individuals self-handicap to protect a general or global perception of themselves or to protect perceptions of competence in the specific domain being evaluated. Handicapping behaviors related to…

  13. Some Costs of Caring at Home for an Intellectually Handicapped Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetwynd, Jane

    1985-01-01

    Household expenditure patterns of families in the general population were compared with those of 91 families caring for an intellectually handicapped child. Results indicated that handicapped child families spent on average $NZ17 per week more on household items and $NZ7 a week on items related to care of the handicapped child. (Author/CL)

  14. Ten Lessons from Ten Years PPP Experience in Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, T.; Verhoest, K.; Voets, J.; Coppens, T.; van Dooren, W.; van den Hurk, M.

    2017-01-01

    In 2004 Flanders, the northern region of Belgium launched a range of large public–private partnership (PPP) projects for a total value of 6 billion euros. Ten years later, PPP has become a well-embedded procurement method for long-term public infrastructure projects. This article makes a critical

  15. Data processing potential ten years from now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajde, C.

    1982-01-01

    What today is still experimental will tomorrow be routine. Use of emission tomography, automatic determination of regions of interest, generalisation of Fourrier phase and amplitude analysis, parametric images these will become routine medical protocols. The next ten years will see a saturation in the field of research and a stabilisation in system development. Equipment renewal will be seen from the same angle as in the automotive industry - more for reasons of wear and tear than for reasons of technical advancement

  16. Modification of the 'ten-day rule'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klempfner, G.

    1985-01-01

    In a 1964 decision the National Health and Medical Research Council recommended that radiological examinations of the lower abdomen and pelvis of women of childbearing age should be confined to the 10-day interval following the onset of menstruation. Recent evidence suggests that the first four weeks from the first day of the last menstrual period is not a critically radiosensitive period and consequently strict adherence to the ten-day rule is no longer indicated

  17. The effectiveness of three sets of school-based instructional materials and community training on the acquisition and generalization of community laundry skills by students with severe handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, S A; Bates, P E

    1987-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of three sets of school-based instructional materials and community training on acquisition and generalization of a community laundry skill by nine students with severe handicaps. School-based instruction involved artificial materials (pictures), simulated materials (cardboard replica of a community washing machine), and natural materials (modified home model washing machine). Generalization assessments were conducted at two different community laundromats, on two machines represented fully by the school-based instructional materials and two machines not represented fully by these materials. After three phases of school-based instruction, the students were provided ten community training trials in one laundromat setting and a final assessment was conducted in both the trained and untrained community settings. A multiple probe design across students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the three types of school instruction and community training. After systematic training, most of the students increased their laundry performance with all three sets of school-based materials; however, generalization of these acquired skills was limited in the two community settings. Direct training in one of the community settings resulted in more efficient acquisition of the laundry skills and enhanced generalization to the untrained laundromat setting for most of the students. Results of this study are discussed in regard to the issue of school versus community-based instruction and recommendations are made for future research in this area.

  18. Assessment of Self-Recognition in Young Children with Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Thirty young children with handicaps were assessed on five self-recognition mirror tasks. The set of tasks formed a reproducible scale, indicating that these tasks are an appropriate measure of self-recognition in this population. Data analysis suggested that stage of self-recognition is positively and significantly related to cognitive…

  19. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Hygiene Care for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for dental hygiene curriculum cover the scope and definitions of care for the handicapped, interrelationships between disciplines and courses, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, and…

  20. Workshops for the Handicapped; An Annotated Bibliography - No. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Dorothy C., Comp.; And Others

    An annotated bibliography of workshops for the handicapped covers the literature on work programs for the period July, 1968 through June, 1969. One hundred and fifty four publications were reviewed; the number of articles on administration, management, and planning of facilities and programs has increased since the last edition. (Author/RJ)

  1. Aerobic energy expenditure of handicapped children after training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresen, M. H.; de Groot, G.; Mesa Menor, J. R.; Bouman, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The effect is reported of a 10-week physical training program, consisting of three sessions with a total duration of two hours weekly, on the physical work capacity and efficiency of physically handicapped children aged 8 to 14 years. The program for the experimental group (n = 6) was an

  2. Demographic and audiological factors as predictors of hearing handicap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leposavić Ljubica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Currently available evidence reveals comparatively few studies of psychological effects of hearing impairments, in spite of the fact that clinicians have for a long time been aware of a connection between the acquired hearing impairment and mental disorders. They are focused on the investigation of dysfunction in general. Thus, three domains of the auditory imbalance may be distinguished: disorder, disability and handicap. 'Handicap', according to the definition of the World Health Organization, is a hindrance in an individual that results from an impairment or disability and represents psychological response of the individual to the impairment. OBJECTIVE Validation of acquired hearing impairment as a risk factor of psychical disorders as well as an analysis of relation of some demographic factors (sex, age, education and audiological factors (degree and duration of the impairment with the frequency of hearing handicap. METHOD MMPI-201 has been applied in 60 subjects affected with otosclerosis, potential candidates for stapedectomy, before and after the surgery. RESULTS Individuals with acquired hearing impairment manifest more frequent disorders of psychical functioning in comparison with general population, while demographic and audiometric parameters did not correlate with acquired hearing handicap. CONCLUSION It may be assumed that the very recognition of demographic and audio-logical factors can not help much in the understanding of the psychological stress associated with hearing impairment.

  3. Effects of Handicap and Job Characteristics on Selection Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Gerald L.; Brief, Arthur P.

    1979-01-01

    Business administration students evaluated a hypothetical job applicant who was either an amputee, an epileptic, or "normal." The hypothetical job openings varied as to levels of supervisory responsibility and public contact. With some noted exceptions, the handicapped applicants were evaluated no differently than the normal applicants.…

  4. Signal modulation as a mechanism for handicap disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavassa, Sat; Silva, Ana C.; Gonzalez, Emmanuel; Stoddard, Philip K.

    2012-01-01

    Signal honesty may be compromised when heightened competition provides incentive for signal exaggeration. Some degree of honesty might be maintained by intrinsic handicap costs on signalling or through imposition of extrinsic costs, such as social punishment of low quality cheaters. Thus, theory predicts a delicate balance between signal enhancement and signal reliability that varies with degree of social competition, handicap cost, and social cost. We investigated whether male sexual signals of the electric fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio would become less reliable predictors of body length when competition provides incentives for males to boost electric signal amplitude. As expected, social competition under natural field conditions and in controlled lab experiments drove males to enhance their signals. However, signal enhancement improved the reliability of the information conveyed by the signal, as revealed in the tightening of the relationship between signal amplitude and body length. Signal augmentation in male B. gauderio was independent of body length, and thus appeared not to be curtailed through punishment of low quality (small) individuals. Rather, all individuals boosted their signals under high competition, but those whose signals were farthest from the predicted value under low competition boosted signal amplitude the most. By elimination, intrinsic handicap cost of signal production, rather than extrinsic social cost, appears to be the basis for the unexpected reinforcement of electric signal honesty under social competition. Signal modulation may provide its greatest advantage to the signaller as a mechanism for handicap disposal under low competition rather than as a mechanism for exaggeration of quality under high competition. PMID:22665940

  5. Game Plans for Victors: New Skills for Severely Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Sharon; And Others

    The paper describes an approach in which games were planned to provide instruction for three severely handicapped children (5-6 years old) with few leisure, social, or academic skills and many aberrant behaviors. The first of two games involved a language program to teach verbal interactions, picture identification, and picture matching. The…

  6. Comprehensive Social Service Programs for Handicapped Citizens through Title XX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roten, Shelby Jean

    Reviewed are present and potential services and social programs for handicapped children in Mississippi through purchase of service contracts under Title XX of the Social Security Act. Sections cover the following topics: background and purpose of Title XX which gives states greater control over social service programs, planning state supported…

  7. Assessing Transition Service for Handicapped Youth: A Cooperative Interagency Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.; Boone, Rosalie

    1987-01-01

    The article presents a cooperative interagency approach for assessing effectiveness of programs and services to facilitate the transition of handicapped students from school to adult community living. Features of the model include cooperative planning at the policy level, implementation level, and direct service level; and collaboration by state…

  8. Occupational Opportunities for the Physically Handicapped. Part B. Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthe, Elaine F.

    This manual presents the master lists of 206 job titles of 167 different Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) code numbers which were held by physically handicapped graduates/completers of vocational programs as determined by a business and industry survey and graduate followup. (The project itself is reported in CE 026 163; survey and followup…

  9. Common Vocational Training Project for the Handicapped (CVTPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amritmahal, Ananda; Mehta, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    A project of the Poona (India) District Leprosy Committee offers training in the industrial sector to leprosy patients, orthopedically handicapped individuals, and socioeconomically disadvantaged individuals, under a common roof. The project aims to combat the leprosy stigma and to aid rehabilitation by making the trainees economically…

  10. 2001: Employment Odyssey or Opportunity for Persons with Handicapping Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linari, Ronald F.; Belmont, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Implications of trends in population, families, communications, automation, the environment, and employment changes are noted for the training and employment of handicapped persons. The need for emphasis in vocational education on generalizability, job readiness and vocational adjustment skills, and job analysis is stressed. (CL)

  11. Some Personality Characteristics of Self-Handicapping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Cathy A.

    Based on a modification of Berglas and Jones' (1978) design, conditions of contingent and noncontingent success and failure were manipulated to determine when and why individuals choose to adopt self-handicapping strategies. Male undergraduates (N=76) were informed that they were participating in a study investigating the effects of music on…

  12. Predictors of Middle School Students' Use of Self- Handicapping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Carol; Urdan, Tim

    1995-01-01

    By procrastinating, allowing others to keep them from studying, deliberately not trying, and using other "self-handicapping" strategies, students can convey that those circumstances, rather than lack of ability, are the reasons for subsequent poor performance. Survey data from 256 eighth-grade students indicated that boys use those strategies more…

  13. Attitudes of Preschool Teachers toward the Integration of Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Lily L.; Kubo, H. Richard

    Forty-six supervisors and teachers were surveyed regarding their attitudes toward integration of handicapped children in a regular preschool program, the helpfulness of supportive services, and the necessary conditions for the integration of their programs. Findings showed that the majority of teachers were in favor of integration and supportive…

  14. Developmental Trampoline Activities for Individuals with Multiple Handicapping Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Bill

    1979-01-01

    The use of trampoline activities with multiple handicapped students is discussed. Management considerations in safety are noted, and developmental trampoline skills are listed beginning with bouncing for stimulation. Progression to limited independence and finally independent jumping is described. The position statement of the American Alliance…

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 609 - Elderly and Handicapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... capabilities, are unable without special facilities or special planning or design to utilize mass... planning, facilities, or design. However, deafness is recognized as a handicap in the Department of Transportation's ADA regulation, and applicants for Section 5 assistance are encouraged to include the deaf as...

  16. Employers' Attitudes toward Employing People with Mental Handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, John W. L.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 66 Hong Kong companies and factories identified factors affecting employers' decisions to hire workers with mental handicaps. The five most important factors were emotional problems and personalities of workers, workers' ability to perform the job, availability of low-level jobs, productivity of workers, and possible special…

  17. Aquatics for the Handicapped--A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Irene

    1985-01-01

    The author reviews the literature on aquatic activity for the disabled, discussing the physical, physiological, psychological, and sociological benefits of swimming and water safety activities. Unique properties of water and legal requirements regarding physical education of the handicapped, specifically citing the development of skills in…

  18. EARLY DETECTION OF HANDICAPS OF PERSONS WITH TRISOMIA OF 21 CHROMOSOME IN THE CYTOGENETIC LABORATORY IN THE CENTER FOR MENTAL HEALTH FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS IN SKOPJE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. APOSTOLOSKI

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Factors which contribute the appearance of handicaps are numerous and complex. By their nature they are inherited or determined by factors of outer environment, mostly as a result of interaction of both. In the broad sense the genetic factors are located in 46 chromosomes in the human cell, before all in the female and male fertilized cell e.i. the genes located in the chromosomes which determine the function of the central nervous system. The chromosome aberrations e.i. the visible aberrations of the chromosome structure presents the cause for the appearance of handicaps mostly together with some syndrome. That’s the case with Dawn’s syndrome( mongolism where we can find trisomy of 21 chromosome.Relatively, the great number of examinees (176 which we discovered in a period of 10 years from all the places of R. Macedonia confirm the need for further investigations. The newborns with this syndrome are children with prenatal development finished in not adequate way. The presence of different physical appearance on the birth and later on, more or less, speaks about indefinite mixture of pathological factors in the growth of the child and the difference. The symptoms that are discovered in these children indicate that they are retarded in their psychological and physical development from the normal children, and the further growth and development are on a lower level. The psychological, pediatrics and psychiatric researches show that the level of intelligence of our examinees is low, where as the social adjustment is far more better.The examination of our examinees was made up of taking an anamnesis from the parents, mostly from the mother. Every examine was under taken an caryological test. Ten of them showed an translocative type of Down’s syndrome where one of the parents is the carrier of the heterological balanced translocation. The heterological balanced translocations can be discovered only through affected newborn child. Our researches

  19. Causal uncertainty, claimed and behavioural self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ted; Hepburn, Jonathan

    2003-06-01

    Causal uncertainty beliefs involve doubts about the causes of events, and arise as a consequence of non-contingent evaluative feedback: feedback that leaves the individual uncertain about the causes of his or her achievement outcomes. Individuals high in causal uncertainty are frequently unable to confidently attribute their achievement outcomes, experience anxiety in achievement situations and as a consequence are likely to engage in self-handicapping behaviour. Accordingly, we sought to establish links between trait causal uncertainty, claimed and behavioural self-handicapping. Participants were N=72 undergraduate students divided equally between high and low causally uncertain groups. We used a 2 (causal uncertainty status: high, low) x 3 (performance feedback condition: success, non-contingent success, non-contingent failure) between-subjects factorial design to examine the effects of causal uncertainty on achievement behaviour. Following performance feedback, participants completed 20 single-solution anagrams and 12 remote associate tasks serving as performance measures, and 16 unicursal tasks to assess practice effort. Participants also completed measures of claimed handicaps, state anxiety and attributions. Relative to low causally uncertain participants, high causally uncertain participants claimed more handicaps prior to performance on the anagrams and remote associates, reported higher anxiety, attributed their failure to internal, stable factors, and reduced practice effort on the unicursal tasks, evident in fewer unicursal tasks solved. These findings confirm links between trait causal uncertainty and claimed and behavioural self-handicapping, highlighting the need for educators to facilitate means by which students can achieve surety in the manner in which they attribute the causes of their achievement outcomes.

  20. A Ten-Year Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Cyndi

    2016-01-01

    Five initiatives launched during Cyndi Phillip's term as American Association of School Librarians (AASL) President (2006-2007) continue to have an impact on school librarians ten years later. They include the rewriting of AASL's learning standards, introduction of the SKILLS Act, the presentation of the Crystal Apple Award to Scholastic Library…

  1. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  2. Correlation between vocal tract symptoms and modern singing handicap index in church gospel singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Joel; Silverio, Kelly Cristina Alves; Siqueira, Larissa Thaís Donalonso; Ramos, Janine Santos; Brasolotto, Alcione Ghedini; Zambon, Fabiana; Behlau, Mara

    2017-08-24

    To verify the correlation between vocal tract discomfort symptoms and perceived voice handicaps in gospel singers, analyzing possible differences according to gender. 100 gospel singers volunteered, 50 male and 50 female. All participants answered two questionnaires: Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTD) scale and the Modern Singing Handicap Index (MSHI) that investigates the vocal handicap perceived by singers, linking the results of both instruments (psinging. Female gospel singers present higher frequency and intensity of vocal tract discomfort symptoms, as well as higher voice handicap for singing than male gospel singers. The higher the frequency and intensity of the laryngeal symptoms, the higher the vocal handicap will be.

  3. A Study to Design a System to Identify Handicapped Family Members of Active Duty Soldiers at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    2 (June 1975): 341-351. 51 "Consumer Services for Handicapped People at Home." Physiotherapy , March 1981, 77. Feuerstein, et al. "Categories of...improve the level and quality of student and faculty research in the HCA Graduate Program, we are in the process of formalizing a three-way relationship...among our graduate faculty, pre- ceptors and graduate students , and the Health Care Studies Division (HCSD) of the Academy. In this regard, we believe

  4. Self-Assessed Hearing Handicap in Older Adults with Poorer-than-Predicted Speech Recognition in Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Mark A.; Matthews, Lois J.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Even older adults with relatively mild hearing loss report hearing handicap, suggesting that hearing handicap is not completely explained by reduced speech audibility. Method: We examined the extent to which self-assessed ratings of hearing handicap using the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982)…

  5. Evaluation of attitudes of university students for handicapped individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Zekiye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Education has an important role in humans’ behaviours. Undergraduate education has headed among factors that influence maturation period before vocational lifes of individuals. The purpose of this study is to determine whether attitudes of university students for handicapped individuals differ according to some variables. This study which was carried out in screening model was done with 1167 people including 646 females 521 males who maintain their education at faculties taking initial teacher training in 2016 spring term at Yuzuncu Yil University. As data collection tool, Attitude Scale for Being Educated of Handicapped Individuals and Personal Information Form, which was developed by Kosterilioglu [12], was used. As statistical method, Duncan’s multiple range test was used in determining different groups following one-wat analysis of variance. Among these variables, pearson coefficients of correlation were calculated separately in groups in determining relation. In determining relationship between groups and categorical variables , chi square test was used. In calculations, value of p was taken as 0,05 and SPSS statistic program was used for calculations. While point average of attitudes of male students , who maintain their educations at Yuzuncu Yil University, for handicapped people was ascertained as 54.27±23.54, point average of attitudes of female students was determined as 55.86±26.34. A significant difference between male and female students according to gender variable was not seen in attitudes for being educated of handicapped individuals (P>0,05. It was observed that attitudes for being educated of handicapped individuals in starting and end of undergraduate term were higher than intermediate classes (P<0,01. Although a significant difference in kind of high schools from which students graduated was not seen, attitudes of graduates from science and sport high schools were found higher than graduates from other high schools

  6. Voice-controlled Internet Browsing for Motor-handicapped Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom; Aaskoven, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system has been designed and implemented in collaboration...... with an advisory board of motor-handicapped (potential) end-users and underlies a number of a priori defined design criteria: learnability and memorability rather than naturalness, minimal need for maintenance after release, support for "all" web standards (not just HTML conforming to certain "recommendations......"), independency of the language on the websites being browsed, etc. These criteria have lead to a primarily message-driven system interacting with an existing browser on the end users' systems...

  7. Military Families with Handicapped Children: The Reassignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    of them ( education service center, Lub- bock Medical facilities , Lubbock State School, psychiatric facilities , etc.) 18. Additional comments: Rapidly...Attached DD ) AN 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV6GS IS OBSOLETE UNCL 23 Oct 81 8 1 10 2oc 0 6 2 !CURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (I7,n Data Entered) AIR WAR...COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY Report No. MS107-81 MILITARY FAMILIES WITH HANDICAPPED CHILDREN: THE REASSIGNMENT PROBLEM (A (WiDE TO SPECIAL EDUCATION AVAILABLE

  8. Development of bladder control in mentally handicapped children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruschini Homero

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE:To analyze the role of mental handicap as a possible source of lack of development of bladder control and to find out the chance of continence to advise future patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The parents and relatives of 100 consecutive mentally handicapped patients were inquired by a personal interview. Questions included the age when they stopped using diapers, enuretic events, frequency, urgency and leakage episodes, urinary infections. Etiology of their mental problem was unknown in 34, perinatal anoxia in 17, Down syndrome in 15, phenylketonuria in 18 and others minors causes. The grade of mental deficiency were profound in 1, severe in 10, moderate in 39, mild in 33 and normal inferior value in 17. The age varied from 7 to 37 years old, with an average of 14 by the time of the interview, comprising 60 males and 40 females. RESULTS: All profound and severe patients presented leakage episodes regardless of the age. The mild and normal inferior value acquired progressive urinary control with aging, and 33% still remain with urinary symptoms above 16 years old. Urinary infection was similar in males and females, around 29%. The most committed group presented less urinary infections. The etiology of the mental handicap was not correlated to the incidence of urinary leakage. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of bladder control was correlated to the grade of mental handicap. In severe and profound groups, the expectancy of control is disappointing. In the less compromised groups, there is a delay in bladder training, with achievement of control in 2/3 after 16 years of age. Those in the normal inferior value have a chance of postponed urinary control, easily misdiagnosed by normal urological interviews.

  9. Critical Studies on Men in Ten European Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pringle, Keith; Hearn, Jeff (and 13 other network partners)

    2002-01-01

    This article is one the work of The European Research Network on Men in Europe project “The Social Problem and Societal Problematization of Men and Masculinities” (2000-2003), funded by the European Commission. The Network comprises women and men researchers with range of disciplinary backgrounds...... of statistical sources on men's practices in the ten countries, are presented. This is the second of four articles reviewing critical studies on men in the ten countries through different methods and approaches....

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A PROGRAM FOR THE RE-EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION OF EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED MALE ADOLESCENTS WITHIN A PUBLIC SCHOOL SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEEM, MICHAEL A.; PORTER, WILLIAM R.

    MAJOR OBJECTIVES OF THIS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WERE (1) TO CONTINUE DEVELOPING A PROTOTYPE SPECIAL CLASS PROGRAM FOR EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS (18 MALE ADOLESCENTS), (2) TO DEVISE METHODS OF EVALUATION FOR THE PROGRAM, AND (3) TO IDENTIFY SIGNIFICANT VARIABLES FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION AND RESEARCH. IN PLANNING THE PROJECT DURING THE FIRST…

  11. Tooth-brushing intervention programme among children with mental handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovska, E; Nakova, M; Radojkova-Nikolovska, V; Ristoska, S

    2010-01-01

    For realizing our study the supervised tooth-brushing program was carried out among 100 schoolchildren at the age of 9-12 and 13-16 years with low and moderate mental handicap in Skopje. To evaluate the results of six months intervention program, concentrated on encouragement of independent manual skills, OHI levels were detected by Green-Vermillion and CPITN index levels to characterize the gingival and periodontal health. For comparative analyzes of date-base OHI levels and after six months of intervention program, we detected that the mean date-base OHI index level for mentally handicaped children are 2.46, and at the end of the program (after six months) it was 0.73. CPITN index levels at the beginning and after six months of intervention programmed for mentally handicaped children in both age groups, also confirmed r statistical significance for this examined parameter, with evident reduction of CPITN mean levels from 2.11 to 0.95. Correlation among date-base OHI levels and levels at the end of our intervention program means high positive correlation between these index levels at the beginningand final examinations. This program gave promising results and was effective in reducing the plaque and gingivitis scores, so the key to long-term success of the program is to maintain the subjects' motivation to make oral hygiene a part of their daily routine and thus sustain this improvement (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 12). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  12. On the self-serving function of social anxiety: shyness as a self-handicapping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, C R; Smith, T W; Augelli, R W; Ingram, R E

    1985-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that socially anxious or shy individuals use their anxiety symptoms as a strategy to control attributions made about their performances in social-evaluative settings (i.e., self-handicapping strategies). Specifically, we predicted that trait-socially anxious or shy persons would report more symptoms of social anxiety in an evaluative setting in which anxiety or shyness could serve as an excuse for poor performance than would individuals in (a) an evaluative setting in which shyness was precluded as an excuse or (b) a nonevaluative setting. Furthermore, we predicted that this self-protective pattern of symptom reporting would not occur for individuals who were not trait-socially anxious because these persons would not commonly use such symptoms as a self-handicapping strategy. Results supported these predictions for male subjects, but not for female subjects. Sex differences in the strategic use of shyness are discussed in relation to other research on sex differences in the etiology and correlates of social anxiety.

  13. Ten questions about systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyner, Michael J; Pedersen, Bente K

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we raise 'ten questions' broadly related to 'omics', the term systems biology, and why the new biology has failed to deliver major therapeutic advances for many common diseases, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We argue that a fundamentally narrow and reductionist...... to understand how whole animals adapt to the real world. We argue that a lack of fluency in these concepts is a major stumbling block for what has been narrowly defined as 'systems biology' by some of its leading advocates. We also point out that it is a failure of regulation at multiple levels that causes many...

  14. Ten questions about systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyner, Michael J; Pedersen, Bente K

    2011-01-01

    to understand how whole animals adapt to the real world. We argue that a lack of fluency in these concepts is a major stumbling block for what has been narrowly defined as 'systems biology' by some of its leading advocates. We also point out that it is a failure of regulation at multiple levels that causes many......In this paper we raise 'ten questions' broadly related to 'omics', the term systems biology, and why the new biology has failed to deliver major therapeutic advances for many common diseases, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We argue that a fundamentally narrow and reductionist...

  15. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, G.; Pasqualetti, M.J.

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benford, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pasqualetti, M.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Ten questions on nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.; Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    The authors give explanations and answers to ten issues related to nuclear wastes: when a radioactive material becomes a waste, how radioactive wastes are classified and particularly nuclear wastes in France, what are the risks associated with radioactive wastes, whether the present management of radioactive wastes is well controlled in France, which wastes are raising actual problems and what are the solutions, whether amounts and radio-toxicity of wastes can be reduced, whether all long life radionuclides or part of them can be transmuted, whether geologic storage of final wastes is inescapable, whether radioactive material can be warehoused over long durations, and how the information on radioactive waste management is organised

  18. The Top Ten Algorithms in Data Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xindong

    2009-01-01

    From classification and clustering to statistical learning, association analysis, and link mining, this book covers the most important topics in data mining research. It presents the ten most influential algorithms used in the data mining community today. Each chapter provides a detailed description of the algorithm, a discussion of available software implementation, advanced topics, and exercises. With a simple data set, examples illustrate how each algorithm works and highlight the overall performance of each algorithm in a real-world application. Featuring contributions from leading researc

  19. Using TENS for pain control: the state of the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Carol GT; Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmacological intervention that activates a complex neuronal network to reduce pain by activating descending inhibitory systems in the central nervous system to reduce hyperalgesia. The evidence for TENS efficacy is conflicting and requires not only description but also critique. Population-specific systemic reviews and meta-analyses are emerging, indicating both HF and LF TENS being shown to provide analgesia, specifically when applied at a strong, nonpainful intensity. The purpose of this article is to provide a critical review of the latest basic science and clinical evidence for TENS. Additional research is necessary to determine if TENS has effects specific to mechanical stimuli and/or beyond reduction of pain and will improve activity levels, function and quality of life. PMID:24953072

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, S; Welch, V; Brosseau, L; Saginur, M; Shea, B; Tugwell, P; Wells, G

    2001-01-01

    . Subgroup analysis performed on TENS application and methodological quality did not demonstrate a significant statistical difference. Remaining pre-planned subgroup analysis was not conducted due to the small number of included trials and the variety of outcome measures reported. The results of the meta-analysis present no evidence to support the use of TENS in the treatment of chronic low back pain. Clinicians and researchers should consistently report the characteristics of the TENS device and the application techniques used. New trials on TENS should make use of standardized outcome measures. This meta-analysis lacked data on how TENS effectiveness is affected by four important factors: type of applications, site of application, treatment duration of TENS, optimal frequencies and intensities.

  1. [Transcultural adaptation of an instrument to evaluate hearing handicap in workers with noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Wanessa Tenório Gonçalves; de Lima, Maria Luiza Carvalho; Figueiroa, José Natal

    2011-01-01

    The noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a chronic and irreversible disease resulting of the exposure to noise in high levels at work. Even in the beginning, this hearing loss can damage in many degrees the worker's quality of life. Before this study, there wasn't an instrument, in Portuguese, to evaluate the psychosocial disadvantages of workers with NIHL. The aim of this research was to make a transcultural adaptation of an especific instrument to evaluate the hearing handicap from the original language to Portuguese, and check the reliability and legitimacy. The selected instrument passed by a process of semantic equivalence that was conducted in five stages: translation, back translation, critical appraisal of the versions, pre-test and a final review by a multi-professional group to develop a consensual version of the instrument for current use in Brazil. The instrument called "Inabilities Scale and Hearing Handicap" had, in general, acceptable psychometric measures, considering the little size of the sample and the fact that workers' hearing loss weren't too significant. Therefore, the Portuguese version of this instrument needs to be further tested in a representative sample of Brazilian workers with NIHL to ratify its utility in order to evaluate hearing handicap in this population.

  2. Testing a model of antecedents and consequences of defensive pessimism and self-handicapping in school physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, Nikos; Taylor, Ian M; Standage, Martyn

    2010-12-01

    There has been very limited research on the use of self-worth protection strategies in the achievement context of school physical education (PE). Thus the aim of the present study was to examine some antecedents and consequences of defensive pessimism and self-handicapping. The sample comprised 534 British pupils (275 females, 259 males) recruited from two schools who responded to established questionnaires. Results of structural equation modelling analysis indicated that self-handicapping and defensive pessimism were positively predicted by fear of failure and negatively predicted by competence valuation. In addition, defensive pessimism was negatively predicted by physical self-concept. In turn, defensive pessimism negatively predicted enjoyment in PE and intentions to participate in future optional PE programmes. Self-handicapping did not predict enjoyment or intentions. Results from multi-sample structural equation modelling showed the specified model to be largely invariant across males and females. The findings indicate that although both strategies aim to protect one's self-worth, some of their antecedents and consequences in PE may differ.

  3. Ten questions about radiant heating and cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, Kyu-Nam; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Kim, Kwang Woo

    2017-01-01

    to extend the applicability of the RHC system are providing the continuous impetus for research on RHC systems. This paper summarizes the important issues involved in the research on RHC system, whereby ten questions and answers concerning the RHC system are discussed, which will help researchers to conduct...

  4. Fear of failure and self-handicapping in college physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung Hung; Chen, Mei-Yen; Lin, Meng-Shyan; Kee, Ying Hwa; Shui, Shang-Hsueh

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fear of failure and self-handicapping within the context of physical education. Participants were 103 college freshmen enrolled in aerobic dance physical education classes in Taiwan. They completed the Performance Failure Appraisal Inventory and Self-Handicapping Scale for Sport 3 mo. after entering the class. Hierarchical regression indicated that scores on fear of failure predicted self-handicapping scores.

  5. The Performance-Perceptual Test (PPT) and its relationship to aided reported handicap and hearing aid satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Forsline, Anna

    2006-06-01

    Results of objective clinical tests (e.g., measures of speech understanding in noise) often conflict with subjective reports of hearing aid benefit and satisfaction. The Performance-Perceptual Test (PPT) is an outcome measure in which objective and subjective evaluations are made by using the same test materials, testing format, and unit of measurement (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N), permitting a direct comparison between measured and perceived ability to hear. Two variables are measured: a Performance Speech Reception Threshold in Noise (SRTN) for 50% correct performance and a Perceptual SRTN, which is the S/N at which listeners perceive that they can understand the speech material. A third variable is computed: the Performance-Perceptual Discrepancy (PPDIS); it is the difference between the Performance and Perceptual SRTNs and measures the extent to which listeners "misjudge" their hearing ability. Saunders et al. in 2004 examined the relation between PPT scores and unaided hearing handicap. In this publication, the relations between the PPT, residual aided handicap, and hearing aid satisfaction are described. Ninety-four individuals between the ages of 47 and 86 yr participated. All had symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and had worn binaural hearing aids for at least 6 wk before participating. All subjects underwent routine audiological examination and completed the PPT, the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly/Adults (HHIE/A), and the Satisfaction for Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire. Sixty-five subjects attended one research visit for participation in this study, and 29 attended a second visit to complete the PPT a second time. Performance and Perceptual SRTN and PPDIS scores were normally distributed and showed excellent test-retest reliability. Aided SRTNs were significantly better than unaided SRTNs; aided and unaided PPDIS values did not differ. Stepwise multiple linear regression showed that the PPDIS, the Performance SRTN, and age were

  6. The Handicap Principle for Trust in Computer Security, the Semantic Web and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam); Krings, Axel W.; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    Communication is a fundamental function of life, and it exists in almost all living things: from single-cell bacteria to human beings. Communication, together with competition and cooperation,arethree fundamental processes in nature. Computer scientists are familiar with the study of competition or 'struggle for life' through Darwin's evolutionary theory, or even evolutionary computing. They may be equally familiar with the study of cooperation or altruism through the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game. However, they are likely to be less familiar with the theory of animal communication. The objective of this article is three-fold: (i) To suggest that the study of animal communication, especially the honesty (reliability) of animal communication, in which some significant advances in behavioral biology have been achieved in the last three decades, should be on the verge to spawn important cross-disciplinary research similar to that generated by the study of cooperation with the PD game. One of the far-reaching advances in the field is marked by the publication of "The Handicap Principle: a Missing Piece of Darwin's Puzzle" by Zahavi (1997). The 'Handicap' principle [34][35], which states that communication signals must be costly in some proper way to be reliable (honest), is best elucidated with evolutionary games, e.g., Sir Philip Sidney (SPS) game [23]. Accordingly, we suggest that the Handicap principle may serve as a fundamental paradigm for trust research in computer science. (ii) To suggest to computer scientists that their expertise in modeling computer networks may help behavioral biologists in their study of the reliability of animal communication networks. This is largely due to the historical reason that, until the last decade, animal communication was studied with the dyadic paradigm (sender-receiver) rather than with the network paradigm. (iii) To pose several open questions, the answers to which may bear some refreshing insights to trust research in

  7. Ten out of ten for LHC decapole magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN's Albert Ijspeert (left) and Avinash Puntambekar of the Indian CAT laboratory with the ten Indian decapole magnets on the test bench. Tests will be carried out by the LHC-MTA group. A batch of 10 superconducting decapole magnets for the LHC has just arrived at CERN from India. These will be used to correct for slight imperfections in the dipole magnets that will steer proton beams around CERN's new accelerator. All magnets have slight imperfections in the fields they produce, and in the LHC dipoles these will be corrected for using sextupoles and decapoles. The sextupoles were the first LHC magnets to be given the production green-light following successful tests of pre-series magnets last year (Bulletin 21/2000, 22 May 2000). Now it is the turn of pre-series decapoles to go on trial at CERN. Of the LHC's 1232 dipole magnets, half will use sextupole correctors only and the other half will use both sextupoles and decapoles. That means that a total of 616 pairs of decapoles are needed. Like the sextupole...

  8. Vocal handicap index in popular and erudite professional singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola-Barreiro, Camila Miranda; Silva, Marta Assumpção de Andrada E

    To compare the voice handicap index of popular and erudite professional singers according to gender, age, professional experience time, and presence or absence of self-reported vocal complaints. One hundred thirty-two professional singers, 74 popular and 58 erudite, who responded to a questionnaire with regards to identification, age, gender, professional experience time in singing, musical genres (for popular singers), vocal classification (for erudite singers), presence of self-reported vocal complaints, and the specific protocols for popular (Modern Singing Handicap Index - MSHI) and erudite (Classical Singing Handicap Index - CSHI) singing. Higher proportion of women and higher incidence of vocal complaints were observed in the popular singers compared with the erudite singers. Most of the popular singers belonged to the genre of Brazilian Popular Music. Regarding the classification of erudite singers, there was greater participation of sopranos and tenors. No statistical differences were observed with respect to age and professional experience time between the groups. Comparison of the MSHI and CSHI scores showed no statistically significant difference between these scores and genre or age in both groups of singers. Professional experience time was related to the total score and the subscales disability and impairment in the MSHI, only for popular singers with vocal complaints. There was no correlation between these variables and the CSHI for erudite singers. The impact of vocal difficulty/problem interferes differently in these two musical genres when related to vocal complaint and professional experience time. The MSHI and CSHI protocols proved to be important tools not only for the identification of problems, but also for the understanding of how these individuals relate their voices with this occupational activity.

  9. Selective nontreatment of handicapped newborns: a critical essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrman, A F

    1985-01-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit is the site of some of the most dramatic technology, complex decision-making and costly activity in the current range of medical institutions. Thus, the decisions made there are particularly visible, and of concern to a society which has increasingly scrutinized and challenged medical practices. Questions of marginal utility and cost-benefit relationships are becoming increasingly prominent. These concerns are heightened by the social and political tensions over issues of the time of initiation of life, quality of life, and assurances of equity for those less well off or handicapped from birth. Robert Weir's book, Selective Nontreatment of Handicapped Newborns, successfully summarizes the current dilemmas and identifies areas of uncertainty and lack of knowledge which cloud the decision-making processes. The book reviews the positions of the major protagonists of the last several years; inevitably, their positions will undergo continuous evolution in response to new data and vigorous political and public policy activity. Weir appropriately identifies the difficulty in arriving at an accurate prognosis as an important and prominent problem in decision-making about defective newborns. The population of surviving, compromised newborns is relatively unfamiliar and their problems remain largely unstudied. Weir's discussion of the desirability of the establishment of Infant Care Review Committees in those institutions which care for defective and handicapped newborns thoughtfully concludes that such committees are, on the balance, desirable. As experience accumulates with Infant Care Review Committees, they should serve the positive purpose of generating open discussion of legitimate disagreements. These committees will provide a forum in which decision-makers can disclose uncertainty, consider alternatives, and receive counsel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A study on CT findings and electroencephalographic findings in severely handicapped children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Masao; Nishimura, Masaaki; Kachi, Shozo; Sugimoto, Kimiyuki; Saito, Msahiko; Yamada, Shigeaki; Kameyama, Yoshio; Tanaka, Minoru; Hiraizumi, Yasuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) and computed tomographic (CT) features were examined in 40 institutionalized severely handicapped persons. Cranial CT appearance fell into five major types: (I) no abnormal findings (n=2), (II) generalized brain atrophy (n=16), (III) diffuse parenchymal disturbance (n=10), (IV) brain malformation (n=4), and (V) localized brain disturbance (n=8). In the I group, one person had normal EEG findings as well, but another person had the presence of focal spikes without spindles on EEG. Five of the II group had no abnormal EEG findings; ten had abnormality in basic waves and/or localized paroxysmal waves; and one had generalized spike-and-slow wave complex. All persons in the III group had flattening or disappearance of spindle waves. In the IV group, two persons with cerebral malformation and one with linear nevus sebaceous syndrome in association with hypoplasia of the cerebral hemisphere had abnormality in basic waves and localized paroxysmal waves. In the remaining one person with deficit of vermis cerebelli, there was no EEG abnormality. Among the last group of persons, there was no EEG abnormality corresponding to CT features. (Namekawa, K)

  11. Resolution 1540, ten years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Adopted on the 28 April 2004 by the United Nations Security Council under Chapter VII of the UN Charter, Resolution 1540 is a composite tool that was hitherto unprecedented. To recap, States are bound to 'refrain from providing any form of support to non-State actors that attempt to develop, acquire, manufacture, possess, transport, transfer or use nuclear, chemical or biological weapons and their means of delivery' (par. 1), and to prohibit and prevent non-State actors from the aforementioned through 'appropriate and effective' (par. 2,3) legal, judiciary, and administrative means. A Committee was established to which States had to submit a first report outlining the steps 'they have taken or intend to take to implement this resolution' (par. 4). This Committee was initially established for two years and has been regularly renewed since, and its mandate was extended in 2011 for ten years. It is not a surveillance mechanism. Finally, with the aim of remedying difficulties that certain States may experience in implementing the Resolution, 'States in a position to do so' are invited to offer assistance (par. 7). The level of the application of Resolution 1540 was originally based on a delicate three-pronged balance of obligation, good will, and partnership. It is not a matter of designating certain States to the rest of the international community, whilst avoiding that the exercise be limited to the submission of national reports, instead aiming to initiate a dynamic. The wager was a risky one. Ten years on, 90% of UN member States have submitted one or several implementation reports. 170 States and 50 international and regional organisations have taken part in outreach and implementation support events. Whatever quantitative or qualitative conclusions that can be reached, we should continue to promote the Re-solution's universal adoption, and to ensure that the implementation of its provisions is undertaken in a lasting manner, taking account of the national

  12. The music therapy of an anorectic mentally handicapped adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, M; O'Hara, J

    1993-03-01

    Where words fail, music may be a medium through which to explore one's inner world and experiences. Psychodynamic approaches have helped us to understand what it means to be handicapped (e.g. Sinason, 1992). The subtleties of diagnosing anorexia nervosa have recently been recognized in this group (e.g. Cottrell & Crisp, 1984). Music therapy has been used with clients of normal intelligence who have eating disorders (Nolan, 1989; Sloboda, 1993; Smeijsters & van den Hurk 1993). This article illustrates the music therapy of a woman with Down's syndrome (IQ = 50) and anorexia nervosa. It describes her management and progress in music therapy in relation to her external world and anorectic behaviours.

  13. Infanticide for handicapped infants: sometimes it's a metaphysical dispute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, T A

    1988-01-01

    Since 1973 the practice of infanticide for some severely handicapped newborns has been receiving more open discussion and defence in the literature on medical ethics. A recent and important argument for the permissibility of infanticide relies crucially on a particular concept of personhood that excludes the theological. This paper attempts to show that the dispute between the proponents of infanticide and their religious opponents cannot be resolved because one side's perspective on the infant is shaped by a metaphysics that is emphatically rejected by the other. In such a situation philosophical argument is powerless to bring about a resolution because there can be no refutation of one side by the other. PMID:2969052

  14. arTenTen: Arabic Corpus and Word Sketches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tressy Arts

    2014-12-01

    The article also presents the ‘sketch grammar’ (the basis for the word sketches in detail, describes the process of building and processing the corpus, and considers the role of the corpus in additional research on Arabic.

  15. The self-serving function of hypochondriacal complaints: physical symptoms as self-handicapping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T W; Snyder, C R; Perkins, S C

    1983-04-01

    The present experiment tested the hypothesis that hypochondriacal individuals commonly use reports of physical illness and symptoms as a strategy to control attributions made about their performances in evaluative settings (i.e., self-handicapping strategies). Specifically, it was predicted that hypochondriacal individuals would report more recent physical illness and complaints and more current physical symptoms in an evaluative setting in which poor health could serve as an alternative explanation for poor performance than would either individuals in an evaluative setting in which poor health was precluded as an excuse or individuals in a nonevaluative setting. As predicted, results supported this self-protective pattern of complaints in a hypochondriacal sample but not in a nonhypochondriacal group. The self-protective role of hypochondriacal behavior is discussed in relation to other theory and research on the nature and treatment of hypochondriasis.

  16. Physical-recreate activities to occupy the free time of handicaps children aged 6 to 11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizmary Feriz Otaño

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The research answers to the scholar age children’s necessity of Hermanos Cruz Community in Pinar del Río municipality. To verify the existence of a real problem about the necessity to occupy the free time o handicaps children, an initial diagnosis was carried out using different methods of investigation such as theoretical, empirical, and statistical and community intervention methods. There were consulted some specialists so as to gather the necessary information to validate the proposal, that contributes to insert the children in society as a way of relaxing and also promoting them health. The participative techniques are aimed to transform the group’s way of acting in the community. The proposed physical and recreate activities are integrating and take into account the children’s psychobiological necessities. The proposal was greatly accepted by Hermanos Cruz community and its results were considerably higher than those ones expected in the investigation.

  17. Object permanence development in infants with motor handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetters, L

    1981-03-01

    This study was an investigation of the effects of a motor handicap on the development of object permanence in the young child. Motor abilities were evaluated for 12 infants aged 13 to 29 months. Based on this evaluation, the children were described as manipulators or nonmanipulators in reference to their upper extremity skills. Their stage of object permanence was assessed using traditional and nontraditional assessments. Heart rate and visual tracking were recorded during the nontraditional assessment. Heart rate did not significantly relate to visual fixation or search response. There was, however, a significant difference (p less than .02) between stage achievement with traditional testing and age-appropriate levels. There was no significant difference between the nontraditional assessment and the age-appropriate levels. In addition, there was no significant difference in the development of object permanence between infants described as manipulators and those described as nonmanipulators. The last two findings suggest that infants with motor handicaps may develop object permanence at the expected ages, according to a nontraditional assessment.

  18. Ethics of professional relations to functionally handicapped users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Griljc

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic purpose of 1ibrarianship code is to form and build librarian personality who can make possible the same opportunity to acquiring knowledge for all users, irrespective of their different demands or special needs.When we discuss the importance of building librarian personality the demanding work with users we confront the problem of ethical treatment very often. Ethics advises only general rules which are rarely simple and they are frequently opposite to each other.The process of reacting between the librarian and the user - as with general information needs as with special functional needs - is also dependent on librarian's professional relation which is formed on important elements such as professional qualification,experiences, creativeness and ethics.We are also interested in question where is the border between ethical and non - ethical action in key situations when the 1ibrarian meets functionally handicapped user. Opportunities for non - ethical reaction of professional workers are much more possible if the library's premises and the furniture don't offer suitable conditions for adaptable communication with the handicapped.But on the other side the 1ibrarian has just because of the bad arhitectural conditions better occasion to introduce himself as one of the best ethically formed personalies compared with other professions. With adaptable communication, creative work and with professional relation in offering help to disabled people, the librarian can contribute to more quality service and even more - he/she becomes an example to other professions - also in ethical sense.

  19. Supporting for Visually Handicapped to Walk Around with RFID Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshhi Asano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Visually handicapped use their white cane to find obstacles. They follow tactile walking surface indicators to find routes and intersections. They use all sensory organs they can use to acquire the surrounding information. They match the surrounding information with routing information they have, to find their current location and target direction. However, even if tactile walking surface indicators are installed, it is difficult for them to visit unknown places because they have no correct routing information. When they go outside depending on tactile walking surface indicators, they have to follow them. They cannot plan their walking routes for themselves in unknown places. It is impossible for them to walk around various places such as shopping malls and station concourses as sighted persons, which is indispensable to enjoy their daily life. In this work, we propose a method which supports visually handicapped people to visit and walk around in their unknown places. We use RFID technologies to achieve voice navigation with the direction to their destination from their current location and their moving direction. To verify effectiveness of our system, we navigate blindfolded people experimentally. In the experiment, we have confirmed the success rate is 81 %.

  20. Compactified vacuum in ten dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurmser, D.

    1987-01-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M 4 and a compactified space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum by annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. The authors illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S 6 where S 6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. He explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The examples M 4 x S 6 is still plagued by the semi-classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a test for any theory which predicts a compactified vacuum

  1. KI-Aikido for Handicapped Students at Leeward Community College: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGugan, Kirk

    In an effort to provide physical education instruction for handicapped students, Leeward Community College implemented, on a pilot basis, a non-credit course in KI-Aikido, an oriental martial art which combines theory and exercise toward the goal of controlling the body through the power of the mind. The course, offered to both handicapped and…

  2. Self-Esteem, Achievement Goals, and Self-Handicapping in College Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zuosong; Sun, Kaihong; Wang, Kun

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationships among self-esteem, achievement goals, and self-handicapping and the potential mediating role of achievement goals in the relationship between self-esteem and self-handicapping in college physical education. The participants were 320 Chinese college students. Three validated scales were employed to assess participants' self-esteem, achievement goals, and self-handicapping in college physical education. Results showed that self-esteem had a negative effect on self-handicapping. Self-esteem had a positive effect on mastery goals, but had a negative effect on performance-avoidance goals. Mastery goals had a negative effect and performance-avoidance goals had a positive effect on self-handicapping. Moreover, mastery goals and performance-avoidance goals partially mediated the relationship between self-esteem and self-handicapping, and self-esteem had both direct and indirect effects on self-handicapping in college physical education. The findings indicate that improving individual's self-esteem and promoting mastery goals while reducing performance-avoidance goals may be relevant strategies to reduce self-handicapping in college physical education.

  3. [22q11.2 deletion: handicap-related problems and coping strategies of primary caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, Wolfgang; Schneider, Marco; Schwab, K Otfried

    2009-11-01

    To investigate handicap-related problems of children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and their primary caregivers' coping strategies. Primary caregivers of 153 subjects aged 2-16 years were anonymously asked to fill out questionnaires, e.g., the Handicap Related Problems for Parents Inventory. Primary caregivers of 96 subjects (53 males, 43 females; mean age: 7;0 [2;1-16;11] years) sent back questionnaires. Patient's behaviour and discipline were the most important handicap-related problems. Significant correlations could be found between the patient's age and his/her relationship with the primary caregiver (rho=0.228; p=.029) and other family members (rho=0.293; p=.004). Compared to other parents of physically handicapped children or those with multiple handicaps, these parents did not experience increased stress. The more the coping strategies "self-fulfillment" and "intensification of partnership" were used, the lower parental stress was (p=.012, p=.025, respectively). "Focusing on the handicapped child" was positively correlated with high parental stress (p=.000). With regard to parental stress and coping strategies, primary caregivers of children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion do not significantly differ from other parents of physically handicapped children. As handicap-related family problems increase with the patient's age, a growing need for counseling, especially for aspects of parenting and discipline, and for treatment can be presumed.

  4. Trait self-esteem and claimed self-handicapping motives in sports situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finez, Lucie; Berjot, Sophie; Rosnet, Elisabeth; Cleveland, Christena; Tice, Dianne M

    2012-12-01

    We examined the relationship between physical self-esteem and claimed self-handicapping among athletes by taking motives into consideration. In Study 1, 99 athletes were asked to report their tendency to engage in claimed self-handicapping for self-protective and self-enhancement motives (trait measures). Low self-esteem athletes reported a higher tendency to engage in claimed self-handicapping for these two motives compared with high self-esteem athletes. Neither low nor high self-esteem athletes reported a preference for one motive over the other. In Study 2, 107 athletes participated in a test that was ostensibly designed to assess high physical abilities - and thus to encourage self-handicapping for self-enhancement motives (success-meaningful condition) - or to assess low physical abilities, and thus to encourage self-handicapping for self-protective motives (failure-meaningful condition). Before starting the test, athletes were given the opportunity to claim handicaps that could impair their performance. Low self-esteem athletes claimed more handicaps than high self-esteem athletes in both conditions. Findings suggest that low physical self-esteem athletes engage more in claimed handicapping regardless of motives, relative to high physical self-esteem athletes.

  5. The Barthel index as predictor of handicap in stroke survivors: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: After adjusting for other variables, the multivariable analysis showed that handicap in stroke is significantly associated with the Barthel index (p<0.05) and atrial fibrillation (p<0.05). Conclusion: Barthel index is an important predictor of handicap following stroke. Atrial fibrillation should also be considered in the ...

  6. TOWARD DEVELOPMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL PROTECTION, REHABILITATUION OF HANDICAPPED PEOPLE IN MACEDONIA (basis for furtherer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljupco AJDINSKI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This work gives an detailed review of the basic issues of development of protection and rehabilitation of handicapped people in Macedonia with data especially for the period pf the last five decades.A plentitude of documentary materials proved to be important starting assumption for further historical studies on protection and rehabilitation of handicapped people in the Republic of Macedonia.

  7. The natural environment and human development: implications for handicapped children in urban settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis A. Vinton; Donald E. Hawkins

    1977-01-01

    This review of literature is intended to promote awareness of the needs of the 15 percent of the nation's children and youth who are afflicted with some form of handicap. It is imperative that those who design children's programs that utilize natural environments understand the special problems of handicapped children.

  8. Self-Handicapping, Defensive Pessimism, and Goal Orientation: A Qualitative Study of University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Williamson, Alan; Debus, Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with university students selected as high or low in either self-handicapping or defensive pessimism identified personal perspectives on the nature of self-handicapping and defensive pessimism, the perceived reasons why they engage in these strategies and the perceived advantages that follow from them, and the extent to which ego goals…

  9. Academic Self-Handicapping: The Role of Self-Concept Clarity and Students' Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cathy R.; Gadbois, Shannon A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Self-handicapping is linked to students' personal motivations, classroom goal structure, academic outcomes, global self-esteem and certainty of self-esteem. Academic self-handicapping has yet to be studied with respect to students' consistency in self-description and their description of themselves as learners. Aims: This study…

  10. Self-Handicapping in School Physical Education: The Influence of the Motivational Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standage, Martyn; Treasure, Darren C.; Hooper, Katherine; Kuczka, Kendy

    2007-01-01

    Background: Self-handicapping is an attribution-related process whereby individuals create performance impediments/excuses to protect self-worth in socially evaluative environments. Thus, the prevailing motivational climate would appear to be an important factor when attempting to understand the situational self-handicapping process within school…

  11. Implications of Self-Handicapping Strategies for Academic Achievement: A Reconceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Carolyn B.; Warden, M. Robert

    1992-01-01

    Presents questionnaire results concerning self-handicapping, course-related expectancies, and study habits. Reports that self-handicappers were more likely than others to make external and unstable attributions. Concludes that the underlying cognitive mechanism of self-handicapping strategies is a defensive attributional pattern that protects an…

  12. Causes of blindness in blind unit of the school for the handicapped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To describe the causes of blindness in pupils and staff in the blind unit of the School for the Handicapped in Kwara State. 2. To identify problems in the blind school and initiate intervention. All the blind or visually challenged people in the blind unit of the school for the handicapped were interviewed and examined using a ...

  13. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Bed ... you hire an expert, be sure it’s a company with a good reputation and request that it ...

  14. Relations between female students' personality traits and reported handicaps to rhythmic gymnastics performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Claude; Champely, Stephane; Brunel, Philippe C

    2005-04-01

    The present study evaluated the relative contributions of Self-esteem, Trait anxiety, and Public Self-consciousness to self-handicapping on a sex-typed task, within a specific academic sport context. Prior to the competitive examination used to recruit French Physical Education Teachers, female sport students (N = 74) were asked to list and rate on a 7-point scale handicaps which could be disruptive to their Rhythmic Gymnastics performance. Self-esteem did not account for significant variance in any category of handicaps. Trait Anxiety was negatively related to handicaps related to Rhythmic Gymnastics and to Social and Work Commitments. Public Self-consciousness was significantly related to endorsement of Friends and Family Commitments handicaps. These results were discussed in relation to the literature.

  15. Nonresponse Error in Mail Surveys: Top Ten Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Daly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conducting mail surveys can result in nonresponse error, which occurs when the potential participant is unwilling to participate or impossible to contact. Nonresponse can result in a reduction in precision of the study and may bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe and make readers aware of a top ten list of mailed survey problems affecting the response rate encountered over time with different research projects, while utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service. These ten mishaps can potentiate nonresponse errors, but there are ways to minimize their frequency. Suggestions offered stem from our own experiences during research projects. Our goal is to increase researchers' knowledge of nonresponse error problems and to offer solutions which can decrease nonresponse error in future projects.

  16. 13 CFR 113.3-1 - Consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin. 113.3-1 Section 113.3-1 Business Credit and... of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin. (a) This regulation does not prohibit the consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national...

  17. Psychosocial Environment and Student Self-Handicapping in Secondary School Mathematics Classes: A Cross-National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Adams, Joan E.; Ferguson, Janet M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an investigation of the relationship between classroom environment and self-handicapping in Australian, Canadian, and British secondary schools. Explores student perceptions of classroom environment, self-handicapping, and academic efficacy. Reports that classroom environment scales accounted for variance in self-handicapping beyond what…

  18. Predicting Academic Self-Handicapping in Different Age Groups: The Role of Personal Achievement Goals and Social Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leondari, Angeliki; Gonida, Eleftheria

    2007-01-01

    Background: Academic self-handicapping refers to the use of impediments to successful performance on academic tasks. Previous studies have shown that it is related to personal achievement goals. A performance goal orientation is a positive predictor of self-handicapping, whereas a task goal orientation is unrelated to self-handicapping. Aims: The…

  19. Ten years of effective multilateralism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    successes of multilateralism and international law provide security assurances or do they mask the flaws of an insufficiently intrusive system? While the U.S. signaled their defiance under the guidance of John Bolton, European thinking settled on a conclusion with the air of a slogan: yes to multilateralism, providing it is effective. This was to be the cornerstone of the policies to undertake and the instruments to implement to forge a global role for the Union. Its originality is based simultaneously in realism and in a refusal to resort to force as the foremost means of action on the international stage. Another way of defining the 2003 Strategy is a skillful compromise between differing positions to banish the Iraqi 'cacophony' as quickly as possible. Ten years on, it is now time for 'impact assessments' and other 'scorecards' of public policies. In the midst of the Eurozone economic crisis, evaluating a strategy of 'effective multilateralism' is not easy. The Union's bi-annual reports on its implementation have recently begun to try to provide a quantitative analysis that is not entirely convincing (for instance, the number of ratifications of such-and-such an instrument with regard to the budget allocated by the EU to facilitate its universalization, over such-and-such a period). Fundamentally, the 2003 Strategy is essentially beyond this kind of analysis even if it can prove useful. The strength of the European approach consists in establishing a long-term willingness to maintain and strengthen collective security tools approved by the greatest possible number of States. Its weakness is to occasionally confront a strategic reality that is as contradictory as it is stubborn. Effective multilateralism is linked to voluntarism and vows. (author)

  20. Ten myths about work addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, MD; Demetrovics, Z; Atroszko, PA

    2018-01-01

    Research into work addiction has steadily grown over the past decade. However, the literature is far from unified and there has been much debate on many different issues. Aim and methods: This paper comprises a narrative review and focuses on 10 myths about work addiction that have permeated the psychological literature and beyond. The 10 myths examined are (a) work addiction is a new behavioral addiction, (b) work addiction is similar to other behavioral addictions, (c) there are only psycho...

  1. Ten myths about subprime mortgages

    OpenAIRE

    Yuliya Demyanyk

    2009-01-01

    On close inspection many of the most popular explanations for the subprime crisis turn out to be myths. Empirical research shows that the causes of the subprime mortgage crisis and its magnitude were more complicated than mortgage interest rate resets, declining underwriting standards, or declining home values. Nor were its causes unlike other crises of the past. The subprime crisis was building for years before showing any signs and was fed by lending, securitization, leveraging, and housing...

  2. Cigarette makers pioneered many of our black arts of disinformation, including the funding of research to distract from the hazards of smoking. Ten Nobel prizes were the result. By funding distraction research, the cigarette industry became an important source of academic corruption, helping also to forge other forms of denialism on a global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette Disinformation: Origins and Global Impact Robert N. Proctor The cigarette is the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization. And whereas "only" a hundred million people died in the 20th century from smoking, we are presently on a pace to have several times that toll in the present century. Much of that catastrophe would not be possible without a massive campaign of disinformation. The cigarette industry pioneered many of the black arts of disinformation, cleverly exploiting the inherent skepticism of science to claim that "more research" was needed to resolve a purported "cigarette controversy." Cigarette makers funded hundreds of millions of dollars worth of "distraction research," most of which was solid empirical science but off topic, focusing on basic biology and biochemistry, viral and genetic causes of disease, and other "cigarette friendly" topics. At least ten Nobel prizes were the result. Cigarette skepticism was thus more complex than we normally imagine: the tobacco industry corrupted science by funding "alternative causation," meaning anything that could be used to draw attention away from cigarettes as a source of disease. The cigarette industry by this means became the most important source of academic corruption since the Nazi era. That corruption has also helped forge other forms of denialism and corruption on a global scale.

  3. Aerodynamic findings and Voice Handicap Index in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Sergio; Cesari, Ugo; Paternoster, Mariano; Motta, Giovanni; Orefice, Giuseppe

    2018-04-23

    To verify possible relations between vocal disability and aerodynamic measures in selected Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with low/moderate-grade dysphonia. Fifteen idiopathic dysphonic PD male patients were examined and compared with 15 euphonic subjects. Testing included the following measures: Voice Handicap Index (VHI), maximum phonation time (MPT), mean estimated subglottal pressure (MESGP), mean sound pressure level (MSPL), mean phonatory power (MPP), mean phonatory efficiency (MPE) and mean phonatory resistance (MPR). Statistical analysis showed: a significant reduction in MPR and MSPL in PD subjects compared to the healthy ones; a significant positive correlation between VHI score and MSPL, MPR, MPP, MESGP and a significant negative correlation between VHI and MTP within PD subjects. Test for multiple linear regression showed a significant correlation between VHI score, MPT, MPR and MSPL. A relationship between VHI and aerodynamic measures was shown in the present study. Compensatory mechanisms may aggravate vocal disability in PD subjects.

  4. [Voice disorders in female teachers assessed by Voice Handicap Index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebudek-Bogusz, Ewa; Kuzańska, Anna; Woźnicka, Ewelina; Sliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the application of Voice Handicap Index (VHI) in the diagnosis of occupational voice disorders in female teachers. The subjective assessment of voice by VHI was performed in fifty subjects with dysphonia diagnosed in laryngovideostroboscopic examination. The control group comprised 30 women whose jobs did not involve vocal effort. The results of the total VHI score and each of its subscales: functional, emotional and physical was significantly worse in the study group than in controls (p teachers estimated their own voice problems as a moderate disability, while 12% of them reported severe voice disability. However, all non-teachers assessed their voice problems as slight, their results ranged at the lowest level of VHI score. This study confirmed that VHI as a tool for self-assessment of voice can be a significant contribution to the diagnosis of occupational dysphonia.

  5. Paradox, reprimand and extinction in adults with mental handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, V E; Chamove, A S

    1991-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of paradoxical directives, levels of challenging behaviour during 2 weeks of paradox, reprimand and extinction were compared with baseline levels in four adults with mental handicaps attending a day centre. Paradox was the most effective procedure for reducing the frequency and severity of challenging behaviour by an average of over 70% by the end of 2 weeks and up to 90% in certain subjects; extinction was least effective. Paradox was most effective with more defiant subjects, when staff rated treatment success as low, when improvement using extinction and reprimand was poorest, and in reducing aggressive behaviour. The present authors suggest the overjustification effect offers an explanation for the effects of paradox.

  6. Psychological distress longitudinally mediates the effect of vertigo symptoms on vertigo-related handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Thomas; Dinkel, Andreas; Schmid-Mühlbauer, Gabriele; Radziej, Katharina; Limburg, Karina; Pieh, Christoph; Lahmann, Claas

    2017-02-01

    Vertigo symptoms can lead to more or less vertigo-related handicap. This longitudinal study investigated whether depression, anxiety, and/or somatization mediate the relationship between vertigo symptoms and vertigo-related handicap. N=111 patients with vertigo/dizziness provided complete data on the following measures: Vertigo symptoms at baseline, depression at 6-month follow-up, anxiety at 6-month follow-up, somatization at 6-month follow-up, and vertigo handicap at 12-month follow-up. Mediation analyses with bootstrapping were performed to investigate the mediating role of anxiety, depression, and somatization in the relationship between vertigo symptoms and vertigo-related handicap. When the mediating role of anxiety, depression, and somatization was evaluated separately from each other in single mediation models, the effect vertigo symptoms at baseline exerted on vertigo-related handicap at 12-month follow-up was significantly mediated by depression at 6-month follow-up (pvertigo symptoms at baseline on vertigo-related handicap at 12-month follow-up (pvertigo symptoms lead to vertigo-related handicap. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Train in vain: the role of the self in claimed self-handicapping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finez, Lucie; Sherman, David K

    2012-10-01

    Two field studies investigate the role of self in the tendency of athletes to engage in claimed handicapping strategies during training (anticipatively claiming that handicaps may interfere with their performance). Study 1 tested the relationship between trait self-esteem and athletes' engagement in claimed self-handicapping. As hypothesized, low physical self-esteem athletes claimed more handicaps than high physical self-esteem athletes. For stronger evidence for the causal role of the self, Study 2 tested whether securing athletes' self-worth through self-affirmation would lead to decreased claimed self-handicapping by using a mixed model design that allows for both between-subjects (affirmation vs. control condition) and within-subject comparisons (before vs. after self-affirmation intervention). Self-affirmed athletes had decreased levels of claimed self-handicapping. Studies 1 and 2 also demonstrate that athletes engage in claimed self-handicapping during training, which could have deleterious effects on subsequent performance. Discussion centers on theoretical implications and applications for coaches, sport teachers, and sport psychologists.

  8. Ten myths about work addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark D; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Atroszko, Paweł A

    2018-02-07

    Background and aims Research into work addiction has steadily grown over the past decade. However, the literature is far from unified and there has been much debate on many different issues. Aim and methods This paper comprises a narrative review and focuses on 10 myths about work addiction that have permeated the psychological literature and beyond. The 10 myths examined are (a) work addiction is a new behavioral addiction, (b) work addiction is similar to other behavioral addictions, (c) there are only psychosocial consequences of work addiction, (d) work addiction and workaholism are the same thing, (e) work addiction exclusively occurs as a consequence of individual personality factors, (f) work addiction only occurs in adulthood, (g) some types of work addiction are positive, (h) work addiction is a transient behavioral pattern related to situational factors, (i) work addiction is a function of the time spent engaging in work, and (j) work addiction is an example of overpathogizing everyday behavior and it will never be classed as a mental disorder in the DSM. Results Using the empirical literature to date, it is demonstrated that there is evidence to counter each of the 10 myths. Conclusion It appears that the field is far from unified and that there are different theoretical constructs underpinning different strands of research.

  9. Disciplining handicapped students: legal issues in light of Honig v. Doe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, L

    1989-01-01

    Court decisions interpreting the effect of the education for All Handicapped children Act on traditional forms of public school discipline have raised many question. This article reviews these decisions and confirms that most forms of minor disciplinary remedies remain available to educators so long as they are also used with nonhandicapped students. However, many legal problems arise with expulsion and long-term, or indefinite, suspensions of handicapped students, especially in the light of the recent Supreme court ruling regarding the expulsion of handicapped students.

  10. [Psychosocial adjustment of the handicapped child--possibilities and problems of rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulitz, R

    1989-01-01

    A successful childhood is to be striven after particularly for a handicapped child. Habilitation and rehabilitation, only carefully adapted to one another referring to medical specialties in colaboration with the family, may rise to the demand of the individuality of every one handicapped child. On prior conditions children with chiefly physical handicaps may be integrated into the polytechnical secondary school providing general education in the home town. The total-body examination of these children remains to be the basis for all paediatric actions.

  11. An Evolutionary Comparison of the Handicap Principle and Hybrid Equilibrium Theories of Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Patrick; Zollman, Kevin J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The handicap principle has come under significant challenge both from empirical studies and from theoretical work. As a result, a number of alternative explanations for honest signaling have been proposed. This paper compares the evolutionary plausibility of one such alternative, the “hybrid equilibrium,” to the handicap principle. We utilize computer simulations to compare these two theories as they are instantiated in Maynard Smith’s Sir Philip Sidney game. We conclude that, when both types of communication are possible, evolution is unlikely to lead to handicap signaling and is far more likely to result in the partially honest signaling predicted by hybrid equilibrium theory. PMID:26348617

  12. Ten steps to successful software process improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandt, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies ten steps for managing change that address organizational and cultural issues. Four of these steps are critical, that if not done, will almost guarantee failure. This ten-step program emphasizes the alignment of business goals, change process goals, and the work performed by the employees of an organization.

  13. Clinical experience with TENS and TENS combined with nitrous oxide-oxygen. Report of 371 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Quarnstrom, F. C.; Milgrom, P.

    1989-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) alone or TENS combined with nitrous oxide-oxygen (N2O) was administered for restorative dentistry without local anesthesia to 371 adult patients. A total of 55% of TENS alone and 84% of TENS/N2O visits were rated successful. A total of 53% of TENS alone and 82% of TENS/N2O patients reported slight or no pain. In multivariable analyses, pain reports were related to the anesthesia technique and patient fear and unrelated to sex, race, age, toot...

  14. Technical descriptions of ten irrigation technologies for conserving energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrer, B.J.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Technical description of ten technologies which were researched to save energy in irrigated agriculture are presented. These technologies are: well design and development ground water supply system optimization, column and pump redesign, variable-speed pumping, pipe network optimization, reduced-pressure center-pivot systems, low-energy precision application, automated gated-pipe system, computerized irrigation scheduling, and instrumented irrigation scheduling. (MHR)

  15. LOW HANDICAP GOLFERS GENERATE MORE TORQUE AT THE SHOE-NATURAL GRASS INTERFACE WHEN USING A DRIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Worsfold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to determine the rotational torque occurring at the shoe-natural grass interface during golf swing performance with different clubs, and to determine the influence of handicap and golf shoe design. Twenty-four golfers (8 low 0-7; 8 medium 8-14; and 8 high 15+ performed 5 shots with a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron when 3 shoes were worn: a modern 8 mm metal 7-spike shoe, an alternative 7-spike shoe and a flat soled shoe. Torque was measured at the front and back foot by grass covered force platforms in an outdoor field. Torque at the shoe- natural turf interface was similar at the front foot when using a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron with maximum mean torque (Tzmax 17-19 Nm and torque generation in the entire backswing and downswing approximately 40 Nm. At the back foot, torque was less than at the front foot when using the driver, 3-iron and 7-iron. At the back foot Tzmax was 6-7 Nm, and torque generation was 10-16 Nm, with a trend for greater torque generation when using the driver rather than the irons. The metal spike shoe allowed significantly more back foot torque generation when using a driver than a flat- soled shoe (p 0.05, although back foot mean torques generated tended to be greater for the metal spike shoe. The golf shot outcomes were similar for low, medium and high handicappers in both metal and alternative spike shoes (metal: 87%; 76%; 54%; alternative: 85%; 74%; 54% respectively. The better, low handicap golfers generated significantly more back foot torque (metal spike: 18.2 Nm; alternative: 15.8 Nm; p < 0.05 when using a driver. Further research should consider back foot shoe-grass interface demands during driver usage by low handicap and lighter body-weight golfers

  16. The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, George [The New York Times

    2010-10-20

    "Science in the 21st century has become industrialized. The experiments so often celebrated in the newspapers - sequencing the genome, proving the existence of the top quark, discovering a new planet by analyzing the wobble of a distant start - cost millions of dollars. They generate terabytes of data to be analyzed by supercomputers, calculating factories that spew out so much heat that they are equipped with cooling stacks and consume the energy of a small town. The experiments are carried out by research teams that have grown to the size of small corporations. But until very recently the most earth-shaking science came from individual pairs of hands. From a single mind confronting the unknown. The great experiments that mark the edges of our understanding were most often performed by one or two scientists and usually on a tabletop. Computation, if there was any, was carried out on paper or later with a slide rule. These experiments were designed and conducted with such straightforward elegance that they deserve to be called beautiful." (excerpt from the slide presentation accompanying the video)

  17. Astrophysical parameters of ten poorly studied open star clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadross, Ashraf Latif; El-Bendary, Reda; Osman, Anas; Ismail, Nader; Bakry, Abdel Aziz

    2012-01-01

    We present the fundamental parameters of ten open star clusters, nominated from Kronberger et al. who presented some newly discovered stellar groups on the basis of the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry and Digitized Sky Survey visual images. Star counts and photometric parameters (radius, membership, distance, color excess, age, luminosity function, mass function, total mass, and dynamical relaxation time) have been determined for these ten clusters for the first time. In order to calibrate our procedures, the main parameters (distance, age, and color excess) have been re-estimated for another five clusters, which are also studied by Kronberger et al. (research papers)

  18. Assessment of Object Permanence in Severely Handicapped Students as a Function of Motor and Prompting Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmer, Steven; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The study assessed object permanence construct performance in 20 severely handicapped students (4 to 14 years old) who were differentiated by treatment (prompt) condition and motor ability level. Results revealed a trait (motor ability) x treatment interaction. (Author/SB)

  19. Self-handicapping and intrinsic motivation: buffering intrinsic motivation from the threat of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, R K; Harackiewicz, J M

    1996-04-01

    High and low self-handicappers (as measured by E. E. Jones & F. Rhodewalt's [1982] Self-Handicapping Scale) were asked to play a game of pinball (in a competitive or noncompetitive setting) after they had practices as much as they wanted on a related task (thus, not practicing could have served as a self-handicap). High self-handicappers who did not practice much became more involved in the game and subsequently reported enjoying the game more than high self-handicappers who practiced a lot. Furthermore, the effects on enjoyment were mediated by task involvement, suggesting that the protection afforded by self-handicapping affects intrinsic motivation by allowing the individual to become absorbed in the activity instead of focusing on performance concerns. Individuals who self-handicap may be providing themselves with the "breathing room" they need to become absorbed in an activity and to experience the activity as enjoyable.

  20. Consequences of self-handicapping: effects on coping, academic performance, and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, M; Kieffer, S C; Knee, C R

    1998-06-01

    Self-handicappers erect impediments to performance to protect their self-esteem. The impediments may interfere with the ability to do well and, as such, may result in poor adjustment. Using a longitudinal design, the present studies examined prospective effects of self-handicapping on coping, academic performance, and several adjustment-related variables (e.g., self-esteem). It was found that, compared to low self-handicappers, high self-handicappers reported higher usage of coping strategies implying withdrawal and negative focus. High self-handicappers performed less well academically, an effect that was mediated in part by poor study habits. Finally, high self-handicapping resulted in poorer adjustment over time, and poorer adjustment resulted in higher self-handicapping over time. These relations are consistent with the idea of a vicious cycle in which self-handicapping and poor adjustment reinforce one another.

  1. Creating aesthetically resonant environments for the handicapped, elderly and rehabilitation: Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony; Hasselblad, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    CARE HERE (Creating Aesthetically Resonant Environments for the Handicapped, Elderly and Rehabilitation) was realised as a full European IST (Information Society Technologies) project, involving adults and children with learning disability, PMLD (Profound and Multiple Learning Disability...

  2. The origin of the future ten questions for the next ten years

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2006-01-01

    How did the universe begin? Where do galaxies come from? How do stars and planets form? Where do the material particles we are made of come from? How did life begin? Today we have only provisional answers to such questions. But scientific progress will improve these answers dramatically over the next ten years, predicts John Gribbin in this riveting book. He focuses on what we know—or think we know—about ten controversial, unanswered issues in the physical sciences and explains how current cutting-edge research may yield solutions in the very near future. With his trademark facility for engaging readers with or without a scientific background, the author explores ideas concerning the creation of the universe, the possibility of other forms of life, and the fate of the expanding cosmos. He examines “theories of everything,” including grand unified theories and string theory, and he discusses the Big Bang theory, the origin of structure and patterns of matter in the galaxies, and dark mass and dark ene...

  3. [Evaluation of an intensive therapy program for treatment of severe behavioral disorders in mentally handicapped patients with autistic or psychotic behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, U; Rohmann, U H

    1993-09-01

    The development of severely disturbed and socially accepted behavior in mentally handicapped persons with autistic or psychotic symptoms is documented before, during and after an intensive therapy program conducted in a residential institution for mentally handicapped persons. Seven single case studies were made as long term observation with a duration between 18 and 33 weeks, mostly with a multiple baseline design. One or two follow ups with at least four weeks length were conducted in six out of seven cases up to four years after the end of the intensive therapy. The main results show (1) the decrease of disturbed behavior and the increase of socially accepted behavior during the therapy program, and (2) the significant reduction of the disturbed behavior patterns taking place during the baseline phase before the beginning of the therapy in all cases but one. The results are discussed under the aspects of a possible explanation for the findings and their impact on the discussion about psychotherapy research.

  4. ALGORITHMS FOR TETRAHEDRAL NETWORK (TEN) GENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Tetrahedral Network(TEN) is a powerful 3-D vector structure in GIS, which has a lot of advantages such as simple structure, fast topological relation processing and rapid visualization. The difficulty of TEN application is automatic creating data structure. Al though a raster algorithm has been introduced by some authors, the problems in accuracy, memory requirement, speed and integrity are still existent. In this paper, the raster algorithm is completed and a vector algorithm is presented after a 3-D data model and structure of TEN have been introducted. Finally, experiment, conclusion and future work are discussed.

  5. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C virus in two institutions caring for mentally handicapped adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Cramp, M E; Grundy, H C; Perinpanayagam, R M; Barnado, D E

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is common in institutions caring for the mentally handicapped. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus share routes of transmission but the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in this population is unknown. We have tested 101 patients from two institutions in South-East England caring for adults with mental handicap for the presence of hepatitis C antibody, hepatitis B core antibody, and if necessary hepatitis B surface antigen. None tested positive for hepat...

  6. Motivation and future temporal orientation: a test of the self-handicapping hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennings, C J

    1999-06-01

    Self-handicapping motivation refers to the likelihood a person will project personal ambition into the future, make a pessimistic judgement, and then mobilise effort in the present to avoid an anticipated negative outcome. It should, therefore, be a correlate of future time perspective. This study showed for a sample of 120 first-year students that, whilst future time perspective did strongly predict scores on a measure of self-handicapping motivation, neither variable was a useful predictor of outcome.

  7. Voice Handicap Index (VHI in Persian Speaking Parkinson\\'s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Madjdinasab

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: “Voice” is affected more and sooner than other speech subsystems in Parkinson's Disease (PD. Voice Handicap Index (VHI is the most applicable subjective self-rating questionnaire in VD patients. The aim of this study was the investigation of Voice handicap in Iranian PD patients. Methods & Materials: This cross-sectional, analytical and non-interventional study was done on 50 (35 males, 15 females patients who reported a VD related to their PD. They were selected from thepatients referring to movement disorders’ clinic in Rasool Akram Hospital affiliated withTehran University of medical sciences, through easy sampling. VHI total score (VHIT and its domains (functional-VHIF, Emotional VHIE, Physical VHIP was assessed in all of participants and by gender segregation. Results: 83% of patients reported voice handicap. There wasn't any difference between VHIT and its mentioned 3 domains in both sexes. There is positive correlation between VHIT, VHIE and VHIF with age. VHIT and VHIF had a positive relationship with disease duration (DD. The males VHIT and the mentioned domains had positive correlations with DD. Conclusion: Most of Iranian PD patients feel handicap due to voice disorder caused by PD and their quality of life was affected by voice impairment. Increase in age and disease duration caused more voice disorder and reduced quality of life especially patients feel more handicaps in functional domain (VHIF. In addition, the males feel more handicap than females when DD develops.

  8. Vadose Zone Journal: The first ten years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, J.A.; Or, D.; Young, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Celebrating ten years of publication, the authors introduce a special section commemorating the anniversary of Vadose Zone Journal and reviewing the journal’s role in an evolving understanding of vadose zone science.

  9. Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... in Hospital Emergency Departments, United States – 2014 Leading Causes of Death Charts Causes of Death by Age Group 2016 [ ...

  10. Ten key issues in modern flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Jens; Ceylan, Sascha; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-04-28

    Ten essentials of synthesis in the flow mode, a new enabling technology in organic chemistry, are highlighted as flashlighted providing an insight into current and future issues and developments in this field. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  11. Ten into four won't go

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, D.Z.; West, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that nontrivial spontaneous compactification of ten-dimensional N = 1 supergravity with or without Yang-Mills matter is not possible unless maximal symmetry (i.e. Lorentz invariance) is violated in the four-dimensional spacetime

  12. Depressive self-presentation: beyond self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weary, G; Williams, J P

    1990-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to examine the notion that depressives' responses would reflect a protective self-presentation style (Hill, Weary, & Williams, 1986), the underlying goal of which would be the avoidance of future performance demands and potential losses in self-esteem. In this study, depressed and nondepressed Ss were asked to perform a relatively simple visual-motor task. Half of the depressed and half of the nondepressed Ss were told that if they were successful at the task, they would be asked to perform a 2nd, similar task. The remaining Ss were given no such expectation of future performance. We predicted and found that depressed compared with nondepressed Ss strategically failed at the task when presented with the possibility of future performance and further losses in esteem. Moreover, this strategic failure was associated with some costs; depressed-future performance expectancy Ss experienced more discomfort or negative affect as a result of their performance. The relationship between this depressive self-presentation and self-handicapping strategies is discussed.

  13. Wireless hydrotherapy smart suit for monitoring handicapped people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Jose H.; Mendes, Paulo M.

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a smart suit, water impermeable, containing sensors and electronics for monitoring handicapped people at hydrotherapy sessions in swimming-pools. For integration into textiles, electronic components should be designed in a functional, robust and inexpensive way. Therefore, small-size electronics microsystems are a promising approach. The smart suit allows the monitoring of individual biometric data, such as heart rate, temperature and movement of the body. Two solutions for transmitting the data wirelessly are presented: through a low-voltage (3.0 V), low-power, CMOS RF IC (1.6 mm x 1.5 mm size dimensions) operating at 433 MHz, with ASK modulation and a patch antenna built on lossy substrates compatible with integrated circuits fabrication. Two different substrates were used for antenna implementation: high-resistivity silicon (HRS) and Corning Pyrex #7740 glass. The antenna prototypes were built to operate close to the 5 GHz ISM band. They operate at a center frequency of 5.705 GHz (HRS) and 5.995 GHz (Pyrex). The studied parameters were: substrate thickness, substrate losses, oxide thickness, metal conductivity and thickness. The antenna on HRS uses an area of 8 mm2, providing a 90 MHz bandwidth and ~0.3 dBi of gain. On a glass substrate, the antenna uses 12 mm2, provides 100 MHz bandwidth and ~3 dBi of gain.

  14. Documenting handicap situations and eliminations through Universal Design patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Heylighen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available According to contemporary academic and social insights,human functional limitations and handicaps are not exclusively the result of the physical and / or mental characteristics of the individual (medical model, but theycan just as well be a consequence of a maladjustment of the social and physical environment (conflict / social model.This radical reversal of focus from person to environment,or in other words, from the assessment that the person isimpeded to the insight that the physical and socialenvironment is an impediment, has far-reaching consequences for the designing of human-made environments.The recent Universal Design paradigm extends beyond accommodating ‘modal’ users and aims to include the realdiversity of user populations, including those with physical and / or mental impairments and functional limitations. To achieve this, a large amount of design information in connection with human dis-abilities (limitations andpossibilities is required.Together with prescriptive laws and regulations, designers need descriptive information about; on the one hand,CONFLICTS between users and built environments, and onthe other hand, empirically evident design RESOLUTIONS. In response to this need, the paper advances the development of specific Universal Design Patterns (UD Patterns in order to collect and organise this information for decision makers and for designers.

  15. The Supersymmetric Top-Ten Lists

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Ten reasons are given why supersymmetry is the leading candidate for physics beyond the Standard Model. Ultimately, the experimental discovery of supersymmetric particles at future colliders will determine whether supersymmetry is relevant for TeV scale physics. The grand hope of supersymmetry enthusiasts is to connect TeV scale supersymmetry with Planck scale physics. The ten most pressing theoretical problems standing in the way of this goal are briefly described.

  16. JUSTIFICATION OF THE EXISTENCE OF PREPARATORY GROUPS IN SPECIAL SCOOLS FOR CHILDREN LIGHTLY HANDICAPPED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta ANDONAKIS

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Researches about child’s intellectual development in the psychology has started in the 19th century and the first step has been made by Tiedemann in “ Observation of the development of the mental abilities of the children”. His work caused a great interest in the circles of doctors and psychologists. Their interpretation of intelligence was different, but the most acceptable is the performance of complicated activities for getting knowledge and skills and getting over the obstacles in the development of the person”.The social ability do not correspond with the intelligence. The two aspects are tested and a complete picture of their functioning can be seen. The developmental principle is determined from general to the separate as functionally connected.In the period when a child does not accept the higher level of intelligence and thinking , in relation to which are effectuated by sense-motor activities, than we say that a child is mentally handicapped. The widest approach of the educational system should be treated as a functional, institutional and organizational, that takes part in the realization of the social aims and tasks.Not getting into viewing of the curriculum's and programs for preparatory groups in the preeducational period, we may say that the justification for the existence of these group in the regular schools, is maturation of the perceptive motor coordination and learning. With the maturing the function of the "ego" is increasing.As a child adapts better he can learn better, and the maturity comes sooner. In this way these groups are justified.Mentally handicapped child has not the opportunity to attend an organized prepared education which provides:-forming of the speech, self-control, which can be achieved in the process of learning through a direct contact with other children;· regulation of the lateralization through re-education of the psycho-motor abilities, and in general neuro-motor experienced maturation

  17. Horticultural therapy--aspects of land use for the mentally handicapped. A system of planning for the requirements of the mentally handicapped gardener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, T; Underhill, C

    1979-01-01

    An increasing number of facilities for the mentally handicapped use horticulture, agriculture and gardening in their training programmes. This paper contains a review of: (1) some aspects of land use as a medium for leisure, rehabilitation, therapy and training for the mentally handicapped, (2) employment, both sheltered and open, in land use as reflected in a recent survey, (3) the variety of knowledge available through the medium of land use. The main emphasis of the paper deals with: (1) the need for planning, (2) a suggested planning system that assists the instructor in understanding the requirements of the mentally handicapped gardener when he approaches a given job, (3) some problems peculiar to land use work with the mentally handicapped. In conclusion the authors briefly examine: (1) the need for assessment, (2) the need to distinguish between production and training, (3) suggestions towards an expansion of the planning system to take in other areas of the horticultural unit than were originally described, (4) social activities connected with the horticultural activities described, (5) the hierarchy identified through the use of a particular planning system.

  18. The Effect of Colour Psychodynamic Environment on the Psychophysiological and Behavioural Reactions of Severely Handicapped Children. Effects of Colour/Light Changes on Severely Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, H.; Sam, C.

    The effects of varied lighting and coloring in the classroom environment were examined on the behavior of seven severely handicapped 8 to 11 year olds with behavior problems. Analysis of changes in systolic blood pressure indicated that Ss were more comfortable and relaxed in the experimental room (in which the fluorescent lights were replaced by…

  19. Self-esteem, self-conscious emotions, resilience, trait anxiety and their relation to self-handicapping tendencies

    OpenAIRE

    Török, Lilla; Szabó, Zsolt Péter; Boda-Ujlaky, Judit

    2014-01-01

    Jones and Berglas (1978) define self-handicapping as any action or choice of performance setting that enhances the opportunity to externalize (or excuse) failure and to internalize (reasonably accept credit for) success (p. 406). The present study examined the role of potential precursors in the self-handicapping process. A total of 626 undergraduates from various Hungarian universities completed measures of dispositional self-handicapping, self-esteem, self-conscious emotions, trait anxiety,...

  20. Vocal Hygiene Habits and Vocal Handicap Among Conservatory Students of Classical Singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achey, Meredith A; He, Mike Z; Akst, Lee M

    2016-03-01

    This study sought to assess classical singing students' compliance with vocal hygiene practices identified in the literature and to explore the relationship between self-reported vocal hygiene practice and self-reported singing voice handicap in this population. The primary hypothesis was that increased attention to commonly recommended vocal hygiene practices would correlate with reduced singing voice handicap. This is a cross-sectional, survey-based study. An anonymous survey assessing demographics, attention to 11 common vocal hygiene recommendations in both performance and nonperformance periods, and the Singing Voice Handicap Index 10 (SVHI-10) was distributed to classical singing teachers to be administered to their students at two major schools of music. Of the 215 surveys distributed, 108 were returned (50.2%), of which 4 were incomplete and discarded from analysis. Conservatory students of classical singing reported a moderate degree of vocal handicap (mean SVHI-10, 12; range, 0-29). Singers reported considering all 11 vocal hygiene factors more frequently when preparing for performances than when not preparing for performances. Of these, significant correlations with increased handicap were identified for consideration of stress reduction in nonperformance (P = 0.01) and performance periods (P = 0.02) and with decreased handicap for consideration of singing voice use in performance periods alone (P = 0.02). Conservatory students of classical singing report more assiduous attention to vocal hygiene practices when preparing for performances and report moderate degrees of vocal handicap overall. These students may have elevated risk for dysphonia and voice disorders which is not effectively addressed through common vocal hygiene recommendations alone. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigating the feasibility of a BCI-driven robot-based writing agent for handicapped individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syan, Chanan S.; Harnarinesingh, Randy E. S.; Beharry, Rishi

    2014-07-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) predominantly employ output actuators such as virtual keyboards and wheelchair controllers to enable handicapped individuals to interact and communicate with their environment. However, BCI-based assistive technologies are limited in their application. There is minimal research geared towards granting disabled individuals the ability to communicate using written words. This is a drawback because involving a human attendant in writing tasks can entail a breach of personal privacy where the task entails sensitive and private information such as banking matters. BCI-driven robot-based writing however can provide a safeguard for user privacy where it is required. This study investigated the feasibility of a BCI-driven writing agent using the 3 degree-of- freedom Phantom Omnibot. A full alphanumerical English character set was developed and validated using a teach pendant program in MATLAB. The Omnibot was subsequently interfaced to a P300-based BCI. Three subjects utilised the BCI in the online context to communicate words to the writing robot over a Local Area Network (LAN). The average online letter-wise classification accuracy was 91.43%. The writing agent legibly constructed the communicated letters with minor errors in trajectory execution. The developed system therefore provided a feasible platform for BCI-based writing.

  2. Investigating the feasibility of a BCI-driven robot-based writing agent for handicapped individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syan, Chanan S; Harnarinesingh, Randy E S; Beharry, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) predominantly employ output actuators such as virtual keyboards and wheelchair controllers to enable handicapped individuals to interact and communicate with their environment. However, BCI-based assistive technologies are limited in their application. There is minimal research geared towards granting disabled individuals the ability to communicate using written words. This is a drawback because involving a human attendant in writing tasks can entail a breach of personal privacy where the task entails sensitive and private information such as banking matters. BCI-driven robot-based writing however can provide a safeguard for user privacy where it is required. This study investigated the feasibility of a BCI-driven writing agent using the 3 degree-of- freedom Phantom Omnibot. A full alphanumerical English character set was developed and validated using a teach pendant program in MATLAB. The Omnibot was subsequently interfaced to a P300-based BCI. Three subjects utilised the BCI in the online context to communicate words to the writing robot over a Local Area Network (LAN). The average online letter-wise classification accuracy was 91.43%. The writing agent legibly constructed the communicated letters with minor errors in trajectory execution. The developed system therefore provided a feasible platform for BCI-based writing

  3. French-Canadian translation and validation of four questionnaires assessing hearing impairment and handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claude; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Leroux, Tony; Clothier, Audrey; Larivière, Marianne; Dumont, Frédéric S; Gendron, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Questionnaires evaluating hearing impairment are available in English but there is a need for French standardised questionnaires for researchers as well as for audiologists and other clinicians. The objective of this study is to describe the translation and validation of four questionnaires that assess different aspects of hearing impairment and handicap among elders with hearing loss, by comparing the main score and psychometric evaluation of original and French-Canadian (FC) versions of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale II (WHO-DAS II), the Screening Test for Hearing Problems (STHP), the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy for Hearing Aids (MARS-HA). Vallerand method: translation and back-translation by two translators, revision by a committee of experts and pre-tested with five bilingual older participants. Participants (n = 29) were 65 years of age or older including 21 with hearing aids. The psychometric properties (internal consistency, temporal stability after four weeks) indicate good reliability for most of the translated questionnaires and their subscales, especially the WHO-DAS II. The translations in FC of two hearing loss and two hearing aid questionnaires were validated. It is recommended to pursue the demonstration for temporal stability for the STHP.

  4. Comparison of Nursing Home Hearing Handicap Index with Audiological Findings: A Presbycusis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Nilforoush

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing evaluation usually includes hearing threshold assessment, middle ear function, and word recognition tests that lead to an accurate result of peripheral and central auditory system. However, they have some limitations because they cannot fully encompass all aspects of hearing loss problems. Using self-assessment approach, via a questionnaire or telephone survey, is one of the easiest methods to study hearing loss in population. In this research, 60 nursing home residents (27 females and 33 males ranging from 55 to 85 years with a mean age of were studied via completing self-assessment questionnaire by the elderly cases (NHHI self-version and the other one was filled by the nursing home personnel (NHHI staff-version. The effects of the hearing loss level on the self- and staff-version scores indicated that there is a significant relationship between self- and staff-version with hearing loss levels ( in male and female. Results from this study demonstrate the usefulness of NHHI questionnaire for evaluating hearing handicap of aged people and it may be a useful adjunct in setting up treatment and determining proper care.

  5. Modification of the 'ten-day rule'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klempfner, G.

    1985-02-01

    In a 1964 decision the National Health and Medical Research Council recommended that radiological examinations of the lower abdomen and pelvis of women of childbearing age should be confined to the 10-day interval following the onset of menstruation. Recent evidence suggests that the first four weeks from the first day of the last menstrual period is not a critically radiosensitive period and consequently strict adherence to the ten-day rule is no longer indicated.

  6. ANALGETSKI UCINAK TRANSAKUTNE ELEKTRICNE NERVNE STIMULACIJE (TENS)

    OpenAIRE

    ĆURKOVIĆ, B.

    1984-01-01

    Transkutana električna nervna stimulacija. (TENS) danas je široko prihvaćen terapijski postupak za suzbijanje boli. Način njezina djelovanja nije još jasno definiran, premda se većina autora priklanja centralnom mehranizmu smanjenja boli. Rezultati, u literaturi, variraju od nesignifikantno boljeg učinka od placeba do 95°/o dobrog analgetskog djelovanja. U Zavodu za reumatske bolesti i rehabilitaciju Kliničkog bolničkog centra, Zagreb, evaluiran je učinak TENS-a u bolesnika s križ...

  7. A home-centered instructional communication strategy for severely handicapped children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulz, S V; Hall, M K; Klein, M D

    1983-02-01

    Family involvement is an essential element of language intervention with severely handicapped children for several reasons. First, the parent-child interaction is the focus of normal language development, and can be a powerful impetus in language learning for handicapped children. Second, limited generalization and maintenance of skills often occur when they are acquired in environments that do not also teach the appropriate use of skills. Third, parents can be successful intervention agents and may generalize their skills to other interactions with their child. Training conducted in the home must be compatible with that environment: it should involve only those skills that are of immediate use in the home. The Instructional Communication Strategy described herein represents such a program. It is a synthesis of training strategies used with normal and handicapped children, and is applicable regardless of child's level of functioning, age, or handicapping condition. This training model involves considerable modification in the role of speech-language pathologists dealing with the severely handicapped. The professional's skills are best utilized for assessment, program development, monitoring progress, and training specialized skills. The parents provide most of the direct training; however, professionals are also utilized for the child's maximum benefit.

  8. Kaluza-Klein supergravity in ten dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huq, M.; Namazie, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    We construct a massive version of N=2 supergravity in ten dimensions by compactification of the eleven dimensional, N=1 theory. This theory describes the usual N=2 massless super-multiplet, in addition to which there is an infinite tower of massive, charged N=2 supermultiplets. (author)

  9. Top-Ten IT Issues: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Anne Scrivener; Yang, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the top-ten IT-related issues in terms of strategic importance to the institution, as revealed by the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey. These IT-related issues include: (1) Funding IT; (2) Administrative/ERP Information Systems; (3) Security; (4) Infrastructure/Cyberinfrastructure; (5) Teaching and Learning with…

  10. Ten years after the Jali Commission

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten years have lapsed since the Jali Commission's final report became publicly available, and it is therefore an .... as the 'core business' of the department. This was seen as .... the 2009/10–2013/14 DCS Strategic Plan did the department ...

  11. Ten themes of viscous liquid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Ten ‘themes' of viscous liquid physics are discussed with a focus on how they point to a general description of equilibrium viscous liquid dynamics (i.e., fluctuations) at a given temperature. This description is based on standard time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for the density fields...

  12. VINKA, ten years on. Main scientific results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The VINKA facility in the TRITON swimming-pool reactor at Fontenay-aux-Roses allows the irradiation of solids at low temperatures in order to study crystalline defects. After ten years of operation the main scientific results obtained in the fields of creep and growth (chapter I), point defects (chapter II), amorphisation (chapter III) and dechanneling of particles (chapter IV) are summarised [fr

  13. Implementation fidelity of self-administered transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with chronic back pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallett, Edward J; Rentowl, Patricia; Johnson, Mark I; Watson, Paul J

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief has not been reliably established. Inconclusive findings could be due to inadequate TENS delivery and inappropriate outcome assessment. Electronic monitoring devices were used to determine patient compliance with a TENS intervention and outcome assessment protocol, to record pain scores before, during, and after TENS, and measure electrical output settings. Patients with chronic back pain consented to use TENS daily for 2 weeks and to report pain scores before, during, and after 1-hour treatments. A ≥ 30% reduction in pain scores was used to classify participants as TENS responders. Electronic monitoring devices "TLOG" and "TSCORE" recorded time and duration of TENS use, electrical settings, and pain scores. Forty-two patients consented to participate. One of 35 (3%) patients adhered completely to the TENS use and pain score reporting protocol. Fourteen of 33 (42%) were TENS responders according to electronic pain score data. Analgesia onset occurred within 30 to 60 minutes for 13/14 (93%) responders. It was not possible to correlate TENS amplitude, frequency, or pulse width measurements with therapeutic response. Findings from TENS research studies depend on the timing of outcome assessment; pain should be recorded during stimulation. TENS device sophistication might be an issue and parameter restriction should be considered. Careful protocol design is required to improve adherence and monitoring is necessary to evaluate the validity of findings. This observational study provides objective evidence to support concerns about poor implementation fidelity in TENS research.

  14. Social distance and behavioral attributes of developmentally handicapped and normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, L W; Burgess, D E

    1985-12-01

    20 behavioral attributes predicting social distance were examined among 101 junior high school students in six classrooms. The sample included 8 developmentally handicapped students, of whom at least one of each was mainstreamed into each classroom. Subjects were predominantly white, middle-class, suburban midwesterners. A sociometric nomination measure was used to obtain behavioral attribute profiles of the students which were then used to predict a psychometric measure of social distance. Handicapped students were not more socially distant than their normal peers. Factor analysis of the 20 behavioral attributes yielded four factors, three of which were significant predictors of classroom social distance, accounting for better than half the variance in social distance. These were described as Incompetent/Unassertive, Positive/Active/Assertive, and Passive/Unassertive. Social rejection in mainstreamed classrooms is more a function of perceived behavioral attributes than the label developmentally handicapped.

  15. Hearing Handicap and Speech Recognition Correlate With Self-Reported Listening Effort and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhanbali, Sara; Dawes, Piers; Lloyd, Simon; Munro, Kevin J

    To investigate the correlations between hearing handicap, speech recognition, listening effort, and fatigue. Eighty-four adults with hearing loss (65 to 85 years) completed three self-report questionnaires: the Fatigue Assessment Scale, the Effort Assessment Scale, and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly. Audiometric assessment included pure-tone audiometry and speech recognition in noise. There was a significant positive correlation between handicap and fatigue (r = 0.39, p speech recognition and fatigue (r = 0.22, p speech recognition both correlate with self-reported listening effort and fatigue, which is consistent with a model of listening effort and fatigue where perceived difficulty is related to sustained effort and fatigue for unrewarding tasks over which the listener has low control. A clinical implication is that encouraging clients to recognize and focus on the pleasure and positive experiences of listening may result in greater satisfaction and benefit from hearing aid use.

  16. The role of uncertain self-esteem in self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R N; Snyder, C R

    1986-08-01

    In this article, the hypothesis that some individuals confronted with an intellectual evaluation use a lack of preparation as a "self-handicapping" strategy (Jones & Berglas, 1978) was studied. Sex and both level and certainty of self-esteem were examined in regard to the self-handicapping strategy of lack of effort. Subjects were 54 men and 54 women, certain and uncertain, high and low self-esteem college students, who believed that the experiment was designed to update local norms for a nonverbal test of intellectual ability. After subjects' level of state anxiety was assessed, they were instructed in the benefits of practicing for the evaluation. Subsequently, subjects' state anxiety and preparatory efforts (the primary dependent variables) were measured. Subjects' practice, self-protective attributions, and related affect supported a self-handicapping interpretation for uncertain males but not for uncertain females.

  17. Administrative and financial responsibilities for sheltered housing for mentally ill and handicapped persons in Germany and its impact on housing supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramesfeld, Anke; Holler, Gerhard

    2005-06-01

    for a considerable duration of time. Organising the responsibilities for housing for mental ill and handicapped persons on one authority level and the availability of subsidy programmes have a positive impact on the supply with ambulatory housing. However other factors also have to be considered to influence the supply with ambulatory housing, such as political will, attitudes towards the mentally ill, interests of hostel operators, pre-existing hostel infrastructure, available funds. These factors need to be researched further.

  18. Formation en TIC destinée aux personnes handicapées en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Formation en TIC destinée aux personnes handicapées en Amérique latine. En Amérique latine et dans les Caraïbes, les personnes handicapées représentent environ 10 % de la population. La population de cette région affiche des taux de pauvreté et de chômage élevés; assurer des moyens de subsistance décents aux ...

  19. Handicap discrimination considerations in treating the impaired worker: drugs, alcohol, pregnancy, and AIDS in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postol, L P

    1988-04-01

    In dealing with applicants and employees, administrators must comply with handicap and pregnancy discrimination statutes, any union collective bargaining agreement, and any state or local statutes specifically directed at protecting certain classes of handicapped persons. The employer must make reasonable accommodations which allow the disabled worker to perform the job, although the employer need not implement accommodations which are an undue hardship. Similarly, if the impaired employee cannot safely perform the essential functions of the job, he or she need not be hired or retained. Employers must also recognize their responsibilities and liability under their health benefit plans and other liability statutes, and attempt to minimize their exposure.

  20. The impact of self-handicapping strategies use on the impression formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hip-Fabek, Irena

    2006-01-01

    Self-handicapping is usually defined as any claim, action or choice of performance setting that enhances the opportunity to externalize (or excuse) failure and to internalize (accept credit for) success. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of using different self-handicapping strategies on formation of the impression about the person. We collected data from 365 participants, whose task was to read a story about the person who failed on the task delegated to him/her, and to app...

  1. Self-handicapping and obesity: is there a sympathetic audience out there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, T; Beyler, J; Wehr, J; Swigert, L; Tatter, T

    1991-06-01

    After reading a case description of a 20-year-old woman, subjects attributed her personal shortcomings to her weight rather than to herself per se. In particular, people who scored higher on a measure of self-handicapping were even more likely to attribute shortcomings to a person's weight and excuse or overlook them. A person who attributes shortcomings to being overweight will very likely find a sympathetic audience. These results support the suggestion by Baumeister, Kahn, and Tice (1990) that obesity can be a self-handicapping strategy.

  2. The EU Offshore Safety Directive and its potential effects. Opportunity or handicap?; Die EU Offshore Safety Directive und ihre moeglichen Auswirkungen. Chance oder Handicap?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwiederowski, Claudia [RWE Dea AG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the EU Offshore Safety Directive, which took effect on 18 July 2013, is to define minimum requirements for the prevention of severe accidents in connection with offshore crude oil or natural gas activities of any kind and the containment of the follow-on effects of such accidents. This is without question a logical consequence of the offshore incidents seen around the globe over the past decades. An interesting question in this context is for whom the EU Offshore Safety Directive has become an opportunity and for whom a handicap. [German] Ziel der am 18. Juli 2013 in Kraft getretenen EU Offshore Safety Direktive ist die Festlegung von Mindestanforderungen fuer die Verhinderung schwerer Unfaelle bei Offshore-Erdoel- bzw. - Erdgasaktivitaeten und die Begrenzung etwaiger Unfallfolgen. Nach den weltweiten Offshore- Ereignissen der vergangenen Jahrzehnte ist dies ohne Zweifel eine logische Entwicklung. Nun stellt sich die Frage: Fuer wen entwickelt sich die EU Offshore Safety Directive zur Chance, fuer wen zum Handicap?.

  3. The Relationship Between Attitudes Toward the Handicapped and Nonverbal Behavior with Educators of Special Needs Students: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.; And Others

    Examined were the relationships between attitudes toward the handicapped and nonverbal behavior of 60 special education teachers involved in inservice or preservice coursework. Ss were administered the Attitudes Toward Handicapped Individuals (ATHI) Scale and the Nonverbal Behavior Characteristics Scale (NBCS). Analysis of the data indicated a…

  4. The Effect of Biological Movement Variability on the Performance of the Golf Swing in High- and Low-Handicapped Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J.; Keogh, Justin W. L.; Hume, Patria A.; Maulder, Peter S.; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n = 10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated…

  5. The relation of vocal fold lesions and voice quality to voice handicap and psychosomatic well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, R.; Marres, H.A.; de Jong, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voice disorders have a multifactorial genesis and may be present in various ways. They can cause a significant communication handicap and impaired quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of vocal fold lesions and voice quality on voice handicap and psychosomatic well-being.

  6. When a High Distinction Isn't Good Enough: A Review of Perfectionism and Self-Handicapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Hugh; Forbes, Angus; Gardiner, Maria; Marshall, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses two problems which are common amongst university students, namely perfectionism and self-handicapping. Perfectionism deals with setting unreasonably high standards for one's own performance, while self-handicapping behaviours provide a possible excuse for poor performance, for example putting tasks off until the last minute.…

  7. Self-Handicapping and Defensive Pessimism: Exploring a Model of Predictors and Outcomes from a Self-Protection Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Debus, Raymond L.

    2001-01-01

    Examines self-handicapping and defensive pessimism, the factors that predict these strategies, and the associations between these strategies and a variety of academic outcomes. Findings reveal that task orientation negatively predicts both self-handicapping and defensive expectations and positively predicts reflectivity. Students high in…

  8. School Psychologists' Job Satisfaction: Ten Years Later

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, Travis G.

    2004-01-01

    School Psychologistsâ Job Satisfaction: Ten Years Later (ABSTRACT) This study was designed to replicate nationwide surveys completed in 1982 and 1992. The purpose was to examine and describe the levels of job satisfaction and the relationship between the variables in a national sample of school psychologists belonging to the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The sample for this study consisted of respondents who reported being full-time school practitioners. ...

  9. Simplification of the helical TEN2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, K.-H.

    1980-04-01

    The observation that the helical TEN2 laser can effectively be simplified by giving up the use of decoupling elements as well as by abolishing the segmentation of the electrode structure is examined. Although, as a consequence of this simplification, the operating pressure range was slightly decreased, the output power could be improved by roughly 30%, a result which is attributed to the new electrode geometry exhibiting lower inductance and lower damping losses.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of Verbascum macrurum Ten. (Scrophulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, C

    2002-01-01

    The Author presents the results regarding the antibacterial action of extracts of Verbascum macrurum Ten.. The leaves of this species, gathered on the slopes of Mt. Matese, were ground and four extracts were made as follows: with dicholoromethane, ethonol and water (70:30 v/v), water and methanol. The antibacterial activity of each of the samples was tested and it is demonstrated that the extract with the ethanol/water was the most activity one.

  11. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for the correlation coefficients between the subjective ratings on the ten positive emotions per film clip and the corresponding EEG spectral powers in different frequency bands. Based on the similarities of the participants' ratings on the ten positive emotions, these emotions were further clustered into three representative clusters, as 'encouragement' for awe, gratitude, hope, inspiration, pride, 'playfulness' for amusement, joy, interest, and 'harmony' for love, serenity. Using the EEG spectral powers as features, both the binary classification on the higher and lower ratings on these positive emotions and the binary classification between the three positive emotion clusters, achieved accuracies of approximately 80% and above. To our knowledge, our study provides the first piece of evidence on the EEG correlates of different positive emotions.

  12. Claudius, the handicapped Caesar (41-54 A.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois P. Retief

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Claudius, fourth Caesar of the Roman Empire, proved himself an able administrator, but physically and emotionally handicapped from birth. His parents, members of the imperial family, considered him mentally deficient and he was isolated from the general public and put in the care of an uneducated tutor who firmly disciplined the youngster. The historians report that he had a weak constitution caused by frequent illness, and when he appeared in public he was muffled in a protective cloak. To avoid possible embarrassment the ceremony of the toga virilis, at approximately 14 years of age, was a secretive affair held at midnight and devoid of the traditional procession. His grandfather, Augustus Caesar, had some sympathy for the young lad, but did not consider him capable of managing any position of public office appropriate for his age and position. This would also be the approach of the succeeding emperor, Tiberius. Claudius spent the fi rst four decades of his life in relative idleness, isolated from his family and upper class Romans, consorting with the lower classes, playing dice and revelling in excessive eating and drinking. He did, however, also involve himself seriously in a study of the sciences, literature, Greek and history – his role model in the latter being Livy. During his life time he published quite extensively, including dramas, an autobiography, a work in defence of Cicero, histories of Rome, Carthage and Etruria, and a book on dice. His first public office (besides an augurship under Augustus was at the age of 47 years when the new emperor, Gaius (Caligula made him a consul for two months. The Knights and a section of Senate now warmed towards Claudius, but Gaius and the majority of aristocratic Romans still despised him as dull-witted. After the assassination of Gaius, the Praetorian Guard in an extraordinary step, proclaimed a protesting Claudius (50 years old as emperor, and convinced an astounded Senate to endorse

  13. He Will Lift Up His Head: A Report to the Developmental Disabilities Office on the Situation of Handicapped Navajos and the Implications Thereof for All Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, James S.; Stifle, J. M.

    Issues involved in education of handicapped Navajo children are examined. Background sections contrast the history of treatment for the handicapped in America with the treatment received by handicapped Navajos. Unemployment, substandard housing, lack of accessibility within the reservation, overpopulation, language barriers, and the relationship…

  14. Ten design lessons from the literature on child development and children’s use of technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gelderblom, H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available sampling, data collection and data analysis [15]. We used multiple case sampling [28] to establish a trustworthy profile of five to eight year old children and reputational case selection [28] to choose the relevant theories of development, research... here will confirm. For this paper we selected, from the complete framework, ten themes to focus on. We present the guidelines associated with these themes as ten ‘lessons’ grounded in respected theoretical or empirical research results...

  15. Training Teachers at a School for the Handicapped in Quezaltenango, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Beth

    A 5 day course was developed to train teachers at the Instituto Neurologico (Guatemala), a day school for about 50 children (aged 3 to 16) considered to be learning handicapped and educationally or trainably retarded. The course addressed five topics (one each day): special education, class routines and schedules, classroom management, evaluating…

  16. Self-Esteem of Gifted, Normal, and Mild Mentally Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Lian-Hwang

    1990-01-01

    Administered Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI) Form B to elementary school students (N=450) identified as gifted, normal, and mild mentally handicapped (MiMH). Results indicated that both the gifted and normal children had significantly higher self-esteem than did the MiMH children, but there were no differences between gifted and normal…

  17. The DEBT Project: Early Intervention for Handicapped Children and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Daniel J.; And Others

    Project DEBT (Developmental Education Birth through Two), an early identification and intervention program for handicapped and at risk children and their parents, is described. The Koontz Child Developmental Program, the core curriculum for instructional planning and intervention in DEBT, is reviewed, and new data are presented. It is explained…

  18. Investigating the Relationship between Self-Handicapping Tendencies, Self-Esteem and Cognitive Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuzer, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between cognitive distortions, self-handicapping tendencies, and self-esteem in a sample of students studying in a school of education. The sample of the study was comprised of 507 volunteer students chosen through random sampling from a total of 4,720 students who were studying teaching at…

  19. Out-of-Level Testing for Special Education Students with Mild Learning Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eric D.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of out-of-level testing (OLT) when it is applied to the assessment of special education students with mild learning handicaps. This evaluation of OLT involved testing hypotheses related to: (1) the adequacy of vertical scaling, (2) the reliability and (3) the validity of OLT scores. Fifty-eight…

  20. Medical Considerations for Multiple-Handicapped Children in the Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Elizabeth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss concerns and practical suggestions involved in the education of multiply handicapped children in the following problem areas: first aid, emergency care and disaster planning; sanitation; environment; safety in routine and supplemental activities; therapy procedures; and staff protection, training, orientation, and special…

  1. Treatment or Involuntary Euthanasia for Severely Handicapped Newborns: Issues of Philosophy and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, T. Hennessy; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated that parents and/or physicians occasionally decide not to provide life-sustaining treatment (referred to as involuntary euthanasia), thus ensuring that the severely handicapped newborn will die. The issues involved relative to treatment or involuntary euthanasia are reviewed from two opposing perspectives…

  2. Attending Behavior: Commonalities and Differences Among Educable Retarded, Learning Disabled, and Emotionally Handicapped Juvenile Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nancy C.; And Others

    The study investigated three variables--juvenile delinquency, academic achievement, and attention span--with 77 incarcerated juveniles [18 emotionally handicapped (EH), 20 learning disabled (LD), 19 educable mentally retarded (EMR), and 20 nonidentified]. The Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude were used for testing in the areas of visual and…

  3. An Approximation of an Instructional Model for Developing Home Living Skills in Severely Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, S.

    The author discusses the need for severely handicapped students to acquire basic home living skills, reviews task analysis principles, and provides sample instructional programs. Listed are basic grooming, dressing, domestic maintenance, and cooking skills. A sample task analysis procedure is demonstrated for the skill of brushing teeth. Reported…

  4. Training Pragmatic Language Skills through Alternate Strategies with a Blind Multiply Handicapped Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. J.; Johnson, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    A blind multiply handicapped preschooler was taught to respond appropriately to two adjacency pair types ("where question-answer" and "comment-acknowledgement"). The two alternative language acquisition strategies available to blind children were encouraged: echolalia to maintain communicative interactions and manual searching…

  5. Nursing-care dependency : Development of an assessment scale for demented and mentally handicapped patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Buist, Girbe; Dassen, T

    1996-01-01

    This article describing the first phase in the development of an assessment scale of nursing-care dependency (NCD) for Dutch demented and mentally handicapped patients focuses on the background to the study and the content validation of the nursing-care dependency scale. The scale aims to

  6. Strategic behaviour of institutional providers in mental handicapped care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Willem H.; Veldhuis, Marleen J.M.; Hoeksma, Bernhard H.; Krabbendam, Johannes Jacobus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe an inventory of the strategic responses of institutional providers of mental handicapped care to the strengthening of consumer choice through a personal care budget (PCB) Design/methodology/approach – Semi structured interviews were conducted among

  7. Guidelines for Assessing Job-Related Social Skills of Mildly Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Michael; Foss, Gilbert

    1986-01-01

    Effective assessment of job-related social skills of mildly handicapped workers should consider three components of social competence: context, cognition, and performance. A comprehensive profile of social competence is best obtained through use of several assessment tools, such as: rating scales; role play; problem-solving tests; applied…

  8. Feeding Management of a Child with a Handicap: A Guide for Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Ann Harvey; And Others

    Intended for professionals from a variety of disciplines (such as nutrition, dentistry, nursing, occupational and physical therapy, speech pathology, social work, and education), the guide presents information on feeding problems of children with handicaps. Part I, which traces the development of feeding, considers in detail normal development and…

  9. Materials on Creative Arts (Arts, Crafts, Dance, Drama, Music, Bibliotherapy) for Persons with Handicapping Conditions. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC. Information and Research Utilization Center.

    Intended as a resource guide for persons who include such subjects as arts, crafts, dance, and music in programs for the handicapped, resources are listed for printed materials, audiovisual materials, resource persons and organizations, and material and equipment suppliers. Brief literature reviews sum up the state of the art in the specific art…

  10. Pots and Pans Activities for Parent and Child: Activities for Preschool Multiple Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassel, Jean

    Intended for parents and teachers of multiply handicapped preschool children, the booklet provides lesson plans in three major areas--basic concepts, motor activities, and language activities. Each lesson plan is broken down into four parts: purpose (a descriptive statement of what the lesson hopes to accomplish), materials (list of materials…

  11. Oral Health Status Of Handicapped Primary School Pupils In Dar Es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    calculus, with highest mean scores mainly among the blind (p= 0.008). Conclusion: The caries prevalence among handicapped primary school pupils was quite low. However, there was relatively high level of gingival bleeding and calculus. Regarding treatment needs, 23% required dental fillings mainly of one and two ...

  12. Mental and Behavioral Symptoms of Person's with Asperger's Syndrome: Relationships with Social Isolation and Handicaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Masayuki; Kanai, Chieko; Ota, Haruhisa; Yamada, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiromi; Yokoi, Hideki; Takayama, Yuko; Ono, Taisei; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Kato, Nobumasa; Iwanami, Akira

    2012-01-01

    People with Asperger's syndrome (AS) experience mental comorbidities, and behavioral symptoms that can deepen social isolation and handicaps. We compared the frequency of mental and behavioral symptoms, motor abnormality, and life history between adults with AS and those with no mental disorders but with disturbance of social functions and…

  13. Reevaluation of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospers, J. Mirjam Boeschen; Smits, Niels; Smits, Cas; Stam, Mariska; Terwee, Caroline B.; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We reevaluated the psychometric properties of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1995) using item response theory. Item response theory describes item functioning along an ability continuum. Method: Cross-sectional data from 2,352 adults with and without hearing…

  14. STATEMENT OF GEORGE W. FELLENDORF BEFORE THE MARYLAND COMMISSION TO STUDY EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FELLENDORF, GEORGE W.

    THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL ASSOCIATION FOR THE DEAF URGED THAT THE STATE OF MARYLAND CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE AREA OF EDUCATION OF THE HANDICAPPED. HE RECOMMENDED THAT CONTINUAL REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF NEEDS BE MADE BY REGIONAL SUBCOMMITTEES, PROGRAMS BE COORDINATED BY AN ADMINISTRATOR AT THE…

  15. Cost Accounting and Accountability for Early Education Programs for Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold, William

    The paper offers some basic information for making decisions about allocating and accounting for resources provided to young handicapped children. Sections address the following topics: reasons for costing, audiences for cost accounting and accountability information, and a process for cost accounting and accountability (defining cost categories,…

  16. Identification of Aurally Handicapped Children and Methods and Procedures of Developing a Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Div. of Special Education Services.

    An article on identification of preschool and school age aurally handicapped children and program development by John J. O'Neill precedes discussions of the role of the audiologist in evaluation of these children by Jack A. Willeford, and educational aspects of planning by John J. O'Neill. Three articles are presented on the role of the teacher in…

  17. The Placement Handbook. A Guide for the Competitive Employment of the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Adelaide; Drury, Stephen

    This handbook stresses those components that are considered peripheral to the placement process but that must precede the actual placement. The philosophy of placement upon which this guide is based appears first. Discussions follow of the basic components of the process of training and placement of handicapped individuals, including a varied…

  18. Designing Environments for Handicapped Children: A Design Guide and Case Study. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gary T.; And Others

    This guide addresses the planning and architectural design of play/learning environments for special needs children. The exceptional children discussed include those with most types of mild to severe handicaps and developmental disabilities. Specifically excluded from consideration are health impairments, severe psycho-emotional difficulties such…

  19. Arte en la Clase para Personas Incapacitadas (Art in the Classroom for Handicapped Persons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Committee, Arts for the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    The Spanish translation contains a collection of arts strategies intended to stimulate, motivate, and teach basic skills to handicapped children. The lessons involve one or more of the basic art forms (movement, music, drama, and art) and are further divided into five levels of aesthetic development: awareness, imitation, self-initiation, skill…

  20. Predictors of Academic Self-Handicapping and Achievement: Examining Achievement Goals, Classroom Goal Structures, and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdan, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the predictors and achievement consequences of academic self-handicapping and to explore cultural variations in the pursuit and effects of performance goals and perceived classroom performance goal structures. Data were collected in 2 consecutive academic years from a diverse sample of high school…

  1. Self-Handicapping and Irrational Beliefs about Approval in a Sample of Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Çinar; Ugur, Erol; Sar, Ali Haydar; Ercengiz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the current study is to examine the relationships between self-handicapping, and irrational beliefs about approval, irrational beliefs about interpersonal relationships, irrational beliefs about self and the overall level of irrational beliefs by reference to the " ABC " framework. Participants of the study were 263…

  2. Prevention of Self-Handicapping--The Protective Function of Mastery Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinger, Malte; Stiensmeier-Pelster, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on modern diathesis-stress theories which suggest a multiplicative approach to determine one's personal vulnerability status, we posit that the degree of an individual's vulnerability for using self-handicapping strategies in case of self-threatening events depends on the interaction between different vulnerability and protective factors.…

  3. Evaluating Post-School Transition of Secondary Students with Moderate to Severe Handicaps. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruininks, Robert H.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    The final report describes a 3-year project which had four primary objectives: (1) development of a followup system feasible for schools to use to obtain information on individuals with handicaps who leave school; (2) data collection on three special education samples; (3) data analysis to evaluate long-term effects of secondary programs and…

  4. A Leisure Activities Curricular Component for Severely Handicapped Youth: Why and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voeltz, Luanna M.; Apffel, James A.

    1981-01-01

    A rationale for including a leisure time activities curriculum component in educational programing for severely handicapped individuals is presented. The importance of play and the constructive use of leisure time is described through the use of a model demonstration project. (JN)

  5. Relating the Capabilities of the Handicapped to the Human Attribute Requirements of Jobs: Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    Twenty-five appendixes from a study attempting to match capabilities of the handicapped to the human attribute requirements of three jobs (general secretary, automotive mechanic, and business data programmer) are presented. Appendixes include information on such topics as data analysis for identification of key tasks; job descriptions for the…

  6. Issues in the Enumeration of Handicapping Conditions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Linda; MacTurk, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    The article identifies sources of prevalence and incidence rates for handicaps and disabilities, points out problems regarding obtaining this information, and examines reasons for the problems. Two measures are suggested: first, to set up a national directory of those health statistics already being collected; and second, to develop a nationwide…

  7. Integrating Severely Handicapped Learners: Potential Teacher Liability in Community Based Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Dennis, H. Floyd

    1984-01-01

    The paper examines elements of negligence and other legal concerns in view of the evolving trend to educate severely handicapped persons in integrated, community based settings. Duty, care, risk, and appropriate placement and instruction are discussed. Finally, recommendations for avoiding teacher liability are presented. (Author/CL)

  8. Relationships between Competitive Anxiety, Social Support and Self-Handicapping in Youth Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezyk, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the level of self-handicapping tendency, competitive anxiety (trait) and social support within groups of young male and female athletes, as well as to determine the relationships between those variables. Material and methods: A group of 75 athletes (46 male football players and 29 female volleyball players) from Sport Mastery…

  9. Education of the handicapped child: Status, trend, and issues related to electronic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, D.

    1973-01-01

    This study is part of a broader investigation of the role of large-scale educational telecommunications systems. Thus, data are analyzed and trends and issues discussed to provide information useful to the systems designer who wishes to identify and assess the opportunities for large-scale electronic delivery of education for the handicapped.

  10. Coping Strategies and Adaptation of Mothers of Children with Handicapping Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyar, Nahid T.

    Mothers' coping mechanisms and adaptations to having a handicapped child were analyzed through extensive structured interviews with mothers of eight preschool-aged Down syndrome children and a language impaired child. Three illustrative case studies are presented, and general conclusions are drawn. Mothers of Down syndrome children go through the…

  11. The Professional Education of Handicapped People in Moscow: Opportunities and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadova, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    In Moscow, one priority area of urban social policy has focused on the formation of equal opportunities for handicapped people and those with impaired health in the process of their integration into all spheres of life and activity, including professional education. The year 2009 was declared to be the Year of Equal Opportunities. The…

  12. Ten steps to successful poster presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardicre, Jayne; Devitt, Patric; Coad, Jane

    Receiving a letter confirming acceptance for you to present a poster at a conference can evoke mixed emotions. Joy, panic, fear and dread are among the many possible emotions and this is not exclusive to first time presenters. Developing an effective poster presentation is a skill that you can learn and can provide a rewarding way to present your work in a manner less intimidating than oral presentation (Shelledy, 2004). The key to successful poster presentation is meticulous, timely, well informed preparation. This article outlines ten steps to help guide you through the process to maximize your success.

  13. Novitäten im Breslauer Stadttheater

    OpenAIRE

    Zduniak, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Am Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts zählte das Breslauer Stadttheater, obwohl mit nur einer kleinen Orchester-Besetzung ausgestattet, zu den bemerkenswerten europäischen Opernbühnen. Es war aufgeschlossen für musikalische Novitäten. Als Beweis dafür sind u.a. die Breslauer Premieren Salome (1906) von Richard Strauss, L\\'Orfeo (1913) von Claudio Monteverdi und die Uraufführung der Oper Eros und Psyche (1917) von Ludomir Różycki zu nennen.

  14. Ten financial management principles for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O

    1988-03-01

    Financial insolvency is the primary cause of hospital failure. Managers may analyze a hospital's financial statements to anticipate and prevent fiscal problems. Ten measures of fiscal status may be used to evaluate the following: operating profitability nonoperating income equity growth liquidity debt capacity age of facilities revenue generation replacement funds receivables survivability Based on data from the Financial Analysis Service, Catholic hospitals are doing better than other U.S. hospitals in some areas of financial preparedness. In most areas, however, all hospitals suffer by comparison with manufacturers. The 10 principles of solvent and successful operations can help hospitals improve financial resiliency.

  15. Ten essential skills for electrical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Dorr, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Engineers know that, as in any other discipline, getting a good job requires practical, up-to-date skills. An engineering degree provides a broad set of fundamentals. Ten Essential Skills applies those fundamentals to practical tasks required by employers. Written in a user-friendly, no-nonsense format, the book reviews practical skills using the latest tools and techniques, and features a companion website with interview practice problems and advanced material for readers wishing to pursue additional skills. With this book, aspiring and current engineers may approach job interviews confident

  16. Optical spectroscopy of ten extragalactic radiosources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, S.; Riley, J.M.; Saunders, R.

    1989-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of ten objects associated with extra-galactic radiosources, using the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. Redshifts are measured for four radiogalaxies (B20217 + 36A + B, 3C73, 0648 + 19A, 0648 + 19B) and for a galaxy which is probably associated with a double radio-source with highly unusual properties (0951 + 37); existing redshifts are confirmed for two radiogalaxies (4C39.04, 4C40.08); and a tentative redshift of z=2.87 measured for the quasar 3C82. (author)

  17. Audits reveal ten common environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buys, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The old saying that open-quotes an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cureclose quotes rings particularly true in environmental matters in the 1990s. Environmental problems can potentially lead to expensive fines, costly cleanups, negative public relations, and even criminal sanctions against members of the corporation. A recurring pattern of problems has been noted during the performance of environmental disposition, acquisition, and compliance assessments of many different operators in most of the producing states. The ten most common problems found in oilfield audits are discussed here in an effort to enhance the awareness of operators

  18. Ten new withanolides from Physalis peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Sheng-Tao; Liu, Ji-Kai; Li, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Ten new withanolides, including four perulactone-type withanolides, perulactones E-H (1-4), three 28-hydroxy-withanolides, withaperuvins I-K (5-7), and three other withanolides, withaperuvins L-N (8-10), together with six known compounds (11-16) were isolated from the aerial parts of Physalis peruviana. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses (1D and 2D NMR, IR, HR-MS) and chemical methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Combined hepatitis A/B vaccination: evaluation of a vaccination schedule in facilities for handicapped people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, B; Müller, T; Ross, R S; Kundt, R; Roggendorf, M; Roggendorf, H

    2014-02-01

    People with mental and physical disabilities have a higher risk of infection with hepatitis viruses. Studies conducted so far show contradictory results on the success of vaccination in this population. These people live and work under special conditions and sometimes have immune defects. We investigated the antibody response after combined vaccination against hepatitis A and B in facilities for handicapped people in the city of Essen/Germany. Antibodies were determined in people with disabilities (n=949) and also in social workers taking care of handicapped people (n=115). Protective antibodies against hepatitis A were detected in 98.9% in people with disabilities and social workers. The seroconversion rate against hepatitis B in handicapped people was 90.2% and was comparable to the seroconversion rate in social workers (91.3%). Re-vaccinations were offered to all people with anti-HBs titres below 100 IU/L (28% of handicapped and 23.5% of social workers). In the group of low responders in handicapped people about 50% developed anti-HBs concentration above 100 IU/L. Non-responders showed 30-40% seroconversion rate after re-vaccination. Based on this study we would recommend serological tests about 4-8 weeks after vaccination to confirm seroconversion. By this procedure people who need a booster vaccination will be recognized and non-responders should be offered another HBV vaccination. In about 20% of the non-responders included in this study HBs antigen was detected. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Breastfeeding Practices and Barriers to Implementing the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding in Mississippi Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakaam, Amir; Lemacks, Jennifer; Yadrick, Kathleen; Connell, Carol; Choi, Hwanseok Winston; Newman, Ray G

    2018-05-01

    Mississippi has the lowest rates of breastfeeding in the United States at 6 and 12 months. There is growing evidence that the rates and duration of infant breastfeeding improve after hospitals implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding; moreover, the Ten Steps approach is considered the standard model for evaluation of breastfeeding practices in birthplaces. Research aim: This study aimed to examine the implementation level of the Ten Steps and identify barriers to implementing the Ten Steps in Mississippi hospitals. A cross-sectional self-report survey was used to answer the research aim. Nurse managers of the birthing and maternity units of all 43 Mississippi hospitals that provided birthing and maternity care were recruited. A response rate of 72% ( N = 31) was obtained. Implementation of the Ten Steps in these hospitals was categorized as low, partial, moderate, or high. The researcher classified implementation in 29% of hospitals as moderate and in 71% as partial. The hospital level of implementation was significantly positively associated with the hospital delivery rate along with the hospital cesarean section rate per year. The main barriers for the implementation process of the Ten Steps reported were resistance to new policies, limited financial and human resources, and lack of support from national and state governments. Breastfeeding practices in Mississippi hospitals need to be improved. New policies need to be established in Mississippi to encourage hospitals to adopt the Ten Steps policies and practice in the maternity and birthing units.

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-05-09

    May 9, 2016 ... WHO Grade 1, eleven Grade 2, ten Grade 3 and nineteen Grade 4 neoplasms. Thirty-six cases were supratentorial and thirty-eight were infratentorial in location. The most common tumours in this series were pilocytic astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas in that order.

  2. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Booth, Andrew; Ariss, Steven; Smith, Tony; Enderby, Pam; Roots, Alison

    2013-05-10

    Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate.

  3. Flexible parents: joint effects of handicapping and brood size manipulation on female parental care in Nicrophorus vespilloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Tom; Smiseth, Per T

    2018-02-22

    Parental care is highly variable, reflecting that parents make flexible decisions in response to variation in the cost of care to themselves and the benefit to their offspring. Much of the evidence that parents respond to such variation derives from handicapping and brood size manipulations, the separate effects of which are well understood. However, little is known about their joint effects. Here, we fill this gap by conducting a joint handicapping and brood size manipulation in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We handicapped half of the females by attaching a lead weight to their pronotum, leaving the remaining females as controls. We also manipulated brood size by providing each female with 5, 20 or 40 larvae. In contrast to what we predicted, handicapped females spent more time provisioning food than controls. We also found that handicapped females spent more time consuming carrion. Furthermore, handicapped females spent a similar amount of time consuming carrion regardless of brood size, whereas controls spent more time consuming carrion as brood increased. Females spent more time provisioning food towards larger broods, and females were more likely to engage in carrion consumption when caring for larger broods. We conclude that females respond to both handicapping and brood size manipulations, but these responses are largely independent of each other. Overall, our results suggest that handicapping might lead to a higher investment into current reproduction and that it might be associated with compensatory responses that negate the detrimental impact of higher cost of care in handicapped parents. © 2018 Crown copyright. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland. Note: some government agencies may require additional wording and acknowledgement.

  4. School children with neuropsychological handicap: coping strategies and parents' impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krener, P; Cranston, C

    1990-01-01

    One hundred forty six boys (mean age 9 years 1 months, SD = two years, nine months) and forty one girls (mean age 8 years 6 months, SD = three years, three months) received medical, developmental, psychoeducational, and psychiatric evaluations in a multidisciplinary developmental pediatric clinic. Two hundred fifty variables were analyzed by developing ten scales to quantitatively evaluate neuropsychological risk factors, family and parent functioning, and outcome measures of academic achievement, social adjustment and coping or psychiatric symptom pattern. Higher academic achievement, and lower behavioral symptomatology were associated with high IQ scores but not with higher scores on neurobehavioral risk factors. Chief complaints reported by parents did not correlate with their children's final psychiatric diagnoses and also were found to be independent of children's coping styles observed in the office. Problem parenting, as observed in the pediatrician's office, was associated with behavioral problems, and also with decreased competence on language measures and lower academic achievement in relation to IQ. In this sample, assessing parenting yielded a stronger prediction of the child's school and behavioral functioning than did taking a detailed history of neuropsychological risk factors.

  5. [Ten years of early complex geriatric rehabilitation therapy in the DRG system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, G; Breuninger, K; Gronemeyer, S; van den Heuvel, D; Lübke, N; Lüttje, D; Wittrich, A; Wolff, J

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric medicine, as a specialized form of treatment for the elderly, is gaining in importance due to demographic changes. Especially important for geriatric medicine is combining acute care with the need to maintain functionality and participation. This includes prevention of dependency on structured care or chronic disability and handicap by means of rehabilitation. Ten years ago, the German DRG system tried to incorporate procedures (e.g., "early rehabilitation in geriatric medicine") in the hospital reimbursement system. OPS 8-550.x, defined by structural quality, days of treatment, and number of therapeutic interventions, triggers 17 different geriatric DRGs, covering most of the fields of medicine. OPS 8-550.x had been revised continuously to give a clear structure to quality aspects of geriatric procedures. However, OPS 8-550.x is based on proven need of in-hospital treatment. In the last 10 years, no such definition has been produced taking aspects of the German hospital system into account as well as aspects of transparency and benefit in everyday work. The German DRG system covers just basic reimbursement aspects of geriatric medicine quite well; however, a practicable and patient-oriented definition of "hospital necessity" is still lacking, but is absolutely essential for proper compensation. A further problem concerning geriatric medicine reimbursement in the DRG system is due to the different structures of providing geriatric in-hospital care throughout Germany.

  6. Desvantagem vocal em cantores de igreja Vocal handicap of church singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Prestes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a desvantagem vocal de cantores amadores de coros de igreja. MÉTODO: participaram 42 cantores de coros amadores de igrejas, sendo 20 homens e 22 mulheres, com idades entre 18 e 59 anos. Todos responderam a um questionário contendo perguntas sobre autopercepção vocal e práticas de canto, e ao protocolo Índice de Desvantagem para o Canto Moderno (IDCM, composto por 30 questões referentes às subescalas incapacidade, desvantagem e defeito. Foi realizada triagem perceptivo-auditiva para classificação das vozes em adaptadas ou alteradas e mensuração dos graus De alteração. RESULTADOS: a pontuação total média obtida no IDCM foi 23 pontos. Os maiores escores foram obtidos na subescala "defeito" (10,9, seguido por "incapacidade" (7,6 e "desvantagem" (4,5, com diferença entre elas (p= 0,001. Cantores que nunca realizaram aula de canto apresentaram maiores escores no domínio "desvantagem" (p=0,003. À medida que o escore total do IDCM aumentou, a nota atribuída pelo cantor em relação à própria voz diminuiu (p= 0,046. Participantes com qualidade vocal alterada apresentaram maiores escores nas subescalas incapacidade e desvantagem e no domínio total do IDCM quando comparados aos que apresentavam qualidade vocal adaptada (p=0,012, p=0,049 e p=0,015, respectivamente. Além disso, quanto maior o grau de alteração vocal, maiores foram os escores referentes à subescala incapacidade (p=0,022. CONCLUSÃO: cantores de igreja apresentam desvantagem vocal importante. Quando apresentam alterações vocais, esta desvantagem é ainda maior. Quanto maior o grau de alteração vocal, maiores as limitações referentes à voz cantada. Aulas de canto parecem minimizar a desvantagem vocal nessa população.PURPOSE: to evaluate the vocal handicap of amateur singers of church choirs. METHOD: we interviewed 42 amateur singers from church choirs, 20 men, and 22 women, between 18 and 59 year old. Everybody answered a questionnaire

  7. Assessment of clinical residents' needs for ten educational subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Razavi

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Fulfilling the learners' "real needs" will improve medical education. There are subjects that are necessary for any clinical residents not considering their field of specialty. Among the subjects ten seems to be the most important: research methodology and data analysis, computer-based programs, medical recording, cardiopulmonary and cerebral resuscitation, clinical teaching programs, communication skills, clinical ethics, laboratory examinations, reporting special diseases and death certification, and prescription. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed educational needs of clinical residents for ten educational subjects. Methods A questionnaire prepared by board faculty members consisted of 10 close-ended questions, and one open­ ended question was distributed among 1307 residents from 22 clinical disciplines, who registered for preboard or promotion exam in June 2000. Results Among the subjects three were the most needed: computer-based programs 149 (60%, data collecting system 606 (49%, and clinical ethics 643 (46%. The prescription standard was the least required 177(13%. Conclusion Complementary training courses on these subjects can be an answer to the clinical residents needs. Keywords : research methodology, computer in medicine, cpr, clinical teaching methods, communication in medicine, medical ethics, laboratory ordering, disease coding system, death certificate, prescription writing

  8. Ten years of the Spanish Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, E.

    2015-05-01

    The main objective of the Virtual Observatory (VO) is to guarantee an easy and efficient access and analysis of the information hosted in astronomical archives. The Spanish Virtual Observatory (SVO) is a project that was born in 2004 with the goal of promoting and coordinating the VO-related activities at national level. SVO is also the national contact point for the international VO initiatives, in particular the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) and the Euro-VO project. The project, led by Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), is structured around four major topics: a) VO compliance of astronomical archives, b) VO-science, c) VO- and data mining-tools, and d) Education and outreach. In this paper I will describe the most important results obtained by the Spanish Virtual Observatory in its first ten years of life as well as the future lines of work.

  9. Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Wallace

    2004-01-01

    The meeting "Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After" took place at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA June 27-28, 2003. The meeting was sponsored by the Committee on the Status of Women of the American Astronomical Society and was attended by about 155 participants. The purpose of the meeting was: "To review the current status of women in astronomy, understand their work environment, assess development since the 1992 Baltimore conference, and recommend future actions that will improve the environment for all astronomers." A description of the meeting and its background can be found at http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/WIA2003.html. The proceedings are being edited by Profs. Meg Urry (Yale University) and Ran Bagenal (University of Colorado). The principal outcome of WIAII was a series of recommendations, "The Pasadena Recommendations", which have been approved by the AAS Council and which can be found at http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/.

  10. Spacelab - Ten years of international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignier, M.; Harrington, J. C.; Sander, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of the Spacelab program are reviewed, with a focus on the cooperative relationship between ESA and NASA. The initial decision to undertake the program and the three agreements signed to begin its implementation are examined, and the division of responsibilities and financial contributions is discussed insofar as it affected the management structure. Consideration is given to the major facilities, the 50-mission operational cycle, communications, the currently scheduled activities (through 1985), the prospective later uses, and the ten dedicated discipline laboratories. The importance of continuous mutual support during the planning and development phases is stressed. The program so far is considered a success, in terms of the goals set by the participants and in terms of the resolution of the problems inherent in international technological endeavors.

  11. Ten years of x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Bortel, G.; Tegze, M.; Fadley, C.S.; Simionovici, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    With the appearance of nano-science the role of local methods has become more and more important. Hard x-ray holography based on the inside reference point concept is a local probe of the atomic order in solids. It gives the 3D real space image of atoms without the phase ambiguity inherent to diffraction methods. In this paper a brief description of the basics of hard x-ray holography is given. The last ten years' experimental and evaluation-related developments are reviewed. We also introduce different variants of the method, such as Bremsstrahlung and gamma ray holography (GRH). The power of the method is illustrated by examples. We outline new directions and future possibilities. (authors)

  12. Successful replantation in ten-digit amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Umit; Cepel, Selim; Buldu, Halil

    2010-01-01

    Amputations involving ten digits are very rare because of different lengths of the digits. A 34-year-old man working in a printing house presented one hour after guillotine amputation involving all ten digits. Surgery was initiated 80 minutes after admission and took seven hours. Under axillary anesthesia, the operation was performed by two teams each consisting of two microsurgeons and two assistants. Replantation was completed without the use of any skin graft or flap. Fingertip examination showed poor arterial circulation in the second, third, and fourth digits of the left hand after 24 hours of replantation and surgical exploration was performed, during which anastomosis of the ulnar digital artery of the second digit was re-established and a Y-shaped vein graft was placed at the level of the third web to restore revascularization of the third and fourth digits. However, these interventions did not prevent the development of necrosis in the distal segment of the fourth digit which resulted in dry gangrene that required amputation. After 38 months of replantation, radiographic examination showed complete union in all fingers without malunion or damage to the joint surface and about 8 degrees of medial angulation in the proximal phalanx of the fourth digit of the right hand. The patient did not have difficulty in performing daily activities and had a considerably good pinching. Losses of active range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints were within the rage of 10 to 30 degrees in both hands. In the assessment of sensation, static and dynamic two-point discrimination test results were 6.1 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively.

  13. The General Factor of Personality: Ten Years After

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janek Musek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the empirical and theoretical research in past ten years, the General Factor of Personality (GFP was interpreted as the highest-order (most general personality dimension, which occupies the apex of the structural hierarchy of personality traits. Thus, the GFP is the central concept in the new structural paradigm of personality (the Pyramidal Model of Personality. In the majority of the studies, the GFP was conceptualized as a general factor with substantial psychological (cognitive and behavioural content reflecting the general social and personal adjustment or effectiveness. The alternative explanations of the GFP emphasize the role of the semantic factors, response styles and other biases. This study reviews the main results of the GFP research including the nature, the biological bases, the strength and cultural universality of GFP, its relations to intelligence and other prominent psychological variables, and its predictive power and practical importance.

  14. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  15. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis in two sexually dimorphic pinniped species - there a sex difference in immunity during early development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, A.J.; Engelhard, G.H.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Vecchione, A.; Burton, H.R.; Reijnders, P.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    The 'immunocompetence handicap hypothesis' predicts that highly sexually dimorphic and polygynous species will exhibit sex differences in immunity. We tested this hypothesis in southern elephant and grey seals during their early development by measuring the following parameters: leucocyte counts,

  16. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis in two sexually dimorphic pinniped species - is there a sex difference in immunity during early development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, AJ; Englehard, GH; Brasseur, SMJM; Vecchione, A; Burton, HR; Reijnders, PJH

    2003-01-01

    The 'immunocompetence handicap hypothesis' predicts that highly sexually dimorphic and polygynous species will exhibit sex differences in immunity. We tested this hypothesis in southern elephant and grey seals during their early development by measuring the following parameters: leucocyte counts,

  17. The Philosophy behind a (Danish) Voice-controlled Interface to Internet Browsing for motor-handicapped

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system underlies a number of a priori defined design cri...... with the unimodal oral mode, etc. These criteria have lead to a primarily message-driven system interacting with an existing browser on the end users' systems.......The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system underlies a number of a priori defined design...

  18. Psychosomatic symptoms in medical outpatients: an investigation of self-handicapping theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organista, P B; Miranda, J

    1991-01-01

    Investigated self-handicapping theory as it relates to somatization in medical patients. We predicted that medical outpatients (N = 113) would report psychosomatic symptoms in response to events that threaten their self-esteem. As predicted, results of hierarchical multiple regression indicated that high-perfectionism patients reported somatic symptoms positively related to the number of events that jeopardize their sense of accomplishment, whereas low-perfectionism patients' somatic symptoms were not related to these events (p = .005). Contrary to prediction, high-dependency patients did not differ significantly from low-dependency patients in the relationship of somatic symptoms and events that threatened their interpersonal relationships (p = .115). Implications of these findings and the utility of self-handicapping theory for predicting somatization in medical patients are discussed.

  19. Translation, validity, and reliability of a persian version of the iowa tinnitus handicap questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arian Nahad, Homa; Rouzbahani, Masomeh; Jarollahi, Farnoush; Jalaie, Shohreh; Pourbakht, Akram; Mokrian, Helnaz; Mahdi, Parvane; Amali, Amin; Nodin Zadeh, Abdolmajid

    2014-04-01

    Tinnitus is a common otologic symptom that can seriously affect a patient's quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to translate and validate the Iowa Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire (THQ) into the Persian language, and to make it applicable as a tool for determining the effects of tinnitus on a patient's life. The main version of the THQ was translated into the Persian language. The agreed Persian version was administered to 150 tinnitus patients. The validity of the Persian THQ was evaluated and internal reliability was confirmed using Cronbach's α-coefficient. Finally, the effect of independent variables such as age, mean patient threshold, gender, and duration of tinnitus were considered in order to determine the psychometric properties of tinnitus. After an exact translation process, the Persian THQ was found to exhibit face validity. In terms of content validity, content validity index in total questionnaire was 0.93. Further, in structural validity measurements, intermediate correlation with annoyance from tinnitus (r=0.49), low correlation with duration of tinnitus (r=0.34) and high correlation with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) questionnaire (r=0.84) were demonstrated. Additionally, a negligible effect of gender and age was noted on degree of tinnitus handicap (P= 0.754, P= 0.573, respectively). In the internal reliability assessment for Factors 1, 2, 3, and the whole questionnaire, Cronbach`s α-coefficient was 0.95, 0.92, 0.25 and 0.88, respectively. The Persian version of the Iowa THQ demonstrates high validity and reliability and can be used for the determination of tinnitus handicap and for following-up in the intervention process in Persian tinnitus patients.

  20. Behavioral and physiological responses to male handicap in chick-rearing black-legged kittiwakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, S.; Bourret, V.; Wagner, R.H.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Helfenstein, F.; Chastel, O.; Danchin, E.

    2011-01-01

    Parental investment entails a trade-off between the benefits of effort in current offspring and the costs to future reproduction. Long-lived species are predicted to be reluctant to increase parental effort to avoid affecting their survival. We tested this hypothesis in black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla by clipping flight feathers of experimental males at the beginning of the chick-rearing period. We analyzed the consequences of this handicap on feeding and attendance behavior, body condition, integument coloration, and circulating levels of corticosterone and prolactin in handicapped males and their mates in comparison to unmanipulated controls. Chicks in both groups were compared in terms of aggressive behavior, growth, and mortality. Handicapped males lost more mass, had less bright integuments, and attended the nest less often than controls. Nevertheless, they fed their chicks at the same rate and had similar corticosterone and prolactin levels. Compared with control females, females mated with handicapped males showed a lower provisioning rate and higher nest attendance in the first days after manipulation. Their lower feeding rate probably triggered the increased sibling aggression and mortality observed in experimental broods. Our findings suggest that experimental females adaptively adjusted their effort to their mate's perceived quality or that their provisioning was constrained by their higher nest attendance. Overall, our results suggest that kittiwake males can decrease their condition for the sake of their chicks, which seems to contradict the hypothesis that kittiwakes should be reluctant to increase parental effort to avoid affecting their survival. ?? 2011 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved.

  1. In Turkey, factors which urge physically handicapped sporters to start badminton sport and their expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Ersin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine factors, which lead physically handicapped badminton players in Turkey to tend towards badminton sport, and expectations of sporters. 45 (Male: 29 Female: 16 physically handicapped sporters, who participated in Turkey Bandminton Championship for Physically Handicapped, which was arranged in Antalya on 24-26 February, 2017, from different cities, attended the study voluntarily. Developed by Sunay and his colluages [13], tendency to sports and expectation survey was used in badminton branch after expert opinions, firstly, were received and necessary regulations were made for using it in our study. In order to determine whether the difference between opinions of sporters, attending the study, according to their genders, their ages, their best sport degrees, their sport years, their parents’ educational backgrounds and jobs, is important or not, one-way analysis of variance was used. To identify resource of the difference, Duncan’s multiple range test was used. Kruskal Wallis H test was used when normality and homogeneity of variances were not provided. Value of p for comparisons was taken as 0,05. Consequently, it was determined that, in Turkey, effects of environment, friend-peer group and trainer on sporters playing at elite level as physically handicapped are high in starting badminton firstly while effects of sport complex, parents and siblings, mass media such as television and media organs on tendency to badminton are quite low. It was ascertained that liking badminton sport and delighting in earning success were effective as the reasons of physically handicappeds’ playing badminton sport and their expectations were, firstly, to be chosen for national team and to be national team sporters.

  2. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  3. Ten years for the public Web

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Ten years ago, CERN issued a statement declaring that a little known piece of software called the World Wide Web was in the public domain. Nowadays, the Web is an indispensable part of modern communications. The idea for the Web goes back to March 1989 when CERN Computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee wrote a proposal for a 'Distributed Information Management System' for the high-energy physics community. The Web was originaly conceived and developed to meet the demand for information sharing between scientists working all over the world. There were many obstacles in the 1980s to the effective exchange of information. There was, for example a great variety of computer and network systems, with hardly any common features. The main purpose of the web was to allow scientists to access information from any source in a consistent and simple way. By Christmas 1990, Berners-Lee's idea had become the World Wide Web, with its first server and browser running at CERN. Through 1991, the Web spread to other particle physics ...

  4. Comparative Genomics of Ten Solanaceous Plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of complete plastid genomes of ten solanaceous species, Atropa belladonna, Capsicum annuum, Datura stramonium, Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, Nicotiana undulata, Solanum bulbocastanum, Solanum lycopersicum, and Solanum tuberosum provided us with an opportunity to conduct their in silico comparative analysis in depth. The size of complete chloroplast genomes and LSC and SSC regions of three species of Solanum is comparatively smaller than that of any other species studied till date (exception: SSC region of A. belladonna. AT content of coding regions was found to be less than noncoding regions. A duplicate copy of trnH gene in C. annuum and two alternative tRNA genes for proline in D. stramonium were observed for the first time in this analysis. Further, homology search revealed the presence of rps19 pseudogene and infA genes in A. belladonna and D. stramonium, a region identical to rps19 pseudogene in C. annum and orthologues of sprA gene in another six species. Among the eighteen intron-containing genes, 3 genes have two introns and 15 genes have one intron. The longest insertion was found in accD gene in C. annuum. Phylogenetic analysis using concatenated protein coding sequences gave two clades, one for Nicotiana species and another for Solanum, Capsicum, Atropa, and Datura.

  5. Ten steps to a cooler planet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The overwhelming scientific consensus is that human activities, especially activities that produce greenhouse gases are accumulating in the atmosphere and are changing the intricate balance that has sustained life on earth for millions of years. The estimate is that in Canada about 35 per cent of the greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere come from personal sources. This booklet provides brief account of the ways that individuals contribute to green house gas emissions and provides some helpful hints on how to reduce this personal contribution to the climate change problem. The ten ways suggested are: (1) use public transport as much as possible, (2) buy smaller cars , (3) use the train instead of flying, make fewer long distance trips by combining business and vacation travel, (4) set the thermostat one degree lower and save 525 kg of carbon dioxide per year, (5) avoid overhousing by choosing a smaller house and by making every square foot count, (6) buy energy efficient appliances, (7) reduce water heater's energy consumption by insulating it, (8) reduce meat intake and buy locally produced food in season, (9) minimize garbage production by reusing and recycling, (10) use green power wherever available and contribute to the development of renewable energy sources

  6. Ten tips for authors of scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Tae

    2014-08-01

    Writing a good quality scientific article takes experience and skill. I propose 'Ten Tips' that may help to improve the quality of manuscripts for scholarly journals. It is advisable to draft first version of manuscript and revise it repeatedly for consistency and accuracy of the writing. During the drafting and revising the following tips can be considered: 1) focus on design to have proper content, conclusion, points compliant with scope of the target journal, appropriate authors and contributors list, and relevant references from widely visible sources; 2) format the manuscript in accordance with instructions to authors of the target journal; 3) ensure consistency and logical flow of ideas and scientific facts; 4) provide scientific confidence; 5) make your story interesting for your readers; 6) write up short, simple and attractive sentences; 7) bear in mind that properly composed and reflective titles increase chances of attracting more readers; 8) do not forget that well-structured and readable abstracts improve citability of your publications; 9) when revising adhere to the rule of 'First and Last' - open your text with topic paragraph and close it with resolution paragraph; 10) use connecting words linking sentences within a paragraph by repeating relevant keywords.

  7. Choledochal cysts: our ten year experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cianci, F

    2012-04-01

    We present our experience in the management of choledochal cysts from 1999 to 2009. A retrospective review of all charts with a diagnosis of choledochal cysts in our institution in this ten-year period. Data was collated using Excel. A total of 17 patients were diagnosed with choledochal cyst: 9 females and 8 males. The average age at diagnosis was 28 months (range from 0 to 9 years). The most common presenting symptoms were obstructive jaundice 6 (35%) and abdominal pain and vomiting 4 (23%). Ultrasound (US) was the initial diagnostic test in all cases with 4 patients requiring further investigations. All patients underwent Roux-en-Y Hepaticojejunostomy. The average length of stay was 11 days. Patients were followed up with Liver Function Tests (LFTS) and US 4-6 weeks post-operatively. Three patients developed complications including post-op collection, high drain output requiring blood transfusion and adhesive bowel obstruction. Our overall experience with choledochal cyst patients has been a positive one with effective management and low complication rates.

  8. WORKSHOPS FOR THE HANDICAPPED, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY--NO. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PERKINS, DOROTHY C.; AND OTHERS

    THESE 126 ANNOTATIONS ARE THE THIRD VOLUME OF A CONTINUING SERIES OF BIBLIOGRAPHIES LISTING ARTICLES APPEARING IN JOURNALS AND CONFERENCE, RESEARCH, AND PROJECT REPORTS. LISTINGS INCLUDE TESTS, TEST RESULTS, STAFF TRAINING PROGRAMS, GUIDES FOR COUNSELORS AND TEACHERS, AND ARCHITECTURAL PLANNING, AND RELATE TO THE MENTALLY RETARDED, EMOTIONALLY…

  9. Quality of life of childhood cancer survivors: handicaps and benefits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Kepák, T.; Vlčková, I.; Jelínek, Martin; Tóthová, K.; Pilát, M.; Slezáčková, Alena; Sobotková, Veronika; Bartošová, Kateřina; Hrstková, H.; Štěrba, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2011), s. 112-125 ISSN 0009-062X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/07/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : childhood cancer survivors * quality of life * psycho-oncology Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.087, year: 2011

  10. The social representation about handicapped students in inclusive education: the view of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Mendonça Vasconcellos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically excluded, handicapped people have been socially included through new standards guided by egalitarian principles. The Social Representation Theory, which studies how the common sense builds “theories” about relevant objects, was used to answer how this situation affects children socially and psychologically in inclusive schools. We use a multimethodological approach with free associations, drawings and focus groups to study the social representations of 39 third and fourth grade students about their handicapped colleagues, all the children being from a state school in Recife, Pernambuco. The data were submitted to content analysis and analysis using the EVOC software, and the results indicate that handicapped children are seen as people limited by a temporary or permanent shortage or disability; they learn differently from others and disrupt classes; they require constant care and protection; they are allowed to join the group, but not to be part of it. The group seems to be outlining the contours of otherness, which shows a representation under construction.

  11. Children's experiences of war: handicapped children in England during the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, Sue

    2008-01-01

    The experiences of children during the Second World War have attracted considerable attention, both scholarly and popular. Not all children however, have received equal attention. Handicapped children are conspicuous by their absence from all types of literature, both on evacuation and on children's experiences of the Second World War. This article restores these children to the story of wartime England and assesses their experiences. It examines the plans that were made for their evacuation and how they were carried out, and compares their lives, both individually and institutionally (i.e. in the various types of 'special' school) with those who, for various reasons, were not evacuated. It also compares their experiences, to a lesser degree, with those of their non-handicapped counterparts. The article argues that for many handicapped children it was a positive experience but one which depended on specific aspects, such as the attitudes of the authorities and of the general public, and perhaps more importantly, the attitudes and quality of the teaching and nursing staff, who were responsible for the children on a daily basis.

  12. The handicapped child: psychological effects of parental, marital, and sibling relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisman, S; Wolf, L

    1991-03-01

    Although the nature and severity of a handicapping condition are not the sole determinants of family functioning, the presence of a child with a pervasive developmental disorder has a significant effect on family members. Maternal mental health suffers, and the resulting depression affects her role as mother and marriage partner. Unlike other handicapping conditions with obvious physical stigmata, the invisible handicap of the autistic child and the frequent delay in diagnosis contribute to the mother's self-doubt about her parental competence. While the impact on paternal psychological health is less, the fathers of autistic children are nevertheless highly stressed and appear to be particularly vulnerable to the stress generated by these difficult children. Living within this family climate, the risks for emotional and behavioral problems for siblings must be evaluated, along with their intrinsic strengths, to plan preventive interventions for these children. Effective work with these families requires an understanding of the evolution of family system problems and their dynamic and reciprocal interaction over time.

  13. [Handicapped patients and leisure sports--a chance for social integration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, U

    2000-10-01

    Organizing leisure time in an active way with lots of experiences is getting more and more important in western society. Accordingly, sports activities and travelling as well as their combination, holiday sports activities, are in great demand. A general idea of the literature in that field with regard to the possibilities and difficulties of handicapped persons is that holiday sports activities are considered apt to offer outstanding prerequisites for handicapped and nonhandicapped people getting closer to each other. Starting out on this basis, this survey is mainly dedicated to the following questions: What is the situation for handicapped persons in holiday sports activities? Is holiday sporting in a position to meet the expectations of social integration, and to what extent? A questionnaire about these items was answered by wheelchair users, making it clear, on the one hand, that there are hardly any offers for disabled people to take part in holiday sporting activities. On the other hand, the survey confirms that holiday sports activities are well suited to answer major demands of the integration issue, i.e., communication and interaction as well as other factors conducive to social integration. Subsequently, the author formulates the request that access to and participation in holiday sporting activities be made easier for disabled people so that greater use can be made of these special opportunities for social integration.

  14. Achievement goals, self-handicapping, and performance: a 2 x 2 achievement goal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, Nikos; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Smith, Alison L

    2009-11-01

    Elliot and colleagues (2006) examined the effects of experimentally induced achievement goals, proposed by the trichotomous model, on self-handicapping and performance in physical education. Our study replicated and extended the work of Elliot et al. by experimentally promoting all four goals proposed by the 2 x 2 model (Elliot & McGregor, 2001), measuring the participants' own situational achievement goals, using a relatively novel task, and testing the participants in a group setting. We used a randomized experimental design with four conditions that aimed to induce one of the four goals advanced by the 2 x 2 model. The participants (n = 138) were undergraduates who engaged in a dart-throwing task. The results pertaining to self-handicapping partly replicated Elliot and colleagues' findings by showing that experimentally promoted performance-avoidance goals resulted in less practice. In contrast, the promotion of mastery-avoidance goals did not result in less practice compared with either of the approach goals. Dart-throwing performance did not differ among the four goal conditions. Personal achievement goals did not moderate the effects of experimentally induced goals on self-handicapping and performance. The extent to which mastery-avoidance goals are maladaptive is discussed, as well as the interplay between personal and experimentally induced goals.

  15. The effects of cognitive load on strategic self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, D H

    2000-03-01

    Past research has demonstrated that observers tend to underestimate the importance of situational determinants (e.g. task difficulty) of the performances of others. This tendency is particularly pronounced when observers are unmotivated, distracted or otherwise 'cognitively busy' while making attributional judgments. The objective of the present research was to determine whether a similar tendency exists when actors are given the opportunity to choose the tasks they will undertake in a self-presentational situation. Sixty-one participants were given a choice between a difficult and a simple task, with cognitive busyness being manipulated while this choice was being made. Cognitively busy participants were significantly more likely to choose the simple task than their non-busy counterparts.

  16. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, E K

    2012-02-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  17. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, E K

    2010-09-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  18. The five times ten things everyone should have had in their hands before they are ten and two years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, R.; Poot, A.

    2017-12-01

    To train the young ones to become people that make stuff, I present the five times ten things we use a lot that everyone should have used before they are ten and two years old. I will bring at least two times ten of these things and show them live to you! And: I will bring a large paper for you to bring home with those five times ten things on it to put in the hands of your kids!

  19. Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Their Daily Living. Handicap Research Group Report No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Jane

    The study examined aspects of daily living of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta, a mineral deficiency in the skeleton which results in stunted growth and frequent fractures. A questionnaire was administered to 24 families with children under the age of 18 and 3 families were interviewed. The study found the families in great need of…

  20. The National Research Council program on aid to the neurologically handicapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaurin, C.

    1974-01-01

    The multidisciplinary care of neuromuscular disabled patients is reviewed. Described are the activities of occupational and vocational therapists, social workers, clinical psychologists and speech pathologists that are directed toward the major effects of spinal cord injuries, amputations, stroke, cerebral palsy, and rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. C.R. Snyder's Research on Self-Handicapping, Excusing, and Hope: Overview and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Beverly S.

    Persons with low hope are characterized as having an external locus of control that is concerned with protecting an uncertain sense of self-esteem. Strategies are employed to limit negative attributions made by self and others when self-esteem is threatened. Those with high hope, on the other hand, have an internal locus of control, see themselves…

  2. Translating Research into Classroom Practice: Workplace Independence for Students with Severe Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carolyn; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The article describes a process for use in high-school transition programs to promote student independence within the context of vocational training. Strategies described include: evaluating student independence in community-based settings, teaching student adaptability, and transferring control of student independence to work-related stimuli. A…

  3. The performance-perceptual test and its relationship to unaided reported handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Forsline, Anna; Fausti, Stephen A

    2004-04-01

    Measurement of hearing aid outcomes is necessary for demonstration of treatment efficacy, third-party payment, and cost-benefit analysis. Outcomes are usually measured with hearing-related questionnaires and/or tests of speech recognition. However, results from these two types of test often conflict. In this paper, we provide data from a new test measure, known as the Performance-Perceptual Test (PPT), in which subjective and performance aspects of hearing in noise are measured using the same test materials and procedures. A Performance Speech Reception Threshold (SRTN) and a Perceptual SRTN are measured using the Hearing In Noise Test materials and adaptive procedure. A third variable, the discrepancy between these two SRTNs, is also computed. It measures the accuracy with which subjects assess their own hearing ability and is referred to as the Performance-Perceptual Discrepancy (PPDIS). One hundred seven subjects between 24 and 83 yr of age took part. Thirty-three subjects had normal hearing, while the remaining seventy-four had symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Of the subjects with impaired hearing, 24 wore hearing aids and 50 did not. All subjects underwent routine audiological examination and completed the PPT and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly/Adults on two occasions, between 1 and 2 wk apart. The PPT was conducted for unaided listening with the masker level set to 50, 65, and 80 dB SPL. PPT data show that the subjects with normal hearing have significantly better Performance and Perceptual SRTNs at each test level than the subjects with impaired hearing but that PPDIS values do not differ between the groups. Test-retest reliability for the PPT is excellent (r-values > 0.93 for all conditions). Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the Performance SRTN, the PPDIS, and age explain 40% of the variance in reported handicap (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly/Adults scores). More specifically, poorer performance

  4. The TEN-T core network and the Fehmarnbelt region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guasco, Clement Nicolas

    This note is a snapshot picture, taken in early 2014, that places the Green STRING corridor project within the context of the TEN-T strategy and gives a summarized overview on the impact of this strategy in the region. Chapter 1 contains a summary of the TEN-T strategy today, chapter 2 presents...... the sources used for this note, chapter 3 presents all the relevant EU regulations with direct impact on the development of TEN-T corridors, chapter 4 gives practical examples of the challenges for the development of TEN-T corridors, chapter 5 pre-sents the national initiatives related to the TEN-T corridor...

  5. Ten years of energy policy in Catalonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masalles Roman, I.; Marin Sanchez, J.M.; Gurgui Ferrer, A.; Figuerola Perez, E.

    1992-01-01

    Catalonia is located in the north-east corner of Spain, on the Mediterranean coast and bordering with France in the north. It is one of the most industrialized and developed regions of Spain, with a per capita income of 10879 ECU per year (1989), 21.9% higher than the Spanish average. It contributes to 20.3% of the Spanish GDP. Primary energy consumption was 16.5 M toe in 1989, covered by the following sources: 3.5% coal, 51.8% oil, 9.4% natural gas, 3.6% hydro, 30.8% nuclear, 0.1% electrical import/export balance and 0.8% waste residuals. Oil dependence is distorted by the existence of a major petrochemical industry that uses more than 2.6 Mtoe of oil derivatives for non-energy purposes. Final energy demand in 1989 was 8.8 Mtoe, 40.9% for industry, 36.9% for transportation and 22.3% for the domestic and services sector. In the 60's, Catalonia's socio-economic development was accompanied by a spectacular increase in the demand for primary energy: from slightly above 2.5 million toe in 1960 to 5.6 Mtoe ten years later. If this decade can be characterized by a steady increase in the total value of consumption, the 70's also constitute years of major changes in the field of energy on an international scale (the oil crisis) and in politics in the Spanish State. 6 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Ten questions concerning green buildings and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinemann, Anne; Wargocki, Pawel; Rismanchi, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the concern that green buildings may promote energy efficiency and other aspects of sustainability, but not necessarily the health and well-being of occupants through better indoor air quality (IAQ). We ask ten questions to explore IAQ challenges for green buildings as well...... as opportunities to improve IAQ within green buildings and their programs. Our focus is on IAQ, while recognizing that many factors influence human health and the healthfulness of a building. We begin with an overview of green buildings, IAQ, and whether and how green building certifications address IAQ. Next, we...... examine evidence on whether green buildings have better IAQ than comparable conventional buildings. Then, we identify so-called green practices and green products that can have unintended and unfavorable effects on IAQ. Looking ahead, we offer both immediate and longer-term actions, and a set of research...

  7. Mobile and Social: Ten Best Practices for Designing Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu LICA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives ten best practices for designing mobile applications that have social-networking functions. The need for such an approach is given by the rapid growth in impor-tance of both social networks and mobile applications. In order to make it easy to follow where the best practices come from, the paper starts with a look at why social networks are more than just a buzz word and at how the field of mobile applications is evolving. It also shows how and why the two fields go together so well. To further make the point, there is a case study of four interesting mobile applications that are textbooks examples of successful applications. The best practices are based on research done for this article and on the extensive knowledge of the author.

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain management in labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowswell, Therese; Bedwell, Carol; Lavender, Tina; Neilson, James P

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been proposed as a means of reducing pain in labour. The TENS unit emits low-voltage electrical impulses which vary in frequency and intensity. During labour, TENS electrodes are generally placed on the lower back, although TENS may be used to stimulate acupuncture points or other parts of the body. The physiological mechanisms whereby TENS relieves pain are uncertain. TENS machines are frequently operated by women, which may increase a sense of control in labour. Objectives To assess the effects of TENS on pain in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain management in labour versus routine care, alternative non-pharmacological methods of pain relief, or placebo devices. We included all types of TENS machines. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed for inclusion all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. We have recorded reasons for excluding studies. Main results Seventeen trials with 1466 women contribute data to the review. Thirteen examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points, and two to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (average risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.54; measured in two studies). The majority of women using TENS said they would be willing to use it again in a future labour. Where TENS was used as an adjunct to epidural analgesia there was no evidence that it reduced pain. There was no consistent evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and babies. No

  10. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowswell, Therese; Bedwell, Carol; Lavender, Tina; Neilson, James P

    2009-04-15

    Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been proposed as a means of reducing pain in labour. The TENS unit emits low-voltage electrical impulses which vary in frequency and intensity. During labour, TENS electrodes are generally placed on the lower back, although TENS may be used to stimulate acupuncture points or other parts of the body. The physiological mechanisms whereby TENS relieves pain are uncertain. The TENS unit is frequently operated by women, which may increase sense of control in labour. To assess the effects of TENS on pain in labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (November 2008). Randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain relief in labour versus routine care, alternative pharmacological methods of pain relief, or placebo devices. We included all types of TENS machines. Two review authors assessed for inclusion all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. We have recorded reasons for excluding studies. The search identified 25 studies; we excluded six and included 19 studies including 1671 women. Fifteen examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points and two to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.55). The majority of women using TENS said they would be willing to use it again in a future labour. Where TENS was used as an adjunct to epidural analgesia there was no evidence that it reduced pain. There was no consistent evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and babies. No adverse events were reported. There is only limited evidence that TENS reduces pain in labour and it does not seem to have any impact (either positive or

  11. Povl Ole Fanger's impact ten years later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2017-01-01

    This paper pays tribute to Povl Ole Fanger, the late professor at the Technical University of Denmark. His scientific studies, focused on the main parameters affecting indoor environmental quality, have inspired (and still inspire) professional design engineers and academic researchers on human t...

  12. Tens of Romanian scientists work at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Silian, Sidonia

    2007-01-01

    "The figures regarding the actual number of Romanian scientists working at the European Center for Nuclear Research, or CERN, differ. The CERN data base lists some 30 Romanians on its payroll, while the scientists with the Nuclear Center at Magurele, Romania, say they should be around 50." (1 page)

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  14. The Ten-Minute Neighbourhood Is [not] a Basic Planning Unit for Happiness in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Mohamed Elshater

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between inhabitants’ happiness and the right to the city in the status quo of Egyptian neighborhoods. Although services are easily accessible, by ten-minute walks in a suitable ambience, happiness is not achieved. The research aims to, first, review the literature that provides a guideline for ten-minute neighborhoods. Second, this study conducts a comparative content analysis of recent online articles on the right to the city. Third, the study tests findings from Egyptian neighborhood settings. The idea of a ten-minute neighborhood is manageable. The hypothesis concerns a compliant design. It is a logical assumption that people who live within ten minutes walking distance of essential facilities in their area can minimize several problems and maximize a healthy lifestyle. The supposed issue causes the right to the city to affect the relationship between ten-minute neighborhoods and citizens’ happiness. This assumption can be established through site observation and oriented questionnaires. This paper contributes by presenting new planning units that suit the current context of the old cities in the Middle East and North Africa region, based on walking distances of ten minutes or less with reference to the right to the city. This planning unit can result in citizens’ happiness.

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  16. The Uranium Institute: the first ten years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    As noted in its Memorandum of Association, the Uranium Institute was founded: to promote the use of uranium for peaceful purposes; to conduct research into uranium requirements, uranium resources and uranium production; to consult for these purposes with governments and other bodies; and to provide a forum for the exchange of information on these matters. A brief account of Institute organisation and activities during the period 1975-1985 is given. (author)

  17. Enuresis and encopresis: ten years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, E J

    2001-10-01

    To review the progress made over the past decade with regard to the treatment of enuresis and encopresis, as well as advances in the understanding of etiological mechanisms. Separate computerized literature (English language only) searches of Medline and PsycINFO databases were conducted under the parameter of enuresis and children-adolescents, as well as encopresis and children-adolescents. There has been a substantial decrease in published research concerning the use of imipramine to treat enuresis compared with the prior two decades, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the number of papers concerning desmopressin acetate (DDAVP), which has become the primary pharmacological treatment. Genetic studies of large pedigrees have further confirmed the importance of heritable factors. With regard to encopresis, the research has focused primarily on pathophysiological factors related to the colon and anal sphincter. The widespread use of DDAVP has been the primary addition to treatment strategies over the past decade. The bell-and-pad method of conditioning, the only major treatment that has enduring benefit after being withdrawn, is the most cost-effective and appears to be underutilized. Research into etiological mechanisms has focused primarily on the mechanism of action of DDAVP and advances in the understanding of genetic factors. Advances in the treatment and etiological understanding of encopresis have been less impressive.

  18. CT of the infants and children with mental and/or physical handicaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Junichiro; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    1980-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 47 children and adolescents with mental and/or physical handicaps. Of these series, 22 cases of morphological change were noted. Another 25 cases showed no overt CT abnormality. These 47 cases were divided into three groups in the following manner. Group 1, with no CT abnormality; Group 2, with ventricular dilatation and/or cerebral atrophy, and Group 3, with a major morphological anomaly of the brain. Group 1 (25 cases) showed a marked dissociation between the CT findings and the IQ. EEG showed normal findings in two cases, diffuse abnormality in 5 cases, and focal abnormality in 9 cases. This group alone included 8 cases of athetosis. Group 2 (14 cases). Seven cases of EEG showed diffuse abnormality in 3 cases and focal abnormality in 4 cases. So-called cerebral palsy was noted in 11 cases. Group 3 (8 cases). This group included cases of hemihydranencephaly, porencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and arachnoid cyst. The mean and standard deviations of the IQ's in the groups are 57.1 +- 21.6, 65.2 +- 20.5, and 72.0 +- 8.0. That is, an inverted correlation between the CT abnormality and the IQ was noted. CT is a noninvasive study and a reasonable method of investigation for mentally handicapped children. DeMyer gave three categories of cerebral malformation: cytogenetic malformations, organogenetic disorders, and histogenetic disorders. On the other hand, EEG aimed at evaluating cerebral function and CT undertaken for morphological evaluation reveal no intimate correlation with one another. Rather, these two procedures each have their one value for the evaluation of the function and the structure of the brain. Mentally and/or physically handicapped patients without any overt cerebral anomaly have been found to be as follows: Murobushi, 12.29%; Malamud, 34%; Gross, 15.8%; Benda, 15%, and Hamada, 45.4%. (author)

  19. Increasing intensity of TENS prevents analgesic tolerance in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Karina L.; Sanada, Luciana S.; Rakel, Barbara A.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) reduces hyperalgesia and pain. Both low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) TENS, delivered at the same intensity (90% motor threshold (MT)) daily, result in analgesic tolerance with repeated use by the 5th day of treatment. Thecurrentstudytestedif 1) increasingintensityby 10% per daypreventsthedevelopmentoftolerance to repeated TENS, and 2) iflowerintensity TENS (50 % MT) produces an equivalentreduction in hyperalgesia when compared to 90% MT TENS. Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral knee joint inflammation (3% carrageenan) were separated according to the intensity of TENS used: Sham, 50% LF, 50% HF, 90% LF, 90% HF, and increased intensity by 10% per day (LF and HF). The reduced mechanical withdrawal threshold following the induction of inflammation was reversed by application of TENS applied at 90% MT and increasing intensity for the first 4 days. On the 5th day, the groups that received 90% MT intensity showed tolerance. Nevertheless, the group that received an increased intensity on each day still showed a reversal of the mechanical withdrawal threshold with TENS. These results show that the development of tolerance can be delayed by increasing intensity of TENS. PMID:22858165

  20. [Applicability of Voice Handicap Index to the evaluation of voice therapy effectiveness in teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebudek-Bogusz, Ewa; Kuzańska, Anna; Błoch, Piotr; Domańska, Maja; Woźnicka, Ewelina; Politański, Piotr; Sliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of Voice Handicap Index (VHI) to the evaluation of effectiveness of functional voice disorders treatment in teachers. The subjects were 45 female teachers with functional dysphonia who evaluated their voice problems according to the subjective VHI scale before and after phoniatric management. Group I (29 patients) were subjected to vocal training, whereas group II (16 patients) received only voice hygiene instructions. The results demonstrated that differences in the mean VHI score before and after phoniatric treatment were significantly higher in group 1 than in group II (p teacher's dysphonia.

  1. Special sliding door with storable handrail to support senior and handicapped persons to walk by themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, K.; Noda, N.-A.; Sano, Y.; Takase, Y.; Murai, K.; Wang, Z. F.; Li, S. Q.; Liu, X.; Tanaka, H.; Kubo, Y.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, special sliding door is designed in order to support senior and handicapped persons to walk by themselves in hospitals and nursing facilities. This semiautomatic lifting equipment is utilized for the storable handrail to make sure the bad health persons are able to open the door by using a weak force. In this study, to design the equipment of the handrail, the theoretical formula of opening force is derived. Then the simulation is performed by varying geometrical conditions. The simulation results are compared with the experiment results.

  2. Ten years left to eliminate blinding trachoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad D.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available n 1997, the World Health Organization formed the Global Alliance to Eliminate Blinding Trachoma by 2020 (GET 2020, a coalition of governmental, non-governmental, research, and pharmaceutical partners. In 1998, the World Health Assembly urged member states to map blinding trachoma in endemic areas, implement the SAFE strategy (which stands for surgery for trichiasis, antibiotics, facial-cleanliness and environmental change, such as clean water and latrines and collaborate with the global alliance in its work to eliminate blinding trachoma.

  3. Nanotoxicology ten years later: Lights and shadows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvedova, Anna, E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States); Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV (United States); Pietroiusti, Antonio [Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Kagan, Valerian [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The mounting societal concerns about possible and maybe even likely adverse effects of nanomaterials are reflected in a large and growing number of publications in the field of nanotoxicology. Indeed, today's search in PubMed reveals > 3700 publications on the subject denoted by (toxic + nanomaterials) – quite a growth over the last decade that began with only two dozens of them up-to 2005. - Highlights: • Major factors of nanotoxicology • Key directions for research efforts • Global representation of the authorship.

  4. "Crowdsourcing" ten years in: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazny, Kerri

    2017-12-01

    First coined by Howe in 2006, the field of crowdsourcing has grown exponentially. Despite its growth and its transcendence across many fields, the definition of crowdsourcing has still not been agreed upon, and examples are poorly indexed in peer-reviewed literature. Many examples of crowdsourcing have not been scaled-up past the pilot phase. In spite of this, crowdsourcing has great potential, especially in global health where resources are lacking. This narrative review seeks to review both indexed and grey crowdsourcing literature broadly in order to explore the current state of the field. This is a review of reviews of crowdsourcing. Semantic searches were conducted using Google Scholar rather than indexed databases due to poor indexing of the topic. 996 articles were retrieved, of which 69 were initially identified as being reviews or theoretically-based. 21 of these were found to be irrelevant and 48 articles were reviewed. This narrative review focuses on defining crowdsourcing, taxonomies of crowdsourcing, who constitutes the crowd, research that is amenable to crowdsourcing, regulatory and ethical aspects of crowdsourcing and some notable examples of crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing has the potential to be hugely promising, especially in global health, due to its ability to collect information rapidly, inexpensively and accurately. Rigorous ethical and regulatory controls are needed to ensure data are collected and analysed appropriately and crowdsourcing should be considered complementary to traditional research methods.

  5. Methodology for the identification, evaluation and prioritization of market handicaps which prevent the implementation of Demand Response: Application to European electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcázar-Ortega, Manuel; Calpe, Carmen; Theisen, Thomas; Carbonell-Carretero, José Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the identification, analysis and comparative assessment of the handicaps which nowadays prevent the higher implementation of Demand Response (DR) in the electricity market. Its application provides a hierarchical organization of handicaps from the most critical to the less critical and then, from the easiest to the most difficult to overcome. This makes possible to determine which barriers would be a priority, which may indicate the direction of regulatory changes to properly address these handicaps and so, stimulating a higher participation of the demand side in electricity markets. After applying the methodology to three European countries, 34 handicaps have been identified, analyzing which of these handicaps affect such stakeholders as grid operators, retailers and customers and how these stakeholders are affected. For each handicap, the criticality and difficulty to overcome the different handicaps have been studied, based on detailed information coming from personal interviews to experts representing the different stakeholders in the electricity trading chain. Regulatory barriers have been identified as the most critical and difficult to overcome. Together with regulatory changes, the promotion of aggregators and the training of customers on DR applications are some of the most significant initiatives. - Highlights: • Market handicaps prevent the application of Demand Response in electricity markets. • A methodology to identify and organize such market handicaps has been developed. • The evaluation and quantification of criticality and difficulty to overcome is done. • A hierarchical list prioritizing handicaps to be addressed is obtained. • Market handicaps of three European countries were evaluated through this methodology.

  6. Desempenho funcional de crianças com deficiência visual, atendidas no Departamento de Estimulação Visual da Fundação Altino Ventura Functional outcome of visually handicapped children cared for at the Department of Visual Stimulation - "Fundação Altino Ventura"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Malta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Traçar o perfil funcional de crianças portadoras de deficiência visual. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas 27 crianças. Dezessete com acuidade visual normal (que freqüentavam a Escola Municipal Alto do Maracanã, em Recife, e dez portadoras de deficiência visual (que recebiam estimulação visual no Departamento de Estimulação Visual da Fundação Altino Ventura, Recife. Foi utilizado o teste funcional padrão PEDI. RESULTADOS: As crianças portadoras de deficiência visual apresentaram desempenho significantemente inferior nas áreas de autocuidado e mobilidade que as crianças do grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: A deficiência visual traz conseqüências limitantes para o desempenho de atividades de autocuidado, locomoção, compreensão, comunicação e tarefas domésticas, na faixa etária estudada.PURPOSE: To analyze the functional outcome of visually handicapped children. METHODS: Twenty-seven children were evaluated using the standard functional PEDI test. Seventeen who attended school at "Escola Municipal Alto do Maracanã", Recife - Pernambuco, Brazil, had normal visual acuity and the other ten had visual handicap, and were cared for at Stimulation Visual Department - "Fundação Altino Ventura", in the same city. RESULTS: The children who had visual handicap showed significantly worse performance in self-care and mobility than normal children. CONCLUSION: Visual handicap may have limited the performance regarding self-care, mobility, understanding, communication, home works, in the studied group.

  7. Ten questions on hydrogen Jean Dhers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The author proposes explanations and comments on the use of hydrogen in energy production. He discusses whether hydrogen can be a new energy technology within the context of a sustainable development, whether hydrogen is actually an energy vector, what would be the benefits of using hydrogen in energy applications, why it took so much time to be interested in hydrogen, when the hydrogen vector will be needed, whether we can economically produce hydrogen to meet energy needs (particularly in transports), whether hydrogen is the best suited energy vector for ground transports in the future, how to retail hydrogen for ground transports, what are the difficulties to store hydrogen for ground transport applications, and how research programs on hydrogen are linked together

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Chelsea & Westminster TEN management protocol [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sica-Chapman, A; Williams, G; Soni, N; Bunker, C B

    2010-04-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare but life-threatening, allergic drug reaction. Skin blistering with epidermal and mucosal necrolysis with subsequent detachment from an inflamed underlying dermis is a hallmark of the condition. The pathogenesis of TEN is not well understood, accounting for controversies about its management and significant delay in initiating potentially beneficial therapy. There are no management protocols based on a robust evidence base. Prompt recognition of the diagnosis and consensus on early management initiatives are necessary in order to improve outcomes and survival in TEN. To date, TEN management has been directed at arresting the allergic reaction and treating the complications. We have identified a need for specific medical interventions to accelerate wound regeneration. This approach has not previously been adopted in the management of TEN. We observed that in two cases of severe TEN, dramatic re-epithelialization and recovery coincided with the introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia. We explain how addition of the G-CSF promotes recovery from TEN by enhanced bioregeneration of the damaged tissues through accelerated re-epithelialization. G-CSF has been used for severe neutropenia in TEN, but we recommend and explain why, as in our Chelsea and Westminster protocol, G-CSF should be considered in treating severe TEN irrespective of the severity of neutropenia.

  9. Mixité sociale : les handicapés dans la société britannique 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Hélène Adveille

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Depuis la seconde moitié du XXe siècle le regard porté sur la place des handicapés dans la société, a changé de manière significative. Les personnes en situation de handicap qui n’étaient souvent vues auparavant que comme les bénéficiaires d’une aide charitable, ont acquis, grâce à l’action de nombreuses organisations, le droit d’être reconnues comme des individus devant jouir des mêmes droits que les personnes ordinaires. Cependant, bien que des changements aient été opérés dans la perception que les valides ont des handicapés, il n’en demeure pas moins que les personnes en situation de handicap sont toujours confrontées à de nombreux problèmes dans leur vie de tous les jours. La société a fait des progrès pour ce qui est des aides qu’elle apporte aux handicapés moteurs, en instituant par exemple qu’ils puissent avoir accès aux bâtiments publics ainsi qu’aux moyens de transport urbain, ferroviaire, aérien. Les difficultés des handicapés sensoriels (vue, ouie sont prises en compte, avec la mise en place, par exemple, des signaux sonores dans la cité, en favorisant la présence de chiens d’aveugle. Cependant l’accès aux droits fondamentaux de ceux qui présentent des handicaps mentaux (intellectuels et/ou psychiques est encore peu développé. C’est donc sur la politique d’intégration et d’inclusion dans la vie ordinaire des personnes présentant des handicaps intellectuels que portera principalement cette étude. Nous aborderons en premier lieu la législation mise en œuvre pour favoriser leur insertion dans la société britannique, puis nous étudierons la façon dont les enfants sont intégrés dans le système scolaire. Enfin, les arguments qui soulignent l’intérêt que peut revêtir une intégration réussie pour l’adulte et pour la société seront examinés.The way in which the disabled were viewed underwent significant changes in the second half of the 20th century

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  13. How the Big Ten West Was Won: Football Recruiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diehl Kevin A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the 2017 Big Ten West Division football cycle models recruiting. The top ten recruit scores [(Rivals.com * 100 + [100 (outside surrounding; 75 (surrounding] + extra credit walk-ons (100; 75] allow proper ranking: Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Northwestern, Illinois, Minnesota, and Purdue.

  14. Ten Things Every Professor Should Know about Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kenneth; Dunlap, Joanna; Stevens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ten key assessment practices for advancing student learning that all professors should be familiar with and strategically incorporate in their classrooms and programs. Each practice or concept is explained with examples and guidance for putting it into practice. The ten are: learning outcomes, performance assessments,…

  15. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, William; Wand, Benedict M; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-09-14

    Neuropathic pain, which is due to nerve disease or damage, represents a significant burden on people and society. It can be particularly unpleasant and achieving adequate symptom control can be difficult. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are often employed by people with neuropathic pain and may include transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This review supersedes one Cochrane Review 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic pain' (Nnoaham 2014) and one withdrawn protocol 'Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults' (Claydon 2014). This review replaces the original protocol for neuropathic pain that was withdrawn. To determine the analgesic effectiveness of TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, PEDro, LILACS (up to September 2016) and various clinical trials registries. We also searched bibliographies of included studies for further relevant studies. We included randomised controlled trials where TENS was evaluated in the treatment of central or peripheral neuropathic pain. We included studies if they investigated the following: TENS versus placebo (sham) TENS, TENS versus usual care, TENS versus no treatment and TENS in addition to usual care versus usual care alone in the management of neuropathic pain in adults. Two review authors independently screened all database search results and identified papers requiring full-text assessment. Subsequently, two review authors independently applied inclusion/exclusion criteria to these studies. The same review authors then independently extracted data, assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane standard tool and rated the quality of evidence using GRADE. We included 15 studies with 724 participants. We found a

  16. TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE-STIMULATION (TENS) IN RAYNAUDS-PHENOMENON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULDER, P; DOMPELING, EC; VANSLOCHTERENVANDERBOOR, JC; KUIPERS, WD; SMIT, AJ

    Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been described as resulting in vasodilatation. The effect of 2 Hz TENS of the right hand during forty-five minutes on skin temperature and plethysmography of the third digit of both hands and feet and on transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcpO2) of the right

  17. Increasing pressure does not benefit lie detection : A reply to Ten Brinke et al.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuere, B.; Meijer, E.; Vrij, A.

    2016-01-01

    When passively attending to suspects, observers are poor at distinguishing lies from truths. Deception research has therefore shifted to examining interview styles aimed at eliciting and enhancing deception cues. Based upon a literature review and three empirical studies, ten Brinke, L., Khambatta,

  18. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem repeats loci in the central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-03

    Apr 3, 2009 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. Allele frequencies of ten short tandem ... Statistical parameters of forensic importance, the power of discrimination (PD), observed and expected ... rameters indicated the usefulness of the loci in forensic per- sonal identification and paternity testing among ...

  19. Ten Tonne Plan: Education for Sustainability from a Whole Systems Thinking Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elaine; Mansfield, Caroline; Baudains, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The "Ten Tonne Plan" is a greenhouse gas emissions reduction initiative that aimed to reduce school emissions by 10 tonnes (metric tons) in one year. A case study was conducted on the impact of this initiative at a primary school in Western Australia. Research investigated student, staff, parent, and community partner perceptions…

  20. TOJDE: Electronic Publishing and a Review of Ten Years' Experience in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarslan, Yasin; Balaban-Sali, Jale; Demiray, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    This review examines "The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education" (TOJDE) over a ten years period from 2000-2010. The study provides an opportunity to examine publishing activities such as number of published articles, authors, research topics and methods, and analyses of TOJDE's website such as time users stay on site and user…